WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced fission energy

  1. Activation Energy for Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, Glenn T.

    1952-08-29

    The experimentally determined exponential dependence of spontaneous fission rate on Z{sup 2}/A has been used to derive an expression for the dependence of the fission activation energy on Z{sup 2}/A. This expression has been used to calculate the activation energy for slow neutron induced fission and photofission. The correlation with the experimental data on these types of fission seems to be quite good.

  2. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  3. Advanced Fission Reactor Program objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of an advanced fission reactor program should be to develop an economically attractive, safe, proliferation-resistant fission reactor. To achieve this objective, an aggressive and broad-based research and development program is needed. Preliminary work at Brookhaven National Laboratory shows that a reasonable goal for a research program would be a reactor combining as many as possible of the following features: (1) initial loading of uranium enriched to less than 15% uranium 235, (2) no handling of fuel for the full 30-year nominal core life, (3) inherent safety ensured by core physics, and (4) utilization of natural uranium at least 5 times as efficiently as light water reactors

  4. Low-energy ternary fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the detector system DIOGENES thermal neutron induced and spontaneous α particle associated fission and spontaneous nuclear tripartition into three fragments of similar masses has been investigated. DIOGENES is a concentric arrangement of toroidal angular position sensitive ionization chambers and proportional counters to measure the kinetic energies and relative angular distributions of the three reaction products of ternary fission. For α-particle accompanied fission some of the many possible α particle fission-fragment parameter correlations will be discussed. For nearly symmetric low-energy nuclear tripartition new upper limits are presented. Former experimental results which pretended evidence for so called true ternary fission could be explained by charged-particle associated fission with a light particle in the mass range of 13 < A < 23

  5. Energy from nuclear fission(*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripani M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  6. Energy from nuclear fission()

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripani, M.

    2015-08-01

    The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  7. Fusion and fission of atomic clusters: recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2005-01-01

    We review recent advances made by our group in finding optimized geometries of atomic clusters as well as in description of fission of charged small metal clusters. We base our approach to these problems on analysis of multidimensional potential energy surface. For the fusion process we have...... developed an effective scheme of adding new atoms to stable cluster geometries of larger clusters in an efficient way. We apply this algorithm to finding geometries of metal and noble gas clusters. For the fission process the analysis of the potential energy landscape calculated on the ab initio level...... of theory allowed us to obtain very detailed information on energetics and pathways of the different fission channels for the Na^2+_10 clusters....

  8. Fusion-fission energy systems evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report serves as the basis for comparing the fusion-fission (hybrid) energy system concept with other advanced technology fissile fuel breeding concepts evaluated in the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). As such, much of the information and data provided herein is in a form that meets the NASAP data requirements. Since the hybrid concept has not been studied as extensively as many of the other fission concepts being examined in NASAP, the provided data and information are sparse relative to these more developed concepts. Nevertheless, this report is intended to provide a perspective on hybrids and to summarize the findings of the rather limited analyses made to date on this concept

  9. Fusion-fission energy systems evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Aase, D.T.; Bickford, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    This report serves as the basis for comparing the fusion-fission (hybrid) energy system concept with other advanced technology fissile fuel breeding concepts evaluated in the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). As such, much of the information and data provided herein is in a form that meets the NASAP data requirements. Since the hybrid concept has not been studied as extensively as many of the other fission concepts being examined in NASAP, the provided data and information are sparse relative to these more developed concepts. Nevertheless, this report is intended to provide a perspective on hybrids and to summarize the findings of the rather limited analyses made to date on this concept.

  10. Energy partition in low energy fission

    CERN Document Server

    Mirea, M

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic excitation energy of fission fragments is dynamically evaluated in terms of the time dependent pairing equations. These equations are corroborated with two conditions. One of them fixes the number of particles and the another separates the pairing active spaces associated to the two fragments in the vicinity of the scission configuration. The fission path is obtained in the frame of the macroscopic-microscopic model. The single particle level schemes are obtained within the two center Woods-Saxon shell model. It is shown that the available intrinsic dissipated energy is not shared proportionally to the masses of the two fission fragments. If the heavy fragment possesses nucleon numbers close to the magic ones, the accumulated intrinsic excitation energy is lower than that of the light fragment.

  11. Fission dynamics at low excitation energy

    CERN Document Server

    Aritomo, Y

    2013-01-01

    The origin of mass asymmetry in the fission of uranium at a low excitation energy is clarified by a trajectory analysis of the Langevin equation. The positions of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments are mainly determined by fission saddle points originating from the shell correction energy. The widths of the peaks, on the other hand, result from a shape fluctuation around the scission point caused by the random force in the Langevin equation. We found that a random vibration in the oblate direction of fissioning fragments is essential for the fission process. According to this picture, fission does not occur with continuous stretching in the prolate direction, similarly to that observed in starch syrup. This is expected to lead to a new viewpoint of fission dynamics and the splitting mechanism.

  12. Structural materials for fission & fusion energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Zinkle

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Structural materials represent the key for containment of nuclear fuel and fission products as well as reliable and thermodynamically efficient production of electrical energy from nuclear reactors. Similarly, high-performance structural materials will be critical for the future success of proposed fusion energy reactors, which will subject the structures to unprecedented fluxes of high-energy neutrons along with intense thermomechanical stresses. Advanced materials can enable improved reactor performance via increased safety margins and design flexibility, in particular by providing increased strength, thermal creep resistance and superior corrosion and neutron radiation damage resistance. In many cases, a key strategy for designing high-performance radiation-resistant materials is based on the introduction of a high, uniform density of nanoscale particles that simultaneously provide good high temperature strength and neutron radiation damage resistance.

  13. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by ...

  14. Calculated medium energy fission cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis has been made of medium-energy nucleon induced fission of 238U and 237Np using detailed models of fission, based upon the Bohr-Wheeler formalism. Two principal motivations were associated with these calculations. The first was determination of barrier parameters for proton-rich uranium and neptunium isotopes normally not accessible in lower energy reactions. The second was examination of the consistency between (p,f) experimental data versus new (n,f) data that has recently become available. Additionally, preliminary investigations were also made concerning the effect of fission dynamics on calculated fission cross sections at higher energies where neutron emission times may be significantly less than those associated with fission

  15. Fission dynamics at low excitation energy. 2

    CERN Document Server

    Aritomo, Y; Ivanyuk, F A

    2014-01-01

    The mass asymmetry in the fission of U-236 at low excitation energy is clarified by the analysis of the trajectories obtained by solving the Langevin equations for the shape degrees of freedom. It is demonstrated that the position of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments is determined mainly by the saddle point configuration originating from the shell correction energy. The width of the peaks, on the other hand, results from the shape fluctuations close to the scission point caused by the random force in the Langevin equation. We have found out that the fluctuations between elongated and compact shapes are essential for the fission process. According to our results the fission does not occur with continuous stretching in the prolate direction, similarly to that observed in starch syrup, but is accompanied by the fluctuations between elongated and compact shapes. This picture presents a new viewpoint of fission dynamics and the splitting mechanism.

  16. Energy from nuclear fission an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    De Sanctis, Enzo; Ripani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview on nuclear physics and energy production from nuclear fission. It serves as a readable and reliable source of information for anyone who wants to have a well-balanced opinion about exploitation of nuclear fission in power plants. The text is divided into two parts; the first covers the basics of nuclear forces and properties of nuclei, nuclear collisions, nuclear stability, radioactivity, and provides a detailed discussion of nuclear fission and relevant topics in its application to energy production. The second part covers the basic technical aspects of nuclear fission reactors, nuclear fuel cycle and resources, safety, safeguards, and radioactive waste management. The book also contains a discussion of the biological effects of nuclear radiation and of radiation protection, and a summary of the ten most relevant nuclear accidents. The book is suitable for undergraduates in physics, nuclear engineering and other science subjects. However, the mathematics is kept at a level that...

  17. Energy Correlation of Prompt Fission Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elter, Zs.; Pázsit, I.

    2016-03-01

    In all cases where neutron fluctuations in a branching process (such as in multiplicity measurements) are treated in an energy dependent description, the energy correlations of the branching itself (energy correlations of the fission neutrons) need to be known. To date, these are not known from experiments. Such correlations can be theoretically and numerically derived by modelling the details of the fission process. It was suggested earlier that the fact that the prompt neutrons are emitted from the moving fission targets, will influence their energy and angular distributions in the lab system, which possibly induces correlations. In this paper the influence of the neutron emission process from the moving targets on the energy correlations is investigated analytically and via numerical simulations. It is shown that the correlations are generated by the random energy and direction distributions of the fission fragments. Analytical formulas are derived for the two-point energy distributions, and quantitative results are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations. The results lend insight into the character of the two-point distributions, and give quantitative estimates of the energy correlations, which are generally small.

  18. Energy Correlation of Prompt Fission Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elter Zs.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In all cases where neutron fluctuations in a branching process (such as in multiplicity measurements are treated in an energy dependent description, the energy correlations of the branching itself (energy correlations of the fission neutrons need to be known. To date, these are not known from experiments. Such correlations can be theoretically and numerically derived by modelling the details of the fission process. It was suggested earlier that the fact that the prompt neutrons are emitted from the moving fission targets, will influence their energy and angular distributions in the lab system, which possibly induces correlations. In this paper the influence of the neutron emission process from the moving targets on the energy correlations is investigated analytically and via numerical simulations. It is shown that the correlations are generated by the random energy and direction distributions of the fission fragments. Analytical formulas are derived for the two-point energy distributions, and quantitative results are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations. The results lend insight into the character of the two-point distributions, and give quantitative estimates of the energy correlations, which are generally small.

  19. Fission energy program of the US Department of Energy, FY 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, Robert L.

    1980-03-01

    Information is presented concerning the National Energy Plan and fission energy policy; fission energy program management; converter reactor systems; breeder reactor systems; and special nuclear evaluations and systems.

  20. Fission energy program of the US Department of Energy, FY 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning the National Energy Plan and fission energy policy; fission energy program management; converter reactor systems; breeder reactor systems; and special nuclear evaluations and systems

  1. Derivation of Energy Generated by Nuclear Fission-Fusion Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kayano, Hideo; Teshigawara, Makoto; Konashi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Takuya

    1994-01-01

    In the solids which contain fissionable elements and deuterium, it is expected that the energy generated by nuclear fission contributes to the promotion of the D-D nuclear fusion in the solids. When nuclear fission occurs by neutrons in the solid, the fissionable elements divide into two fission product nuclei having the energy of 100MeV, respectively. It is expected that the hige energy fission products promote rapidly nuclear fision reaction by knocking out the D atoms in the solids and by ...

  2. Excitation-energy dependence of the nuclear fission characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, H.; Saito, T.; Takahashi, N. [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science] [and others

    1996-03-01

    It is known that the width parameter of the fragment mass yield distribution follows a beautiful systematics with respect to the excitation energy. According to this systematics, the fission characteristics following the systematics should disappear when the excitation energy Ex goes down to 14 MeV. The present purpose is to elucidate if, where, how and why a transition takes place in the fission characteristics of the asymmetric fission of light actinide elements. Two types of experiments are performed, one is the double-energy measurement of the kinetic energies of complementary fragments in the thermal-neutron fission of {sup 235,233}U and proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U at 13.3- and 15.7-MeV excitations, and the other is the radiochemical study of proton-induced fission and photofission of {sup 238}U at various excitation energies. In conclusion, it has demonstrated that there are two distinctive fission mechanisms in the low-energy fission of light actinide elements and the transition between them takes place around 14-MeV excitation. The characteristics of proton fission and photofission in the energy range lower than the above transition point are the essentially the same as those of thermal-neutron fission and also spontaneous fission. The results of GDR fission indicates the fission in the high-energy side starts from the nuclear collective states, whereas the lower-energy fission is of non-collective nature. It is likely that thermal-neutron fission is rather of the barrier-penetrating type like spontaneous fission than the threshold fission. (S.Y.)

  3. Effects of fissioning nuclei distributions on fragment mass distributions for high energy fission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi P C R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects of fissioning nuclei mass- and energy-distributions on the formation of fragments for fission induced by high energy probes. A Monte Carlo code called CRISP was used for obtaining mass distributions and spectra of the fissioning nuclei for reactions induced by 660 MeV protons on 241Am and on 239Np, by 500 MeV protons on 208Pb, and by Bremsstrahlung photons with end-point energies at 50 MeV and 3500 MeV on 238U. The results show that even at high excitation energies, asymmetric fission may still contribute significantly to the fission cross section of actinide nuclei, while it is the dominante mode in the case of lead. However, more precise data for high energy fission on actinide are necessary in order to allow definite conclusions.

  4. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Hansen, L.F.; Lanier, R.G.; Massoletti, D.J.; Namboodiri, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Sangster, T.C.; Struble, G.L.; Webb, M.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Chan, Y.D.; Dacai, A.; Harmon, A.; Leyba, J.; Pouliot, J.; Stokstad, R.G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Hansen, O.; Levine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Trautmann, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Dichter, B.; Kaufman, S.; Videbaek, F. (Argonne National Lab. (USA)); Fraenkel, Z.; Mamane, G. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel)); Cebra, D.; Westfall, G.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1989-10-09

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50-100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: The reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicty of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. (orig.).

  5. Advanced modeling of prompt fission neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompt fission neutrons and gamma rays are computed using a Monte Carlo treatment of the statistical evaporation of the excited primary fission fragments. The assumption of two fragments in thermal equilibrium at the time of neutron emission is addressed by studying the neutron multiplicity as a function of fragment mass. Results for the neutron-induced fission of 235U are discussed, for incident neutron energies from 0.5 to 5.5 MeV. Recent experimental data on the fission fragment yields as a function of mass and total kinetic energy are used as input data. Monte-Carlo calculations allow the exploration of physical observables beyond average quantities. A new parameter RT has been introduced: RT=Tl/Th where Tl and Th are the temperatures in the light and heavy fragments. The average neutron multiplicity computed as a function of the fragment mass agrees best with the experimental data (with En=5.5 MeV) when RT=1 which can be understood as follows: as the incident neutron energy increases, the role of shell effects diminishes and the ratio of collective energies stored in the light and heavy fragment tends toward 1

  6. Fast Neutron Induced Fission neutron Spectra Below the Incident Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodring, Mitchell L.; Egan, James J.; Kegel, Gunter H.; DeSimone, David J.

    2008-06-15

    Fission neutron spectra from neutron induced fission in 235U and 239Pu for energies below that of the neutron inducing fission have been measured. The spectra were obtained for 1.5 MeV and 2.5 MeV incident neutrons. Previous accelerator-based fission neutron spectra measurements have been seriously complicated by time-correlated gamma rays and scattered neutrons from the fission sample. Three barium fluoride detectors were placed near the sample undergoing induced fission and used to identify fission gamma rays. A coincidence of fission gamma rays was used to gate a liquid scintillator neutron detector to distinguish fission events from other events. The fission neutron spectral shape and average energy measured in this experiment compare well to both previous measurements and prior theory and also suggest a dependence on incident neutron energy and mass of the fissioning nucleus. An overview of the experiment, a discussion of the results, and the importance of this work to homeland security are given.

  7. Study on Fission Blanket Fuel Cycling of a Fusion-Fission Hybrid Energy Generation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Direct application of ITER-scale tokamak as a neutron driver in a subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor to generate electric power is of great potential in predictable future. This paper reports a primary study on neutronic and fuel cycle behaviors of a fission blanket for a new type of fusion-driven system (FDS), namely a subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation aiming at energy generation fueled with natural or depleted uranium. Using COUPLE2 developed at INET of Tsinghua University by coupling the MCNP code with the ORIGEN code to study the neutronic behavior and the refueling scheme, this paper focuses on refueling scheme of the fissionable fuel while keeping some important parameters such as tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and energy gain. Different fission fuels, coolants and their volumetric ratios arranged in the fission blanket satisfy the requirements for power generation. The results show that soft neutron spectrum with optimized fuel to moderator ratio can yield an energy amplifying factor of M> 20 while maintaining the TBR > 1.1 and the CR > 1 (the conversion ratio of fissile materials) in a reasonably long refueling cycle. Using an in-site fuel recycle plant, it will be an attractive way to realize the goal of burning 238U with such a new type of fusion-fission hybrid reactor system to generate electric power. (author)

  8. Energy dissipation in the cold fission of 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of energy of collective nuclear motion into internal single particle excitation energy is one of the modes of nuclear energy dissipation. Dissipation and its relation to pair breaking is one of the challenges in nuclear field. A characteristic of low energy fission is odd-even effect. Odd-even staggering in the mass or charge yields and in the total kinetic energies will be of useful to analyze dissipation energy. The odd even effects in the charge distribution of cold fission fragments can be analysed to extract information on the energy dissipation during the passage from the first potential well towards the scission point through the fission barrier. The Q value during a fission process is decomposed into the total kinetic and excitation energies (TKE and TXE)

  9. A Review of Previous Research in Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the earliest days of power reactor development, direct energy conversion was an obvious choice to produce high efficiency electric power generation. Directly capturing the energy of the fission fragments produced during nuclear fission avoids the intermediate conversion to thermal energy and the efficiency limitations of classical thermodynamics. Efficiencies of more than 80% are possible, independent of operational temperature. Direct energy conversion fission reactors would possess a number of unique characteristics that would make them very attractive for commercial power generation. These reactors would be modular in design with integral power conversion and operate at low pressures and temperatures. They would operate at high efficiency and produce power well suited for long distance transmission. They would feature large safety margins and passively safe design. Ideally suited to production by advanced manufacturing techniques, direct energy conversion fission reactors could be produced more economically than conventional reactor designs. The history of direct energy conversion can be considered as dating back to 1913 when Moseleyl demonstrated that charged particle emission could be used to buildup a voltage. Soon after the successful operation of a nuclear reactor, E.P. Wigner suggested the use of fission fragments for direct energy conversion. Over a decade after Wigner's suggestion, the first theoretical treatment of the conversion of fission fragment kinetic energy into electrical potential appeared in the literature. Over the ten years that followed, a number of researchers investigated various aspects of fission fragment direct energy conversion. Experiments were performed that validated the basic physics of the concept, but a variety of technical challenges limited the efficiencies that were achieved. Most research in direct energy conversion ceased in the US by the late 1960s. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this

  10. Energy-Dependent Fission Q Values Generalized for All Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R

    2008-09-25

    We generalize Madland's parameterization of the energy release in fission to obtain the dependence of the fission Q values on incident neutron energy, E{sub n}, for all major and minor actinides. These Q(E{sub n}) parameterizations are included in the ENDL2008 release. This paper describes calculations of energy-dependent fission Q values based on parameterizations of the prompt energy release in fission [1], developed by Madland [1] to describe the prompt energy release in neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu. The energy release is then related to the energy deposited during fission so that experimentally measurable quantities can be used to obtain the Q values. A discussion of these specific parameterizations and their implementation in the processing code for Monte Carlo neutron transport, MCFGEN, [2] is described in Ref. [3]. We extend this model to describe Q(E) for all actinides, major and minor, in the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) 2008 release, ENDL2008.

  11. Measurement of energy dependence of fission fragment angular anisotropy for resonance neutron induced fission of 235U aligned target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the experiment on measuring the energy dependence of fission fragment angular anisotropy in resonance neutron induced fission of 235U aligned target in energy region up to 42 eV are presented. The agreement with the data of Pattenden and Postma in resonances is good enough, while the theoretical curve, calculated using the R-matrix multilevel two fission channel approach, does not seem to describe the energy dependence of fission fragment angular anisotropy property. The necessity of taking into account the interference between levels with different spins is discussed. 11 refs., 2 figs

  12. Fission of Oriented Nuclei by Low Energy Neutrons. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the study of the angular distribution of α-particles and of fission fragments originating from neutron capture in heavy nuclei, which are aligned at low temperatures by the method of hyperfine interaction. The results of the measurements with the target nucleus 233U with neutrons in the energy range from 0 to 2000 eV can be interpreted with the Bohr-theory of transition states at the deformation barrier for nuclear fission. The relatively invariant behaviour of the anisotropy in the angular distribution of fission fragments as a function of neutron energy indicates that the available fission channels are strongly mixed. For neutron resonances with spin and parity 2+ 2 to 3 channels are open and for 3+ resonances 1 to 2. The group structure in the subthreshold fission cross section of 237Np has been explained by the double-humped deformation barrier proposed by Strutinsky. The implication of this interpretation is that all the resonances in one group have the same spin. The resonances in the first group at 40 eV agree consistently with the fission channel (2+,2). The groups at higher neutron energies up to 2000 eV correspond mainly with the channels (2+,2) and (3+,2). (author)

  13. Proton-induced fission of heavy nuclei at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Deppman, A; Guimaraes, V; Karapetyan, G S; Balabekyan, A R; Demekhina, N A

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate energy proton-induced fission of 241Am, 238$U and 237$Np is studied. The inelastic interactions of protons and heavy nuclei are described by a CRISP model, in which the reaction proceeds in two steps. The first one corresponds fast cascade, where a series of individual particle-particle collisions occurs within the nucleus. It leaves a highly excited cascade residual nucleus, assumed to be in thermal equilibrium. Subsequently, in the second step the excited nucleus releases its energy by evaporation of neutrons and light charged particles as well. Both the symmetric and asymmetric fission are regarded, and the fission probabilities are obtained from CRISP code calculations, by means of statistical weighting factors. The fission cross sections, the fissility of the fissioning nuclei, and the number of nucleons lost by the target - before and after fission - are calculated and compared to experiments for 660 MeV protons incident on 241Am, 238$U and 237$Np. Some of the model predictions are in f...

  14. Implementation in the reaction code system EMPIRE-2.19 of an advanced formalism for fission cross-section calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The implementation in the reaction code system EMPIRE-2.19 of an advanced formalism for fission cross-section calculation has been completed. The formalism is based on the optical model for fission and can be applied for nuclei exhibiting double- or triple-humped barrier starting from sub-barrier excitation energies. The optical model for fission, initially developed to describe the resonant structure of the fission cross section at sub-barrier excitation energies due to the vibrational states in the second well of a double-humped fission barrier, was extended to light actinides by including the relations for the transmission coefficients through a complex triple-humped fission barrier. The real part of the fission barrier is parameterised as a function of the nucleus deformation by five smoothly joined parabolas. The imaginary potential is introduced only in the deformation range corresponding to the second well because the tertiary well is supposed to be shallow enough to neglect the damping of class III vibrational states. The transition states are assumed to be rotational states built on vibrational or non-collective band-heads. As the excitation energy increases, the shell effect, which causes the splitting of the outer barrier, diminishes and the outer humps lump into a single one. Therefore, in the present formalism, triple-humped barriers are associated only to the discrete transition states; the contribution of continuum to the fission coefficients is calculated considering a double-humped barrier. The parameters of the second single barrier equivalent with the outer humps are being determined from the condition of equal transmission coefficients. The saddle-point transition states in continuum are described by level densities (BCS below the critical energy and a modified version of Fermi Gas above) accounting for collective enhancements specific to the nuclear shape asymmetry at each saddle point . The neutron cross sections of 232Th in the

  15. Early results utilizing high-energy fission product gamma rays to detect fissionable material in cargo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A concept for detecting the presence of special nuclear material (235U or 239Pu) concealed in inter modal cargo containers is described. It is based on interrogation with a pulsed beam of 6-8 MeV neutrons and fission events are identified between beam pulses by their β-delayed neutron emission or β -delayed high-energy γ-radiation. The high-energy γ-ray signature is being employed for the first time. Fission product γ-rays above 3 MeV are distinct from natural radioactivity and from nearly all of the induced activity in a normal cargo. High-energy γ-radiation is nearly 10X more abundant than the delayed neutrons and penetrates even thick cargo's readily. The concept employs two large (8x20 ft) arrays of liquid scintillation detectors that have high efficiency for the detection of both delayed neutrons and delayed γ-radiation. Detector backgrounds and potential interferences with the fission signature radiation have been identified and quantified. This information, together with predicted signature strength, has been applied to the estimation of detection probability for the nuclear material and estimation of false alarm rates. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48

  16. Perspective on the fusion-fission energy concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept which has potential for near-term application in the electric power sector of our energy economy is combining fusion and fission technology. The fusion-fission system, called a hybrid, is distinguished from its pure fusion counterpart by incorporation of fertile materials (uranium or thorium) in the blanket region of a fusion machine. The neutrons produced by the fusion process can be used to generate energy through fission events in the blanket or produce fuel for fission reactors through capture events in the fertile material. The performance requirements of the fusion component of hybrids is perceived as being less stringent than those for pure fusion electric power plants. The performance requirements for the fission component of hybrids is perceived as having been demonstrated or could be demonstrated with a modest investment of research and development funds. This paper presents our insights and observations of this concept in the context of why and where it might fit into the picture of meeting our future energy needs. A bibliography of hybrid research is given

  17. Experimental survey of the potential energy surfaces associated with fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in the experimental determination of the properties of the potential energy surface associated with fission is reviewed. The importance of nuclear symmetry effects on the calculation of fission widths is demonstrated. Evidence is presented for the fragmentation of the mass-asymmetric second barrier in the thorium region and the axial asymmetric first barrier in the californium region. Detailed analyses of experimental data suggest the presence of two parallel second barriers; the normal mass-asymmetric, axial-symmetric barrier and a slightly higher mass-symmetric, axial-asymmetric barrier. Experimental barrier parameters are determined systematically and compared with calculations from various theoretical models. Techniques for expanding fission probability measurements to higher energies are discussed. (author)

  18. Systematics of fission cross sections at the intermediate energy region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukahori, Tokio; Chiba, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The systematics was obtained with fitting experimental data for proton induced fission cross sections of Ag, {sup 181}Ta, {sup 197}Au, {sup 206,207,208}Pb, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 232}Th, {sup 233,235,238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu above 20 MeV. The low energy cross section of actinoid nuclei is omitted from systematics study, since the cross section has a complicated shape and strongly depends on characteristic of nucleus. The fission cross sections calculated by the systematics are in good agreement with experimental data. (author)

  19. Laser Intertial Fusion Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Kevin James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-04-08

    This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by LFFH plants. The LFFH engine described utilizes a central fusion chamber surrounded by multiple layers of multiplying and moderating media. These layers, or blankets, include coolant plenums, a beryllium (Be) multiplier layer, a fertile fission blanket and a graphite-pebble reflector. Each layer is separated by perforated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel walls. The central fusion chamber is surrounded by an ODS ferritic steel first wall. The first wall is coated with 250-500 μm of tungsten to mitigate x-ray damage. The first wall is cooled by Li17Pb83 eutectic, chosen for its neutron multiplication and good heat transfer properties. The Li17Pb83 flows in a jacket around the first wall to an extraction plenum. The main coolant injection plenum is immediately behind the Li17Pb83, separated from the Li17Pb83 by a solid ODS wall. This main system coolant is the molten salt flibe (2LiF-BeF2), chosen for beneficial neutronics and heat transfer properties. The use of flibe enables both fusion fuel production (tritium) and neutron moderation and multiplication for the fission blanket. A Be pebble (1 cm diameter) multiplier layer surrounds the coolant injection plenum and the coolant flows radially through perforated walls across the bed. Outside the Be layer, a fission fuel layer comprised of depleted uranium contained in Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles

  20. Simultaneous Measurements of Flight Times and Energies of Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a companion paper the results of measuring the prompt neutron emission from individual fission fragments arising in thermal fission are reported. In that experiment a large volume liquid scintillation counter was .used to. record the fission neutrons, and fragment mass was identified by a gold silicon surface barrier counter.- arrangement. An alternative Way of measuring the prompt neutron emission is described here. Fragment time-of- flight apparatus is mounted in an evacuated tube that passes laterally through the thermal column of the 5-MW research reactor HERALD. A centrally positioned thin source produces 3 x 105 fissions s-1. Fragments travel distances of 180 cm and 300 cm respectively to the terminal detectors, and in passing through a VYNS film, positioned 180 cm from the source along the longer flight path, eject electrons that are used to form a reference time-signal. Essentially the times of flight of both fission fragments are measured simultaneously with the kinetic energy of one of the pair. This is achieved by using a surface barrier counter for the 300-cm detector. The difficulty of maintaining good timing and energy resolutions simultaneously is overcome by routing the pulse to the charge sensitive preamplifier through a delay line amplifier from which a fast timing pulse is derived. The collected data enables the fragment mass to be determined both before and after prompt neutrons have been emitted. Hence the experiment provides a means for studying the behaviour of neutron emission from individual fragments. The experimental uncertainties are those associated with the measurement of small differences, and an appraisal is made of the errors and calibrations that enter into the measurements. Of particular importance, the response of the surface barrier counter to fission fragments is obtained directly, from the collected data from events in which the neutron emission is low. These calibrations are used in the measurements of postneutron mass

  1. High-energy fission models validation and comparison with experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations including the high energy fission models were performed. Comparisons on BNL-Cosmotron arrangements of thermal neutron peak fluxes in the H2O-moderator for lead and depleted uranium targets are given for different proton beam energies (540, 960, 1470 MeV) and two B0-parameters (8 and 14 MeV) of the level density formula. Preliminary results of neutron spectra measurements for thin uranium targets are compared with HETC calculations at 590 MeV incident proton beam energy. The residual mass distributions are determined in thin uranium targets for proton beam energies of 0.3, 1.0, and 2.9 GeV. The calculations are done using the Rutherford and Appleton Laboratory high energy fission model (RAL) and are compared with respective calculations of the ORNL-model by Alsmiller et al

  2. Feasibility of Traveling Wave Direct Energy Conversion of Fission Reaction Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, A. G.; George, J. A.; Miley, G. H.; Scott, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Fission fragment direct energy conversion has been considered in the past for the purpose of increasing nuclear power plant efficiency and for advanced space propulsion. Since the fragments carry electric charge (typically in the order of 20 e) and have 100 MeV-range kinetic energy, techniques utilizing very high-voltage DC electrodes have been considered. This study is focused on a different approach: the kinetic energy of the charged fission fragments is converted into alternating current by means of a traveling wave coupling scheme (Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter, TWDEC), thereby not requiring the utilization of high voltage technology. A preliminary feasibility analysis of the concept is introduced based on a conceptual level study and on a particle simulation model of the beam dynamics.

  3. 先进裂变核能的关键核数据测量和CSNS白光中子源%Key Nuclear Data Measurements for Advanced Fission Energy and White Neutron Source at CSNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐靖宇; 敬罕涛; 夏海鸿; 唐洪庆; 张闯; 周祖英; 阮锡超; 张奇玮; 杨征

    2013-01-01

    在设计加速器驱动的次临界系统(ADS)、核废料嬗变装置及钍基熔盐堆时亟需一些关键核数据,当前核数据库受实验条件或中子能区的限制,存在核数据精度不高甚至少部分核素数据缺失的情况.本文综述了国内外相关的核数据研究和相应的白光中子源情况.基于中国散裂中子源(CSNS)的反角通道白光中子源实验终端的中子束流具有非常宽的能谱(0.01 eV~200 MeV)和很好的时间特性.模拟得到距靶80 m处的实验终端的中子注量率为9.3×106 cm-2·s-1,1 eV~1 MeV能量间隔内的中子数占总中子数的53%;同时,加速器运行在双束团模式或单束团模式,时间分辨率均在0.3%~0.9%之间,适合开展核数据测量.%The key nuclear data for advanced fission energy are important in designing advanced nuclear reactors and facilities for nuclear-waste transmutation.Because the present nuclear data library is limited by experimental condition and energy range,the precision of some nuclear data is low,even some nuclear data are blank.In this paper,the status of the nuclear data and white neutron sources were presented.The backstreaming neutron beam at China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) has very wide energy spectrum (0.01 eV-200 MeV) and excellent time structure.From the simulation results,it's obtained that the uncollimated neutron fluence rate is around 9.3 ×106 cm-2 · s-1 within the given energy range at 80 m away from the target,which accounts for about 53% of the total neutrons.The time resolution of 0.3%-0.9%,which is important for the Time-of-Flight method,can be obtained for both the parasite operation mode with two proton bunches and the dedicated operation mode with a single proton bunch.CSNS white neutron source will be a good facility for nuclear data measurement.

  4. Excitation-energy sorting in superfluid fission dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt K.-H.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that at moderate excitation energies the nucleus temperature does not vary with increasing excitation energy. We show that, as a consequence, two nuclei with different temperatures brought into contact show a rather surprising energy-sorting mechanism where the hotter nucleus transfers all its excitation energy to the colder one. The scission configuration of the fission process offers a unique possibility to observe this phenomenon. The energy-sorting mechanism is clearly reflected by the mean number of prompt neutrons as a function of the fragment mass and by the dependence of the local even-odd effect with mass asymmetry.

  5. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 2: Power from nuclear fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Different types of nuclear fission reactors and fissionable materials are compared. Special emphasis is placed upon the environmental impact of such reactors. Graphs and charts comparing reactor facilities in the U. S. are presented.

  6. Composite delayed neutron energy spectra of fissionable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayed neutron (DN) energy spectra spanning a range of 0.01-4.00 MeV have been measured for 235U, 238U and 239Pu. DN equilibrium spectra were also measured for all three nuclides. A helium jet transfer system was used to transport fission products to a low-background counting area. Beta-neutron correlations were used for background suppression and for energy determination by the neutron time-of-flight method. The 235U and 239Pu spectra show marked similarity, while those from the fast fission of 238U are considerably more energetic. DN six-group spectra for 235U, 238U and 239Pu have been deduced from these measurements using a constrained least-squares iterative method

  7. Laser Intertial Fusion Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Kevin James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-04-08

    This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by LFFH plants. The LFFH engine described utilizes a central fusion chamber surrounded by multiple layers of multiplying and moderating media. These layers, or blankets, include coolant plenums, a beryllium (Be) multiplier layer, a fertile fission blanket and a graphite-pebble reflector. Each layer is separated by perforated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel walls. The central fusion chamber is surrounded by an ODS ferritic steel first wall. The first wall is coated with 250-500 μm of tungsten to mitigate x-ray damage. The first wall is cooled by Li17Pb83 eutectic, chosen for its neutron multiplication and good heat transfer properties. The Li17Pb83 flows in a jacket around the first wall to an extraction plenum. The main coolant injection plenum is immediately behind the Li17Pb83, separated from the Li17Pb83 by a solid ODS wall. This main system coolant is the molten salt flibe (2LiF-BeF2), chosen for beneficial neutronics and heat transfer properties. The use of flibe enables both fusion fuel production (tritium) and neutron moderation and multiplication for the fission blanket. A Be pebble (1 cm diameter) multiplier layer surrounds the coolant injection plenum and the coolant flows radially through perforated walls across the bed. Outside the Be layer, a fission fuel layer comprised of depleted uranium contained in Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles

  8. Precise Nuclear Data Measurements Possible with the NIFFTE fissionTPC for Advanced Reactor Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towell, Rusty; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) Collaboration has applied the proven technology of Time Projection Chambers (TPC) to the task of precisely measuring fission cross sections. With the NIFFTE fission TPC, precise measurements have been made during the last year at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center from both U-235 and Pu-239 targets. The exquisite tracking capabilities of this device allow the full reconstruction of charged particles produced by neutron beam induced fissions from a thin central target. The wealth of information gained from this approach will allow systematics to be controlled at the level of 1%. The fissionTPC performance will be presented. These results are critical to the development of advanced uranium-fueled reactors. However, there are clear advantages to developing thorium-fueled reactors such as Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors over uranium-fueled reactors. These advantages include improved reactor safety, minimizing radioactive waste, improved reactor efficiency, and enhanced proliferation resistance. The potential for using the fissionTPC to measure needed cross sections important to the development of thorium-fueled reactors will also be discussed.

  9. Theoretical model application to the evaluation of fission neutron data up to 20 MeV incidence energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex statistical theory of fission neutron emission combined with a phenomenological fission model has been used to calculate fission neutron data for 238U. Obtained neutron multiplicities and energy spectra as well as average fragment energies for incidence energies from threshold to 20 MeV (including multiple-chance fission) are compared with traditional data representations. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  10. Proceedings of the Second Fusion-Fission Energy Systems Review Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-11-02

    The agenda of the meeting was developed to address, in turn, the following major areas: specific problem areas in nuclear energy systems for application of fusion-fission concepts; current and proposed fusion-fission programs in response to the identified problem areas; target costs and projected benefits associated with fusion-fission energy systems; and technical problems associated with the development of fusion-fission concepts. The greatest emphasis was placed on the characteristics of and problems, associated with fuel producing fusion-fission hybrid reactors.

  11. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, Dana Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  12. Ambiguity in choosing potential energy surface in the interpretation of fission of A∼200 at intermediate excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to highlight the sensitivity of the fission observables to the potential energy surface, we have carried out statistical model calculations with three different options: a. liquid drop mass (MLD) and liquid drop fission barrier (BLD), b. experimental mass (Mexp = MLD + Δn) along with a damping of the shell correction at the ground state (Δn) with excitation energy and shell corrected fission barrier (BLD-Δn), c. experimental mass and liquid drop fission barrier

  13. The Power Makers' Challenge And the Need for Fission Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The Power Makers - the producers of our electricity - must meet the demands of their customers while also addressing the threat of climate change. There are widely differing views about solutions to electricity generation in an emission constrained world. Some see the problem as relatively straight forward, requiring deep cuts in emissions now by improving energy efficiency, energy conservation and using only renewable resources. Many electricity industry engineers and scientists see the problem as being much more involved.   The Power Makers ’ Challenge: and the need for Fission Energy looks at why using only conventional renewable energy sources is not quite as simple as it seems. Following a general introduction to electricity and its distribution, the author quantifies the reductions needed in greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector in the face of ever increasing world demands for electricity. It provides some much needed background on the many energy sources available for producing electricity ...

  14. Fission Measurements with Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Dashdorj, D.; Macri, R. A.; Parker, W. E.; Wilk, P. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Angell, C. T.; Tonchev, A. P.; Baker, J. D.

    2008-08-01

    Neutron capture cross section measurements on actinides are complicated by the presence of neutron-induced fission. An efficient fission tagging detector used in coincidence with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) provides a powerful tool in undertaking simultaneous measurements of (n,γ) and (n,f) cross sections. Preliminary results on 235U(n,γ) and (n,f) and 242mAm(n,f) cross sections measured with DANCE and a custom fission-tagging parallel plate avalanche counter (PPAC) are presented. Additional measurements of γ-ray cluster multiplicity distributions for neutron-induced fission of 235U and 242mAm and spontaneous fission of 252Cf are shown, as well as γ-ray energy and average γ-ray energy distributions.

  15. Role of energy cost in the yield of cold ternary fission of 252Cf

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P V Kunhikrishnan; K P Santhosh

    2013-01-01

    The energy costs in the cold ternary fission of 252Cf for various light charged particle emission are calculated by includingWong's correction for Coulomb potential. Energy cost is found to be higher in cold fission than in normal fission. It is found that energy cost always increases with decrease in experimental yield in all the light charged particle emissions. The higher ground state deformation of the fragments, the odd–even effect and the enhanced yield in the octupole region observed in cold fission are found to be consistent with the concept of energy cost.

  16. Dynamical effects in fission investigated at high excitation energy

    OpenAIRE

    Benlliure J.

    2016-01-01

    The experimental techniques used for the investigation of nuclear fission have progressed considerably during the last decade. Most of this progress is based on the use of the inverse kinematics technique allowing for the first time the complete isotopic and kinematic characterization of both fission fragments. These measurements make possible to characterize the fissioning system at saddle and at scission, and can be used to benchmark fission model calculations. One of the important ingredie...

  17. Design related aspects in advanced nuclear fission plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important issues to be considered for design of future reactors are: extrapolation of stress rupture data, creep-fatigue, negligible creep, damage monitoring. The paper highlights some new developments taking examples from a martensitic steel (mod 9% Cr), oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels and nickel-base superalloys. Traditional approaches to extrapolation of (thermal) stress rupture data like Larson-Miller Parameter or Monkman-Grant rule seem to be valid concepts also for advanced reactors. However, a significant influence of cyclic softening on creep rates and stress rupture data can be expected as shown for grade 91. This is particularly true for creep-fatigue interactions. Based on cyclic stress-strain behaviour it is also possible to get very good life-time predictions under creep-fatigue with a strain range separation (inelastic fatigue and creep ranges) technique which could replace the currently used linear life fraction rule. Results from in-beam irradiation creep reveal no significant influence of dispersoid size. It can be assumed that irradiation creep is a matrix property. Finally it is shown that micro-sample testing of exposed material could be used as an advanced method for damage assessment in future nuclear power plants.

  18. Fission cross section calculations for 209Bi target nucleus based on fission reaction models in high energy regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of projects of new generation nuclear power plants requires the solving of material science and technological issues in developing of reactor materials. Melts of heavy metals (Pb, Bi and Pb-Bi due to their nuclear and thermophysical properties, are the candidate coolants for fast reactors and accelerator-driven systems (ADS. In this study, α, γ, p, n and 3He induced fission cross section calculations for 209Bi target nucleus at high-energy regions for (α,f, (γ,f, (p,f, (n,f and (3He,f reactions have been investigated using different fission reaction models. Mamdouh Table, Sierk, Rotating Liquid Drop and Fission Path models of theoretical fission barriers of TALYS 1.6 code have been used for the fission cross section calculations. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the EXFOR database. TALYS 1.6 Sierk model calculations exhibit generally good agreement with the experimental measurements for all reactions used in this study.

  19. Examining fine potential energy effects in high-energy fission dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, K.; Schmitt, C.; Nadtochy, P. N.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Wasiak, P.; Wieleczko, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    The potential energy surface plays a decisive role in nuclear fission. Together with inertia and viscosity, it influences the trajectory of the system, and the properties of the fission fragments result from the puzzling interplay between static and dynamical effects. A careful study on the influence of the parametrization of the potential energy landscape in heavy-ion-induced fission is performed. Dynamical calculations are done within the stochastic Langevin approach in a three-dimensional deformation space. Various prescriptions of the potential energy surface are considered, probing two different Liquid Drop models and the deformation dependence of the Wigner/congruence energy. A wide set of observables, including cross sections, particle multiplicities, and integral, as well as isotopic and isobaric, distributions of fission and evaporation products, is analyzed. Nuclei close to the Businaro-Gallone point are confirmed to be well suited for investigating the Liquid Drop parametrization, while the influence of the deformation-dependent Wigner/congruence energy is difficult to demonstrate unambiguously in fission at high excitation energies.

  20. Economic implications of fusion-fission energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal conclusions that can be made based on the estimated costs reported in this paper are twofold. First, hybrid reactors operating symbiotically with conventional fission reactors are a potentially attractive supply alternative. Estimated hybrid energy system costs are slightly greater than estimated costs of the most attractive alternatives. However, given the technological, economic, and institutional uncertainties associated with future energy supply, differences of such magnitude are of little significance. Second, to be economically viable, hybrid reactors must be both fuel producers and electricity producers. A data point representing each hybrid reactor driver-blanket concept is plotted as a function of net electrical production efficiency and annual fuel production. The plots illustrate that the most economically viable reactor concepts are those that produce both fuel and electricity

  1. Understanding Low Energy Gamma Emission from Fission and Capture with DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, Grey; Couture, Aaron; Mosby, Shea

    2012-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 barium fluoride (BaF2) detectors in a 4π array used to study cross-section measurements from neutron capture reactions. Further, recent studies have taken advantage of DANCE to study the gamma emission from fission, which is not well characterized. Neutron capture is studied because of its relevance to nuclear astrophysics (almost all elements heavier than iron are formed via neutron capture) and nuclear energy, where neutron capture is a poison in the reactor. Gamma ray cascades following neutron capture and fission include photons with energies between 100 keV and 10 MeV. DANCE uses a ^6LiH sphere to attenuate scattered neutrons, the primary background in DANCE. Unfortunately, it also attenuates low energy gamma rays. In order to quantify this effect and validate simulations, direct measurements of low energy gammas were made with a high purity germanium (HPGe) crystal. HPGe's allow for high resolution measurements of low energy gamma rays that are not possible using the BaF2 crystals. The results and their agreement with simulations will be discussed.

  2. Sustainable, Full-Scope Nuclear Fission Energy at Planetary Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Petroski

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A nuclear fission-based energy system is described that is capable of supplying the energy needs of all of human civilization for a full range of human energy use scenarios, including both very high rates of energy use and strikingly-large amounts of total energy-utilized. To achieve such “planetary scale sustainability”, this nuclear energy system integrates three nascent technologies: uranium extraction from seawater, manifestly safe breeder reactors, and deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste. In addition to these technological components, it also possesses the sociopolitical quality of manifest safety, which involves engineering to a very high degree of safety in a straightforward manner, while concurrently making the safety characteristics of the resulting nuclear systems continually manifest to society as a whole. Near-term aspects of this nuclear system are outlined, and representative parameters given for a system of global scale capable of supplying energy to a planetary population of 10 billion people at a per capita level enjoyed by contemporary Americans, i.e., of a type which might be seen a half-century hence. In addition to being sustainable from a resource standpoint, the described nuclear system is also sustainable with respect to environmental and human health impacts, including those resulting from severe accidents.

  3. Dependence of Fission-Fragment Properties On Excitation Energy For Neutron-Rich Actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos D.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic fission yields of 250Cf, 244Cm, 240Pu, 239Np and 238U are presented in this work. With this information, the average number of neutrons as a function of the atomic number of the fragments is calculated, which reflects the impact of nuclear structure around Z=50, N=80 on the production of fission fragments. The characteristics of the Super Long, Standard I, Standard II, and Standard III fission channels were extracted from fits of the fragment yields for different ranges of excitation energy. The position and contribution of the fission channels as function of excitation energy are presented.

  4. Dependence of Fission-Fragment Properties On Excitation Energy For Neutron-Rich Actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Audouin, L.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Clement, E.; Cortina, D.; Delaune, O.; Derkx, X.; Dijon, A.; Doré, D.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; de France, G.; Heinz, A.; Jacquot, B.; Navin, A.; Paradela, C.; Rejmund, M.; Roger, T.; Salsac, M. D.; Schmitt, C.

    2016-03-01

    Experimental access to full isotopic fragment distributions is very important to determine the features of the fission process. However, the isotopic identification of fission fragments has been, in the past, partial and scarce. A solution based on the use of inverse kinematics to study transfer-induced fission of exotic actinides was carried out at GANIL, resulting in the first experiment accessing the full identification of a collection of fissioning systems and their corresponding fission fragment distribution. In these experiments, a 238U beam at 6.14 AMeV impinged on a carbon target to produce fissioning systems from U to Am by transfer reactions, and Cf by fusion reactions. Isotopic fission yields of 250Cf, 244Cm, 240Pu, 239Np and 238U are presented in this work. With this information, the average number of neutrons as a function of the atomic number of the fragments is calculated, which reflects the impact of nuclear structure around Z=50, N=80 on the production of fission fragments. The characteristics of the Super Long, Standard I, Standard II, and Standard III fission channels were extracted from fits of the fragment yields for different ranges of excitation energy. The position and contribution of the fission channels as function of excitation energy are presented.

  5. Preliminary calculations of medium-energy fission cross sections and spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleon-induced fission cross sections determined from a statistical preequilibrium model are used in conjunction with a new scission-point model of fission fragment mass, charge and excitation energy distributions to produce evaporation model calculations of particle and gamma spectra and multiplicities from fission. Comparisons are made to experiment for the 14.5-MeV neutron-induced fission of 238U. In addition, calculated particle and gamma spectra will be compared with the ENDF/B library for 2- and 5-MeV neutron-induced fission of 235U and 238U, respectively. Initial predictions for these same quantities for proton-induced fission reactions at energies up to 100 MeV will be presented and discussed. 6 refs., 3 figs

  6. Advanced energy materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    An essential resource for scientists designing new energy materials for the vast landscape of solar energy conversion as well as materials processing and characterization Based on the new and fundamental research on novel energy materials with tailor-made photonic properties, the role of materials engineering has been to provide much needed support in the development of photovoltaic devices. Advanced Energy Materials offers a unique, state-of-the-art look at the new world of novel energy materials science, shedding light on the subject's vast multi-disciplinary approach The book focuses p

  7. The Future of Nuclear Energy: Facts and Fiction Chapter I: Nuclear Fission Energy Today

    OpenAIRE

    Dittmar, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear fission energy is considered to be somewhere between the holy grail, required to solve all energy worries of the human industrialized civilization, and a fast path directly to hell. Discussions about future energy sources and the possible contribution from nuclear energy are often dominated by variations of fundamentalists and often irrational approaches. As a result, very little is known by the general public and even by decision makers about the contribution of nuclear energy today,...

  8. Multi-modal calculations of prompt fission neutrons from 238U(n, f) at low induced energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Na; ZHONG Chun-Lai; FAN Tie-Shuan

    2011-01-01

    Properties of prompt fission neutrons from 238U(n,f) are calculated for incident neutron energies below 6 MeV using the multi-modal model,including the prompt fission neutron spectrum,the average prompt fission neutron multiplicity,and the prompt fission neutron multiplicity as a function of the fission fragment mass v(A) (usually named “sawtooth” data) The three most dominant fission modes are taken into account.The model parameters are determined on the basis of experimental fission fragment data.The predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. The fusion fission and quasi-fission processes in the reaction 48Ca + 208Pb at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorova, E. V.; Bogachev, A. A.; Itkis, M. G.; Itkis, I. M.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Pashkevich, V. V.; Rusanov, A. Ya.

    2008-04-01

    Mass-energy distributions (MEDs) and capture-fission cross sections have been measured in the reaction 48Ca + 208Pb → 256No at the energies E=206-242 MeV using a double-arm time-of-flight spectrometer CORSET. It has been observed that MED of the fragments consists of two parts, namely, the classical fusion-fission process corresponding to the symmetric fission of 256No and quasi-fission "shoulders" corresponding to the light fragment masses ˜60-90 u and complimentary heavy fragment masses. The quasi-fission "shoulders" have a higher total kinetic energy (TKE) as compared with that expected for the classical fission. A mathematical formalism was employed for the MEDs fragment decomposition into fusion-fission and quasi-fission components. In the fusion-fission process a high-energy Super-Short mode has been discovered for the masses M=130-135 u and the TKE of ≈233 MeV.

  10. The fusion-fission and quasi-fission processes in the reaction 48Ca + 208Pb at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass-energy distributions (MEDs) and capture-fission cross sections have been measured in the reaction 48Ca + 208Pb →256No at the energies Elab=206-242 MeV using a double-arm time-of-flight spectrometer CORSET. It has been observed that MED of the fragments consists of two parts, namely, the classical fusion-fission process corresponding to the symmetric fission of 256No and quasi-fission 'shoulders' corresponding to the light fragment masses ∼60-90 u and complimentary heavy fragment masses. The quasi-fission 'shoulders' have a higher total kinetic energy (TKE) as compared with that expected for the classical fission. A mathematical formalism was employed for the MEDs fragment decomposition into fusion-fission and quasi-fission components. In the fusion-fission process a high-energy Super-Short mode has been discovered for the masses MH=130-135 u and the TKE of ∼233 MeV

  11. An investigation of fission models for high-energy radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of high-energy fission models for use in the HETC code has been made. The validation work has been directed checking the accuracy of the high-energy radiation transport computer code HETC to investigate the appropriate model for routine calculations, particularly for spallation neutron source applications. Model calculations are given in terms of neutron production, fission fragment energy release, and residual nuclei production for high-energy protons incident on thin uranium targets. The effect of the fission models on neutron production from thick uranium targets is also shown. (orig.)

  12. FITPULS: a code for obtaining analytic fits to aggregate fission-product decay-energy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation and input to the FITPULS code, recently updated to utilize interactive graphics, are described. The code is designed to retrieve data from a library containing aggregate fine-group spectra (150 energy groups) from fission products, collapse the data to few groups (up to 25), and fit the resulting spectra along the cooling time axis with a linear combination of exponential functions. Also given in this report are useful results for aggregate gamma and beta spectra from the decay of fission products released from 235U irradiated with a pulse (10-4 s irradiation time) of thermal neutrons. These fits are given in 22 energy groups that are the first 22 groups of the LASL 25-group decay-energy group structure, and the data are expressed both as MeV per fission second and particles per fission second; these pulse functions are readily folded into finite fission histories. 65 figures, 11 tables

  13. Energy dependence of 238U fission yields investigated in inverse kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselsky M.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The production cross sections of neutron-rich fission residues produced in reactions induced by a 238U beam impinging onto Pb and Be targets were investigated at the Fragment Separator (FRS at GSI using the inverse kinematic technique. These data allowed us to discuss the optimum energies in fission for producing the most neutron-rich residues.

  14. Laser inertial fusion-based energy: Neutronic design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Kevin James

    This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by LFFH plants. The LFFH engine described utilizes a central fusion chamber surrounded by multiple layers of multiplying and moderating media. These layers, or blankets, include coolant plenums, a beryllium (Be) multiplier layer, a fertile fission blanket and a graphite-pebble reflector. Each layer is separated by perforated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel walls. The central fusion chamber is surrounded by an ODS ferritic steel first wall. The first wall is coated with 250-500 mum of tungsten to mitigate x-ray damage. The first wall is cooled by Li17Pb83 eutectic, chosen for its neutron multiplication and good heat transfer properties. The Li17Pb 83 flows in a jacket around the first wall to an extraction plenum. The main coolant injection plenum is immediately behind the Li17Pb83, separated from the Li17Pb83 by a solid ODS wall. This main system coolant is the molten salt flibe (2LiF-BeF2), chosen for beneficial neutronics and heat transfer properties. The use of flibe enables both fusion fuel production (tritium) and neutron moderation and multiplication for the fission blanket. A Be pebble (1 cm diameter) multiplier layer surrounds the coolant injection plenum and the coolant flows radially through perforated walls across the bed. Outside the Be layer, a fission fuel layer comprised of depleted uranium contained in Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles having a packing fraction of 20% in 2 cm diameter fuel pebbles. The fission blanket is cooled by

  15. Photon and proton induced fission on heavy nuclei at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade-II, E.; Karapetyan, G.S.; Deppman, A.; Guimaraes, V. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Balabekyan, A.R. [Yerevan State University, Alex Manoogian 1, Yerevan (Armenia); Demekhina, N.A. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Alikhanyan Brothers 2, Yerevan (Armenia); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (LNR), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    We present an analysis of fission induced by intermediate energy protons or photons on actinides. The 660 MeV proton induced reactions are on {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}U, and {sup 237}Np targets and the Bremsstrahlung-photons with end-point energies at 50 MeV and 3500 MeV are on {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U targets. The study was performed by means of the Monte Carlo simulation code CRISP. A multimodal fission extension was added to the code within an approach which accounts for the contribution of symmetric and asymmetric fission. This procedure allowed the investigation of fission cross sections, fissility, number of evaporated nucleons and fission-fragment charge distributions. The comparison with experimental data show a good agreement between calculations and experiments. (author)

  16. Photon and proton induced fission on heavy nuclei at intermediate energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-II E.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of fission induced by intermediate energy protons or photons on actinides. The 660 MeV proton induced reactions are on 241Am, 238U, and 237Np targets and the Bremmstrahlung-photons with end-point energies at 50 MeV and 3500 MeV are on 232Th and 238U targets. The study was performed by means of the Monte Carlo simulation code CRISP. A multimodal fission extension was added to the code within an approach which accounts for the contribution of symmetric and asymmetric fission. This procedure allowed the investigation of fission cross sections, fissility, number of evaporated nucleons and fission-fragment charge distributions. The comparison with experimental data show a good agreement between calculations and experiments.

  17. Multi-mode fission mechanisms correlated to deformation of the fragments and transition of the characteristics in relation to excitation energy of the fissioning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamiya, Koichi; Inoue, Takakazu; Nakanishi, Kiyoshi [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Science] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Aiming to conduct a measurement under further higher resolution, a TOF measurement of the fission fragment of {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) was conducted by using a thin-film scintillator excellent in time responsibility. By TOF measurement, the fission fragment mass after emitting the prompt neutron and the numbers of the prompt neutron could be obtained. And, double energy measurement at the different incident proton energy was conducted for {sup 238}U(p,f) to investigate the to investigate the energy dependency of the nuclear fission. As a result of investigating the nuclear fission mechanism in multi face and due to the obtained data, it was found that degree of deformation of the fission fragment played an important role. However, as data on the prompt neutron numbers was not obtained this time, more detailed investigation could not be conducted. (G.K.)

  18. Fission energy program of the U.S. Department of Energy. FY 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the baseline implementation program plan as of January 1979 and is derived from the National Energy Plan and other major policy documents. The document discusses civilian nuclear power development, the policy for which has been established by the National Energy Plan of April 1977 and the National Energy Act of 1978. It derives the fission energy policy and program objectives from the National Energy Plan and Act, describes the overall program strategy, and presents the overall budget. The approach used in managing the program, including the program structure and methods used for program control, is explained. The civilian fission power development implementation programs are described in detail. Other considerations affecting civilian nuclear power development are also discussed

  19. Fission energy program of the U. S. Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    The document describes programs managed by the Program Director for Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy, and under the cognizance of the Committee on Science and Technology, United States House of Representatives. The major portion of the document is concerned with civilian nuclear power development, the policy for which has been established by the National Energy Plan of April 1977, but it also includes descriptions of the space applications and naval reactor programs.

  20. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature and predict the evolution of both the inner and the outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T >0 , and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that a finite temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  1. Measurement of fission cross-section of actinides at n_TOF for advanced nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, Marco; Montagnoli, G; Mastinu, P

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the determination of high accuracy neutron-induced fission cross-sections of various isotopes - all of which radioactive - of interest for emerging nuclear technologies. The measurements had been performed at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF. In particular, in this work, fission cross-sections on 233U, the main fissile isotope of the Th/U fuel cycle, and on the minor actinides 241Am, 243Am and 245Cm have been analyzed. Data on these isotopes are requested for the feasibility study of innovative nuclear systems (ADS and Generation IV reactors) currently being considered for energy production and radioactive waste transmutation. The measurements have been performed with a high performance Fast Ionization Chamber (FIC), in conjunction with an innovative data acquisition system based on Flash-ADCs. The first step in the analysis has been the reconstruction of the digitized signals, in order to extract the information required for the discrimination between fission fragm...

  2. Dynamical effects in fission investigated at high excitation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlliure, J.

    2016-05-01

    The experimental techniques used for the investigation of nuclear fission have progressed considerably during the last decade. Most of this progress is based on the use of the inverse kinematics technique allowing for the first time the complete isotopic and kinematic characterization of both fission fragments. These measurements make possible to characterize the fissioning system at saddle and at scission, and can be used to benchmark fission model calculations. One of the important ingredients in transport models describing the dynamics of the process is the dissipation parameter, governing the coupling between intrinsic and collective degrees of freedom. Recent experiments got access to the magnitude of this parameter and could also investigate its dependence in temperature and deformation.

  3. Dynamical effects in fission investigated at high excitation energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benlliure J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental techniques used for the investigation of nuclear fission have progressed considerably during the last decade. Most of this progress is based on the use of the inverse kinematics technique allowing for the first time the complete isotopic and kinematic characterization of both fission fragments. These measurements make possible to characterize the fissioning system at saddle and at scission, and can be used to benchmark fission model calculations. One of the important ingredients in transport models describing the dynamics of the process is the dissipation parameter, governing the coupling between intrinsic and collective degrees of freedom. Recent experiments got access to the magnitude of this parameter and could also investigate its dependence in temperature and deformation.

  4. Neutron emission as a function of fragment energy in the spontaneous fission of 260Md

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have made the first measurement of the number of neutrons emitted in the spontaneous fission of a nuclide in which very high fragment energies dominate the fission process. In bombardments of 254Es, they produced 28-d 260Md, which was neutron-counted in a 1-m-diam spherical tank containing a Gd-doped scintillator solution. The average number of neutrons emitted per fission is only 2.58 ± 0.11, substantially less than for other actinides. A direct correlation of neutron multiplicity with fragment excitation energy is clearly demonstrated

  5. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting on neutron activation cross sections for fission and fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings of a specialists' meeting on neutron activation cross sections for fission and fusion energy applications are divided into 4 sessions bearing on: - data needs: 4 conferences - experimental work: 11 conferences - theoretical work: 4 conferences - evaluation work: 5 conferences

  6. Total kinetic energy distribution of fission fragments in 6,7Li + 238U reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shape and width of fission-fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy distribution provides a lot of information on the fission reaction mechanism and the structure of the compound nucleus (CN), the fragments as well as the interacting nuclei. The shape of the mass distribution of the fission fragments for the actinides induced by the proton or neutron is known to change with the incident energy. At low energies, it shows a double humped distribution which changes slowly to a single humped distribution as energy increases. However, for a reaction involving a weakly bound projectile (i.e., 6Li + 232Th), a sharp change in the shape of the mass distribution with energy was observed. The sharp increase in the peak to valley ratio (P:V) in the fission-fragment mass distribution in 6Li + 232Th reaction by Itkis et al. and in 6,7Li + 238U reactions by Santra et al. was concluded to be due to the reduced energy transfer to the composite system caused by incomplete fusion (ICF) of alpha or deuteron/triton followed by fissions. Total Kinetic Energy (TKE) distribution of fission fragments is another important observable on which the effect of projectile breakup is not explored yet. In this contribution, the study of breakup/transfer effect on average TKE distribution for 6,7Li + 238U reactions is presented

  7. Spontaneous fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experimental results for spontaneous fission half-lives and fission fragment mass and kinetic-energy distributions and other properties of the fragments are reviewed and compared with recent theoretical models. The experimental data lend support to the existence of the predicted deformed shells near Z = 108 and N = 162. Prospects for extending detailed studies of spontaneous fission properties to elements beyond hahnium (element 105) are considered. (orig.)

  8. Microscopic description of fission in neutron-rich radium isotopes with the Gogny energy density functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Guzman, R. [Kuwait University, Physics Department, Kuwait (Kuwait); Robledo, L.M. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Mean-field calculations, based on the D1S, D1N and D1M parametrizations of the Gogny energy density functional, have been carried out to obtain the potential energy surfaces relevant to fission in several Ra isotopes with the neutron number 144 ≤ N ≤ 176. Inner and outer barrier heights as well as first and second isomer excitation energies are given. The existence of a well-developed third minimum along the fission paths of Ra nuclei is analyzed in terms of the energetics of the ''fragments'' defining such elongated configuration. The masses and charges of the fission fragments are studied as functions of the neutron number in the parent Ra isotope. The comparison between fission and α-decay half-lives, reveals that the former becomes faster for increasing neutron numbers. Though there exists a strong variance of the results with respect to the parameters used in the computation of the spontaneous fission rate, a change in tendency is observed at N = 164 with a steady increase that makes heavier neutron-rich Ra isotopes stable against fission, diminishing the importance of fission recycling in the r-process. (orig.)

  9. Microscopic description of fission in neutron-rich radium isotopes with the Gogny energy density functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrıguez-Guzmán, R.; Robledo, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mean-field calculations, based on the D1S, D1N and D1M parametrizations of the Gogny energy density functional, have been carried out to obtain the potential energy surfaces relevant to fission in several Ra isotopes with the neutron number 144≤ N≤ 176. Inner and outer barrier heights as well as first and second isomer excitation energies are given. The existence of a well-developed third minimum along the fission paths of Ra nuclei is analyzed in terms of the energetics of the "fragments" defining such elongated configuration. The masses and charges of the fission fragments are studied as functions of the neutron number in the parent Ra isotope. The comparison between fission and α -decay half-lives, reveals that the former becomes faster for increasing neutron numbers. Though there exists a strong variance of the results with respect to the parameters used in the computation of the spontaneous fission rate, a change in tendency is observed at N=164 with a steady increase that makes heavier neutron-rich Ra isotopes stable against fission, diminishing the importance of fission recycling in the r-process.

  10. Safety and economical requirements of conceptual fusion power reactors in co-existing advanced fission plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An EPR fission plant is expected to operate from 2010 to 2070. In this time range a new generation of advanced fission reactors and several stages of fusion reactors from ITER to DEMO will emerge. Their viability in the competitive socio-economic environment and also their possible synergy benefits are discussed in this paper. The studied cases involve the Finnish EPR, Generation IV, and the EFDA Power Plant Conceptual Study Models A-D. The main focus is on economic and safety assessments. Some cross-cutting issues of technologies are discussed. Concerning the economic potential of both conceptual fusion power plants and those of Generation IV candidates, we have used the present Finnish EPR as a reference. Comparisons using various pricing methods are made for fusion and Generation IV: mass flow analyses together with engineering, construction and financial margins form one method and another one is based on simple scaling relations between components or structures with common technology level. In all these studies fusion competitiveness has to be improved in terms of plant availability and internal power recirculation. At present the best fission plants have a plant availability close to 95% and an internal power recirculation of the order of 3-4%. The operation and maintenance solutions of Model C and D show the right way for fusion. A remarkable rise of the fuel costs of present LWRs would first make the Generation IV breeder options and thereafter the fusion plants more competitive. The costs of safety related components, such as the containment and the equipment for severe accident mitigation (e.g. the core catcher in a LWR), should be accounted for and the extent to which the inherent fusion safety features could compensate such expenses should be analysed. For an overall assessment of the various nuclear options both internal and external costs are considered. (author)

  11. Advances in Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frois, B.

    2005-04-01

    This paper briefly reviews the next generations of nuclear reactors and the perspectives of development of nuclear energy. Advanced reactors will progressively replace the existing ones during the next two decades. Future systems of the fourth generation are planned to be built beyond 2030. These systems have been studied in the framework of the "Generation IV" International Forum. The goals of these systems is to have a considerable increase in safety, be economically competitive and produce a significantly reduced volume of nuclear wastes. The closed fuel cycle is preferred.

  12. Evaluation of excitation energy and spin in fission fragments using the statistical model, and the FIPPS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sage C.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We review the statistical model and its application for the process of nuclear fission. The expressions for excitation energy and spin distributions for the individual fission fragments are given. We will finally emphasize the importance of measuring prompt gamma decay to further test the statistical model in nuclear fission with the FIPPS project.

  13. The dependence of cumulative 238U(n,f) fission yield on incident-neutron energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Na; ZHONG Chunlai; MA Liyong; CHEN Zhongjing; LI Xiangqing; LIU Tingjin; CHEN Jinxiang; FAN Tieshuan

    2009-01-01

    This work is aim at studying the dependence of fission yields on incident neutron energy,so as to produce evaluated yield sets of the energy dependence.Experimental data at different neutron energies for gas fission products 85m,87,88Kr and 138Xe resulting from the 238U(n,f) reaction are processed using codes AVERAGE for weighed average and ZOTT for simultaneous evaluation.Energy dependence of the cumulative fission product yields on the incident neutron is presented.The evaluated curve of product yield is compared with the results calculated by the TALYS-0.64 code.The present evaluation is consistent with other main libraries in error permission.The fit curve of 87,88Kr can be recommended to predict the unmeasured fission yields.Comparisons of the evaluated energy dependence curves with theoretical calculated results show that the predictions using purely theoretical model for the fission process are not sufficiently accurate and reliable for the calculations of the cumulative fission yields for the 238U(n,f).

  14. Assessing the role of the (n, γ f) process in the low-energy fission of actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talou, Patrick; Lynn, J. E.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Couture, A.; Bouland, O.

    2016-06-01

    We review the role of the (n, γ f) process in the low-energy neutron-induced fission reaction of 239Pu. Recent measurements of the average total γ-ray energy released in this reaction were performed with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos. Significant fluctuations of this quantity in the resonance region below 100 eV can be interpreted by invoking the presence of the indirect (n, γ f) process. Modern calculations of the probability for such an event to occur are presented.

  15. Assessing the role of the (n, γ f process in the low-energy fission of actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talou Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of the (n, γ f process in the low-energy neutron-induced fission reaction of 239Pu. Recent measurements of the average total γ-ray energy released in this reaction were performed with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE at Los Alamos. Significant fluctuations of this quantity in the resonance region below 100 eV can be interpreted by invoking the presence of the indirect (n, γ f process. Modern calculations of the probability for such an event to occur are presented.

  16. Neutron-induced fission: properties of prompt neutron and γ rays as a function of incident energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.

    2016-06-01

    We have applied the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory, in a Monte-Carlo implementation, to the de-excitation of fission fragments, obtaining a reasonable description of the characteristics of neutrons and gamma rays emitted before beta decays toward stability. Originally implemented for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the neutroninduced fission of 235U and 239Pu at thermal neutron energy, in this contribution we discuss the extension of the formalism to incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV. For the emission of pre-fission neutrons, at incident energies beyond second-chance fission, we take into account both the pre-equilibrium and statistical pre-fission components. Phenomenological parameterizations of mass, charge and TKE yields are used to obtain the initial conditions for the fission fragments that subsequently decay via neutron and emissions. We illustrate this approach for 239Pu(n,f).

  17. Absolute Energy Calibration of Solid-State Detectors for Fission Fragments and Heavy Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed measurements of the pulse-height response of silicon solid-state detectors to energetic heavy ions and fission fragments have been made. These studies have now led to a reliable method of absolute energy calibration of solid-state detectors for fission fragments, as well as to a better understanding of the somewhat peculiar response characteristics of the detectors to fission fragments and heavy ions. The use of silicon solid-state detectors in fragment kinetic energy measurements in recent years has been widespread; at the same time, questions have been raised about the detailed interpretation of such measurements because of the increasing evidence for anomalous behaviour in charge production, charge collection and charge multiplication in the case of densely ionizing particles. The present report discusses systematics and possible origins of these effects. Application of the absolute energy calibration method, which takes into account the mass and energy dependence of the response, is based simply on a Cf252 or U235 fragment pulse- height spectrum. Our studies were carried out with mono-energetic Br71, Br81 and I127 ions of energies from 30 to 120 MeV, and with fission fragments from spontaneous fission of Cf252 and neutron-induced fission of U235 and Pu239. It is shown that for a given fragment mass, over a wide energy range, the fragment energy versus pulse-height relationship is of the form E = ax + b, where E is the fragment energy and x is the measured pulse height. A dependence of pulse height on fragment mass has also been established, which leads to an energy versus pulse-height relationship, for the range of fission-fragment masses and energies, of the form E = (a + a'm)x + b + b'M, where M is the fragment mass. The effect of detector window and of detector type, resistivity and electric field have been studied. Guides to the selection of detectors and to their use with fission fragments are given. The effect of the more exact calibration

  18. Description of Induced Nuclear Fission with Skyrme Energy Functionals: II. Finite Temperature Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, N; Carr, H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production of nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic model to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the fission of 239Pu(n,f). We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature, and predict the evolution of both the inner and outer fission barriers as ...

  19. Fission-product yields for thermal-neutron fission of 243Cm determined from measurements with a high-resolution low-energy germanium gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumulative fission-product yields have been determined for 13 gamma rays emitted during the decay of 12 fission products created by thermal-neutron fission of 243Cm. A high-resolution low-energy germanium detector was used to measure the pulse-height spectra of gamma rays emitted from a 77-nanogram sample of 243Cm after the sample had been irradiated by thermal neutrons. Analysis of the data resulted in the identification and matching of gamma-ray energies and half-lives to individual radioisotopes. From these results, 12 cumulative fission product yields were deduced for radionuclides with half-lives between 4.2 min and 84.2 min. 7 references

  20. Studies on fission with ALADIN. Precise and simultaneous measurement of fission yields, total kinetic energy and total prompt neutron multiplicity at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Taieb, Julien; Chatillon, Audrey; Belier, Gilbert; Boutoux, Guillaume; Ebran, Adeline; Gorbinet, Thomas; Grente, Lucie; Laurent, Benoit; Pellereau, Eric [CEA DAM Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Arpajon (France); Alvarez-Pol, Hector; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Cortina Gil, Dolores; Caamano, Manuel; Fernandez Dominguez, Beatriz; Paradela, Carlos; Ramos, Diego; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Jose-Luis; Vargas, Jossitt [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Audouin, Laurent; Tassan-Got, Laurent [CNRS/IN2P3, IPNO, Orsay (France); Aumann, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Casarejos, Enrique [Universidad de Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Farget, Fanny; Rodriguez-Tajes, Carme [CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen (France); Heinz, Andreas [Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Jurado, Beatriz [CNRS/IN2P3, CENBG, Gradignan (France); Kelic-Heil, Aleksandra; Kurz, Nikolaus; Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Rossi, Dominic; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Simon, Haik; Voss, Bernd; Weick, Helmut [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A novel technique for fission studies, based on the inverse kinematics approach, is presented. Following pioneering work in the nineties, the SOFIA Collaboration has designed and built an experimental set-up dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of isotopic yields, total kinetic energies and total prompt neutron multiplicities, by fully identifying both fission fragments in coincidence, for the very first time. This experiment, performed at GSI, permits to study the fission of a wide variety of fissioning systems, ranging from mercury to neptunium, possibly far from the valley of stability. A first experiment, performed in 2012, has provided a large array of unprecedented data regarding the nuclear fission process. An excerpt of the results is presented. With this solid starter, further improvements of the experimental set-up are considered, which are consistent with the expected developments at the GSI facility, in order to measure more fission observables in coincidence. The completeness reached in the SOFIA data, permits to scrutinize the correlations between the interesting features of fission, offering a very detailed insight in this still unraveled mechanism. (orig.)

  1. Advances in energy harvesting methods

    CERN Document Server

    Elvin, Niell

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Energy Harvesting Methods presents a state-of-the-art understanding of diverse aspects of energy harvesting with a focus on: broadband energy conversion, new concepts in electronic circuits, and novel materials. This book covers recent advances in energy harvesting using different transduction mechanisms; these include methods of performance enhancement using nonlinear effects, non-harmonic forms of excitation and non-resonant energy harvesting, fluidic energy harvesting, and advances in both low-power electronics as well as  material science. The contributors include a brief liter

  2. Partition between the fission fragments of the excitation energy and of the neutron multiplicity at scission in low-energy fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carjan, N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Rizea, M.; Serot, O.

    2012-04-01

    The partition between the light (L) and the heavy (H) fission fragments of the excitation energy available at scission is studied in the framework of the sudden approximation, i.e., under the assumption that the neck rupture and the absorption of the neck pieces by the fragments happen infinitely fast. We are dealing with a sudden transition between two different nuclear configurations (αi→αf) and we only need to know the two sets of neutron eigenstates involved. The accent in the present work is put on the dependence of this share of energy on the mass asymmetry AL/AH of the primary fission fragments during the low-energy fission of 236U. In particular, for every fragment mass A we estimate the scission neutron multiplicity νsc, the average energy cost for their release , the primary fragments' excitation energy Esc*, and the corresponding temperature Tsc. The results are analyzed separately for each value of Ω (the projection of the angular momentum on the symmetry axis). As general trends, a decrease of Esc* (Tsc) and an increase of νsc () with increasing A were observed.

  3. Study of advanced fission power reactor development for the United States. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a multi-phase research study which had as its objective the comparative study of various advanced fission reactors and evaluation of alternate strategies for their development in the USA through the year 2020. By direction from NSF, ''advanced'' reactors were defined as those which met the dual requirements of (1) offering a significant improvement in fissile fuel utilization as compared to light-water reactors and (2) currently receiving U.S. Government funding. (A detailed study of the LMFBR was specifically excluded, but cursory baseline data were obtained from ERDA sources.) Included initially were the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), and Light-Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Subsequently, the CANDU Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) was included for comparison due to increased interest in its potential. This volume presents the reasoning process and analytical methods utilized to arrive at the conclusions for the overall study

  4. Recent Advances in Power Conversion and Heat Rejection Technology for Fission Surface Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Under the Exploration Technology Development Program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are jointly developing Fission Surface Power (FSP) technology for possible use in human missions to the Moon and Mars. A preliminary reference concept was generated to guide FSP technology development. The concept consists of a liquid-metal-cooled reactor, Stirling power conversion, and water heat rejection, with Brayton power conversion as a backup option. The FSP project has begun risk reduction activities on some key components with the eventual goal of conducting an end-to-end, non-nuclear, integrated system test. Several power conversion and heat rejection hardware prototypes have been built and tested. These include multi-kilowatt Stirling and Brayton power conversion units, titanium-water heat pipes, and composite radiator panels.

  5. Probing energy dissipation, γ-ray and neutron multiplicity in the thermal neutron-induced fission of 239Pu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Mirfathi, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    The incorporation of the four-dimensional Langevin equations led to an integrative description of fission cross-section, fragment mass distribution and the multiplicity and energy distribution of prompt neutrons and γ-rays in the thermal neutron-induced fission of 239Pu. The dynamical approach presented in this paper thoroughly reproduces several experimental observables of the fission process at low excitation energy.

  6. Probing energy dissipation, γ-ray and neutron multiplicity in the thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahlavani, M.R.; Mirfathi, S.M. [University of Mazandaran, Department of Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Basic Science, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The incorporation of the four-dimensional Langevin equations led to an integrative description of fission cross-section, fragment mass distribution and the multiplicity and energy distribution of prompt neutrons and γ-rays in the thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu. The dynamical approach presented in this paper thoroughly reproduces several experimental observables of the fission process at low excitation energy. (orig.)

  7. Microscopic description of fission in neutron-rich Radium isotopes with the Gogny energy density functional

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Guzman, R R

    2015-01-01

    Mean field calculations, based on the D1S, D1N and D1M parametrizations of the Gogny energy density functional, have been carried out to obtain the potential energy surfaces relevant to fission in several Ra isotopes with the neutron number 144 $\\le$ N $\\le$ 176. Inner and outer barrier heights as well as first and second isomer excitation energies are given. The existence of a well developed third minimum along the fission paths of Ra nuclei, is analyzed in terms of the energetics of the "fragments" defining such elongated configuration. The masses and charges of the fission fragments are studied as functions of the neutron number in the parent Ra isotope. The comparison between fission and $\\alpha$-decay half-lives, reveals that the former becomes faster for increasing neutron numbers. Though there exists a strong variance of the results with respect to the parameters used in the computation of the spontaneous fission rate, a change in tendency is observed at N=164 with a steady increase that makes heavier ...

  8. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n,f) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Regnier, D; Schunck, N; Verriere, M

    2016-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically using the time dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in tw...

  9. Decay heat and anti-neutrino energy spectra in fission fragments from total absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-10-01

    Decay studies of over forty 238U fission products have been studied using ORNL's Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer. The results are showing increased decay heat values, by 10% to 50%, and the energy spectra of anti-neutrinos shifted towards lower energies. The latter effect is resulting in a reduced number of anti-neutrinos interacting with matter, often by tens of percent per fission product. The results for several studied nuclei will be presented and their impact on decay heat pattern in power reactors and reactor anti-neutrino physics will be discussed.

  10. Simulation of neutron rich nuclei production through 239U fission at intermediates energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical part and some results obtained from a model realised for fission processes in wide range of mass-asymmetries are presented. The fission barriers are computed in a tridimensional configuration space using the Yukawa - plus - exponential macroscopic energies corrected within the Strutinsky procedure. It is assumed that channel probabilities are proportional with Gamow penetrabilities. The model is applied for the disintegration of the 239U in order to determine the relative yields for the production of neutron rich nuclei at diverse intermediate energies. (author)

  11. Odd–even effect in fragment angular momentum in low-energy fission of actinides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Tomar; R Tripathi; A Goswami

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative explanation for the odd–even effect on fragment angular momenta in the low-energy fission of actinides have been provided by taking into account the single particle spin of the odd proton at the fragment's scission point deformation in the case of odd- fragments along with the contribution from the population of angular momentum bearing collective vibrations of the fissioning nucleus at scission point. The calculated fragment angular momenta have been found to be in very good agreement with the experimental data for fragments in the mass number region of 130–140. The odd–even effect observed in the fragment angular momenta in the low-energy fission of actinides has been explained quantitatively for the first time.

  12. Effects of Fission Yield Data in the Calculation of Antineutrino Spectra for ^{235}U(n,fission) at Thermal and Fast Neutron Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonzogni, A A; McCutchan, E A; Johnson, T D; Dimitriou, P

    2016-04-01

    Fission yields form an integral part of the prediction of antineutrino spectra generated by nuclear reactors, but little attention has been paid to the quality and reliability of the data used in current calculations. Following a critical review of the thermal and fast ENDF/B-VII.1 ^{235}U fission yields, deficiencies are identified and improved yields are obtained, based on corrections of erroneous yields, consistency between decay and fission yield data, and updated isomeric ratios. These corrected yields are used to calculate antineutrino spectra using the summation method. An anomalous value for the thermal fission yield of ^{86}Ge generates an excess of antineutrinos at 5-7 MeV, a feature which is no longer present when the corrected yields are used. Thermal spectra calculated with two distinct fission yield libraries (corrected ENDF/B and JEFF) differ by up to 6% in the 0-7 MeV energy window, allowing for a basic estimate of the uncertainty involved in the fission yield component of summation calculations. Finally, the fast neutron antineutrino spectrum is calculated, which at the moment can only be obtained with the summation method and may be relevant for short baseline reactor experiments using highly enriched uranium fuel. PMID:27081973

  13. Effects of Fission Yield Data in the Calculation of Antineutrino Spectra for 235U (n ,fission) at Thermal and Fast Neutron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonzogni, A. A.; McCutchan, E. A.; Johnson, T. D.; Dimitriou, P.

    2016-04-01

    Fission yields form an integral part of the prediction of antineutrino spectra generated by nuclear reactors, but little attention has been paid to the quality and reliability of the data used in current calculations. Following a critical review of the thermal and fast ENDF/B-VII.1 235U 235 fission yields, deficiencies are identified and improved yields are obtained, based on corrections of erroneous yields, consistency between decay and fission yield data, and updated isomeric ratios. These corrected yields are used to calculate antineutrino spectra using the summation method. An anomalous value for the thermal fission yield of 86Ge generates an excess of antineutrinos at 5-7 MeV, a feature which is no longer present when the corrected yields are used. Thermal spectra calculated with two distinct fission yield libraries (corrected ENDF/B and JEFF) differ by up to 6% in the 0-7 MeV energy window, allowing for a basic estimate of the uncertainty involved in the fission yield component of summation calculations. Finally, the fast neutron antineutrino spectrum is calculated, which at the moment can only be obtained with the summation method and may be relevant for short baseline reactor experiments using highly enriched uranium fuel.

  14. Effects of Fission Yield Data in the Calculation of Antineutrino Spectra for ^{235}U(n,fission) at Thermal and Fast Neutron Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonzogni, A A; McCutchan, E A; Johnson, T D; Dimitriou, P

    2016-04-01

    Fission yields form an integral part of the prediction of antineutrino spectra generated by nuclear reactors, but little attention has been paid to the quality and reliability of the data used in current calculations. Following a critical review of the thermal and fast ENDF/B-VII.1 ^{235}U fission yields, deficiencies are identified and improved yields are obtained, based on corrections of erroneous yields, consistency between decay and fission yield data, and updated isomeric ratios. These corrected yields are used to calculate antineutrino spectra using the summation method. An anomalous value for the thermal fission yield of ^{86}Ge generates an excess of antineutrinos at 5-7 MeV, a feature which is no longer present when the corrected yields are used. Thermal spectra calculated with two distinct fission yield libraries (corrected ENDF/B and JEFF) differ by up to 6% in the 0-7 MeV energy window, allowing for a basic estimate of the uncertainty involved in the fission yield component of summation calculations. Finally, the fast neutron antineutrino spectrum is calculated, which at the moment can only be obtained with the summation method and may be relevant for short baseline reactor experiments using highly enriched uranium fuel.

  15. Advances in Development of the Fission Product Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JAck D. Law

    2007-09-01

    The Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) Process is being developed as part of the United States Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative for the simultaneous separation of cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. Separation of the Cs and Sr will reduce the short-term heat load in a geological repository, and when combined with the separation of americium (Am) and curium (Cm), could increase the capacity of the geological repository by a factor of approximately 100. The FPEX process is based on two highly specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-Di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. Results of flowsheet testing of the FPEX process with a simulated feed solution in 3.3-cm centrifugal contactors are detailed. Removal efficiencies, distribution coefficient data, coextraction of metals, and process hydrodynamic performance are discussed along with recommendations for future flowsheet testing with actual spent nuclear fuel.

  16. Theory and applications of the fission matrix method for continuous-energy Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The fission matrix method is implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. • Eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of power distributions are shown and studied. • Source convergence acceleration is demonstrated for a fuel storage vault problem. • Forward flux eigenmodes and relative uncertainties are shown for a reactor problem. • Eigenmodes expansions are performed during source convergence for a reactor problem. - Abstract: The fission matrix method can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode fission distribution, the dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode forward and adjoint eigenfunctions of the fission distribution. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of power method iterations and to provide basis functions for higher-order perturbation theory. The higher-mode fission sources can be used to determine higher-mode forward fluxes and tallies, and work is underway to provide higher-mode adjoint-weighted fluxes and tallies. These aspects of the method are here both theoretically justified and demonstrated, and then used to investigate fundamental properties of the transport equation for a continuous-energy physics treatment. Implementation into the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code is also discussed, including a sparse representation of the fission matrix, which permits much larger and more accurate representations. Properties of the calculated eigenvalue spectrum of a 2D PWR problem are discussed: for a fine enough mesh and a sufficient degree of sampling, the spectrum both converges and has a negligible imaginary component. Calculation of the fundamental mode of the fission matrix for a fuel storage vault problem shows how convergence can be accelerated by over a factor of ten given a flat initial distribution. Forward fluxes and the relative uncertainties for a 2D PWR are shown, both of which qualitatively agree with expectation. Lastly, eigenmode expansions are performed during source convergence of the 2D PWR

  17. Excitation Functions of Fusion and Fission for 32S+170Er at Energies Near and Below Coulomb Barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO; Peng-fei; LIN; Cheng-jian; YANG; Feng; JIA; Hui-ming; XU; Xin-xing; YANG; Lei; SUN; Li-jie; MA; Nan-ru; ZHANG; Huan-qiao; LIU; Zu-hua

    2013-01-01

    Excitation functions of fusion evaporation residue(ER)and fission for 32S+170Er system at near barrier energy region were measured,respectively.With the comparison to the calculations of coupledchannels effects,it is accessible to investigate the impacts on the fusion and fission processes of target deformation and the dependence on the entrance-channel.The experiment was performed at Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator.Fission and fusion evaporation

  18. Yield-Energy Evaluation of 85Kr of 239Pu+n Fission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The yields of 85Kr, the important production of the 239Pu fission, were re-evaluated over the incident neutron energy 1-15 MeV, based upon all the experimental data. The yields as function of energ

  19. Systematics of Proton-Induced Fission Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Prokofiev, A V; Wilson, W B

    2002-01-01

    The recent systematics of proton-induced fission cross sections is extended to a wider range of target nuclei and incident energies. Reasonable agreement with available experimental data is demonstrated. The extended systematics is employed to generate a data library for use in the CINDER'90 transmutation inventory code.

  20. Theoretical and experimental studies of the neutron rich fission product yields at intermediate energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Äystö J.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new method to measure the fission product independent yields employing the ion guide technique and a Penning trap as a precision mass filter, which allows an unambiguous identification of the nuclides is presented. The method was used to determine the independent yields in the proton-induced fission of 232Th and 238U at 25 MeV. The data were analyzed with the consistent model for description of the fission product formation cross section at the projectile energies up to 100 MeV. Pre-compound nucleon emission is described with the two-component exciton model using Monte Carlo method. Decay of excited compound nuclei is treated within time-dependent statistical model with inclusion of the nuclear friction effect. The charge distribution of the primary fragment isobaric chain was considered as a result of frozen quantal fluctuations of the isovector nuclear density. The theoretical predictions of the independent fission product cross sections are used for normalization of the measured fission product isotopic distributions.

  1. XEUS: Exploratory Energy Utilization Systemic s for Fission Fusion Hybrid Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World energy outlook requires environmental friendliness, sustain ability and improved economic feasibility. The Exploratory Energy Utilization Systemic s (XEUS) is being developed at the Seoul National University (SNU) to satisfy these demands. Generation IV (Gen IV) and fusion reactors are considered as candidates for the primary system. Battery Omnibus Reactor Integral System (BORIS) is a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor which is one of the Gen IV concepts. Fusion Engineering Lifetime Integral Explorer (FELIX) is a fusion demonstration reactor for power generation. These two concepts are considered as dominant options for future nuclear energy source from the environmental, commercial and nonproliferation points of view. XEUS may as well be applied to the fusion-fission hybrid system. The system code is being developed to analyze the steady state and transient behavior of the primary system. Compact and high efficiency heat exchangers are designed in the Loop Energy Exchanger Integral System (LEXIS). Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System (MOBIS) incorporates a Brayton cycle with supercritical fluid to achieve high power conversion ratio. The high volumetric energy density of the Brayton cycle enables designers to reduce the size and eventually the cost of the system when compared with that of the Rankine cycle. MOBIS is home to heat exchangers and turbo machineries. The advanced shell-and-tube or printed circuit heat exchanger is considered as heat transfer components to reduce size of the system. The supercritical fluid driven turbines and compressor are designed to achieve higher component efficiency. Thermo hydrodynamic characteristics of each component in MOBIS are demonstrated utilizing computational fluid dynamics software CFXR. Another key contributor to the reduction of capital costs per unit energy has to do with manufacturing and assembly processes that streamline plant construction by minimizing construction work and time. In a three

  2. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote

  3. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote

  4. Overview of research by the fission group in Trombay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Chourdhury

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear fission studies in Trombay began nearly six decades ago, with the commissioning of the APSARA research reactor. Early experimental work was based on mass, kinetic energy distributions, neutron and X-ray emission in thermal neutron fission of 235U, which were carried out with indigenously developed detectors and electronics instrumentation. With the commissioning of CIRUS reactor and the availability of higher neutron flux, advanced experiments were carried out on ternary fission, pre-scission neutron emission, fragment charge distributions, quarternary fission, etc. In the late eighties, heavy-ion beams from the pelletron-based medium energy heavy-ion accelerator were available, which provided a rich variety of possibilities in nuclear fission studies. Pioneering work on fragment angular distributions, fission time-scales, transfer-induced fission, -ray multiplicities and mass–energy correlations were carried out, providing important information on the dynamics of the fission process. More recently, work on fission fragment -ray spectroscopy has been initiated, to understand the nuclear structure aspects of the neutron-rich fission fragment nuclei. There have also been parallel efforts to carry out theoretical studies in the areas of shell effects, superheavy nuclei, fusion–fission dynamics, fragment angular distributions, etc. to complement the experimental studies. This paper will provide a glimpse of the work carried out by the fission group at Trombay in the above-mentioned topics.

  5. Investigating the fission process at high excitation energies through proton induced reactions on 181Ta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradela C.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have investigated total fission cross section of 181Ta+1H at FRS (FRagment Separator -GSI at 1, 0.8, 0.5 and 0.3 GeV with an specific setup, providing high accuracy measurements of the cross section values. We compare the results obtained in this experiment, with several calculations performed with the intra-nuclear cascade model (INCL v4.1 coupled to de-excitation code (ABLAv3p, according to two different models describing fission process at high-excitation energies: statistical model of Bohr and Wheeler and the dynamical description of the fission process. The comparison with data of previous experiments is also discussed in order to address the existing discrepancies with this new results.

  6. A new facility for high-energy neutron-induced fission studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokofiev, A.V. [The Svedberg Lab., Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)]|[V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Pomp, S.; Bergenwall, B.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Mermod, P.; Oesterlund, M.; Blomgren, J. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Tippawan, U. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)]|[Fast Neutron Research Facility, Chiang Mai Univ., Chiang Mai (Thailand); Dangtip, S. [Fast Neutron Research Facility, Chiang Mai Univ., Chiang Mai (Thailand); Einarsson, L. [The Svedberg Lab., Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Gavrikov, Yu.A.; Kotov, A.A.; Vaishnene, L.A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., Gatchina, Leningrad District (Russian Federation); Germann, T. [Univ. of Konstanz, Konstanz (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    A new facility is constructed for measurements of neutron-induced fission cross-sections in the 20-180 MeV energy region versus the np scattering cross-section, which is adopted as the primary neutron standard. The advantage of the experiment compared to earlier studies is that the fission-fragment detection and the neutron-flux measurement via np scattering are performed simultaneously and at the same position in the beam, and, therefore, many sources of systematic errors cancel out. Further reduction of systematic errors is achieved due to ''embedded'' determination of effective solid angle of particle detectors using {alpha}-particles from the radioactive decay of the target nuclei. The performance of the facility is illustrated by first data obtained for angular distributions of fission fragments in the {sup 238}U(n,f) reaction. (orig.)

  7. Fission excitation function for 19F + 194,196,198Pt at near and above barrier energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Varinderjit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fission excitation functions for 19F + 194,196,198Pt reactions populating 213,215,217Fr compound nuclei are reported. Out of these three compound nuclei, 213Fr is a shell closed (N=126 compound nucleus and the other two are away from the shell closure. From a comparison of the experimental fission cross-sections with the statistical model predictions, it is observed that the fission cross-sections are underestimated by the statistical model predictions using shell corrected finite range rotating liquid drop model (FRLDM fission barriers. Further the FRLDM fission barriers are reduced to fit the fission cross-sections over the entire measured energy range.

  8. Advanced Performance Hydraulic Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Bruce, Allan; Lam, Adrienne S.

    2013-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, has developed a novel advanced hydraulic wind energy design, which has up to 23% performance improvement over conventional wind turbine and conventional hydraulic wind energy systems with 5 m/sec winds. It also has significant cost advantages with levelized costs equal to coal (after carbon tax rebate). The design is equally applicable to tidal energy systems and has passed preliminary laboratory proof-of-performance tests, as funded by the Department of Energy.

  9. Advanced energy efficient windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    2007-01-01

    energy savings. In terms of energy, windows occupy a special position compared with other thermal envelope structures due to their many functions: 1) windows let daylight into the building and provide occupants with visual contact with their surroundings 2) windows protect against the outdoor climate 3......Windows should be paid special attention as they contribute a significant part of the total heat-loss coefficient of the building. Contrary to other parts of the thermal envelope the windows are not only heat loosers, but may gain heat in the day-time. Therefore there are possibilities for large......) windows transmit solar energy that may contribute to a reduction of energy consumption, but which may also lead to unpleasant overheating. In the following paragraphs the current use of windows is reviewed with an emphasis on energy, while special products like solar protection glazing and security...

  10. FITPULS: a code for obtaining analytic fits to aggregate fission-product decay-energy spectra. [In FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBauve, R.J.; George, D.C.; England, T.R.

    1980-03-01

    The operation and input to the FITPULS code, recently updated to utilize interactive graphics, are described. The code is designed to retrieve data from a library containing aggregate fine-group spectra (150 energy groups) from fission products, collapse the data to few groups (up to 25), and fit the resulting spectra along the cooling time axis with a linear combination of exponential functions. Also given in this report are useful results for aggregate gamma and beta spectra from the decay of fission products released from /sup 235/U irradiated with a pulse (10/sup -4/ s irradiation time) of thermal neutrons. These fits are given in 22 energy groups that are the first 22 groups of the LASL 25-group decay-energy group structure, and the data are expressed both as MeV per fission second and particles per fission second; these pulse functions are readily folded into finite fission histories. 65 figures, 11 tables.

  11. Influence of complete energy sorting on the characteristics of the odd-even effect in fission-fragment element distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Jurado, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of the odd-even effect in fission-fragment Z distributions are compared to a model based on statistical mechanics. Special care is taken for using a consistent description for the influence of pairing correlations on the nuclear level density. The variation of the odd-even effect with the mass of the fissioning nucleus and with fission asymmetry is explained by the important statistical weight of configurations where the light nascent fission fragment populates the lowest energy state of an even-even nucleus. This implies that entropy drives excitation energy and unpaired nucleons predominantly to the heavy fragment. Therefore, within our model, the odd-even effect appears as an additional signature of the recently discovered energy-sorting process in nuclear fission.

  12. On the role of energy separated in fission process, excitation energy and reaction channels effects in the isomeric ratios of fission product 135Xe in photofission of actinide elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiep, Tran Duc; An, Truong Thi; Cuong, Phan Viet; Vinh, Nguyen The; Mishinski, G. V.; Zhemenik, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we present the isomeric ratio of fission product 135Xe in the photo-fission of actinide elements 232Th, 233U and 237Np induced by end-point bremsstrahlung energies of 13.5, 23.5 and 25.0 MeV which were determined by the method of inert gaseous flow. The data were analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar data from literature to examine the role of energy separated in fission process, excitation energy and reaction channels effects.

  13. Advanced energy efficient windows

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    2007-01-01

    Windows should be paid special attention as they contribute a significant part of the total heat-loss coefficient of the building. Contrary to other parts of the thermal envelope the windows are not only heat loosers, but may gain heat in the day-time. Therefore there are possibilities for large energy savings. In terms of energy, windows occupy a special position compared with other thermal envelope structures due to their many functions: 1) windows let daylight into the building and provide...

  14. Unfolding the fission prompt gamma-ray energy and multiplicity distribution measured by DANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J; Laptev, A

    2010-10-16

    The nearly energy independence of the {gamma}-ray efficiency and multiplicity response for the DANCE array, the unusual characteristic elucidated in our early technical report (LLNL-TR-452298), gives one a unique opportunity to derive the true prompt {gamma}-ray energy and multiplicity distribution in fission from the measurement. This unfolding procedure for the experimental data will be described in details and examples will be given to demonstrate the feasibility of reconstruction of the true distribution.

  15. Unfolding the fission prompt γ-ray energy and multiplicity distribution measured by DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nearly energy independence of the γ-ray efficiency and multiplicity response for the DANCE array, the unusual characteristic elucidated in our early technical report (LLNL-TR-452298), gives one a unique opportunity to derive the true prompt γ-ray energy and multiplicity distribution in fission from the measurement. This unfolding procedure for the experimental data will be described in details and examples will be given to demonstrate the feasibility of reconstruction of the true distribution.

  16. Advanced materials for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Li, Feng; Ma, Lai-Peng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2010-02-23

    Popularization of portable electronics and electric vehicles worldwide stimulates the development of energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors, toward higher power density and energy density, which significantly depends upon the advancement of new materials used in these devices. Moreover, energy storage materials play a key role in efficient, clean, and versatile use of energy, and are crucial for the exploitation of renewable energy. Therefore, energy storage materials cover a wide range of materials and have been receiving intensive attention from research and development to industrialization. In this Review, firstly a general introduction is given to several typical energy storage systems, including thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic, hydrogen, and electrochemical energy storage. Then the current status of high-performance hydrogen storage materials for on-board applications and electrochemical energy storage materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors is introduced in detail. The strategies for developing these advanced energy storage materials, including nanostructuring, nano-/microcombination, hybridization, pore-structure control, configuration design, surface modification, and composition optimization, are discussed. Finally, the future trends and prospects in the development of advanced energy storage materials are highlighted.

  17. Theory of neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a summary of the observables in neutron emission in fission, a brief history is given of theoretical representations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum N(E) and average prompt neutron multiplicity bar νp. This is followed by descriptions, together with examples, of modern approaches to the calculation of these quantities including recent advancements. Emphasis will be placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the modern approaches. In particular, the dependence of N(E) and bar νp on the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy will be discussed, as will the effects of and competition between first-, second- and third-chance fission in circumstances of high excitation energy. Finally, properties of neutron-rich (fission-fragment) nuclei are discussed that must be better known to calculate N(E) and bar νp with higher accuracy than is currently possible

  18. Seminar on Fission VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, Cyriel; Wagemans, Jan; D'Hondt, Pierre

    2008-04-01

    Topical reviews. Angular momentum in fission / F. Gönnenwein ... [et al.]. The processes of fusion-fission and quasi-fission of heavy and super-heavy nuclei / M. G. Itkis ... [et al.] -- Fission cross sections and fragment properties. Minor-actinides fission cross sections and fission fragment mass yields via the surrogate reaction technique / B. Jurado ... [et al.]. Proton-induced fission on actinide nuclei at medium energy / S. Isaev ... [et al.]. Fission cross sections of minor actinides and application in transmutation studies / A. Letourneau ... [et al.]. Systematics on even-odd effects in fission fragments yields: comparison between symmetric and asymmetric splits / F. Rejmund, M Caamano. Measurement of kinetic energy distributions, mass and isotopic yields in the heavy fission products region at Lohengrin / A. Bail ... [et al.] -- Ternary fission. On the Ternary [symbol] spectrum in [symbol]Cf(sf) / M. Mutterer ... [et al.]. Energy degrader technique for light-charged particle spectroscopy at LOHENGRIN / A. Oberstedt, S. Oberstedt, D. Rochman. Ternary fission of Cf isotopes / S. Vermote ... [et al.]. Systematics of the triton and alpha particle emission in ternary fission / C. Wagemans, S. Vermote, O. Serot -- Neutron emission in fission. Scission neutron emission in fission / F.-J. Hambsch ... [et al.]. At and beyond the Scission point: what can we learn from Scission and prompt neutrons? / P. Talou. Fission prompt neutron and gamma multiplicity by statistical decay of fragments / S. Perez-Martin, S. Hilaire, E. Bauge -- Fission theory. Structure and fission properties of actinides with the Gogny force / H. Goutte ... [et al.]. Fission fragment properties from a microscopic approach / N. Dubray, H. Goutte, J.-P. Delaroche. Smoker and non-smoker neutron-induced fission rates / I. Korneev ... [et al.] -- Facilities and detectors. A novel 2v2E spectrometer in Manchester: new development in identification of fission fragments / I. Tsekhanovich ... [et al

  19. Fission rates measured using high-energy gamma-rays from short half-life fission products in fresh and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, higher discharge burn-ups and initial fuel enrichments have led to more and more heterogeneous core configurations in light water reactors (LWRs), especially at the beginning of cycle when fresh fuel assemblies are loaded next to highly burnt ones. As this trend is expected to continue in the future, the Paul Scherrer Institute has, in collaboration with the Swiss Association of Nuclear Utilities, swissnuclear, launched the experimental programme LIFE(at)PROTEUS. The LIFE(at)PROTEUS programme aims to better characterise interfaces between burnt and fresh UO2 fuel assemblies in modern LWRs. Thereby, a novel experimental database is to be made available for enabling the validation of neutronics calculations of strongly heterogeneous LWR core configurations. During the programme, mixed fresh and highly burnt UO2 fuel lattices will be investigated in the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. One of the main types of investigations will be to irradiate the fuel in PROTEUS and measure the resulting fission rate distributions across the interface between fresh and burnt fuel zones. The measurement of fission rates in burnt fuel re-irradiated in a zero-power reactor requires, however, the development of new experimental techniques which are able to discriminate against the high intrinsic activity of the fuel. The principal goal of the present research work has been to develop such a new measurement technique. The selected approach is based on the detection of high-energy gamma-ray lines above the intrinsic background (i.e. above 2200 keV), which are emitted by short-lived fission products freshly created in the fuel. The fission products 88Kr, 142La, 138Cs, 84Br, 89Rb, 95Y, 90mRb and 90Rb, with half-lives between 2.6 min and 2.8 h, have been identified as potential candidates. During the present research work, the gamma-ray activity of short-lived fission products has, for the first time, been measured and quantitatively evaluated for re-irradiated burnt UO

  20. The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

    2008-12-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission

  1. A physical description of fission product behavior fuels for advanced power reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganas, G.; Rest, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Florida International Univ.

    2007-10-18

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is considering a list of reactors and nuclear fuels as part of its chartered initiative. Because many of the candidate materials have not been explored experimentally under the conditions of interest, and in order to economize on program costs, analytical support in the form of combined first principle and mechanistic modeling is highly desirable. The present work is a compilation of mechanistic models developed in order to describe the fission product behavior of irradiated nuclear fuel. The mechanistic nature of the model development allows for the possibility of describing a range of nuclear fuels under varying operating conditions. Key sources include the FASTGRASS code with an application to UO{sub 2} power reactor fuel and the Dispersion Analysis Research Tool (DART ) with an application to uranium-silicide and uranium-molybdenum research reactor fuel. Described behavior mechanisms are divided into subdivisions treating fundamental materials processes under normal operation as well as the effect of transient heating conditions on these processes. Model topics discussed include intra- and intergranular gas-atom and bubble diffusion, bubble nucleation and growth, gas-atom re-solution, fuel swelling and ?scion gas release. In addition, the effect of an evolving microstructure on these processes (e.g., irradiation-induced recrystallization) is considered. The uranium-alloy fuel, U-xPu-Zr, is investigated and behavior mechanisms are proposed for swelling in the {alpha}-, intermediate- and {gamma}-uranium zones of this fuel. The work reviews the FASTGRASS kinetic/mechanistic description of volatile ?scion products and, separately, the basis for the DART calculation of bubble behavior in amorphous fuels. Development areas and applications for physical nuclear fuel models are identified.

  2. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    CERN Document Server

    Yanez, R; King, J; Barrett, J S; Fotiades, N; Lee, H Y

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. (To calibrate the apparatus, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the OSU TRIGA reactor). The TKE decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to 161.4 MeV for $E_{n}$=2-90 MeV. The standard deviation of the TKE distribution is constant from $E_{n}$=20-90 MeV. Comparison of the data with the multi-modal fission model of Brosa indicates the TKE decrease is a consequence of the growth of symmetric fission and the corresponding decrease of asymmetric fission with increasing neutron energy. The average TKE associated with the Brosa superlong, standard I and standard II modes for a given mass is independent of neutron energy.

  3. Measurement of the energy spectra of fission fragments using nuclear track detectors and digital image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy spectra of fission fragments were determined using a Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM) supported by digital image analysis and numerical data processing using a standard personal computer. The analysis of a californium (252Cf) spectrum with this approach shows improvement compared with the values reported previously using the standard procedure, in terms of resolution and accuracy. This new method adds full automation to the technical advantages and cost effectiveness of an NTM.

  4. Double-energy double-velocity measurement system for fission fragments and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new system of double-energy double-velocity (DEDV) measurement for fission fragments has been developed. In this system, the energies of fission fragments are measured by silicon surface barrier detectors (SSB) and the velocities by the time-of-flight (TOF) method utilizing thin film detectors (TFD) as start detectors and SSBs as stop detectors of TOF. Theoretical and experimental studies on TFDs and SSBs have been performed before the construction of the DEDV measurement system. The TFD consists of a thin plastic scintillator film and light guide. The author proposes a new model of the luminescence production in a scintillator film. This model takes into account the thickness of the scintillator film and uses only one parameter. The calculated TFD response to charged particles shows good agreement with other experiments. The dependence of the TFD response to the thickness of the scintillator film has been studied experimentally and analyzed by the luminescence production model. The results of this analysis shows the validity of the luminescence production model. The time resolution of the DEDV measurement system using TFDs and SSBs was 133 ps. As an application of this system, the DEDV measurement for the thermal neutron-induced fission of 233U has been carried out at the super mirror neutron guide tube facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). The energy and velocity of each fission fragment have been stored on magnetic disk event by event in a list mode. The analyzed results of masses, energies and velocities of light and heavy fragments agree well with other authors' works. The value of the total neutron emission number is 2.53 and shows good agreement within experimental error, with the JENDL-2 value, 2.49. The light fragment shows a slightly greater number of neutrons emitted than the other works. This suggests the possibility of larger deformation of light fragments at the scission point. (author)

  5. Prompt Fission Gamma-ray Studies at DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Keksis, A. L.; Mosby, S. M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Stoyer, M. A.; Haslett, R. J.; Henderson, R. A.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.

    Measurements of correlated data on prompt-fission γ-rays (PFG) have been carried out for various actinide isotopes in recent years using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have developed a model that conveniently parametrizes the correlated data of γ-ray multiplicity and energy. New results on two- dimensional prompt-fission γ-ray multiplicity versus energy distributions from spontaneous fission on 252Cf and neutron-induced fission on 242mAm are presented together with previously obtained results on 233,235U and 239Pu. Correlated PFG data from 252Cf are also compared to results of the detailed theoretical model developed at LANL, for different thresholds of PFG energies. Future plans to measure correlated data on fission fragments, prompt fission neutrons and γ-rays at DANCE are presented.

  6. Study of Relationship Between Neutron Energy and Fission Yields of 95Zr, 140Ba and 147Nd From 235U

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This work measures fission yields of 235U induced by neutrons with energy of thermal, 3.0, 5.0, 5.5, 8.0 and 14.8 MeV. The main purpose is to study the relationship between neutron energy and fission fields of 95Zr,140Ba and 147Nd from 235U by measuring the radioactivity of foil with direct gamma spectrometry. The fission yields induced by fast neutrons are get by fast-thermal-ratio method which based on yields from thermal neutrons, yields by thermal neutron are come from absolute measurement. Since fast-thermal-ratio method eliminates uncertainties of gamma intensity, gamma

  7. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    CERN Document Server

    Yanez, R; King, J; Barrett, J S; Fotiades, N; Lee, H Y

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. To benchmark the TKE measurement, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor, giving pre-neutron emission $E^*_{TKE}=170.7\\pm0.4$ MeV in good agreement with known values. Our measurements are thus absolute measurements. The TKE in $^{235}$U(n,f) decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to 161.4 MeV for $E_{n}$=2-90 MeV. Comparison of the data with the multi-modal fission model of Brosa indicates the TKE decrease is a consequence of the growth of symmetric fission and the corresponding decrease of asymmetric fission with increasing neutron energy. The average TKE associated with the Brosa superlong, standard I and standard II ...

  8. Fission 2009 4. International Workshop on Nuclear Fission and Fission Product Spectroscopy - Compilation of slides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference is dedicated to the last achievements in experimental and theoretical aspects of the nuclear fission process. The topics include: mass, charge and energy distribution, dynamical aspect of the fission process, nuclear data evaluation, quasi-fission and fission lifetime in super heavy elements, fission fragment spectroscopy, cross-section and fission barrier, and neutron and gamma emission. This document gathers the program of the conference and the slides of the presentations

  9. Total fission cross section of {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb induced by protons at relativistic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Schmidt, K. H. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Jurado, B. [Universite Bordeaux I, CNRS/IN2 P3, CENBG, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Kelic-Heil, A. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Pol, H. A. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ricciardi, M. V.; Pleskac, R. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Enqvist, T. [CUPP Project, P.O. Box 22, FI-86801, Pyhsalmi (Finland); Rejmund, F. [Grand Accelerateur National D Ions Lourds, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Giot, L. [Subatech - Ecole des Mines de Nantes (France); Henzl, V. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77, Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lukic, S. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ngoc, S. N. [Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Inst. of Physics, National Centre for Natural Science and Technology, NgiaDo-TuLiem, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Boudard, A. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Leray, S. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Fernandez, M. [Entro de Investigaciones Energticas Medioambientales Y Tecnolgicas, Madrid (Spain); Kurtukian, T. [Universite Bordeaux I, CNRS/IN2 P3, CENBG, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Nadtochy, P. [Omsk State Univ., Dept. of Theoretical Physics, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation); Schmitt, C. [Grand Accelerateur National D' Ions Lourds, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Henzlova, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Safeguards Science and Technology Group N-1, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Paradela, C. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bacquias, A. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Loureiro, D. P. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Foehr, V. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, 64941, Darmstadt (Germany); Tarrio, D. [Group GENP, Dpto. Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Kezzar, K. [DSM/IRFU/CEA, 91191 Gif-sur-Ivette (France)

    2011-07-01

    Total fission cross section induced by protons in {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb at energies in the range of 300 to 1000 A MeV have been measured at GSI (Germany) using the inverse kinematics technique. A dedicated setup with high efficiency made it possible to determine these cross sections with high accuracy. The new data seed light in the controversial results obtained so far and contribute to the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energies. (authors)

  10. Effect of the fragment excitation energy distribution on the prompt fission neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of cascade emission of neutrons from a nucleus and of distribution of the initial excitation energy upon characteristics of the emission spectrum are studied. Calculations of the emission spectrum are made in the Weisskopf form in the constant temperature approximation. It has been elucidated that the cascade character of particle emission is not sufficient for the total spectrum to approach the maxwellian one. A dependence of the distorting function upon energy has been obtained. The calculation spectrum is compared with the experimental and with the Weisskopf spectra. A conclusion is drawn that the temperature dependence upon excitation energy is predominant in formation of a fission neutron spectrum

  11. Measurement of Fission Cross-Sections for Neutrons of Energies in the Range 40-500 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements have been made of the fission cross-section of U233, U234 , U236, Np237, Pu239 and Pu241 at several neutron energies between 40 keV and 500 keV. Measurements in this energy range are of importance in reactor calculations especially in fast dilute systems where the neutron flux is high in the 10- 100-keV energy range. Recent measurements at this laboratory of the U235 fission cross-section gave absolute values slightly lower than previous data. The present series of measurements are made relative to the new values of the U235 fission cross-section using back-to-back ionization chambers. The fissile foils were assayed by α-assay, direct weighing and coulometry. Good agreement was obtained between these assays. The fission measurements have an estimated accuracy of between 1 % and.2% and,combined with the, error on the U235 fission cross-section,give a final error of about 3% in the fission cross-sections. The present results together with those of previous measurements are given, and the corrections for fission- fragment absorption, backgrounds and scattering are discussed. (author)

  12. Ternary fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Balasubramaniam; K R Vijayaraghavan; C Karthikraj

    2015-09-01

    We present the ternary fission of 252Cf and 236U within a three-cluster model as well as in a level density approach. The competition between collinear and equatorial geometry is studied by calculating the ternary fragmentation potential as a function of the angle between the lines joining the stationary middle fragment and the two end fragments. The obtained results for the 16O accompanying ternary fission indicate that collinear configuration is preferred to equatorial configuration. Further, for all the possible third fragments, the potential energy surface (PES) is calculated corresponding to an arrangement in which the heaviest and the lightest fragments are considered at the end in a collinear configuration. The PES reveals several possible ternary modes including true ternary modes where the three fragments are of similar size. The complete mass distributions of Si and Ca which accompanied ternary fission of 236U is studied within a level density picture. The obtained results favour several possible ternary combinations.

  13. A Model for Fragment Mass-Versus-Energy Correlations in Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed investigation of the two-spheioid model of the scission configuration in fission, including the study of both the classical and quantum-mechanical properties of the system, is given. The most probable total fragment kinetic energy as a function of mass division is calculated from minimization of the total potential energy of the system. The root mean square width of the kinetic energy distribution is calculated from the quantum mechanical properties of the system. The local effective stiffness τ as a function of fragment mass m required for these calculations was obtained solely from correlated fragment kinetic energy measurements for thermal-neutron fission of 239Pu, 241Pu, and 235U, together with the minimum potential energy hypothesis. Strong shell effects in the function τ (m) were found to occur in the region of m ≅ 132, where Z ≅ 50, N ≅ 82; however, no shell effects seem to occur in the region of m es 83, where N ≅ 50. We may interpret this result to indicate that for N ≅ 50 proton-deficient nuclei, the ground-state well in the nuclear potential is relatively shallow, so that when these nuclei occur in fission they occur with distorted shapes outside the ground-state well, where the effective stiffness is reduced. Effective stiffnesses obtained for fragments of mass 82 ≤ m ≲ 112 are within ∼ 20% of the liquid-drop-model value. The stiffness parameters τ (m) are used together with minimization of the potential energy to calculate EK (m), the average total fragment kinetic energy as a function of mass. In all cases examined to date, the calculated and experimental energies agree to within about 3%. The root-mean-square width oEK; (m) of the total kinetic energy distribution as a function of fragment mass is determined from quantum-mechanical properties of the system. Normal modes of the system are derived, and a harmonic approximation to the potential is used. Calculated and measured widths agree within about 20% for a wide range

  14. A model for fragment mass-versus-energy correlations in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed investigation of the two-spheroid model of the scission configuration in fission, including the study of both the classical and quantum-mechanical properties of the system, is given. The most probable total fragment kinetic energy as a function of mass division is calculated from minimization of the total potential energy of the system. The root mean square width of the kinetic energy distribution is calculated from the quantum mechanical properties of the system. The local effective stiffness τ as a function of fragment mass m required for these calculations was obtained solely from correlated fragment kinetic energy measurements for thermal-neutron fission of 239Pu, 241Pu, and 235U, together with the minimum potential energy hypothesis. Strong shell effects in the function τ (m) were found to occur in the region of m ≅ 132, where Z ≅ 50, N ≅ 82; however, no shell effects seem to occur in the region of m ≅ 83, where N ≅ 50. We may interpret this result to indicate that for N = 50 proton-deficient nuclei, the ground-state well in the nuclear potential is relatively shallow, so that when these nuclei occur in fission they occur with distorted shapes outside the ground-state well, where the effective stiffness is reduced. Effective stiffnesses obtained for fragments of mass 82 ≤ m K (m), the average total fragment kinetic energy as a function of mass. In all cases examined to date, the calculated and experimental energies agree to within about 3%. The root-mean-square width σEK (m) of the total kinetic energy distribution as a function of fragment mass is determined from quantum-mechanical properties of the system. Normal modes of the system are derived, and a harmonic approximation to the potential is used. Calculated and measured widths agree within about 20% for a wide range of fissioning nuclei. Discussions of the sensitivity of these results to the stiffness parameters, to the nuclear vibrational mass parameter, and to nuclear

  15. Energy Storage (II): Developing Advanced Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Arthur L

    1974-01-01

    Energy storage, considered by some scientists to be the best technological and economic advancement after advanced nuclear power, still rates only modest funding for research concerning the development of advanced technologies. (PEB)

  16. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  17. Linear Free Energy Correlations for Fission Product Release from the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-03-03

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes, et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the source of the radionuclides to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form ln χ = -α (ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)+β were obtained between the deposited concentration and the reduction potential of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn(TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2130 K and 2220 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, 151Sm through atmospheric venting and releases during the first month following the accident were performed, and indicate large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  18. Linear free energy correlations for fission product release from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M

    2015-03-01

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the initial source of the radionuclides to the environment to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form In χ = −α ((ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)) + β were obtained between the deposited concentrations, and the reduction potentials of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn (TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2015 and 2060 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, and 151Sm through atmospheric venting during the first month following the accident were obtained, indicating that large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores. PMID:25675358

  19. Linear free energy correlations for fission product release from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M

    2015-03-01

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the initial source of the radionuclides to the environment to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form In χ = −α ((ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)) + β were obtained between the deposited concentrations, and the reduction potentials of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn (TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2015 and 2060 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, and 151Sm through atmospheric venting during the first month following the accident were obtained, indicating that large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  20. Fission of 255,256Es, 255-257Fm, and 258Md at moderate excitation energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Britt, H.C.; Hoffman, D.C.; Plicht, J. van der; Wilhelmy, J.; Cheifetz, E.; Dupzyk, R.J.; Lougheed, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The fission of 255,256Es, 255-257Fm, and 258Md has been studied in the excitation energy range from threshold to 25 MeV. A target of 254Es was used in the direct reaction studies; (d,pf), (t,pf), (3He,df), (3He,pf), and in the compound induced fission reactions formed with p, d, t, and α particle pr

  1. Fission Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  2. Development of technetium alloy waste forms for advanced nuclear energy cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program within the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy is charged with developing nuclear fuel cycle options that improve use of actinide resources, responsibly manage wastes, improve and limit proliferation risk. Technetium is a fission product of particular concern for disposal in a repository because of its high fission yield, long half-life, and high solubility and mobility in groundwater as pertechnetate. For example, modeling studies for the former Yucca Mountain repository site indicated that technetium would be an important dose contributor after closure of the repository, in the first 10,000 years. The FCT Program is investigating a range of potential repository environments for ultimate disposal of fission products including technetium from advanced nuclear fuel recycling schemes

  3. Energy-Dependent Boltzmann Equation with Fission and Slowing-Down Kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a study of the energy-dependent neutron transport equation, using Case's method of singular eigenfunctions and considering a continuous energy variable (rather than a multigroup scheme). Both fission and slowing-down kernels are included in the analysis. Under the assumption of simple cross-sections laws, and plane symmetry, a completeness theorem and the Green's function are found for-the infinite medium, for both isotropic and anisotropic scattering, using rather general assumptions as to the slowing-down kernels (including convolution kernels) and, only in the anisotropic case, the generalized Greuling-Goertzel kernel. The crux of the completeness theorem is the inversion and analysis of the spectral properties of a continuous operator which acts upon the energy variable, and depends parametrically upon a complex variable z (with analyticity in some cut complex plane). For half-space problems, the Wiener-Hopf factorization of such an operator is a remarkably difficult problem. However, it can be performed if, for the slowing-down kernel, the Greuling-Goertzel approximation generalized to all its anisotropic components is used, in which case the Wiener-Hopf factorization gives another convolution operator. In this approximation the Milne problem is solved, and a study is made of the extrapolation length. There is a discussion of the difficulties introduced by fission kernels, with emphasis on the coexistence of space-energy separable modes with slowing-down transient modes. (author)

  4. Calculation for fission decay from heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaich, T.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Fowler, M.M.; Wilhelmy, J.B. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Hansen, L.F.; Namboodiri, M.N.; Sangster, T.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Fraenkel, Z. (Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel))

    1992-02-01

    A detailed deexcitation calculation is presented for target residues resulting from intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions. The model involves an intranuclear cascade, subsequent fast nucleon emission, and final decay by statistical evaporation including fission. Results are compared to data from bombardments with Fe and Nb projectiles on targets of Ta, Au, and Th at 100 MeV/nucleon. The majority of observable features are reproduced with this simple approach, making obvious the need for involving new physical phenomena associated with multifragmentation or other collective dissipation mechanisms.

  5. Neutronic study of an innovative natural uranium–thorium based fusion–fission hybrid energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An innovative fusion-fission hybrid reactor blanket design is presented. • The blanket adopts seed–blanket concept to improve overall neutron economy. • The blanket is designed with two types of modules, i.e. uranium and thorium module. • The reactor could reach multi operating system purpose. - Abstract: An innovative design for a water cooled fusion–fission hybrid reactor (FFHR), aiming at efficiently utilizing natural uranium and thorium resources, is presented. The major objective is to study the feasibility of this concept balanced with multi-purposes, including energy gain, tritium breeding and 233U breeding. In order to improve overall neutron economy of the system, the fission blanket is designed with two types of modules, i.e. the natural uranium modules (U-modules) and thorium modules (Th-modules), which are alternately arranged in the toroidal and poloidal directions of the blanket. This innovative design is based on a simple intuition of neutron distribution: with the alternate geometrical arrangement, energy multiplication by uranium fission, tritium breeding and 233U breeding are performed separately in different sub-zones in the blanket. The uranium modules which has excellent neutron economy under the combined neutron spectrum, plays the dominant role in the energy production, neutron multiplication and tritium breeding. Excess neutrons produced by the uranium modules are then used to drive the thorium modules (which have poor neutron economy) to breed 233U fuel. Therefore, it creates a new free dimension to realize the blanket’s balanced design. The COUPLE code developed by INET of Tsinghua University is used to simulate the neutronic behavior in the blanket. The simulated results show that with the volumetric ratio of thorium modules about 0.4, the balanced design for multi purposes is achievable, with energy multiplication M ⩾ 9, tritium breeding ratio TBR ⩾ 1.05, and at the end of the five years refueling cycle

  6. Scale and innovation in the energy sector: a focus on photovoltaics and nuclear fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trancik, J. E.

    2006-10-01

    Energy technologies have a tendency to become locked in. Mature technologies are favoured due to their accumulated experience and low costs, preventing the entry of new competitors into the market. Public policies support technological evolution in the energy sector through research, development, demonstration and market transformation initiatives. These programmes can reduce CO2 emissions. Their scope, however, is limited by costs and therefore efficiency is critical. Based on a study of photovoltaics and nuclear fission, I show that the scale of an energy technology influences its responsiveness to policy interventions. Rapid innovation can be more effectively supported with limited funds for small scale technologies than for those restricted to the size of a large power plant. An energy infrastructure consisting of small scale technologies may more readily adapt to strict emissions regulations.

  7. Fission and fragmentation of silver and bromine nuclei by 1-6 GeV energy photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission and fragmentation of silver and bromine nuclei induced by bremsstrahlung photons in the maximum energy range of 1-6 GeV are studied. A special technique of nuclear emulsion for the highly ionizing nuclear fragment detection is used in the discrimination between nuclear fission and fragmentation events. Films of Ilford-KO nuclear emulsion (approximatelly 1020 atoms/cm2 of Ag, Br) which had been exposed to bremsstrahlung beams in 'Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron' (DESY, Hamburg) with total doses of approximatelly 1011 equivalent photons are used. Through a detailed analysis of range, angular and angle between fragment distributions, and empirical relations which permit to estimate nuclear fragment energy, range and velocity, the discrimination between fission and fragmentation events is made. Results related to fragment range distribution, angular distribution, distribution of angle between fragments, distribution of ratio between ranges, velocity distributions, forward/backward ratio, fission and fragmentation cross sections, nuclear fissionability and ternary fission frequency are presented and discussed. The results show that the mean photofragmentation cross section in the internal 1-6 GeV (0,09+-0,02mb) is significant when compared to the photofission (0,29+-0,05mb). It is also shown that the mean photofission cross section between 1 and 6 GeV is great by a factor of approximatelly 10 when compared to the foreseen by the cascade-evaporation nuclear model for monoenergetic photons of 0,6 GeV. (L.C.)

  8. Advanced Space Power Systems (ASPS): Advanced Energy Storage Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of high specific energy devices will enable NASA’s future robotic and human-exploration missions.  The need for advances in energy...

  9. $\\gamma$-ray energy spectra and multiplicities from the neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U using STEFF

    CERN Multimedia

    An experiment is proposed to use the STEFF spectrometer at n_TOF to study fragment $\\gamma$-correlations following the neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U. The STEFF array of 12 NaI detectors will allow measurements of the single $\\gamma$-energy, the $\\gamma$ multiplicity, and the summed $\\gamma$energy distributions as a function of the mass and charge split, and deduced excitation energy in the fission event. These data will be used to study the origin of fission-fragment angular momenta, examining angular distribution eects as a function of incident neutron energy. The principal application of this work is in meeting the NEA high-priority request for improved $\\gamma$ray data from $^{235}$U(n; F). To improve the detection rate and expand the range of detection angles, STEFF will be modied to include two new ssion-fragment detectors each at 45 to the beam direction.

  10. Advanced materials for clean energy

    CERN Document Server

    Xu (Kyo Jo), Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Arylamine-Based Photosensitizing Metal Complexes for Dye-Sensitized Solar CellsCheuk-Lam Ho and Wai-Yeung Wongp-Type Small Electron-Donating Molecules for Organic Heterojunction Solar CellsZhijun Ning and He TianInorganic Materials for Solar Cell ApplicationsYasutake ToyoshimaDevelopment of Thermoelectric Technology from Materials to GeneratorsRyoji Funahashi, Chunlei Wan, Feng Dang, Hiroaki Anno, Ryosuke O. Suzuki, Takeyuki Fujisaka, and Kunihito KoumotoPiezoelectric Materials for Energy HarvestingDeepam Maurya, Yongke Yan, and Shashank PriyaAdvanced Electrode Materials for Electrochemical Ca

  11. Nanocarbons for advanced energy storage

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Xinliang

    2015-01-01

    This first volume in the series on nanocarbons for advanced applications presents the latest achievements in the design, synthesis, characterization, and applications of these materials for electrochemical energy storage. The highly renowned series and volume editor, Xinliang Feng, has put together an internationally acclaimed expert team who covers nanocarbons such as carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, graphenes, and porous carbons. The first two parts focus on nanocarbon-based anode and cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, while the third part deals with carbon material-based supercapacit

  12. Fission neutron statistical emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The statistical model approach FINESSE (FIssion NEutronS' Statistical Emission) for the description of fission neutron multiplicities, energy spectra and angular distributions is described. Based on an extended Weisskopf ansatz and on a realistic temperature distribution it provides a fragment mass number dependent description of fission neutron data. Model parameters (optical potential, n/γ competition) were fixed on the basis of the 252Cf(sf) (nuclear data standard). Combined with a phenomenological fission model for predicting relevant fragment data as function of asymmetry. FINESSE can be applied to any fission reaction of actinides in the Th-Cf region without further parameter adjustment. Results are presented for 252Cf(sf) and neutron induced fission of 235U, 239Pu, 232Th. Effects of multiple-chance fission are discussed for 232Th(n,xnf) reacation. (author). 46 refs, 11 figs

  13. Fluctuations in Electronic Energy Affecting Singlet Fission Dynamics and Mixing with Charge-Transfer State: Quantum Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2016-02-01

    Singlet fission is a spin-allowed process by which a singlet excited state is converted to two triplet states. To understand mechanisms of the ultrafast fission via a charge transfer (CT) state, one has investigated the dynamics through quantum-dynamical calculations with the uncorrelated fluctuation model; however, the electronic states are expected to experience the same fluctuations induced by the surrounding molecules because the electronic structure of the triplet pair state is similar to that of the singlet state except for the spin configuration. Therefore, the fluctuations in the electronic energies could be correlated, and the 1D reaction coordinate model may adequately describe the fission dynamics. In this work we develop a model for describing the fission dynamics to explain the experimentally observed behaviors. We also explore impacts of fluctuations in the energy of the CT state on the fission dynamics and the mixing with the CT state. The overall behavior of the dynamics is insensitive to values of the reorganization energy associated with the transition from the singlet state to the CT state, although the coherent oscillation is affected by the fluctuations. This result indicates that the mixing with the CT state is rather robust under the fluctuations in the energy of the CT state as well as the high-lying CT state. PMID:26732701

  14. Cherenkov light detection as a velocity selector for uranium fission products at intermediate energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Enomoto, A.; Kouno, J.; Yamaki, S.; Matsunaga, S.; Suzaki, F.; Suzuki, T.; Abe, Y.; Nagae, D.; Okada, S.; Ozawa, A.; Saito, Y.; Sawahata, K.; Kitagawa, A.; Sato, S.

    2014-12-01

    The in-flight particle separation capability of intermediate-energy radioactive ion (RI) beams produced at a fragment separator can be improved with the Cherenkov light detection technique. The cone angle of Cherenkov light emission varies as a function of beam velocity. This can be exploited as a velocity selector for secondary beams. Using heavy ion beams available at the HIMAC synchrotron facility, the Cherenkov light angular distribution was measured for several thin radiators with high refractive indices (n = 1.9 ~ 2.1). A velocity resolution of ~10-3 was achieved for a 56Fe beam with an energy of 500 MeV/nucleon. Combined with the conventional rigidity selection technique coupled with energy-loss analysis, the present method will enable the efficient selection of an exotic species from huge amounts of various nuclides, such as uranium fission products at the BigRIPS fragment separator located at the RI Beam Factory.

  15. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources, part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.; Reupke, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    The role of nuclear fission reactors in becoming an important power source in the world is discussed. The supply of fissile nuclear fuel will be severely depleted by the year 2000. With breeder reactors the world supply of uranium could last thousands of years. However, breeder reactors have problems of a large radioactive inventory and an accident potential which could present an unacceptable hazard. Although breeder reactors afford a possible solution to the energy shortage, their ultimate role will depend on demonstrated safety and acceptable risks and environmental effects. Fusion power would also be a long range, essentially permanent, solution to the world's energy problem. Fusion appears to compare favorably with breeders in safety and environmental effects. Research comparing a controlled fusion reactor with the breeder reactor in solving our long range energy needs is discussed.

  16. Determination of the Spectral Index in the Fission Spectrum Energy Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Amy Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Neutron reaction cross sections play a vital role in tracking the production and destruction of isotopes exposed to neutron fluence. They are central to the process of reconciling the initial and final atom inventories. Measurements of irradiated samples by radiochemical methods in tangent with an algorithm are used to evaluate the fluence a sample is exposed to over the course of the irradiation. This algorithm is the Isotope Production Code (IPC) created and used by the radiochemistry data assessment team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An integral result is calculated by varying the total neutron fluence seen by a sample. A sample, irradiated in a critical assembly, will be exposed to a unique neutron flux defined by the neutron source and distance of the sample from the source. Neutron cross sections utilized are a function of the hardness of the neutron spectrum at the location of irradiation. A spectral index is used an indicator of the hardness of the neutron spectrum. Cross sections fit forms applied in IPC are collapsed from a LANL 30-group energy structure. Several decades of research and development have been performed to formalize the current IPC cross section library. Basis of the current fission spectrum neutron reaction cross section library is rooted in critical assembly experiments performed from the 1950’s through the early 1970’s at LANL. The focus of this report is development of the spectral index used an indicator of the hardness of the neutron spectrum in the fission spectrum energy regime.

  17. New antineutrino energy spectra predictions from the summation of beta decay branches of the fission products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallot, M; Cormon, S; Estienne, M; Algora, A; Bui, V M; Cucoanes, A; Elnimr, M; Giot, L; Jordan, D; Martino, J; Onillon, A; Porta, A; Pronost, G; Remoto, A; Taín, J L; Yermia, F; Zakari-Issoufou, A-A

    2012-11-16

    In this Letter, we study the impact of the inclusion of the recently measured beta decay properties of the (102;104;105;106;107)Tc, (105)Mo, and (101)Nb nuclei in an updated calculation of the antineutrino energy spectra of the four fissible isotopes (235,238)U and (239,241)Pu. These actinides are the main contributors to the fission processes in pressurized water reactors. The beta feeding probabilities of the above-mentioned Tc, Mo, and Nb isotopes have been found to play a major role in the γ component of the decay heat of (239)Pu, solving a large part of the γ discrepancy in the 4-3000 s range. They have been measured by using the total absorption technique, insensitive to the pandemonium effect. The calculations are performed by using the information available nowadays in the nuclear databases, summing all the contributions of the beta decay branches of the fission products. Our results provide a new prediction of the antineutrino energy spectra of (235)U, (239,241)Pu, and, in particular, (238)U for which no measurement has been published yet. We conclude that new total absorption technique measurements are mandatory to improve the reliability of the predicted spectra.

  18. New antineutrino energy spectra predictions from the summation of beta decay branches of the fission products

    CERN Document Server

    Fallot, M; Estienne, M; Algora, A; Bui, V M; Cucoanes, A; Elnimr, M; Giot, L; Jordan, D; Martino, J; Onillon, A; Porta, A; Pronost, G; Taín, J L; Yermia, F; Zakari-Issoufou, A -A

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the impact of the inclusion of the recently measured beta decay properties of the $^{102;104;105;106;107}$Tc, $^{105}$Mo, and $^{101}$Nb nuclei in an updated calculation of the antineutrino energy spectra of the four fissible isotopes $^{235, 238}$U, and $^{239,241}$Pu. These actinides are the main contributors to the fission processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. The beta feeding probabilities of the above-mentioned Tc, Mo and Nb isotopes have been found to play a major role in the $\\gamma$ component of the decay heat of $^{239}$Pu, solving a large part of the $\\gamma$ discrepancy in the 4 to 3000\\,s range. They have been measured using the Total Absorption Technique (TAS), avoiding the Pandemonium effect. The calculations are performed using the information available nowadays in the nuclear databases, summing all the contributions of the beta decay branches of the fission products. Our results provide a new prediction of the antineutrino energy spectra of $^{235}$U, $^{239,241}$Pu ...

  19. To fission or not to fission

    CERN Document Server

    Pomorski, Krzysztof; Ivanyuk, Fedir A

    2016-01-01

    The fission-fragments mass-yield of 236U is obtained by an approximate solution of the eigenvalue problem of the collective Hamiltonian that describes the dynamics of the fission process whose degrees of freedom are: the fission (elongation), the neck and the mass-asymmetry mode. The macroscopic-microscopic method is used to evaluate the potential energy surface. The macroscopic energy part is calculated using the liquid drop model and the microscopic corrections are obtained using the Woods-Saxon single-particle levels. The four dimensional modified Cassini ovals shape parametrization is used to describe the shape of the fissioning nucleus. The mass tensor is taken within the cranking-type approximation. The final fragment mass distribution is obtained by weighting the adiabatic density distribution in the collective space with the neck-dependent fission probability. The neck degree of freedom is found to play a significant role in determining that final fragment mass distribution.

  20. Reaction 48Ca+208Pb: the capture-fission cross-sections and the mass-energy distributions of fragments above and deep below the Coulomb barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Prokhorova, E. V.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Itkis, M.G.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Pashkevich, V. V.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Rusanov, A. Ya.

    2003-01-01

    The capture-fission cross-sections in an energy range of 206-242 MeV of 48Ca-projectiles and mass-energy distributions (MEDs) of reaction products in an energy range of 211-242 MeV have been measured in the 48Ca+208Pb reaction using the double-arm time-of-flight spectrometer CORSET. The MEDs of fragments for heated fission were shown to consist of two components. One component, which is due to classical fusion-fission, is associated with the symmetric fission of the 256No compound nucleus. Th...

  1. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  2. Density Functional Theory Approach to Nuclear Fission

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, N

    2012-01-01

    The Skyrme nuclear energy density functional theory (DFT) is used to model neutron-induced fission in actinides. This paper focuses on the numerical implementation of the theory. In particular, it reports recent advances in DFT code development on leadership class computers, and presents a detailed analysis of the numerical accuracy of DFT solvers for near-scission calculations.

  3. EPRI Asilomar papers: on the possibility of advanced fuel fusion reactors, fusion-fission hybrid breeders, small fusion power reactors, Asilomar, California, December 15--17, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An EPRI Ad Hoc Panel met in Asilomar, California for a three day general discussion of topics of particular interest to utility representatives. The three main topics considered were: (1) the possibility of advanced fuel fusion reactors, (2) fusion-fission hybrid breeders, and (3) small fusion power reactors. The report describes the ideas that evolved on these three topics. An example of a ''neutron less'' fusion reactor using the p-11B fuel cycle is described along with the critical questions that need to be addressed. The importance to the utility industry of using fusion neutrons to breed fission fuel for LWRs is outlined and directions for future EPRI research on fusion-fission systems are recommended. The desirability of small fusion power reactors to enable the early commercialization of fusion and for satisfying users' needs is discussed. Areas for possible EPRI research to help achieve this goal are presented

  4. Neutron multiplicity for neutron induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu as a function of neutron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent development in the theory and practice of neutron correlation (''coincidence'') counting require knowledge of the higher factorial moments of the P/sub ν/ distribution (the probability that (ν) neutrons are emitted in a fission) for the case where the fission is induced by bombarding neutrons of more than thermal energies. In contrast to the situation with spontaneous and thermal neutron induced fission, where with a few exceptions the P/sub ν/ is reasonably well known, in the fast neutron energy region, almost no information is available concerning the multiplicity beyond the average value, [ν], even for the most important nuclides. The reason for this is the difficulty of such experiments, with consequent statistically poor and physically inconsistent results

  5. Energy dependence of the neutron multiplicity P/sub nu/ in fast neutron induced fission of /sup 235,238/U and 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain applications require knowledge of the higher moments of the neutron multiplicity probability. It can be shown that the second factorial moment is proportional to the fission rate in the sample, and that the third factorial moment can be of use in disentangling spontaneous fission from induced fission. Using a source of unpublished work in which neutron multiplicities were derived for the fast neutron induced fission of U-235, U-238, and Pu-239, the multiplicity probability has been calculated as a function of neutron energy for the energy range 0 to 10 MeV

  6. Signatures of special nuclear material: High-energy gamma rays following fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.; Larimer, Ruth-Mary; Shugart, Howard; Browne, Edgardo; Smith, Alan R.; McDonald, Rchard J.; Nitsche, Heino; Gupta, Puja; Frank, Michael I.; Gosnell, Thomas B.

    2003-05-29

    Since September 11, 2001, much effort has been devoted to the development of new and improved means for the detection and prevention of the clandestine transport of special nuclear material (SNM, i.e. {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu) and other materials for producing weapons of mass destruction. In a recent Brief Communication, Borozdin et al. showed that cosmic-ray muons could be used to image dense objects inside containers. Here we describe a method for unequivocally identifying SNM in large seagoing containers. Our method is based on the fact that neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu is followed by {beta} decays of short-lived fission fragments during which large numbers of high-energy {gamma} rays (above 3000 keV) are emitted. These {gamma} rays have energies above those of natural {gamma} background, are emitted with significantly greater intensity per fission than {beta}-delayed neutrons, have much higher probabilities of escaping hydrogenous cargo loadings than neutrons, and their energy spectra and time dependencies provide a unique signature of SNM. To demonstrate the main properties of high-energy delayed {gamma} rays, we produced neutrons by bombarding a 1-inch thick water-cooled Be target with 16-MeV deuterons from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Neutrons were moderated using steel and polyethylene. We employed a pneumatic transfer system to shuttle targets from the irradiation location inside the polyethylene moderator to a remote shielded counting station. We irradiated {sup 235}U (93% isotopic content), {sup 239}Pu (95% isotopic content), wood, polyethylene, aluminum, sandstone, and steel targets for 30 seconds (in a thermal-neutron flux of 1.5 x 10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2}-sec) and acquired 10 sequential {gamma}-ray spectra, each of 3 sec. duration starting 3 sec. after the end of bombardment. We used an 80% relative efficiency coaxial germanium detector and a 30-cm x 30-cm x 10-cm plastic scintillator to detect

  7. Coincident measurements of prompt fission γ rays and fission fragments at DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. L.; Baramsai, B.; Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J.; Kawano, T.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.

    2015-10-01

    Modern statistical approaches to modeling fission involve the calculation of not only average quantities but also fully correlated distributions of all fission products. Applications such as those involving the detection of special nuclear materials also rely on fully correlated data of fission products. Experimental measurements of correlated data are thus critical to the validation of theory and the development of important applications. The goal of this experiment was to measure properties of prompt fission gamma-ray emission as a function of fission fragments' total kinetic energy in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The measurement was carried out at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE), a 4 π γ-ray calorimeter. A prototype design consisting of two silicon detectors was installed in the center of DANCE, allowing simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and γ rays. Effort has been taken to simulate fragment kinetic energy losses as well as γ-ray attenuation in DANCE using such tools as GEANT4 and SRIM. Theoretical predictions generated by the code CGMF were also incorporated as input for these simulations. Results from the experiment and simulations will be presented, along with plans for future measurements.

  8. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Carter, D; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J

    2010-11-06

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 BF{sub 2} crystals with equal solid-angle coverage. DANCE is a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter and designed to study the neutron-capture reactions on small quantities of radioactive and rare stable nuclei. These reactions are important for the radiochemistry applications and modeling the element production in stars. The recognition of capture event is made by the summed {gamma}-ray energy which is equivalent of the reaction Q-value and unique for a given capture reaction. For a selective group of actinides, where the neutron-induced fission reaction competes favorably with the neutron capture reaction, additional signature is needed to distinguish between fission and capture {gamma} rays for the DANCE measurement. This can be accomplished by introducing a detector system to tag fission fragments and thus establish a unique signature for the fission event. Once this system is implemented, one has the opportunity to study not only the capture but also fission reactions. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to {alpha} particles, which is important for experiments with {alpha}-emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. A PPAC with an ingenious design was fabricated in 2006 by integrating amplifiers into the target assembly. However, this counter was proved to be unsuitable for this application because of issues related to the stability of amplifiers and the ability to separate fission fragments from {alpha}'s. Therefore, a new design is needed. A LLNL proposal to develop a new PPAC for DANCE was funded by NA22 in FY09. The design goal is to minimize the mass for the proposed

  9. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 BF2 crystals with equal solid-angle coverage. DANCE is a 4π γ-ray calorimeter and designed to study the neutron-capture reactions on small quantities of radioactive and rare stable nuclei. These reactions are important for the radiochemistry applications and modeling the element production in stars. The recognition of capture event is made by the summed γ-ray energy which is equivalent of the reaction Q-value and unique for a given capture reaction. For a selective group of actinides, where the neutron-induced fission reaction competes favorably with the neutron capture reaction, additional signature is needed to distinguish between fission and capture γ rays for the DANCE measurement. This can be accomplished by introducing a detector system to tag fission fragments and thus establish a unique signature for the fission event. Once this system is implemented, one has the opportunity to study not only the capture but also fission reactions. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to α particles, which is important for experiments with α-emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. A PPAC with an ingenious design was fabricated in 2006 by integrating amplifiers into the target assembly. However, this counter was proved to be unsuitable for this application because of issues related to the stability of amplifiers and the ability to separate fission fragments from α's. Therefore, a new design is needed. A LLNL proposal to develop a new PPAC for DANCE was funded by NA22 in FY09. The design goal is to minimize the mass for the proposed counter and still be able to maintain a stable

  10. Brownian shape motion on five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces:nuclear fission-fragment mass distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randrup, Jørgen; Möller, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Although nuclear fission can be understood qualitatively as an evolution of the nuclear shape, a quantitative description has proven to be very elusive. In particular, until now, there existed no model with demonstrated predictive power for the fission-fragment mass yields. Exploiting the expected strongly damped character of nuclear dynamics, we treat the nuclear shape evolution in analogy with Brownian motion and perform random walks on five-dimensional fission potential-energy surfaces which were calculated previously and are the most comprehensive available. Test applications give good reproduction of highly variable experimental mass yields. This novel general approach requires only a single new global parameter, namely, the critical neck size at which the mass split is frozen in, and the results are remarkably insensitive to its specific value.

  11. Multiplicity and energy of neutrons from {sup 233}U(n{sub th},f) fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Kimura, Itsuro; Nakagome, Yoshihiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The correlation between fission fragments and prompt neutrons from the reaction {sup 233}U(n{sub th},f) was measured with improved accuracy. The results determined the neutron multiplicity and emission energy as a function of fragment mass and total kinetic energy. The average energy as a function of fragment mass followed a nearly symmetric distribution centered about the equal mass-split and formed a remarkable contrast with the saw-tooth distribution of the average neutron multiplicity. The neutron multiplicity from the specified fragment decreases linearly with total kinetic energy, and the slope of multiplicity with kinetic energy had the minimum value at about 130 u. The level density parameter versus mass determined from the neutron data showed a saw-tooth structure with the pronounced minimum at about 128 and generally followed the formula by Gilbert and Cameron, suggesting that the neutron emission process was very much affected by the shell-effect of the fission fragment. (author)

  12. Fission of intermediate mass nuclei by photons of stopping radiation in the maximum energy range 0,8 - 1,8 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fission of intermediate mass nuclei in Al - Ta interval, induced by stopping radiation phtons of maximum energies between 0,8 and 1.8 GeV is studied. Nd and Sm thin targets and Al, Ti, Co, Zr, Nb, Ag, In and Ta thick targets were used, considering all peculiarities inherent to absorption of fission fragments in the target. The samples were exposed into the 2.5 GeV Electron Synchrotron in Bonn Univerity. The fission fragment tracks were registered in foil type detectors using mica muscovite for Sm and Nd, CR-39 for Al and Ti and makrofol for Co, Zr; Nb, Ag, In, Nd and Ta. The track length and track depth angle distributions were measured for determining fission efficiencies. The fission cross sections and nuclear fissionable of the studied elements were evaluated. (M.C.K.)

  13. Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 233U and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 Mev En 20 MeV @ n_TOF

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, F; Milazzo, P M; Calviani, M; Colonna, N; Mastinu, P; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Álvarez, H; Álvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, P; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvár, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapiço, C; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; González-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Igashira, M; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Koehler, P; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lampoudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mengoni, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vazl, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2011-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides have been recently measured at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN in the frame of a research project involving isotopes relevant for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear technologies. Fission fragments are detected by a gas counter with good discrimination between nuclear fission products and background events. Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 233U and 243Am were determined relative to 235U. The present paper reports the results obtained at neutron energies between 0.5 and 20 MeV.

  14. Microstructural Characterization of a Mg Matrix U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plate Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to High Fission Density: SEM Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam B.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Madden, James W.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2016-06-01

    Low-enriched (U-235 reactors. In most cases, fuel plates with Al or Al-Si alloy matrices have been tested in the Advanced Test Reactor to support this development. In addition, fuel plates with Mg as the matrix have also been tested. The benefit of using Mg as the matrix is that it potentially will not chemically interact with the U-Mo fuel particles during fabrication or irradiation, whereas with Al and Al-Si alloys such interactions will occur. Fuel plate R9R010 is a Mg matrix fuel plate that was aggressively irradiated in ATR. This fuel plate was irradiated as part of the RERTR-8 experiment at high temperature, high fission rate, and high power, up to high fission density. This paper describes the results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of an irradiated fuel plate using polished samples and those produced with a focused ion beam. A follow-up paper will discuss the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Using SEM, it was observed that even at very aggressive irradiation conditions, negligible chemical interaction occurred between the irradiated U-7Mo fuel particles and Mg matrix; no interconnection of fission gas bubbles from fuel particle to fuel particle was observed; the interconnected fission gas bubbles that were observed in the irradiated U-7Mo particles resulted in some transport of solid fission products to the U-7Mo/Mg interface; the presence of microstructural pathways in some U-9.1 Mo particles that could allow for transport of fission gases did not result in the apparent presence of large porosity at the U-7Mo/Mg interface; and, the Mg-Al interaction layers that were present at the Mg matrix/Al 6061 cladding interface exhibited good radiation stability, i.e. no large pores.

  15. Uranium and Plutonium Average Prompt-fission Neutron Energy Spectra (PFNS) from the Analysis of NTS NUEX Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestone, J. P.; Shores, E. F.

    2014-05-01

    In neutron experiments (NUEX) conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by Los Alamos National Laboratory, the time-of-flight of fission-neutrons emitted from nuclear tests were observed by measuring the current generated by the collection of protons scattered from a thin CH2 foil many meters from the nuclear device into a Faraday cup. The time dependence of the Faraday cup current is a measure of the energy spectrum of the neutrons that leak from the device. With good device models and accurate neutron-transport codes, the leakage spectra can be converted into prompt fast-neutron-induced fission-neutron energy spectra. This has been done for two events containing plutonium, and for an earlier event containing uranium. The prompt-fission neutron spectra have been inferred for 1.5-MeV 239Pu(n,f) and 235U(n,f) reactions for outgoing neutron energies from 1.5 to ∼10.5 MeV, in 1-MeV steps. These spectra are in good agreement with the Los Alamos fission model.

  16. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  17. ND:GLASS LASER DESIGN FOR LASER ICF FISSION ENERGY (LIFE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caird, J A; Agrawal, V; Bayramian, A; Beach, R; Britten, J; Chen, D; Cross, R; Ebbers, C; Erlandson, A; Feit, M; Freitas, B; Ghosh, C; Haefner, C; Homoelle, D; Ladran, T; Latkowski, J; Molander, W; Murray, J; Rubenchik, S; Schaffers, K; Siders, C W; Stappaerts, E; Sutton, S; Telford, S; Trenholme, J; Barty, C J

    2008-10-28

    We have developed preliminary conceptual laser system designs for the Laser ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) Fission Energy (LIFE) application. Our approach leverages experience in high-energy Nd:glass laser technology developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), along with high-energy-class diode-pumped solid-state laser (HEC-DPSSL) technology developed for the DOE's High Average Power Laser (HAPL) Program and embodied in LLNL's Mercury laser system. We present laser system designs suitable for both indirect-drive, hot spot ignition and indirect-drive, fast ignition targets. Main amplifiers for both systems use laser-diode-pumped Nd:glass slabs oriented at Brewster's angle, as in NIF, but the slabs are much thinner to allow for cooling by high-velocity helium gas as in the Mercury laser system. We also describe a plan to mass-produce pump-diode lasers to bring diode costs down to the order of $0.01 per Watt of peak output power, as needed to make the LIFE application economically attractive.

  18. Microscopic description of fission in neutron-rich plutonium isotopes with the Gogny-D1M energy density functional

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Guzman, R

    2014-01-01

    The most recent parametrization D1M of the Gogny energy density functional is used to describe fission in the isotopes $^{232-280}$ Pu. We resort to the methodology introduced in our previous studies [Phys. Rev. C \\textbf{88}, 054325 (2013) and Phys. Rev. C \\textbf {89}, 054310 (2014)] to compute the fission paths, collective masses and zero point quantum corrections within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework. The systematics of the spontaneous fission half-lives t$_{SF}$, masses and charges of the fragments in Plutonium isotopes is analyzed and compared with available experimental data. We also pay attention to isomeric states, the deformation properties of the fragments as well as to the competition between the spontaneous fission and $\\alpha$-decay modes. The impact of pairing correlations on the predicted t$_{SF}$ values is demonstrated with the help of calculations for $^{232-280}$Pu in which the pairing strengths of the Gogny-D1M energy density functional are modified by 5 $\\%$ and 10 $\\%$, respective...

  19. Measurements of high-energy neutron-induced fission ofnatPb and 209Bi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couture A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The CERN Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n_TOF facility is well suited to measure low cross sections as those of neutron-induced fission in subactinides. The cross section ratios of natPb and 209Bi relative to 235U and 238U were measured using PPAC detectors and a fragment coincidence method that allows us to identify the fission events. The present experiment provides first results for neutron-induced fission up to 1 GeV. Good agreement is found with previous experimental data below 200 MeV. The comparison with proton-induced fission indicates that the limiting regime where neutron-induced and proton-induced fission reach equal cross sections is close to 1 GeV.

  20. High-energy Neutron-induced Fission Cross Sections of Natural Lead and Bismuth-209

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrio, D; Carrapico, C; Eleftheriadis, C; Leeb, H; Calvino, F; Herrera-Martinez, A; Savvidis, I; Vlachoudis, V; Haas, B; Koehler, P; Vannini, G; Oshima, M; Le Naour, C; Gramegna, F; Wiescher, M; Pigni, M T; Audouin, L; Mengoni, A; Quesada, J; Becvar, F; Plag, R; Cennini, P; Mosconi, M; Rauscher, T; Couture, A; Capote, R; Sarchiapone, L; Vlastou, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dillmann, I; Pavlopoulos, P; Karamanis, D; Krticka, M; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Martinez, T; Trubert, D; Oberhummer, H; Karadimos, D; Plompen, A; Isaev, S; Terlizzi, R; Cortes, G; Cox, J; Cano-Ott, D; Pretel, C; Colonna, N; Berthoumieux, E; Vaz, P; Heil, M; Lopes, I; Lampoudis, C; Walter, S; Calviani, M; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Embid-Segura, M; Stephan, C; Igashira, M; Papachristodoulou, C; Aerts, G; Tavora, L; Berthier, B; Rudolf, G; Andrzejewski, J; Villamarin, D; Ferreira-Marques, R; Tain, J L; O'Brien, S; Reifarth, R; Kadi, Y; Neves, F; Poch, A; Kerveno, M; Rubbia, C; Lazano, M; Dahlfors, M; Wisshak, K; Salgado, J; Dridi, W; Ventura, A; Andriamonje, S; Assimakopoulos, P; Santos, C; Voss, F; Ferrant, L; Patronis, N; Chiaveri, E; Guerrero, C; Perrot, L; Vicente, M C; Lindote, A; Praena, J; Baumann, P; Kappeler, F; Rullhusen, P; Furman, W; David, S; Marrone, S; Tassan-Got, L; Gunsig, F; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Tagliente, G; Haight, R; Chepel, V; Kossionides, E; Badurek, G; Marganiec, J; Lukic, S; Pavlik, A; Goncalves, I; Duran, I; Alvarez, H; Abbondanno, U; Fujii, K; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n\\_TOF) facility is well suited to measure small neutron-induced fission cross sections, as those of subactinides. The cross section ratios of (nat)Pb and (209)Bi relative to (235)U and (238)U were measured using PPAC detectors. The fragment coincidence method allows to unambiguously identify the fission events. The present experiment provides the first results for neutron-induced fission up to 1 GeV for (nat)Pb and (209)Bi. A good agreement with previous experimental data below 200 MeV is shown. The comparison with proton-induced fission indicates that the limiting regime where neutron-induced and proton-induced fission reach equal cross section is close to 1 GeV.

  1. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-05-12

    In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

  2. Advancement of reprocessing technology. The forefront of the actinides/fission products separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject which is important for building the future back end process of nuclear fuel is the better compatibility of the sharp rise of economic efficiency with global environmental conditions, taking up the fuel cycle system for fast reactors as the object. Wet reprocessing PUREX process is excellent in its reliability and safety, but from the viewpoint of economic efficiency and the load on waste disposal, same pointing-out has been done. In high level waste liquid, trace minor actinides and large amount of Na salt are the problems. As the advancement of PUREX process, the research on the reduction of Na waste liquid is reported. As for the recent improvement, emphasis has been placed on the control of the behavior of Np, Tc and Pt family. As the wet type actinide separation process, transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process is the relatively new, powerful solvent extraction process. Its development is described. By using the real waste liquid generated by the PUREX test of the spent fuel from fast reactors, the multi-stage, opposite flow extraction test on bench scale has been carried out at the hot cell of Chemical Processing Facility. The separation of actinides using macrocyclic compounds is reported. (K.I.)

  3. NEUTRON CROSS SECTION EVALUATIONS OF FISSION PRODUCTS BELOW THE FAST ENERGY REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OH,S.Y.; CHANG,J.; MUGHABGHAB,S.

    2000-05-11

    Neutron cross section evaluations of the fission-product isotopes, {sup 95}Mo, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 101}Ru, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 105}Pd, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 131}Xe, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 141}Pr, {sup 141}Nd, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 153}Eu, {sup 155}Gd, and {sup 157}Gd were carried out below the fast neutron energy region within the framework of the BNL-KAERI international collaboration. In the thermal energy region, the energy dependence of the various cross-sections was calculated by applying the multi-level Breit-Wigner formalism. In particular, the strong energy dependence of the coherent scattering lengths of {sup 155}Gd and {sup 157}Gd were determined and were compared with recent calculations of Lynn and Seeger. In the resonance region, the recommended resonance parameters, reported in the BNL compilation, were updated by considering resonance parameter information published in the literature since 1981. The s-wave and, if available, p-wave reduced neutron widths were analyzed in terms of the Porter-Thomas distribution to determine the average level spacings and the neutron strength functions. Average radiative widths were also calculated from measured values of resolved energy resonances. The average resonance parameters determined in this study were compared with those in the BNL and other compilations, as well as the ENDF/B-VI, JEF-2.2, and JENDL-3.2 data libraries. The unresolved capture cross sections of these isotopes, computed with the determined average resonance parameters, were compared with measurements, as well as the ENDF/B-VI evaluations. To achieve agreement with the measurements, in a few cases minor adjustments in the average resonance parameters were made. Because of astrophysical interest, the Maxwellian capture cross sections of these nuclides at a neutron temperature of 30 keV were computed and were compared with other compilations and evaluations.

  4. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. Purpose: We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective mass parameters. Methods: The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures has to incorporate the reflection above barriers. Results: Our results of spontaneous fission rates reasonably agree with other studies and experiments. The temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures have been discussed. The temperature dependent behaviors of mass parameters have also been discussed. The thermal fission rates from low to high temperatures with a smooth connection have been given by different approaches. Conclusions: Since the temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures, and the mass parameters can vary rapidly for different nuclei, the microscopic descriptions of thermal fission rates are very valuable. Our studies without free parameters provide a consistent picture to study various fissions such as that in fast-neutron reactors, astrophysical environments, and fusion reactions for superheavy nuclei.

  5. Microscopic description of fission in neutron-rich plutonium isotopes with the Gogny-D1M energy density functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Guzman, R. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, Texas (United States); Rice University, Department of Chemistry, Houston, Texas (United States); Robledo, L.M. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    The most recent parametrization D1M of the Gogny energy density functional is used to describe fission in the isotopes {sup 232-280}Pu. We resort to the methodology introduced in our previous studies (Phys. Rev. C 88, 054325 (2013) and Phys. Rev. C 89, 054310 (2014)) to compute the fission paths, collective masses and zero point quantum corrections within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework. The systematics of the spontaneous fission half-lives t{sub SF}, masses and charges of the fragments in plutonium isotopes is analyzed and compared with available experimental data. We also pay attention to isomeric states, the deformation properties of the fragments as well as to the competition between the spontaneous fission and α-decay modes. The impact of pairing correlations on the predicted t{sub SF} values is demonstrated with the help of calculations for {sup 232-280}Pu, in which the pairing strengths of the Gogny-D1M energy density functional are modified by 5% and 10%, respectively. We further validate the use of the D1M parametrization through the discussion of the half-lives in {sup 242-262}Fm. Our calculations corroborate that, though the uncertainties in the absolute values of physical observables are large, the Gogny-D1M Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework still reproduces the trends with mass and/or neutron numbers and therefore represents a reasonable starting point to describe fission in heavy nuclear systems from a microscopic point of view. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of Neutron Induced and Spontaneous Fission in Pu-242 at DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyzh, Andrii; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R.; Couture, A.; Lee, H. Y.; Ullmann, J.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Jandel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Dance Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Neutron capture and fission reactions are important in nuclear engineering and physics. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Measurement, LANL) combined with PPAC (avalanche technique based fission tagging detector, LLNL) were used to study neutron induced and spontaneous fission in 242Pu. 2 measurements were performed in 2013. The first experiment was done without the incident neutron beam with the fission tagging ability to study γ-rays emitted in the spontaneous fission of 242Pu. The second one - with the neutron beam to measure both the neutron capture and fission reactions. This is the first direct measurement of prompt fission γ-rays in 242Pu. The γ-ray multiplicity, γ-ray energy, and total energy of γ-rays per fission in 242Pu will be presented. These distributions of the 242Pu spontaneous fission will be compared to those in the 241Pu neutron induced fission. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Detecting special nuclear materials in containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.

    2007-10-02

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a container. The system and its method include irradiating the container with an energetic beam, so as to induce a fission in the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  8. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  9. Energy Dependence of Neutron-Induced Fission Product Yields of 235U, 238U and 239Pu Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, Matthew; Tornow, Werner; Tonchev, Anton; Vieira, Dave; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Arnold, Charles; Fowler, Malcolm; Stoyer, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Under a joint collaboration between TUNL-LANL-LLNL, a set of absolute fission product yield measurements have been performed. The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission products between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV have been measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combination of activation utilizing specially designed dual-fission chambers and γ-ray counting. The dual-fission chambers are back-to-back ionization chambers encasing a target with thin deposits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurement of the fission rate in the activation target with no reference to the fission cross-section, reducing uncertainties. γ-ray counting was performed on well-shield HPGe detectors over a period of 2 months per activation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 4.6 and 14.8 MeV.

  10. Neutron Induced Fission Measurements of ^242mAm at DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyzh, A.; Wu, C. Y.; Macri, R. A.; Agvaanlusan, U.; Parker, W. E.; Wilk, P. A.; Becker, J. A.; Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2010-11-01

    Neutron capture and fission reactions on actinieds often present challenges in measuring each of the reaction. Fission tagging detector used along with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) provides a way to measure (n,f) and (n,γ) reactions simultaneously. DANCE was used to measure ^242mAm(n,f) reaction along with a custom made fission-tagging parallel plate avalanche counter (PPAC). The results on fission related γ-ray multiplicity distribution, the ^242mAm(n,f) cross section, and the average γ-ray energy distribution are presented.

  11. Interpretation of the low energy fission process in the framework of dinuclear system conception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, V. V.; Kalandarov, Sh. A.

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of the interpretation of fission of heavy nuclei as the process of formation, evolution and decay of dinuclear system is discussed. The interpretation is based on the nuclear interaction data obtained in heavy-ion nuclear physics investigations.

  12. Molten Salt Fuel Version of Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R W; Shaw, H F; Caro, A; Kaufman, L; Latkowski, J F; Powers, J; Turchi, P A

    2008-10-24

    Molten salt with dissolved uranium is being considered for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) fission blanket as a backup in case a solid-fuel version cannot meet the performance objectives, for example because of radiation damage of the solid materials. Molten salt is not damaged by radiation and therefore could likely achieve the desired high burnup (>99%) of heavy atoms of {sup 238}U. A perceived disadvantage is the possibility that the circulating molten salt could lend itself to misuse (proliferation) by making separation of fissile material easier than for the solid-fuel case. The molten salt composition being considered is the eutectic mixture of 73 mol% LiF and 27 mol% UF{sub 4}, whose melting point is 490 C. The use of {sup 232}Th as a fuel is also being studied. ({sup 232}Th does not produce Pu under neutron irradiation.) The temperature of the molten salt would be {approx}550 C at the inlet (60 C above the solidus temperature) and {approx}650 C at the outlet. Mixtures of U and Th are being considered. To minimize corrosion of structural materials, the molten salt would also contain a small amount ({approx}1 mol%) of UF{sub 3}. The same beryllium neutron multiplier could be used as in the solid fuel case; alternatively, a liquid lithium or liquid lead multiplier could be used. Insuring that the solubility of Pu{sup 3+} in the melt is not exceeded is a design criterion. To mitigate corrosion of the steel, a refractory coating such as tungsten similar to the first wall facing the fusion source is suggested in the high-neutron-flux regions; and in low-neutron-flux regions, including the piping and heat exchangers, a nickel alloy, Hastelloy, would be used. These material choices parallel those made for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at ORNL. The nuclear performance is better than the solid fuel case. At the beginning of life, the tritium breeding ratio is unity and the plutonium plus {sup 233}U production rate is {approx}0

  13. Small Scale Indigenous Molybdenum-99 Production Using LEU Fission at Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission [Country report: Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of the activities carried out in the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) under CRP Nº 13358 “Small Scale Indigenous Molybdenum-99 Production Using LEU Fission” started in October 2005 to November 2011. The object of the project was to develop the basic infrastructure and to establish the conditions to obtain fission molybdenum-99 (99Mo) by neutron irradiation of uranium-235 (235U) targets in RECH-1 reactor located in Santiago, Chile

  14. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 1: Solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The utilization of solar energy to meet the energy needs of the U.S. is discussed. Topics discussed include: availability of solar energy, solar energy collectors, heating for houses and buildings, solar water heater, electric power generation, and ocean thermal power.

  15. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Office Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-27

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Office Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  16. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  17. Fuels for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuels for advanced nuclear reactors differ greatly from conventional light water reactor fuels and vary widely between the different concepts, due differences in reactor architecture and deployment. Functional requirements of all fuel designs include (1) retention of fission products and fuel nuclides, (2) dimensional stability, and (3) maintaining a coolable geometry. In all cases, the anticipated fuel performance under normal or off-normal conditions is the limiting factor in reactor system design, and cumulative effects of increased exposure to higher burnup degrades fuel performance. In high-temperature (thermal) gas reactor systems, fuel particles of uranium dioxide or uranium oxycarbide particles are coated with layers of carbon and SiC (or ZrC). Such fuels have been used successfully to very high burnup (10-20% of heavy-metal atoms) and can withstand transient temperatures up to 1600 C. Oxide (pellet-type) and metal (pin-type) fuels clad in stainless steel tubes have been successfully used in liquid metal cooled fast reactors, attaining burnup of 20% or more of heavy-metal atoms. Those fuel designs are being adapted for actinide management missions, requiring greater contents of minor actinides (e.g. Am, Np, Cm). The current status of each fuel system is reviewed and technical challenges confronting the implementation of each fuel in the context of the entire advanced reactor fuel cycle (fabrication, reactor performance, recycle) are discussed

  18. Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kostelnik

    2005-09-01

    The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

  19. Monte-Carlo simulation for fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions from neutron induced fission of 235U

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya, M; Rojas, J

    2007-01-01

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron induced fission of 235U have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening on the standard deviation of the final fragment kinetic energy distribution $\\sigma_{e}(m)$ around the mass number m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125, that is in agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. These results are consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the variation in the primary fragment mean kinetic energy and the yield as a function of the mass.

  20. Spectroscopy of heavy fissionable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Tandel

    2015-09-01

    Structural studies of heavy nuclei are quite challenging due to increased competition from fission, particularly at high spins. Nuclei in the actinide region exhibit a variety of interesting phenomena. Recent advances in instrumentation and analysis techniques have made feasible sensitive measurements of nuclei populated with quite low cross-sections. These include isomers and rotational band structures in isotopes of Pu ( = 94) to Rf ( = 104), and octupole correlations in the Th ( = 90) region. The obtained experimental data have provided insights on various aspects like moments of inertia and nucleon alignments at high spins, quasiparticle energies and evolution of quadrupole and octupole collectivity, among others. An overview of some of these results is presented.

  1. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  2. Fission energy program of the U.S. Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document describes programs managed by the Program Director for Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy, and under the cognizance of the Committee on Science and Technology, United States House of Representatives. The major portion of the document is concerned with civilian nuclear power development, the policy for which has been established by the National Energy Plan of April 1977, but it also includes descriptions of the space applications and naval reactor programs

  3. Excitation energy dependence of fragment-mass distributions from fission of 180,190Hg formed in fusion reactions of 36Ar + 144,154Sm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nishio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass distributions of fission fragments from the compound nuclei 180Hg and 190Hg formed in fusion reactions 36Ar + 144Sm and 36Ar + 154Sm, respectively, were measured at initial excitation energies of E⁎(Hg180=33–66 MeV and E⁎(Hg190=48–71 MeV. In the fission of 180Hg, the mass spectra were well reproduced by assuming only an asymmetric-mass division, with most probable light and heavy fragment masses A¯L/A¯H=79/101. The mass asymmetry for 180Hg agrees well with that obtained in the low-energy β+/EC-delayed fission of 180Tl, from our earlier ISOLDE(CERN experiment. Fission of 190Hg is found to proceed in a similar way, delivering the mass asymmetry of A¯L/A¯H=83/107, throughout the measured excitation energy range. The persistence as a function of excitation energy of the mass-asymmetric fission for both proton-rich Hg isotopes gives strong evidence for the survival of microscopic effects up to effective excitation energies of compound nuclei as high as 40 MeV. This behavior is different from fission of actinide nuclei and heavier mercury isotope 198Hg.

  4. Determination of Fission Product Yields of 235U, 238U and 239Pu for Neutron Energies from 0.5 to 14.8 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, Matthew; Arnold, Charles; Becker, John; Bhatia, Chitra; Bhike, Megha; Fowler, Malcolm; Howell, Calvin; Kelley, John; Stoyer, Mark; Tonchev, Anton; Tornow, Werner; Vieira, Dave; Wilhelmy, Jerry

    2014-03-01

    A joint TUNL-LANL-LLNL collaboration has been formed to study the issue of possible energy dependences for certain fission product isotopes. Work has been carried out at the TUNL 10 MV Tandem accelerator which produces nearly mono-energetic neutrons via either 2H(d,n)3He,3H(d,n)4He,or3H(p,n)3He reactions. Three dual fission ionization chambers dedicated to 235U, 238U and 239Pu thick target foils and thin monitor foils respectively, were exposed to the neutron beams. After irradiation, thick target foils were gamma counted over a period of 1-2 months and characteristic gamma rays from fission products were recorded using HPGe detectors at TUNL's low background counting area. Using the dual fission chambers, relative fission product yield were determined at a high precision of 2-3 % as well as absolute fission product yields at a lower precision of 5-6 %. Preliminary results will be presented for a number of fission product isotopes over the incident neutron energy range of 0.5 to 14.8 MeV.

  5. Advanced Energy Efficient Roof System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jane Davidson

    2008-09-30

    Energy consumption in buildings represents 40 percent of primary U.S. energy consumption, split almost equally between residential (22%) and commercial (18%) buildings.1 Space heating (31%) and cooling (12%) account for approximately 9 quadrillion Btu. Improvements in the building envelope can have a significant impact on reducing energy consumption. Thermal losses (or gains) from the roof make up 14 percent of the building component energy load. Infiltration through the building envelope, including the roof, accounts for an additional 28 percent of the heating loads and 16 percent of the cooling loads. These figures provide a strong incentive to develop and implement more energy efficient roof systems. The roof is perhaps the most challenging component of the building envelope to change for many reasons. The engineered roof truss, which has been around since 1956, is relatively low cost and is the industry standard. The roof has multiple functions. A typical wood frame home lasts a long time. Building codes vary across the country. Customer and trade acceptance of new building products and materials may impede market penetration. The energy savings of a new roof system must be balanced with other requirements such as first and life-cycle costs, durability, appearance, and ease of construction. Conventional residential roof construction utilizes closely spaced roof trusses supporting a layer of sheathing and roofing materials. Gypsum board is typically attached to the lower chord of the trusses forming the finished ceiling for the occupied space. Often in warmer climates, the HVAC system and ducts are placed in the unconditioned and otherwise unusable attic. High temperature differentials and leaky ducts result in thermal losses. Penetrations through the ceilings are notoriously difficult to seal and lead to moisture and air infiltration. These issues all contribute to greater energy use and have led builders to consider construction of a conditioned attic. The

  6. 50% Advanced Energy Design Guides: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.; Liu, B.; Wang, W.; Thornton, B.; Williams, J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the process, methodology, and assumptions for the development of the 50% Energy Savings Advanced Energy Design Guides (AEDGs), a design guidance document that provides specific recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings above the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 in four building types: (1) Small to medium office buildings, (2) K-12 school buildings, (3) Medium to big box retail buildings, (4) Large hospital buildings.

  7. Dynamical features of nuclear fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Pal

    2015-08-01

    It is now established that the transition-state theory of nuclear fission due to Bohr and Wheeler underestimates several observables in heavy-ion-induced fusion–fission reactions. Dissipative dynamical models employing either the Langevin equation or equivalently the Fokker–Planck equation have been developed for fission of heavy nuclei at high excitations (T ∼1 MeV or higher). Here, we first present the physical picture underlying the dissipative fission dynamics. We mainly concentrate upon the Kramers’ prescription for including dissipation in fission dynamics. We discuss, in some detail, the results of a statistical model analysis of the pre-scission neutron multiplicity data from the reactions 19F+194,196,198Pt using Kramers’ fission width. We also discuss the multi-dimensional Langevin equation in the context of kinetic energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments.

  8. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle; 1: l'atome. 2: la radioactivite. 3: l'homme et les rayonnements. 4: l'energie. 5: l'energie nucleaire: fusion et fission. 6: le fonctionnement d'un reacteur nucleaire. 7: le cycle du combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  9. Advanced Energy Efficient Roof System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jane Davidson

    2008-09-30

    Energy consumption in buildings represents 40 percent of primary U.S. energy consumption, split almost equally between residential (22%) and commercial (18%) buildings.1 Space heating (31%) and cooling (12%) account for approximately 9 quadrillion Btu. Improvements in the building envelope can have a significant impact on reducing energy consumption. Thermal losses (or gains) from the roof make up 14 percent of the building component energy load. Infiltration through the building envelope, including the roof, accounts for an additional 28 percent of the heating loads and 16 percent of the cooling loads. These figures provide a strong incentive to develop and implement more energy efficient roof systems. The roof is perhaps the most challenging component of the building envelope to change for many reasons. The engineered roof truss, which has been around since 1956, is relatively low cost and is the industry standard. The roof has multiple functions. A typical wood frame home lasts a long time. Building codes vary across the country. Customer and trade acceptance of new building products and materials may impede market penetration. The energy savings of a new roof system must be balanced with other requirements such as first and life-cycle costs, durability, appearance, and ease of construction. Conventional residential roof construction utilizes closely spaced roof trusses supporting a layer of sheathing and roofing materials. Gypsum board is typically attached to the lower chord of the trusses forming the finished ceiling for the occupied space. Often in warmer climates, the HVAC system and ducts are placed in the unconditioned and otherwise unusable attic. High temperature differentials and leaky ducts result in thermal losses. Penetrations through the ceilings are notoriously difficult to seal and lead to moisture and air infiltration. These issues all contribute to greater energy use and have led builders to consider construction of a conditioned attic. The

  10. Measurement of multiplicity and total energy of gamma radiation following the U-235 fission induced by resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopy of γ-radiation following the fission of U-235 induced by resonance neutrons with energies from 0.7 eV to 36 eV from the IBR-30 pulsed source was studied. The ionization chamber containing 10 g of uranium enriched to 90% with U-235 and the Ge(Li) detector abour 30 cm3 in volume having an energy resolution of 2.8 keV at 1333 keV energy were operating in coincidence. The results were analysed within the multidimensional procedure. After reconstructing the measured spectrum the γ-spectrum in the energy range from 0.1 to 1.6 MeV has been obtained. The following integral characteristics have been calculated: multiplicity, total and average energies. The average energies for the 3- and 4- resonances are reported

  11. Advanced energy projects FY 1992 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) provides support to explore the feasibility of novel, energy-related concepts that evolve from advances in basic research. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific definition and, therefore, are beyond the scope of ongoing applied research or technology development programs. The Division provides a mechanism for converting basic research findings to applications that eventually could impact the Nation's energy economy. Technical topics include physical, chemical, materials, engineering, and biotechnologies. Projects can involve interdisciplinary approaches to solve energy-related problems. Projects are supported for a finite period of time, which is typically three years. Annual funding levels for projects are usually about $300,000 but can vary from approximately $50,000 to $500,000. It is expected that, following AEP support, each concept will be sufficiently developed and promising to attract further funding from other sources in order to realize its full potential. There were 39 research projects in the Division of Advanced Energy Projects during Fiscal Year 1992 (October 1, 1991 -- September 30, 1992). The abstracts of those projects are provided to introduce the overall program in Advanced Energy Projects. Further information on a specific project may be obtained by contacting the principal investigator, who is listed below the project title. Projects completed during FY 1992 are indicated

  12. Prompt Neutrons from Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is given of the present state of knowledge of the spectrum, angular distribution and number of prompt fission neutrons, as functions of incident neutron energy and individual fragment mass, for low-energy fission. The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons has been found to be of the same form (nearly Maxwellian) for many different types of fission. It has been shown that this type of spectrum is to be expected on the basis of evaporation from moving fragments, and theoretical predictions of the spectrum agree very accurately with experimental data. Some data are now available on the variation of the neutron spectrum with fragment mass and angle of emission. Only recently has it become possible to take accurate data on the angular distribution of the neutrons. It appears that the neutrons have the angular distribution to be expected if emitted almost isotropically from the moving fragments, with a possibility that some small fraction are not emitted in this way, but directly from the fissioning nuclide. Much work has been done on the variation of fission neutron number v with incident neutron energy for neutron-induced fission. The neutron number increases roughly linearly with energy, with a slope of about 0.15 n/MeV. There is now evidence that this slope changes somewhat with energy. This change must be associated with other changes in the-fission process. The most interesting recent discovery concerning fission neutrons is the strong dependence of neutron number on individual fragment mass. The data are being rapidly improved by means of the newer techniques of determining fragment mass yields from velocity and pulse-height data, and of determining neutron yields from cumulative mass yields. There is evidence of similar dependence of neutron yield on fragment mass in a number of cases. It has been suggested that this property is directly connected with the deformability of the fragments, and in particular with the near-spherical shapes of magic

  13. High density electronic excitation effects on microstructural evolution in CeO2 under irradiations with high energy fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For progressing high burnup extension of LWR fuels, formation and growth mechanism of a crystallographic re-structuring in the periphery region of high burnup fuel pellets, as named 'rim structure', should be clarified. The structure shall be formed by the accumulation and mutual interactions of radiation damages, fission products (FPs) and electronic excitations deposited partially by nuclear fissions. In order to clarify electronic excitation effects on the microstructural evolution in CeO2, 70-210 MeV FP ions (Xe, I, Zr) irradiation examinations on CeO2 have been done at JAERI-Tandem facility. These experiments clarify that 1) the effective area of electronic excitation by high energy fission products might be around 5-7 mmφ, and the square of ion track diameter tends to be proportional to the electronic stopping power (Se), and 2) overlapping of ion tracks, under 210 MeV Xe irradiation to a fluence of 1x1015 ions/cm2, makes the surface to be rough, whose size of the roughness is around 1 μm. (author)

  14. Two parameter studies of TFD response to fission fragments for measurements of fragment mass and energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique involving detection of the pair fragments associated with each fission event by two thin film scintillators is investigated to determine its applicability for the determination of fragment mass and energy distributions. The thin film scintillation detectors (thickness 14 microns) were positioned on opposite sides of a VYNS backed 235U source of thickness 60/cm2 placed in a thermal neutron beam of flux 5 x 107 neutrons/cm2/sec. The coincident pulses from the two detectors were recorded event by event on a multi-parameter data acquisition system. The functional behaviour of the film response to fission fragments of specified E/M and Z was obtained by combining the specific luminescence and specific energy loss data for heavy ions. Using the mass and momentum conservation conditions and an iterative procedure it was possible to analyse the data event by event to obtain the fragment mass and kinetic energies. The mass and energy distributions and mass energy correlations so obtained are in good agreement with the published data based on solid state detector measurements. This technique can therefore be a good substitute for solid state detector based methods especially in those cases where radiation damage on solid state detectors is a serious problem. (author)

  15. Energy Systems Integration: NREL + Advanced Energy (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    This fact sheet describes the collaboration between NREL and Advanced Energy Industries at the ESIF to test its advanced photovoltaic inverter technology with the ESIF's power hardware-in-the-loop system and megawatt-scale grid simulators.

  16. Advanced Energy Projects FY 1996 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The mission of the Advanced Energy Projects Division (AEP) is to explore the scientific feasibility of novel energy-related concepts. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific development and, therefore, are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. The portfolio of projects is dynamic, but reflects the broad role of the Department in supporting research and development for improving the Nation`s energy posture. Topical areas presently receiving support include: alternative energy sources; innovative concepts for energy conversion and storage; alternate pathways to energy efficiency; exploring uses of new scientific discoveries; biologically-based energy concepts; renewable and biodegradable materials; novel materials for energy technology; and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. Summaries of the 70 projects currently being supported are presented. Appendices contain budget information and investigator and institutional indices.

  17. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume XI. Nuclear fission program summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief management and technical summaries of nuclear fission power programs are presented for nineteen countries. The programs include the following: fuel supply, resource recovery, enrichment, fuel fabrication, light water reactors, heavy water reactors, gas cooled reactors, breeder reactors, research and test reactors, spent fuel processing, waste management, and safety and environment

  18. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume XI. Nuclear fission program summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    Brief management and technical summaries of nuclear fission power programs are presented for nineteen countries. The programs include the following: fuel supply, resource recovery, enrichment, fuel fabrication, light water reactors, heavy water reactors, gas cooled reactors, breeder reactors, research and test reactors, spent fuel processing, waste management, and safety and environment. (JWR)

  19. HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from a LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., 137Cs, 90Sr, 129I, 99Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,α), (n,γ), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R = 1.0 to 3.0) requirements. These studies also indicate that masses on the order of 1.0 g at densities of rho greater than or equal to 500.0 g/cm3 are required for a practical fusion-based fission product transmutation system

  20. Simultaneous Evaluation of Fission Cross Sections for Cm Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Y.-O.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fission Cross Sections for a complete set of Cm-isotopes, 240-250Cm, have been calculated in the incident energy range from above resonance region to 20 MeV. This work aims at providing the fission cross sections with consistent set of model parameters for Cm isotopes, as a part of a complete evaluation including covariance files for several minor actinides which play a great role in the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC design and applications as well as the design of new generation of nuclear reactors (GEN-IV. This was accomplished by means of computational analyses carried out with the nuclear model code EMPIRE-2.19 which is the modular system of nuclear reaction codes. A Fission model of this work took into account transmission derived in the WKB approximation within an optical model through a double-humped fission barrier.

  1. Measurements of neutron cross sections for advanced nuclear energy systems at n_TOF (CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbagallo M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The n_TOF facility operates at CERN with the aim of addressing the request of high accuracy nuclear data for advanced nuclear energy systems as well as for nuclear astrophysics. Thanks to the features of the neutron beam, important results have been obtained on neutron induced fission and capture cross sections of U, Pu and minor actinides. Recently the construction of another beam line has started; the new line will be complementary to the first one, allowing to further extend the experimental program foreseen for next measurement campaigns.

  2. Assessment of fission product yields data needs in nuclear reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on the build-up of fission products in fast reactors have been performed, with particular emphasis on the effects related to the physics of the nuclear fission process. Fission product yields, which are required for burn-up calculations, depend on the proton and neutron number of the target nucleus as well as on the incident neutron energy. Evaluated nuclear data on fission product yields are available for all relevant target nuclides in reactor applications. However, the description of their energy dependence in evaluated data is still rather rudimentary, which is due to the lack of experimental fast fission data and reliable physical models. Additionally, physics studies of evaluated JEFF-3.1.1 fission yields data have shown potential improvements, especially for various fast fission data sets of this evaluation. In recent years, important progress in the understanding of the fission process has been made, and advanced model codes are currently being developed. This paper deals with the semi-empirical approach to the description of the fission process, which is used in the GEF code being developed by K.-H. Schmidt and B. Jurado on behalf of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, and with results from the corresponding author's diploma thesis. An extended version of the GEF code, supporting the calculation of spectrum weighted fission product yields, has been developed. It has been applied to the calculation of fission product yields in the fission rate spectra of a MOX fuelled sodium-cooled fast reactor. Important results are compared to JEFF-3.1.1 data and discussed in this paper. (authors)

  3. The New Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.J. Bond; K. Kostelnik; R.A. Wharton; A. Kadak

    2006-06-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundation to enable future economic growth. The next generation energy workforce in the U.S. is a critical element in meeting both national and global energy needs. The Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) was established in 2005 in response to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements. CAES, located at the new Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will address critical energy education, research, policy study and training needs. CAES is a unique joint partnership between the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA), the State of Idaho, an Idaho University Consortium (IUC), and a National University Consortium (NUC). CAES will be based in a new facility that will foster collaborative academic and research efforts among participating institutions.

  4. Singlet exciton fission photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiye; Jadhav, Priya; Reusswig, Philip D; Yost, Shane R; Thompson, Nicholas J; Congreve, Daniel N; Hontz, Eric; Van Voorhis, Troy; Baldo, Marc A

    2013-06-18

    Singlet exciton fission, a process that generates two excitons from a single photon, is perhaps the most efficient of the various multiexciton-generation processes studied to date, offering the potential to increase the efficiency of solar devices. But its unique characteristic, splitting a photogenerated singlet exciton into two dark triplet states, means that the empty absorption region between the singlet and triplet excitons must be filled by adding another material that captures low-energy photons. This has required the development of specialized device architectures. In this Account, we review work to develop devices that harness the theoretical benefits of singlet exciton fission. First, we discuss singlet fission in the archetypal material, pentacene. Pentacene-based photovoltaic devices typically show high external and internal quantum efficiencies. They have enabled researchers to characterize fission, including yield and the impact of competing loss processes, within functional devices. We review in situ probes of singlet fission that modulate the photocurrent using a magnetic field. We also summarize studies of the dissociation of triplet excitons into charge at the pentacene-buckyball (C60) donor-acceptor interface. Multiple independent measurements confirm that pentacene triplet excitons can dissociate at the C60 interface despite their relatively low energy. Because triplet excitons produced by singlet fission each have no more than half the energy of the original photoexcitation, they limit the potential open circuit voltage within a solar cell. Thus, if singlet fission is to increase the overall efficiency of a solar cell and not just double the photocurrent at the cost of halving the voltage, it is necessary to also harvest photons in the absorption gap between the singlet and triplet energies of the singlet fission material. We review two device architectures that attempt this using long-wavelength materials: a three-layer structure that uses

  5. Effect of transverse vibrations of fissile nuclei on the angular and spin distributions of low-energy fission fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.; Lyubashevsky, D. E.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that A. Bohr's classic theory of angular distributions of fragments originating from low-energy fission should be supplemented with quantum corrections based on the involvement of a superposition of a very large number of angular momenta L m in the description of the relative motion of fragments flying apart along the straight line coincidentwith the symmetry axis. It is revealed that quantum zero-point wriggling-type vibrations of the fissile system in the vicinity of its scission point are a source of these angular momenta and of high fragment spins observed experimentally.

  6. Hidden systematics of fission channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Karl-Heinz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is a common procedure to describe the fission-fragment mass distributions of fissioning systems in the actinide region by a sum of at least 5 Gaussian curves, one for the symmetric component and a few additional ones, together with their complementary parts, for the asymmetric components. These components have been attributed to the influence of fragment shells, e.g. in the statistical scission-point model of Wilkins, Steinberg and Chasman. They have also been associated with valleys in the potential-energy landscape between the outer saddle and the scission configuration in the multi-channel fission model of Brosa. When the relative yields, the widths and the mean mass-asymmetry values of these components are fitted to experimental data, the mass distributions can be very well reproduced. Moreover, these fission channels are characterised by specific values of charge polarisation, total kinetic energy and prompt-neutron yields. The present contribution investigates the systematic variation of the characteristic fission-channel properties as a function of the composition and the excitation energy of the fissioning system. The mean position of the asymmetric fission channels in the heavy fragment is almost constant in atomic number. The deformation of the nascent fragments at scission, which is the main source of excitation energy of the separated fission fragments ending up in prompt-neutron emission, is found to be a unique function of Z for the light and the heavy fragment of the asymmetric fission channels. A variation of the initial excitation energy of the fissioning system above the fission saddle is only seen in the neutron yield of the heavy fragment. The charge polarisation in the two most important asymmetric fission channels is found to be constant and to appreciably exceed the macroscopic value. The variation of the relative yields and of the positions of the fission channels as a function of the composition and excitation energy

  7. Atomic energy to advance human progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr Manmohan Singh, the prime minister of India on the occasion of the inaugural ceremony of international conference on peaceful uses of atomic energy said that the return of India to the international nuclear global main streams is of high significance not only for India but for global energy security as well. It is not beyond the imagination of the human mind to devise solutions and strategies that exploit the vast potential of atomic energy to advance human progress, while assuring global peace and security

  8. Electrospinning for advanced energy and environmental applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cavaliere, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning for Advanced Energy and Environmental Applications delivers a state-of-the-art overview of the use of electrospun fibers in energy conversion and storage, as well as in environmental sensing and remediation. Featuring contributions from leading experts in electrospinning and its specific applications, this book: Introduces the electrospinning technique and its origins, outlining achievable one-dimensional (1D) nanoscaled materials and their various applicationsDiscusses the use of electrospun materials in energy devices, including low- and high-temperature fuel cells, hydrogen

  9. Dynamics of fission and heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in a unified macroscopic-microscopic description of large-amplitude collective nuclear motion such as occurs in fission and heavy ion reactions are discussed. With the goal of finding observable quantities that depend upon the magnitude and mechanism of nuclear dissipation, one-body dissipation and two-body viscosity within the framework of a generalized Fokker-Planck equation for the time dependence of the distribution function in phase space of collective coordinates and momenta are considered. Proceeding in two separate directions, the generalized Hamilton equations of motion for the first moments of the distribution function with a new shape parametrization and other technical innovations are first solved. This yields the mean translational fission-fragment kinetic energy and mass of a third fragment that sometimes forms between the two end fragments, as well as the energy required for fusion in symmetric heavy-ion reactions and the mass transfer and capture cross section in asymmetric heavy-ion reactions. In a second direction, we specialize to an inverted-oscillator fission barrier and use Kramers' stationary solution to calculate the mean time from the saddle point to scission for a heavy-ion-induced fission reaction for which experimental information is becoming available. 25 references

  10. HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from an LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., 137Cs, 90Sr, 129I, 99Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,α), (n,γ), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R=1.0 to 3.0) requirements

  11. Neutron-rich rare isotope production from projectile fission of heavy beams in the energy range of 20 MeV/nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Vonta, N; Loveland, W D; Kwon, Y K; Tshoo, K; Jeong, S C; Veselsky, M; Bonasera, A; Botvina, A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the possibilities of producing neutron-rich nuclides in projectile fission of heavy beams in the energy range of 20 MeV/nucleon expected from low-energy facilities. We report our efforts to theoretically describe the reaction mechanism of projectile fission following a multinucleon transfer collision at this energy range. Our calculations are mainly based on a two-step approach: the dynamical stage of the collision is described with either the phenomenological Deep-Inelastic Transfer model (DIT), or with the microscopic Constrained Molecular Dynamics model (CoMD). The deexcitation/fission of the hot heavy projectile fragments is performed with the Statistical Mul- tifragmentation Model (SMM). We compared our model calculations with our previous experimental projectile-fission data of 238U (20 MeV/nucleon)+208Pb and 197Au (20 MeV/nucleon)+197Au and found an overall reasonable agreement. Our study suggests that projectile fission following periph- eral heavy-ion collisions at this energy range of...

  12. Analysis of Intermediate-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Spallation, Fission, and Fragmentation Reactions with the LAQGSM code

    CERN Document Server

    Mashnik, S G; Prael, R E; Sierk, A J

    2003-01-01

    The LAQGSM code has been recently developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to simulate nuclear reactions for proton radiography applications. We have benchmarked our code against most available measured data both for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions at incident energies from 10 MeV to 800 GeV and have compared our results with predictions of other current models used by the nuclear community. Here, we present a brief description of our code and show illustrative results obtained with LAQGSM for neutron spectra measured recently by Nakamura's groups for reactions induced by light and medium nuclei on targets from C to Pb at several incident energies from 95 to 600 MeV/nucleon and with the recent GSI measurements of spallation, fission, and fragmentation yields from A+p and A+A reactions at incident energies near and below 1 GeV/nucleon. Further necessary work is outlined.

  13. Advanced Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzati Abdellah,

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs is anticipated to bring enormous changes in data gathering, processing and dissemination for different environments and applications. However, a WSN is a power constrained system, since nodes run on limited power batteries which shorten its lifespan. Prolonging the network lifetime depends on efficient management of sensing node energy resource. Hierarchicalrouting protocols are best known in regard to energy efficiency. By using a clustering technique hierarchical routing protocols greatly minimize energy consumed in collecting and disseminating data. Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy (LEACH is one of the undamental protocols in this class. In this paper we propose Advanced LEACH (A-LEACH, a heterogeneous-energy protocol to decrease probability of failure nodes and to prolong the time interval before the death of the first node (we refer to as stability period and increasing the lifetime in heterogeneous WSNs, which is crucial for many applications.

  14. Communicating about advanced nuclear energy plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of advanced nuclear energy plants, as with any new product, will not depend on design alone. Success will require public support and good communications to achieve that support. In the past, communication weaknesses - including mixed and confusing messages - have sometimes created barriers between the technical community and the public. Several lessons learned from a decade of social science research in the United States of America have implications for communicating effectively about advanced design nuclear energy plants: (1) Most audiences are open-minded and receptive to communications on this topic. They view nuclear energy as a fuel of the future and want to be comfortable about the future. Most people in the USA (82%) expect future nuclear energy plants to be safer, so the improvements being made are simply consistent with public expectations. (2) Few people pay close attention to energy issues. (3) Communications must be simple and free of jargon. Because people do not pay close attention to the issues, their knowledge is limited. Some terms used by the industry to describe advanced design plants are misinterpreted. (4) Good communications focus on consumer wants and values, not industry needs or problems. People care about generational responsibility, planning for the future, environmental protection and security. (5) Benefits and safeguards should be shown instead of risk comparisons. Generic benefits of nuclear energy, such as clean air, are important to consumers. (6) Pictures and hand-on demonstrations help in communicating about nuclear energy plants, because many of the discussion concepts are abstract. (7) Trust is crucial and is established now for tomorrow through word and deed. (author)

  15. Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

  16. Advanced energy projects FY 1994 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Division of Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) provides support to explore the feasibility of novel, energy-related concepts that evolve from advances in basic research. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific definition and, therefore, are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. The AEP also supports high-risk, exploratory concepts that do not readily fit into a program area but could have several applications that may span scientific disciplines or technical areas. Projects supported by the Division arise from unsolicited ideas and concepts submitted by researchers. The portfolio of projects is dynamic and reflects the broad role of the Department in supporting research and development for improving the Nation`s energy outlook. FY 1994 projects include the following topical areas: novel materials for energy technology; renewable and biodegradable materials; exploring uses of new scientific discoveries; alternate pathways to energy efficiency; alternative energy sources; and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. Summaries are given for 66 projects.

  17. Advanced energy projects FY 1994 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) provides support to explore the feasibility of novel, energy-related concepts that evolve from advances in basic research. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific definition and, therefore, are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. The AEP also supports high-risk, exploratory concepts that do not readily fit into a program area but could have several applications that may span scientific disciplines or technical areas. Projects supported by the Division arise from unsolicited ideas and concepts submitted by researchers. The portfolio of projects is dynamic and reflects the broad role of the Department in supporting research and development for improving the Nation's energy outlook. FY 1994 projects include the following topical areas: novel materials for energy technology; renewable and biodegradable materials; exploring uses of new scientific discoveries; alternate pathways to energy efficiency; alternative energy sources; and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. Summaries are given for 66 projects

  18. Advances in energy and environment. Vol. 1: Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 5th conference of energy and environment was held on 3-6 June 1996 in Cairo. The specialists discussed the effects of advances in energy and environment. The applications of solar energy, heat transfer, thermal application, storage and bio-conversion, fuels, energy and development. Studies were discussed at the meeting and more than 1000 papers were presented. This first volume covers papers presented on the following topics: solar thermal, heat transfer and thermal applications, storage and bio-conversion, refrigeration and iar conditioning, combustion, fuels and engines, energy and development. tabs., figs

  19. Advanced energy projects: FY 1987 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief summaries of all projects active in the Division of Advanced Energy Projects during Fiscal Year 1987 (October 1, 1986-September 30, 1987). The intent of this compilation is to provide a convenient means for quickly acquainting an interested reader with the program in Advanced Energy Projects. More detailed information on research activities in a particular project may be obtained by contacting directly the principal investigator. Some projects will have reached the end of their contract periods by the time this book appears, and will, therefore, no longer be active. Those cases in which work was completed in FY '87 are indicated by the footnote: Project completed. The annual funding level of each project is shown

  20. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Shields, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Arnold, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Blakeley, R. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hecht, A.A.; Heffern, L.E. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mader, D. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); O' Donnell, J.M.; Sierk, A.; White, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-07-11

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) has been developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using {sup 229}Th and {sup 252}Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Mass yield results measured from {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.

  1. Fission modes in charged-particle induced fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthies, A.; Kotte, R.; Seidel, W.; Stary, F.; Wohlfarth, D. (Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf bei Dresden (German Democratic Republic))

    1990-12-01

    The population of the three fission modes predicted by Brosa's multi-channel fission model for the uranium region was studied in different fissioning systems. They were produced bombarding {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U targets by light charged particles with energies slightly above the Coulomb barrier. Though the maximum excitation energy of the compound nucleus amounted to about 22 MeV, the influences of various spherical and deformed nuclear shells on the mass and total kinetic energy distributions of fission fragments are still pronounced. The larger variances of the total kinetic energy distributions compared to those of thermal neutron induced fission were explained by temperature dependent fluctuations of the amount and velocity of alteration of the scission point elongation of the fissioning system. From the ratio of these variances the portion of the potential energy dissipated among intrinsic degrees of freedom before scission was deduced for the different fission channels. It was found that the excitation remaining after pre-scission neutron emission is mainly transferred into intrinsic heat and less into pre-scission kinetic energy. (orig.).

  2. Isoscaling of the Fission Fragments with Langevin Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; TIAN Wen-Dong; ZHONG Chen; ZHOU Xing-Fei; MA Yu-Gang; WEI Yi-Bin; CAI Xiang-Zhou; CHEN Jin-Gen; FANG De-Qing; GUO Wei; MA Guo-Liang; SHEN Wen-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The Langevin equation is used to simulate the fission process of 112Sn + 112Sn and 116Sn + 116Sn. The mass distribution of the fission fragments are given by assuming the process of symmetric fission or asymmetric fission with the Gaussian probability sampling. The isoscaling behaviour has been observed from the analysis of fission fragments of both the reactions, and the isoscaling parameter α seems to be sensitive to the width of fission probability and the beam energy.

  3. Isoscaling of the Fission Fragments with Langevin Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, K.; Ma, Y. G.; Wei, Y. B.; Cai, X. Z.; Chen, J. G.; Fang, D Q; Guo, W; Ma, G. L.; Shen, W.Q.(Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai, 201800, China); Tian, W.D.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, X. F.

    2004-01-01

    Langevin equation is used to simulate the fission process of $^{112}$Sn + $^{112}$Sn and $^{116}$Sn + $^{116}$Sn. The mass distribution of the fission fragments are given by assuming the process of symmetric fission or asymmetric fission with the Gaussian probability sampling. Isoscaling behavior has been observed from the analysis of fission fragments of both reactions and the isoscaling parameter $\\alpha$ seems to be sensitive to the width of fission probability and the beam energy.

  4. An indirect-drive non-cryogenic double-shell path to 1ω Nd-laser hybrid inertial fusion-fission energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-yield, room temperature, double-shell target design using a Nd : glass laser driver at the fundamental frequency 1ω is developed for hybrid inertial fusion-fission energy generation (Moses et al 2009 Fusion Sci. Technol. 56 547). The associated 4-10x fission energy gain relaxes the gain requirements of the fusion driver, enabling the prospect of a volume-ignition target with high thermonuclear burn fraction, simplified (1ω) laser operations from a quasi-impulsive power history, room temperature fielding, minimal shock-timing requirements and reduced risk of plasma-mediated laser backscatter with a vacuum hohlraum.

  5. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  6. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantz M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f and Th(p,f have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  7. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  8. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  9. Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. SEGIS developments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Mesa P. (Advanced Energy Industries, Inc., Bend, OR); Bower, Ward Isaac; Mills-Price, Michael A. (Advanced Energy Industries, Inc., Bend, OR); Sena-Henderson, Lisa; David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

    2012-03-01

    The Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) initiative is a three-year, three-stage project that includes conceptual design and market analysis (Stage 1), prototype development/testing (Stage 2), and commercialization (Stage 3). Projects focus on system development of solar technologies, expansion of intelligent renewable energy applications, and connecting large-scale photovoltaic (PV) installations into the electric grid. As documented in this report, Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. (AE), its partners, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) successfully collaborated to complete the final stage of the SEGIS initiative, which has guided new technology development and development of methodologies for unification of PV and smart-grid technologies. The combined team met all deliverables throughout the three-year program and commercialized a broad set of the developed technologies.

  10. General view on the progress in nuclear fission : a review

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    An overview is given on some of the main advances in experimental methods, experimental results and theoretical models and ideas of the last years in the field of nuclear fission. New approaches extended the availability of fissioning systems for experimental studies of nuclear fission considerably and provided a full identification of all fission products in A and Z for the first time. In particular, the transition from symmetric to asymmetric fission around 226 Th and some unexpected struct...

  11. Spontaneous fission. A many-body approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Akira; Bonasera, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    We propose new model to calculate the fission phenomena in tunnel region. By the Vlasov equation and the imaginary time method, we could calculate actinides nuclear fission. This method makes possible to describe unified the motion of fission inside and outside of potential wall. The potential energy and mass parameters can be calculated by no means of the special model. The freedom of internal motion are calculated automatically both collective and a particle motion. Accordingly, particle released during fission process can be calculated. The kinetic energy of fragment after fission was very agreeable with the calculation results. (S.Y.)

  12. Experimental Neutron-Induced Fission Fragment Mass Yields of 232Th and 238U at Energies from 10 to 33 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Simutkin, V D; Blomgren, J; Österlund, M; Bevilacqua, R; Ryzhov, I V; Tutin, G A; Yavshits, S G; Vaishnene, L A; Onegin, M S; Meulders, J P; Prieels, R

    2013-01-01

    Development of nuclear energy applications requires data for neutron-induced reactions for actinides in a wide neutron energy range. Here we describe measurements of pre-neutron emission fission fragment mass yields of 232Th and 238U at incident neutron energies from 10 to 33 MeV. The measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE; a multi-section twin Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used to detect fission fragments. For the peak neutron energies at 33, 45 and 60 MeV, the details of the data analysis and the experimental results have been published before and in this work we present data analysis in the low-energy tail of the neutron energy spectra. The preliminary measurement results are compared with available experimental data and theoretical predictions.

  13. Saving Energy Through Advanced Power Strips (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, D.

    2013-10-01

    Advanced Power Strips (APS) look just like ordinary power strips, except that they have built-in features that are designed to reduce the amount of energy used by many consumer electronics. There are several different types of APSs on the market, but they all operate on the same basic principle of shutting off the supply power to devices that are not in use. By replacing your standard power strip with an APS, you can signifcantly cut the amount of electricity used by your home office and entertainment center devices, and save money on your electric bill. This illustration summarizes the different options.

  14. Solar vs. Fission Surface Power for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    crewed expedition mission. Unlike the demonstration mission, a lengthy power outage due to the global dust storms that are known to occur on Mars would pose a safety hazard to a crewed mission. A similar fission versus solar power trade study performed by NASA in 2007 concluded that fission power was more reliable-with a much lower mass penalty-than solar power for this application. However, recent advances in solar cell and energy storage technologies and changes in operational assumptions prompted NASA to revisit the analysis. For the purpose of this exercise a particular landing site at Jezero Crater, located at 18o north latitude, was assumed. A fission power system consisting of four each 10 kW Kilopower fission reactors was compared to a distributed network of Orion-derived Ultraflex solar arrays and Lithium ion batteries mounted on every lander. The team found that a solar power system mass of about 9,800 kg would provide the 22 kilowatts (kW) keep-alive power needed to survive a dust storm lasting up to 120-days at average optical depth of 5, and 35 kW peak power for normal operations under clear skies. Although this is less than half the mass estimated during the 2007 work (which assumed latitudes up to 30o) it is still more than the 7,000 kg mass of the fission system which provides full power regardless of dust storm conditions.

  15. Neutron-induced fission cross-section of {sup 233}U in the energy range 0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P.M.; Abbondanno, U.; Fujii, K.; Moreau, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Trieste (Italy); Calviani, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Legnaro (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Colonna, N.; Marrone, S.; Meaze, M.H.; Tagliente, G.; Terlizzi, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Bari (Italy); Mastinu, P.; Gramegna, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy); Aerts, G.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.; Gunsing, F.; Pancin, J.; Perrot, L.; Plukis, A. [CEA, Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Alvarez, H.; Cano-Ott, D.; Duran, I.; Embid-Segura, M.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Paradela, C. [Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago (Spain); Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Guerrero, C.; Martinez, T.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Technologicas, Madrid (Spain); Andrzejewski, J.; Marganiec, J. [Univ. of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L.; Dillmann, I.; Heil, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Mosconi, M.; Plag, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wisshak, K. [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology, Campus Nord, Karlsruhe (Germany); Badurek, G.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H.; Oberhummer, H.; Pigni, M.T. [Technische Univ. Wien, Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Univ., Wien (Austria); Baumann, P.; David, S.; Kerveno, M.; Lukic, S.; Rudolf, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 - IReS, Strasbourg (France); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M. [Charles Univ., Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Calvino, F.; Cortes, G.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Capote, R. [NAPC/Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Univ. de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain); Carrapico, C.; Goncalves, I.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Tavora, L.; Vaz, P. [Inst. Tecnologico e Nuclear, Lisbon (Portugal)] [and others

    2011-01-15

    The neutron-induced fission cross-section of {sup 233}U has been measured at the CERN n-TOF facility relative to the standard fission cross-section of {sup 235}U between 0.5 and 20MeV. The experiment was performed with a fast ionization chamber for the detection of the fission fragments and to discriminate against {alpha} -particles from the natural radioactivity of the samples. The high instantaneous flux and the low background of the n-TOF facility result in data with uncertainties of {approx} 3%, which were found in good agreement with previous experiments. The high quality of the present results allows to improve the evaluation of the {sup 233}U (n,f) cross-section and, consequently, the design of energy systems based on the Th/U cycle. (orig.)

  16. Determination of the fission barrier height in fission of heavy radioactive beams induced by the (d,p)-transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    A theoretical framework is described, allowing to determine the fission barrier height using the observed cross sections of fission induced by the (d,p)-transfer with accuracy, which is not achievable in another type of low-energy fission of neutron-deficient nuclei, the $\\beta$-delayed fission. The primary goal is to directly determine the fission barrier height of proton-rich fissile nuclei, preferably using the radio-active beams of isotopes of odd elements, and thus confirm or exclude the low values of fission barrier heights, typically extracted using statistical calculations in the compound nucleus reactions at higher excitation energies. Calculated fission cross sections in transfer reactions of the radioactive beams show sufficient sensitivity to fission barrier height. In the probable case that fission rates will be high enough, mass asymmetry of fission fragments can be determined. Results will be relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for production of super-heavy nuclei. Transfer induced fission of...

  17. Energy Theft in the Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Stephen; Podkuiko, Dmitry; McDaniel, Patrick

    Global energy generation and delivery systems are transitioning to a new computerized "smart grid". One of the principle components of the smart grid is an advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). AMI replaces the analog meters with computerized systems that report usage over digital communication interfaces, e.g., phone lines. However, with this infrastructure comes new risk. In this paper, we consider adversary means of defrauding the electrical grid by manipulating AMI systems. We document the methods adversaries will use to attempt to manipulate energy usage data, and validate the viability of these attacks by performing penetration testing on commodity devices. Through these activities, we demonstrate that not only is theft still possible in AMI systems, but that current AMI devices introduce a myriad of new vectors for achieving it.

  18. Nanoporous metals for advanced energy technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the state-of-the-art research in nanoporous metals for potential applications in advanced energy fields, including proton exchange membrane fuel cells, Li batteries (Li ion, Li-S, and Li-O2), and supercapacitors. The related structural design and performance of nanoporous metals as well as possible mechanisms and challenges are fully addressed. The formation mechanisms of nanoporous metals during dealloying, the microstructures of nanoporous metals and characterization methods, as well as miscrostructural regulation of nanoporous metals through alloy design of precursors and surface diffusion control are also covered in detail. This is an ideal book for researchers, engineers, graduate students, and government/industry officers who are in charge of R&D investments and strategy related to energy technologies.

  19. Advanced energy projects FY 1997 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The mission of the Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) program is to explore the scientific feasibility of novel energy-related concepts that are high risk, in terms of scientific feasibility, yet have a realistic potential for a high technological payoff. The concepts supported by the AEP are typically at an early stage of scientific development. They often arise from advances in basic research and are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. Some are based on discoveries of new scientific phenomena or involve exploratory ideas that span multiple scientific and technical disciplines which do not fit into an existing DOE program area. In all cases, the objective is to support evaluation of the scientific or technical feasibility of the novel concepts involved. Following AEP support, it is expected that each concept will be sufficiently developed to attract further funding from other sources to realize its full potential. Projects that involve evolutionary research or technology development and demonstration are not supported by AEP. Furthermore, research projects more appropriate for another existing DOE research program are not encouraged. There were 65 projects in the AEP research portfolio during Fiscal Year 1997. Eigheen projects were initiated during that fiscal year. This document consists of short summaries of projects active in FY 1997. Further information of a specific project may be obtained by contacting the principal investigator.

  20. General Description of Fission Observables: GEF Model Code

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz; Amouroux, Charlotte; Schmitt, C.

    2015-01-01

    The GEF (" GEneral description of Fission observables ") model code is documented. It describes the observables for spontaneous fission, neutron-induced fission and, more generally, for fission of a compound nucleus from any other entrance channel, with given excitation energy and angular momentum. The GEF model is applicable for a wide range of isotopes from Z = 80 to Z = 112 and beyond, up to excitation energies of about 100 MeV. The results of the GEF model are compared with fission barrie...

  1. Advances in High Energy Materials (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. R. Nair

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Research and development efforts for realizing higher performance levels of high energy materials (HEMs are continued unabated all over the globe. Of late, it is becoming increasingly necessary to ensure that such materials are also eco-friendly. This has provided thrust to research in the area of force multiplying HEMs and compounds free from pollution causing components. Enhancement of the performance necessitates introduction of strained structure or increase in oxygen balance to achieve near stoichiometry. The search for environment friendly molecules is focused on chlorine free propellant compositions and lead free primary explosives. Energetic polymers offer added advantage of partitioning of energy and thus not necessitating the concentration of only solid components (HEMs and metal fuels in the formulations, to achieve higher performance, thereby leading to improvement in energetics without adversely affecting the processability and mechanical properties. During recent times, research in the area of insensitive explosives has received impetus particularly with the signature of STANAG. This paper gives a review of the all-round advances in the areas of HEMs encompassing oxidizers, high-energy dense materials, insensitive high-energy materials, polymers and plasticizers. Selected formulations based on these materials are also included.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(2, pp.137-151, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.327

  2. Competition between fusion-fission and quasifission processes in the 32S+184W reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The angular distributions of fission fragments for the 32S+184W reaction at center-of-mass energies of 118.8, 123.1, 127.3, 131.5, 135.8, 141.1, and 144.4 MeV are measured. The experimental fission excitation function is obtained. The anisotropy (Aexp) is found by extrapolating each fission fragment angular distribution. The measured fission cross sections of the 32S+182,184W reaction are decomposed into fusion-fission, quasifission, and fast-fission contributions by the dinuclear system model (DNS). The angular momentum distributions of the dinuclear system and compound nucleus calculated by the DNS model are used to reproduce the experimental capture and fusion excitation functions for both reactions and quantities K02, 2>, and Aexp, which characterize angular distributions of the fission products at the considered range of beam energy. The total evaporation residue excitation function for the 32S+184W reaction calculated in the framework of the advanced statistical model is close to the available experimental data only up to about Ec.m.≅160 MeV. The underestimation of the experimental data at high excitation energies Ec.m.>160 MeV is explained by the fact that the statistical model cannot reproduce the cross section of evaporation residues formed by the nonequilibrium mechanism, that is, without formation of the compound nucleus in the statistical equilibrium state.

  3. (d,p)-transfer induced fission of heavy radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Veselsky, Martin

    2012-01-01

    (d,p)-transfer induced fission is proposed as a tool to study low energy fission of exotic heavy nuclei. Primary goal is to directly determine the fission barrier height of proton-rich fissile nuclei, preferably using the radio-active beams of isotopes of odd elements, and thus confirm or exclude the low values of fission barrier heights, typically extracted using statistical calculations in the compound nucleus reactions at higher excitation energies. Calculated fission cross sections in transfer reactions of the radioactive beams show sufficient sensitivity to fission barrier height. In the probable case that fission rates will be high enough, mass asymmetry of fission fragments can be determined. Results will be relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for production of super-heavy nuclei. Transfer induced fission offers a possibility for systematic study the low energy fission of heavy exotic nuclei at the ISOLDE.

  4. Biomass energy conversion: conventional and advanced technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing interest in biomass energy conversion in recent years has focused attention on enhancing the efficiency of technologies converting biomass fuels into heat and power, their capital and operating costs and their environmental emissions. Conventional combustion systems, such as fixed-bed or grate units and entrainment units, deliver lower efficiencies (<25%) than modem coal-fired combustors (30-35%). The gasification of biomass will improve energy conversion efficiency and yield products useful for heat and power generation and chemical synthesis. Advanced biomass gasification technologies using pressurized fluidized-bed systems, including those incorporating hot-gas clean-up for feeding gas turbines or fuel cells, are being demonstrated. However, many biomass gasification processes are derivatives of coal gasification technologies and do not exploit the unique properties of biomass. This paper examines some existing and upcoming technologies for converting biomass into electric power or heat. Small-scale 1-30 MWe units are emphasized, but brief reference is made to larger and smaller systems, including those that bum coal-biomass mixtures and gasifiers that feed pilot-fuelled diesel engines. Promising advanced systems, such as a biomass integrated gasifier/gas turbine (BIG/GT) with combined-cycle operation and a biomass gasifier coupled to a fuel cell, giving cycle efficiencies approaching 50% are also described. These advanced gasifiers, typically fluid-bed designs, may be pressurized and can use a wide variety of biomass materials to generate electricity, process steam and chemical products such as methanol. Low-cost, disposable catalysts are becoming available for hot-gas clean-up (enhanced gas composition) for turbine and fuel cell systems. The advantages, limitations and relative costs of various biomass gasifier systems are briefly discussed. The paper identifies the best known biomass power projects and includes some information on proposed and

  5. Chemical Production using Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some reactor design considerations of the use of fission recoil fragment energy for the production of chemicals of industrial importance have been discussed previously in a paper given at the Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy [A/Conf. 15/P.76]. The present paper summarizes more recent progress made on this topic at AERE, Harwell. The range-energy relationship for fission fragments is discussed in the context of the choice of fuel system for a chemical production reactor, and the experimental observation of a variation of chemical effect along the length of a fission fragment track is described for the irradiation of nitrogen-oxygen mixtures. Recent results are given on the effect of fission fragments on carbon monoxide-hydrogen gas mixtures and on water vapour. No system investigated to date shows any outstanding promise for large-scale chemical production. (author)

  6. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Leonie [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e{sup -}). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for

  7. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Léonie

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ , e-) . The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  8. Nucleon-induced fission cross-sections of tantalum and separated tungsten isotopes and "compound nucleus" effect in intermediate energy region

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, A N; Eismont, V P; Filatov, N P; Blomgren, J; Conde, H; Prokofiev, A V; Mashnik, S G

    2007-01-01

    Neutron- and proton-induced fission cross-sections of separated isotopes of tungsten (182W, 183W, 184W, and 186W) and 181Ta relative to 209Bi have been measured in the incident nucleon energy region 50 - 200 MeV using fission chambers based on thin-film breakdown counters (TFBC) using quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n) reaction and at the proton beams of The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL), Uppsala University (Uppsala, Sweden). The results are compared with predictions by the CEM03.01 event generator, as well as with the recent data for nuclei in the lead-bismuth region. The effect of "compound nucleus" in the intermediate energy region is discussed, displaying in exponential dependence of nucleon-induced fission cross-sections on the parameter Z^2/A of the composite system (projectile+target nucleus), and in other characteristics of the fission process for which parameter Z^2/A plays a role similar to the one of the usual liquid-drop parameter Z^2/A of compound nuclei.

  9. Electron energy loss spectroscopy in advanced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    The combination of a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) with an electron energy loss spectrometer (EELS) yields a powerful tool for the microcharacterization of materials. However, the application of this technique to advanced materials problems can only be fully appreciated when the information obtained using EELS is related to that obtained from other analytical spectroscopies. In this chapter, we briefly discuss the relative performance of X-ray, Auger and Photoelectron Spectroscopies with EELS pointing out the limitations and merits of each. This comparison is followed by examples of the application of EELS to investigations involving high {Tc} superconductors, artificial metallic superlattices, amorphous magnetic materials and the characterization of metallic hydride phases. 14 refs., 22 figs.

  10. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The news of the discovery of nuclear fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fifieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty Years with Nuclear Fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent development in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicated a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two fully days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main site of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered in this Volume 1 by this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled: Preclude to the First Chain Reaction -- 1932 to 1942; Early Fission Research -- Nuclear Structure and Spontaneous Fission; 50 Years of Fission, Science, and Technology; Nuclear Reactors, Secure Energy for the Future; Reactors 1; Fission Science 1; Safeguards and Space Applications; Fission Data; Nuclear Fission -- Its Various Aspects; Theory and Experiments in Support of Theory; Reactors and Safeguards; and General Research, Instrumentation, and By-Product. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  11. Distributed sensor coordination for advanced energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumer, Kagan [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

    2015-03-12

    Motivation: The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reliable operation of advanced power systems. Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled some level of decision making directly at the sensor level. However, coordinating large numbers of sensors, particularly heterogeneous sensors, to achieve system level objectives such as predicting plant efficiency, reducing downtime or predicting outages requires sophisticated coordination algorithms. Indeed, a critical issue in such systems is how to ensure the interaction of a large number of heterogenous system components do not interfere with one another and lead to undesirable behavior. Objectives and Contributions: The long-term objective of this work is to provide sensor deployment, coordination and networking algorithms for large numbers of sensors to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. Our two specific objectives are to: 1. Derive sensor performance metrics for heterogeneous sensor networks. 2. Demonstrate effectiveness, scalability and reconfigurability of heterogeneous sensor network in advanced power systems. The key technical contribution of this work is to push the coordination step to the design of the objective functions of the sensors, allowing networks of heterogeneous sensors to be controlled. By ensuring that the control and coordination is not specific to particular sensor hardware, this approach enables the design and operation of large heterogeneous sensor networks. In addition to the coordination coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Impact: The impact of this work extends to a large class of problems relevant to the National Energy Technology Laboratory including sensor placement, heterogeneous sensor

  12. Fission product data library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A library is described of data for 584 isotopes of fission products, including decay constants, branching ratios (both burn-up and decay), the type of emitted radiation, relative and absolute yields, capture cross sections for thermal neutrons, and resonance integrals. When a detailed decay scheme is not known, the mean energies of beta particles and neutrino and gamma radiations are given. In the ZVJE SKODA system the library is named BIBFP and is stored on film No 49 of the NE 803 B computer. It is used in calculating the inventory of fission products in fuel elements (and also determining absorption cross sections for burn-up calculations, gamma ray sources, heat generation) and in solving radioactivity transport problems in the primary circuit. It may also be used in the spectrometric method for burn-up determination of fuel elements. The library comprises the latest literary data available. It serves as the basis for library BIBGRFP storing group constants of fission products with independent yields of isotopes from fission. This, in turn, forms the basis for the BIBDN library collecting data on the precursors of delayed neutron emitters. (author)

  13. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  14. Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope (ADEPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles L. Bennett

    2009-03-26

    In 2006, we proposed to NASA a detailed concept study of ADEPT (the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope), a potential space mission to reliably measure the time-evolution of dark energy by conducting the largest effective volume survey of the universe ever done. A peer-review panel of scientific, management, and technical experts reported back the highest possible 'excellent' rating for ADEPT. We have since made substantial advances in the scientific and technical maturity of the mission design. With this Department of Energy (DOE) award we were granted supplemental funding to support specific extended research items that were not included in the NASA proposal, many of which were intended to broadly advance future dark energy research, as laid out by the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF). The proposed work had three targets: (1) the adaptation of large-format infrared arrays to a 2 micron cut-off; (2) analytical research to improve the understanding of the dark energy figure-of- merit; and (3) extended studies of baryon acoustic oscillation systematic uncertainties. Since the actual award was only for {approx}10% of the proposed amount item (1) was dropped and item (2) work was severely restricted, consistent with the referee reviews of the proposal, although there was considerable contradictions between reviewer comments and several comments that displayed a lack of familiarity with the research. None the less, item (3) was the focus of the work. To characterize the nature of the dark energy, ADEPT is designed to observe baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in a large galaxy redshift survey and to obtain substantial numbers of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The 2003 Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) made a precise determination of the BAO 'standard ruler' scale, as it was imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at z {approx} 1090. The standard ruler was also imprinted on the pattern of galaxies, and was first

  15. Two neutron correlations in photo-fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, D. S.; Kosinov, O.; Forest, T.; Burggraf, J.; Stave, S.; Warren, G.; Starovoitova, V.

    2016-09-01

    A large body of experimental work has established the strong kinematical correlation between fission fragments and fission neutrons. Here, we report on the progress of investigations of the potential for strong two neutron correlations arising from the nearly back-to-back nature of the two fission fragments that emit these neutrons in the photo-fission process. In initial measurements, a pulsed electron linear accelerator was used to generate bremsstrahlung photons that impinged upon an actinide target, and the energy and opening angle distributions of coincident neutrons were measured using a large acceptance neutron detector array. A planned comprehensive set of measurements of two neutron correlations in the photo-fission of actinides is expected to shed light on several fundamental aspects of the fission process including the multiplicity distributions associated with the light and heavy fission fragments, the nuclear temperatures of the fission fragments, and the mass distribution of the fission fragments as a function of energy released. In addition to these measurements providing important nuclear data, the unique kinematics of fission and the resulting two neutron correlations have the potential to be the basis for a new tool to detect fissionable materials. A key technical challenge of this program arises from the need to perform coincidence measurements with a low duty factor, pulsed electron accelerator. This has motivated the construction of a large acceptance neutron detector array, and the development of data analysis techniques to directly measure uncorrelated two neutron backgrounds.

  16. GGA+U study of uranium mononitride: A comparison of the U-ramping and occupation matrix schemes and incorporation energies of fission products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claisse, Antoine; Klipfel, Marco; Lindbom, Niclas; Freyss, Michel; Olsson, Pär

    2016-09-01

    Uranium mononitride is studied in the DFT + U framework. Its ground state is investigated and a study of the incorporation of diverse fission products in the crystal is conducted. The U-ramping and occupation matrix control (OMC) schemes are used to eliminate metastable states. Beyond a certain amount of introduced correlation, the OMC scheme starts to find a lower total energy. The OMC scheme is chosen for the second part of this study. Furthermore, the influence of the magnetic ordering is studied using the U-ramping method, showing that antiferromagnetic order is the most stable one when the U parameter is larger than 1.75 eV. The effect on the density of states is investigated and elastic constants are provided for comparison with other methods and experiments. The incorporation energies of fission products in different defect configurations are calculated and these energies are corrected to take into account the limited size of the supercell.

  17. Advanced Energy Efficiency and Distributed Renewables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovins, Amory

    2007-04-01

    The US now wrings twice the GDP from each unit of energy that it did in 1975. Reduced energy intensity since then now provides more than twice as much service as burning oil does. Yet still more efficient end-use of energy -- explained more fully in a companion workshop offered at 1245 -- is the largest, fastest, cheapest, most benign, least understood, and least harnessed energy resource available. For example, existing technologies could save half of 2000 US oil and gas and three-fourths of US electricity, at lower cost than producing and delivering that energy from existing facilities. Saving half the oil through efficiency and replacing the other half with saved natural gas and advanced biofuels would cost an average of only 15/barrel and could eliminate US oil use by the 2040s, led by business for profit. Efficiency techniques and ways to combine and apply them continue to improve faster than they're applied, so the ``efficiency resource'' is becoming ever larger and cheaper. As for electricity, ``micropower'' (distributed renewables plus low-carbon cogeneration) is growing so quickly that by 2005 it provided a sixth of the world's electricity and a third of its new electricity, and was adding annually 4x the capacity and 11x the capacity added by nuclear power, which it surpassed in capacity in 2002 and in output in 2006. Together, micropower and ``negawatts'' (saved electricity) now provide upwards half the world's new electrical services, due to their far lower cost and lower financial risk than the central thermal power stations that still dominate policy discussions. For oil and electricity, each of which adds about two-fifths of the world's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, efficiency plus competitive alternative supplies can stabilize the earth's climate at a profit, as well as solving the oil and (largely) the nuclear proliferation problems. Conversely, costlier and slower options, notably nuclear power, would displace less carbon emission per

  18. Response to 'A comment on 'Signatures of fissile materials:High-energy gamma rays following fission,' by Zeev B. Alfassi'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.; Larimer, Ruth-Mary; Shugart, Howard; Browne, Edgardo; Smith, Alan R.; McDonald, Richard J.; Nitsche, Heino; Gupta, Puja; Frank, Michael I.; Gosnell, Thomas B.

    2004-06-03

    Prof. Alfassi has pointed out that radionuclides that are not fission products, but which emit {gamma} rays with energies E{sub {gamma}} > 3 MeV, can be produced by neutron irradiation. He suggested that the decays of such activation products would interfere with the identification of fissionable materials. However, the combination of the energy spectrum and the temporal variation of the fission product gamma rays can be used to distinguish fissionable material from other nuclides. The activation of nuclides that could produce interferences will depend upon the specifics of the cargo and, possibly, the local surroundings. As discussed in our original publication, in addition to the steel that Prof. Alfassi referred to in his Comment, we studied the activation of wood, polyethylene, aluminum, and sandstone. Activation by thermal neutrons will always occur, and Prof. Alfassi correctly points out that nuclides such as {sup 49}Ca and {sup 37}S can be formed in this way. These nuclides are representative of most potential interferences. Both {sup 48}Ca and {sup 36}S have very low isotopic abundances (0.187% and 0.02%, respectively) and small thermal neutron capture cross sections (0.20 barns and 0.98 barns, respectively). In addition, their half lives are more than an order of magnitude longer than the gross average observed from the fission products, and more than two orders of magnitude longer than the lifetimes of the shorter-lived fission products that contribute significantly to the total intensity in the energy range of interest. These differences make it possible to distinguish between fission products and thermal neutron activation products. Prof. Alfassi also pointed out that interferences, of which {sup 16}N is likely to be the most important, can be produced by fast neutron reactions. (As described in our original publication, we did not use a 14 MeV generator in our work.) Fortunately, a judicious choice of the source neutron energy can limit the extent of

  19. Sub-library of Updated Fission Barrier Parameters(CENPL-FBP2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The fission barrier parameters are important to determine the fission character of a nucleus. The fission barrier parameters and fission level densities are key ingredients in calculations of not only fission cross section but also various cross sections, and spectra for the fissile nuclides, even heavy nuclides at higher incident energies. It is necessaries that the accuracy of fission barrier parameters requires even higher, and nuclides with fission barrier parameters can cover even wider nuclear range.

  20. Theoretical Description of the Fission Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witold Nazarewicz

    2003-07-01

    The main goals of the project can be summarized as follows: Development of effective energy functionals that are appropriate for the description of heavy nuclei. Our goal is to improve the existing energy density (Skyrme) functionals to develop a force that will be used in calculations of fission dynamics. Systematic self-consistent calculations of binding energies and fission barriers of actinide and trans-actinide nuclei using modern density functionals. This will be followed by calculations of spontaneous fission lifetimes and mass and charge divisions using dynamic adiabatic approaches based on the WKB approximation. Investigate novel microscopic (non-adiabatic) methods to study the fission process.

  1. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the eleventh issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS

  2. Fission product behaviour in severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of fission product (FP) behaviour in severe accidents is important for source term assessment and accident mitigation measures. For example in accident management the operator needs to know the effect of different actions on the behaviour and release of fission products. At VTT fission product behaviour have been studied in different national and international projects. In this presentation the results of projects in EU funded 4th framework programme Nuclear Fission Safety 1994-1998 are reported. The projects are: fission product vapour/aerosol chemistry in the primary circuit (FI4SCT960020), aerosol physics in containment (FI4SCT950016), revaporisation of test samples from Phebus fission products (FI4SCT960019) and assessment of models for fission product revaporisation (FI4SCT960044). Also results from the national project 'aerosol experiments in the Victoria facility' funded by IVO PE and VTT Energy are reported

  3. Fission yield studies at the IGISOL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penttilae, H.; Elomaa, V.V.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I.D.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Weber, C.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Rubchenya, V. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-15

    Low-energy-particle-induced fission is a cost-effective way to produce neutron-rich nuclei for spectroscopic studies. Fission has been utilized at the IGISOL to produce isotopes for decay and nuclear structure studies, collinear laser spectroscopy and precision mass measurements. The ion guide technique is also very suitable for the fission yield measurements, which can be performed very efficiently by using the Penning trap for fission fragment identification and counting. The proton- and neutron-induced fission yield measurements at the IGISOL are reviewed, and the independent isotopic yields of Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Cd and In in 25MeV deuterium-induced fission are presented for the first time. Moving to a new location next to the high intensity MCC30/15 light-ion cyclotron will allow also the use of the neutron-induced fission to produce the neutron rich nuclei at the IGISOL in the future. (orig.)

  4. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.

    2009-01-27

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  5. Results of a First Generation Propellant Energy Source Module Testing: Non-Nuclear Testing of Fission System

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Houts, Mike; Dickens, Ricky; Dobson, Chris; Pederson, Kevin; Reid, Bob

    1999-01-01

    The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on the Module Unfueled Thermal- hydraulic Test (MUTT) article has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This paper discusses the results of these experiments to date, and describes the additional testing that will be performed. Recommendations related to the design of testable space fission power and propulsion systems are made.

  6. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing

  7. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  8. Energy Dependence of Fission Product Yields from 235U, 238U and 239Pu for Incident Neutron Energies Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, M. E.; Arnold, C. W.; Becker, J. A.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fallin, B.; Fowler, M. M.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Krishichayan; Macri, R.; Rusev, G.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Fission Product Yields (FPY) have historically been one of the most observable features of the fission process. They are known to have strong variations that are dependent on the fissioning species, the excitation energy, and the angular momentum of the compound system. However, consistent and systematic studies of the variation of these FPY with energy have proved challenging. This is caused primarily by the nature of the experiments that have traditionally relied on radiochemical procedures to isolate specific fission products. Although radiochemical procedures exist that can isolate all products, each element presents specific challenges and introduces varying degrees of systematic errors that can make inter-comparison of FPY uncertain. Although of high importance in fields such as nuclear forensics and Stockpile Stewardship, accurate information about the energy dependence of neutron induced FPY are sparse, due primarily to the lack of suitable monoenergetic neutron sources. There is a clear need for improved data, and to address this issue, a collaboration was formed between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure the energy dependence of FPY for 235U, 238U and 239Pu. The measurements have been performed at TUNL, using a 10 MV Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to produce monoenergetic neutrons at energies between 0.6 MeV to 14.8 MeV through a variety of reactions. The measurements have utilized a dual-fission chamber, with thin (10-100 μg/cm2) reference foils of similar material to a thick (100-400 mg) activation target held in the center between the chambers. This method allows for the accurate determination of the number of fissions that occurred in the thick target without requiring knowledge of the fission cross section or neutron fluence on target. Following activation, the thick target was removed from the dual-fission chamber and gamma

  9. Measurement of Fragment Mass Distributions in Neutron-induced Fission of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simutkin, V.D. [Uppsala University, P.O Box 525, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Conceptual analysis of accelerator-driven systems assumes extensive use of nuclear data on neutron-induced reactions at intermediate energies. In particular, information about the fission fragment yields from the {sup 238}U(n,f) and {sup 232}Th(n,f) reactions is of particular interest at neutron energies from 10 to 200 MeV. However, there is a lack of such data for both {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th. Up to now, the intermediate energy measurements have been performed for {sup 238}U only, and there are no data for the {sup 232}Th(n,f) reaction. The aim of the work is to provide such data. Fission fragment mass distributions for the {sup 232}Th(n,f) and {sup 238}U(n,f) reactions have been measured for the incident neutron energies 32.8 MeV, 45.3 MeV and 59.9 MeV. The experiments have been performed at the neutron beam facility of the Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium. A multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber has been used as a fission fragment detector. The data obtained have been interpreted in terms of the multimodal random neck-rupture model (MMRNRM). (authors)

  10. Physics and Chemistry of Fission. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Physics and Chemistry of Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recognition of recent significant developments in nuclear fission, the International Atomic Energy Agency convened this first International Symposium on the Physics and Chemistry of Fission at Salzburg, Austria, from 22 to 26 March, 1965. Nearly 200 delegates from 29 countries and 5 international organizations participated in the Symposium in which all aspects of the fission process and its products were considered. Each of the nine technical sessions of the Symposium was opened with a survey paper intended to provide an up-to-date picture of the current status of the session topic. Contributed original papers were then presented during the remainder of each session. The first two sessions were concerned with dynamics in the neighbourhood of the saddle point and the descent from saddle point to scission point, and the interpretation of angular distribution and fission cross-section data. The remaining seven sessions were concerned largely with experimental studies of post-scission phenomena. These sessions were marked by reports of truly impressive advances in new experimental techniques such as solid-state detectors in conjunction with ultra-fast time-of-flight and coincidence methods, on-line mass separators, detailed studies of nuclear gamma rays, X-rays and conversion electrons, and the increasing use of big computers for ever more elaborate (and, it is to be hoped, more accurate) data processing and analysis. It was clear at the Salzburg Symposium that the long-standing gap between empirical knowledge and theoretical understanding of fission is still widening. The fission theorists nevertheless have welcomed this flood of new information as additional material for a systematic approach that must ultimately lead to fuller theoretical understanding of the process of nuclear fission

  11. Two-Dimensional Mapping of the Calculated Fission Power for the Full-Size Fuel Plate Experiment Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G. S.; Lillo, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program assigned to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the responsibility of developing and demonstrating high uranium density research reactor fuel forms to enable the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) in research and test reactors around the world. A series of full-size fuel plate experiments have been proposed for irradiation testing in the center flux trap (CFT) position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These full-size fuel plate tests are designated as the AFIP tests. The AFIP nominal fuel zone is rectangular in shape having a designed length of 21.5-in (54.61-cm), width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), and uniform thickness of 0.014-in (0.03556-cm). This gives a nominal fuel zone volume of 0.482 in3 (7.89 cm3) per fuel plate. The AFIP test assembly has two test positions. Each test position is designed to hold 2 full-size plates, for a total of 4 full-size plates per test assembly. The AFIP test plates will be irradiated at a peak surface heat flux of about 350 W/cm2 and discharged at a peak U-235 burn-up of about 70 at.%. Based on limited irradiation testing of the monolithic (U-10Mo) fuel form, it is desirable to keep the peak fuel temperature below 250°C to achieve this, it will be necessary to keep plate heat fluxes below 500 W/cm2. Due to the heavy U-235 loading and a plate width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), the neutron self-shielding will increase the local-to-average-ratio (L2AR) fission power near the sides of the fuel plates. To demonstrate that the AFIP experiment will meet the ATR safety requirements, a very detailed 2-dimensional (2D) Y-Z fission power profile was evaluated in order to best predict the fuel plate temperature distribution. The ability to accurately predict fuel plate power and burnup are essential to both the design of the AFIP tests as well as evaluation of the irradiated fuel performance. To support this need, a detailed MCNP Y

  12. Up-to-date status and problems of the experimental nucleon-induced fission cross section data base at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review presents a critical consideration of all experimental data known to the authors by the end of 1998, for nuclei from 181Ta to 243Am and in the projectile energy range up to 30 GeV for protons and up to 450 MeV for neutrons. Special attention was paid to elements in the W-Bi region which are regarded as the most prospective materials for neutron-producing targets for ADS. The experimental data on nucleon-induced fission fragment angular distributions were systematized for the first time for projectile energies above 20 MeV . Data on neutron-induced fission cross sections and angular distributions are compared with proton-induced data. The large dispersion of some results and other problems of experimental data base are discussed. The possibilities of new experiments with proton beams and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams are discussed

  13. Highly efficient spin-conversion effect leading to energy up-converted electroluminescence in singlet fission photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    Free charge generation in donor-acceptor (D-A) based organic photovoltaic diodes (OPV) progresses through formation of charge-transfer (CT) and charge-separated (CS) states and excitation decay to the triplet level is considered as a terminal loss. On the other hand a direct excitation decay to the triplet state is beneficial for multiexciton harvesting in singlet fission photovoltaics (SF-PV) and the formation of CT-state is considered as a limiting factor for multiple triplet harvesting. These two extremes when present in a D-A system are expected to provide important insights into the mechanism of free charge generation and spin-character of bimolecular recombination in OPVs. Herein, we present the complete cycle of events linked to spin conversion in the model OPV system of rubrene/C60. By tracking the spectral evolution of photocurrent generation at short-circuit and close to open-circuit conditions we are able to capture spectral changes to photocurrent that reveal the triplet character of CT-state. Furthermore, we unveil an energy up-conversion effect that sets in as a consequence of triplet population build-up where triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) process effectively regenerates the singlet excitation. This detailed balance is shown to enable a rare event of photon emission just above the open-circuit voltage (VOC) in OPVs.

  14. Measurement of the energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission fragments using nuclear track detectors and digital image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Castano, V. M. [UNAM, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Queretaro, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico); Gaso, I. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mena, M.; Segovia, N. [UNAM, Instituto de Geofisica, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    The energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission fragments was measured using nuclear track detectors and digital image analysis system. The detection material was fused silica glass. The detectors were chemically etched in an 8% HF solution. After experimenting with various etching time, it was found that the best resolution of the track diameter distribution was obtained after 30 minutes of etching. Both Gaussian and Lorentzian curves were fit to the track diameter distribution histograms and used to determine the basic parameters of the distribution of the light (N{sub L}) and heavy (N{sub H}) formed peaks and the minimum of the central valley (N{sub V}). Advantages of the method presented here include the fully-automated analysis process, the low cost of the nuclear track detectors and the simplicity of the nuclear track method. The distribution resolution obtained by this method is comparable with the resolution obtained by electronic analysis devices. The descriptive variables calculated were very close to those obtained by other methods based on the use of semiconductor detectors. (Author)

  15. Advanced Potential Energy Surfaces for Molecular Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaugh, Alex; Boateng, Henry A; Bradshaw, Richard T; Demerdash, Omar N; Dziedzic, Jacek; Mao, Yuezhi; Margul, Daniel T; Swails, Jason; Zeng, Qiao; Case, David A; Eastman, Peter; Wang, Lee-Ping; Essex, Jonathan W; Head-Gordon, Martin; Pande, Vijay S; Ponder, Jay W; Shao, Yihan; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Todorov, Ilian T; Tuckerman, Mark E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-09-22

    Advanced potential energy surfaces are defined as theoretical models that explicitly include many-body effects that transcend the standard fixed-charge, pairwise-additive paradigm typically used in molecular simulation. However, several factors relating to their software implementation have precluded their widespread use in condensed-phase simulations: the computational cost of the theoretical models, a paucity of approximate models and algorithmic improvements that can ameliorate their cost, underdeveloped interfaces and limited dissemination in computational code bases that are widely used in the computational chemistry community, and software implementations that have not kept pace with modern high-performance computing (HPC) architectures, such as multicore CPUs and modern graphics processing units (GPUs). In this Feature Article we review recent progress made in these areas, including well-defined polarization approximations and new multipole electrostatic formulations, novel methods for solving the mutual polarization equations and increasing the MD time step, combining linear-scaling electronic structure methods with new QM/MM methods that account for mutual polarization between the two regions, and the greatly improved software deployment of these models and methods onto GPU and CPU hardware platforms. We have now approached an era where multipole-based polarizable force fields can be routinely used to obtain computational results comparable to state-of-the-art density functional theory while reaching sampling statistics that are acceptable when compared to that obtained from simpler fixed partial charge force fields. PMID:27513316

  16. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 5: Conclusions and recomendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Air pollution resulting from the use of fossil fuels is discussed. Phenomena relating to the emission of CO2 such as the greenhouse effect and multiplier effect are explored. Particulate release is also discussed. The following recommendations are made for the elimination of fossil fuel combustion products in the United States: development of nuclear breeder reactors, use of solar energy systems, exploration of energy alternatives such as geothermal and fusion, and the substitution of coal for gas and oil use.

  17. A study of potential high band-gap photovoltaic materials for a two step photon intermediate technique in fission energy conversion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prelas, M.A.

    1996-01-24

    This report describes progress made to develop a high bandgap photovoltaic materials for direct conversion to electricity of excimer radiation produced by fission energy pumped laser. This report summarizes the major achievements in sections. The first section covers n-type diamond. The second section covers forced diffusion. The third section covers radiation effects. The fourth section covers progress in Schottky barrier and heterojunction photovoltaic cells. The fifth section covers cell and reactor development.

  18. Search for instantaneous radiation near the instant of break momentum of various fissioning nuclear systems at low excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main results of studying the properties of “instantaneous” neutrons and γ photons during the fission of 233,235U(nth, f) and 239Pu(nth, f) nuclei and spontaneous fission of 252Cf, which were performed on the WWR-M reactor at the St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, are presented. Along with obtaining the main characteristics of the instantaneous radiation from fission fragments, these studies were also aimed at gaining deeper insight into such exotic processes as the emission of break neutrons and γ photons from a fissioning nucleus near the break point. These investigations were performed on different experimental setups using different analytical methods. This approach allowed us not only to find but also to reduce to minimum possible systematic effects. The yields of break neutrons were found to be about (5–7) × 10−2 of the total number of neutrons per 233,235U(n, f) fission event and approximately twice as much for 239Pu(n, f) and 252Cf. The coefficient of T-odd asymmetry for γ photons is in agreement with the estimate obtained on the assumption that the observed effect is mainly related to the γ photons emitted by excited fragments with highly oriented angular momenta. This fact gave grounds to conclude that the desired break γ photons cannot be reliably selected (within the obtained experimental accuracy) against the much larger background of γ photons from fission fragments.

  19. Background radiation from fission pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, T.R.; Arthur, E.D.; Brady, M.C.; LaBauve, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    Extensive source terms for beta, gamma, and neutrons following fission pulses are presented in various tabular and graphical forms. Neutron results from a wide range of fissioning nuclides (42) are examined and detailed information is provided for four fuels: /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 239/Pu; these bracket the range of the delayed spectra. Results at several cooling (decay) times are presented. For ..beta../sup -/ and ..gamma.. spectra, only /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu results are given; fission-product data are currently inadequate for other fuels. The data base consists of all known measured data for individual fission products extensively supplemented with nuclear model results. The process is evolutionary, and therefore, the current base is summarized in sufficient detail for users to judge its quality. Comparisons with recent delayed neutron experiments and total ..beta../sup -/ and ..gamma.. decay energies are included. 27 refs., 47 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Fission cross section uncertainties with the NIFFTE TPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiorgio, Samuele; Niffte Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear data such as neutron-induced fission cross sections play a fundamental role in nuclear energy and defense applications. In recent years, understanding of these systems has become increasingly dependent upon advanced simulation and modeling, where uncertainties in nuclear data propagate in the expected performances of existing and future systems. It is important therefore that uncertainties in nuclear data are minimized and fully understood. For this reason, the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) uses a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure energy-differential (n,f) cross sections with unprecedented precision. The presentation will discuss how the capabilities of the NIFFTE TPC allow to directly measures systematic uncertainties in fission cross sections, in particular for what concerns fission-fragment identification, and target and beam uniformity. Preliminary results from recent analysis of 238U/235U and 239Pu/235U data collected with the TPC will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    OpenAIRE

    Yanez, R; Loveland, W.; King, J.; Barrett, J. S.; Fotiades, N.; Lee, H. Y.

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. (To calibrate the apparatus, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the OSU TRIGA reactor). The TKE decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to ...

  2. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    OpenAIRE

    Yanez, R; Loveland, W.; King, J.; Barrett, J. S.; Fotiades, N.; Lee, H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. To benchmark the TKE measurement, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor, giving pre-neutron emissi...

  3. Radiochemical studies on nuclear fission at Trombay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asok Goswami

    2015-08-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear fission in the year 1939, both physical and radiochemical techniques have been adopted for the study of various aspects of the phenomenon. Due to the ability to separate individual elements from a complex reaction mixture with a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity, a chemist plays a significant role in the measurements of mass, charge, kinetic energy, angular momentum and angular distribution of fission products in various fissioning systems. At Trombay, a small group of radiochemists initiated the work on radiochemical studies of mass distribution in the early sixties. Since then, radiochemical investigations on various fission observables have been carried out at Trombay in , , and heavy-ion-induced fissions. An attempt has been made to highlight the important findings of such studies in this paper, with an emphasis on medium energy and heavy-ion-induced fission.

  4. Development and Utilization of Space Fission Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Mason, Lee S.; Palac, Donald T.; Harlow, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    Space fission power systems could enable advanced civilian space missions. Terrestrially, thousands of fission systems have been operated since 1942. In addition, the US flew a space fission system in 1965, and the former Soviet Union flew 33 such systems prior to the end of the Cold War. Modern design and development practices, coupled with 65 years of experience with terrestrial reactors, could enable the affordable development of space fission power systems for near-term planetary surface applications.

  5. Energy Dissipation in the Process of Ternary Fission in Heavy Nuclear Reaction%重核三裂变反应过程中的能量耗散

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李贤; 晏世伟; 王诚谦

    2015-01-01

    We studied the evolution of the collective motion, interaction potential, the total kinetic and exci-tation energies in ternary fissions of 197 Au +197 Au system at 15 Mev/u, and discussed energy dissipation of this reaction. Through the comparison with energy-angle correlation data in binary fissions, we preliminarily concluded that the first fission of ternary fission was an extreme deep-inelastic process. We further analyzed the correlation of the total kinetic energy with impact parameters in both binary and ternary reactions, and found that the total energy of binary reactions systems was lost about 150 MeV more than ternary fission with small impact parameters, and with larger impact parameters the total energy of ternary reactions were lost 300 MeV more than binary reactions.%研究了15 MeV/u 197 Au+197 Au体系三裂变反应过程中体系的集体运动动能、核-核相互作用势、集体运动总动能以及核子激发能的演化过程,并讨论了该反应过程的能量耗散问题。通过与两裂变时体系总动能εtot和Θc.m.关联图作对比,初步得出三裂变反应体系的第一次裂变是极端深度非弹性散射过程;进一步分析了三裂变与两裂变反应体系总动能与碰撞参数的关系,发现小碰撞参数下两裂变比三裂变反应耗散的能量多大约150 MeV,大碰撞参数下三裂变比两裂变反应多消耗300 MeV。

  6. Historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI. Fission, fusion, accelerator utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overview of the historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI is given in the report. This report reviews the research and development for light water reactor, fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas reactor, fusion reactor and utilization of accelerator-based neutron source. (author)

  7. Nuclear Fission and Cluster Radioactivity An Energy-Density Functional Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hooshyar, M. A; Malik, F. B

    2005-01-01

    It is the first application to nuclear physics from energy-density functional method, for which Professor Walter Kohn received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The book presents a comprehensive extension of the Bohr-Wheeler theory with the present knowledge of nuclear density distribution function.

  8. Historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI. Fission, fusion, accelerator utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tone, Tatsuzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Overview of the historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI is given in the report. This report reviews the research and development for light water reactor, fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas reactor, fusion reactor and utilization of accelerator-based neutron source. (author)

  9. Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liby, Alan L [ORNL; Rogers, Hiram [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this activity was to carry out program implementation and technical projects in support of the ARRA-funded Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program of the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) (formerly the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)). The work was organized into eight projects in four materials areas: strategic materials, structural materials, energy storage and production materials, and advanced/field/transient processing. Strategic materials included work on titanium, magnesium and carbon fiber. Structural materials included work on alumina forming austentic (AFA) and CF8C-Plus steels. The advanced batteries and production materials projects included work on advanced batteries and photovoltaic devices. Advanced/field/transient processing included work on magnetic field processing. Details of the work in the eight projects are available in the project final reports which have been previously submitted.

  10. Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John B. Walter; Mark W. Drigert

    2007-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software.

  11. Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEntee, Jarlath [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Polagye, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Fabien, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Thomson, Jim [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Kilcher, Levi [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Marnagh, Cian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Donegan, James [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices (Project) investigated, analyzed and modeled advanced turbine control schemes with the objective of increasing the energy harvested by hydrokinetic turbines in turbulent flow. Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) implemented and validated a feedforward controller to increase power capture; and applied and tested the controls on ORPC’s RivGen® Power Systems in Igiugig, Alaska. Assessments of performance improvements were made for the RivGen® in the Igiugig environment and for ORPC’s TidGen® Power System in a reference tidal environment. Annualized Energy Production (AEP) and Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) improvements associated with implementation of the recommended control methodology were made for the TidGen® Power System in the DOE reference tidal environment. System Performance Advancement (SPA) goals were selected for the project. SPA targets were to improve Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) and system Availability, with the intention of reducing Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). This project focused primarily reducing in PWR. Reductions in PWR of 25.5% were achieved. Reductions of 20.3% in LCOE were achieved. This project evaluated four types of controllers which were tested in simulation, emulation, a laboratory flume, and the field. The adaptive Kω2 controller performs similarly to the non-adaptive version of the same controller and may be useful in tidal channels where the mean velocity is continually evolving. Trends in simulation were largely verified through experiments, which also provided the opportunity to test assumptions about turbine responsiveness and control resilience to varying scales of turbulence. Laboratory experiments provided an essential stepping stone between simulation and implementation on a field-scale turbine. Experiments also demonstrated that using “energy loss” as a metric to differentiate between well-designed controllers operating at

  12. The SOFIA experiment: Measurement of 236U fission fragment yields in inverse kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grente L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The SOFIA (Studies On FIssion with Aladin experiment aims at measuring fission-fragments isotopic yields with high accuracy using inverse kinematics at relativistic energies. This experimental technique allows to fully identify the fission fragments in nuclear charge and mass number, thus providing very accurate isotopic yields for low energy fission of a large variety of fissioning systems. This report focuses on the latest results obtained with this set-up concerning electromagnetic-induced fission of 236U.

  13. Microstructural Characterization of a Mg Matrix U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plate Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to High Fission Density: SEM Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam B.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Madden, James W.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2016-06-01

    Low-enriched (U-235 aggressively irradiated in ATR. This fuel plate was irradiated as part of the RERTR-8 experiment at high temperature, high fission rate, and high power, up to high fission density. This paper describes the results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of an irradiated fuel plate using polished samples and those produced with a focused ion beam. A follow-up paper will discuss the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Using SEM, it was observed that even at very aggressive irradiation conditions, negligible chemical interaction occurred between the irradiated U-7Mo fuel particles and Mg matrix; no interconnection of fission gas bubbles from fuel particle to fuel particle was observed; the interconnected fission gas bubbles that were observed in the irradiated U-7Mo particles resulted in some transport of solid fission products to the U-7Mo/Mg interface; the presence of microstructural pathways in some U-9.1 Mo particles that could allow for transport of fission gases did not result in the apparent presence of large porosity at the U-7Mo/Mg interface; and, the Mg-Al interaction layers that were present at the Mg matrix/Al 6061 cladding interface exhibited good radiation stability, i.e. no large pores.

  14. Sampling ENDL Watt Fission Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D E

    2004-04-01

    All of the fission spectra in the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, ENDL [1], are defined by a simple analytical function: a Watt spectrum [2], W(a,b,E') = C*Exp[-a*E']*Sinh[(b*E'){sup 1/2}]. Where the normalization, C, is given by, C = [{pi}b/4a]{sup 1/2} Exp[b/4a]/a. The coefficients a and b vary from one isotope to another and also vary weakly with the incident neutron energy. Here E' is the secondary energy, i.e., the energy at which the fission neutrons are emitted. In ENDL energy units of MeV for incident neutron energies between 0 and 20 MeV, in all cases b is very close to 1.0, and a varies over a rather small range near 1.0. Currently there are 38 fissionable isotopes in ENDL. For each of these isotopes I have parameterized a as a simple function of the incident neutron energy, and I treat b as always equal to unity. The values of these parameters are available to TART users as part of the TART CD package [3]. This parameterization coupled with the general Watt sampling method described below results in a very fast and accurate method of sampling all of the fission spectra in ENDL. In all cases I select the fissioning isotope, define a based on isotope and incident neutron energy, and then use the below described method to sample the energy E' of a neutron emitted due to fission.

  15. Dynamical collective potential energy landscape: its impact on the competition between fusion and quasi-fission in a heavy fusing system

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Torres, A

    2006-01-01

    A realistic microscopically-based quantum approach to the competition between fusion and quasi-fission in a heavy fusing system is applied to several reactions leading to $^{256}$No. Fusion and quasi-fission are described in terms of a diffusion process of nuclear shapes through a dynamical collective potential energy landscape which is initially diabatic and gradually becomes adiabatic. The microscopic ingredients of the theory are obtained with a realistic two-center shell model based on Woods-Saxon potentials. The results indicate that (i) the diabatic effects play a very important role in the onset of fusion hindrance for heavy systems, and (ii) very asymmetric reactions induced by closed shell nuclei seem to be the best suited to synthesize the heaviest compound nuclei.

  16. Simultaneous measurement of (n,γ) and (n,fission) cross sections with the DANCE 4π BaF2 array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture cross section measurements on many of the actinides are complicated by low-energy neutron-induced fission, which competes with neutron capture to varying degrees depending on the nuclide of interest. Measurements of neutron capture on 235U using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) have shown that we can partially resolve capture from fission events based on total photon calorimetry (i.e. total γ-ray energy and γ-ray multiplicity per event). The addition of a fission-tagging detector to the DANCE array will greatly improve our ability to separate these two competing processes so that improved neutron capture and (n,γ)/(n,fission) cross section ratio measurements can be obtained. The addition of a fission-tagging detector to the DANCE array will also provide a means to study several important issues associated with neutron-induced fission, including (n,fission) cross sections as a function of incident neutron energy, and total energy and multiplicity of prompt fission photons. We have focused on two detector designs with complementary capabilities, a parallel-plate avalanche counter and an array of solar cells

  17. Advanced nanomaterials and their applications in renewable energy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingbo Louise

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Nanomaterials and Their Applications in Renewable Energy presents timely topics related to nanomaterials' feasible synthesis and characterization, and their application in the energy fields. In addition, the book provides insights and scientific discoveries in toxicity study, with information that is easily understood by a wide audience. Advanced energy materials are important in designing materials that have greater physical, electronic, and optical properties. This book emphasizes the fundamental physics and chemistry underlying the techniques used to develop solar and fuel cell

  18. Advancing Opportunities in Renewable Energy Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vokony István

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The organization - WEC Hungarian Young Professionals in Energy (HYPE - in line with WEC’s (World Energy Council visions aims for the dissemination of the principle of sustainable energy development in Hungary. The HYPE’s goals are to represent the Hungarian energy sector’s viewpoint at national, regional and international events; to introduce and evaluate the key energy issues by preparing studies; and to foster the development of future energy professionals.

  19. Fission fragment angular distributions and fission cross section validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present knowledge of angular distributions of neutron-induced fission is limited to a maximal energy of 15 MeV, with large discrepancies around 14 MeV. Only 238U and 232Th have been investigated up to 100 MeV in a single experiment. The n-TOF Collaboration performed the fission cross section measurement of several actinides (232Th, 235U, 238U, 234U, 237Np) at the n-TOF facility using an experimental set-up made of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC), extending the energy domain of the incident neutron above hundreds of MeV. The method based on the detection of the 2 fragments in coincidence allowed to clearly disentangle the fission reactions among other types of reactions occurring in the spallation domain. I will show the methods we used to reconstruct the full angular resolution by the tracking of fission fragments. Below 10 MeV our results are consistent with existing data. For example in the case of 232Th, below 10 MeV the results show clearly the variation occurring at the first (1 MeV) and second (7 MeV) chance fission, corresponding to transition states of given J and K (total spin and its projection on the fission axis), and a much more accurate energy dependence at the 3. chance threshold (14 MeV) has been obtained. In the spallation domain, above 30 MeV we confirm the high anisotropy revealed in 232Th by the single existing data set. I'll discuss the implications of this finding, related to the low anisotropy exhibited in proton-induced fission. I also explore the critical experiments which is valuable checks of nuclear data. The 237Np neutron-induced fission cross section has recently been measured in a large energy range (from eV to GeV) at the n-TOF facility at CERN. When compared to previous measurements, the n-TOF fission cross section appears to be higher by 5-7 % beyond the fission threshold. To check the relevance of n-TOF data, we simulate a criticality experiment performed at Los Alamos with a 6 kg sphere of 237Np. This sphere was

  20. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  1. [BIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF FISSION SPECTRUM NEUTRONS AND PROTONS WITH ENERGIES OF 60-126 MEV DURING ACUTE AND PROLONGED IRRADIATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafirkin, A V

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons of the fission spectrum are characterized by relatively high values of linear energy transfer (LET). Data about their effects on biological objects are used to evaluate the risk of delayed effects of accelerated ions within the same LET range that serve as an experimental model of the nuclei component of galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Additionally, risks of delayed consequences to cosmonaut's health and average lifetime from certain GCR fluxes and secondary neutrons can be also prognosticated. The article deals with comparative analysis of the literature on reduction of average lifespan (ALS) of animals exposed to neutron reactor spectrum, 60-126 MeV protons, and X- and γ-rays in a broad range of radiation intensity and duration. It was shown that a minimal lifespan reduction by 5% occurs due to a brief exposure to neutrons with the absorbed dose of 5 cGy, whereas same lifespan reduction due to hard X- and γ-radiation occurs after absorption of a minimal dose of 100 cGy. Therefore, according to the estimated minimal ALS reduction in mice, neutron effectiveness is 20-fold higher. Biological effectiveness of protons as regards ALS reduction is virtually equal to that of standard types of radiation. Exposure to X- and γ-radiation with decreasing daily doses, and increasing number of fractions and duration gives rise to an apparent trend toward a less dramatic ALS reduction in mice; on the contrary, exposure to neutrons of varying duration had no effect on threshold doses for the specified ALS reductions. Factors of relative biological effectiveness of neutrons reached 40. PMID:26934784

  2. HYPERFUSE: a novel inertial confinement system utilizing hypervelocity projectiles for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from an LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., 137Cs or 90Sr. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n, 2n), (n, α), etc.) that convert the long lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product

  3. Report of fission study meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is the report of fission Study Meeting held from September 19 to 21, 1985 in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. The objective of this study meeting was to stimulate the research on nuclear physics in Japan, which began to show new development accompanying the advance of the research on heavy ion nuclear reaction, and to make this a new starting point. More than 50 participants from physical, chemical and engineering fields, who have interest in the theory and experiment related to nuclear fission, gathered, and the meeting was a success beyond expectation. The contents covered a wide range including nuclear smashing reaction as well as nuclear fission in a narrow sense. In this book, the gists of 28 papers are collected. (Kako, I.)

  4. Total prompt γ-ray emission in fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.; Kwan, E.; Henserson, R. A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A. C.; Lee, H. Y.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    The total prompt γ-ray energy distributions for the neutron-induced fission of 235U, 239,241Pu at incident neutron energy of 0.025 eV ‒ 100 keV, and the spontaneous fission of 252Cf were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) array in coincidence with the detection of fission fragments by a parallel-plate avalanche counter. DANCE is a highly segmented, highly efficient 4π γ-ray calorimeter. Corrections were made to the measured distribution by unfolding the two-dimension spectrum of total γ-ray energy vs multiplicity using a simulated DANCE response matrix. The mean values of the total prompt γ-ray energy, determined from the unfolded distributions, are ~ 20% higher than those derived from measurements using single γ-ray detector for all the fissile nuclei studied. This raises serious concern on the validity of the mean total prompt γ-ray energy obtained from the product of mean values for both prompt γ-ray energy and multiplicity.

  5. Neutron emission prior to fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, many groups have measured neutrons and light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments in heavy ion reactions. In most cases, particles emitted with an energy spectrum and angular distribution characteristic of that of compound nucleus evaporation have been measured in excess of statistical model predictions. They have chosen to investigate this effect in detail by studying neutron emission in the 158Er composite system. The advantage of this system is that it can be produced by a variety of projectile target combinations. They have chosen four combinations which form 158Er with similar critical angular momenta but varying excitation energy. The rationale is to form the same system with different neutron emission times; if the enhanced neutrons are being emitted during the fission process, the different emission time scales might possibly be used to time the fission process. In addition, they impose an additional constraint - that they have a significant fission barrier for most of the partial waves involved in the fission process. The reactions they have selected are 16O + 142Nd (207 MeV beam energy), 24Mg + 134Ba (180 MeV), 32S + 126Te (180 MeV), 50Ti + 108Pd (216 MeV)

  6. Collective spectra along the fission barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigni M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Discrete and continuous spectra of fissioning nuclei at the humps of fission barriers (Bohr transition states and in the intermediate wells (superdeformed and hyperdeformed states play a key role in the calculation of fission cross sections. A theoretical evaluation of the collective parts of the spectra is possible within the framework of the dinuclear system model, which treats the wave function of the fissioning nucleus as a superposition of a mononucleus configuration and two–cluster configurations in a dynamical way, permitting exchange of upper–shell nucleons between clusters. The impact of theoretical spectra on neutron–induced fission cross sections and, in combination with an improved version of the scission–point model, on angular distribution of fission fragments is evaluated for plutonium isotopes of interest to nuclear energy applications.

  7. Fast fission phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    In these lectures we have described two different phenomena occuring in dissipative heavy ion collisions : neutron-proton asymmetry and fast fission. Neutron-proton asymmetry has provided us with an example of a fast collective motion. As a consequence quantum fluctuations can be observed. The observation of quantum or statistical fluctuations is directly connected to the comparison between the phonon energy and the temperature of the intrinsic system. This means that this mode might also provide a good example for the investigation of the transition between quantum and statistical fluctuations which might occur when the bombarding energy is raised above 10 MeV/A. However it is by no means sure that in this energy domain enough excitation energy can be put into the system in order to reach such high temperatures over the all system. The other interest in investigating neutron-proton asymmetry above 10 MeV/A is that the interaction time between the two incident nuclei will decrease. Consequently, if some collective motion should still be observed, it will be one of the last which can be seen. Fast fission corresponds on the contrary to long interaction times. The experimental indications are still rather weak and mainly consist of experimental data which cannot be understood in the framework of standard dissipative models. We have seen that a model which can describe both the entrance and the exit configuration gives this mechanism in a natural way and that the experimental data can, to a good extend, be explained. The nicest thing is probably that our old understanding of dissipative heavy ion collisions is not changed at all except for the problems that can now be understood in terms of fast fission. Nevertheless this area desserve further studies, especially on the experimental side to be sure that the consistent picture which we have on dissipative heavy ion collisions still remain coherent in the future.

  8. Effect of nuclear viscosity on fission process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shidong; Kuang Huishun; Zhang Shufa; Xing Jingru; Zhuo Yizhong; Wu Xizhen; Feng Renfa

    1989-02-01

    According to the fission diffusion model, the deformation motion of fission nucleuses is regarded as a diffusion process of quasi-Brownian particles under fission potential. Through simulating such Brownian motion in two dimensional phase space by Monte-Carlo mehtod, the effect of nuclear visocity on Brownian particle diffusion is studied. Dynamical quanties, such as fission rate, kinetic energy distribution on scission, and soon are numerically calculated for various viscosity coefficients. The results are resonable in physics. This method can be easily extended to deal with multi-dimensional diffusion problems.

  9. Fission investigations and evaluation activities at IRMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IRMM has a longstanding tradition in the field of neutron induced fission physics studies. It is especially well equipped with world-class facilities as the high resolution neutron time-of-flight spectrometer GELINA and the 7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator for the quasi-monoenergetic neutron production. During the past decade several neutron induced fission reactions have been studied in the energy range from eV up to 6 MeV and spontaneous fission. The isotopes under investigation were 235,238 U(n,f), 239 Pu(n,f), 237 Np(n,f), 252 Cf(SF) and 233 Pa(n,f). For all isotopes but 233 Pa, the fission fragment mass-yield and total kinetic energy distributions were measured. 233 Pa was only investigated for the fission cross-section. The results have been described within the multi-modal fission model. The three most dominant fission modes, the two asymmetric standard I (S1) and standard II (S2) as well as the the symmetric superlong mode were used for all the isotopes but 252 Cf. For this isotope at least one other fission mode had to be taken into account, the so--called standard III (S3) mode. Since the theoretical interpretation of experimental results was rather successful also an attempt was made to improve the evaluation of the respective fission cross-section as well as their neutron multiplicities and spectra. Here, the statistical model for fission cross-section evaluation was extended by including the multi-modality concept for fission. Based on the underlying model, separate outer fission barriers have been considered for each mode, while the inner barriers and isomeric wells are assumed to be the same. The self-consistent calculations of the fission cross-section as well as total, capture, elastic and inelastic cross-sections were in good agreement with the experimental data and evaluated nuclear data libraries. As a side product, also fission fragment mass yield distributions have been deduced at incident neutron energies hitherto unaccessible. Very

  10. Advanced DC/AC inverters applications in renewable energy

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Fang Lin

    2013-01-01

    DC/AC inversion technology is of vital importance for industrial applications, including electrical vehicles and renewable energy systems, which require a large number of inverters. In recent years, inversion technology has developed rapidly, with new topologies improving the power factor and increasing power efficiency. Proposing many novel approaches, Advanced DC/AC Inverters: Applications in Renewable Energy describes advanced DC/AC inverters that can be used for renewable energy systems. The book introduces more than 100 topologies of advanced inverters originally developed by the authors,

  11. Development of ODS FeCrAl for Compatibility in Fusion and Fission Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pint, B. A.; Dryepondt, S.; Unocic, K. A.; Hoelzer, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12-15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is a general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.

  12. Renewable energy systems advanced conversion technologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Fang Lin

    2012-01-01

    Energy conversion techniques are key in power electronics and even more so in renewable energy source systems, which require a large number of converters. Renewable Energy Systems: Advanced Conversion Technologies and Applications describes advanced conversion technologies and provides design examples of converters and inverters for renewable energy systems-including wind turbine and solar panel energy systems. Learn Cutting-Edge Techniques for Converters and Inverters Setting the scene, the book begins with a review of the basics of astronomy and Earth physics. It then systematically introduc

  13. Advanced Burnup Method using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilton, Bruce A. [Idaho Natonal Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Glagolenko, Irina; Giglio, Jeffrey J.; Cummings, Daniel G

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear fuel burnup is a key parameter used to assess irradiated fuel performance, to characterize the dependence of property changes due to irradiation, and to perform nuclear materials accountability. For advanced transmutation fuels and high burnup LWR fuels that have multiple fission sources, the existing Nd-148 ASTM burnup determination practice requires input of calculated fission fractions (identifying the specific fission source isotope and neutron energy that yielded fission, e.g., U-235 from thermal neutron, U-238 from fast neutron) from computational neutronics analysis in addition to the measured concentration of a single fission product isotope. We report a novel methodology of nuclear fuel burnup determination, which is completely independent of model predictions and reactor types. The proposed method leverages the capability of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantify multiple fission products and actinides and uses these data to develop a system of burnup equations whose solution is the fission fractions. The fission fractions are substituted back in the equations to determine burnup. This technique requires high fidelity fission yield data, which is not uniformly available for all fission products. We discuss different means that can potentially assist in indirect determination, verification and improvement (refinement) of the ambiguously known fission yields. A variety of irradiated fuel samples are characterized by ICP-MS and the results used to test the advanced burnup method. The samples include metallic alloy fuel irradiated in fast spectrum reactor (EBRII) and metallic alloy in a tailored spectrum and dispersion fuel in the thermal spectrum of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The derived fission fractions and measured burnups are compared with calculated values predicted by neutronics models. (authors)

  14. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R A Gherghescu; D N Poenaru

    2015-09-01

    The macroscopic–microscopic method is extended to calculate the deformation energy and penetrability for binary nuclear configurations typical for fission processes. The deformed two-centre shell model is used to obtain single-particle energy levels for the transition region of two partially overlapped daughter and emitted fragment nuclei. The macroscopic part is obtained using the Yukawa-plus-exponential potential. The microscopic shell and pairing corrections are obtained using the Strutinsky and BCS approaches and the cranking formulae yield the inertia tensor. Finally, the WKB method is used to calculate penetrabilities and spontaneous fission half-lives. Calculations are performed for the decay of 282,292120 nuclei.

  15. Average Number and Energy of Gamma-Rays Emitted as a Function of Fragment Mass in U235 Thermal-Neutron-Induced Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The average number and energy of gamma-rays emitted as a function of fragment mass in U235 thermal-neutron-induced fission have been measured. A three-parameter correlation experimeni was performed in which two silicon suríace barrier detectors were used to measure the fission product energies, and a 5-in-diam., 4-in-thick Nal(Tl) scintillation crystal was used to measure the gamma-ray energies. Extreme care was taken in the experimental arrangement to avoid counting direct fission neutrons, scattered gamma-rays and neutrons, and other false events. Data were recorded event-by-event in a system similar to that used in previous energy correlation experiments at Oak Ridge, and were analysed according to a ''weighting method'' proposed by Maier-Leibnitz. The total number and energy of the gamma- rays for both fragments as a function of mass ratio were obtained directly. The number and energy of gamma- rays for individual fragment masses were determined by making use of the variation in laboratory angular distribution and energy of the gamma-rays emitted from moving fragments. In particular, the 0° to 180° ratio of the number of gamma-rays from a moving source emitting isotropically in its centre-of-mass system is proportional to 1 + 2 x 2v/c; similarly the 0° to 180° ratio in total gamma energy is proportional to 1 + 2 x3v/c. Thus by comparing appropriate ratios in the analysis for light and heavy fragments moving towards or away from the gamma-ray derector, one obtains these quantities as a function of individual fragment mass. Results of preliminary analyses show interesting similarities in behaviour to those for neutrons. Both the total energy and average quantum energy of gamma-rays are essentially constant over most of the range of mass ratios; however a broad minimum is observed for the total energy in the region where Mh ∼ 130, i. e. where ZH ∼ 50 or NH ∼ 82. An increase is observed in the total energy as the mass ratio approaches unity. The number

  16. Measurement of high energy neutrons (E > 50 MeV) at electron accelerators of INDUS accelerator complex using bismuth fission detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the measurement of high energy neutron component (E > 50 MeV) carried out at INDUS-I (450 MeV) and INDUS-II (2.5 GeV) electron accelerators (RRCAT, Indore, India). The study is based on the registration of neutron induced fission fragments from bismuth films in solid polymeric track detectors. These BFD stacks were exposed at the injection septums of booster synchrotron, Indus-1 and Indus-2 storage rings, where the possibility of dose due to beam loss is expected to be maximum. The detection efficiency of the bismuth fission detector (BFD) could be enhanced by enlarging the detector surface area and accordingly a large area spark counter was fabricated for automatic and rapid counting of the track densities. The dose equivalent rates were found to be 11.0 ± 0.7 mrem/h (73 h total exposure time), 11.0 ± 2.6 mrem/h (35 h total exposure time) and 65.0 mrem/h (5 h total exposure time) for the injection septums of booster synchrotron, Indus-1 and Indus-2 respectively. However, the values reported here were not corrected for the contribution from photo fissions, if any. (author)

  17. Advanced Energy Projects: FY 1993, Research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    AEP has been supporting research on novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, new uses for scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction, etc. The summaries are grouped according to projects active in FY 1993, Phase I SBIR projects, and Phase II SBIR projects. Investigator and institutional indexes are included.

  18. Prompt fission neutron spectrum of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capote, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Chen, Y. -J. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Hambsch, F. J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre - IRRM, Geel (Belgium); Jurado, B. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Kornilov, N. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Lestone, J. P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Litaize, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Morillon, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Neudecker, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Oberstedt, S. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre - IRRM, Geel (Belgium); Ohsawa, T. [Kinki Univ., Osaka-fu (Japan); Otuka, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pronyaev, V. G. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Saxena, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Schmidt, K. H. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Serot, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Shcherbakov, O. A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of NRC " Kurchatov Institute" , Gatchina (Russian Federation); Shu, N. -C. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Smith, D. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Talou, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trkov, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Tudora, A. C. [Univ. of Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Vorobyev, A. S. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of NRC " Kurchatov Institute" , Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutron emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  19. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberstedt A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments’ heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  20. Spontaneous fission properties and lifetime systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Half-lives for spontaneous fission of nuclides with even and odd numbers of particles are compared with recent theoretical calculations. A summary of odd particle hindrance factors is given. The most recent measurements of kinetic-energy and mass distributions and neutron emission for spontaneous fission of the heaviest nuclides are summarized and discussed. 51 refs., 9 figs

  1. Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEntee, Jarlath [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Polagye, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Fabien, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Thomson, Jim [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Kilcher, Levi [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Marnagh, Cian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Donegan, James [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices (Project) investigated, analyzed and modeled advanced turbine control schemes with the objective of increasing the energy harvested by hydrokinetic turbines in turbulent flow. Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) implemented and validated a feedforward controller to increase power capture; and applied and tested the controls on ORPC’s RivGen® Power Systems in Igiugig, Alaska. Assessments of performance improvements were made for the RivGen® in the Igiugig environment and for ORPC’s TidGen® Power System in a reference tidal environment. Annualized Energy Production (AEP) and Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) improvements associated with implementation of the recommended control methodology were made for the TidGen® Power System in the DOE reference tidal environment. System Performance Advancement (SPA) goals were selected for the project. SPA targets were to improve Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) and system Availability, with the intention of reducing Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). This project focused primarily reducing in PWR. Reductions in PWR of 25.5% were achieved. Reductions of 20.3% in LCOE were achieved. This project evaluated four types of controllers which were tested in simulation, emulation, a laboratory flume, and the field. The adaptive Kω2 controller performs similarly to the non-adaptive version of the same controller and may be useful in tidal channels where the mean velocity is continually evolving. Trends in simulation were largely verified through experiments, which also provided the opportunity to test assumptions about turbine responsiveness and control resilience to varying scales of turbulence. Laboratory experiments provided an essential stepping stone between simulation and implementation on a field-scale turbine. Experiments also demonstrated that using “energy loss” as a metric to differentiate between well-designed controllers operating at

  2. Mutlifunctional Fibers for Energy Storage in Advanced EVA Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the Phase II effort is to demonstrate prototype multifunctional EVA system power patches that integrate energy storage into advanced space...

  3. A Fusion-Fission Reactor Concept based on Viable Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The world needs a great deal of carbon free energy for civilization to continue. Nuclear power is attractive for helping cut carbon emissions and reducing imports of fossil fuel. It is commonly realized that it needs hard work before pure fusion energy could be commercially and economically utilized. Some countries are speeding up the development of their fission industry. In China, the government has decided to develop nuclear power with a mid-term target of ∼40 GWe in 2020. If only PWR is used to meet the huge nuclear capacity requirement, there may be a shortage of fissile uranium and an increase of long-lived nuclear wastes. Therefore, any activity to solve the problems has been welcome. A lot of research activities had been done to evaluate the possibility of the hybrid systems in the world, however, most of them were based on advanced fusion and fission technologies. In this contribution, three types of fusion-fission hybrid reactor concepts, i.e. the energy multiplier named FDS-EM, the fuel breeder named FDS-FB, waste transmuter named FDS-WT, have been proposed for the re-examination of feasibility, capability and safety and environmental potential of fission-fusion hybrid systems. Then based on the re-evaluation activity, a multi-functional fusion-fission reactor concept named FDS-MF simultaneously for nuclear waste transmutation, fissile fuel breeding and thermal energy production based on viable technologies i.e. available or limitedly extrapolated nuclear, processing and fusion technologies is proposed. The tokamak can be designed based on relatively easy-achieved plasma parameters extrapolated from the successful operation of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in China and other tokamaks in the world, and the subcritical blanket can be designed based on the well-developed technology of PWR. The design and optimization of fusion plasma core parameters, fission blanket and fuel cycle have been presented. And the

  4. Advanced Waste-To-Energy Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Branchini, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The increase in environmental and healthy concerns, combined with the possibility to exploit waste as a valuable energy resource, has led to explore alternative methods for waste final disposal. In this context, the energy conversion of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) in Waste-To-Energy (WTE) power plant is increasing throughout Europe, both in terms of plants number and capacity, furthered by legislative directives. Due to the heterogeneous nature of waste, some differences with respect to a...

  5. Advanced energy projects; FY 1995 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The AEP Division supports projects to explore novel energy-related concepts which are typically at an early stage of scientific development, and high-risk, exploratory concepts. Topical areas presently receiving support are: novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, exploring uses of new scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. There were 46 research projects during FY 1995; ten were initiated during that fiscal year. The summaries are separated into grant and laboratory programs, and small business innovation research programs.

  6. Curved Waveguide Based Nuclear Fission for Small, Lightweight Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Robert; Putnam, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    advance could be applied to direct propulsion through guided fission products or as a secondary energy source for high impulse electric propulsion. It would help meet national needs for highly efficient energy sources with limited dependence on fossil fuels or conflict materials, and it would improve the use of low grade fissile materials which would help reduce national stockpiles and waste.

  7. Fissionable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a presentation of controversies surrounding nuclear energy discussions in the Netherlands and aims to show that there are serious arguments against nuclear energy. Chapters on the following topics are included: the various dimensions of the energy discussion, the background to the existence of controversies in the nuclear energy discussion, the relation between nuclear energy and prosperity, different opinions concerning the cost of producing electricity from nuclear energy, radioactive waste, the consequences of a large scale accident, the relation between the peaceful use of nuclear energy and the proliferation of nuclear weapons, the effects of low radiation doses, the relation between nuclear energy and developments in the Third World, the effect of nuclear energy on democracy. The authors of these chapters, themselves critical of nuclear energy, have described the particular controversy and have given the viewpoints of both advocates and adversaries, followed by their own opinion. The conclusions from each chapter are recapitulated in a summary and the various components of the nuclear energy cycle are presented in an appendix. (C.F.)

  8. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: boost-induced fission

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, P M; Rios, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus, and the daughter products. Purpose: To explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide $^{240}$Pu as an example. Methods: Quadrupole constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickl...

  9. The Energies, Angular Distribution and Yields of the Prompt Neutrons from Individual Fragments in the Thermal-Neutron Fission of U233 and U235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apparatus for simultaneously recording the velocities of both fission fragments and the velocity of a neutron at any one of four angles to the fragment direction has been used to investigate the neutron-emission properties of individual fragments. Early results for U233 exhibit the saw-tooth variation of v, the neutron yield per fragment, observed in the spontaneous fission of Cf252 The yields in the vicinity of mass 130 are consistent with no neutrons being emitted from these fragments. Unlike the neutron yields, the average neutron kinetic energy is symmetric about the symmetric mass point, being high near this point and low at the most probable mass division. The paradox between very small yields and high apparent nuclear temperatures has been qualitatively explained on the basis of a model that takes account of shell structure in the level densities and assumes that at the time of scission the fragments are cold but in some cases highly deformed, in others nearly spherical. The model is supported by the fact that in fissions with more than the average total excitation energy, the fragments near mass 130 and 80 receive much less than half the increase in energy and the other fragment of the pair much more. The experiment is now being conducted with U235 under considerably improved conditions. The background per channel under the neutron spectrum has been reduced by nearly a factor of three, so that 0.39 of all recorded events in the 10° detector are useful neutron events with a corresponding increase in statistical accuracy. Better time resolution in the fragment system (1.5 ns, full width at half maximum) has allowed the. flight paths to be shortened to 125 and 100 cm (formerly 145-145 cm) with a concomitant higher countings rate. (author)

  10. SPIDER Progress Towards High Resolution Correlated Fission Product Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Dan; Meierbachtol, Krista; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arnold, Charles; Blackeley, Rick; Bredeweg, Todd; Devlin, Matt; Hecht, Adam; Jandel, Marian; Jorgenson, Justin; Nelson, Ron; White, Morgan; Spider Team

    2014-09-01

    The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) is under development with the goal of obtaining high-resolution, high-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). A detailed description of the prototype SPIDER detector components will be presented. Characterization measurements with alpha and spontaneous fission sources will also be discussed. LA-UR-14-24875. The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) is under development with the goal of obtaining high-resolution, high-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). A detailed description of the prototype SPIDER detector components will be presented. Characterization measurements with alpha and spontaneous fission sources will also be discussed. LA-UR-14-24875. This work is in part supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Projects 20110037DR and 20120077DR.

  11. Fission barrier heights in the A ∼ 200 mass region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Mahata

    2015-08-01

    Statistical model analysis is carried out for - and -induced fission reactions using a consistent description for fission barrier and level density in A ∼ 200 mass region. A continuous damping of shell correction with excitation energy is considered. Extracted fission barriers agree well with the recent microscopic–macroscopic model. The shell corrections at the saddle point were found to be insignificant.

  12. Energy Multiplier Module (EM{sup 2}) - advanced small modular reactor for electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertch, T.; Schleicher, R.; Choi, H.; Rawls, J., E-mail: timothy.bertch@ga.com [General Atomics, San Diego, California (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In order to provide cost effective nuclear energy in other than large reactor, large grid applications, fission technology needs to make further advances. 'Convert and burn' fast reactors offer long life cores, improved fuel utilization, reduced waste and other benefits while achieving cost effective energy production in a smaller reactor. General Atomics' Energy Multiplier Module (EM{sup 2}), a helium-cooled compact fast reactor that augments its fissile fuel load with either depleted uranium (DU) or used nuclear fuel (UNF). The convert and burn in-situ provides 250 MWe with a 30 year core life. High temperature provides a simple, high efficiency direct cycle gas turbine which along with modular construction, fewer systems, road shipment and minimum on site construction support cost effectiveness. Additional advantages in fuel cycle, non-proliferation and siting flexibility and its ability to meet all safety requirements make for an attractive power source, especially in remote and small grid regions. (author)

  13. Physics of neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the Physics of Neutron Emission in Fission, Mito City (Japan), 24-27 May 1988. Included are the conclusions and recommendations reached at the meeting and the papers presented by the meeting participants. These papers cover the following topics: Energy dependence of the number of fission neutrons ν-bar (3 papers), multiplicity distribution of fission neutrons (3 papers), competition between neutron and γ-ray emission (4 papers), the fission neutron yield in resonances (2 papers) and the energy spectrum of fission neutrons in experiment (9 papers), theory (4 papers) and evaluation (1 paper). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Modeling Innovations Advance Wind Energy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 1981, Glenn Research Center scientist Dr. Larry Viterna developed a model that predicted certain elements of wind turbine performance with far greater accuracy than previous methods. The model was met with derision from others in the wind energy industry, but years later, Viterna discovered it had become the most widely used method of its kind, enabling significant wind energy technologies-like the fixed pitch turbines produced by manufacturers like Aerostar Inc. of Westport, Massachusetts-that are providing sustainable, climate friendly energy sources today.

  15. Search for Singlet Fission Chromophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlas, Z.; Akdag, A.; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Singlet fission, in which a singlet excited chromophore shares its energy with a ground-state neighbor and both end up in their triplet states, is of potential interest for solar cells. Only a handful of compounds, mostly alternant hydrocarbons, are known to perform efficiently. In view of the large number of conditions that a successful candidate for a practical cell has to meet, it appears desirable to extend the present list of high performers to additional classes of compounds. We have (i) identified design rules for new singlet fission chromophores and for their coupling to covalent dimers, (ii) synthesized them, and (iii) evaluated their performance as neat solids or covalent dimers.

  16. Decision support tools for advanced energy management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marik, Karel; Schindler, Zdenek; Stluka, Petr [Honeywell Prague Laboratory, Pod vodarenskou vezi 4, 182 08 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2008-06-15

    Rising fuel costs boost energy prices, which is a driving force for improving efficiency of operation of any energy generation facility. This paper focuses on enhancing the operation of distributed integrated energy systems (IES), system that bring together all forms of cooling, heating and power (CCHP) technologies. Described methodology can be applied in power generation and district heating companies, as well as in small-scale systems that supply multiple types of utilities to consumers in industrial, commercial, residential and governmental spheres. Dispatching of such system in an optimal way needs to assess large number of production and purchasing schemes in conditions of continually changing market and variable utility demands influenced by many external factors, very often by weather conditions. The paper describes a combination of forecasting and optimization methods that supports effective decisions in IES system management. The forecaster generates the future most probable utility demand several hours or days ahead, derived from the past energy consumer behaviour. The optimizer generates economically most efficient operating schedule for the IES system that matches these forecasted energy demands and respects expected purchased energy prices. (author)

  17. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  18. Status of fission yield data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we summarize the current status of the recent US evaluation for 34 fissioning nuclides at one or more neutron incident energies and for spontaneous fission. Currently there are 50 yields sets, and for each we have independent and cumulative yields and uncertainties for approximately 1100 fission products. When finalized the recommended data will become part of Version VI of the US ENDF/B. Other major evaluations in progress that are included in a recently formed IAEA Coordinated Research Program are also summarized. In a second part we review two empirical models in use to estimate independent yields. Comparison of model estimates with measured data is presented, including a comparison with some recent data obtained from Lohengrin (Cf-249 T). 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  19. High-energy diffraction microscopy at the advanced photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lienert, U.; Li, S. F.; Hefferan, C. M.;

    2011-01-01

    The status of the High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) program at the 1-ID beam line of the Advanced Photon Source is reported. HEDM applies high energy synchrotron radiation for the grain and sub-grain scale structural and mechanical characterization of polycrystalline bulk materials in situ...

  20. Multifunctional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Energy Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures—including graphene, fullerenes, etc.—have found applications in a number of areas synergistically with a number of other materials. These multifunctional carbon nanostructures have recently attracted tremendous interest for energy storage applications due to their large aspect ratios, specific surface areas, and electrical conductivity. This succinct review aims to report on the recent advances in energy storage applications involving these multifunctional carbon nanostructures. The advanced design and testing of multifunctional carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications—specifically, electrochemical capacitors, lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells—are emphasized with comprehensive examples.

  1. Research opportunities to advance solar energy utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan S

    2016-01-22

    Major developments, as well as remaining challenges and the associated research opportunities, are evaluated for three technologically distinct approaches to solar energy utilization: solar electricity, solar thermal, and solar fuels technologies. Much progress has been made, but research opportunities are still present for all approaches. Both evolutionary and revolutionary technology development, involving foundational research, applied research, learning by doing, demonstration projects, and deployment at scale will be needed to continue this technology-innovation ecosystem. Most of the approaches still offer the potential to provide much higher efficiencies, much lower costs, improved scalability, and new functionality, relative to the embodiments of solar energy-conversion systems that have been developed to date.

  2. 14. International workshop on nuclear fission physics. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meetings on nuclear fission took place 12-15 October 1998 and was organized by Institute of Physics and Power Engineering. The aim of the workshop was to present and discuss main new both theoretical and experimental results obtained in the area of nuclear fission, dynamical feature, properties of fission fragments and complementary radiation. As usual the program of the workshop was designed to cover a wide range of physical phenomena - from low energy and spontaneous fission to fission of hot rotating nuclei and multifragmentation at intermediate and high energies. Reaction induced by slow and fast neutron, light and heavy ions were discussed

  3. Geometrical and statistical factors in fission of small metal clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Obolensky, O. I.; Lyalin, A. G.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W.

    2005-01-01

    Fission of metastable charged univalent metal clusters has been studied on example of Na_{10}^{2+} and Na_{18}^{2+} clusters by means of density functional theory methods. Energetics of the process, i.e. dissociation energies and fission barriers, as well as its dynamics, i.e. fission pathways, have been analyzed. The dissociation energies and fission barriers have been calculated for the full range of fission channels for the Na_{10}^{2+} cluster. The impact of cluster structure on the fissi...

  4. Application of the dinuclear system model to fission process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A. V.; Shneidman, T. M.; Ventura, A.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical evaluation of the collective excitation spectra of nucleus at large deformations is possible within the framework of the dinuclear system model, which treats the wave function of the fissioning nucleus as a superposition of a mononucleus configuration and two-cluster configurations in a dynamical way, permitting exchange of nucleons between clusters. In this work the method of calculation of the potential energy and the collective spectrum of fissioning nucleus at scission point is presented. Combining the DNS model calculations and the statistical model of fission we calculate the mass, total kinetic energy, and angular distribution of fission fragments for the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu.

  5. Application of the dinuclear system model to fission process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreev A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical evaluation of the collective excitation spectra of nucleus at large deformations is possible within the framework of the dinuclear system model, which treats the wave function of the fissioning nucleus as a superposition of a mononucleus configuration and two-cluster configurations in a dynamical way, permitting exchange of nucleons between clusters. In this work the method of calculation of the potential energy and the collective spectrum of fissioning nucleus at scission point is presented. Combining the DNS model calculations and the statistical model of fission we calculate the mass, total kinetic energy, and angular distribution of fission fragments for the neutron–induced fission of 239Pu.

  6. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock. II. Boost-induced fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide 240Pu as an example. Methods: Following upon the work presented in Goddard et al. [Phys. Rev. C 92, 054610 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.054610, quadrupole-constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickly absorbed by the nucleus. In instantaneous boosts, this leads to fast shape rearrangements and violent dynamics that can ultimately lead to fission. This is a qualitatively different process than the deformation-induced fission. Boosts induced within a finite time window excite the system in a relatively gentler way and do induce fission but with a smaller energy deposition. Conclusions: The fission products obtained using boost-induced fission in time-dependent Hartree-Fock are more asymmetric than the fragments obtained in deformation-induced fission or the corresponding adiabatic approaches.

  7. SOFIA, a Next-Generation Facility for Fission Yields Measurements and Fission Study. First Results and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audouin, L.; Pellereau, E.; Taieb, J.; Boutoux, G.; Béliera, G.; Chatillon, A.; Ebran, A.; Gorbinet, T.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Tassan-Got, L.; Jurado, B.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Caamano, M.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Paradela, C.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, J.-L.; Vargas, J.; Casarejos, E.; Heinz, A.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kurz, N.; Nociforo, C.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rossi, D.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Simon, H.; Voss, B.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    Fission fragments play an important role in nuclear reactors evolution and safety. However, fragments yields are poorly known : data are essentially limited to mass yields from thermal neutron-induced fissions on a very few nuclei. SOFIA (Study On FIssion with Aladin) is an innovative experimental program on nuclear fission carried out at the GSI facility, which aims at providing isotopic yields on a broad range of fissioning systems. Relativistic secondary beams of actinides and pre-actinides are selected by the Fragment Separator (FRS) and their fission is triggered by electromagnetic interaction. The resulting excitation energy is comparable to the result of an interaction with a low-energy neutron, thus leading to useful data for reactor simulations. For the first time ever, both fission fragments are completely identified in charge and mass in a new recoil spectrometer, allowing for precise yields measurements. The yield of prompt neutrons can then be deduced, and the fission mechanism can be ascribed, providing new constraints for fission models. During the first experiment, all the technical challenges were matched : we have thus set new experimental standards in the measurements of relativistic heavy ions (time of flight, position, energy loss).This communication presents a first series of results obtained on the fission of 238U; many other fissioning systems have also been measured and are being analyzed presently. A second SOFIA experiment is planned in September 2014, and will be focused on the measurement of the fission of 236U, the analog of 235U+n.

  8. Fission cross section for 242Am.met

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron-induced fission cross section for 242Am.met (152y) was measured at the Livermore 100-MeV electron linac in the neutron energy range of 0.01 eV to 20 MeV. Fission fragments were detected using a hemispherical fission chamber. The neutron flux was measured below 10 keV using lithium glass scintillators. Above 10 keV, the 242Am.met fission cross section was measured relative to the 235U fission cross section. Below 20 eV, the data were fit with a sum of single-level Breit-Wigner resonances. Results for the distribution of fission widths, the average fission width, and the average level spacing are presented. The fission cross section in the 100 keV to 20 MeV range is compared with previous measurements

  9. Space Experiments to Advance Beamed Energy Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Donald G.

    2010-05-01

    High power microwave sources are now available and usable, with modification, or beamed energy propulsion experiments in space. As output windows and vacuum seals are not needed space is a natural environment for high power vacuum tubes. Application to space therefore improves reliability and performance but complicates testing and qualification. Low power communications satellite devices (TWT, etc) have already been through the adapt-to-space design cycle and this history is a useful pathway for high power devices such as gyrotrons. In this paper, space experiments are described for low earth orbit (LEO) and lunar environment. These experiments are precursors to space application for beamed energy propulsion using high power microwaves. Power generation and storage using cryogenic systems are important elements of BEP systems and also have an important role as part of BEP experiments in the space environment.

  10. Advances in computational studies of energy materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, C R A; Guo, Z X; Miskufova, M; Shevlin, S A; Smith, A G H; Sokol, A A; Walsh, A; Wilson, D J; Woodley, S M

    2010-07-28

    We review recent developments and applications of computational modelling techniques in the field of materials for energy technologies including hydrogen production and storage, energy storage and conversion, and light absorption and emission. In addition, we present new work on an Sn2TiO4 photocatalyst containing an Sn(II) lone pair, new interatomic potential models for SrTiO3 and GaN, an exploration of defects in the kesterite/stannite-structured solar cell absorber Cu2ZnSnS4, and report details of the incorporation of hydrogen into Ag2O and Cu2O. Special attention is paid to the modelling of nanostructured systems, including ceria (CeO2, mixed Ce(x)O(y) and Ce2O3) and group 13 sesquioxides. We consider applications based on both interatomic potential and electronic structure methodologies; and we illustrate the increasingly quantitative and predictive nature of modelling in this field. PMID:20566517

  11. Research opportunities to advance solar energy utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan S

    2016-01-22

    Major developments, as well as remaining challenges and the associated research opportunities, are evaluated for three technologically distinct approaches to solar energy utilization: solar electricity, solar thermal, and solar fuels technologies. Much progress has been made, but research opportunities are still present for all approaches. Both evolutionary and revolutionary technology development, involving foundational research, applied research, learning by doing, demonstration projects, and deployment at scale will be needed to continue this technology-innovation ecosystem. Most of the approaches still offer the potential to provide much higher efficiencies, much lower costs, improved scalability, and new functionality, relative to the embodiments of solar energy-conversion systems that have been developed to date. PMID:26798020

  12. Recent Advancements in Nanogenerators for Energy Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fei; Cai, Qian; Liao, Fan; Shao, Mingwang; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-11-11

    Nanomaterial-based generators are a highly promising power supply for micro/nanoscale devices, capable of directly harvesting energy from ambient sources without the need for batteries. These generators have been designed within four main types: piezoelectric, triboelectric, thermoelectric, and electret effects, and consist of ZnO-based, silicon-based, ferroelectric-material-based, polymer-based, and graphene-based examples. The representative achievements, current challenges, and future prospects of these nanogenerators are discussed.

  13. Advanced Combustion and Fuels; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zigler, Brad

    2015-06-08

    Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, held June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. It addresses technical barriers of inadequate data and predictive tools for fuel and lubricant effects on advanced combustion engines, with the strategy being through collaboration, develop techniques, tools, and data to quantify critical fuel physico-chemical effects to enable development of advanced combustion engines that use alternative fuels.

  14. Materials Challenges for Advanced Combustion and Gasification Fossil Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, S.; Rozzelle, P.; Morreale, B.; Alman, D.

    2011-04-01

    This special section of Metallurgical and Materials Transactions is devoted to materials challenges associated with coal based energy conversion systems. The purpose of this introductory article is to provide a brief outline to the challenges associated with advanced combustion and advanced gasification, which has the potential of providing clean, affordable electricity by improving process efficiency and implementing carbon capture and sequestration. Affordable materials that can meet the demanding performance requirements will be a key enabling technology for these systems.

  15. Wave Energy Study in China: Advancements and Perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游亚戈; 郑永红; 沈永明; 吴必军; 刘荣

    2003-01-01

    The history and current status of research and development of wave energy in the world is briefly introduced. The main problems existing in these studies are pointed out. The description is focused on the current status and the advancements achieved in China. After analysis of the wave energy resources and practical situations in China, it is pointed out that the studies on wave energy should be not only concentrated on the conversion efficiency and costs of wave energy devices, but also focused on the technology of independent operation and stable output of electricity. Finally, the perspectives of application of wave energy in China are discussed.

  16. Fission dynamics with systems of intermediate fissility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Vardaci; A Di Nitto; P N Nadtochy; A Brondi; G La Rana; R Moro; M Cinausero; G Prete; N Gelli; E M Kozulin; G N Knyazheva; I M Itkis

    2015-08-01

    A 4 light charged particle spectrometer, called 8 LP, is in operation at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, for studying reaction mechanisms in low-energy heavy-ion reactions. Besides about 300 telescopes to detect light charged particles, the spectrometer is also equipped with an anular PPAC system to detect evaporation residues and a two-arm time-of-flight spectrometer to detect fission fragments. The spectrometer has been used in several fission dynamics studies using as a probe light charged particles in the fission and evaporation residues (ER) channels. This paper proposes a journey within some open questions about the fission dynamics and a review of the main results concerning nuclear dissipation and fission time-scale obtained from several of these studies. In particular, the advantages of using systems of intermediate fissility will be discussed.

  17. Microscopic Theory of Nuclear Fission: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, N

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. In spontaneous fission, half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, while in induced fission the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are needed. The cornerstone of the current microscopic theory of fission is the energy density functional formalism. Its basic tenets, including tools such as the HFB theory, effective two-body effective nuclear potentials, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections, are presented succinctly. The EDF approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schr\\"odinger equation into a collective Schr\\"odinge...

  18. ENERGY EFFICIENT MODERN BUILDINGS USING ADVANCED MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Amit kumar; parmod kumar; Tarun gupta; Vinod shehrawat

    2016-01-01

    Energy is essence of life. Now days we see that all the activities performed by mankind are being optimized in terms of use of resources. The list of resources being optimized is long, few are very general in nature of their application for example manpower, investment&nb...

  19. A revised calculational model for fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atchison, F.

    1998-09-01

    A semi-empirical parametrization has been developed to calculate the fission contribution to evaporative de-excitation of nuclei with a very wide range of charge, mass and excitation-energy and also the nuclear states of the scission products. The calculational model reproduces measured values (cross-sections, mass distributions, etc.) for a wide range of fissioning systems: Nuclei from Ta to Cf, interactions involving nucleons up to medium energy and light ions. (author)

  20. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the ninth issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The present issue contains also a section with some recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The eighth issue of this series has been published in July 1982 as INDC(NDS)-130. The present issue includes contributions which were received by NDS between 1 August 1982 and 25 June 1983

  1. Advanced Offshore Wind Energy - Atlantic Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempton, Willett

    2015-11-04

    This project developed relationships among the lead institution, U of Delaware, wind industry participants from 11 companies, and two other universities in the region. The participating regional universities were University of Maryland and Old Dominion University. Research was carried out in six major areas: Analysis and documentation of extreme oceanic wind events & their impact on design parameters, calibration of corrosivity estimates measured on a coastal turbine, measurment and modeling of tower structures, measurement and modeling of the tribology of major drive components, and gearbox conditioning monitoring using acoustic sensors. The project also had several educational goals, including establishing a course in wind energy and training graduate students. Going beyond these goals, three new courses were developed, a graduate certificate program in wind power was developed and approved, and an exchange program in wind energy was established with Danish Technical University. Related to the installation of a Gamesa G90 turbine on campus and a Gamesa-UD research program established in part due to this award, several additional research projects have been carried out based on mutual industry-university interests, and funded by turbine revenues. This award and the Gamesa partnership have jointly led to seven graduate students receiving full safety and climb training, to become “research climbers” as part of their wind power training, and contributing to on-turbine research. As a result of the educational program, already six graduate students have taken jobs in the US wind industry.

  2. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Gooden, M.E., E-mail: megooden@tunl.duke.edu [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Howell, C.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Kelley, J.H. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Tornow, W. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Arnold, C.W.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Moody, W.A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Becker, J.A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.A.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  3. Advanced energy projects FY 1983 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Division supports exploratory research on novel concepts related to energy. The research is usually aimed at establishing the scientific feasibility of a concept and, where appropriate, also at estimating its economic viability. Because projects supported inevitably involve a high degree of risk, an indication of a high potential payoff is required. An immediate, specific application of the concept is not an absolute prerequisite for consideration; thus, for example, proposers of schemes leading to the development of x-ray lasers are not required to justify their proposals by discussing potential applications of such lasers. The concepts supported are typically at too early a stage of scientific verification to qualify for funding by DOE programs responsible for technology development. Where doubt exists, such programs are consulted, prior to proposal consideration by AEP, in order to establish their possible interest in the project

  4. Measurements of yields of fission products in the reaction of {sup 238}U with high-energy p, d and n beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolen, J.A.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B. [and others

    1995-08-01

    An experiment was performed at the Michigan State University cyclotron to determine the yields of neutron-rich fission products in the reaction of {sup 238}U with 100-MeV neutrons, 200-MeV deuterons and 200-MeV protons. Several 1-mm-thick {sup 238}U foils were irradiated for 100-second intervals sequentially for each configuration and the ten spectra were added for higher statistics. The three successive spectra, each for a 40 s period, were accumulated for each sample. Ten foils were irradiated. Successive spectra allowed us to determine approximate half-lives of the gamma peaks. Several arrangements, which were similar to the setup we plan to use in our radioactive beam proposal, were used for the production of fission products. For the high-energy neutron irradiation, U foils were placed after a 5-inch-long, 1-inch-diameter Be cylinder which stopped the 200-MeV deuteron beam generating 100-MeV neutrons. Arrangements for deuteron irradiation included direct irradiation of U foils, placing U foils after different lengths of (0.5 inch, 1.0 inch and 1.5 inch) 2-inch diameter U cylinder. Since the deuteron range in uranium is 17 mm, some of the irradiations were due to the secondary neutrons from the deuteron-induced fission of U. Similar arrangements were also used for the 200-MeV proton irradiation of the {sup 238}U foils. In all cases, several neutron-rich fission products were identified and their yields determined. In particular, we were able to observe Sn in all the runs and determine its yield. The data show that with our proposed radioactive device we will be able to produce more than 10{sup 12} {sup 132}Sn atoms per second in the target. Assuming an overall efficiency of 1 %, we will be able to deliver one particle nanoampere of {sup 132}Sn beam at a target location. Detailed analysis of the {gamma}-ray spectra is in progress.

  5. Our 50-year odyssey with fission: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the occasion of this International Conference on Fifty Years Research in Nuclear Fission, we summarize our present understanding of the fission process and the challenges that lie ahead. The basic properties of fission arise from a delicate competition between disruptive Coulomb forces, cohesive nuclear forces, and fluctuating shell and pairing forces. These static forces are primarily responsible for such experimental phenomena as deformed ground-state nuclear shapes, fission into fragments of unequal size, sawtooth neutron yields, spontaneously fissioning isomers, broad resonances and narrow intermediate structure in fission cross sections, and cluster radioactivity. However, inertial and dissipative forces also play decisive roles in the dynamical evolution of a fissioning nucleus. The energy dissipated between the saddle and scission points is small for low initial excitation energy at the saddle point and increases with increasing excitation energy. At moderate excitation energies, the dissipation of collective energy into internal single-particle excitation energy proceeds largely through the interaction of nucleons with the mean field and with each other in the vicinity of the nuclear surface, as well as through the transfer of nucleons between the two portions of the evolving dumbell-like system. These unique dissipation mechanisms arise from the Pauli exclusion principle for fermions and the details of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, which make the mean free path of a nucleon near the Fermi surface at low excitation energy longer than the nuclear radius. With its inverse process of heavy-ion fusion reactions, fission continues to yield surprises in the study of large-amplitude collective nuclear motion. 87 refs., 12 figs

  6. Electron spectra from decay of fission products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, J K

    1982-09-01

    Electron spectra following decay of individual fission products (72 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 162) are obtained from the nuclear data given in the compilation using a listed and documented computer subroutine. Data are given for more than 500 radionuclides created during or after fission. The data include transition energies, absolute intensities, and shape parameters when known. An average beta-ray energy is given for fission products lacking experimental information on transition energies and intensities. For fission products having partial or incomplete decay information, the available data are utilized to provide best estimates of otherwise unknown decay schemes. This compilation is completely referenced and includes data available in the reviewed literature up to January 1982.

  7. Advanced Energy Storage Management in Distribution Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Ceylan, Oguzhan [ORNL; Xiao, Bailu [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Ollis, T Ben [ORNL; King, Daniel J [ORNL; Irminger, Philip [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2016-01-01

    With increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG) in the distribution networks (DN), the secure and optimal operation of DN has become an important concern. In this paper, an iterative mixed integer quadratic constrained quadratic programming model to optimize the operation of a three phase unbalanced distribution system with high penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) panels, DG and energy storage (ES) is developed. The proposed model minimizes not only the operating cost, including fuel cost and purchasing cost, but also voltage deviations and power loss. The optimization model is based on the linearized sensitivity coefficients between state variables (e.g., node voltages) and control variables (e.g., real and reactive power injections of DG and ES). To avoid slow convergence when close to the optimum, a golden search method is introduced to control the step size and accelerate the convergence. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on modified IEEE 13 nodes test feeders with multiple PV panels, DG and ES. Numerical simulation results validate the proposed algorithm. Various scenarios of system configuration are studied and some critical findings are concluded.

  8. Challenge: Advancing Energy Informatics to Enable Assessable Improvements of Energy Performance in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard; Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja;

    2015-01-01

    Within the emerging discipline of Energy Informatics people are researching, developing and applying information and communication technologies, energy engineering and computer science to address energy challenges. In this paper we discuss the challenge of advancing energy informatics to enable...... assessable improvements of energy performance in buildings. This challenge follows a long-standing goal within the built environment to develop processes that enable predictable outcomes. Implementing this goal in the research framework of energy informatics creates a need for establishing a new underlying...

  9. Rearrangement of cluster structure during fission processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2004-01-01

    groups of atoms from the parent cluster is largely independent of the isomer form of the parent cluster. The importance of rearrangement of the cluster structure during the fission process is elucidated. This rearrangement may include transition to another isomer state of the parent cluster before actual......Results of molecular dynamics simulations of fission reactions $Na_10^2+ -->Na_7^++ Na_3^+ and Na_18^2+--> 2Na_9^+ are presented. The dependence of the fission barriers on the isomer structure of the parent cluster is analysed. It is demonstrated that the energy necessary for removing homothetic...

  10. Fission cross section measurements for minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fursov, B. [IPPE, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The main task of this work is the measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section for minor actinides of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243,244,245,246,247,248}Cm. The task of the work is to increase the accuracy of data in MeV energy region. Basic experimental method, fissile samples, fission detectors and electronics, track detectors, alpha counting, neutron generation, fission rate measurement, corrections to the data and error analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  11. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  12. Fission product yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are summed up necessary for determining the yields of individual fission products from different fissionable nuclides. Fractional independent yields, cumulative and isobaric yields are presented here for the thermal fission of 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu and for fast fission (approximately 1 MeV) of 235U, 238U, 239Pu, 241Pu; these values are included into the 5th version of the YIELDS library, supplementing the BIBFP library. A comparison is made of experimental data and possible improvements of calculational methods are suggested. (author)

  13. Fission fragment mass distributions in reactions populating 200Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, A; Ghosh, T K; Banerjee, K; Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Bhattacharya, S; Roy, P; Roy, T; Bhattacharya, C; Asgar, Md A; Dey, A; Kundu, S; Manna, S; Meena, J K; Mukherjee, G; Pandey, R; Rana, T K; Srivastava, V; Dubey, R; Kaur, Gurpreet; Saneesh, N; Sugathan, P; Bhattacharya, P

    2016-01-01

    The fission fragment mass distributions have been measured in the reactions 16O + 184W and 19F+ 181Ta populating the same compound nucleus 200Pb? at similar excitation energies. It is found that the widths of the mass distribution increases monotonically with excitation energy, indicating the absence of quasi-fission for both reactions. This is contrary to two recent claims of the presence of quasi-fission in the above mentioned reactions.

  14. The multi-step prompt particle emission from fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is the study of non-equilibrium high-energy gamma emission from 252 Cf. In the framework of the formalism of statistical multi-step compound processes in nuclear reactions. A relation was found between the shape of the high-energy part of the gamma spectrum and different mechanisms of excitation of the fission fragments. Agreement with experimental data for different groups of fission fragments was obtained. The analysis of the experimental high-energy part of gamma spectra yields information about the mechanism of excitation of fission fragments. The influence of dissipation of the deformation excess on intrinsic excitation of fission fragments was studied. (authors)

  15. Determination of the fission-neutron averaged cross sections of some high-energy threshold reactions of interest for reactor dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Arribere, M A; Ribeiro-Guevara, S; Korochinsky, S; Blostein, J J

    2003-01-01

    For three high threshold reactions, we have measured the cross sections averaged over a sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U fission neutron spectrum. The measured reactions, and corresponding averaged cross sections found, are: sup 1 sup 2 sup 7 I(n,2n) sup 1 sup 2 sup 6 I, (1.36+-0.12) mb; sup 9 sup 0 Zr(n,2n) sup 8 sup 9 sup m Zr, (13.86+-0.83) mu b; and sup 5 sup 8 Ni(n,d+np+pn) sup 5 sup 7 Co, (274+-15) mu b; all referred to the well known standard of (111+-3) mb for the sup 5 sup 8 Ni(n,p) sup 5 sup 8 sup m sup + sup g Co averaged cross section. The measured cross sections are of interest in nuclear engineering for the characterization of the fast neutron component in the energy distribution of reactor neutrons. (author)

  16. Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Report: Development of Advanced Window Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, Ladena A.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.

    2014-08-05

    Advanced fenestration technologies for light and thermal management in building applications are of great recent research interest for improvements in energy efficiency. Of these technologies, there is specific interest in advanced window coating technologies that have tailored control over the visible and infrared (IR) scattering into a room for both static and dynamic applications. Recently, PNNL has investigated novel subwavelength nanostructured coatings for both daylighting, and IR thermal management applications. Such coatings rese still in the early stages and additional research is needed in terms of scalable manufacturing. This project investigates aspects of a potential new methodology for low-cost scalable manufacture of said subwavelength coatings.

  17. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, Junchen

    2016-01-01

    The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective ...

  18. Neutron Energy Spectra from Neutron Induced Fission of 235U at 0.95 MeV a of 238U at 1.35 and 2.02 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shapes of fission neutron spectra are of interest for power reactor calculations. Recently it has been suggested that the neutron induced fission spectrum of 235U may be harder than was earlier assumed. For this reason measurements of the neutron spectra of some fissile isotopes are in progress at our laboratory. This report will present results from studies of the energy spectra of the neutrons emitted in the neutron induced fission of 235U and 238U. The measurements were performed at an incident neutron energy of 0.95 MeV for 235U and at energies of 1.35 and 2.02 MeV for 238U using time-of-flight techniques. The time-of-flight spectra were only analysed at energies higher than those of the incident neutrons and up to about 10 MeV. Corrections for neutron attenuation in the uranium samples were calculated using a Monte Carlo program. The corrected fission neutron spectra were fitted to Maxwellian temperature distributions. For 235U a temperature of 1.27 ± 0.01 MeV gives the best fit to the experimental data and for 238U the corresponding values are 1.29 ± 0.03 MeV at 1.35 MeV and 1.29 ± 0.02 MeV at 2.02 MeV

  19. Simultaneous measurement of (n, γ) and (n, fission) cross sections with the DANCE 4π BaF 2 array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Becker, J. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R. C.; Esch, E.-I.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Jandel, M.; Macri, R. A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2007-08-01

    We have recently begun a program of high precision measurements of the key production and destruction reactions of important radiochemical diagnostic isotopes, including several isotopes of uranium, plutonium and americium. The detector for advanced neutron capture experiments (DANCE), a 4π BaF2 array located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, will be used to measure the neutron capture cross sections for most of the isotopes of interest. However, neutron capture measurements on many of the actinides are complicated by the presence of prompt γ-rays arising from low energy neutron-induced fission, which competes with neutron capture to varying degrees. Previous measurements of 235U using the DANCE array have shown that we can partially resolve capture from fission events based on total γ-ray calorimetry (i.e. total γ-ray energy versus γ-ray multiplicity). The addition of a dedicated fission-tagging detector to the DANCE array has greatly improved our ability to separate these two competing processes. In addition to higher quality neutron capture data, the addition of a fission-tagging detector offers a means to determine the capture-to-fission ratio (σγ/σf) in a single measurement, which should reduce the effect of systematic uncertainties. We are currently using a dual parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) with the target material electro-deposited directly on the center cathode foil. This design provides a high efficiency for detecting fission fragments and allows loading of pre-assembled target/detector assemblies into the neutron beam line at DANCE. Results from tests of the fission-tag detector, as well as preliminary results from measurements on 235U and 252Cf that utilized the fission-tag detector will be presented.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of (n, γ) and (n, fission) cross sections with the DANCE 4π BaF2 array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently begun a program of high precision measurements of Key production and destruction reactions of important radiochemical diagnostic isotopes, including several isotopes of uranium, plutonium and americium. The detector for advanced neutron capture experiments (DANCE), a 4π BaF2 array located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, will be used to measure the neutron capture cross sections for most of the isotopes of interest. However, neutron capture measurements on many of the actinides are complicated by the presence of prompt γ-rays arising from low energy neutron-induced fission, which competes with neutron capture to varying degrees. Previous measurements of 235U using the DANCE array have shown that we can partially resolve capture from fission events based on total γ-ray calorimetry (i.e. total γ-ray energy versus γ-ray multiplicity). The addition of a dedicated fission-tagging detector to the DANCE array has greatly improved our ability to separate these two competing processes. In addition to higher quality neutron capture data, the addition of a fission-tagging detector offers a means to determine the capture-to-fission ratio (σ γ/σ f) in a single measurement, which should reduce the effect of systematic uncertainties. We are currently using a dual parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) with the target material electro-deposited directly on the center cathode foil. This design provides a high efficiency for detecting fission fragments and allows loading of pre-assembled target/detector assemblies into the neutron beam line at DANCE. Results from tests of the fission-tag detector, as well as preliminary results from measurements on 235U and 252Cf that utilized the fission-tag detector will be presented

  1. Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, J C; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Kerman, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The relationship between isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. F...

  2. A transferable model for singlet-fission kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Shane R; Lee, Jiye; Wilson, Mark W B; Wu, Tony; McMahon, David P; Parkhurst, Rebecca R; Thompson, Nicholas J; Congreve, Daniel N; Rao, Akshay; Johnson, Kerr; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Bawendi, Moungi G; Swager, Timothy M; Friend, Richard H; Baldo, Marc A; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2014-06-01

    Exciton fission is a process that occurs in certain organic materials whereby one singlet exciton splits into two independent triplets. In photovoltaic devices these two triplet excitons can each generate an electron, producing quantum yields per photon of >100% and potentially enabling single-junction power efficiencies above 40%. Here, we measure fission dynamics using ultrafast photoinduced absorption and present a first-principles expression that successfully reproduces the fission rate in materials with vastly different structures. Fission is non-adiabatic and Marcus-like in weakly interacting systems, becoming adiabatic and coupling-independent at larger interaction strengths. In neat films, we demonstrate fission yields near unity even when monomers are separated by >5 Å. For efficient solar cells, however, we show that fission must outcompete charge generation from the singlet exciton. This work lays the foundation for tailoring molecular properties like solubility and energy level alignment while maintaining the high fission yield required for photovoltaic applications. PMID:24848234

  3. Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    This report is the written version of a colloquium first presented at Argonne National Laboratory in January 1989. The paper begins with an historical preamble about the events leading to the discovery of nuclear fission. This leads naturally to an account of early results and understanding of the fission phenomena. Some of the key concepts in the development of fission theory are then discussed. The main theme of this discussion is the topography of the fission barrier, in which the interplay of the liquid-drop model and nucleon shell effects lead to a wide range of fascinating phenomena encompassing metastable isomers, intermediate-structure effects in fission cross-sections, and large changes in fission product properties. It is shown how study of these changing effects and theoretical calculations of the potential energy of the deformed nucleus have led to broad qualitative understanding of the nature of the fission process. 54 refs., 35 figs.

  4. Simulation on advanced operation mode for the compact fusion-fission hybrid reactor%紧凑型聚变裂变混合堆先进运行模式的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈美霞; 刘成岳; 吴斌

    2012-01-01

    Reversed shear (RS) operation mode is simulated with Jsolver and TSC codes on some important issues, such as RS Plasma configuration, bootstrap current fraction and RS operation mode discharge simulation etc.. To some degree, the modeling results show that the RS operation mode is advanced and feasible for the compact Fusion-fission hybrid reactor.%使用Jsolver程序及托卡马克模拟程序TSC对紧凑型聚变裂变混合堆系统的反剪切平衡位形、自举电流份额及放电模拟进行数值模拟研究,以此探讨该混合堆的可行性和先进性.

  5. Measurements of Fission Cross Sections for the Isotopes relevant to the Thorium Fuel Cycle

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The present concern about a sustainable energy supply is characterised by a considerable uncertainty: the green house effect and foreseeable limits in fossil fuel resources on the one hand, the concern about the environmental impact of nuclear fission energy and the long term fusion research on the other hand, have led to the consideration of a variety of advanced strategies for the nuclear fuel cycle and related nuclear energy systems. The present research directories concern such strategies as the extension of the life span of presently operating reactors, the increase of the fuel burn-up, the plutonium recycling, and in particular the incineration of actinides and long-Lived fission products, the accelerator driven systems (ADS), like the "Energy Amplifier" (EA) concept of C. Rubbia, and the possible use of the Thorium fuel cycle. The detailed feasibility study and safety assessment of these strategies requires the accurate knowledge of neutron nuclear reaction data. Both, higher fuel burn-up and especiall...

  6. Advanced Energy Saving and its Applications in Industry

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, Kazuo; Fushimi, Chihiro; Tsutsumi, Atsushi; Kishimoto, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The conventional approach for energy saving in a process system is to maximize heat recovery without changing any process conditions by using pinch technology. “Self-heat recuperation technology” was developed to achieve further energy saving in the process system by eliminating the necessity for any external heat input, such as firing or imported steam. Advanced Energy Saving and its Applications in Industry introduces the concept of self-heat recuperation and the application of such technology to a wide range of processes from heavy chemical complexes to other processes such as drying and gas separation processes, which require heating and cooling during operation.   Conventional energy saving items in a utility system are applied and implemented based on a single site approach, however, when looking at heavy chemical complexes, it was apparent that the low-grade heat discharged as waste from a refinery could also be used in an adjacent petrochemical plant. There could therefore be a large energy savin...

  7. General Description of Fission Observables - JEFF Report 24. GEF Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) Project is a collaborative effort among the member countries of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank to develop a reference nuclear data library. The JEFF library contains sets of evaluated nuclear data, mainly for fission and fusion applications; it contains a number of different data types, including neutron and proton interaction data, radioactive decay data, fission yield data and thermal scattering law data. The General fission (GEF) model is based on novel theoretical concepts and ideas developed to model low energy nuclear fission. The GEF code calculates fission-fragment yields and associated quantities (e.g. prompt neutron and gamma) for a large range of nuclei and excitation energy. This opens up the possibility of a qualitative step forward to improve further the JEFF fission yields sub-library. This report describes the GEF model which explains the complex appearance of fission observables by universal principles of theoretical models and considerations on the basis of fundamental laws of physics and mathematics. The approach reveals a high degree of regularity and provides a considerable insight into the physics of the fission process. Fission observables can be calculated with a precision that comply with the needs for applications in nuclear technology. The relevance of the approach for examining the consistency of experimental results and for evaluating nuclear data is demonstrated. (authors)

  8. Muon-induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of recent experimental results on negative-muon-induced fission, both of 238U and 232Th, is given. Some conclusions drawn by the author are concerned with muonic atoms of fission fragments and muonic atoms of the shape isomer of 238U. (author)

  9. Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sabharwall; S.J. Yoon; M.G. McKellar; C. Stoots; George Griffith

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the advanced reactors could be licensed on the reactor side are qualification of next generation of nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

  10. Advanced vehicles: Costs, energy use, and macroeconomic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua

    Advanced vehicles and alternative fuels could play an important role in reducing oil use and changing the economy structure. We developed the Costs for Advanced Vehicles and Energy (CAVE) model to investigate a vehicle portfolio scenario in California during 2010-2030. Then we employed a computable general equilibrium model to estimate macroeconomic impacts of the advanced vehicle scenario on the economy of California. Results indicate that, due to slow fleet turnover, conventional vehicles are expected to continue to dominate the on-road fleet and gasoline is the major transportation fuel over the next two decades. However, alternative fuels could play an increasingly important role in gasoline displacement. Advanced vehicle costs are expected to decrease dramatically with production volume and technological progress; e.g., incremental costs for fuel cell vehicles and hydrogen could break even with gasoline savings in 2028. Overall, the vehicle portfolio scenario is estimated to have a slightly negative influence on California's economy, because advanced vehicles are very costly and, therefore, the resulting gasoline savings generally cannot offset the high incremental expenditure on vehicles and alternative fuels. Sensitivity analysis shows that an increase in gasoline price or a drop in alternative fuel prices could offset a portion of the negative impact.

  11. Operating Experiences with an Advanced Fabric Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.J Fuller

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite their proven track record in the cold climate countries of northern Europe, there are no reports in the research literature of experiences using advanced fabric energy storage (FES systems in countries where cooling rather than heating is the main priority. This paper reports some of the experiences with the first known advanced FES system in Australia made over the first full calendar year of operation. It is located in a three-storey building on a university campus in Victoria and has been in operation since mid-2002. Temperature, energy use and operational mode data were recorded during 2003. Airflow measurements through the FES system have been made in five areas of the building. On-going operating problems still exist with the system and this has prevented a conclusive evaluation of its suitability for the southern Australian climate.

  12. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: 1. Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; 2. Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; 3. Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; 4. Identify synergies across different industries; 5. Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; 6. Understand who are the leading experts; 7. Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  13. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  14. Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

    2006-10-01

    -ray sources, neutron sources, nanoscale science research centers, and supercomputers, offer the opportunity to transform and accelerate the fundamental materials and chemical sciences that underpin technology development for advanced nuclear energy systems. The fundamental challenge is to understand and control chemical and physical phenomena in multi-component systems from femto-seconds to millennia, at temperatures to 1000?C, and for radiation doses to hundreds of displacements per atom (dpa). This is a scientific challenge of enormous proportions, with broad implications in the materials science and chemistry of complex systems. New understanding is required for microstructural evolution and phase stability under relevant chemical and physical conditions, chemistry and structural evolution at interfaces, chemical behavior of actinide and fission-product solutions, and nuclear and thermomechanical phenomena in fuels and waste forms. First-principles approaches are needed to describe f-electron systems, design molecules for separations, and explain materials failure mechanisms. Nanoscale synthesis and characterization methods are needed to understand and design materials and interfaces with radiation, temperature, and corrosion resistance. Dynamical measurements are required to understand fundamental physical and chemical phenomena. New multiscale approaches are needed to integrate this knowledge into accurate models of relevant phenomena and complex systems across multiple length and time scales.

  15. Advances in energy systems and technology v.5

    CERN Document Server

    Auer, Peter L

    1986-01-01

    Advances in Energy Systems and Technology: Volume 5 present articles that provides a critical review of specific topics within the general field of energy. It discusses the fuel cells for electric utility power generation. It addresses the classification of fuel cell technologies. Some of the topics covered in the book are the major components of the fuel cell; the phosphoric acid fuel cells; molten carbonate fuel cells; solid oxide fuel cells; electric utility fuel cell systems; and the integration within fuel cell power plants. The analysis of the solar ponds is covered. The operational

  16. Design of advanced photocatalytic materials for energy and environmental applications

    CERN Document Server

    Coronado, Juan M; Hernández-Alonso, María D; Portela, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Research for the development of more efficient photocatalysts has experienced an almost exponential growth since its popularization in early 1970's. Despite the advantages of the widely used TiO2, the yield of the conversion of sun power into chemical energy that can be achieved with this material is limited prompting the research and development of  a number of structural, morphological and chemical modifications of TiO2 , as well as a number of novel photocatalysts with very different composition. Design of Advanced Photocatalytic Materials for Energy and Environmental Applications provides

  17. Systematic analysis of advanced fusion fuel in inertial fusion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, G.; Eliezer, S.; Henis, Z.; Piera, M.; Martinez-Val, J. M.

    1997-04-01

    Aneutronic fusion reactions can be considered as the cleanest way to exploit nuclear energy. However, these reactions present in general two main drawbacks.—very high temperatures are needed to reach relevant values of their cross sections—Moderate (and even low) energy yield per reaction. This value is still lower if measured in relation to the Z number of the reacting particles. It is already known that bremsstrahlung overruns the plasma reheating by fusion born charged-particles in most of the advanced fuels. This is for instance the case for proton-boron-11 fusion in a stoichiometric plasma and is also so in lithium isotopes fusion reactions. In this paper, the use of deuterium-tritium seeding is suggested to allow to reach higher burnup fractions of advanced fuels, starting at a lower ignition temperature. Of course, neutron production increases as DT contents does. Nevertheless, the ratio of neutron production to energy generation is much lower in DT-advanced fuel mixtures than in pure DT plasmas. One of the main findings of this work is that some natural resources (as D and Li-7) can be burned-up in a catalytic regime for tritium. In this case, neither external tritium breeding nor tritium storage are needed, because the tritium inventory after the fusion burst is the same as before it. The fusion reactor can thus operate on a pure recycling of a small tritium inventory.

  18. The importance of advancing technology to America's energy goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide range of energy technologies appears to be needed for the United States to meet its energy goals. A method is developed that relates the uncertainty of technological progress in eleven technology areas to the achievement of CO2 mitigation and reduced oil dependence. We conclude that to be confident of meeting both energy goals, each technology area must have a much better than 50/50 probability of success, that carbon capture and sequestration, biomass, battery electric or fuel cell vehicles, advanced fossil liquids, and energy efficiency technologies for buildings appear to be almost essential, and that the success of each one of the 11 technologies is important. These inferences are robust to moderate variations in assumptions.

  19. New fission-fragment detector for experiments at DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusev, G.; Roman, A. R.; Daum, J. K.; Springs, R. K.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-10-01

    A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films has been built to serve as a veto/trigger detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4 π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillation events caused by the fission fragment interactions in the films are registered with silicon photomultipliers. Design of the detector and test measurements are described. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Nuclear Physics under the Early Career Award No. LANL20135009.

  20. Tuning of the stability and energy levels of singlet exciton fission relevant excited states of pentacenes by site-specific substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Chen, Yuhan; Li, Xiyou; Li, Chungang

    2016-05-01

    Pentacene crystals or oligomers undergo efficient singlet exciton fission (SF) after photo-excitation, which is expected to be useful in overcoming the Shockley-Queisser theoretical limit of solar cells. However, pentacenes are extremely unstable in air due to oxidation by oxygen. In this work, we designed a group of pentacene compounds with different substituents at different positions. The energy levels of HOMO and LUMO, which are believed to be closely related to the stability of pentacene, were calculated. The relationship between the molecular structure and the stability was discussed. The driving force for SF was estimated from the difference between the energy of first singlet excited state (E(S1)) and the energy of two triplet excited state (2×E(T1)) following equation E(S1)-2E(T1). Strong electron-withdrawing groups can stabilize pentacene compounds significantly, but induce a decrease on the driving force of SF slightly. Electron-donating groups destabilize the pentacene compounds dramatically and hence the introduction of electron donating groups to pentacene is not recommended. TIPS is an ideal group to improve the stability of pentacene compounds. TIPS does not change the driving force of SF significantly. Sulfur containing groups are also efficient on stabilizing pentacene compounds. These groups increase the driving force of SF at ɑ position, and recued the driving force of SF at other positions. The results of this work provide a theoretical ground for rational design of new SF molecules based on pentacenes. PMID:27131283

  1. The 233Pa fission cross-section measurement and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    233Pa is a conspicuous example of strongly discrepant data in the accepted nuclear data evaluations. The precise knowledge of the neutron-induced reaction cross-section of this highly β-active nuclide (T1/2 = 27.0 d) is essential for the successful implementation of the thorium-based fuel cycle in advanced nuclear applications. The reactions involving 233Pa are responsible for the balance of nuclei as well as the average number of prompt fission neutrons in a contemplated reactor scenario. In an IAEA report, it is stated that there is a need to know the 233Pa(n, f) cross-section with an accuracy of 20%. The different evaluated neutron data libraries show, however, a difference of a factor of two for this cross-section. It has previously been deemed not feasible to measure this reaction directly due to its short half-life, high radioactivity and the in-growth of the daughter product 233U. Hence, the entries in the neutron libraries are based on theoretical predictions, which explains the large discrepancies. As reported recently the neutron-induced fission cross-section of 233Pa has been measured for the first time directly with mono-energetic neutrons from 1.0 to 3.0 MeV at the Van-de-Graaff facility of the IRMM. In the meantime, during two further measurement campaigns, the energy range has been extended up to 8.5 MeV. The experimental results will be presented together with recent model calculations of the fission cross-section applying the statistical model code STATIS, which improve the cross-section evaluation up to the second chance fission threshold. (authors)

  2. Microscopic description of 258Fm fission dynamic with pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamps, Guillaume; Simenel, Cédric; Lacroix, Denis

    2016-05-01

    Fission dynamic remains a challenge for nuclear microscopic theories. In order to understand the dynamic of the last stage of the fission process, the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with BCS pairing is applied to the describe the fission of the 258Fm. A good agreement is found for the one-body observables: the total kinetic energy and the average mass asymmetry. The non-physical dependence of two-body observables with the initial shape is discussed.

  3. Microscopic description of 258Fm fission dynamic with pairing

    OpenAIRE

    Scamps Guillaume; Simenel Cédric; Lacroix Denis

    2016-01-01

    Fission dynamic remains a challenge for nuclear microscopic theories. In order to understand the dynamic of the last stage of the fission process, the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with BCS pairing is applied to the describe the fission of the 258Fm. A good agreement is found for the one-body observables: the total kinetic energy and the average mass asymmetry. The non-physical dependence of two-body observables with the initial shape is discussed.

  4. Masters Study in Advanced Energy and Fuels Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Kanchan [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    2014-12-08

    There are currently three key drivers for the US energy sector a) increasing energy demand and b) environmental stewardship in energy production for sustainability and c) general public and governmental desire for domestic resources. These drivers are also true for energy nation globally. As a result, this sector is rapidly diversifying to alternate sources that would supplement or replace fossil fuels. These changes have created a need for a highly trained workforce with a the understanding of both conventional and emerging energy resources and technology to lead and facilitate the reinvention of the US energy production, rational deployment of alternate energy technologies based on scientific and business criteria while invigorating the overall economy. In addition, the current trends focus on the the need of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) graduate education to move beyond academia and be more responsive to the workforce needs of businesses and the industry. The SIUC PSM in Advanced Energy and Fuels Management (AEFM) program was developed in response to the industries stated need for employees who combine technical competencies and workforce skills similar to all PSM degree programs. The SIUC AEFM program was designed to provide the STEM graduates with advanced technical training in energy resources and technology while simultaneously equipping them with the business management skills required by professional employers in the energy sector. Technical training include core skills in energy resources, technology and management for both conventional and emerging energy technologies. Business skills training include financial, personnel and project management. A capstone internship is also built into the program to train students such that they are acclimatized to the real world scenarios in research laboratories, in energy companies and in government agencies. The current curriculum in the SIUC AEFM will help fill the need for training both recent

  5. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carney, Sean E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-05

    In a Monte Carlo criticality calculation, before the tallying of quantities can begin, a converged fission source (the fundamental eigenvector of the fission kernel) is required. Tallies of interest may include powers, absorption rates, leakage rates, or the multiplication factor (the fundamental eigenvalue of the fission kernel, k{sub eff}). Just as in the power iteration method of linear algebra, if the dominance ratio (the ratio of the first and zeroth eigenvalues) is high, many iterations of neutron history simulations are required to isolate the fundamental mode of the problem. Optically large systems have large dominance ratios, and systems containing poor neutron communication between regions are also slow to converge. The fission matrix method, implemented into MCNP[1], addresses these problems. When Monte Carlo random walk from a source is executed, the fission kernel is stochastically applied to the source. Random numbers are used for: distances to collision, reaction types, scattering physics, fission reactions, etc. This method is used because the fission kernel is a complex, 7-dimensional operator that is not explicitly known. Deterministic methods use approximations/discretization in energy, space, and direction to the kernel. Consequently, they are faster. Monte Carlo directly simulates the physics, which necessitates the use of random sampling. Because of this statistical noise, common convergence acceleration methods used in deterministic methods do not work. In the fission matrix method, we are using the random walk information not only to build the next-iteration fission source, but also a spatially-averaged fission kernel. Just like in deterministic methods, this involves approximation and discretization. The approximation is the tallying of the spatially-discretized fission kernel with an incorrect fission source. We address this by making the spatial mesh fine enough that this error is negligible. As a consequence of discretization we get a

  6. Wireless Sensor Network for Advanced Energy Management Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Theisen; Bin Lu, Charles J. Luebke

    2009-09-23

    Eaton has developed an advanced energy management solution that has been deployed to several Industries of the Future (IoF) sites. This demonstrated energy savings and reduced unscheduled downtime through an improved means for performing predictive diagnostics and energy efficiency estimation. Eaton has developed a suite of online, continuous, and inferential algorithms that utilize motor current signature analysis (MCSA) and motor power signature analysis (MPSA) techniques to detect and predict the health condition and energy usage condition of motors and their connect loads. Eaton has also developed a hardware and software platform that provided a means to develop and test these advanced algorithms in the field. Results from lab validation and field trials have demonstrated that the developed advanced algorithms are able to detect motor and load inefficiency and performance degradation. Eaton investigated the performance of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) within various industrial facilities to understand concerns about topology and environmental conditions that have precluded broad adoption by the industry to date. A Wireless Link Assessment System (WLAS), was used to validate wireless performance under a variety of conditions. Results demonstrated that wireless networks can provide adequate performance in most facilities when properly specified and deployed. Customers from various IoF expressed interest in applying wireless more broadly for selected applications, but continue to prefer utilizing existing, wired field bus networks for most sensor based applications that will tie into their existing Computerized Motor Maintenance Systems (CMMS). As a result, wireless technology was de-emphasized within the project, and a greater focus placed on energy efficiency/predictive diagnostics. Commercially available wireless networks were only utilized in field test sites to facilitate collection of motor wellness information, and no wireless sensor network products were

  7. A fission-fragment-sensitive target for X-ray spectroscopy in neutron-induced fission

    CERN Document Server

    Ethvignot, T; Giot, L; Casoli, P; Nelson, R O

    2002-01-01

    A fission-fragment-sensitive detector built for low-energy photon spectroscopy applications at the WNR 'white' neutron source at Los Alamos is described. The detector consists of eight layers of thin photovoltaic cells, onto which 1 mg/cm sup 2 of pure sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U is deposited. The detector serves as an active target to select fission events from background and other reaction channels. The fairly small thickness of the detector with respect to transmission of 20-50 keV photons permits the measurement of prompt fission-fragment X-rays. Results with the GEANIE photon spectrometer are presented.

  8. Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloiu, Valentin A. [Georgia Southern Univ., Statesboro, GA (United States)

    2012-03-31

    The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuels combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

  9. Dynamics in heavy ion fusion and fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamical aspects of heavy ion fussion and fission, mainly the aspect of damping which is meant as the dissipation of kinetic energy and the aspect of the effective mass of the fission motion, are discussed. Two categories of evidence of damping effects are given. One relates to the damping of the fission motion for the ground state shape and for the isomeric more elongated shape. The other relates to the damping of the fission motion from the last barrier to the scission point. The dependence of the effective mass associated with the fission motion on the deormation of nucleus is shown. As the elongation of the nucleus increases the effective mass of the fission motion varies strongly from being about forty times greater than the reduced mass in the beta-vibrational state of the ground state shape to being equal to the reduced mass in the moment of scission. Damping effects are expected to be propartional to the difference between the effective mass and the reduced mass. It is concluded that the damping in fussion reactions is relatively weak for lighter products and quite strong for superheavy products like 236U or 252Cf. (S.B.)

  10. Status of fission yield evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very few yield compilations are also evaluations, and very few contain an extensive global library of measured data and extensive models for unmeasured data. The earlier U.K. evaluations and US evaluations were comparable up to the retirements of the primary evaluators. Only the effort in the US has been continued and expanded. The previous U.K. evaluations have been published. In this paper we summarize the current status of the US evaluation, philosophy, and various integral yield tests for 34 fissioning nuclides at one or more neutron incident energies and/or for spontaneous fission. Currently there are 50 yield sets and for each we have independent and cumulative yields and uncertainties for approximately 1100 fission products. When finalized, the recommended data will become part of the next version of the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-VI). The complete set of data, including the basic input of measured yields, will be issued as a sequel to the General Electric evaluation reports (better known by the authors' names: Rider - or earlier - Meek and Rider). 16 references

  11. Characterization of the scission point from fission-fragment velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Caamaño, M; Delaune, O; Schmidt, K -H; Schmitt, C; Audouin, L; Bacri, C -O; Benlliure, J; Casarejos, E; Derkx, X; Fernández-Domínguez, B; Gaudefroy, L; Golabek, C; Jurado, B; Lemasson, A; Ramos, D; Rodríguez-Tajes, C; Roger, T; Shrivastava, A

    2015-01-01

    The isotopic-yield distributions and kinematic properties of fragments produced in transfer-induced fission of 240Pu and fusion-induced fission of 250Cf, with 9 MeV and 45 MeV of excitation energy respectively, were measured in inverse kinematics with the spectrometer VAMOS. The kinematic properties of identified fission fragments allow to derive properties of the scission configuration such as the distance between fragments, the total kinetic energy, the neutron multiplicity, the total excitation energy, and, for the first time, the proton- and neutron-number sharing during the emergence of the fragments. These properties of the scission point are studied as functions of the fragment atomic number. The correlation between these observables, gathered in one single experiment and for two different fissioning systems at different excitation energies, give valuable information for the understanding and modeling of the fission process.

  12. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Grocery Stores (Revised) (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, B.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders successfully plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited in these guides. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. Grocery stores were selected as one of the highest priority sectors, because they represent one of the most energy-intensive market segments.

  13. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance, K-12 Schools (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the K-12 Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. We emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluation of the most promising retrofit measure for each building type. K-12 schools were selected as one of the highest priority building sectors, because schools affect the lives of most Americans. They also represent approximately 8% of the energy use and 10% of the floor area in commercial buildings.

  14. Nuclear fission induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because the accelerators of the 50's and 60's mostly provided beams of light ions, well suited for studying individual quantum states of low angular momentum or reactions involving the transfer of one or two nucleons, the study of fission, being an example of large-scale collective motion, has until recently been outside of the mainstream of nuclear research. This situation has changed in recent years, due to the new generation of accelerators capable of producing beams of heavy ions with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of all stable nuclei. These have made possible the study of new examples of large-scale collective motions, involving major rearrangements of nuclear matter, such as deep-inelastic collisions and heavy-ion fusion. Perhaps the most exciting development in the past few years is the discovery that dissipative effects (nuclear viscosity) play an important role in fission induced by heavy ions, contrary to earlier assumptions that the viscosity involved in fission was very weak and played only a minor role. This review will be mainly concerned with developments in heavy-ion induced fission during the last few years and have an emphasis on the very recent results on dissipative effects. Since heavy-ion bombardment usually results in compound systems with high excitation energies and angular momenta, shell effects might be expected to be small, and the subject of low energy fission, where they are important, will not be addressed. 285 refs., 58 figs

  15. Fission product decay heat for thermal reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    In the past five years there have been new experimental programs to measure decay heat (i.e., time dependent beta- plus gamma-ray energy release rates from the decay of fission products) following thermal-neutron fission of /sup 235/U, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 241/Pu for times after fission between 1 and approx. 10/sup 5/ sec. Experimental results from the ORNL program stress the very short times following fission, particularly in the first few hundred sec. Complementing the experimental effort, computer codes have been developed for the computation of decay heat by summation of calculated individual energies released by each one of the fission products. By suitably combining the results of the summation calculations with the recent experimental results, a new Decay Heat Standard has been developed for application to safety analysis of operations of light water reactors. The new standard indicates somewhat smaller energy release rates than those being used at present, and the overall uncertainties assigned to the new standard are much smaller than those being used at present.

  16. Rupture of the neck in nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a degree of freedom to describe the rupture of the neck in nuclear fission and calculate the point at which the neck ruptures as the nucleus descends dynamically from its fission saddle point. This is done by mentally slicing the system into two portions at its minimum neck radius and calculating the force required to separate the two portions while keeping their shapes fixed. This force is obtained by differentiating with respect to separation the sum of the Coulomb and nuclear interaction energies between the two portions. For nuclei throughout the Periodic Table we calculate this force along dynamical paths leading from the fission saddle point. The force is initially attractive but becomes repulsive when the neck reaches a critical size. For actinide nuclei the neck radius at which rupture occurs is about 2 fm. This increases the calculated translational kinetic energy of the fission fragments at infinity relative to that calculated for scission occurring at zero neck radius. With the effect of neck rupture taken into account, we calculate and compare with experimental results fission-fragment kinetic energies for two types of nuclear dissipation: ordinary two-body viscosity and one-body dissipation

  17. Negative Pion Induced Fission with Heavy Target Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Sher; Mukhtar A. Rana; S. Manzoor; M. I. Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    We investigate fission induced by negative pions in copper and bismuth targets using CR-39 dielectric track detectors. The target-detector assemblies in Air-geometric configuration were exposed at the AGS facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA. The exposed detectors were chemically etched under appropriate etching conditions and scanned to collect data in the form of fission fragments tracks produced as a result of interaction of pions with the target nuclei. Using the track counts, the experimental fission cross sections for copper and bismuth have been measured at energies of 500, 672, 1068 and 1665 MeV and compared with the calculation using the Cascade-Exciton Model code (CEM95). The values of fission probability based on experimental fission cross-sections have been compared with the theoretically calculated values of fission probabilities obtained using the CEM95 code. Good agreement is observed between the measured and computed results.

  18. Nuclear data for neutron emission in the fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Nuclear Data for Neutron Emission in the Fission Process, Vienna, 22 - 24 October 1990. Included are the conclusions and recommendations reached at the meeting and the papers presented by the meeting participants. These papers provide a review of the status of experimental and theoretical data on neutron emission in spontaneous and neutron induced fission with reference to the data needs for reactor applications oriented towards actinide burner studies. The specific topics covered are the following: experimental measurements and theoretical predictions and evaluations of fission neutron energy spectra, average prompt fission neutron multiplicity, correlation in neutron emission from complementary fragments, neutron emission during acceleration of fission fragments, statistical properties of neutron rich nuclei by study of emission spectra of neutrons from the excited fission fragments, integral qualification of nu-bar for the major fissile isotopes, nu-bar total of 239Pu and 235U, and related problems. Refs figs and tabs

  19. Possible origin of transition from symmetric to asymmetric fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paşca, H.; Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The charged distributions of fragments produced in the electromagnetic-induced fission of the even-even isotopes of Rn, Ra, Th, and U are described within an improved scission-point model and compared with the available experimental data. The three-equal-peaked charge distributions are predicted for several fissioning nuclei with neutron number N = 136. The possible explanation of the transition from a symmetric fission mode to an asymmetric one around N ∼ 136 is presented. The excitation energy dependencies of the asymmetric and symmetric fission modes are anticipated.

  20. Fuel rod internal chemistry and fission products behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present meeting was scheduled by the International Atomic Energy Agency upon the proposal of the members of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. Forty-six participants representing fourteen countries and two international organizations attended the meeting. Twenty-one presentations were discussed in four sessions: thermodynamics of fission products (six papers); fission products migration and release (seven papers); fission product release in transients or accident conditions (four papers); fission products to cladding interaction - stress corrosion cracking (five papers). A separate abstract was prepared for all twenty-one papers

  1. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector. Final Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, T.; Rempe, Joy; McGregor, Douglas; Ugorowski, Philip; Reichenberger, Michael; Ito, Takashi; Villard, J.-F.

    2014-09-01

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), is funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program to develop and test Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When deployed, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, and high performance reactors, allowing several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs to obtain higher accuracy/higher resolution data from irradiation tests of candidate new fuels and materials. Specifically, deployment of MPFDs will address several challenges faced in irradiations performed at MTRs: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe; MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different than current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions encountered in-core of high performance MTRs. The higher accuracy, high fidelity data available from the compact MPFD will significantly enhance efforts to validate new high-fidelity reactor physics codes and new multi-scale, multi-physics codes. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs, allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be deployed, offering the potential to

  2. Heavy ion fusion and fission reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various methods of probing the partial wave distribution are reviewed and new results using fission fragment angular distributions are discussed. Evidence that existing models of fusion reactions near-barrier and sub-barrier energies underestimate the mean-square spin values are presented. The dynamics of fusion reactions at higher energies are also discussed. The controversy over the interpretation of fission fragment and angular distributions are reviewed. Both statistical scission models and dynamical models with incomplete K mixing are discussed. New developments related to the effective moment of inertia of the saddlepoint shape are presented

  3. Geometrical and statistical factors in fission of small metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Obolensky, O I; Solovyov, A V; Greiner, W

    2005-01-01

    Fission of metastable charged univalent metal clusters has been studied on example of Na_{10}^{2+} and Na_{18}^{2+} clusters by means of density functional theory methods. Energetics of the process, i.e. dissociation energies and fission barriers, as well as its dynamics, i.e. fission pathways, have been analyzed. The dissociation energies and fission barriers have been calculated for the full range of fission channels for the Na_{10}^{2+} cluster. The impact of cluster structure on the fission process has been elucidated. The calculations show that the geometry of the smaller fragment and geometry of its immediate neighborhood in the larger fragment play a leading role in defining the fission barrier height. The present study demonstrates importance of rearrangement of the cluster structure during fission. It may include forming a neck between the two fragments or fissioning via another isomer state of the parent cluster; examples of such processes are given. For several low-lying isomers of Na_{10}^{2+} clu...

  4. Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bonnema

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities (AEDG-SHC was recently completed. It is the sixth document in a series of guides designed to achieve 30% savings over the minimum code requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999. The guide [1] is available for print purchase or as a free download from http://www.ashrae.org/aedg and provides user-friendly assistance and recommendations for the building design, construction, and owner communities to achieve energy savings. Included in the guide are prescriptive recommendations for quality assurance and commissioning; design of the building envelope; fenestration; lighting systems (including electric lighting and daylighting; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC systems; building automation and controls; outside air (OA treatment; and service water heating (SWH. The guide educates, provides practical recommendations for exceeding code minimums, and provides leadership to help design teams and owners produce higher efficiency commercial buildings.

  5. Cooperative technology development: An approach to advancing energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology development requires an enormous financial investment over a long period of time. Scarce national and corporate resources, the result of highly competitive markets, decreased profit margins, wide currency fluctuations, and growing debt, often preclude continuous development of energy technology by single entities, i.e., corporations, institutions, or nations. Although the energy needs of the developed world are generally being met by existing institutions, it is becoming increasingly clear that existing capital formation and technology transfer structures have failed to aid developing nations in meeting their growing electricity needs. This paper will describe a method for meeting the electricity needs of the developing world through technology transfer and international cooperative technology development. The role of nuclear power and the advanced passive plant design will be discussed. (author)

  6. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Magnetic Resonance : Introduction, Advanced Topics and Applications to Fossil Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Fraissard, Jacques

    1984-01-01

    This volume contains the lectures presented at an Advanced Study Institute on "Magnetic Resonance Techniques in Fossil Energy Problems," which was held at the village of Maleme, Crete, in July of 1983. As of this writing, a different popular attitude prevails from that when the ASI was proposed as far as how critical the world energy picture is. In the popular press, a panglossian attitude (the "petroleum glut" of the 80's) has replaced the jeremiads of the 70's ( a catastrophic "energy crisis"). Yet, there are certain important constants: (a) for the foreseeable future, fossil energy sources (petroleum, coal, oil shale, etc. ) will continue to be of paramount importance; and (b) science and technology of the highest order are needed to extend the fossil ener~y resource base and to utilize it in a cost-effective manner that is also environmentally acceptable. It is precisely this second item that this volume addresses. The volume introduces the phenomenology of magnetic resonance ~n a unified and detailed man...

  7. Easetech Energy: Advanced Life Cycle Assessment of Energy from Biomass and Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Turconi, Roberto; Tonini, Davide;

    SUMMARY: Biomass and waste are expected to play a key role in future energy systems based on large shares of renewable energy resources. The LCA model EASETECH Energy was developed specifically for modelling large and complex energy systems including various technologies and several processing...... steps. The model allows simultaneous balancing of mass and energy flows of the system under assessment, and is equipped with advanced tools for sensitivity/uncertainty analysis. EASETECH Energy was used to assess the environmental footprint of the Danish energy system in 2050 (based on 100% renewables......) and compare it to the current situation. The results show that the future Danish energy systems will have a rather different environmental footprint than the current one....

  8. Applications of Event-by-Event Fission Modeling with FREYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt R.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The recently developed code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm generates large samples of complete fission events, consisting of two receding product nuclei as well as a number of neutrons and photons, all with complete kinematic information. Thus it is possible to calculate arbitrary correlation observables whose behavior may provide unique insight into the fission process. We first discuss the present status of FREYA, which has now been extended to include spontaneous fission. Concentrating on 239Pu(nth,f, 240Pu(sf and 252Cf(sf, we discuss the neutron multiplicity correlations, the dependence of the neutron energy spectrum on the neutron multiplicity, and the relationship between the fragment kinetic energy and the number of neutrons and their energies. We also suggest novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.

  9. Advanced concepts in ground thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kevin David

    In recent years, ground thermal energy storage has become a topic of interest in the energy community for solar thermal energy storage systems, ground sourced heat pump systems, and data center thermal management systems due to an increase in the energy efficiency of such systems utilizing the ground as a thermal reservoir. The most common method for transferring thermal energy to the ground formation is the geothermal borehole. This dissertation presents the state of the art in geothermal borehole modeling and derives novel analytical functions to model advanced concepts concerning their operation. The novel solutions derived allow a geothermal borehole designer to better understand and design ground energy storage systems. The state of the art in geothermal borehole modeling is the stationary line source solution which is limited to boreholes operating without groundwater flow. Novel solutions for modeling a geothermal borehole with groundwater advection are presented through derivation of a transient moving line source solution as well as a transient moving cylindrical surface source solution. These solutions are applied to model a specific type of open loop geothermal borehole called a standing column well with groundwater advection and are compared to empirical and numerical data for validation. The dissertation then moves into derivation of a property determination method for geothermal boreholes with groundwater advection. The traditional property determination method used to obtain ground formation properties is based on the stationary transient line source method and fails in the presence of groundwater flow. The proposed novel property determination method calculates the thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and superficial flow velocity of groundwater within a ground formation. These methods and solutions are novel tools allowing for geothermal borehole designers to grasp a better understanding of the systems they are designing as well as open other

  10. Probability of induced nuclear fission in diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apparatus of the fission diffusion model taking into account nonequilibrium stage of the process as applied to the description of the probability of induced nuclear fission is described. The results of calculation of the energy dependence of 212Po nuclear fissility according to the new approach are presented

  11. Fusion and quasi-fission in heavy systems with the microscopic time-dependent energy density functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Washiyama Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    Fusion hindrance, where fusion probability in heavy systems is strongly hindered compared with that in light and medium-mass systems, is analyzed by the microscopic time-dependent energy density functional theory. From trajectories obtained for fusion reactions, we extract nucleus-nucleus potential and one-body energy dissipation for the entrance channel of fusion reactions in heavy systems. We find that a barrier structure disappears and an increase behavior is observed in the obtained poten...

  12. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  13. Advanced model for fast assessment of piezoelectric micro energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardito, Raffaele; Corigliano, Alberto; Gafforelli, Giacomo; Valzasina, Carlo; Procopio, Francesco; Zafalon, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to present recent advances in modelling and design of piezoelectric energy harvesters, in the framework of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). More specifically, the case of inertial energy harvesting is considered, in the sense that the kinetic energy due to environmental vibration is transformed into electrical energy by means of piezoelectric transduction. The execution of numerical analyses is greatly important in order to predict the actual behaviour of MEMS devices and to carry out the optimization process. In the common practice, the results are obtained by means of burdensome 3D Finite Element Analyses (FEA). The case of beams could be treated by applying 1D models, which can enormously reduce the computational burden with obvious benefits in the case of repeated analyses. Unfortunately, the presence of piezoelectric coupling may entail some serious issues in view of its intrinsically three-dimensional behaviour. In this paper, a refined, yet simple, model is proposed with the objective of retaining the Euler-Bernoulli beam model, with the inclusion of effects connected to the actual three-dimensional shape of the device. The proposed model is adopted to evaluate the performances of realistic harvesters, both in the case of harmonic excitation and for impulsive loads.

  14. Advanced model for fast assessment of piezoelectric micro energy harvesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele eArdito

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to present recent advances in modelling and design of piezoelectric energy harvesters, in the framework of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS. More specifically, the case of inertial energy harvesting is considered, in the sense that the kinetic energy due to environmental vibration is transformed into electrical energy by means of piezoelectric transduction. The execution of numerical analyses is greatly important in order to predict the actual behaviour of MEMS devices and to carry out the optimization process. In the common practice, the results are obtained by means of burdensome 3D Finite Element Analyses (FEA.The case of beams could be treated by applying 1D models, which can enormously reduce the computational burden with obvious benefits in the case of repeated analyses. Unfortunately, the presence of piezoelectric coupling may entail some serious issues in view of its intrinsically three-dimensional behaviour. In this paper, a refined, yet simple, model is proposed with the objective of retaining the Euler-Bernoulli beam model, with the inclusion of effects connected to the actual three-dimensional shape of the device. The proposed model is adopted to evaluate the performances of realistic harvesters, both in the case of harmonic excitation and for impulsive loads.

  15. Torin1-mediated TOR kinase inhibition reduces Wee1 levels and advances mitotic commitment in fission yeast and HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Jane; Halova, Lenka; Ferguson, Jennifer; Hitchin, James R; Lichawska-Cieslar, Agata; Jordan, Allan M; Pines, Jonathon; Wellbrock, Claudia; Petersen, Janni

    2014-03-15

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase regulates cell growth and division. Rapamycin only inhibits a subset of TOR activities. Here we show that in contrast to the mild impact of rapamycin on cell division, blocking the catalytic site of TOR with the Torin1 inhibitor completely arrests growth without cell death in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A mutation of the Tor2 glycine residue (G2040D) that lies adjacent to the key Torin-interacting tryptophan provides Torin1 resistance, confirming the specificity of Torin1 for TOR. Using this mutation, we show that Torin1 advanced mitotic onset before inducing growth arrest. In contrast to TOR inhibition with rapamycin, regulation by either Wee1 or Cdc25 was sufficient for this Torin1-induced advanced mitosis. Torin1 promoted a Polo and Cdr2 kinase-controlled drop in Wee1 levels. Experiments in human cell lines recapitulated these yeast observations: mammalian TOR (mTOR) was inhibited by Torin1, Wee1 levels declined and mitotic commitment was advanced in HeLa cells. Thus, the regulation of the mitotic inhibitor Wee1 by TOR signalling is a conserved mechanism that helps to couple cell cycle and growth controls.

  16. Angular correlations of fission fragments from the reactions 232Th(p,p'f) and 236U(p,p'f) at a projectile energy of 26.5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular correlations of fission fragments from the reactions 232Th(p,p'f) and 236U(p,p'f) have been measured at a projectile energy of Ep=26.5 MeV and excitation energies up to the second chance fission. The scattered protons have been detected by a semiconductor telescope positioned at two different angles (vTel=90 and vTel=60 ). The fission fragments have been measured by a parallel plate avalanche detector, which was position sensitive in two dimensions. The data continuously cover the angular ranges of about -15 up to +95 for vTel=90 and about -5 up to +50 for vTel=60 with respect to the kinematical recoil axis. It succeeded to describe the changes of the angular distribution with increasing excitation energy in terms of the Transition State Model by a uniform increase of the contributions with K≠0 for both compound systems and both excitation reactions. (orig./DG)

  17. Indicative energy technology assessment of advanced rechargeable batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Several ‘Advanced Rechargeable Battery Technologies’ (ARBT) have been evaluated. • Energy, environmental, economic, and technical appraisal techniques were employed. • Li-Ion Polymer (LIP) batteries exhibited the most attractive energy and power metrics. • Lithium-Ion batteries (LIB) and LIP batteries displayed the lowest CO2 and SO2 emissions per kW h. • Comparative costs for LIB, LIP and ZEBRA batteries were estimated against Nickel–Cadmium cells. - Abstract: Several ‘Advanced Rechargeable Battery Technologies’ (ARBT) have been evaluated in terms of various energy, environmental, economic, and technical criteria. Their suitability for different applications, such as electric vehicles (EV), consumer electronics, load levelling, and stationary power storage, have also been examined. In order to gain a sense of perspective regarding the performance of the ARBT [including Lithium-Ion batteries (LIB), Li-Ion Polymer (LIP) and Sodium Nickel Chloride (NaNiCl) {or ‘ZEBRA’} batteries] they are compared to more mature Nickel–Cadmium (Ni–Cd) batteries. LIBs currently dominate the rechargeable battery market, and are likely to continue to do so in the short term in view of their excellent all-round performance and firm grip on the consumer electronics market. However, in view of the competition from Li-Ion Polymer their long-term future is uncertain. The high charge/discharge cycle life of Li-Ion batteries means that their use may grow in the electric vehicle (EV) sector, and to a lesser extent in load levelling, if safety concerns are overcome and costs fall significantly. LIP batteries exhibited attractive values of gravimetric energy density, volumetric energy density, and power density. Consequently, they are likely to dominate the consumer electronics market in the long-term, once mass production has become established, but may struggle to break into other sectors unless their charge/discharge cycle life and cost are improved

  18. Biomass supply management for advanced energy: applications in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced biomass energy systems, including new biomass resource enhancement technologies, should be developed only where compelling situations for investors or communities exist to economically do so. These situations, or minimum viable operating conditions, are assessed from a pragmatic perspective. They are determined by specific circumstances and divergent interests that take time to define and integrate. Customized solutions are necessary and can change quickly with geography and market circumstances New technologies offer more options but are not necessarily the best. The example of energy crop technology is used to demonstrate the interdependencies that exist between new resource enhancement technology and biomass energy systems operations. The ability to genetically increase the energy density of energy crops is compared to other enhancement measures such as increasing the number of tonnes grown per hectare-year, reducing costs per tonne and improving other characteristics. Issues that need to be considered include significant knowledge gaps, lack of commitments in R and D, specificity of conversion system requirements, handling capabilities and opportunity costs. Broader biomass procurement strategies, which may be more important than resource enhancement technologies, are discussed. Biomass cost-supply is utilized as a strong analytical feature to evaluate the effectiveness of biomass procurement strategies and new biomass production technologies. Some past experiences are reviewed. Cost-supply is assessed from the perspective of the whole biomass energy system to expose the interdependencies between production operations, conversion scale and technologies, and community markets and service. Investment limits, for example, may be as important a determinant as the cost-efficiency of a new technology, which, in turn, affects biomass cost-supply-quality requirements. The cost of new technologies can then be compared to the changed performance of the overall

  19. Rechargeable dual-metal-ion batteries for advanced energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hu-Rong; You, Ya; Yin, Ya-Xia; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-14

    Energy storage devices are more important today than any time before in human history due to the increasing demand for clean and sustainable energy. Rechargeable batteries are emerging as the most efficient energy storage technology for a wide range of portable devices, grids and electronic vehicles. Future generations of batteries are required to have high gravimetric and volumetric energy, high power density, low price, long cycle life, high safety and low self-discharge properties. However, it is quite challenging to achieve the above properties simultaneously in state-of-the-art single metal ion batteries (e.g. Li-ion batteries, Na-ion batteries and Mg-ion batteries). In this contribution, hybrid-ion batteries in which various metal ions simultaneously engage to store energy are shown to provide a new perspective towards advanced energy storage: by connecting the respective advantages of different metal ion batteries they have recently attracted widespread attention due to their novel performances. The properties of hybrid-ion batteries are not simply the superposition of the performances of single ion batteries. To enable a distinct description, we only focus on dual-metal-ion batteries in this article, for which the design and the benefits are briefly discussed. We enumerate some new results about dual-metal-ion batteries and demonstrate the mechanism for improving performance based on knowledge from the literature and experiments. Although the search for hybrid-ion batteries is still at an early age, we believe that this strategy would be an excellent choice for breaking the inherent disadvantages of single ion batteries in the near future.

  20. Fossil energy: From laboratory to marketplace. Part 2, The role of advanced research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide a summary description of the role of advanced research in the overall Fossil Energy R&D program successes. It presents the specific Fossil Energy advanced research products that have been adopted commercially or fed into other R&D programs as part of the crosscutting enabling technology base upon which advanced systems are based.

  1. Method Research of Detecting High- Energy Neutron in Pulse Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum%一种探测裂变谱高能中子方法的分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立宗; 朱学彬; 李波均; 杨建伦

    2011-01-01

    Technical methods of increasing high -energy neutron sensitivity of detecting system and signal -to - noise of measurement are discussed. Through optimization of detecting system structure, neutron sensitivity of detecting system is increased. Influence of Background radiation, such as scattered neutron and scattered gamma, are calculated. Results indicate, fission high - energy neutron can be measured with low intensities and high- intensity radiation background.%探讨了提高系统中子灵敏度和测量信噪比的技术措施,通过结构参数的优化设计,提高了探测高能中子灵敏度.对影响信号测量的内本底干扰水平进行了理论计算.结果表明,在强辐射内本底条件下,可实现较低强度下探测裂变谱高能中子.

  2. Entrance channel dependence of fission fragment anisotropies - a direct experimental signature of fission before equilibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In several cases of heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions, the fission fragment angular distributions exhibit much larger anisotropies than predicted by the standard Halpern-Strutinsky theory. Several explanations have been put forward to interpret these anomalous angular distributions. One of them is that a characteristic signature of fission before full K-equilibration will be an entrance channel dependence of the fragment anisotropies for target-projectile combinations across the Businaro-Gallone ridge in the mass/charge asymmetry degree of freedom. To look for any such entrance channel dependence of fragment anisotropies, we have carried out measurements of fragment angular distributions in fission induced by boron, carbon, oxygen ions on thorium and neptunium targets and by fluorine ions on neptunium target at above barrier energies. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig

  3. Fission barriers and probabilities of spontaneous fission for elements with Z$\\geq$100

    CERN Document Server

    Baran, A; Reinhard, P -G; Robledo, L M; Staszczak, A; Warda, M

    2015-01-01

    This is a short review of methods and results of calculations of fission barriers and fission half-lives of even-even superheavy nuclei. An approvable agreement of the following approaches is shown and discussed: The macroscopic-microscopic approach based on the stratagem of the shell correction to the liquid drop model and a vantage point of microscopic energy density functionals of Skyrme and Gogny type selfconsistently calculated within Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method. Mass parameters are calculated in the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov cranking approximation. A short part of the paper is devoted to the nuclear fission dynamics. We also discuss the predictive power of Skyrme functionals applied to key properties of the fission path of $^{266}$Hs. It applies the standard techniques of error estimates in the framework of a $\\chi^2$ analysis.

  4. Fission fragment formation and fission yields in the model of octupole neutron-proton oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavshits S.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The fission fragment formation is considered as a result of neck instability in the process of octupole oscillations of neutrons and protons near the scission point. To describe such a phenomenon the potential surface of fissionning nucleus with neck radius about 1 fm was calculated with shell correction approach. The new version of smooth liquid drop part of deformation energy is proposed. The liquid drop part is formulated in a double folding model with n-n, p-p, and n-p Yukawa interaction potential. Fission fragment mass and charge distributions correspond approximately to isoscalar and isovector modes of vibrations and are defined by wave functions of oscillations. The preliminary calculation results have shown a rather good description of main integral fission yield observables.

  5. Simultaneous measurement of (n, {gamma}) and (n, fission) cross sections with the DANCE 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredeweg, T.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: toddb@lanl.gov; Fowler, M.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Becker, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bond, E.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chadwick, M.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Clement, R.R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Esch, E.-I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ethvignot, T. [CEA-DAM, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Granier, T. [CEA-DAM, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Jandel, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Macri, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); O' Donnell, J.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Reifarth, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Rundberg, R.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ullmann, J.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Vieira, D.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wouters, J.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wu, C.Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    We have recently begun a program of high precision measurements of Key production and destruction reactions of important radiochemical diagnostic isotopes, including several isotopes of uranium, plutonium and americium. The detector for advanced neutron capture experiments (DANCE), a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} array located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, will be used to measure the neutron capture cross sections for most of the isotopes of interest. However, neutron capture measurements on many of the actinides are complicated by the presence of prompt {gamma}-rays arising from low energy neutron-induced fission, which competes with neutron capture to varying degrees. Previous measurements of {sup 235}U using the DANCE array have shown that we can partially resolve capture from fission events based on total {gamma}-ray calorimetry (i.e. total {gamma}-ray energy versus {gamma}-ray multiplicity). The addition of a dedicated fission-tagging detector to the DANCE array has greatly improved our ability to separate these two competing processes. In addition to higher quality neutron capture data, the addition of a fission-tagging detector offers a means to determine the capture-to-fission ratio ({sigma} {sub {gamma}}/{sigma} {sub f}) in a single measurement, which should reduce the effect of systematic uncertainties. We are currently using a dual parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) with the target material electro-deposited directly on the center cathode foil. This design provides a high efficiency for detecting fission fragments and allows loading of pre-assembled target/detector assemblies into the neutron beam line at DANCE. Results from tests of the fission-tag detector, as well as preliminary results from measurements on {sup 235}U and {sup 252}Cf that utilized the fission-tag detector will be presented.

  6. Fission waves can oscillate

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Under the right conditions, self sustaining fission waves can form in fertile nuclear materials. These waves result from the transport and absorption of neutrons and the resulting production of fissile isotopes. When these fission, additional neutrons are produced and the chain reaction propagates until it is poisoned by the buildup of fission products. It is typically assumed that fission waves are soliton-like and self stabilizing. However, we show that in uranium, coupling of the neutron field to the 239U->239Np->239Pu decay chain can lead to a Hopf bifurcation. The fission reaction then ramps up and down, along with the wave velocity. The critical driver for the instability is a delay, caused by the half-life of 239U, between the time evolution of the neutron field and the production of 239Pu. This allows the 239Pu to accumulate and burn out in a self limiting oscillation that is characteristic of a Hopf bifurcation. Time dependent results are obtained using a numerical implementation of a reduced order r...

  7. Clusters in true ternary fission in the 252Cf (Sf) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper effect of the formation of clusters on production of the true ternary fission at simultaneous fission of 2'52Cf is investigated. Unlike conventional ternary fission with the emission of the alpha particle and binary fission, in true ternary fission reaction products are observed with the comparable masses and charges. By studying the potential energy surface calculated for the ternary system before splitting, charge and mass distributions of the nascent products at the spontaneous fission of 252Cf are estimated. Probabilities of the true ternary fission products will be greater where the potential energy surface has minima deeper. Results showed that the products of true ternary fission with magical numbers 20, 28, 50 and 82 for protons and neutrons are formed with a high probability. (authors)

  8. 3He- and 4He-induced nuclear fission -- A test of the transition state method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission in 3H and 4He induced reactions at excitation energies between the fission barrier and 140 MeV has been investigated. Twenty-three fission excitation functions of various compound nuclei in different mass regions are shown to scale exactly according to the transition state prediction once the shell effects are accounted for. New precise measurements of excitation functions in a mass region where shell effects are very strong, allow one to test the predictions with an even higher accuracy. The fact that no deviations from the transition state method have been observed within the experimentally investigated excitation energy regime allows one to assign limits for the fission transient time. The precise measurement of fission excitation functions of neighboring isotopes enables one to experimentally estimate the first chance fission probability. Even if only first chance fission is investigated, no evidence for fission transient times larger than 30 zs can be found

  9. FASTGRASS implementation in BISON and Fission gas behavior characterization in UO2 and connection to validating MARMOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Di [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mo, Kun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jamison, Laura M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lian, Jie [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Yao, Tiankei [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This activity is supported by the US Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Product Line (FPL). Two major accomplishments in FY 15 are summarized in this report: (1) implementation of the FASTGRASS module in the BISON code; and (2) a Xe implantation experiment for large-grained UO2. Both BISON AND MARMOT codes have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to enable next generation fuel performance modeling capability as part of the NEAMS Program FPL. To contribute to the development of the Moose-Bison-Marmot (MBM) code suite, we have implemented the FASTGRASS fission gas model as a module in the BISON code. Based on rate theory formulations, the coupled FASTGRASS module in BISON is capable of modeling LWR oxide fuel fission gas behavior and fission gas release. In addition, we conducted a Xe implantation experiment at the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) in order to produce the needed UO2 samples with desired bubble morphology. With these samples, further experiments to study the fission gas diffusivity are planned to provide validation data for the Fission Gas Release Model in MARMOT codes.

  10. Quasifission and fusion-fission in massive nuclei reactions. Comparison of reactions leading to the Z=120 element

    CERN Document Server

    Nasirov, A K; Hanappe, F; Heinz, S; Hofmann, S; Mandaglio, G; Manganaro, M; Muminov, A I; Scheid, W

    2008-01-01

    The yields of evaporation residues, fusion-fission and quasifission fragments in the $^{48}$Ca+$^{144,154}$Sm and $^{16}$O+$^{186}$W reactions are analyzed in the framework of the combined theoretical method based on the dinuclear system concept and advanced statistical model. The measured yields of evaporation residues for the $^{48}$Ca+$^{154}$Sm reaction can be well reproduced. The measured yields of fission fragments are decomposed into contributions coming from fusion-fission, quasifission, and fast-fission. The decrease in the measured yield of quasifission fragments in $^{48}$Ca+$^{154}$Sm at the large collision energies and the lack of quasifission fragments in the $^{48}$Ca+$^{144}$Sm reaction are explained by the overlap in mass-angle distributions of the quasifission and fusion-fission fragments. The investigation of the optimal conditions for the synthesis of the new element $Z$=120 ($A$=302) show that the $^{54}$Cr+$^{248}$Cm reaction is preferable in comparison with the $^{58}$Fe+$^{244}$Pu and ...

  11. Wireless Sensor Network for Advanced Energy Management Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Theisen; Bin Lu, Charles J. Luebke

    2009-09-23

    Eaton has developed an advanced energy management solution that has been deployed to several Industries of the Future (IoF) sites. This demonstrated energy savings and reduced unscheduled downtime through an improved means for performing predictive diagnostics and energy efficiency estimation. Eaton has developed a suite of online, continuous, and inferential algorithms that utilize motor current signature analysis (MCSA) and motor power signature analysis (MPSA) techniques to detect and predict the health condition and energy usage condition of motors and their connect loads. Eaton has also developed a hardware and software platform that provided a means to develop and test these advanced algorithms in the field. Results from lab validation and field trials have demonstrated that the developed advanced algorithms are able to detect motor and load inefficiency and performance degradation. Eaton investigated the performance of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) within various industrial facilities to understand concerns about topology and environmental conditions that have precluded broad adoption by the industry to date. A Wireless Link Assessment System (WLAS), was used to validate wireless performance under a variety of conditions. Results demonstrated that wireless networks can provide adequate performance in most facilities when properly specified and deployed. Customers from various IoF expressed interest in applying wireless more broadly for selected applications, but continue to prefer utilizing existing, wired field bus networks for most sensor based applications that will tie into their existing Computerized Motor Maintenance Systems (CMMS). As a result, wireless technology was de-emphasized within the project, and a greater focus placed on energy efficiency/predictive diagnostics. Commercially available wireless networks were only utilized in field test sites to facilitate collection of motor wellness information, and no wireless sensor network products were

  12. Experimental studies of fission properties utilized in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of fission properties utilized in reactor design. A programme of experimental studies of fission parameters useful in reactor design is described including the following: (a) The periods and yields of delayed-neutron groups emitted following the neutron-induced fission of Pu241 are measured. Evidence for systematic isotopic dependence of delayed-neutron yields is presented. An experimental investigation of the relation between the time behaviour of delayed-neutron emission and the energy of the incident neutron inducing fission is described. (b) The cross-section for the inducing, of fission in Am243, Pu242 and Pu241 with neutrons in the energy range 0.030 to 1.8 MeV is measured. Emphasis is placed upon the detailed dependence of the fission cross-section on the incident-neutron energy. The absolute values of the cross-sections are given to a precision of ∼25%. (c) Detailed results of a measurement of the Pu241 fission-neutron spectrum are given, including the spectral shape and average fission-neutron energy. Techniques and methods of measuring prompt-fission-neutron spectra are described. (d) The dependence of #-v# (the average number of neutrons emitted per fission) of U235 on the incident neutron energy is measured from 100 keV to 1.6 MeV. #-v# of U238 and other fissile isotopes is compared to #-v# of U235 (thermal). The relative precision of the measurements is #>approx#1.2%. (author)

  13. Guest Editorial Advanced Distributed Control of Energy Conversion Devices and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davoudi, Ali; Guerrero, Josep M.; Lewis, Frank;

    2014-01-01

    The papers in this special issue on advanced distributed control of energy conversion devices and systems are loosely grouped into three categories: 1) ac energy conversion systems; 2) dc energy conversion systems; and 3) optimization and standards.......The papers in this special issue on advanced distributed control of energy conversion devices and systems are loosely grouped into three categories: 1) ac energy conversion systems; 2) dc energy conversion systems; and 3) optimization and standards....

  14. Singlet Fission of Non-polycyclic Aromatic Molecules in Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, So; Pu, Yong-Jin; Saito, Ayaka; Kurashige, Yuki; Beppu, Teruo; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Hada, Masaki; Kido, Junji

    2016-02-24

    Singlet fission of thienoquinoid compounds in organic photovoltaics is demonstrated. The escalation of the thienoquinoid length of the compounds realizes a suitable packing structure and energy levels for singlet fission. The magnetic-field dependence of the photocurrent and the external quantum efficiency of the devices reveal singlet fission of the compounds and dissociation of triplet excitons into charges.

  15. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator; Dufera, Hiz [Project Manager; Montagna, Deb [Business Point of Contact

    2012-10-29

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE‐EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven‐stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling‐up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke‐ unlimited Power Take‐Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  16. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  17. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO2 emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  18. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckthorpe, Derek [AMEC, Knutsford, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO{sub 2} emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  19. Advanced Nanostructured Cathode for Ultra High Specific Energy Lithium Ion Batteries Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Integrate advanced nanotechnology with energy storage technology to develop advanced cathode materials for use in Li-ion batteries while maintaining a high level of...

  20. Analysis of Intermediate-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Spallation, Fission, and Fragmentation Reactions with the LAQGSM code

    OpenAIRE

    Mashnik, S. G.; Gudima, K. K.; Prael, R. E.; Sierk, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    The LAQGSM code has been recently developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to simulate nuclear reactions for proton radiography applications. We have benchmarked our code against most available measured data both for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions at incident energies from 10 MeV to 800 GeV and have compared our results with predictions of other current models used by the nuclear community. Here, we present a brief description of our code and show illustrative results obta...