WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced direct liquefaction

  1. Advanced Direct Liquefaction Concepts for PETC Generic Units - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-02-01

    Reported here are the results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments and supporting technical and economic assessments conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC9104O during the period October 1, 1996 to December 31, 1996. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, CONSOI+ Inc., LDP Associates, and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. This work invoives the introduction into the basic two stage liquefaction process several novel concepts which include dispersed lower-cost catalysts, coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing.

  2. Advanced Direct Liquefaction Concepts for PETC Generic Units - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-09-01

    Reported here are the results of Laboratory and Bench- Scale experiments and supporting technical and economic assessments conducted under DOE Contract No. DE- AC22- 91PC91040 during the period April 1, 1997 to June 30, 1997. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, CONSOL, Inc., LDP Associates, and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. This work involves the introduction into the basic two stage liquefaction process several novel concepts which includes dispersed lower- cost catalysts, coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. This report includes a data analysis of the ALC- 2 run which was the second continuous run in which Wyodak Black Thunder coal was fed to a two kg/ h bench- scale unit. One of the objectives of that run was to determine the relative activity of several Mo- based coal impregnated catalyst precursors. The precursors included ammonium heptamolybdate (100 mg Mo/ kg dry coal), which was used alone as well as in combination with ferrous sulfate (1% Fe/ dry coal) and nickel sulfate (50 mg Ni/ kg dry coal). The fourth precursor that was tested was phosphomolybdic acid which was used at a level of 100 mg Mo/ kg dry coal. Because of difficulties in effectively separating solids from the product stream, considerable variation in the feed stream occurred. Although the coal feed rate was nearly constant, the amount of recycle solvent varied which resulted in wide variations of resid, unconverted coal and mineral matter in the feed stream. Unfortunately, steady state was not achieved in any of the four conditions that were run. Earlier it was reported that Ni- Mo catalyst appeared to give the best results based upon speculative steady- state yields that were developed.

  3. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The Advanced Concepts for Direct Coal Liquefaction program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1991 to develop technologies that could significantly reduce the cost of producing liquid fuels by the direct liquefaction of coal. The advanced 2-stage liquefaction technology that was developed at Wilsonville over the past 10 years has contributed significantly toward decreasing the cost of producing liquids from coal to about $33/bbl. It remains, however, the objective of DOE to further reduce this cost to a level more competitive with petroleum based products. This project, among others, was initiated to investigate various alternative approaches to develop technologies that might ultimately lead to a 25 % reduction in cost of product. In this project a number of novel concepts were investigated, either individually or in a coupled configuration that had the potential to contribute toward meeting the DOE goal. The concepts included mature technologies or ones closely related to them, such as coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, fluid coking and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. Other approaches that were either embryonic or less developed were chemical pretreatment of coal to remove oxygen, and dispersed catalyst development for application in the 2-stage liquefaction process. This report presents the results of this project. It is arranged in four sections which were prepared by participating organizations responsible for that phase of the project. A summary of the overall project and the principal results are given in this section. First, however, an overview of the process economics and the process concepts that were developed during the course of this program is presented.

  4. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units: Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Advanced Direct Liquefaction Concepts Program sponsored by the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center was initiated in 1991 with the objective of promoting the development of new and emerging technology that has the potential for reducing the cost of producing liquid fuels by direct coal liquefaction. The laboratory research program (Phase I) was completed in 1995 by UK/CAER, CONSOL, Sandia National Laboratories and LDP Associates. A three year extension was subsequently awarded in October 1995 to further develop several promising concepts derived from the laboratory program. During Phase II, four continuous bench scale runs will be conducted at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. using a 2 kg/hr continuous bench scale unit located at their facility in Lawrenceville, NJ. The first run in this program (ALC-1), conducted between April 19 and May 14, 1996, consisted of five test conditions to evaluate the affect of coal cleaning and recycle solvent modification. A detailed discussion of this run is included in Section Two of this report. Results obtained during this reporting period for all participants in this program are summarized.

  5. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units, Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The aims of this research program are to advance to bench-scale testing, concepts that have the potential for making net reductions in direct coal liquefaction process costs. The research involves a teaming arrangement between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), Consolidation Coal Company (CONSOL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and LDP Associates. Progress reports are presented for: Task 2.1.1 development of a catalyst screening test (UK/CAER); Task 2.1.2 activation of impregnated catalysts (UK/CAER); Task 2.2 laboratory support (CONSOL); Task 3 continuous operations/parametric studies (Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc.) and; Task 4.4 conceptual design, preliminary technical assessment (LDP Associates).

  6. Reaction engineering in direct coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Y. T.

    Processes for direct coal liquefaction by solvent extraction are considered along with the structure and properties of coal and the mechanism of coal liquefaction, heteroatom removal during liquefaction, kinetic models for donor-solvent coal liquefaction, the design of coal liquefaction reactors, and the refining of coal liquids. Attention is given to the catalytic hydrogenation of coal in the presence of a solvent, the origin and character of coal, laboratory reactors for rate measurements, reaction networks based on lumped fractions, free-radical reaction models, reactor types, the compatibility of coal-derived liquids and petroleum fuels, the stability of coal liquids, thermal cracking, catalytic hydrotreating, catalytic cracking, and catalytic reforming.

  7. Advances in Seabed Liquefaction and its Implications for Marine Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    A review is presented of recent advances in seabed liquefaction and its implications for marine structures. The review is organized in seven sections: Residual liquefaction, including the sequence of liquefaction, mathematical modelling, centrifuge modelling and comparison with standard wave......-flume results; Momentary liquefaction; Floatation of buried pipelines; Sinking of pipelines and marine objects; Liquefaction at gravity structures; Stability of rock berms in liquefied soils; and Impact of seismic-induced liquefaction....

  8. The direct liquefaction proof of concept program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H. [New York & Puritan Avenues, Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the Proof of Concept (POC) Program is to develop Direct Coal Liquefaction and associated transitional technologies towards commercial readiness for economically producing premium liquid fuels from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. The program focuses on developing the two-stage liquefaction (TSL) process by utilizing geographically strategic feedstocks, commercially feasible catalysts, new prototype equipment, and testing co-processing or alternate feedstocks and improved process configurations. Other high priority objectives include dispersed catalyst studies, demonstrating low rank coal liquefaction without solids deposition, improving distillate yields on a unit reactor volume basis, demonstrating ebullated bed operations while obtaining scale-up data, demonstrating optimum catalyst consumption using new concepts (e.g. regeneration, cascading), producing premium products through on-line hydrotreating, demonstrating improved hydrogen utilization for low rank coals using novel heteroatom removal methods, defining and demonstrating two-stage product properties for upgrading; demonstrating efficient and economic solid separation methods, examining the merits of integrated coal cleaning, demonstrating co-processing, studying interactions between the preheater and first and second-stage reactors, improving process operability by testing and incorporating advanced equipment and instrumentation, and demonstrating operation with alternate coal feedstocks. During the past two years major PDU Proof of Concept runs were completed. POC-1 with Illinois No. 6 coal and POC-2 with Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal. Results from these operations are continuing under review and the products are being further refined and upgraded. This paper will update the results from these operations and discuss future plans for the POC program.

  9. DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROOF-OF-CONCEPT PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.G. Comolli; T.L.K. Lee; J. Hu; G. Popper; M.D. Elwell; J. Miller; D. Parfitt; P. Zhou

    1999-12-30

    This report presents the results of the bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-09, HTI Run Number 227-106, conducted under the DOE Proof-of-Concept Option Program indirect coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-09 was conducted using two types of Chinese coal, Shenhua No.2 and Shenhua No.3, and had several goals. One goal was to study the liquefaction performance of Shenhua No.2 and Shenhua No.3 with respect to coal conversion and distillate production. Another goal of Bench Run PB-09 was to study the effect of different GelCatw formulations and loadings. At the same time, the space velocity and the temperature of the fmt reactor, K-1, were varied to optimize the liquefaction of the two Chinese coals. The promoter-modified HTI GelCat{trademark} catalyst was very effective in the direct liquefaction of coal with nearly 92% maf coal conversion with Shenhua No.3 and 93% maf coal conversion with 9 Shenhua No.2. Distillate yields (CQ-524 C)varied from 52-68% maf for Shenhua No.3 coal to 54-63% maf for Shenhua No.2 coal. The primary conclusion from Bench Run PB-09 is that Shenhua No.3 coal is superior to Shenhua No.2 coal in direct liquefaction due to its greater distillate production, although coal conversion is slightly lower and C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} light gas production is higher for Shenhua No.3. The new promoter modified GelCat{trademark} proved successful in converting the two 9 Chinese coals and, under some conditions, producing good distillate yields for a coal-only bench run. Run PB-09 demonstrated significantly better performance of China Shenhua coal using HTI's coal direct liquefaction technology and GelCat{trademark} catalyst than that obtained at China Coal Research Institute (CCRI, coal conversion 88% and distillate yield 61%).

  10. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfred G. Comolli; Peizheng Zhou; HTI Staff

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of the U.S. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, is to ensure the US a secure energy supply at an affordable price. An integral part of this program was the demonstration of fully developed coal liquefaction processes that could be implemented if market and supply considerations so required, Demonstration of the technology, even if not commercialized, provides a security factor for the country if it is known that the coal to liquid processes are proven and readily available. Direct liquefaction breaks down and rearranges complex hydrocarbon molecules from coal, adds hydrogen, and cracks the large molecules to those in the fuel range, removes hetero-atoms and gives the liquids characteristics comparable to petroleum derived fuels. The current processes being scaled and demonstrated are based on two reactor stages that increase conversion efficiency and improve quality by providing the flexibility to adjust process conditions to accommodate favorable reactions. The first stage conditions promote hydrogenation and some oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen removal. The second stage hydrocracks and speeds the conversion to liquids while removing the remaining sulfur and nitrogen. A third hydrotreatment stage can be used to upgrade the liquids to clean specification fuels.

  11. Subtask 3.9 - Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulich, Ted; Sharma, Ramesh

    2012-07-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Accelergy Corporation, an advanced fuels developer with technologies exclusively licensed from ExxonMobil, undertook Subtask 3.9 to design, build, and preliminarily operate a bench-scale direct coal liquefaction (DCL) system capable of converting 45 pounds/hour of pulverized, dried coal to a liquid suitable for upgrading to fuels and/or chemicals. Fabrication and installation of the DCL system and an accompanying distillation system for off-line fractionation of raw coal liquids into 1) a naphtha middle distillate stream for upgrading and 2) a recycle stream was completed in May 2012. Shakedown of the system was initiated in July 2012. In addition to completing fabrication of the DCL system, the project also produced a 500-milliliter sample of jet fuel derived in part from direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal, and submitted the sample to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, for evaluation. The sample was confirmed by AFRL to be in compliance with all U.S. Air Force-prescribed alternative aviation fuel initial screening criteria.

  12. Case studies on direct liquefaction of low rank Wyoming coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, P.; Kramer, S.J.; Poddar, S.K. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Previous Studies have developed process designs, costs, and economics for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 and Wyoming Black Thunder coals at mine-mouth plants. This investigation concerns two case studies related to the liquefaction of Wyoming Black Thunder coal. The first study showed that reducing the coal liquefaction reactor design pressure from 3300 to 1000 psig could reduce the crude oil equivalent price by 2.1 $/bbl provided equivalent performing catalysts can be developed. The second one showed that incentives may exist for locating a facility that liquifies Wyoming coal on the Gulf Coast because of lower construction costs and higher labor productivity. These incentives are dependent upon the relative values of the cost of shipping the coal to the Gulf Coast and the increased product revenues that may be obtained by distributing the liquid products among several nearby refineries.

  13. Direct liquefaction of plastics and coprocessing of coal with plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P.; Feng, Z.; Mahajan, V. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this work were to optimize reaction conditions for the direct liquefaction of waste plastics and the coprocessing of coal with waste plastics. In previous work, the direct liquefaction of medium and high density polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PPE), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and a mixed plastic waste, and the coliquefaction of these plastics with coals of three different ranks was studied. The results established that a solid acid catalyst (HZSM-5 zeolite) was highly active for the liquefaction of the plastics alone, typically giving oil yields of 80-95% and total conversions of 90-100% at temperatures of 430-450 {degrees}C. In the coliquefaction experiments, 50:50 mixtures of plastic and coal were used with a tetralin solvent (tetralin:solid = 3:2). Using approximately 1% of the HZSM-5 catalyst and a nanoscale iron catalyst, oil yields of 50-70% and total conversion of 80-90% were typical. In the current year, further investigations were conducted of the liquefaction of PE, PPE, and a commingled waste plastic obtained from the American Plastics Council (APC), and the coprocessing of PE, PPE and the APC plastic with Black Thunder subbituminous coal. Several different catalysts were used in these studies.

  14. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Gutterman, C. (Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)); Chander, S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  15. Solvent recyclability in a multistep direct liquefaction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetland, M.D.; Rindt, J.R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Direct liquefaction research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has, for a number of years, concentrated on developing a direct liquefaction process specifically for low-rank coals (LRCs) through the use of hydrogen-donating solvents and solvents similar to coal-derived liquids, the water/gas shift reaction, and lower-severity reaction conditions. The underlying assumption of all of the research was that advantage could be taken of the reactivity and specific qualities of LRCs to produce a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble material that might be easier to upgrade than the soluble residuum produced during direct liquefaction of high-rank coals. A multistep approach was taken to produce the THF-soluble material, consisting of (1) preconversion treatment to prepare the coal for solubilization, (2) solubilization of the coal in the solvent, and (3) polishing to complete solubilization of the remaining material. The product of these three steps can then be upgraded during a traditional hydrotreatment step. The results of the EERC`s research indicated that additional studies to develop this process more fully were justified. Two areas were targeted for further research: (1) determination of the recyclability of the solvent used during solubilization and (2) determination of the minimum severity required for hydrotreatment of the liquid product. The current project was funded to investigate these two areas.

  16. An advanced extruder-feeder biomass liquefaction reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Don H.; Wolf, D.; Davenport, G.; Mathews, S.; Porter, M.; Zhao, Y.

    1987-11-01

    A unique method of pumping concentrated, viscous biomass slurries that are characteristic of biomass direct liquefaction systems was developed. A modified single-screw extruder was shown to be capable of pumping solid slurries as high as 60 weight percent wood flour in wood oil derived vacuum bottoms, as compared to only 10 to 20 weight percent wood flour in wood oil in conventional systems. During the period August, 1985 to April, 1987, a total of 18 experimental continuous biomass liquefaction runs were made using white birch feedstock. Good operability with feed rates up to 30 lb/hr covering a range of carbon monoxide, sodium carbonate catalyst, pressures from 800 to 3000 psi and temperatures from 350 C to 430 C was achieved. Crude wood oils containing 6 to 10 weight percent residual oxygen were obtained. Other wood oil characteristics are reported.

  17. Development of an extruder-feeder biomass direct liquefaction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Wolf, D. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-10-01

    As an abundant, renewable, domestic energy resource, biomass could help the United States reduce its dependence on imported oil. Biomass is the only renewable energy technology capable of addressing the national need for liquid transportation fuels. Thus, there is an incentive to develop economic conversion processes for converting biomass, including wood, into liquid fuels. Through research sponsored by the US DOE's Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program, the University of Arizona has developed a unique biomass direct liquefaction system. The system features a modified single-screw extruder capable of pumping solid slurries containing as high as 60 wt% wood flour in wood oil derived vacuum bottoms at pressures up to 3000 psi. The extruder-feeder has been integrated with a unique reactor by the University to form a system which offers potential for improving high pressure biomass direct liquefaction technology. The extruder-feeder acts simultaneously as both a feed preheater and a pumping device for injecting wood slurries into a high pressure reactor in the biomass liquefaction process. An experimental facility was constructed and following shakedown operations, wood crude oil was produced by mid-1985. By July 1988, a total of 57 experimental continuous biomass liquefaction runs were made using White Birch wood feedstock. Good operability was achieved at slurry feed rates up to 30 lb/hr, reactor pressures from 800 to 3000 psi and temperatures from 350{degree}C to 430{degree}C under conditions covering a range of carbon monoxide feed rates and sodium carbonate catalyst addition. Crude wood oils containing as little as 6--10 wt% residual oxygen were produced. 38 refs., 82 figs., 26 tabs.

  18. Technology for advanced liquefaction processes: Coal/waste coprocessing studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugini, A.V.; Rothenberger, K.S.; Ciocco, M.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The efforts in this project are directed toward three areas: (1) novel catalyst (supported and unsupported) research and development, (2) study and optimization of major operating parameters (specifically pressure), and (3) coal/waste coprocessing. The novel catalyst research and development activity has involved testing supported catalysts, dispersed catalysts, and use of catalyst testing units to investigate the effects of operating parameters (the second area) with both supported and unsupported catalysts. Several supported catalysts were tested in a simulated first stage coal liquefaction application at 404{degrees}C during this performance period. A Ni-Mo hydrous titanate catalyst on an Amocat support prepared by Sandia National laboratories was tested. Other baseline experiments using AO-60 and Amocat, both Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported catalysts, were also made. These experiments were short duration (approximately 12 days) and monitored the initial activity of the catalysts. The results of these tests indicate that the Sandia catalyst performed as well as the commercially prepared catalysts. Future tests are planned with other Sandia preparations. The dispersed catalysts tested include sulfated iron oxide, Bayferrox iron oxide (iron oxide from Miles, Inc.), and Bailey iron oxide (micronized iron oxide from Bailey, Inc.). The effects of space velocity, temperature, and solvent-to-coal ratio on coal liquefaction activity with the dispersed catalysts were investigated. A comparison of the coal liquefaction activity of these catalysts relative to iron catalysts tested earlier, including FeOOH-impregnated coal, was made. These studies are discussed.

  19. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R. [and others

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results of work conducted under the DOE Proof-of-Concept Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, from February 1994 through April 1995. The work includes modifications to HRI`s existing 3 ton per day Process Development Unit (PDU) and completion of the second PDU run (POC Run 2) under the Program. The 45-day POC Run 2 demonstrated scale up of the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL Process) for a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal to produce distillate liquid products at a rate of up to 4 barrels per ton of moisture-ash-free coal. The combined processing of organic hydrocarbon wastes, such as waste plastics and used tire rubber, with coal was also successfully demonstrated during the last nine days of operations of Run POC-02. Prior to the first PDU run (POC-01) in this program, a major effort was made to modify the PDU to improve reliability and to provide the flexibility to operate in several alternative modes. The Kerr McGee Rose-SR{sup SM} unit from Wilsonville, Alabama, was redesigned and installed next to the U.S. Filter installation to allow a comparison of the two solids removal systems. The 45-day CTSL Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal demonstration run achieved several milestones in the effort to further reduce the cost of liquid fuels from coal. The primary objective of PDU Run POC-02 was to scale-up the CTSL extinction recycle process for subbituminous coal to produce a total distillate product using an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Of major concern was whether calcium-carbon deposits would occur in the system as has happened in other low rank coal conversion processes. An additional objective of major importance was to study the co-liquefaction of plastics with coal and waste tire rubber with coal.

  20. Effect of Recycle Solvent Hydrotreatment on Oil Yield of Direct Coal Liquefaction

    OpenAIRE

    Shansong Gao; Dexiang Zhang; Kejian Li

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the recycle solvent hydrotreatment on oil yield of direct coal liquefaction were carried out in the 0.18 t/day direct coal liquefaction bench support unit of National Engineering Laboratory for Direct Coal Liquefaction (China). Results showed that the hydrogen-donating ability of the hydrogenated recycle solvent improved and the hydrogen consumption of solvent hydrotreatment was increased by decreasing liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV) from 1.5 to 1.0 h −1 and increasing reacti...

  1. Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, D.; Lukas, J.; Schoen, P.

    2013-11-01

    This report provides detailed reactor designs and capital costs, and operating cost estimates for the hydrothermal liquefaction reactor system, used for biomass-to-biofuels conversion, under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Five cases were developed and the costs associated with all cases ranged from $22 MM/year - $47 MM/year.

  2. An Advanced Wet Expansion Turbine for Hydrogen Liquefaction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is responsive to NASA SBIR Topic X10.01, specifically, the need for efficient small- to medium-scale hydrogen liquefaction technologies, including...

  3. An Advanced Wet Expansion Turbine for Hydrogen Liquefaction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is responsive to NASA SBIR Topic X10.01, specifically, the need for efficient small- to medium-scale hydrogen liquefaction technologies including...

  4. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion contractors review conference: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This volume contains 55 papers presented at the conference. They are divided into the following topical sections: Direct liquefaction; Indirect liquefaction; Gas conversion (methane conversion); and Advanced research liquefaction. Papers in this last section deal mostly with coprocessing of coal with petroleum, plastics, and waste tires, and catalyst studies. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Subtask 3.3 - Feasibility of Direct Coal Liquefaction in the Modern Economic Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin Oster; Joshua Strege; Marc Kurz; Anthony Snyder; Melanie Jensen

    2009-06-15

    Coal liquefaction provides an alternative to petroleum for the production of liquid hydrocarbon-based fuels. There are two main processes to liquefy coal: direct coal liquefaction (DCL) and indirect coal liquefaction (ICL). Because ICL has been demonstrated to a greater extent than DCL, ICL may be viewed as the lower-risk option when it comes to building a coal liquefaction facility. However, a closer look, based on conversion efficiencies and economics, is necessary to determine the optimal technology. This report summarizes historical DCL efforts in the United States, describes the technical challenges facing DCL, overviews Shenhua's current DCL project in China, provides a DCL conceptual cost estimate based on a literature review, and compares the carbon dioxide emissions from a DCL facility to those from an ICL facility.

  6. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE DOE DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN OF THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.P. Burke; S.D. Brandes; D.C. McCoy; R.A. Winschel; D. Gray; G. Tomlinson

    2001-07-01

    Following the petroleum price and supply disruptions of 1973, the U.S. government began a substantial program to fund the development of alternative fuels. Direct coal liquefaction was one of the potential routes to alternative fuels. The direct coal liquefaction program was funded at substantial levels through 1982, and at much lower levels thereafter. Those processes that were of most interest during this period were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels. By 1999, U.S. government funding for the development of direct coal liquefaction ended. Now that the end of this campaign has arrived, it is appropriate to summarize the process learnings derived from it. This report is a summary of the process learnings derived from the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development campaign of the late twentieth century. The report concentrates on those process development programs that were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels and were largely funded by DOE and its predecessors in response to the petroleum supply and price disruptions of the 1970s. The report is structured as chapters written by different authors on most of the major individual DOE-funded process development programs. The focus of the report is process learnings, as opposed to, say, fundamental coal liquefaction science or equipment design. As detailed in the overview (Chapter 2), DOE's direct coal liquefaction campaign made substantial progress in improving the process yields and the quality of the distillate product. Much of the progress was made after termination by 1983 of the major demonstration programs of the ''first generation'' (SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS) processes.

  7. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE DOE DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN OF THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the petroleum price and supply disruptions of 1973, the U.S. government began a substantial program to fund the development of alternative fuels. Direct coal liquefaction was one of the potential routes to alternative fuels. The direct coal liquefaction program was funded at substantial levels through 1982, and at much lower levels thereafter. Those processes that were of most interest during this period were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels. By 1999, U.S. government funding for the development of direct coal liquefaction ended. Now that the end of this campaign has arrived, it is appropriate to summarize the process learnings derived from it. This report is a summary of the process learnings derived from the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development campaign of the late twentieth century. The report concentrates on those process development programs that were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels and were largely funded by DOE and its predecessors in response to the petroleum supply and price disruptions of the 1970s. The report is structured as chapters written by different authors on most of the major individual DOE-funded process development programs. The focus of the report is process learnings, as opposed to, say, fundamental coal liquefaction science or equipment design. As detailed in the overview (Chapter 2), DOE's direct coal liquefaction campaign made substantial progress in improving the process yields and the quality of the distillate product. Much of the progress was made after termination by 1983 of the major demonstration programs of the ''first generation'' (SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS) processes

  8. Efficient direct coal liquefaction of a premium brown coal catalyzed by cobalt-promoted fumed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, M.; Loewe, A.; Traa, Y. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2013-11-01

    The search for alternatives in the fuel sector is an important technological challenge. An interim solution could be provided by direct coal liquefaction. Hydrogen economy and the lack of an efficient catalyst are the main obstacles for this process. We used a premium German brown coal with a high H/C molar ratio of 1.25 and nanostructured cobalt catalysts to improve the efficiency of direct coal liquefaction. We were able to recover and recycle the catalyst efficiently and reached good brown coal conversions and oil yields with single-stage coal liquefaction. The oil quality observed almost reached that of a conventional crude oil considering higher heating value (HHV), H/C molar ratio and aliphatic content. (orig.)

  9. Biomass Direct Liquefaction Options. TechnoEconomic and Life Cycle Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tews, Iva J.; Zhu, Yunhua; Drennan, Corinne; Elliott, Douglas C.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Onarheim, Kristin; Solantausta, Yrjo; Beckman, David

    2014-07-31

    The purpose of this work was to assess the competitiveness of two biomass to transportation fuel processing routes, which were under development in Finland, the U.S. and elsewhere. Concepts included fast pyrolysis (FP), and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), both followed by hydrodeoxygenation, and final product refining. This work was carried out as a collaboration between VTT (Finland), and PNNL (USA). The public funding agents for the work were Tekes in Finland and the Bioenergy Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy. The effort was proposed as an update of the earlier comparative technoeconomic assessment performed by the IEA Bioenergy Direct Biomass Liquefaction Task in the 1980s. New developments in HTL and the upgrading of the HTL biocrude product triggered the interest in reinvestigating this comparison of these biomass liquefaction processes. In addition, developments in FP bio-oil upgrading had provided additional definition of this process option, which could provide an interesting comparison.

  10. Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

    1982-06-01

    This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

  11. Direct hydrothermal liquefaction of undried macroalgae Enteromorpha prolifera using acid catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Bio-oil from liquefaction of wet E. prolifera was as feasible as dry powder. • Adding acid catalysts could improve the flow property of bio-oil. • Alkenes in the bio-oil converted to ketones in the presence of acid catalysts. • Content of 5-methyl furfural increased in the bio-oil obtained with acid catalysts. • Esters were formed in the bio-oil when adding sulfuric acid as a catalyst. - Abstract: Direct liquefaction of macroalgae Enteromorpha prolifera without predrying treatment was performed in a batch reactor. Effects of temperature, reaction time, biomass-to-water ratio and acid catalysts (sulfuric acid and acetic acid) on liquefaction products were investigated. Raw material and liquefaction products were analyzed by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Results showed that liquefaction at 290 °C for 20 min with 1:3 biomass-to-water ratio produced the highest bio-oil yield of 28.4 wt%, and high heating value (HHV) was 29.5 MJ/kg. Main components of bio-oil were fatty acids, ketones, alkenes and 5-methyl furfural, and main components of water soluble organics (WSOs) were pyridines, carboxylic acids and glycerol. In the bio-oil obtained with acid catalysts, content of ketones significantly increased while alkenes disappeared. Content of 5-methyl furfural also increased. Flow property of bio-oils was improved in the presence of acid catalysts. Moreover, esters were formed when adding sulfuric acid

  12. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, Oleg

    2013-12-31

    Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State’s Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct conversion of Wyoming coals and coal-lignin mixed feeds into liquid fuels in conditions highly relevant to practice. During the Phase I, catalytic direct liquefaction of sub-bituminous Wyoming coals was investigated. The process conditions and catalysts were identified that lead to a significant increase of desirable oil fraction in the products. The Phase II work focused on systematic study of solvothermal depolymerization (STD) and direct liquefaction (DCL) of carbonaceous feedstocks. The effect of the reaction conditions (the nature of solvent, solvent/lignin ratio, temperature, pressure, heating rate, and residence time) on STD was investigated. The effect of a number of various additives (including lignin, model lignin compounds, lignin-derivable chemicals, and inorganic radical initiators), solvents, and catalysts on DCL has been studied. Although a significant progress has been achieved in developing solvothermal depolymerization, the side reactions – formation of considerable amounts of char and gaseous products – as well as other drawbacks do not render aqueous media as the most appropriate choice for commercial implementation of STD for processing coals and lignins. The trends and effects discovered in DCL point at the specific features of liquefaction mechanism that are currently underutilized yet could be exploited to intensify the process. A judicious choice of catalysts, solvents, and additives might enable practical and economically efficient direct conversion of Wyoming coals into liquid fuels.

  13. Characterization of the impregnated iron based catalyst for direct coal liquefaction by EXAFS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianliYang; JishengZhun; 等

    2001-01-01

    Catalyst plays an important role in direct cola liquefaction(DCL)[1],Due to relatively high activity,low cost and environmentally benign for disposal,iron catalysts are regarded as the most attractive catalysts for DCL.To maximize catalytic effect and minimize catalyst usage,ultra-fine size catalysts are preferred.The most effective catalysts are found to be those impregnated onto coal because of their high dispersion on coal surface and intimate contact with coal particles.

  14. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing direct coal liquefaction rawhide sub-bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, R.F.; Coless, L.A.; Davis, S.M. [and others

    1995-12-31

    In 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research to demonstrate a dispersed catalyst system using a combination of molybdenum and iron precursors for direct coal liquefaction. This dispersed catalyst system was successfully demonstrated using Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal at Wilsonville, Alabama by Southern Electric International, Inc. The DOE sponsored research continues at Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL). A six month continuous bench-scale program using ERDL`s Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) is planned, three months in 1994 and three months in 1995. The initial conditions in RCLU reflect experience gained from the Wilsonville facility in their Test Run 263. Rawhide sub-bituminous coal which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested at Wilsonville was used as the feed coal. A slate of five dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal has been tested. Throughout the experiments, the molybdenum addition rate was held constant at 100 wppm while the iron oxide addition rate was varied from 0.25 to 1.0 weight percent (dry coal basis). This report covers the 1994 operations and accomplishments.

  15. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of residue from China Shenhua industrial direct coal liquefaction plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pyrolysis behavior of direct coal liquefaction residue (DCLR) and its four fractions were investigated. • The inorganic components in DCLR have catalytic effects on both pyrolysis and gasification. • The pyrolysis activation energy of DCLR obtained from DAEM is in the range of 68.4–142.9 kJ/mol. - Abstract: The objective of this work is to comprehensively investigate the pyrolysis characteristics of the direct coal liquefaction residue (DCLR) from China Shenhua industrial direct coal liquefaction plant. The pyrolysis experiments were conducted with TGA under four kinds of atmospheres (N2, 10% H2, CO2, and air) and a fixed bed reactor in N2. Two obvious mass loss peaks at 470 °C and 770 °C, are mainly attributed to decomposition of the organic matrix and inorganic compounds in DCLR, respectively. The four fractions extracted from DCLR (hexane soluble fraction (HS), asphaltene fraction (A), preasphaltene (PA), and tetrahydrofuran insoluble (THFIS)) were studied separately by TG-FTIR, and the results show that the interaction among the fractions is unfavorable for the evolution of volatile matter. In addition, the inorganic compounds in DCLR exhibit catalysis behaviors on both pyrolysis under N2 and gasification under CO2. Moreover, the properties of DCLR pyrolysis products obtained from the fixed bed reactor were analyzed by GC–MS, SEM, and FTIR. Finally, a kinetic analysis of DCLR pyrolysis was performed using the distributed activation energy model (DAEM). The activation energy distribution of DCLR follows an approximate Gaussian distribution with a mean activation energy of 87.6 kJ/mol

  16. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  17. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  18. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-02-01

    Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

  19. Analysis and prevention of metallurgical failures at a major direct coal liquefaction pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H-Coal Pilot Plant in Catlettsburg, KY was the largest-capacity direct coal liquefaction project operating in the United States. Since the start of operations, performance of its components was carefully monitored and occasional failures were examined and documented. The results of the examinations were used to develop remedial steps and improve the design of scale-up units. In this paper, the metallurgical aspects of the following incidents will be described: 1) stress corrosion cracking of martensitic stainless steel bolting on the waterside of a heat exchanger; 2) stress corrosion cracking of a superalloy seal ring; 3) brittle failure of a low alloy nut in a block valve body; 4) corrosion damage in the fractionator and side stripper; 5) erosion/corrosion of a coal liquid transfer line in the atmospheric fractionation area; 6) pitting corrosion in a deaerator carbon steel inlet pipe; 7) brittle failure of a martensitic stainless steel ball in a block valve handling coal liquids; and 8) cracking of cobalt-base alloy seat rings in block valve applications. In addition, remedial steps and preventive measures leading to successful performance after repair are briefly described

  20. Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Markovich

    2010-06-30

    This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

  1. Development of an extruder-feeder biomass direct liquefaction process. Volume 2, Parts 4--8: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Wolf, D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1991-10-01

    As an abundant, renewable, domestic energy resource, biomass could help the United States reduce its dependence on imported oil. Biomass is the only renewable energy technology capable of addressing the national need for liquid transportation fuels. Thus, there is an incentive to develop economic conversion processes for converting biomass, including wood, into liquid fuels. Through research sponsored by the US DOE`s Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program, the University of Arizona has developed a unique biomass direct liquefaction system. The system features a modified single-screw extruder capable of pumping solid slurries containing as high as 60 wt% wood flour in wood oil derived vacuum bottoms at pressures up to 3000 psi. The extruder-feeder has been integrated with a unique reactor by the University to form a system which offers potential for improving high pressure biomass direct liquefaction technology. The extruder-feeder acts simultaneously as both a feed preheater and a pumping device for injecting wood slurries into a high pressure reactor in the biomass liquefaction process. An experimental facility was constructed and following shakedown operations, wood crude oil was produced by mid-1985. By July 1988, a total of 57 experimental continuous biomass liquefaction runs were made using White Birch wood feedstock. Good operability was achieved at slurry feed rates up to 30 lb/hr, reactor pressures from 800 to 3000 psi and temperatures from 350{degree}C to 430{degree}C under conditions covering a range of carbon monoxide feed rates and sodium carbonate catalyst addition. Crude wood oils containing as little as 6--10 wt% residual oxygen were produced. 38 refs., 82 figs., 26 tabs.

  2. Dementia, death and advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    This article considers the ethics of advance directives, especially in relation to conditions such as dementia. For some choices, such as over whether one's life should end at home or in a hospice, advance directives can be very enlightened and helpful. For others, such as those to end the life of an autonomous subject, against their will, have no moral appeal and would rightly be ignored. In a wide range of intermediate cases, given our typical lack of insight into how changes in our health condition will affect us in other ways, we should be very cautious indeed in promoting the use of advance directives in end-of-life decisions, at least where a reasonable quality of life remains. There may be some reasons for giving priority to the earlier autonomous self over a later, contented but non-autonomous self, but these reasons seem far from compelling. PMID:23079306

  3. Dementia, death and advance directives.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, J.

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the ethics of advance directives, especially in relation to conditions such as dementia. For some choices, such as over whether one's life should end at home or in a hospice, advance directives can be very enlightened and helpful. For others, such as those to end the life of an autonomous subject, against their will, have no moral appeal and would rightly be ignored. In a wide range of intermediate cases, given our typical lack of insight into how changes in our health ...

  4. Advanced materials for alternative fuel capable directly fired heat engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, J.W.; Stringer, J. (eds.)

    1979-12-01

    The first conference on advanced materials for alternative fuel capable directly fired heat engines was held at the Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, Maine. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy) and the Electric Power Research Institute, (Division of Fossil Fuel and Advanced Systems). Forty-four papers from the proceedings have been entered into EDB and ERA and one also into EAPA; three had been entered previously from other sources. The papers are concerned with US DOE research programs in this area, coal gasification, coal liquefaction, gas turbines, fluidized-bed combustion and the materials used in these processes or equipments. The materials papers involve alloys, ceramics, coatings, cladding, etc., and the fabrication and materials listing of such materials and studies involving corrosion, erosion, deposition, etc. (LTN)

  5. Optimizing the conditions for the microwave-assisted direct liquefaction of Ulva prolifera for bio-oil production using response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave-assisted direct liquefaction (MADL) of Ulva prolifera was performed in ethylene glycol (EG) using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) as a catalyst. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was employed to optimize the conditions of three independent variables (catalyst content, solvent-to-feedstock ratio and temperature) for the liquefaction yield. And the bio-oil was analyzed by elementary analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis (FT-IR) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The maximum liquefaction yield was 93.17%, which was obtained under a microwave power of 600 W for 30 min at 165 °C with a solvent-to-feedstock ratio of 18.87:1 and 4.93% sulfuric acid. The bio-oil was mainly composed of phthalic acid esters, alkenes and a fatty acid methyl ester with a long chain from C16 to C20. - Highlights: • Ulva prolifera was converted to bio-oil through microwave-assisted direct liquefaction. • Response surface methodology was used to optimize the liquefaction technology. • A maximum liquefaction rate of 93.17 wt% bio-oil was obtained. • The bio-oil was composed of carboxylic acids and esters

  6. Improving performance of direct coal liquefaction through swelling with solvent under the radiation of ultrasonic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Xian-zhi; LI Ke-jian; WANG Li

    2004-01-01

    Three kinds of lower rank bituminous coals from Yanzhou mine and Tengxian mine from Shandong Province were treated and hydrogenated in the study. The test results show that the performance of hydrogenation liquefaction of the pretreated coals is improved markedly. Under the test condition of H2 initial pressure 8.2 MPa, addition of the oil yield of pretreated YZ1 coal is 69.76% compared with 62.53% of oil yield of untreated YZ1. Seminally the oil yield of pretreated YZ2 coal is 55.43% compared with20.88% of untreated YZ2 coal. The results of tests also prove that the improving degree of hydrogenation liquefaction of the pretreated coals is related with radiation duration when the radiation frequency and radiation power of ultrasonic wave are fixed.

  7. Coal liquefaction processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, N.R.; Blazek, C.F.; Tison, R.R.

    1979-07-01

    Coal liquefaction is an emerging technology receiving great attention as a possible liquid fuel source. Currently, four general methods of converting coal to liquid fuel are under active development: direct hydrogenation; pyrolysis/hydrocarbonization; solvent extraction; and indirect liquefaction. This work is being conducted at the pilot plant stage, usually with a coal feed rate of several tons per day. Several conceptual design studies have been published recently for large (measured in tens of thousands of tons per day coal feed rate) commercial liquefaction plants, and these reports form the data base for this evaluation. Products from a liquefaction facility depend on the particular method and plant design selected, and these products range from synthetic crude oils up through the lighter hydrocarbon gases, and, in some cases, electricity. Various processes are evaluated with respect to product compositions, thermal efficiency, environmental effects, operating and maintenance requirements, and cost. Because of the large plant capacities of current conceptual designs, it is not clear as to how, and on what scale, coal liquefaction may be considered appropriate as an energy source for Integrated Community Energy Systems (CES). Development work, both currently under way and planned for the future, should help to clarify and quantify the question of applicability.

  8. Direct liquefaction Proof-of-Concept facility. Final technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.; Harris, E.C.; Mountainland, D.M.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Pablacio, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of work which included extensive modifications to HRI`s existing 3 ton per day Process Development Unit (PDU) and completion of the first PDU run. The 58-day Run 1 demonstrated scale-up of the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL Process) on Illinois No. 6 coal to produce distillate liquid products at a rate of up to 5 barrels per to of moisture-ash-free coal. The Kerr McGee Rose-SR unit from Wilsonville was redesigned and installed next to the US Filter installation to allow a comparison of the two solids removal systems. Also included was a new enclosed reactor tower, upgraded computer controls and a data acquisition system, an alternate power supply, a newly refurbished reactor, an in-line hydrotreater, interstage sampling system, coal handling unit, a new ebullating pump, load cells and improved controls and remodeled preheaters. Distillate liquid yields of 5 barrels/ton of moisture ash free coal were achieved. Coal slurry recycle rates were reduced from the 2--2.5 to 1 ratio demonstrated at Wilsonville to as low as 0.9 to 1. Coal feed rates were increased during the test by 50% while maintaining process performance at a marginally higher reactor severity. Sulfur in the coal was reduced from 4 wt% to ca. 0.02 wt% sulfur in the clean distillate fuel product. More than 3,500 gallons of distillate fuels were collected for evaluation and upgrading studies. The ROSE-SR Process was operated for the first time with a pentane solvent in a steady-state model. The energy rejection of the ash concentrate was consistently below prior data, being as low as 12%, allowing improved liquid yields and recovery.

  9. Direct liquefaction of biomass: Results from operation of continuous bench scale unit in liquefaction of water slurries of Douglas fir wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaleger, L. L.; Figueroa, C.; Davis, H. G.

    1982-05-01

    A continuous liquefaction unit (CLU) is discussed. The operation was single pass, feeding water slurries of prehydrolyzed Douglas fir wood (LBL process). Significant differences from results with the oil slurry, high oil, and water recycle process (PERC process) were found. The LBL process, at practicable temperatures and residence times, makes somewhat less wood oil and considerably more water-soluble product than does PERC. Consumption of carbon monoxide in LBL, other than by water gas shift reaction, is minimal, as opposed to several tenths of a mole per 100 grams of wood in PERC. Replacement of carbon monoxide with hydrogen as reactant gas makes little or no difference in yield distribution or product analysis. Progress in characterizing the oil and water-soluble product, the overall stoichiometry of the LBL and PERC processes, and the role of formate ion are described.

  10. Advanced coal liquefaction research. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-04-01

    Work this quarter focused on staged liquefaction. The effect of residence time on conversion in single pass experiments was found to be quite different for the subbituminous Belle Ayr Mine and bituminous Illinois No. 6 coals studied. With bituminous coal, conversion to soluble material is quite high and the limit of conversion is approached in only a few minutes. With a subbituminous coal, however, conversion is much lower and the limit of conversion is approached much more slowly. Short contact time (SCT) dissolution of Belle Ayr coal was studied as a possible first stage in a two-stage process. Conversion, hydrocarbon gas yield and hydrogen consumption were increased as residence time or temperature were increased. Conversion was also significantly increased by partial slurry recycle. Pyrite was found to be the most effective slurry catalyst for increasing conversion, followed by ammonium molybdate emulsion and finally nickel-molybdenum on alumina. Illinois No. 6 coal was liquefied in two stages. Conditions in the first stage dissolution were varied to determine the effect on upgradability in the second stage. An SCT (6 minute) coal dissolution stage is preferred over one at 30 minutes because hydrocarbon gas yield was much lower while overall oil yields for the combined dissolution and upgrading stages were nearly the same. Use of a NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst in a trickle-bed second stage resulted in a higher oil yield and lower product heteroatom content than use of the same catalyst in the slurry phase. The total oil yield was lower with a pyrite slurry catalyst than with a NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ slurry catalyst. With Belle Ayr coal and added pyrite, there was no change in total oil yield, conversion or product quality brought about by adding an 8-minute first stage at 450/sup 0/C (842/sup 0/F) to a 2-hour second stage operated at 420/sup 0/C (788/sup 0/F). 39 figures, 12 tables.

  11. Directions in advanced reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Successful nuclear power plant concepts must simultaneously performance in terms of both safety and economics. To be attractive to both electric utility companies and the public, such plants must produce economical electric energy consistent with a level of safety which is acceptable to both the public and the plant owner. Programs for reactor development worldwide can be classified according to whether the reactor concept pursues improved safety or improved economic performance as the primary objective. When improved safety is the primary goal, safety enters the solution of the design problem as a constraint which restricts the set of allowed solutions. Conversely, when improved economic performance is the primary goal, it is allowed to be pursued only to an extent which is compatible with stringent safety requirements. The three major reactor coolants under consideration for future advanced reactor use are water, helium and sodium. Reactor development programs focuses upon safety and upon economics using each coolant are being pursued worldwide. These programs are discussed

  12. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  13. Advance Directives - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Advance Directives URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/advancedirectives.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  14. Preferences for Advance Directives in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    KiSun Yeo; Jung-Eun Lee; JooYoung Cheon; Won-Hee Lee; So-Sun Kim; JuHee Lee

    2011-01-01

    Background. The goal of advance directives is to help patients retain their dignity and autonomy by making their own decisions regarding end-stage medical treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine preferences of advance directives among general population in Korea. Method. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was performed from October 2007 to June 2008 in Seoul, Korea. A total of 336 city-dwelling adults self-administered the questionnaire and returned it via mail. Data analyses we...

  15. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: AR-Coal Liquefaction; Gas to Liquids; and Direct Liquefaction. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. EROI Analysis for Direct Coal Liquefaction without and with CCS: The Case of the Shenhua DCL Project in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyang Kong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are considerable discrepancies between China’s central government and some local governments in attitudes towards coal to liquids (CTL technology. Energy return on investment (EROI analysis of CTL could provide new insights that may help solve this dilemma. Unfortunately, there has been little research on this topic; this paper therefore analyses the EROI of China’s Shenhua Group Direct Coal Liquefaction (DCL project, currently the only DCL commercial project in the world. The inclusion or omission of internal energy and by-products is controversial. The results show that the EROIstnd without by-product and with internal energy is 0.68–0.81; the EROIstnd (the standard EROI without by-product and without internal energy is 3.70–5.53; the EROIstnd with by-product and with internal energy is 0.76–0.90; the EROIstnd with by-product and without internal energy is 4.13–6.14. Furthermore, it is necessary to consider carbon capture and storage (CCS as a means to control the CO2 emissions. Considering the added energy inputs of CCS at the plant level, the EROIs decrease to 0.65–0.77, 2.87–3.97, 0.72–0.85, and 3.20–4.40, respectively. The extremely low, even negative, net energy, which may be due to high investments in infrastructure and low conversion efficiency, suggests CTL is not a good choice to replace conventional energy sources, and thus, Chinese government should be prudent when developing it.

  17. 德国IGOR煤液化工艺及云南先锋褐煤液化%IGOR PROCESS OF DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION AND XIANFENG BROWN COAL LIQUEFACTION IN IT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克健; 史士东; 李文博

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, IGOR process of direct coal liquefaction in Germany and experimental results of Xianfeng brown coal in 200 kg/d PDU of IGOR process in Germany are introduced. Compared with other direct coal liquefaction processes, IGOR process is characterized with higher throughout of coal hydrogenation reactor, higher integration degree and higher quality of oils. The results of Xianfeng coal tested in 200 kg/d PDU of IGOR process in Germany showed IGOR process marched Xianfeng brown coal well with 53% of oil yield, 2 mg/kg and 17 mg/kg of N and S contents. Qualified 0# diesel oil can be produced from Xianfeng coal oil with simple distillation and qualified 90# lead free gasoline can be produced from it with reforming step.%介绍了德国IGOR煤直接液化工艺和云南先锋褐煤在IGOR工艺200 kg/d的PDU装置的试验结果. 与其它煤直接液化工艺相比, IGOR工艺具有煤直接液化反应器的空速高、系统集成度高和油品质量好的特点. 云南先锋褐煤在IGOR工艺200 kg/d的PDU装置上的试验结果表明, 先锋褐煤是适宜IGOR煤液化的煤种, 得到的油收率为53%, 油品中氮和硫的含量分别为2 mg/kg和17 mg/kg.煤液化油经过简单蒸馏可得到合格的0#柴油,经过重整可得到合格的90#无铅汽油.

  18. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Hoffmann, Jessica;

    2014-01-01

    can recombine into larger ones. During this process, a substantial part of the oxygen in the biomass is removed by dehy-dration or decarboxylation. The chemical properties of the product are mostly de-pendent of the biomass substrate composition. Biomass consists of various com-ponents such as......Biomass is one of the most abundant sources of renewable energy, and will be an important part of a more sustainable future energy system. In addition to direct combustion, there is growing attention on conversion of biomass into liquid en-ergy carriers. These conversion methods are divided into...... biochemical/biotechnical methods and thermochemical methods; such as direct combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, liquefaction etc. This chapter will focus on hydrothermal liquefaction, where high pressures and intermediate temperatures together with the presence of water are used to convert biomass into...

  19. Direct liquefaction Proof-of-Concept Program, Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc., Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Final topical report, Bench Run 02 (227-91)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the results of Bench Run PB-02, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-02 was the second of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. The primary goal of this bench run was to evaluate the hybrid catalyst system, consisting of a dispersed slurry catalyst in one of the hydroconversion reactors and conventional supported extrudate catalyst in the other hydroconversion reactor, in a high-low two-stage temperature sequence, similar to the one operated at Wilsonville. This hybrid mode of operation with the high-low temperature sequence was studied during direct liquefaction of coal and in coprocessing of coal with Hondo resid and/or waste plastics under high space velocity operating conditions. Another important objective of Bench Run PB-02 was to investigate the novel {open_quotes}interstage internal recycle{close_quotes} of the second stage reactor slurry back to the first stage reactor. Other features of PB-02 included the use of an interstage separator and an in-line fixed bed hydrotreater. In general, it was found during Bench Run PB-02 that the {open_quote}hybrid type{close_quote} catalyst system was not effective for obtaining high levels of process performance as the {open_quote}all dispersed{close_quote} catalyst system, tested earlier, especially at high coal space velocities. The interstage internal recycle of second stage reactor slurry to the first stage reactor feed line was found to improve cracking of liquefaction products. The addition of small amounts of mixed plastics was found to improve the hydrogen utilization in both coal conversion and heavy oil hydrocracking reactions, i.e., plastics resulted in improving the overall distillate yield while at the same time reducing the light gas make and chemical hydrogen consumption.

  20. Chemical analysis and mutational assay of distilled oils from the H-coal direct liquefaction process: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Later, D.W.; Wright, C.W.; Stewart, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Samples from the H-Coal process, a catalytic, single-stage, coal liquefaction technology, were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. For these investigations, a blend of light and heavy H-Coal process oils was fractionally distilled into 50/sup 0/F boiling point cuts. The chemical analyses and biological testing results presented in this status report deal primarily with the blended material and the distillate fractions boiling above 650/sup 0/F. Results from the microbial mutagenicity assays indicated that onset of biological activity in the crude materials occurred above 700/sup 0/F. Similar trends have been observed for Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) I, SRC II, Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) and Exxon EDS process materials. After chemical class fractionation, the primary source of microbial mutagenicity of the crude boiling point cuts was the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) fractions. Amino polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (amino-PAH) were present at sufficient concentration levels in the N-PAC fractions to account for the observed mutagenic responses. In general, the chemical composition of the H-Coal materials studied was similar to that of other single-stage liquefaction materials. The degree of alkylation in these materials was determined to be greater than in the SRC and less than in the EDS process distillate cuts. 13 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  1. Low-rank coal research: Volume 1, Control technology, liquefaction, and gasification: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G.F.; Collings, M.E.; Schelkoph, G.L.; Steadman, E.N.; Moretti, C.J.; Henke, K.R.; Rindt, J.R.; Hetland, M.D.; Knudson, C.L.; Willson, W.G.

    1987-04-01

    Volume I contains articles on SO/sub x//NO/sub x/ control, waste management, low-rank direct liquefaction, hydrogen production from low-rank coals, and advanced wastewater treatment. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  2. A genetic algorithm approach for assessing soil liquefaction potential based on reliability method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M H Bagheripour; I Shooshpasha; M Afzalirad

    2012-02-01

    Deterministic approaches are unable to account for the variations in soil’s strength properties, earthquake loads, as well as source of errors in evaluations of liquefaction potential in sandy soils which make them questionable against other reliability concepts. Furthermore, deterministic approaches are incapable of precisely relating the probability of liquefaction and the factor of safety (FS). Therefore, the use of probabilistic approaches and especially, reliability analysis is considered since a complementary solution is needed to reach better engineering decisions. In this study, Advanced First-Order Second-Moment (AFOSM) technique associated with genetic algorithm (GA) and its corresponding sophisticated optimization techniques have been used to calculate the reliability index and the probability of liquefaction. The use of GA provides a reliable mechanism suitable for computer programming and fast convergence. A new relation is developed here, by which the liquefaction potential can be directly calculated based on the estimated probability of liquefaction (), cyclic stress ratio (CSR) and normalized standard penetration test (SPT) blow counts while containing a mean error of less than 10% from the observational data. The validity of the proposed concept is examined through comparison of the results obtained by the new relation and those predicted by other investigators. A further advantage of the proposed relation is that it relates and FS and hence it provides possibility of decision making based on the liquefaction risk and the use of deterministic approaches. This could be beneficial to geotechnical engineers who use the common methods of FS for evaluation of liquefaction. As an application, the city of Babolsar which is located on the southern coasts of Caspian Sea is investigated for liquefaction potential. The investigation is based primarily on in situ tests in which the results of SPT are analysed.

  3. Direct coal liquefaction using iron-titanium hydride as a hydrogen distribution and catalytic material. Yearly report No. 1, September 1, 1984-August 31, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.E. Jr.

    1985-09-29

    During this year the experimental apparatus was completed after substantial delays by the manufacturer and eight direct coal liquefaction experiments were accomplished. These experiments have produced conversion and selectivity data on samples of Utah coal slurried in tetralin and catalyzed using iron-titanium hydride. Hydrogen loading of the alloy, catalyst particle size, catalyst concentration, coal particle size, operating temperatures for alloy addition and liquefaction without the catalysts present, have all been studied during these experiments. Conversions as high as 61% DAF in 30 min have been recorded at 500/sup 0/F and 500 psia. Product selectivities favor the oil fraction during the initial phase of the reaction, but as the reaction proceeds the heavier fractions are observed to increase at the expense of the oil fraction. We are currently working on a kinetic model in an effort to predict these results. Additionally, proton NMR, fractional distillation, and chromatographic analyses are currently being performed on the recovered product. We have completed the study of Utah coal and are moving on to samples of Kentucky and Alabama coals after a minor modification of the experimental apparatus is completed. Equipment manufacture, delivery, and installation delays, totaling over 6 months, greatly reduced the time available for research, making a 6 month no cost extension necessary. The extended time will permit completion of the proposed research tasks. 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) with the Experimental Apparatus Container (EAC) attached flew during the USMP-2 mission. This assembly consists of a furnace module, a muffle tube assembly and a translation mechanism which are enclosed in the EAC. During USMP-2, the AADSF was used to study the growth of mercury cadmium telluride crystals in microgravity by directional solidification, a process commonly used on earth to process metals and grow crystals. The furnace is tubular and has three independently controlled temperature zone . The sample travels from the hot zone of the furnace (1600 degrees F) where the material solidifies as it cools. The solidification region, known as the solid/liquid interface, moves from one end of the sample to the other at a controlled rate, thus the term directional solidification.

  5. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The experimental study of coal swelling ratios have been determined with a wide variety of solvents. Only marginal levels of coal swelling were observed for the hydrocarbon solvents, but high levels were found with solvents having heteroatom functionality. Blends were superior to pure solvents. The activity of various catalyst precursors for pyrene hydrogenation and coal conversion was measured. Higher coal conversions were observed for the S0{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Coal conversions were highest for Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively. Bottoms processing consists of a combination of the ASCOT process coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking. Initial results indicate that a blend of butane and pentane used near the critical temperature of butane is the best solvent blend for producing a yield/temperature relationship of proper sensitivity and yet retaining an asphalt phase of reasonable viscosity. The literature concerning coal swelling, both alone and in combination with coal liquefaction, and the use of dispersed or unsupported catalysts in coal liquefaction has been updated.

  6. [Euthanasia in advanced dementia: directive is useful].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijsbek, Henri

    2013-01-01

    The Dutch Euthanasia Act states that an advance directive can replace an actual request for euthanasia in cases in which a patient has become unable to make autonomous decisions. In Euthanasia and the Severely Demented, I agree with Keizer that the severely demented can suffer unbearably, but contrary to Keizer I do not believe that it is impossible to state in advance the conditions under which one would not wish to go on living any longer. Consequently, euthanasia can be permissible even in patients with late-stage dementia, provided that the other due-care criteria are met. Permissibility by itself, however, will not settle disputes about borderline cases. Due to the erratic course of the disease, the right moment for euthanasia may very well be impossible to determine. PMID:23777971

  7. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1992--June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    CAER/UK: Detail coal and starting solvents from Wilsonville were analyzed to develop the data necessary to conduct process studies in the CO Pretreatment and Catalyst Evaluation segment of this program. A comparison of the solvent separation analysis with the distillation/separation used at Wilsonville showed that the residual solvent components contained a large amount of residual pentane soluble products. The ashy resid contained 3% iron and 400 ppM molybdenum. Although the iron content in the distillate and deashed resid was much less, namely about 200 ppM., the molybdenum concentrations in these fractions were not significantly reduced over the concentration in the ashy resid, i.e., 200 ppM in each. The pretreatment of coal with CO/H{sub 2}O in the presence of NaOH and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} has been shown to give a product which is lower in oxygen content and higher in hydrogen content compared to the raw coal. The atomic H/C ratios of the H{sub 2}O-insolubles, THF insolubles and the PA+A fractions of the products-together with the hydrogen consumption data suggested that the raw coal has been substantially depolymerized and hydrogenated via the WGS reaction during the pretreatment process. The extensive amount of molecular reconstruction that has occurred in the solid product was evident from the ease of solubilization of the product into pyridine. The result of the pretreatment process is a product which is highly reactive under hydroliquefaction conditions at 400{degrees}C. Reaction rates seem to be much faster than the raw coal, especially at shorter reaction times, providing the opportunity for major reductions in plant vessel sizes, and preliminary data has led us to believe that better efficiency in hydrogen utilization is achieved.

  8. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    Detailed reports from a number of laboratories give results of bench-scale experiments involving pretreatments, recycle oil dewaxing, dispersed iron and molybdenum catalysts, reactor size, fluid coking, solvent extraction of products, etc. It was not possible to prepare a simple overall abstract.

  9. Geysers advanced direct contact condenser research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, J.; Bahning, T.; Bharathan, D.

    1997-12-31

    The first geothermal application of the Advanced Direct Contact Condenser (ADCC) technology developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is now operational and is being tested at The Geysers Power Plant Unit 11. This major research effort is being supported through the combined efforts of NREL, The Department of Energy (DOE), and Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E). NREL and PG&E have entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for a project to improve the direct-contact condenser performance at The Geysers Power Plant. This project is the first geothermal adaptation of an advanced condenser design developed for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems. PG&E expects this technology to improve power plant performance and to help extend the life of the steam field by using steam more efficiently. In accordance with the CRADA, no money is transferred between the contracting parties. In this case the Department of Energy is funding NREL for their efforts in this project and PG&E is contributing funds in kind. Successful application of this technology at The Geysers will provide a basis for NREL to continue to develop this technology for other geothermal and fossil power plant systems.

  10. Dietary biomarkers: advances, limitations and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedrick Valisa E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The subjective nature of self-reported dietary intake assessment methods presents numerous challenges to obtaining accurate dietary intake and nutritional status. This limitation can be overcome by the use of dietary biomarkers, which are able to objectively assess dietary consumption (or exposure without the bias of self-reported dietary intake errors. The need for dietary biomarkers was addressed by the Institute of Medicine, who recognized the lack of nutritional biomarkers as a knowledge gap requiring future research. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature on currently available dietary biomarkers, including novel biomarkers of specific foods and dietary components, and assess the validity, reliability and sensitivity of the markers. This review revealed several biomarkers in need of additional validation research; research is also needed to produce sensitive, specific, cost-effective and noninvasive dietary biomarkers. The emerging field of metabolomics may help to advance the development of food/nutrient biomarkers, yet advances in food metabolome databases are needed. The availability of biomarkers that estimate intake of specific foods and dietary components could greatly enhance nutritional research targeting compliance to national recommendations as well as direct associations with disease outcomes. More research is necessary to refine existing biomarkers by accounting for confounding factors, to establish new indicators of specific food intake, and to develop techniques that are cost-effective, noninvasive, rapid and accurate measures of nutritional status.

  11. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive use of a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives data base, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented in 1986. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings relating the status of air liquefaction technology are presented both as a singular technical area, and also as that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; Heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; Para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; Hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; Hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sinks; Liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket type combustion devices; Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES); and Technically related engine concepts.

  12. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international

  13. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  14. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winschel, R.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-11-01

    Consol R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-field: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  15. Beyond competence: advance directives in dementia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsma, Karin Rolanda; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is highly prevalent and incurable. The participation of dementia patients in clinical research is indispensable if we want to find an effective treatment for dementia. However, one of the primary challenges in dementia research is the patients' gradual loss of the capacity to consent. Patients with dementia are characterized by the fact that, at an earlier stage of their life, they were able to give their consent to participation in research. Therefore, the phase when patients are still competent to decide offers a valuable opportunity to authorize research, by using an advance research directive (ARD). Yet, the use of ARDs as an authorization for research participation remains controversial. In this paper we discuss the role of autonomous decision-making and the protection of incompetent research subjects. We will show why ARDs are a morally defensible basis for the inclusion of this population in biomedical research and that the use of ARDs is compatible with the protection of incompetent research subjects. PMID:26458366

  16. Models of advance directives in mental health care: stakeholder views

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, J.M.; Garner, H.C.; Gilmour, W H

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine perceptions of the place of advance directives in mental health care. Methods: Postal survey of stakeholders was carried out to assess their views on different models of advance directives in mental health care. A total of 473 responded. Results: In all, 28% of psychiatrists thought advance directives were needed compared to 89% of voluntary organisations and above two–thirds of the other stakeholder groups. There were clear tensions be...

  17. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As...

  18. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 2, appendices. Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., College Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

    1995-04-01

    Liquefaction experiments were undertaken using subbituminous Black Thunder mine coal to observe the effects of aqueous SO{sub 2} coal beneficiation and the introduction of various coal swelling solvents and catalyst precursors. Aqueous SO{sub 2} beneficiation of Black Thunder coal removed alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, increased the sulfur content and increased the catalytic liquefaction conversion to THF solubles compared to untreated Black Thunder coal. The liquefaction solvent had varying effects on coal conversion, depending upon the type of solvent added. The hydrogen donor solvent, dihydroanthracene, was most effective, while a coal-derived Wilsonville solvent promoted more coal conversion than did relatively inert 1-methylnaphthalene. Swelling of coal with hydrogen bonding solvents tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropanol, and methanol, prior to reaction resulted in increased noncatalytic conversion of both untreated and SO{sub 2} treated Black Thunder coals, while dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which was absorbed more into the coal than any other swelling solvent, was detrimental to coal conversion. Swelling of SO{sub 2} treated coal before liquefaction resulted in the highest coal conversions; however, the untreated coal showed the most improvements in catalytic reactions when swelled in either THF, isopropanol, or methanol prior to liquefaction. The aprotic solvent DMSO was detrimental to coal conversion.

  19. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  20. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-12-10

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  1. Advances in the directed evolution of proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lane, Michael D.; Seelig, Burckhard

    2014-01-01

    Natural evolution has produced a great diversity of proteins that can be harnessed for numerous applications in biotechnology and pharmaceutical science. Commonly, specific applications require proteins to be tailored by protein engineering. Directed evolution is a type of protein engineering that yields proteins with the desired properties under well-defined conditions and in a practical time frame. While directed evolution has been employed for decades, recent creative developments enable t...

  2. [Written advance directives in dementia: useful and relevant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdershoven, Guy A M; Nieuwenhuijzen Kruseman, Arie C; van Wijmen, Frans C B

    2014-01-01

    According to the Dutch euthanasia law, the current wishes of the patient can be replaced by an advance directive if the patient is unable to give consent. However, Dutch physicians say they have difficulty responding to advance directives in people with dementia. A crucial issue is how to establish whether the patient actually suffers in a specific situation. We argue that the patient's wishes, views and decisions should be discussed in a timely manner, and laid down both in patient directives and in the doctor's files. We also ask for regular discussion, updating and reaffirmation of the advance directive so that the patient can trust the doctor knowing the patient's wishes and what constitutes unbearable suffering for that patient. Through frequent discussion and reaffirmation, the advance directive can play the role intended by the law on euthanasia. PMID:25424631

  3. Integrating Advance Research Directives into the European Legal Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorno, Roberto; Gennet, Eloïse; Jongsma, Karin; Elger, Bernice

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of using advance directives to prospectively consent to research participation in the event of dementia remains largely unexplored in Europe. Moreover, the legal status of advance directives for research is unclear in the European regulations governing biomedical research. The article explores the place that advance research directives have in the current European legal framework, and considers the possibility of integrating them more explicitly into the existing regulations. Special focus is placed on issues regarding informed consent, the role of proxies, and the level of acceptable risks and burdens. PMID:27228684

  4. Prospect of coal liquefaction in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the current known oil reserves of about 11 billion barrel and annual production of approximately 500 million barrel, the country's oil reserves will be depleted by 2010, and Indonesia would have become net oil importer if no major oil fields be found somewhere in the archipelago. Under such circumstances the development of new sources of liquid fuel becomes a must, and coal liquefaction can be one possible solution for the future energy problem in Indonesia, particularly in the transportation sector due to the availability of coal in huge amount. This paper present the prospect of coal liquefaction in Indonesia and look at the possibility of integrating the process with HTR as a heat supplier. Evaluation of liquidability of several low grade Indonesian coals will also be presented. Coal from South Banko-Tanjung Enim is found to be one of the most suitable coal for liquefaction. Several studies show that an advanced coal liquefaction technology recently developed has the potential to reduce not only the environmental impact but also the production cost. The price of oil produced in the year 2000 is expected to reach US $ 17.5 ∼ 19.2/barrel and this will compete with the current oil price. Not much conclusion can be drawn from the idea of integrating HTR with coal liquefaction plant due to limited information available. (author). 7 figs, 3 tabs

  5. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  6. Put It in Writing: Questions and Answers on Advance Directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at any time. Any alterations and any written revocation should be signed and dated, and copies should ... the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) offers free, state-specific advance directives and advice for ...

  7. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Rudolf, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    dehydration or decarboxylation. The chemical properties of bio-oil are highly dependent of the biomass substrate composition. Biomass constitutes of various components such as protein; carbohydrates, lignin and fat, and each of them produce distinct spectra of compounds during hydrothermal liquefaction. In......This article reviews the hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass with the aim of describing the current status of the technology. Hydrothermal liquefaction is a medium-temperature, high-pressure thermochemical process, which produces a liquid product, often called bio-oil or bi-crude. During the...... hydrothermal liquefaction process, the macromolecules of the biomass are first hydrolyzed and/or degraded into smaller molecules. Many of the produced molecules are unstable and reactive and can recombine into larger ones. During this process, a substantial part of the oxygen in the biomass is removed by...

  8. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1990-- April 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1992-02-15

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science (CFFLS) is currently engaged in a three year contract with the US Department of Energy investigating a range of research topics dealing with direct coal liquefaction. This report summarizes the results of this program in its second year, from May 1, 1990 to April 30, 1991. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: Iron-based catalysts for coal liquefaction, exploratory research on coal conversion, novel coal liquefaction concepts, and novel catalysts for coal liquefaction.

  9. Advance directives, dementia, and withholding food and water by mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Paul T; Chandler-Cramer, M Colette

    2014-01-01

    People with dementia who are no longer competent have limited control over how their lives end. But an advance directive to withhold food and water by mouth could be used to ensure that one does not live for years in severe dementia. Such directives are arguably already legal. PMID:24821250

  10. Effect of properties of iron compounds on the catalytic activity in direct coal liquefaction; Tetsu kagobutsu no keitai to sekitan ekika kassei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, T.; Tazawa, K. [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Shimasaki, K. [Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan)

    1998-08-20

    When considering merchandising scale of the coal liquefaction process, it is a preliminary condition that metal used for its catalyst is rich in resource volume, cheap in production cost, without pollution, and so forth, and application of cheap iron ore and ferrous compounds to disposable catalyst is desired. As liquefaction activity of the iron ore was hitherto improved by its micro crushing, its mechanical crush had a limit of about 2 {mu}m in mean particle diameter. However, together with recent crushing technique, crushers with high performance were developed, and then micro crushing by sub-micron became possible industri8ally even for iron ore. In this study, three kinds of Australian iron ores such as limonite of ferric hydroxide type iron ore, pyrite of ferrous sulfide type, and hematite of ferric oxide type were micro crushed to examine coal liquefaction activity and hydrogenation reaction activity of 1-methyl naphthalene (1-MN) and also relationship between properties and activity of catalyst for the latter before and after reaction. 11 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Liquefaction for cataract extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiris, Georgios; Toli, Aspasia; Polychroni, Damaskini; Gkika, Maria; Angelonias, Dimitrios; Kozobolis, Vassilios P.

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the recent literature regarding the implementation of the liquefaction in cataract surgery and its short-term and long-term outcomes in various parameters that affect the quality of patients' life, including visual rehabilitation and possible complications was performed based on the PubMed, Medline, Nature and the American Academy of Ophthalmology databases in November 2013 and data from 14 comparative studies were included in this narrative review. Liquefaction is an innovative technology for cataract extraction that uses micropulses of balanced salt solution to liquefy the lens nucleus. Most studies reported that liquefaction is a reliable technology for mild to moderate cataracts, while fragmentation difficulties may be encountered with harder nuclei. PMID:26949656

  12. Advance Directive from the Romanian Social Cultural Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia DUMITRAS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Giving value to the wishes of the terminal patients regarding the treatment at the end of their life, the use of the advance directive, as an extension of their autonomy when the patients are incompetent, represents a mean to respect and promote their dignity. The authors present and discuss the results of their research that analysed the attitude of Romanians toward the use of the advance directive to identify the usefulness of implementing such a document in the Romanian social cultural context.The target group in this research is general population over 18 years old, speaking Romanian and without psychological illnesses. The representative random sample lot included 828 persons from Iasi County. The data were recorded based on a transversal descriptive study, using the method of questionnaire enquiryThe persons participating in the study admitted the importance of respecting the patient’s dignity and autonomy with reference to decisions concerning the treatment at the end of life. For the subjects agreeing with legalizing the advance directive, the main advantages of such a document are firstly the respect of the patient’s right to decide and secondly the improvement of the medical treatment.The study showed that young, healthy and better educated individuals are interested in the advance directive and are in favour of introducing it in the current medical practice. The results of our research suggest that educational and informative programmes are needed in Romania regarding the role and usefulness of the advance directive, as well as the way to implement it, in order to encourage the implication of all adult persons in planning their own medical treatment in general and in particular in the medical decisions concerning the end of life.

  13. Liquefaction of uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical methods for assessing the liquefaction potential of soils are reviewed with a view to their application to uranium tailings. The method can be divided into two categories: total stress analysis, where changes in pore pressure are not considered in the soil model, and effective stress analysis, where changes in pore pressure are included in the soil model. Effective stress analysis is more realistic, but few computer programs exist for such analysis in two or three dimensions. A simple linearized, two-dimensional, finite element effective stress analysis which incorporates volumetric compaction due to shear motion is described and implemented. The new program is applied to the assessment of liquefaction potential of tailings in the Quirke Mine tailings area near Elliot Lake, Ontario. The results are compared with those of a total stress analysis. Both analyses indicate liquefaction would occur if a magnitude 6.0 earthquake were to occur near the area. However, the extent of liquefaction predicted by the effective stress analysis is much less than that predicted by the total stress analysis. The results of both methods are sensitive to assumed material properties and to the method used to determine the cyclic shear strength of the tailings. Further analysis, incorporating more in situ and/or laboratory data, is recommended before conclusions can be made concerning the dynamic stability of these tailings

  14. Acceptability of an Advance Directive That Limits Food and Liquids in Advanced Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volicer, Ladislav; Stets, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Some individuals fear living with advanced dementia and may even commit suicide if they receive dementia diagnosis. Living with advanced dementia could be prevented if a person who cannot feed himself or herself would not be fed by others. The purpose of the study was to find out how acceptable would be an advance directive that includes discontinuation of feeding at certain stage of dementia for relatives of persons who died with dementia. All participants of 2 focus groups would be willing to indicate at least 1 condition in which they would not want to be fed. Some of them would be willing to make a proxy decision to stop feeding in the absence of advance directives. PMID:25313239

  15. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. [Mainly, the effect of preteatment of coal with carbon monoxide and steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    CAER/UK: Detail coal and starting solvents from Wilsonville were analyzed to develop the data necessary to conduct process studies in the CO Pretreatment and Catalyst Evaluation segment of this program. A comparison of the solvent separation analysis with the distillation/separation used at Wilsonville showed that the residual solvent components contained a large amount of residual pentane soluble products. The ashy resid contained 3% iron and 400 ppM molybdenum. Although the iron content in the distillate and deashed resid was much less, namely about 200 ppM., the molybdenum concentrations in these fractions were not significantly reduced over the concentration in the ashy resid, i.e., 200 ppM in each. The pretreatment of coal with CO/H{sub 2}O in the presence of NaOH and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} has been shown to give a product which is lower in oxygen content and higher in hydrogen content compared to the raw coal. The atomic H/C ratios of the H{sub 2}O-insolubles, THF insolubles and the PA+A fractions of the products-together with the hydrogen consumption data suggested that the raw coal has been substantially depolymerized and hydrogenated via the WGS reaction during the pretreatment process. The extensive amount of molecular reconstruction that has occurred in the solid product was evident from the ease of solubilization of the product into pyridine. The result of the pretreatment process is a product which is highly reactive under hydroliquefaction conditions at 400{degrees}C. Reaction rates seem to be much faster than the raw coal, especially at shorter reaction times, providing the opportunity for major reductions in plant vessel sizes, and preliminary data has led us to believe that better efficiency in hydrogen utilization is achieved.

  16. Direct mineral identification with Geoscan Mk II Advanced Multispectral Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Ronald J. P.; Honey, Frank R.

    1990-09-01

    Analysis of the Geoscan Mk II scanner imagery obtained over the past twelve months in Australia and in the USA has shown that this advanced system can effect direct mineral identification (DM1) with only a minimum of processing and in an operational commercial mode of use. This paper attempts to show some of these results with imagery flown over goldmineralizaon (Leonora W. Australia) porphyry-copper mineralization and associated higher-level advanced argiffic alteration (Yerington NV--Ann Mason and Buckskin Ra. ) and a copper-gold skarn nearby (Ludwig NV). In all cases simple banddifferencing is all the processing that is required and this can be effected minutes after landing from a flight using a proprietary image-display system (GIPSy) which accepts the optical disks directly. [3 1.

  17. Technological advances in site-directed spin labeling of proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbell, Wayne L.; López, Carlos J.; Altenbach, Christian; Yang, Zhongyu

    2013-01-01

    Molecular flexibility over a wide time range is of central importance to the function of many proteins, both soluble and membrane. Revealing the modes of flexibility, their amplitudes, and time scales under physiological conditions is the challenge for spectroscopic methods, one of which is site-directed spin labeling EPR (SDSL-EPR). Here we provide an overview of some recent technological advances in SDSL-EPR related to investigation of structure, structural heterogeneity, and dynamics of pr...

  18. Magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Kondo, T.; Yoshioka, S; Kamiya, K.; Numazawa, T.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic refrigeration which is based on the magnetocaloric effect of solids has the potential to achieve high thermal efficiency for hydrogen liquefaction. We have been developing a magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction which cools down hydrogen gas from liquid natural gas temperature and liquefies at 20 K. The magnetic liquefaction system consists of two magnetic refrigerators: Carnot magnetic refrigerator (CMR) and active magnetic regenerator (AMR) device. CMR with Carnot cycle s...

  19. Progress in Coal Liquefaction Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide primary energy consumption is entering an era of pluralism and high quality under the influence of rapid economic development, increasing energy shortage and strict environmental policies. Although renewable energy technology is developing rapidly, fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) are still the dominant energy sources in the world. As a country rich in coal but short ofoil and gas, China's oil imports have soared in the past few years. Government, research organizations and enterprises in China are paying more and more attention to the processes of converting coal into clean liquid fuels. Direct and indirect coal liquefaction technologies are compared in this paper based on China's current energy status and technological progress not only in China itself but also in the world.

  20. Canadian advanced life support capacities and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamsey, M.; Graham, T.; Stasiak, M.; Berinstain, A.; Scott, A.; Vuk, T. Rondeau; Dixon, M.

    2009-07-01

    Canada began research on space-relevant biological life support systems in the early 1990s. Since that time Canadian capabilities have grown tremendously, placing Canada among the emerging leaders in biological life support systems. The rapid growth of Canadian expertise has been the result of several factors including a large and technically sophisticated greenhouse sector which successfully operates under challenging climatic conditions, well planned technology transfer strategies between the academic and industrial sectors, and a strong emphasis on international research collaborations. Recent activities such as Canada's contribution of the Higher Plant Compartment of the European Space Agency's MELiSSA Pilot Plant and the remote operation of the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse in the Canadian High Arctic continue to demonstrate Canadian capabilities with direct applicability to advanced life support systems. There is also a significant latent potential within Canadian institutions and organizations with respect to directly applicable advanced life support technologies. These directly applicable research interests include such areas as horticultural management strategies (for candidate crops), growth media, food processing, water management, atmosphere management, energy management, waste management, imaging, environment sensors, thermal control, lighting systems, robotics, command and data handling, communications systems, structures, in-situ resource utilization, space analogues and mission operations. With this background and in collaboration with the Canadian aerospace industry sector, a roadmap for future life support contributions is presented here. This roadmap targets an objective of at least 50% food closure by 2050 (providing greater closure in oxygen, water recycling and carbon dioxide uptake). The Canadian advanced life support community has chosen to focus on lunar surface infrastructure and not low Earth orbit or transit systems (i.e. microgravity

  1. Directions for advanced use of nuclear power in century XXI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, C E

    1999-05-01

    Nuclear power can provide a significant contribution to electricity generation and meet other needs of the world and the US during the next century provided that certain directions are taken to achieve its public acceptance. These directions include formulation of projections of population, energy consumption, and energy resources over a responsible period of time. These projections will allow assessment of cumulative effects on the environment and on fixed resources. Use of fossil energy resources in a century of growing demand for energy must be considered in the context of long-term environmental damage and resource depletion. Although some question the validity of these consequences, they can be mitigated by use of advanced fast reactor technology. It must be demonstrated that nuclear power technology is safe, resistant to material diversion for weapon use, and economical. An unbiased examination of all the issues related to energy use, especially of electricity, is an essential direction to take.

  2. Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenko, Olga

    The objectives of this work are to test the application of steam pretreatment to direct coal liquefaction, to investigate the reaction of model compounds with water, and to explore the use of zeolites in these processes. Previous work demonstrated the effectiveness of steam pretreatment in a subsequent flash pyrolysis. Apparently, subcritical steam ruptures nearly all of the ether cross links, leaving a partially depolymerized structure. It was postulated that very rapid heating of the pretreated coal to liquefaction conditions would be required to preserve the effects of such treatment. Accordingly, a method was adopted in which coal slurry is injected into a hot autoclave containing solvent. Since oxygen is capable of destroying the pretreatment effect, precautions were taken for its rigorous exclusion. Tests were conducted with Illinois No. 6 coal steam treated at 340sp°C, 750 psia for 15 minutes. Both raw and pretreated samples were liquified in deoxygenated tetralin at high severity (400sp°C, 30 min.) and low severity (a: 350sp°C, 30 min., and b: 385sp°C, 15 min.) conditions under 1500 psia hydrogen. Substantial improvement in liquid product quality was obtained and the need for rapid heating and oxygen exclusion demonstrated. Under low severity conditions, the oil yield was more than doubled, going from 12.5 to 29 wt%. Also chemistry of the pretreatment process was studied using aromatic ethers as model compounds. alpha-Benzylnaphthyl ether (alpha-BNE), alpha-naphthylmethyl phenyl (alpha-NMPE), and 9-phenoxyphenanthrene were exposed to steam and inert gas at pretreatment conditions and in some cases to liquid water at 315sp°C. alpha-BNE and alpha-NMPE showed little difference in conversion in inert gas and in steam. Hence, these compounds are poor models for coal in steam pretreatment. Thermally stable 9-phenoxyphenanthrene, however, was completely converted in one hour by liquid water at 315sp°C. At pretreatment conditions mostly rearranged starting

  3. U.S. DOE indirect coal liquefaction program: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, J.; Schmetz, E.; Winslow, J.; Tischer, R. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Srivastava, R.

    1997-12-31

    Coal is the most abundant domestic energy resource in the United States. The Fossil Energy Organization within the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been supporting a coal liquefaction program to develop improved technologies to convert coal to clean and cost-effective liquid fuels to complement the dwindling supply of domestic petroleum crude. The goal of this program is to produce coal liquids that are competitive with crude at $20 to $25 per barrel. Indirect and direct liquefaction routes are the two technologies being pursued under the DOE coal liquefaction program. This paper will give an overview of the DOE indirect liquefaction program. More detailed discussions will be given to the F-T diesel and DME fuels which have shown great promises as clean burning alternative diesel fuels. The authors also will briefly discuss the economics of indirect liquefaction and the hurdles and opportunities for the early commercial deployment of these technologies. Discussions will be preceded by two brief reviews on the liquid versus gas phase reactors and the natural gas versus coal based indirect liquefaction.

  4. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction infratechnology and generic technology development: Final report, October 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1987-06-29

    During the first year of its research program, the Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science has made significant progress in many areas of coal liquefaction and coal structure research. Research topics for which substantial progress has been made include integrated coal structure and liquefaction studies, investigation of differential liquefaction processes, development and application of sophisticated techniques for structural analysis, computer analysis of multivariate data, biodesulfurization of coal, catalysis studies, co-processing of coal and crude oil, coal dissolution and extraction processes, coal depolymerization, determination of the liquefaction characteristics of many US coals for use in a liquefaction database, and completion of a retrospective technology assessment for direct coal liquefaction. These and related topics are discussed in considerably more detail in the remainder of this report. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base.

  5. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A. (eds.)

    1991-05-28

    Significant progress was made in the May 1990--May 1991 contract period in three primary coal liquefaction research areas: catalysis, structure-reactivity studies, and novel liquefaction processes. A brief summary of the accomplishments in the past year in each of these areas is given.

  6. Residual Liquefaction under Standing Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study which deals with the residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves. It is shown that the seabed liquefaction under standing waves, although qualitatively similar, exhibits features different from that caused by progressive waves....... The experimental results show that the buildup of pore-water pressure and the resulting liquefaction first starts at the nodal section and spreads towards the antinodal section. The number of waves to cause liquefaction at the nodal section appears to be equal to that experienced in progressive waves for the same...... wave height. Recommendations are made as to how to assess liquefaction potential in standing waves. Copyright © 2012 by the International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers (ISOPE)....

  7. Corrosion studies in coal liquefaction plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, J.R.; Olsen, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    During the past few years, four direct coal liquefaction pilot plants have been operated in the United States in order to evaluate several liquefaction processes. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has provided assistance to pilot plant operators in assessing materials performance through supply and examination of corrosion samples, on-site examination of equipment, and analysis of failed pilot plant components in our laboratory. This paper describes these examinations which have revealed chloride and polythionic acid stress corrosion cracking, water-side pitting, sulfidation, and a chloride-related acid attack. The results of these analyses have helped identify corrosion problems and make proper material selections or design changes, and the results have provided designers of demonstration and commercial plants with information useful in selecting materials for the proposed plants.

  8. Metallography for coal liquefaction pilot plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past few years, four direct coal liquefaction pilot plants have been operated in the United States to evaluate several liquefaction processes. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has assisted pilot plant operators by assessing materials performance through supply and examination of corrosion samples, on-site examination of equipment, and analysis of failed pilot plant components in our laboratory. This paper describes these examinations, which have revealed chloride and polythionic acid stress corrosion cracking, water-side pitting, sulfidation, and a chloride-related acid attack. The results of these analyses have helped identify corrosion problems and make proper material selections or design changes, and the results have provided designers of demonstration and commercial plants with information useful in selecting materials for the proposed plants

  9. EXPLORATORY RESEARCH ON NOVEL COAL LIQUEFACTION CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

    1998-11-30

    The report presents a summary the work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-95PC95050. Investigations performed under Task 4--Integrated Flow Sheet Testing are detailed. In this program, a novel direct coal liquefaction technology was investigated by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates. The process concept explored consists of a first-stage coal dissolution step in which the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second stage, the products are catalytically upgraded to refinery feedstocks. Integrated first-stage and solids-separation steps were used to prepare feedstocks for second-stage catalytic upgrading. An engineering and economic evaluation was conducted concurrently with experimental work throughout the program. Approaches to reduce costs for a conceptual commercial plant were recommended at the conclusion of Task 3. These approaches were investigated in Task 4. The economic analysis of the process as it was defined at the conclusion of Task 4, indicates that the production of refined product (gasoline) via this novel direct liquefaction technology is higher than the cost associated with conventional two-stage liquefaction technologies.

  10. Liquefaction of crop residues for polyol production

    OpenAIRE

    C Wan; Wang, T.; Zhang, L.; Zang, L.; Li, Y.; Mao, Z.; L. Liang

    2006-01-01

    The liquefaction of crop residues in the presence of ethylene glycol, ethylene carbonate, or polyethylene glycol using sulfuric acid as a catalyst was studied. For all experiments, the liquefaction was conducted at 160C and atmospheric pressure. The mass ratio of feedstock to liquefaction solvents used in all the experiments was 30:100. The results show that the acid catalyzed liquefaction process fit a pseudo-first-order kinetics model. Liquefaction yields of 80, 74, and 60% were obtained i...

  11. Algae liquefaction / Hope Baloyi

    OpenAIRE

    Baloyi, Hope

    2012-01-01

    The liquefaction of algae for the recovery of bio–oil was studied. Algae oil is a non–edible feedstock and has minimal impact on food security and food prices; furthermore, it has been identified as a favourable feedstock for the production of biodiesel and this is attributed to its high oil yield per hectare. Algae oil can be potentially used for fuel blending for conventional diesel. The recovery step for algae oil for the production of biodiesel is costly and demands a lot of energy due to...

  12. Advance directives, dementia, and physician-assisted death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Paul T; Steinbock, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Physician-assisted suicide laws in Oregon and Washington require the person's current competency and a prognosis of terminal illness. In The Netherlands voluntariness and unbearable suffering are required for euthanasia. Many people are more concerned about the loss of autonomy and independence in years of severe dementia than about pain and suffering in their last months. To address this concern, people could write advance directives for physician-assisted death in dementia. Should such directives be implemented even though, at the time, the person is no longer competent and would not be either terminally ill or suffering unbearably? We argue that in many cases they should be, and that a sliding scale which considers both autonomy and the capacity for enjoyment provides the best justification for determining when: when written by a previously well-informed and competent person, such a directive gains in authority as the later person's capacities to generate new critical interests and to enjoy life decrease. Such an extension of legalized death assistance is grounded in the same central value of voluntariness that undergirds the current more limited legalization. PMID:23802899

  13. Emergency nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and experiential survey on advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezewski, Mary Ann; Feng, Jui-Ying

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine emergency nurses' knowledge of, attitudes toward, and experiences with advance directives (ADs). This was a descriptive, correlation, mailed survey study sent to a random sample of members of the Emergency Nurses Association. The results, based on the responses of 579 emergency nurses, found that the nurses were not very knowledgeable about ADs in general (68% correct) and even less knowledgeable about the Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA) (51% correct) and their state laws (56% correct). The nurses were experienced with ADs but they were less confident in their ability to assist patients with completing ADs. Forty-seven percent of the nurses agreed that actively assisting some terminally ill patients to die should be made legal. Nurses need information pertaining to ADs in general, the PSDA, and their individual state laws. This could increase their level of confidence in being able to effectively assist patients to understand and complete ADs. PMID:17693216

  14. Two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville Facility operated in the nonintegrated and integrated modes: chemical analyses and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Later, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    This document reports the results from chemical analyses and biological testing of process materials sampled during operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, Alabama) in both the noncoupled or nonintegrated (NTSL Run 241) and coupled or integrated (ITSL Run 242) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative chemical and biological assessments of several NTSL and ITSL process materials. In general, the NTSL process materials were biologically more active and chemically more refractory than analogous ITSL process materials. To provide perspective, the NTSL and ITSL results are compared with those from similar testing and analyses of other direct coal liquefaction materials from the solvent refined coal (SRC) I, SRC II and EDS processes. Comparisons are also made between two-stage coal liquefaction materials from the Wilsonville pilot plant and the C.E. Lummus PDU-ITSL Facility in an effort to assess scale-up effects in these two similar processes. 36 references, 26 figures, 37 tables.

  15. Magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, K; Kondo, T [Department of Physics, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Yoshioka, S; Kamiya, K; Numazawa, T [Tsukuba Magnet Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan)], E-mail: kmatsu@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    Magnetic refrigeration which is based on the magnetocaloric effect of solids has the potential to achieve high thermal efficiency for hydrogen liquefaction. We have been developing a magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction which cools down hydrogen gas from liquid natural gas temperature and liquefies at 20 K. The magnetic liquefaction system consists of two magnetic refrigerators: Carnot magnetic refrigerator (CMR) and active magnetic regenerator (AMR) device. CMR with Carnot cycle succeeded in liquefying hydrogen at 20K. Above liquefaction temperature, a regenerative refrigeration cycle should be necessary to precool hydrogen gas, because adiabatic temperature change of magnetic material is reduced due to a large lattice specific heat of magnetic materials. We have tested an AMR device as the precooling stage. It was confirmed for the first time that AMR cycle worked around 20 K.

  16. Magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic refrigeration which is based on the magnetocaloric effect of solids has the potential to achieve high thermal efficiency for hydrogen liquefaction. We have been developing a magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction which cools down hydrogen gas from liquid natural gas temperature and liquefies at 20 K. The magnetic liquefaction system consists of two magnetic refrigerators: Carnot magnetic refrigerator (CMR) and active magnetic regenerator (AMR) device. CMR with Carnot cycle succeeded in liquefying hydrogen at 20K. Above liquefaction temperature, a regenerative refrigeration cycle should be necessary to precool hydrogen gas, because adiabatic temperature change of magnetic material is reduced due to a large lattice specific heat of magnetic materials. We have tested an AMR device as the precooling stage. It was confirmed for the first time that AMR cycle worked around 20 K.

  17. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  18. Secondary liquefaction in ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase.......The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase....

  19. Advance directives for non-therapeutic dementia research: some ethical and policy considerations.

    OpenAIRE

    Berghmans, R L

    1998-01-01

    This paper explores the use of advance directives in clinical dementia research. The focus is on advance consent to participation of demented patients in non-therapeutic research involving more than minimal risks and/or burdens. First, morally relevant differences between advance directives for treatment and care, and advance directives for dementia research are discussed. Then attention is paid to the philosophical issue of dementia and personal identity, and the implications for the moral a...

  20. Magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, T [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba (Japan); Kamlya, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Utaki, T. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Matsumoto, K. [Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    This paper reviews the development status of magnetic refrigeration system for hydrogen liquefaction. There is no doubt that hydrogen is one of most important energy sources in the near future. In particular, liquid hydrogen can be utilized for infrastructure construction consisting of storage and transportation. Liquid hydrogen is in cryogenic temperatures and therefore high efficient liquefaction method must be studied. Magnetic refrigeration which uses the magneto-caloric effect has potential to realize not only the higher liquefaction efficiency > 50 %, but also to be environmentally friendly and cost effective. Our hydrogen magnetic refrigeration system consists of Carnot cycle for liquefaction stage and AMR (active magnetic regenerator) cycle for precooling stages. For the Carnot cycle, we develop the high efficient system > 80 % liquefaction efficiency by using the heat pipe. For the AMR cycle, we studied two kinds of displacer systems, which transferred the working fluid. We confirmed the AMR effect with the cooling temperature span of 12 K for 1.8 T of the magnetic field and 6 second of the cycle. By using the simulation, we estimate the total efficiency of the hydrogen liquefaction plant for 10 kg/day. A FOM of 0.47 is obtained in the magnetic refrigeration system operation temperature between 20 K and 77 K including LN2 work input.

  1. Magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the development status of magnetic refrigeration system for hydrogen liquefaction. There is no doubt that hydrogen is one of most important energy sources in the near future. In particular, liquid hydrogen can be utilized for infrastructure construction consisting of storage and transportation. Liquid hydrogen is in cryogenic temperatures and therefore high efficient liquefaction method must be studied. Magnetic refrigeration which uses the magneto-caloric effect has potential to realize not only the higher liquefaction efficiency > 50 %, but also to be environmentally friendly and cost effective. Our hydrogen magnetic refrigeration system consists of Carnot cycle for liquefaction stage and AMR (active magnetic regenerator) cycle for precooling stages. For the Carnot cycle, we develop the high efficient system > 80 % liquefaction efficiency by using the heat pipe. For the AMR cycle, we studied two kinds of displacer systems, which transferred the working fluid. We confirmed the AMR effect with the cooling temperature span of 12 K for 1.8 T of the magnetic field and 6 second of the cycle. By using the simulation, we estimate the total efficiency of the hydrogen liquefaction plant for 10 kg/day. A FOM of 0.47 is obtained in the magnetic refrigeration system operation temperature between 20 K and 77 K including LN2 work input.

  2. 煤直接液化生成油沸腾床加氢处理催化剂的研发%Research and Development of Fluidized Bed Hydroprocessing Catalyst in Generating Oil by Direct Coal Liquefaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁明

    2012-01-01

    A kind of ebullated-bedreactor catalyst for hydrotreating heavier distillate from direct coal liquefaction productswas developed. The catalyst hasthe advantages of strength, abrasion resistance,activities of hydrodesulphurization, hydrodenitrogenation, hydrodearomatics and stability by adding 3-8w% of alumina-fibre.%为了进一步完善煤直接液化技术,研究开发了适用于煤直接液化生成油沸腾床加氢处理的催化剂。本催化剂的特点是在常规加氢催化剂中引入了氧化铝纤维组分,氧化铝纤维组分在催化剂中的含量为3w%。8w%。本催化剂具有好的机械强度和抗磨性能,并且其加氢脱硫、脱氮、芳烃饱和活性高,是一种较好的煤直接液化生成油沸腾床加氢处理催化剂。

  3. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 1, Base program activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstrate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process development, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, and development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this objective, novel analytical methods were evaluated for application to direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL teamed with 24 research groups in the program. Well-defined and characterized samples of coal liquefaction process-derived materials were provided to each group. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  4. Fundamental issues, recent advances, and future directions in myodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatze, H

    2002-12-01

    A state-of-the-art report is presented on recent progress in selected areas of myodynamics, but also on problems that severely hamper the further development of the discipline. Significant advances have been made in elucidating the force-producing interaction between actin and the myosin-S1-subunit, including the localization of the most probable molecular site of power stroke initiation. Concerning the architecture of the myostructures, strong experimental evidence has accumulated for numerous intra-, inter-, and extramuscular pathways for lateral force transmission in addition to the serial sarcomere-to-sarcomere myotendinous path. It is shown that contemporary muscle models are inadequate in most respects and lag far behind the requirements an appropriate myodynamic model should fulfil. A similar comment applies to the current approaches designed to solve the myoskeletal indeterminacy problem. These formulations neglect myodynamic properties and do not allow for the implementation of biologically realistic objective functions. The solutions currently obtained are highly unsatisfactory. New research directions to rectify these situations are suggested, also with regard to the identification of subject-specific myodynamic parameters. PMID:12435541

  5. Recent Advances in PV Research and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Satyen K.

    1998-04-01

    The photovoltaic technology is making a major thrust in the commercial arena with 1997 worldwide production of PV modules reaching over 125 MW and growing at the rate of 20-25semiconductor materials and devices are emerging as strong contenders for PV applications even though silicon is still the 'work-horse' of the industry. Ultra-high efficiency solar cells fabricated from gallium arsenide (GaAs) and its ternary alloys like gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) are finding applications in space technology. Enormous progress has also been made on various thin-film solar cell technologies, which offer the promise for substantially reducing the cost of PV systems. Some of the leading contenders are amorphous and polycrystalline silicon, compound semiconductor thin films such as copper indium diselenide (CuInSe2) based alloys, and cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films. Exciting new developments are happening in the use of nano-particle semiconductor materials like titanium dioxide (TiO2) for low-cost PV devices. Intense research on these and other materials and devices is making a strong impact on the technology. In this presentation, a brief overview of recent advances in PV research will b e made and the trends and opportunities for future research directions will be identified.

  6. New Directions for NASA's Advanced Life Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Exploration Life Support (ELS) Project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program, has recently been initiated to perform directed life support technology development in support of Constellation and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). ELS) has replaced ALS, with several major differences. Thermal Control Systems have been separated into a new stand alone project (Thermal Systems for Exploration Missions). Tasks in Advanced Food Technology have been relocated to the Human Research Program. Tasks in a new discipline area, Habitation Engineering, have been added. Research and technology development for capabilities required for longer duration stays on the Moon and Mars, including bioregenerative system, have been deferred.

  7. Liquefaction of lignocellulose: Do basic and acidic additives help out?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, S.; Lange, J.P.; Rossum, van G.; Kersten, S.R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulosic feedstock can be converted to bio-oil by direct liquefaction in a phenolic solvent such as guaiacol. The bio-oil could then be further upgraded to transportation fuel using conventional oil refining process. The production of heavy components (molecular weight >1000 Da) was found to

  8. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-08-01

    In an effort to develop new disposable catalysts for direct coal liquefaction, several types of clay-supported pyrrhotite catalysts were prepared and tested. These included iron-pillared montmorillonite, mixed iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite, iron-impregnated montmorillonite, and iron oxometallate-impregnated montmorillonite.

  9. UTILITY OF MECHANISTIC MODELS FOR DIRECTING ADVANCED SEPARATIONS RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES: Electrochemically Modulated Separation Example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwantes, Jon M.

    2009-06-01

    The objective for this work was to demonstrate the utility of mechanistic computer models designed to simulate actinide behavior for use in efficiently and effectively directing advanced laboratory R&D activities associated with developing advanced separations methods.

  10. Readability of state-sponsored advance directive forms in the United States: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller Paul S; Reid Kevin I; Mueller Luke A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background State governments provide preprinted advance directive forms to the general public. However, many adults in the United States (US) lack the skills necessary to read and comprehend health care-related materials. In this study, we sought to determine the readability of state government-sponsored advance directive forms. Methods A cross sectional study design was used. The readability of advance directive forms available online from all 50 US states and the District of Columb...

  11. Transport fuels from two-stage coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, A.; Cebolla, V.; Fernandez, I.; Martinez, M.T.; Miranda, J.L.; Oelert, H.; Prado, J.G. (Instituto de Carboquimica CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain))

    1994-03-01

    Four Spanish lignites and their vitrinite concentrates were evaluated for coal liquefaction. Correlationships between the content of vitrinite and conversion in direct liquefaction were observed for the lignites but not for the vitrinite concentrates. The most reactive of the four coals was processed in two-stage liquefaction at a higher scale. First-stage coal liquefaction was carried out in a continuous unit at Clausthal University at a temperature of 400[degree]C at 20 MPa hydrogen pressure and with anthracene oil as a solvent. The coal conversion obtained was 75.41% being 3.79% gases, 2.58% primary condensate and 69.04% heavy liquids. A hydroprocessing unit was built at the Instituto de Carboquimica for the second-stage coal liquefaction. Whole and deasphalted liquids from the first-stage liquefaction were processed at 450[degree]C and 10 MPa hydrogen pressure, with two commercial catalysts: Harshaw HT-400E (Co-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and HT-500E (Ni-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]). The effects of liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV), temperature, gas/liquid ratio and catalyst on the heteroatom liquids, and levels of 5 ppm of nitrogen and 52 ppm of sulphur were reached at 450[degree]C, 10 MPa hydrogen pressure, 0.08 kg H[sub 2]/kg feedstock and with Harshaw HT-500E catalyst. The liquids obtained were hydroprocessed again at 420[degree]C, 10 MPa hydrogen pressure and 0.06 kg H[sub 2]/kg feedstock to hydrogenate the aromatic structures. In these conditions, the aromaticity was reduced considerably, and 39% of naphthas and 35% of kerosene fractions were obtained. 18 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. The views of older Malaysians on advanced directive and advanced care planning: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Htut, Y; Shahrul, K; Poi, P J H

    2007-01-01

    The provision of optimum care for the ageing population is dependent on the understanding of their views and values on end of life issues. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted to describe views of elderly Malaysians on Advanced Care Planning (henceforth ACP) and Advanced Directives (henceforth AD), and explore factors influencing these views. Fifteen elderly subjects with ages ranging from 65 to 83 years, representing different ethnic and religious groups in Malaysia were selected for in-depth interviews guided by a questionnaire. Five core themes were extracted from the interviews: 1) Considering the future 2) Contingency plans for future illnesses 3) Attitudes towards life prolonging treatment procedures 4) Doctor-patient relationships and 5) Influence of religion on decisions related to future illness. Despite the lack of knowledge on ACP and AD, older respondents were very receptive to their concept. Although the majority agreed on the importance of planning for future medical management and having open discussion on end of life issues with their doctor, they felt it unnecessary to make a formal written AD. Most felt that the future was best left to fate or God, and none had made any contingency plan for severe future illnesses citing religion as reason for this view. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation and dialysis were considered by most to be invasive life prolonging treatments. We suggest that doctors initiate discussions on end of life care with every older patient and their family so as to promote awareness and introduce the concept of ACP/AD to a Malaysian setting. PMID:18330404

  13. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, May 1, 1993--October 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, G.P. [ed.

    1994-07-01

    This report summarizes progress in four areas of research under the general heading of Coal Liquefaction. Results of studies concerning the coliquefaction of coal with waste organic polymers or chemical products of these polymers were reported. Secondly, studies of catalytic systems for the production of clean transportation fuels from coal were discussed. Thirdly, investigations of the chemical composition of coals and their dehydrogenated counterparts were presented. These studies were directed toward elucidation of coal liquefaction processes on the chemical level. Finally, analytical methodologies developed for in situ monitoring of coal liquefaction were reported. Techniques utilizing model reactions and methods based on XAFS, ESR, and GC/MS are discussed.

  14. Advanced health biotechnologies in Thailand: redefining policy directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velasco Román Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thailand faces a significant burden in terms of treating and managing degenerative and chronic diseases. Moreover, incidences of rare diseases are rising. Many of these—such as diabetes, cancer, and inherited inborn metabolic diseases—have no definite treatments or cure. Meanwhile, advanced health biotechnology has been found, in principle, to be an effective solution for these health problems. Methods Qualitative approaches were employed to analyse the current situation and examine existing public policies related to advanced health biotechnologies in Thailand. The results of this analysis were then used to formulate policy recommendations. Results Our research revealed that the system in Thailand in relation to advanced health biotechnologies is fragmented, with multiple unaddressed gaps, underfunding of research and development (R&D, and a lack of incentives for the private sector. In addition, there are no clear definitions of advanced health biotechnologies, and coverage pathways are absent. Meanwhile, false advertising and misinformation are prevalent, with no responsible bodies to actively and effectively provide appropriate information and education (I&E. The establishment of a specialised institution to fill the gaps in this area is warranted. Conclusion The development and implementation of a comprehensive national strategic plan related to advanced health biotechnologies, greater investment in R&D and I&E for all stakeholders, collaboration among agencies, harmonisation of reimbursement across public health schemes, and provision of targeted I&E are specifically recommended.

  15. Variations in Consumer Self-Determination within US Psychiatric Advance Directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Laura Dreuth; Swanke, Jayme

    2008-01-01

    Advance directives are legal documents that formalize consumer psychiatric care preferences. This article examines the statutes and goals of US psychiatric advance directives within the framework of consumer self-determination, a priority in national mental health reform. It seeks to distinguish between state models based on the degree that…

  16. Effect of Health Literacy on the Utilization of Advance Directives Based on the Health Belief Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkelman, Wallace J.

    2010-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that only a small proportion of individuals in the United States complete advance directives as part of their planning for end-of-life care. This study sought to determine if health literacy is a significant factor in advance directive completion as has been posited by previous researchers. Analysis of the data collected…

  17. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 2, Participants program final summary evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process develpment, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  18. A survey of stakeholder knowledge, experience, and opinions of advance directives for mental health in Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Christine M; Swanson, Jeffrey W; Bonnie, Richard J; Wanchek, Tanya; McLaughlin, Laura; Richardson, Jeanita

    2013-05-01

    An innovative Virginia health care law enables competent adults with serious mental illness to plan for treatment during incapacitating crises using an integrated advance directive with no legal distinction between psychiatric or other causes of decisional incapacity. This article reports results of a survey of 460 individuals in five stakeholder groups during the initial period of the law's implementation. All respondents held favorable views of advance directives for mental health care. Identified barriers to completing and using advance directives varied by group. We conclude that relevant stakeholders support implementation of advance directives for mental health, but level of baseline knowledge and perception of barriers vary. A multi-pronged approach will be needed to achieve successful implementation of advance directives for mental health. PMID:22240937

  19. Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B.

    1980-09-01

    All the products now obtained from oil can be provided by thermal conversion of the solid fuels biomass and coal. As a feedstock, biomass has many advantages over coal and has the potential to supply up to 20% of US energy by the year 2000 and significant amounts of energy for other countries. However, it is imperative that in producing biomass for energy we practice careful land use. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed-bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized-bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products - gas, wood tars, and charcoal - can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best-developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel today, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

  20. Combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction of biomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, T. B.

    1980-09-01

    The advantages of biomass as a feedstock are examined and biomass conversion techniques are described. Combustion is the simplest method of producing heat from biomass, using either the traditional fixed bed combustion on a grate or the fluidized bed and suspended combustion techniques now being developed. Pyrolysis of biomass is a particularly attractive process if all three products gas, wood tars, and charcoal can be used. Gasification of biomass with air is perhaps the most flexible and best developed process for conversion of biomass to fuel, yielding a low energy gas that can be burned in existing gas/oil boilers or in engines. Oxygen gasification yields a gas with higher energy content that can be used in pipelines or to fire turbines. In addition, this gas can be used for producing methanol, ammonia, or gasoline by indirect liquefaction. Fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a gas rich in ethylene that can be used to make alcohols or gasoline. Finally, treatment of biomass with high pressure hydrogen can yield liquid fuels through direct liquefaction.

  1. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  2. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winschel, R.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-11-01

    Consol R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-field: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  3. Advanced Gasoline Turbocharged Direction Injection (GTDI) Engine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Terrance [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This program was undertaken in response to US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000079, resulting in a cooperative agreement with Ford and MTU to demonstrate improvement of fuel efficiency in a vehicle equipped with an advanced GTDI engine. Ford Motor Company has invested significantly in GTDI engine technology as a cost effective, high volume, fuel economy solution, marketed globally as EcoBoost technology. Ford envisions additional fuel economy improvement in the medium and long term by further advancing EcoBoost technology. The approach for the project was to engineer a comprehensive suite of gasoline engine systems technologies to achieve the project objectives, and to progressively demonstrate the objectives via concept analysis / computer modeling, single-cylinder and multi-cylinder engine testing on engine dynamometer, and vehicle level testing on chassis rolls.

  4. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Homes: Correlates of Capacity and Possession of Advance Directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rebecca S.; DeLaine, Shermetra R.; Chaplin, William F.; Marson, Daniel C.; Bourgeois, Michelle S.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Burgio, Louis D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The identification of nursing home residents who can continue to participate in advance care planning about end-of-life care is a critical clinical and bioethical issue. This study uses high quality observational research to identify correlates of advance care planning in nursing homes, including objective measurement of capacity. Design…

  5. Recent Advances and Future Directions for Quality Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vining, Geoff; Kulahci, Murat; Pedersen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The origins of quality engineering are in manufacturing, where quality engineers apply basic statistical methodologies to improve the quality and productivity of products and processes. In the past decade, people have discovered that these methodologies are effective for improving almost any type...... of system or process, such as financial, health care, and supply chains. This paper begins with a review of key advances and trends within quality engineering over the past decade. The second part uses the first part as a foundation to outline new application areas for the field. It also discusses...

  6. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  7. Advanced cellular ceramics processed using direct foaming methods

    OpenAIRE

    Guzi De Moraes, Elisangela

    2015-01-01

    The research work presented in this thesis concerns the development of silicon nitride based ceramics with a cellular structure and containing designed interconnected porosity (> 80 vol%) and cell size distribution (10 up to 800 μm) by direct foaming processing routes. Concentrated emulsions (O/W oil-in-water) stabilized by surfactants and gelcasting using environmentally friendly biopolymers as gelling agents, were developed as intermediates in the production of highly porous inorganic mater...

  8. Recent Advances in Directed Assembly of Nanowires or Nanotub es

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Liu; Zhizheng Wu; Woon Ming Lau; Jun Yang

    2012-01-01

    Nanowires and nanotubes of diverse material compositions, properties and/or functions have been produced or fabricated through various bottom-up or top-down approaches. These nanowires or nanotubes have also been utilized as potential building blocks for functional nanodevices. The key for the integration of those nanowire or nanotube based devices is to assemble these one dimensional nanomaterials to specific locations using techniques that are highly controllable and scalable. Ideally such techniques should enable assembly of highly uniform nanowire/nanotube arrays with precise control of density, location, dimension or even ma-terial types of nanowires/nanotubes. Numerous assembly techniques are being developed that can quickly align and assemble large quantities of one type or multiple types of nanowires through parallel processes, in-cluding flow-assisted alignment, Langmuir-Blodgett assembly, bubble-blown technique, electric/magnetic- field directed assembly, contact/roll printing, knocking-down, etc.. With these assembling techniques, applications of nanowire/nanotube based devices such as flexible electronics and sensors have been demonstrated. This paper delivers an overall review of directed nanowire/nanotube assembling approaches and analyzes advantages and limitations of each method. The future research directions have also been discussed.

  9. Earthquake Risk - MO 2013 Liquefaction Potential (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Soil liquefaction potential was determined using existing geologic and alluvium maps. Quaternary, Tertiary, and Cretaceous-age sediments, and alluvium deposits are...

  10. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  11. Advancements and future directions in enzyme technology for biomass conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zisheng; Donaldson, Adam A; Ma, Xiaoxun

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of pre-treated lignocellulosic biomass is an ideal alternative to acid hydrolysis for bio-ethanol production, limited primarily by pre-treatment requirements and economic considerations arising from enzyme production costs and specific activities. The quest for cheaper and better enzymes has prompted years of bio-prospecting, strain optimization through genetic engineering, enzyme characterization for simple and complex lignocellulosic feedstock, and the development of pre-treatment strategies to mitigate inhibitory effects. The recent shift to systematic characterizations of de novo mixtures of purified proteins is a promising indicator of maturation within this field of study, facilitating progression towards feedstock assay-based rapid enzyme mixture optimization. It is imperative that international standards be developed to enable meaningful comparisons between these studies and the construction of a database of enzymatic activities and kinetics, aspects of which are explored here-in. Complementary efforts to improve the economic viability of enzymatic hydrolysis through process integration and reactor design are also considered, where membrane-confinement shows significant promise despite the associated technological challenges. Significant advancements in enzyme technology towards the economic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass should be expected within the next few years as systematic research in enzyme activities conforms to that of traditional reaction engineering. PMID:22306162

  12. Advances and directions of ion nitriding/carburizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1989-01-01

    Ion nitriding and carburizing are plasma activated thermodynamic processes for the production of case hardened surface layers not only for ferrous materials, but also for an increasing number of nonferrous metals. When the treatment variables are properly controlled, the use of nitrogenous or carbonaceous glow discharge medium offers great flexibility in tailoring surface/near-surface properties independently of the bulk properties. The ion nitriding process has reached a high level of maturity and has gained wide industrial acceptance, while the more recently introduced ion carburizing process is rapidly gaining industrial acceptance. The current status of plasma mass transfer mechanisms into the surface regarding the formation of compound and diffusion layers in ion nitriding and carbon build-up ion carburizing is reviewed. In addition, the recent developments in design and construction of advanced equipment for obtaining optimized and controlled case/core properties is summarized. Also, new developments and trends such as duplex plasma treatments and alternatives to dc diode nitriding are highlighted.

  13. Geological occurrence response to trace elemental migration in coal liquefaction based on SPSS: take no. 11 coalbed in Antaibao mine for example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohong; Qin, Yong; Yang, Weifeng

    2013-03-01

    Coal liquefaction is an adoptable method to transfer the solid fossil energy into liquid oil in large scale, but the dirty material in which will migrate to different step of liquefaction. The migration rule of some trace elements is response to the react activity of macerals in coal and the geological occurrence of the element nature of itself. In this paper, from the SPSS data correlation analysis and hierarchical clustering dendrogram about the trace elements with macerals respond to coal liquefaction yield, it shows the trace elements in No.11 Antaibao coal seam originated from some of lithophile and sulphophle elements. Correlation coefficient between liquefaction yield of three organic macerals and migration of the elements in liquefaction residue indicated that the lithophile are easy to transfer to residue, while sulphophle are apt to in the liquid products. The activated macerals are response to sulphophle trace elements. The conclusion is useful to the coal blending and environmental effects on coal direct liquefaction.

  14. Ceramic thermal wind sensor based on advanced direct chip attaching package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced direct chip attaching packaged two-dimensional ceramic thermal wind sensor is studied. The thermal wind sensor chip is fabricated by metal lift-off processes on the ceramic substrate. An advanced direct chip attaching (DCA) packaging is adopted and this new packaged method simplifies the processes of packaging further. Simulations of the advanced DCA packaged sensor based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model show the sensor can detect wind speed and direction effectively. The wind tunnel testing results show the advanced DCA packaged sensor can detect the wind direction from 0° to 360° and wind speed from 0 to 20 m/s with the error less than 0.5 m/s. The nonlinear fitting based least square method in Matlab is used to analyze the performance of the sensor. (semiconductor devices)

  15. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e+3- linear colliders

  16. The influence of cementation on liquefaction resistance of sands

    OpenAIRE

    Iwabuchi, Jotaro

    1986-01-01

    Cohesionless sands are known to be susceptible to failure by liquefaction when they are saturated and subjected to earthquake shaking. Considerable study has been directed towards this subject over the past 20 years in recognition of the possibility of large-scale property damage or loss of life due to this type of failure. Recent evidence has shown that small degrees of cementation in a sand significantly reduce the likelihood of liquefication. However, the work to date has been ...

  17. Advances and Research Directions in Data-Warehousing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Mohania

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Information is one of the most valuable assets of an organisation and when used properly can assist in intelligent decision making that can significantly improve the functioning of an organisation. Data Warehousing is a recent technology that allows information to be easily and efficiently accessed for decision-making activities by collecting data from many operational, legacy and possibly heterogeneous data sources. On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP tools are well-suited for complex data analysis, such as multi-dimensional data analysis, and to assist in decision support activities while data mining tools take the process one step further and actively search the data for patterns and hidden knowledge in the data held in the warehouse. Many organisations are building, or are planning to develop, a data warehouse for their operational and decision support needs. In this paper, we present an overview of data warehousing, multi-dimensional databases, OLAP and data mining technology and discuss the directions of current research in the area. We also discuss recent developments in data warehouse modelling, view selection and maintenance, indexing schemes, parallel query processing and data mining issues. A number of technical issues for exploratory research are presented and possible solutions are also discussed.

  18. 铁基催化剂对将军庙煤低压直接液化性能影响%Effect of Iron-based Catalysts on Direct Liquefaction Performance of Coal From Jiangjunmiao, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海龙; 廖玲

    2015-01-01

    以将军庙煤为研究对象,催化剂用量按活性金属元素计为3%(wtCoaldaf)、反应温度T=420℃、反应时间τ=75 min、溶煤比S/C=2/1和氢初压PH2=6.5 MPa条件下,首先,以油产率为目标,Fe2O3为主催化剂,S为助催化剂,通过考察S/Fe对煤样直接液化性能的影响,确定了最佳S/Fe=1/1。其次,在S/Fe为1/1和上述反应条件下,考察了一系列铁基催化剂对煤样液化性能的影响。结果表明,以油产率为目标,其活性由高到低为:Fe2O3/S>油溶性Fe3O4/S >油溶性Fe3O4(中试)/S >飞灰/S >纳米Fe3O4/S>黄铁矿/Fe2O3>油酸铁/S > FeSO4/S> Fe(NO3)3/S>β-FeOOH/S >FeCl3/S >还原铁粉/S >FeS。最后,将Fe2O3/S与MoO3/S、FeSO4/S与NiSO4/S和CoSO4/S分别进行了比较。结果表明:Fe2O3/S比MoO3/S更能促进沥青质向油的转化;FeSO4/S与NiSO4/S和CoSO4/S三者油产率相差甚小,均约67%。故此,Fe2O3/S的催化活性最好。%The research objectwasthe coal from Jiangjunmiao. First of all,takingoil yield as the target and Fe2O3as the maincatalyst and S as the sub-catalyst, the best S/Fe=1∶1wasconfirmedby investigating the effect of S/Fe on direct liquefaction performanceof coal sample under the reaction conditions of catalysts 3%( wt), 420℃,reaction time 75 min, solvent/coal=2/1 and H2initial pressure 6.5 MPa. Theneffect of a series of iron-based catalysts on liquefaction performanceof coal sample under S/Fe=1/1andotheraboveconditionswas investigated. The results showthat:the rank ordering of the activity of catalysts according to the oil yield is Fe2O3/S>oil-soluble Fe3O4/S > oil-soluble(pilot plant) Fe3O4/S >fly ash/S >nanometer Fe3O4/S>pyrite/Fe2O3>oleic acid iron/S > FeSO4/S> Fe(NO3)3/S > β-FeOOH/S>FeCl3/S >iron powder/S >FeS. At last,Fe2O3/S and MoO3/S, FeSO4/S and NiSO4/S and CoSO4/Swererespectively compared. Theresults show that:Fe2O3/S can more promote theconversionof asphaltene to oil than MoO3/S;thegap of the oil yieldsamong FeSO4/S

  19. Effect of microwave pretreatment on liquefaction of low-rank Mukah Balingian Malaysian coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Azlan Mohd Ishak; Khudzir Ismail; Mohd Fauzi Abdullah; Nur Nasulhah Kasim [University Technology MARA, Perlis (Malaysia). Fuel Combustion Research Laboratory

    2007-07-01

    The effect of microwave pretreatment on low-rank Malaysian coal towards coal conversion and oil+gas yield during direct liquefaction was investigated. The pretreatment on coal was carried out prior to liquefaction using a conventional variable power microwave oven at 150, 300 and 600 W for a period of 1 to 15 min. Liquefaction processes were carried out in a 1-liter high-pressure high-temperature batch-wise reactor with tetralin as a hydrogen-donor solvent, at temperature of 420{sup o}C and at 4 MPa nitrogen pressure. The DTG results of the pyrolysed microwave-treated samples via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed the increased in coal reactivity in comparison to the untreated sample. The coal conversion and oil+gas yield obtained from the liquefaction of the pretreated coal under various pretreatment conditions showed an increase of up to 3 - 7 and 9 - 22 %, respectively. The significant increased of oil+gas yield at less severe liquefaction temperature on the microwave-irradiated samples might be due to the cracks and fissures formed as shown by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and the weaken coal structure (C-C bonds) that probably occurred during the microwave pretreatment to facilitate the diffusion of solvent into the coal structure. Thus, this new and effective pretreatment on coal could be a promising approach in enhancing coal conversion and oil+gas yield that utilises a less severe temperature for coal liquefaction. 22 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Recording-based identification of site liquefaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yuxian; Zhang Yushan; Liang Jianwen; Ray Ruichong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Reconnaissance reports and pertinent research on seismic hazards show that liquefaction is one of the key sources of damage to geotechnical and structural engineering systems. Therefore, identifying site liquefaction conditions plays an important role in seismic hazard mitigation. One of the widely used approaches for detecting liquefaction is based on the time-frequency analysis of ground motion recordings, in which short-time Fourier transform is typically used. It is known that recordings at a site with liquefaction are the result of nonlinear responses of seismic waves propagating in the liquefied layers underneath the site. Moreover, Fourier transform is not effective in characterizing such dynamic features as time-dependent frequency of the recordings rooted in nonlinear responses. Therefore, the aforementioned approach may not be intrinsically effective in detecting liquefaction. An alternative to the Fourier-based approach is presented in this study,which proposes time-frequency analysis of earthquake ground motion recordings with the aid of the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), and offers justification for the HHT in addressing the liquefaction features shown in the recordings. The paper then defines the predominant instantaneous frequency (PIF) and introduces the PIF-related motion features to identify liquefaction conditions at a given site. Analysis of 29 recorded data sets at different site conditions shows that the proposed approach is effective in detecting site liquefaction in comparison with other methods.

  1. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  2. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction is increa...

  3. Multisensor and Multispectral Approach in Documenting and Analyzing Liquefaction Hazard using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, T.; Baise, L. G.; Gens, R.; Prakash, A.; Gupta, R. P.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic liquefaction is the loss of strength of soil due to shaking that leads to various ground failures such as lateral spreading, settlements, tilting, and sand boils. It is important to document these failures after earthquakes to advance our study of when and where liquefaction occurs. The current approach of mapping these failures by field investigation teams suffers due to the inaccessibility to some of the sites immediately after the event, short life of some of these failures, difficulties in mapping the aerial extent of the failure, incomplete coverage etc. After the 2001 Bhuj earthquake (India), researchers, using the Indian remote sensing satellite, illustrated that satellite remote sensing can provide a synoptic view of the terrain and offer unbiased estimates of liquefaction failures. However, a multisensor (data from different sensors onboard of the same or different satellites) and multispectral (data collected in different spectral regions) approach is needed to efficiently document liquefaction incidences and/or its potential of occurrence due to the possibility of a particular satellite being located inappropriately to image an area shortly after an earthquake. The use of SAR satellite imagery ensures the acquisition of data in all weather conditions at day and night as well as information complimentary to the optical data sets. In this study, we analyze the applicability of the various satellites (Landsat, RADARSAT, Terra-MISR, IRS-1C, IRS-1D) in mapping liquefaction failures after the 2001 Bhuj earthquake using Support Vector Data Description (SVDD). The SVDD is a kernel based nonparametric outlier detection algorithm inspired by the Support Vector Machines (SVMs), which is a new generation learning algorithm based on the statistical learning theory. We present the applicability of SVDD for unsupervised change-detection studies (i.e. to identify post-earthquake liquefaction failures). The liquefaction occurrences identified from the different

  4. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Robert F.; Miller, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  5. Advance Directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Local Offices Volunteer Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or ... reserved. The American Cancer Society is a qualified 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. Cancer.org is provided courtesy of ...

  6. Advance Directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caring Connections is a national consumer and community engagement program of NHPCO that works to improve care ... Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us ...

  7. Bringing Advanced Directives and Symptom Assessment and Management to Community Oncology Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Lesperance, Mary; Shannon, Robert; Phyllis K. Pumphrey; Dunbar, Erin; Genther, Renee; Coleman, C. Lynn; Tabano, Margaret; Maurer, Jennifer; Vazquez, Adrienne; Capp, Elizabeth; McMillan, Jessica; Wilkerson, Katie; Robbins, Gerald; Phillips, Dorothy Green; Howick, Priscilla

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care services are not available in most outpatient oncology practices. A program training 11 mid-level providers from oncology practices on advanced directive discussions and supportive symptom assessment and management performed by palliative care specialists was completed. A follow-up session 9 months later identified barriers to implementation. Of the 11 mid-level providers, 8 participated in the follow-up session, and 9 of the 11 providers implemented advanced directive’s discu...

  8. Liquefaction of crop residues for polyol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan, C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The liquefaction of crop residues in the presence of ethylene glycol, ethylene carbonate, or polyethylene glycol using sulfuric acid as a catalyst was studied. For all experiments, the liquefaction was conducted at 160C and atmospheric pressure. The mass ratio of feedstock to liquefaction solvents used in all the experiments was 30:100. The results show that the acid catalyzed liquefaction process fit a pseudo-first-order kinetics model. Liquefaction yields of 80, 74, and 60% were obtained in 60 minutes of reaction when corn stover was liquefied with ethylene glycol, a mixture of polyethylene glycol and glycerol (9:1, w/w, and ethylene carbonate, respectively. When ethylene carbonate was used as solvent, the liquefaction yields of rice straw and wheat straw were 67% and 73%, respectively, which is lower than that of corn stover (80%. When a mixture of ethylene carbonate and ethylene glycol (8:2, w/w was used as solvent, the liquefaction yields for corn stover, rice straw and wheat straw were 78, 68, and 70%, respectively.

  9. Earthquake-induced liquefaction in Ferland, Quebec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed geological investigations are under way at a number of liquefaction sites in the Ferland-Boilleau valley, Quebec, where sand boils, ground cracks and liquefaction-related damages to homes were documented immediately following the Ms=6.0, Mblg=6.5 Saguenay earthquake of November 25, 1988. To date, results obtained from these subsurface investigations of sand boils at two sites in Ferland, located about 26 km from the epicentre, indicate that: the Saguenay earthquake induced liquefaction in late-Pleistocene and Holocene sediments which was recorded as sand dikes, sills and vents in near-surface sediments and soils; earthquake-induced liquefaction and ground failure have occurred in this area at least three times in the past 10,000 years; and, the size and morphology of liquefaction features and the liquefaction susceptibility of source layers of the features may be indicative of the intensity of ground shaking. These preliminary results are very promising and suggest that with continued research liquefaction features will become a useful tool in glaciated terrains, such as northeastern North America, for determining not only the timing and location but also the size of past earthquakes

  10. Early experience with digital advance care planning and directives, a novel consumer-driven program

    OpenAIRE

    Fine, Robert L.; Yang, Zhiyong; Spivey, Christy; Boardman, Bonnie; Courtney, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Barriers to traditional advance care planning (ACP) and advance directive (AD) creation have limited the promise of ACP/AD for individuals and families, the healthcare team, and society. Our objectives were to determine the results of a digital ACP/AD through which consumers create, store, locate, and retrieve their ACP/AD at no charge and with minimal physician involvement, and the ACP/AD can be integrated into the electronic health record. The authors chose 900 users of MyDirectives, a digi...

  11. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1991-12-31

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  12. Cooperative Research Program in coal liquefaction. Technical report, May 1, 1994--October 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts.

  13. Geotechnical Trainspotting: Early Observations From the New Seattle Liquefaction Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, P.; Yelin, T.; Weaver, C. S.; Steidl, J. H.; Steller, R. A.; Gomberg, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Seattle Liquefaction Array (SLA) is a geotechnical monitoring array established by the US Geological Survey earlier this year in industrialized Seattle, Washington. Funding for the array was provided by the Advanced National Seismic System, at the behest of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network's regional advisory committee. The SLA aims to further the understanding of earthquake-induced liquefaction, particularly the processes associated with repeatedly liquefied soils and the liquefaction of deeply buried deposits. The SLA occupies a site at which shaking-induced liquefaction was observed during earthquakes in 1949, 1965, and 2001. The SLA site is seismically noisy but important as it is similar to sites that host many structures in Seattle. The site is comprised chiefly by loose-to-dense interbedded coastal and river outwash sands. Instrumentation at the site includes four 3-component accelerometers at the surface and at depths of 5.4, 44.9, and 56.4 meters, a surface barometer, and six piezometers at depths of 6.9, 22.9, 28.9, 43.1, 46.9, and 51.9 meters. Emplacement depths were selected to sample a variety of liquefaction susceptibilities. Continuous data from all sensors are sampled at 200 samples per second, and are available from the IRIS DMC archive, with a buffer of data stored on site in the event of telemetry failure. To date, only a handful of earthquakes have produced shaking strong enough at the SLA to be observed within the high levels of background noise. However, the noise itself provides data useful to constrain the low-strain seismic and pressure response of the site. Notably, the array is within a few meters of a set of busy railroad tracks. Passing and parked trains expose the site to a broad bandwidth of deformations, including seismic frequencies, albeit with a source at the surface. Many times each day the site experiences both high levels of shaking, and step changes in the pressure field of a variety of amplitudes that may last from

  14. REVIEW OF NATURAL GAS LIQUEFACTION PROCESSES

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    High pressure pipelines are the most common way of natural gas transport from a gas field to a processing plant and further to consumers. In case when the distance between natural gas production and consumption regions is more than 4000 kilometers, and due to necessity of natural gas supply diversification, gas liquefaction and its transport by ships is being applied. The final choice of liquefaction process depends on the project variables, the development level of new or upgrading of alread...

  15. Exploratory Research on Novel Coal Liquefaction Concept - Task 2: Evaluation of Process Steps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    A novel direct coal liquefaction technology is being investigated in a program being conducted by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates under DOE Contract DE-AC22-95PC95050. The novel concept consists of a new approach to coal liquefaction chemistry which avoids some of the inherent limitations of current high-temperature thermal liquefaction processes. The chemistry employed is based on hydride ion donation to solubilize coal at temperatures (350-400{degrees}C) significantly lower than those typically used in conventional coal liquefaction. The process concept being explored consists of two reaction stages. In the first stage, the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second, the products are catalytically upgraded to acceptable refinery feedstocks. The program explores not only the initial solubilization step, but integration of the subsequent processing steps, including an interstage solids-separation step, to produce distillate products. A unique feature of the process concept is that many of the individual reaction steps can be decoupled, because little recycle around the liquefaction system is expected. This allows for considerable latitude in the process design. Furthermore, this has allowed for each key element in the process to be explored independently in laboratory work conducted under Task 2 of the program.

  16. Paleoseismic investigations in the Kopili Fault Zone of North East India: Evidences from liquefaction chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Devender; Reddy, D. V.; Pandey, Anand K.

    2016-04-01

    We report the seismogenic liquefaction signatures observed in the Kopili Fault Zone of the Brahmaputra plains, NE India. This seismically active zone has previously been identified as the "Assam seismic gap" and thus necessitates understanding its past seismicity and implied seismic hazard. With this objective, paleo-seismic studies using seismogenic liquefaction features have been carried out in this region largely covered with the flood plain deposits of Kopili and Kalang rivers. The trenches excavated at two locations revealed extensive liquefaction features with more than 20 sub parallel sand dykes having major orientation in NE-SW direction. A total of 29 samples from marker horizons have been processed to constrain chronology of the liquefaction features using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and 14C (AMS) dating techniques. The age constraints in terms of respective lower and upper bound age brackets for individual dykes suggest three time intervals of their formations i.e. (i) 250 ± 25 yr. BP, (ii) between 400 to 770 yr. BP and (iii) 900 ± 50 yr. BP. These new ages of liquefaction features correspond to the occurrence timings of causative seismic events which are in addition to the known historical earthquakes and thus enhance our understanding of the paleoseismic history of this region during past ~ 1000 years.

  17. End-of-life communication in Korean older adults: With focus on advance care planning and advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ji Eun; Cho, BeLong; Yoo, Sang Ho; Kim, SangYun; Yoo, Jun-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    The present article aimed to provide a comprehensive review of current status of end-of-life (EOL) care and sociocultural considerations in Korea, with focus on the EOL communication and use of advance directives (AD) in elderly Koreans. Through literature review, we discuss the current status of EOL care and sociocultural considerations in Korea, and provide a look-ahead. In Korea, patients often receive life-sustaining treatment until the very end of life. Advance care planning is rare, and most do-not-resuscitate decisions are made between the family and physician at the very end of patient's life. Koreans, influenced mainly by Confucian tradition, prefer a natural death and discontinuation of life-sustaining treatment. Although Koreans generally believe that death is natural and unavoidable, they tend not to think about or discuss death, and regard preparation for death as unnecessary. As a result, AD are completed by just 4.7% of the general adult population. This situation can be explained by several sociocultural characteristics including opting for natural death, wish not to burden others, preference for family involvement and trust in doctor, avoidance of talking about death, and filial piety. Patients often receive life-sustaining treatment until the very EOL, advance care planning and the use of AD is not common in Korea. This was related to unique sociocultural characteristics of Korea. A more active role of physicians, development of a more deliberate EOL discussion process, development of culturally appropriate AD and promotion of advance care planning might be required to provide good EOL care in Korea. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 407-415. PMID:26459613

  18. Liquefaction reactivity correlations using pyrolysis/mass spectrometry/pattern recognition procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voorhees, K.J.; Durfee, S.L.; Baldwin, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    In the reported experiments, eleven samples of eastern U.S. coals, have been investigated by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry (Py-MS) pattern recognition procedures to evaluate the feasibility of correlating the observed liquefaction reactivities with the pyrolysis mass spectra. The pyrolyses were conducted in vacuum using a Curie-point pyrolyzer (610/degree/C) coupled directly to the ion source of an Extranuclear SpectrEL mass spectrometer. It is demonstrated by evaluating experimental data that the pyrolysis mass spectra (coal structure parameter) can be correlated with conversion data. This suggests that the structure is the dominant factor in controlling liquefaction properties. 4 refs.

  19. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Experimental validation of a mathematical model for seabed liquefaction in waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Kirca, Özgür; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study directed towards the validation of a mathematical model for the buildup of pore water pressure and resulting liquefaction of marine soils under progressive waves. Experiments were conducted under controlled conditions with silt ( d50 = 0....

  1. Experimental Validation of a Mathematical Model for Seabed Liquefaction Under Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Kirca, Özgür; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study directed towards the validation of a mathematical model for the buildup of pore water pressure and resulting liquefaction of marine soils under progressive waves. Experiments were conducted under controlled conditions with silt (d(50) = 0...

  2. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SYNTHETIC ASPHALT PRODUCED FROM LIQUEFACTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct thermochemical liquefaction of primary undigested municipal sewage sludge was carried out to produce a low molecular weight steam-volatile oil, a high molecular weight synthetic asphalt, and a residual char cake. The latter product is capable of supplying the thermal energ...

  3. Coal liquefaction process research quarterly report, October-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickel, T.C.; Curlee, R.M.; Granoff, B.; Stohl, F.V.; Thomas, M.G.

    1980-03-01

    This quarterly report summarizes the activities of Sandia's continuing program in coal liquefaction process research. The overall objectives are to: (1) provide a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of coal liquefaction; (2) determine the role of catalysts in coal liquefaction; and (3) determine the mechanism(s) of catalyst deactivation. The program is composed of three major projects: short-contact-time coal liquefaction, mineral effects, and catalyst studies. These projects are interdependent and overlap significantly.

  4. Preventive measures against liquefaction in consideration of peripheral environment. Example of SAVE (Silent, Advanced Vibration-Erasing) composer method; Shuhen kankyo ni hairyoshita ekijoka taisaku koho. Seiteki shimekatame sunakui (SAVE composer) koho no sekorei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Fukada, H. [Fudo Construction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-09-25

    This paper presents the working machine, method and example of the newly developed SAVE composer method. The working machine of the SAVE composer method adopts a forced elevating equipment and rotating penetration equipment equipped with an auger motor for hydraulic forced penetration and elevation of a casing. The process of the SAVE composer method is composed of setting a casing at a proper position. charging material from a hopper to a casing, penetrating a casing up to a proper depth by the auger motor of the rotating penetration equipment, discharging material by extracting a casing, and re-penetrating a casing for compaction of discharged material. This method is free from noise and vibration because of no use of an excitor. This method was used for preventive measures against liquefaction at the coastal levee of Tsu-Matsuzaka harbor, Mie prefecture. As a result, nearly the same improvement effect as conventional SCP method, and considerable vibration reduction were confirmed. 3 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. [Respect for autonomy of "incompetent" patients?--the ethical problem of advanced directives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehbock, Theda

    2005-12-01

    In addressing the ethical and legal problems of advanced directives, the article discusses whether respect for the autonomy of the so-called "incompetent" patients is possible and morally required. Starting with a critique of how modern medicine threatens patient autonomy and care (2.), the author goes on to highlight the mutual interdependence between respect for autonomy and patient care as two moral requirements arising from respect for human dignity (3.). Finally; the article elucidates the practical consequences as they relate to a treatment approach for each patient that is simultaneously caring and respectful of their autonomy, commenting on the ramifications for a sensitive and conscientious approach to advanced medical directives and for the special -role of nursing in this context. PMID:16398303

  6. Perspectives on advance directives in Japanese society: A population-based questionnaire survey

    OpenAIRE

    Slingsby Brian; Akabayashi Akira; Kai Ichiro

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background In Japan, discussion concerning advance directives (ADs) has been on the rise during the past decade. ADs are one method proposed to facilitate the process of communication among patients, families and health care providers regarding the plan of care of a patient who is no longer capable of communicating. In this paper, we report the results of the first in-depth survey on the general population concerning the preferences and use of ADs in Japan. Method A self-administered...

  7. Default options in advance directives: study protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gabler, Nicole B.; Cooney, Elizabeth; Small, Dylan S.; Troxel, Andrea B.; Arnold, Robert M.; White, Douglas B.; Angus, Derek C.; Loewenstein, George; Volpp, Kevin G; Bryce, Cindy L.; Halpern, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although most seriously ill Americans wish to avoid burdensome and aggressive care at the end of life, such care is often provided unless patients or family members specifically request otherwise. Advance directives (ADs) were created to provide opportunities to set limits on aggressive care near life's end. This study tests the hypothesis that redesigning ADs such that comfort-oriented care is provided as the default, rather than requiring patients to actively choose it, will pr...

  8. Estimation of sand liquefaction based on support vector machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏永华; 马宁; 胡检; 杨小礼

    2008-01-01

    The origin and influence factors of sand liquefaction were analyzed, and the relation between liquefaction and its influence factors was founded. A model based on support vector machines (SVM) was established whose input parameters were selected as following influence factors of sand liquefaction: magnitude (M), the value of SPT, effective pressure of superstratum, the content of clay and the average of grain diameter. Sand was divided into two classes: liquefaction and non-liquefaction, and the class label was treated as output parameter of the model. Then the model was used to estimate sand samples, 20 support vectors and 17 borderline support vectors were gotten, then the parameters were optimized, 14 support vectors and 6 borderline support vectors were gotten, and the prediction precision reaches 100%. In order to verify the generalization of the SVM method, two other practical samples’ data from two cities, Tangshan of Hebei province and Sanshui of Guangdong province, were dealt with by another more intricate model for polytomies, which also considered some influence factors of sand liquefaction as the input parameters and divided sand into four liquefaction grades: serious liquefaction, medium liquefaction, slight liquefaction and non-liquefaction as the output parameters. The simulation results show that the latter model has a very high precision, and using SVM model to estimate sand liquefaction is completely feasible.

  9. A Korean perspective on developing a global policy for advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soyoon; Hahm, Ki-Hyun; Park, Hyoung Wook; Kang, Hyun Hee; Sohn, Myongsei

    2010-03-01

    Despite the wide and daunting array of cross-cultural obstacles that the formulation of a global policy on advance directives will clearly pose, the need is equally evident. Specifically, the expansion of medical services driven by medical tourism, just to name one important example, makes this issue urgently relevant. While ensuring consistency across national borders, a global policy will have the additional and perhaps even more important effect of increasing the use of advance directives in clinical settings and enhancing their effectiveness within each country, regardless of where that country's state of the law currently stands. One cross-cultural issue that may represent a major obstacle in formulating, let alone applying, a global policy is whether patient autonomy as the underlying principle for the use of advance directives is a universal norm or a construct of western traditions that must be reconciled with alternative value systems that may place lesser significance on individual choice. A global policy, at a minimum, must emphasize respect for patient autonomy, provision of medical information, limits to the obligations for physicians, and portability. And though the development of a global policy will be no easy task, active engagement in close collaboration with the World Health Organization can make it possible. PMID:20136819

  10. Thermal gasification or direct combustion? Comparison of advanced cogeneration systems in the sugarcane industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compare different cogeneration system scenarios for efficient energy production from bagasse fuel in an Indonesian sugar and ethanol factory. These scenarios include the use of condensing-extraction steam turbines, variable speed electric drives for process equipment, measures to reduce low pressure steam demand for process needs, and two advanced cogeneration systems. One advanced system includes an 80 bar high pressure direct combustion steam Rankine cycle (advanced SRC), while the other uses a biomass integrated gasifier combined cycle (BIGCC); both utilize fuel dryers. Using steady-state thermodynamic models, we estimate that the net electricity generation potentials of the BIGCC and advanced SRC systems are approximately seven and five times the potential of the existing factory, respectively. The maximum net electricity generation potentials for the respective systems are 170 kWh/tc (BIGCC) and 140 kWh/tc (advanced SRC). However, the BIGCC system needs a bagasse feed rate that is 50 percent higher than the advanced SRC system to satisfy the factory low pressure steam demand for sugar and ethanol processing, which may affect its ability to provide steam and electricity during the off-season. For the Indonesian sugar factory, the annual revenue potential of the BIGCC system is US$14 million per year, approximately 50 percent higher than that of the advanced SRC system (electricity sale rate: US$45/MsWh; carbon credit price: US$13.60). BIGCC technology is still in an early stage of development and there are no commercial systems in sugar factories, so an advanced SRC system may be a more suitable option in the near future. -- Highlights: ► We use steady state thermodynamic models to simulate a sugar-ethanol factory. ► We compare existing performance with five improved and advanced cogeneration system scenarios. ► High pressure steam Rankine cycle can significantly increase electricity generation. ► Biomass integrated gasification combined cycle can

  11. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, through March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. Accomplishments for this quarter are described.

  12. Further studies on developing technology for indirect liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, D.; Neuworth, M. B.; Tomlinson, G.

    1982-03-01

    Our investigations have resulted in the conclusion that fluidized gasifiers, such as Westinghouse or entrained flow gasifiers such as Texaco and Shell-Koppers offer significant advantages over the BGC Lurgi gasifier when Illinois No. 6 coal is employed as the feedstock. Dry-ash Lurgi gasification has additional disadvantages which appear to make it unsuitable for applications with mildly caking coal such as Illinois No. 6. The results of our analyses of Illinois No. 6 coal do not alter our prior conclusions regarding the use of advanced gasification systems for indirect liquefaction. BGC/Lurgi, Westinghouse, Texaco and Shell-Koppers gasifiers offer significant advantages over dry-ash Lurgi and should be given detailed consideration for a US liquefaction facility. The final decision will probably be driven by the relative state of development at the time a decision is required, process license and guarantees which could be negotiated, the market value of an SNG co-product, and the specific characteristics of the coal feedstock to be used.

  13. Nitroreductase gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: insights and advances toward clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Elsie M; Little, Rory F; Mowday, Alexandra M; Rich, Michelle H; Chan-Hyams, Jasmine V E; Copp, Janine N; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V; Ackerley, David F

    2015-10-15

    This review examines the vast catalytic and therapeutic potential offered by type I (i.e. oxygen-insensitive) nitroreductase enzymes in partnership with nitroaromatic prodrugs, with particular focus on gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT; a form of cancer gene therapy). Important first indications of this potential were demonstrated over 20 years ago, for the enzyme-prodrug pairing of Escherichia coli NfsB and CB1954 [5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. However, it has become apparent that both the enzyme and the prodrug in this prototypical pairing have limitations that have impeded their clinical progression. Recently, substantial advances have been made in the biodiscovery and engineering of superior nitroreductase variants, in particular development of elegant high-throughput screening capabilities to enable optimization of desirable activities via directed evolution. These advances in enzymology have been paralleled by advances in medicinal chemistry, leading to the development of second- and third-generation nitroaromatic prodrugs that offer substantial advantages over CB1954 for nitroreductase GDEPT, including greater dose-potency and enhanced ability of the activated metabolite(s) to exhibit a local bystander effect. In addition to forging substantial progress towards future clinical trials, this research is supporting other fields, most notably the development and improvement of targeted cellular ablation capabilities in small animal models, such as zebrafish, to enable cell-specific physiology or regeneration studies. PMID:26431849

  14. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April--June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    The United States has more energy available in coal than in petroleum, natural gas, oil shale, and tar sands combined. Nationwide energy shortages, together with the availability of abundant coal reserves, make commercial production of synthetic fuels from coal vital to the Nation's total supply of clean energy. In response to this need, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) is conducting a research and development program to provide technology that will permit rapid commercialization of processes for converting coal to synthetic liquid and gaseous fuels and for improved direct combustion of coal. These fuels must be storable and suitable for power generation, transportation, and residential and industrial uses. ERDA's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels was begun by two of ERDA's predecessor agencies: Office of Coal Research (OCR) in 1962, and Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, in the 1930's. Current work in coal liquefaction is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and non-catalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. Coal liquefaction can now be achieved under more moderate processing conditions and more rapidly than was the case in the 1930's. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, including heavy boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel oil, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquid fuels also have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To determine the most efficient means of utilizing coal resources, ERDA is sponsoring the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. Nineteen projects under development are described and progress for each in the quarter is detailed briefly

  15. Consciousness in humans and non-human animals: recent advances and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boly, Melanie; Seth, Anil K.; Wilke, Melanie; Ingmundson, Paul; Baars, Bernard; Laureys, Steven; Edelman, David B.; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2013-01-01

    This joint article reflects the authors' personal views regarding noteworthy advances in the neuroscience of consciousness in the last 10 years, and suggests what we feel may be promising future directions. It is based on a small conference at the Samoset Resort in Rockport, Maine, USA, in July of 2012, organized by the Mind Science Foundation of San Antonio, Texas. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of subjectivity in humans and other animals, including empirical, applied, technical, and conceptual insights. These include the evidence for the importance of fronto-parietal connectivity and of “top-down” processes, both of which enable information to travel across distant cortical areas effectively, as well as numerous dissociations between consciousness and cognitive functions, such as attention, in humans. In addition, we describe the development of mental imagery paradigms, which made it possible to identify covert awareness in non-responsive subjects. Non-human animal consciousness research has also witnessed substantial advances on the specific role of cortical areas and higher order thalamus for consciousness, thanks to important technological enhancements. In addition, much progress has been made in the understanding of non-vertebrate cognition relevant to possible conscious states. Finally, major advances have been made in theories of consciousness, and also in their comparison with the available evidence. Along with reviewing these findings, each author suggests future avenues for research in their field of investigation. PMID:24198791

  16. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  17. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-07-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop. The workshop, held March 20–21, 2014, in Golden, Colorado, discussed and detailed the research and development needs for biomass indirect liquefaction. Discussions focused on pathways that convert biomass-based syngas (or any carbon monoxide, hydrogen gaseous stream) to liquid intermediates (alcohols or acids) and further synthesize those intermediates to liquid hydrocarbons that are compatible as either a refinery feed or neat fuel.

  18. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction (CMSL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Ganguli, P.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, T.L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Popper, G.A.; Smith, T.; Stalzer, R.

    1996-11-01

    Under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. has conducted a series of eleven catalytic, multi-stage, liquefaction (CMSL) bench scale runs between February, 1991, and September, 1995. The purpose of these runs was to investigate novel approaches to liquefaction relating to feedstocks, hydrogen source, improved catalysts as well as processing variables, all of which are designed to lower the cost of producing coal-derived liquid products. This report summarizes the technical assessment of these runs, and in particular the evaluation of the economic impact of the results.

  19. Guest Editorial Special Issue on Recent Advances and New Directions in Switched Control Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ As guest editors, it is our great honor to bring this special issue of the Journal of Control Theory and Applications devoted to Recent Advances and New Directions in Switched Control Systems. Recently, switched control systems have attracted much attention in the control systems community. Problems in this area are not only academically challenging for the inherent mathematical complexity, but also are derived or motivated from advanced applications in natural sciences, engineering, and social sciences. For survival, natural biological systems switch their survival strategies in accordance with environmental changes. For improved performance, switching has been extensively utilized/exploited in engineering systems such as automotive drive train control, electronic devices, control of power systems, etc.

  20. Wild orangutan males plan and communicate their travel direction one day in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carel P van Schaik

    Full Text Available The ability to plan for the future beyond immediate needs would be adaptive to many animal species, but is widely thought to be uniquely human. Although studies in captivity have shown that great apes are capable of planning for future needs, it is unknown whether and how they use this ability in the wild. Flanged male Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii emit long calls, which females use to maintain earshot associations with them. We tested whether long calls serve to communicate a male's ever-changing predominant travel direction to facilitate maintaining these associations. We found that the direction in which a flanged male emits his long calls predicts his subsequent travel direction for many hours, and that a new call indicates a change in his main travel direction. Long calls given at or near the night nest indicate travel direction better than random until late afternoon on the next day. These results show that male orangutans make their travel plans well in advance and announce them to conspecifics. We suggest that such a planning ability is likely to be adaptive for great apes, as well as in other taxa.

  1. Residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the seabed liquefaction beneath standing waves. Silt (with d50 =0.070mm) was used in the experiments. Two kinds of measurements were carried out: pore water pressure measurements and water surface elevation measurements. These measuremen...

  2. The Recent Revolution in the Design and Manufacture of Cranial Implants: Modern Advancements and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonda, David J; Manjila, Sunil; Selman, Warren R; Dean, David

    2015-11-01

    Large format (i.e., >25 cm) cranioplasty is a challenging procedure not only from a cosmesis standpoint, but also in terms of ensuring that the patient's brain will be well-protected from direct trauma. Until recently, when a patient's own cranial flap was unavailable, these goals were unattainable. Recent advances in implant computer-aided design and 3-dimensional (3-D) printing are leveraging other advances in regenerative medicine. It is now possible to 3-D-print patient-specific implants from a variety of polymer, ceramic, or metal components. A skull template may be used to design the external shape of an implant that will become well integrated in the skull, while also providing beneficial distribution of mechanical force in the event of trauma. Furthermore, an internal pore geometry can be utilized to facilitate the seeding of banked allograft cells. Implants may be cultured in a bioreactor along with recombinant growth factors to produce implants coated with bone progenitor cells and extracellular matrix that appear to the body as a graft, albeit a tissue-engineered graft. The growth factors would be left behind in the bioreactor and the graft would resorb as new host bone invades the space and is remodeled into strong bone. As we describe in this review, such advancements will lead to optimal replacement of cranial defects that are both patient-specific and regenerative. PMID:26171578

  3. Trial examination of direct pebble fabrication for advanced tritium breeders by the emulsion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: hoshino.tsuyoshi@jaea.go.jp

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The integration of raw material preparation and granulation is proposed as a new direct pebble fabrication process. • The emulsion method granulates gel spheres of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2}. • The gel spheres are calcined and sintered in air. • The crush load of the sintered Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} or Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles obtained is 37.2 or 59.3 N, respectively. - Abstract: Demonstration power plant reactors require advanced tritium breeders with high thermal stability. For the mass production of advanced tritium breeder pebbles, pebble fabrication by the emulsion method is a promising technique. To develop the most efficient pebble fabrication method, a new direct pebble fabrication process utilizing the emulsion method was implemented. A prior pebble fabrication process consisted of the preparation of raw materials followed by granulation. The new process integrates the preparation and granulation of raw materials. The slurry for the emulsion granulation of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} or Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} as a tritium breeder consists of mixtures of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2} at specific ratios. Subsequently, gel spheres of tritium breeders are fabricated by controlling the relative flow speeds of slurry and oil. The average diameter and crush load of the obtained sintered Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} or Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles were 1.0 or 1.5 mm and 37.2 or 59.3 N, respectively. The trial fabrication results suggest that the new process has the potential to increase the fabrication efficiency of advanced tritium breeder pebbles.

  4. Trial examination of direct pebble fabrication for advanced tritium breeders by the emulsion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The integration of raw material preparation and granulation is proposed as a new direct pebble fabrication process. • The emulsion method granulates gel spheres of Li2CO3 and TiO2 or SiO2. • The gel spheres are calcined and sintered in air. • The crush load of the sintered Li2TiO3 or Li4SiO4 pebbles obtained is 37.2 or 59.3 N, respectively. - Abstract: Demonstration power plant reactors require advanced tritium breeders with high thermal stability. For the mass production of advanced tritium breeder pebbles, pebble fabrication by the emulsion method is a promising technique. To develop the most efficient pebble fabrication method, a new direct pebble fabrication process utilizing the emulsion method was implemented. A prior pebble fabrication process consisted of the preparation of raw materials followed by granulation. The new process integrates the preparation and granulation of raw materials. The slurry for the emulsion granulation of Li2TiO3 or Li4SiO4 as a tritium breeder consists of mixtures of Li2CO3 and TiO2 or SiO2 at specific ratios. Subsequently, gel spheres of tritium breeders are fabricated by controlling the relative flow speeds of slurry and oil. The average diameter and crush load of the obtained sintered Li2TiO3 or Li4SiO4 pebbles were 1.0 or 1.5 mm and 37.2 or 59.3 N, respectively. The trial fabrication results suggest that the new process has the potential to increase the fabrication efficiency of advanced tritium breeder pebbles

  5. Study on the mechanism of coal liquefaction reaction and a new process concept

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Shi-dong; LI Wen-bo; WANG Yong; GUO Zhi; LI Ke-jian

    2008-01-01

    The coal hydrogenation reaction process is simply considered as three steps. In the first step, the smaller molecules associated with coal structure units are released as some gases and water in the condition of solvent and heating. In this step, some weaker bonds of the coal structure units are ruptured to form free radicals. The radicals are stabi-lized by hydrogen atoms from donor solvent and/or H2. In the second step, chain reaction occurs quickly. In the process of chain reaction, the covalent bonds of coal structure units are attacked by the radicals to form some asphaltenes. In the third step, asphaltenes are hydrogenated form more liquids and some gases. In coal liquefaction, the second step of coal hydrogenation reaction should be controlled to avoid integration of radicals, and the third step of coal hydrogenation should be accelerated to increase the coal conversion and the oil yield. A new concept of coal liquefaction process named as China direct coal lique-faction (CDCL) process is presented based on the mechanism study of coal liquefaction.

  6. A Modified Time Advancement Algorithm for Optimizing Channel Flow Analysis in Direct Numerical Simulation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rajabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research a direct numerical simulation (DNS of turbulent flow is performed in a geometrically standard case like plane channel flow. Pseudo spectral (PS method is used due to geometry specifications and very high accuracy achieved despite relatively few grid points. A variable time-stepping algorithm is proposed which may reduce requirement of computational cost in simulation of such wall-bounded flow. Channel flow analysis is performed with both constant and varied time-step for 128 × 65×128 grid points. The time advancement is carried out by implicit third-order backward differentiation scheme for linear terms and explicit forward Euler for nonlinear convection term. PS method is used in Cartesian coordinates with Chebychev polynomial expansion in normal direction for one non-periodic boundary condition. Also Fourier series is employed in stream-wise and span-wise directions for two periodic boundary conditions. The friction Reynolds number is about Reτ=175 based on a friction velocity and channel half width. Standard common rotational form was chosen for discritization of nonlinear convective term of Navier-Stocks equation. The comparison is made between turbulent quantities such as the turbulent statistics, Reynolds stress, wall shear velocity, standard deviation of (u and total normalized energy of instantaneous velocities in both time-discretization methods. The results show that if final decision rests on economics, the proposed variable time-stepping algorithm will be proper choice which satisfies the accuracy and reduces the computational cost.

  7. LIQUEFACTION AND DISPLACEMENT OF SATURATED SAND UNDER VERTICAL VIBRATION LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiaobing; TAN Qingming; CHENG C.M.; YU Shanbing; CUI Peng

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of the vertical vibration loading on the liquefaction of saturated sand, one dimensional model for the saturated sand with a vertical vibration is presented based on the two phase continuous media theory. The development of the liquefaction and the liquefaction region are analyzed. It is shown that the vertical vibration loading could induce liquefaction.The rate of the liquefaction increases with the increase of the initial limit strain or initial porosity or amplitude and frequency of loading, and increases with the decrease of the permeability or initial modulus. It is shown also that there is a phase lag in the sand column. When the sand permeability distribution is non-uniform, the pore pressure and the strain will rise sharply where the permeability is the smallest, and fracture might be induced. With the development of liquefaction, the strength of the soil foundation becomes smaller and smaller. In the limiting case, landslides or debris flows could occur.

  8. Advance Directives in Some Western European Countries: A Legal and Ethical Comparison between Spain, France, England, and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veshi, Denard; Neitzke, Gerald

    2015-09-01

    We have studied national laws on advance directives in various Western European countries: Romance-speaking countries (Italy, France, Portugal, and Spain), English-speaking countries (Ireland and the United Kingdom), and German-speaking countries (Austria, Germany, and Switzerland). We distinguish two potentially complementary types of advance medical declaration: the 'living will' and the nomination of a legal proxy. After examining the similarities and differences between countries, we analyse in detail the legislation of four countries (Spain, France, England, and Germany), since the other countries in this survey have similar legal principles and/or a similar political approach. In conclusion, we note that in all the countries examined, advance directives have been seen as an instrument to enable the patient's right to self-determination. Notwithstanding, in Romance-speaking countries, the involvement of physicians in the end-of-life process and risks arising from the execution of advance directives were also considered. PMID:26427271

  9. Functional connectivity measures as schizophrenia intermediate phenotypes: advances, limitations, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hengyi; Dixson, Luanna; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2016-02-01

    The search for quantifiable biological mediators of genetic risk or 'intermediate phenotypes' is an essential strategy in psychiatric neuroscience and a useful tool for exploring the complex relationships between genes, neural circuits and behaviors. In recent years, the examination of connectivity-based intermediate phenotypes has gained increasing popularity in the study of schizophrenia, a brain disorder that manifests in early adulthood and disturbs a wide range of neural network functions. To date, several potential connectivity phenotypes have been identified that link neuroimaging measures of neural circuit interaction to genetic susceptibility for schizophrenia. This paper briefly reviews recent advances, current limitations and future directions in the search for functional connectivity intermediate phenotypes for schizophrenia across different cognitive domains. PMID:26276700

  10. Defending to the Four Directions Evolving Uechi-ryu’s Hojoundo Exercises for Advanced Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor Rymaruk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces “Defending to the Four Directions,” techniques that add challenge to Uechi-ryu while incorporating and building upon the traditional katas which have formed the basis of the style. Making changes within a style’s training methods just to be different without any other purpose is of little value and actually destructive to the system. This article describes a meaningful and realistic addition to the practice of hojoundo, the formal exercises incorporating basic movements. “Defending to the Four Directions” is intended for advanced students who have mastered Uechi-ryu’s foundamentals. In addition, the practice is well-suited for adaptation and adoption into other martial art styles.

  11. Advances in direct numerical simulation for MHD modeling of free surface flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of FLiBe (LiF-BeF2) free-surface flow as a chamber protection scheme is considered in advanced nuclear fusion reactor. At the design of the nuclear fusion reactor from the viewpoint of thermofluid research, it would be very important to understand the influence of a magnetic field in turbulent free surface flow. On the other hand, turbulent free surface flow (called open channel flow) by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with non-deformable surface was first succeeded by imposing free-slip and non-slip conditions as velocity boundary conditions at the upper and lower, respectively. After that, the research by DNS has been advanced more, it has been clarified that turbulent structures generated from the lower wall travels to the free surface and affected the mechanism of heat and mass transfer at the free surface. The behavior of the structures is affected by the strong magnetic field in the nuclear fusion reactor. Therefore, a DNS of liquid film cooling in the nuclear fusion reactor is performed by authors, and the relations between a magnetic orientation and turbulent flow statistics are clearly observed. In this paper, the DNS result is introduced, and the trial turbulence modeling for MHD free-surface flow by using the DNS database is also discussed

  12. Tuberculosis-advances in development of new drugs, treatment regimens, host-directed therapies, and biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Robert S; Maeurer, Markus; Mwaba, Peter; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Rustomjee, Roxana; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Marais, Ben; Schito, Marco; Churchyard, Gavin; Swaminathan, Soumya; Hoelscher, Michael; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis is the leading infectious cause of death worldwide, with 9·6 million cases and 1·5 million deaths reported in 2014. WHO estimates 480 000 cases of these were multidrug resistant (MDR). Less than half of patients who entered into treatment for MDR tuberculosis successfully completed that treatment, mainly due to high mortality and loss to follow-up. These in turn illustrate weaknesses in current treatment regimens and national tuberculosis programmes, coupled with operational treatment challenges. In this Review we provide an update on recent developments in the tuberculosis drug-development pipeline (including new and repurposed antimicrobials and host-directed drugs) as they are applied to new regimens to shorten and improve outcomes of tuberculosis treatment. Several new or repurposed antimicrobial drugs are in advanced trial stages for MDR tuberculosis, and two new antimicrobial drug candidates are in early-stage trials. Several trials to reduce the duration of therapy in MDR and drug-susceptible tuberculosis are ongoing. A wide range of candidate host-directed therapies are being developed to accelerate eradication of infection, prevent new drug resistance, and prevent permanent lung injury. As these drugs have been approved for other clinical indications, they are now ready for repurposing for tuberculosis in phase 2 clinical trials. We assess risks associated with evaluation of new treatment regimens, and highlight opportunities to advance tuberculosis research generally through regulatory innovation in MDR tuberculosis. Progress in tuberculosis-specific biomarkers (including culture conversion, PET and CT imaging, and gene expression profiles) can support this innovation. Several global initiatives now provide unique opportunities to tackle the tuberculosis epidemic through collaborative partnerships between high-income countries and middle-income and low-income countries for clinical trials training and research, allowing funders to

  13. Earthquake Risk - MO 2013 Liquefaction Potential St. Louis Area (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Soil liquefaction potential was determined using existing surficial materials and floodplain alluvium maps. Alluvium deposits and artificial deposits are generally...

  14. Analysis and Evaluation of the Liquefaction on Layered Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquefaction potential on the specific site of nuclear power plant is analyzed and reviewed. The layered site for this study consists of silt and sand. Based on the limited available soil data, maximum shear strength at critical locations using Seed and Idriss method and computer program SHAKE is calculated, and liquefaction potential is reviewed. As seismic input motion used for the assessment of liquefaction, the artificial time history compatible with the US NRC Regulatory Guide 1.60 is used. Assessment results of the liquefaction are validated by analyzing to the other typical soil foundations which can show the effects on the foundation depth and soil data. (authors)

  15. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  16. Liquefaction necrosis of mitral annulus calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallisho, Maram; Hwang, Inyong; Alsafwah, Shadwan F

    2014-01-01

    Liquefaction necrosis of the mitral annulus is a rare form of peri-annular calcification that the cardiologist must be able to differentiate from other cardiac masses. It classically looks like a round or semilunar hyperdense mass with a denser peripheral rim, located mainly in the posterior mitral annulus. The case we report here was diagnosed in a 78-year-old female patient who presented with an embolic cerebral vascular accident, which raises the question of its etiopathogenic responsibility. PMID:24420234

  17. Ultrasound-assisted liquefaction of honey

    OpenAIRE

    Kabbani, Dania

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization of honey is a common process of the honey industry. Liquid honey is preferred by most of the consumers and by food companies for ease of handling. Honey is commonly heated during pasteurization in order to liquefy it and inhibit any microbial growth. However, heating can degrade the main quality parameters of honey. A better method compared to expensive and time-consuming heating is desirable to pasteurize, accelerate the liquefaction and retard the crystallization process...

  18. Low Severity Coal Liquefaction Promoted by Cyclic Olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christine W. Curtis

    1998-04-09

    The development of the donor solvent technology for coal liquefaction has drawn a good deal of attention over the last three decades. The search for better hydrogen donors led investigators to a class of compounds known as cyclic olefins. Cyclic olefins are analogues of the conventional hydroaromatic donor species but do not contain aromatic rings. The cyclic olefins are highly reactive compounds which readily release their hydrogen at temperatures of 200 C or higher. Considerable effort has been o expended toward understanding the process of hydrogen donation. Most of this work was conducted in bomb reactors, with product analysis being carried out after the reaction was complete. Efforts directed towards fundamental studies of these reactions in situ are rare. The current work employs a high temperature and high pressure infrared cell to monitor in situ the concentrations of reactants and products during hydrogen release from hydrogen donor compounds.

  19. Advances in directed monooxygenase evolution : from diversity generation and flow cytometry screening to tailor-made monooxygenases

    OpenAIRE

    Ruff, Anna Joëlle

    2012-01-01

    Directed Evolution became a powerful tool for proteins engineers to generate tailor-made biocatalyst. Directed protein evolution consist of the following three consecutive main steps, which are performed in iterative cycles; Step 1 the gene diversity generation, Step 2 the screening for improved variants and Step 3 the isolation of gene encoding for improved proteins. In this thesis, methodological advancements in the two key steps of the directed evolution, the diversity generation (SeSaM me...

  20. Co-liquefaction of micro algae with coal using coal liquefaction catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikenaga, N.; Ueda, C.; Matsui, T.; Ohtsuki, M.; Suzuki, T. [Kansai University, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

    2001-04-01

    Co-liquefaction of micro algae (Chlorella, Spirulina and Littorale) with coal (Australian Yallourn brown coal and Illinois No. 6 coal) was carried out under pressurized H{sub 2} in 1-methylnaphthalene at 350-400{degree}C for 60 min with various catalysts. Co-liquefaction of Chlorella with Yallourn coal was successfully achieved with excess sulfur to iron (S/Fe = 4), where sufficient amount of Fe{sub 1-x}S, which is believed to be the active species in the coal liquefaction, was produced. The conversion and the yield of the hexane-soluble fraction were close to the values calculated from the additivity of the product yields of the respective homo-reactions. In the reaction with a one-to-one mixture of Chlorella and Yallourn coal, 99.8% of conversion and 65.5% of hexane-soluble fraction were obtained at 400{degree}C with Fe (CO){sub 5} at S/Fe = 4. When Littorale and Spirulina were used as micro algae, a similar tendency was observed with the iron catalyst. On the other hand, in the co-liquefaction with Illinois No. 6 coal, which is known to contain a large amount of sulfur in the form of catalytically active pyrite, the oil yield in the co-liquefaction was close to the additivity of the respective reaction with Fe(CO){sub 5}-S, even at SFe = 2. Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} was also effective for the co-liquefaction of micro algae with coal. 26 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Fabric Behavior of Sand in Post-liquefaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Amirodin Sadrnejad

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropic plasticity model for post-liquefaction of the undrained behavior of sand is presented. The model incorporates the critical/steady state concept that postulates the existence of a state where sand continuously deforms at a certain constant effective stress depending two main parameters of both initial bulk parameters (void ratio or relative density and the stress level (mean stress. The local instability of saturated sand within post-liquefaction is highly dependent on the residual inherent/induced anisotropy, bedding plane effects and stress/strain path. Most of the models developed using stress/strain invariants are not capable of identifying the parameters depending on orientation such as fabric. This is mainly because stress/strain invariants are quantities similar to scalar quantities and not capable of carrying directional information with them. The constitutive equations of the model are derived within the context of non-linear elastic behavior of the whole medium and plastic sliding of interfaces of predefined multi-planes. The proposed multi-plane based model is capable of predicting the behavior of soils on the basis of plastic sliding mechanisms, elastic behavior of particles and possibilities to see the micro-fabric effects as natural anisotropy as well as induced anisotropy in plasticity. The model is capable of predicting the behavior of soil under different orientation of bedding plane, history of strain progression during the application of any stress/strain paths. The influences of rotation of the direction of principal stress and strain axes and induced anisotropy are included in a rational way without any additional hypotheses. The spatial strength distribution at a location as an approximation of probable mobilized sliding mechanism is proposed as an ellipsoid function built up on bedding plane.

  2. Two-stage, close coupled catalytic liquefaction of coal. Eleventh quarterly report, 1 April 1991--30 June 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Panvelker, S.V.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1991-10-01

    The overall purpose of the program is to achieve higher yields of better quality transportation and turbine fuels and to lower the capital and production costs in order to make the products from direct coal liquefaction competitive with other fossil fuel products.

  3. Two-stage, close coupled catalytic liquefaction of coal. [Catalysts: FeOOH and NiMo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Panvelker, S.V.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1991-10-01

    The overall purpose of the program is to achieve higher yields of better quality transportation and turbine fuels and to lower the capital and production costs in order to make the products from direct coal liquefaction competitive with other fossil fuel products.

  4. Factors associated with the designation of a health care proxy and writing advance directives for patients suffering from haematological malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Trarieux-Signol, Sophie; Moreau, Stéphane; Gourin, Marie-Pierre; Penot, Amélie; Edoux de Lafont, Geoffroy; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Background During the last few decades, patients’ rights have been reinforced in many countries by acts of law. Measures now include health care proxies to uphold the doctor-patient relationship and advance directives for end-of-life patients. These could be relevant tools as early as the initial diagnosis of haematological malignancies because of the uncertain disease course. The aim of this research was to assess the factors associated with the designation of a proxy and writing advance dir...

  5. Perspectives on advance directives in Japanese society: A population-based questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slingsby Brian

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, discussion concerning advance directives (ADs has been on the rise during the past decade. ADs are one method proposed to facilitate the process of communication among patients, families and health care providers regarding the plan of care of a patient who is no longer capable of communicating. In this paper, we report the results of the first in-depth survey on the general population concerning the preferences and use of ADs in Japan. Method A self-administered questionnaire was sent via mail to a stratified random sampling of 560 residents listed in the residential registry of one district of Tokyo, Japan (n = 165,567. Association between correlating factors and specific preferences toward ADs was assessed using contingency table bivariate analysis and multivariate regression model to estimate independent contribution. Results Of the 560 questionnaires sent out, a total of 425 participants took part in the survey yielding a response rate of 75.9 %. The results of the present study indicate that: 1 the most important components to be addressed are the specifics of medical treatment at the end of life stage and disclosure of diagnosis and prognosis; 2 the majority of participants found it suitable to express their directives by word to family and/or physician and not by written documentation; 3 there is no strong need for legal measures in setting up an AD; 4 it is permissible for family and physician to loosely interpret one's directives; 5 the most suitable proxy is considered to be a family member, relative, or spouse. Multivariate analysis found the following five factors as significantly associated with preferences: 1 awareness regarding living wills, 2 experience with the use of ADs, 3 preferences for end-of-life treatment, 4 preferences for information disclosure, and 5 intentions of creating a will. Conclusions Written ADs might be useful in the Japanese setting when the individual either wishes: 1 to not

  6. Effect of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide on initial stage of coal liquefaction in tetralin; Sekitan ekika shoki katei ni okeru io to ryuka suiso no hatasu yakuwari

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakada, M. [Government Industrial Research Institute, Kyushu, Saga (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    It is well known that the solubilization of coal can be accelerated by adding sulfur or hydrogen sulfide during direct liquefaction of difficult coals. From the studies of authors on the coal liquefaction under the conditions at rather low temperatures between 300 and 400{degree}C, liquefaction products with high quality can be obtained by suppressing the aromatization of naphthene rings, but it was a problem that the reaction rate is slow. For improving this point, results obtained by changing solvents have been reported. In this study, to accelerate the liquefaction reaction, Illinois No.6 coal was liquefied in tetralin at temperature range from 300 to 400{degree}C by adding a given amount of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide at the initial stage of liquefaction. The addition of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide provided an acceleration effect of liquefaction reaction at temperature range between 300 and 400{degree}C. The addition of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide at 400{degree}C increased the oil products. At 370 and 400{degree}C, the liquid yield by adding sulfur was slightly higher than that by adding hydrogen sulfide, unexpectedly. The effects of sulfur and hydrogen sulfide were reversed when increasing the hydrogen pressure. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Survey study of the efficiency and economics of hydrogen liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The production of liquid hydrogen, with coal as the starting material, is reported. The minimum practicable energy and cost for liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen in the 1985-2000 time period is presented to investigate the possible benefits of the integration of coal gasification processes with the liquefaction process.

  8. Co-liquefaction of micro- and macroalgae in subcritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Binbin; Duan, Peigao; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Feng; Fan, Yunchang

    2013-12-01

    Co-liquefaction of microalgae (Spirulina platensis, SP) and macroalgae (Entermorpha prolifera, EP) was studied in subcritical water by using a stainless-steel batch reactor at different temperature (250 to 370°C), time (5 to 120 min), SP/EP mass ratio (0 to 100%), and water/algae mass ratio (1:1 to 6:1). The results suggested that a positive synergetic effect existed during the co-liquefaction of SP and EP, and this synergetic effect was dependent on reaction conditions. Co-liquefaction alleviated the severe reaction conditions compared to the separate liquefaction of SP and EP and also promoted the in situ deoxygenation of the bio-oil. The higher-heating-value of bio-oil produced from the co-liquefaction of SP and EP (wSP:wEP=1) is 35.3 MJ/kg. The energy recovery from the co-liquefaction is larger than the average value from the separate liquefaction of SP and EP. Co-liquefaction did not affect the molecular composition but affect the relative amount of each component in the bio-oil. PMID:24096026

  9. Chemical aspects of coal liquefaction by oxygen in alkaline slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreozzi, R.; Caprio, V.; Insola, A.

    1988-03-01

    Coal liquefaction by oxygen in alkaline slurries is reviewed from the chemical point of view. Available information is considered in the light of questions relating to coal liquefaction. A lack of chemical knowledge in this area is noted, especially on model compounds. 72 refs.

  10. Lightning Radio Source Retrieval Using Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no Earth curvature) are provided that implement all of tile measurements mentioned above. Tests of the retrieval method are provided using computer-simulated data sets. We also introduce a quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in source location. Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. In the absence of measurement errors, quadratic root degeneracy (no source location ambiguity) is shown to exist exactly on the outer sensor baselines for arbitrary non-collinear network geometries. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer generated data sets. The results are generally better than those obtained from the three station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg. We also note some of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods over the nonlinear method of chi(sup 2) minimization employed by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and discussed in Cummins et al.(1993, 1995, 1998).

  11. Development of an Advanced Flow Meter using the Averaging Bi-directional Flow Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced flow meter using the concept of averaging bi-directional flow tube was developed. To find characteristics of flow meter and derive theory of measurement in the single and two phase flow condition, some basic tests were attempted using flow meters with diameters of 27, 80 and 200 mm. The CFD(computational fluid dynamics) calculation was also performed to find the effects of temperature and pressure, and to optimize design of a prototypic flow meter. Following this procedure, prototypical flow meters with diameters of 200 and 500 mm were designed and manufactured. It is aimed to use in the region in which calibration constant was unchanged. The stress analysis showed that the proposed flow meter of H-beam shape is inherently strong against the bending force induced by flow. The flow computer was developed for the flow rate calculation from the measured pressure difference. In this study, the performance test using this prototype flow meter was carried out. The developed flow meter can be applied in the wide range of pressure and temperature. The basic tests showed that the lineality of the proposed flow meter is ± 0.5 % of full scale and flow turn down ratio is 1:20 where the Reynolds number is larger than 10,000

  12. [Physicians' views and perspectives on advanced directives in patients with incipient dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiussi, Mercedes; Dawidowski, Adriana; Restibo, Jimena; Pollán, Javier; Pezzano, Laura; Cámera, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Dementia is a progressive disease in which patients lose their ability to decide and communicate. Advance directives (AD) allow patients to express their preferences on end of life care in the early stages of the disease. Primary care practitioners (PCP) are in the best position to promote AD. The aim of this study was to elicit PCPs views about the discussion of AD with early stage dementia patients. A qualitative approach was taken, focus groups and individual interviews to elderly patients' PCPs from the Hospital italiano de buenos aires were conducted. A purposive sampling was performed, conforming homogeneous groups according to age and seniority. The discussion was stimulated by a vignette. We performed thematic content analysis in an interdisciplinary team. Twelve PCPs = 30 year of age, 32 middle-aged and 8 over 45 years participated of the study. The youngest group favored the discussion of AD while those over 45 regarded the family as the decision maker, and thus, the discussion as useless. Besides, they expressed that our society is not mature enough to discuss AD. Difficulties in AD implementation, in predicting the evolution of a patient's disease, the span of time between the discussion and AD implementation, lack of legislation and specific institutional policies were other factors that conditioned the discussion. Younger PCPs expressed concern on the lack of communication skills and difficulties to broach this subject with patients. PCPs perspectives on AD vary, their age should be taken into account when designing strategies to their implementation. PMID:22892082

  13. An optimal design methodology for large-scale gas liquefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Configuration selection and parametric optimization carried out simultaneously for gas liquefaction systems. ► Effective Heat Transfer Factor proposed to indicate the performance of heat exchanger networks. ► Relatively high exergy efficiency of liquefaction process achievable under some general assumptions. -- Abstract: This paper presents an optimization methodology for thermodynamic design of large scale gas liquefaction systems. Such a methodology enables configuration selection and parametric optimization to be implemented simultaneously. Exergy efficiency and genetic algorithm have been chosen as an evaluation index and an evaluation criterion, respectively. The methodology has been applied to the design of expander cycle based liquefaction processes. Liquefaction processes of hydrogen, methane and nitrogen are selected as case studies and the simulation results show that relatively high exergy efficiencies (52% for hydrogen and 58% for methane and nitrogen) are achievable based on very general consumptions.

  14. Assessment of Soil Liquefaction Potential Based on Numerical Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choobasti, A. Janalizadeh; Vahdatirad, Mohammad Javad; Torabi, M.;

    2012-01-01

    Paying special attention to geotechnical hazards such as liquefaction in huge civil projects like urban railways especially in susceptible regions to liquefaction is of great importance. A number of approaches to evaluate the potential for initiation of liquefaction, such as Seed and Idriss...... accuracy, also they lack the potential to predict the pore pressure developed in the soil. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out a ground response analysis to obtain pore pressures and shear stresses in the soil due to earthquake loading. Using soil historical, geological and compositional criteria, a...... zone of the corridor of Tabriz urban railway line 2 susceptible to liquefaction was recognized. Then, using numerical analysis and cyclic stress method using QUAKE/W finite element code, soil liquefaction potential in susceptible zone was evaluated based on design earthquake....

  15. Effects of coal rank on the chemical composition and toxicological activity of coal liquefaction materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Dauble, D.D.

    1986-05-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and toxicological testing of coal liquefaction materials from the EDS and H-Coal processes operated using different ranks of coal. Samples of recycle solvent from the bottoms recycle mode of the EDS direct coal liquefaction process derived from bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite coals were analyzed. In addition, the H-Coal heavy fuel oils derived from bituminous and sub-bituminous coals were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsoprtion column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry. The toxicological activity of selected samples was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay, an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity, and a static bioassy with Daphnia magna for aquatic toxicity of the water-soluble fractions. 22 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.; Shams, K.G.

    1994-07-01

    Recent research efforts in direct coal liquefaction are focused on lowering the level of reaction severity, identification and determination of the causes of retrogressive reactions, and improving the economics of the process. Ambient pretreatment of coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid was extensively studied in connection with low severity coal liquefaction. Ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol/HCl improved THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt % (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt % for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt % for the eight Argonne coals at 623 K (350{degrees}C) reaction temperature and 30 minutes reaction time. Optimal pretreatment conditions were determined using Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coals. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol %. The FTIR spectra of treated and untreated Wyodak coal samples demonstrated formation of carboxylic functional groups during pretreatment, a result of divalent (Ca, Mg) cationic bridge destruction. The extent of liquefaction reactivity directly correlated with the amount of calcium removed during pretreatment, and results from calcium ``addback`` experiments supported the observation that calcium adversely affected coal reactivity at low severity reaction conditions. Model compound studies using benzyl phenyl ether demonstrated that calcium cations catalyzed retrogressive reactions, inhibited hydrogenation reactions at low severity reaction conditions, and were more active at higher reaction temperatures. Based on kinetic data, mechanisms for hydrogenation-based inhibition and base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are proposed. The base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are shown to occur via a hydrogen abstraction mechanism where hydrogenation inhibition reactions are shown to take place via a surface quenching mechanism.

  17. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-12-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. Some of the contract activities for this quarter are: We completed many of the analyses on the 81 samples received from HTI bench-scale run CMSL-9, in which coal, coal/mixed plastics, and coal/high density polyethylene were fed; Liquid chromatographic separations of the 15 samples in the University of Delaware sample set were completed; and WRI completed CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR analyses on the Delaware sample set.

  18. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Application of liquid chromatographic separation methods to THF-soluble portions of integrated two-stage coal liquefaction resids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.B.; Pearson, C.D.; Young, L.L.; Green, J.A. (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using non-aqueous ion exchange liquid chromatography (NIELC) for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble distillation resids and THF-soluble whole oils derived from direct coal liquefaction. The technique can be used to separate the material into a number of acid, base, and neutral fractions. Each of the fractions obtained by NIELC was analyzed and then further fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The separation and analysis schemes are given in the accompanying report. With this approach, differences can be distinguished among samples obtained from different process streams in the liquefaction plant and among samples obtained at the same sampling location, but produced from different feed coals. HPLC was directly applied to one THF-soluble whole process oil without the NIELC preparation, with limited success. The direct HPLC technique used was directed toward the elution of the acid species into defined classes. The non-retained neutral and basic components of the oil were not analyzable by the direct HPLC method because of solubility limitations. Sample solubility is a major concern in the application of these techniques.

  19. Piezometer Performance at Wildlife Liquefaction Site, California

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Ronald F.; Hushmand, B.

    1995-01-01

    In response to an urgent need for field data from instrumented liquefaction sites, the U.S. Geological Survey in 1982 selected and instrumented a site in southern California called the Wildlife site. Two accelerometers (one at ground surface and one at a depth of 7.5 m) and six electrical pore-pressure transducers (five in a liquefiable silty sand layer) were placed at the site. The November 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake triggered sand boils and the desired instrumental response by gener...

  20. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  1. Free-radical kinetics of coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.; Smith, J.M.; McCoy, B.J.

    1994-07-16

    A rate expression with first- and second-order terms in the concentration of extractable compounds in solid coal particles is derived from a fundamental free-radical mechanism. The expression was suggested empirically by prior experiments for coal liquefaction in the presence of a hydrogen-donor solvent. Radical reactions are considered to occur in both coal and in solvent. The long-chain approximation justifies the neglect of initiation, hydrogen abstraction, and termination rates as quantitatively insignificant relative to propagation reaction rates.

  2. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor: acute liquefaction necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromal tumors, together with leiomyomas and schwannomas, constitute the sol-called mesenchymal tumors of the intestinal wall. Stromal tumors are histologically differentiated from other mesenchymal tumors in that they are derived from the interstitial cell of Cajal. These tumors can be encountered at any point throughout the entire digestive tract, by usually develop in stomach or small bowel. the clinical presentation in anemia secondary to gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute abdomen due to perforation or necrosis is rare. We present a case of jejunal stromal tumors with massive liquefaction necrosis, a circumstance that resulted in the peculiar radiological features observed. (Author) 9 refs,

  3. Recent Advances in Solution NMR: Fast Methods and Heteronuclear Direct Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, NMR spectroscopy is the technique of choice to investigate molecular structure, dynamics, and interactions in solution at atomic resolution. A major limitation of NMR spectroscopy for the study of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, and their complexes, has always been its low sensitivity, a consequence of the weak magnetic spin interactions. Therefore many efforts have been invested in the last decade to improve NMR instrumentation in terms of experimental sensitivity. As a result of these efforts, the availability of high-field magnets, cryogenically cooled probes, and probably in the near future hyper-polarization techniques, the intrinsic NMR sensitivity has increased by at least one order of magnitude. Stimulated by new challenges in the life sciences, these technical improvements have triggered the development of new NMR methods for the study of molecular systems of increasing size and complexity. Herein, we focus on two examples of recently developed NMR methodologies. First, advanced multidimensional data acquisition schemes provide a speed increase of several orders of magnitude. Second, NMR methods based on the direct detection of low-gamma nuclei present a new spectroscopic tool, highly complementary to conventional NMR techniques. These new methods provide powerful new NMR tools for the study of short-lived molecules, large and intrinsically unstructured proteins, paramagnetic systems, as well as for the characterization of molecular kinetic processes at atomic resolution. These examples illustrate how NMR is continuously adapting to the new challenges in the life sciences, with the focus shifting from the characterization of single biomolecules to an integrated view of interacting molecular networks observed at varying levels of biological organization. (authors)

  4. [Advance directives in Italy: a goal not yet reached but already passed?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccioni, Luigi; Gristina, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    The advance directives (ADs) have been adopted in many countries to defend patients' autonomy. In Italy, in the past, this topic gave rise to a heated debate involving philosophers, theologians, and politicians. In 2009, the government presented a bill of law on ADs firmly criticized from a scientific, moral and juridical point of view because the bill's content is against the principles of Italian Constitution, Italian Code of Medical Ethics, Oviedo Convention, and official statements of many scientific societies. Although the bill has passed the Low Chamber it lies, even since, in the Senate, lacking in regard any agreement among the political parties. The purpose of this article is to highlight that, in our country, patients, relatives and doctors deserve a law not only related to the specific topic of ADs, but - as in other European countries (Germany, Spain, France, UK) - aimed to deal with the complex issue of end of life care as a whole. This law should take into account the sound evidence existing in regard to the four fundamental principles supporting the best scientific and ethical approaches to the end of life issues: shared decision making process between doctors and patients/relatives; rejection of dying process marked by the suffering; withholding/withdrawing futile treatments together with palliative sedation as two crucial contributions to suppress the patient suffering and pain; clear-cut difference between these clinical/ethical options and euthanasia. At the same time, this law should be able to provide physicians with a legal coverage to make all the clinical and ethical decisions more and more complex because of the continuous evolution of medical science on one hand, and the impressive development of biotechnology on the other hand. PMID:26442974

  5. Default options in advance directives: study protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Nicole B; Cooney, Elizabeth; Small, Dylan S; Troxel, Andrea B; Arnold, Robert M; White, Douglas B; Angus, Derek C; Loewenstein, George; Volpp, Kevin G; Bryce, Cindy L; Halpern, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although most seriously ill Americans wish to avoid burdensome and aggressive care at the end of life, such care is often provided unless patients or family members specifically request otherwise. Advance directives (ADs) were created to provide opportunities to set limits on aggressive care near life's end. This study tests the hypothesis that redesigning ADs such that comfort-oriented care is provided as the default, rather than requiring patients to actively choose it, will promote better patient-centred outcomes. Methods and analysis This multicentre trial randomises seriously ill adults to receive 1 of 3 different ADs: (1) a traditional AD that requires patients to actively choose their goals of care or preferences for specific interventions (eg, feeding tube insertion) or otherwise have their care guided by their surrogates and the prevailing societal default toward aggressive care; (2) an AD that defaults to life-extending care and receipt of life-sustaining interventions, enabling patients to opt out from such care; or (3) an AD that defaults to comfort care, enabling patients to opt into life-extending care. We seek to enrol 270 patients who return complete, legally valid ADs so as to generate sufficient power to detect differences in the primary outcome of hospital-free days (days alive and not in an acute care facility). Secondary outcomes include hospital and intensive care unit admissions, costs of care, hospice usage, decision conflict and satisfaction, quality of life, concordance of preferences with care received and bereavement outcomes for surrogates of patients who die. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the Institutional Review Boards at all trial centres, and is guided by a data safety and monitoring board and an ethics advisory board. Study results will be disseminated using methods that describe the results in ways that key stakeholders can best understand and implement. Trial registration number NCT02017548

  6. The role of advance directives in end-of-life decisions in Austria: survey of intensive care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schopper Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, intensive care medicine strives to define a generally accepted way of dealing with end-of-life decisions, therapy limitation and therapy discontinuation. In 2006 a new advance directive legislation was enacted in Austria. Patients may now document their personal views regarding extension of treatment. The aim of this survey was to explore Austrian intensive care physicians' experiences with and their acceptance of the new advance directive legislation two years after enactment (2008. Methods Under the aegis of the OEGARI (Austrian Society of Anaesthesiology, Resuscitation and Intensive Care an anonymised questionnaire was sent to the medical directors of all intensive care units in Austria. The questions focused on the physicians' experiences regarding advance directives and their level of knowledge about the underlying legislation. Results There were 241 questionnaires sent and 139 were turned, which was a response rate of 58%. About one third of the responders reported having had no experience with advance directives and only 9 directors of intensive care units had dealt with more than 10 advance directives in the previous two years. Life-supporting measures, resuscitation, and mechanical ventilation were the predominantly refused therapies, wishes were mainly expressed concerning pain therapy. Conclusion A response rate of almost 60% proves the great interest of intensive care professionals in making patient-oriented end-of-life decisions. However, as long as patients do not make use of their right of co-determination, the enactment of the new law can be considered only a first important step forward.

  7. Assessment of liquefaction potential index for Mumbai city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dixit

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mumbai city is the financial capital of India and is fifth most densely populated city in the world. Seismic soil liquefaction is evaluated for Mumbai city in terms of the factors of safety against liquefaction (FS along the depths of soil profiles for different earthquakes with 2% probability of exceedance in 50 yr using standard penetration test (SPT-based simplified empirical procedure. This liquefaction potential is evaluated at 142 representative sites in the city using the borehole records from standard penetration tests. Liquefaction potential index (LPI is evaluated at each borehole location from the obtained factors of safety (FS to predict the potential of liquefaction to cause damage at the surface level at the site of interest. Spatial distribution of soil liquefaction potential is presented in the form of contour maps of LPI values. As the majority of the sites in the city are of reclaimed land, the vulnerability of liquefaction is observed to be very high at many places.

  8. Earthquake Risk - EARTHQUAKE_LIQUEFACTION_POTENTIAL_MM81_IN: Liquefaction Potential of Surficial Materials in Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:500,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — EARTHQUAKE_LIQUEFACTION_POTENTIAL_MM81_IN is a polygon shapefile that shows highly generalized categories (low, moderate, and high) of liquefaction potential, based...

  9. Advancements in the development of a directional-position sensing fast neutron detector using acoustically tensioned metastable fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Brian C.; Webster, Jeffrey A.; Grimes, Thomas F.; Fischer, Kevin F.; Hagen, Alex R.; Taleyakhan, Rusi P.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in the development of a direction and position sensing fast neutron detector which utilizes the directional acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detector (D-ATMFD) are described. The resulting D-ATMFD sensor is capable of determining the direction of neutron radiation with a single compact detector versus use of arrays of detectors in conventional directional systems. Directional neutron detection and source positioning offer enhanced detection speeds in comparison to traditional proximity searching; including enabling determination of the neutron source shape, size, and strength in near real time. This paper discusses advancements that provide the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality and source localization information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on-demand enlargement capability of the detector sensitive volume. These advancements were accomplished utilizing experimentation and theoretical modeling. Benchmarking and qualifications studies were successfully conducted with random and fission based special nuclear material (SNM) neutron sources (239Pu-Be and 252Cf). These results of assessments have indicated that the D-ATMFD compares well in technical performance with banks of competing directional fast neutron detector technologies under development worldwide, but it does so with a single detector unit, an unlimited field of view, and at a significant reduction in both cost and size while remaining completely blind to common background (e.g., beta-gamma) radiation. Rapid and direct SNM neutron source imaging with two D-ATMFD sensors was experimentally demonstrated, and furthermore, validated via multidimensional nuclear particle transport simulations utilizing MCNP-PoliMi. Characterization of a scaled D-ATMFD based radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a cost-effective and efficient 3He sensor replacement was performed utilizing MCNP-PoliMi simulations, the results of which

  10. Advancements in the development of a directional-position sensing fast neutron detector using acoustically tensioned metastable fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advancements in the development of a direction and position sensing fast neutron detector which utilizes the directional acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detector (D-ATMFD) are described. The resulting D-ATMFD sensor is capable of determining the direction of neutron radiation with a single compact detector versus use of arrays of detectors in conventional directional systems. Directional neutron detection and source positioning offer enhanced detection speeds in comparison to traditional proximity searching; including enabling determination of the neutron source shape, size, and strength in near real time. This paper discusses advancements that provide the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality and source localization information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on-demand enlargement capability of the detector sensitive volume. These advancements were accomplished utilizing experimentation and theoretical modeling. Benchmarking and qualifications studies were successfully conducted with random and fission based special nuclear material (SNM) neutron sources (239Pu–Be and 252Cf). These results of assessments have indicated that the D-ATMFD compares well in technical performance with banks of competing directional fast neutron detector technologies under development worldwide, but it does so with a single detector unit, an unlimited field of view, and at a significant reduction in both cost and size while remaining completely blind to common background (e.g., beta-gamma) radiation. Rapid and direct SNM neutron source imaging with two D-ATMFD sensors was experimentally demonstrated, and furthermore, validated via multidimensional nuclear particle transport simulations utilizing MCNP-PoliMi. Characterization of a scaled D-ATMFD based radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a cost-effective and efficient 3He sensor replacement was performed utilizing MCNP-PoliMi simulations, the results of

  11. Characteristics and Thermal Behaviour of Low Rank Malaysian Coals towards Liquefaction Performance via Thermogravimetric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, M. A. M.; Ismail, K.; Nawawi, W. I.; Jawad, A. H.; Abdullah, M. F.; Kasim, M. N.; Ani, A. Y.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, thermal behaviour of two low-rank Malaysian coals namely Mukah Balingian (MB) and Batu Arang (BA) were obtained under pyrolysis conditions via Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at a heating rate of 20°C min-1. The thermal characteristics of the coals were investigated prior to direct liquefaction in order to determine the liquefaction performance, i.e. coal conversion and oil yield. The differential weight loss (DTG) results for both coals showed that there are three main stages evolved which consists of moisture, volatile matter and heavier hydrocarbons that correspond to temperature range of 150, 200-500 and 550-800°C, respectively. Apparently, the DTG curves of BA coal reveals a similar pattern of thermal evolution profile in comparison to that of the MB coal. However, the calculated mean reactivity of BA coal is higher than that of MB, which implied that BA would probably enhance coal conversion and oil yield in comparison to MB coal. Interestingly, results showed that under the same liquefaction conditions (i.e. at 4MPa pressure and 420°C), conversion and oil yield of both coals were well correlated with their reactivity and petrofactor value obtained.

  12. Advance directives and nursing home stays associated with less aggressive end-of-life care for patients with severe dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Lauren H; Bynum, Julie P W; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Weir, David R; Langa, Kenneth M

    2014-04-01

    The number of older adults with cognitive impairment is increasing, and such adults often require a surrogate to make decisions about health care. However, little is known about the aggressiveness of end-of-life care for these people, especially those who reside in the community. We found that cognitive impairment is common among older adults approaching the end of life, whether they live in the community or in a nursing home, and that nearly 30 percent of patients with severe dementia remained in the community until death. Among those patients, having an advance directive in the form of a living will was associated with significantly less aggressive care at the end of life, compared to similar patients without an advance directive-as measured by Medicare spending ($11,461 less per patient), likelihood of in-hospital death (17.9 percentage points lower), and use of the intensive care unit (9.4 percentage points lower). In contrast, advance directives were not associated with differences in care for people with normal cognition or mild dementia, whether they resided in the community or in a nursing home. Timely advance care planning after a diagnosis of cognitive impairment may be particularly important for older adults who reside in the community. PMID:24711329

  13. Sigma Team for Advanced Actinide Recycle FY2015 Accomplishments and Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-30

    noncomplexing aqueous solution and submission of this scientific breakthrough as a paper in Science; The first-ever co-crystallization of Am(VI) with UO2(NO3)2 ∙ 6H2O, opening the door to a new approach for separating hexavalent actinides as a group; Results showing that three potentially problematic metals will not present risk in ALSEP; Improvement in ALSEP contactor stripping kinetics to acceptable performance; A comparison of centrifugal contactors vs mixer-settlers showing the former performs better in ALSEP stripping; Synthesis of new mixed N,O-donor extractants with enhanced solubility and strength for selective trivalent actinide extraction; Development of computational methods showing promise in prediction of the selectivity of new extractants for trivalent actinides vs lanthanides; An order-of-magnitude improvement in aqueous Am/Eu complexation selectivity of an alternative macrocyclic stripping agent for ALSEP, potentially enabling an option for an Am product stream free from both Ln and Cm. An alternative aqueous combination of dipicolinate complexant and malonate buffer that may present options for ALSEP and TALSPEAK (Trivalent Actinide-Lanthanide Separations by Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes) type separations. The ALSEP concept is advancing toward a benchtop flowsheet demonstration planned for FY 2016, and a bench-scale test bed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be employed to demonstrate at least one tandem Am oxidation and separation concept. This report outlines the goals of the STAAR, significance of achieving these goals, STAAR organization around the above aims and questions, recent highlights, and future directions. The report also includes a listing of publications, reports, patents, and dissertations.

  14. Vibrating Liquefaction Experiment and Mechanism Study in Saturated Granular Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jianhua; Xu Ming; Ju Haiyan; Zhao Jiangqian; Huang Hongyuan; Sun Yezhi

    2006-01-01

    By the vibrating liquefaction experiment of tailings and fine-ores of iron, it is observed and noted that the change of pore water pressure when the vibrating liquefaction takes place. Based on relevant suppositions, the equation of wave propagation in saturated granular media is obtained. This paper postulates the potential vector equation and the velocity expression of three kinds of body waves under normal conditions.Utilizing the wave theory and the experimental results, the influence of three body waves on pore water pressure and granules has been analyzed in detail. This revealed the rapid increment mechanism of pore water pressure and the wave mechanism of vibrating liquefaction.

  15. Technical and economic aspects of brown coal gasification and liquefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of gasification and liquefaction processes for Rhenish brown coal are investigated along with the technical and economic aspects of coal beneficiation. The status of coal beneficiation and the major R + D activities are reviewed. (orig.)

  16. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction: 2014 State of Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Anderson, Daniel; Hallen, Richard T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2014-07-30

    This report describes the base case yields and operating conditions for converting whole microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction and upgrading to liquid fuels. This serves as the basis against which future technical improvements will be measured.

  17. On the risk of liquefaction of buffer and backfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The necessary prerequisites for liquefaction of buffers and backfills in a KBS-3 repository exist but the stress conditions and intended densities practically eliminate the risk of liquefaction for single earthquakes with magnitudes up to M=8 and normal duration. For buffers rich in expandable minerals it would be possible to reduce the density at water saturation to 1,700 - 1,800 kg/m3 or even less without any significant risk of liquefaction, while the density at saturation of backfills with 10 - 15% expandable clay should not be reduced to less than about 1,900 kg/m3. Since the proposed densities of both buffers and backfills will significantly exceed these minimum values it is concluded that there is no risk of liquefaction of the engineered soil barriers in a KBS-3 repository even for very significant earthquakes

  18. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-05-01

    Progress on seventeen projects related to coal liquefaction or the upgrading of coal liquids and supported by US DOE is reported with emphasis on funding, brief process description history and current progress. (LTN)

  19. Self-organized criticality of liquefaction in saturated granules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴爱祥; 孙业志; 李青松

    2003-01-01

    Utilizing the dissipative structure theory, the evolutionary process of vibrating liquefaction in saturatedgranules was analyzed. When the irreversible force increases to some degree, the system will be in a state far fromequilibrium, and the new structure probably occurs. According to synergetics, the equation of liquefaction evolutionwas deduced, and the evolutionary process was analyzed by dynamics. The evolutionary process of vibrating lique-faction is a process in which the period doubling accesses to chaos, and the fluctuation is the original driving force ofsystem evolution. The liquefaction process was also analyzed by fractal geometry. The steady process of vibratingliquefaction obeys the scaling form, and shows self-organized criticality in the course of vibration. With the incre-ment of the recurrence number, the stress of saturated granules will decrease rapidly or lose completely, and thestrain will increase rapidly, so that the granules can not sustain load and the "avalanche" phenomenon takes place.

  20. Inapplicability of advance directives in a paternalistic setting: the case of a post-communist health system

    OpenAIRE

    Kruja Jera; Vyshka Gentian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The Albanian medical system and Albanian health legislation have adopted a paternalistic position with regard to individual decision making. This reflects the practices of a not-so-remote past when state-run facilities and a totalitarian philosophy of medical care were politically imposed. Because of this history, advance directives concerning treatment refusal and do-not-resuscitate decisions are still extremely uncommon in Albania. Medical teams cannot abstain from inter...

  1. Liquefaction Potential for Soil Deposits in Muscat, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hussain, I. W.; Deif, A.; Girgis, M.; Al-Rawas, G.; Mohamed, A.; Al-Jabri, K.; Al-Habsi, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Muscat is located in the northeastern part of Oman on a narrow strip between Oman coast and Oman Mountains, which is the place for at least four earthquakes of order of 5.2 magnitude in the last 1300 years. The near surface geology of Muscat varies from hard rocks in the eastern, southern and western parts to dense and lose sediments in the middle and northern parts. Liquefaction occurs in saturated cohesionless soils when its shear strength decreased to zero due to the increase of pore pressure. More than 500 boreholes in Muscat area were examined for their liquefaction susceptibility based on the soil characteristics data. Only soils susceptible to liquefaction are further considered for liquefaction hazard assessment. Liquefaction occurs if the cyclic stress ratio (CSR) caused by the earthquake is higher than the cyclic resistance ratio (CRR) of the soil. CSR values were evaluated using PGA values at the surface obtained from previously conducted seismic hazard and microzonation studies. CRR for Muscat region is conducted using N values of SPT tests from numerous borehole data and the shear wave velocity results from 99 MASW surveys over the entire region. All the required corrections are conducted to get standardized (N1) 60 values, to correct shear-wave velocity, and scale the results for Mw 6.0 instead of the proposed 7.5 (magnitude scaling factor). Liquefaction hazard maps are generated using the minimum factor of safety (FS) at each site as a representative of the FS against liquefaction at that location. Results indicate that under the current level of seismic hazard, liquefaction potential is possible at few sites along the northern coast where alluvial soils and shallow ground water table are present. The expected soft soil settlement is also evaluated at each liquefiable site.

  2. Asspects Concerning the Improvement of Soils Against Liquefaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costel Pleşcan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The specialized literature concerning the Geotechnical Engineering Field indicates the problems due to soil liquefaction and the aggravating consequences that liquefaction phenomenon may cause to buildings. Some procedures of foundation soil improvement for both existing and future foundations are presented. The paper also presents three soil remediation methods involving a low level of vibration generated in the process of foundation soil improvement and two case studies representing the usual method in Romania.

  3. CFD modeling for direct liquefaction of biomass in hydrothermal media

    OpenAIRE

    Syed, Alizeb Hussain

    2013-01-01

    The first generation biofuels which is coming from food crops for instance grain and sugar beet are inadequate to achieve desirable oil products because of the scarcity to food supply, therefore the importance of second generation biofuels has increased. Another advantage of second generation biofuel is that the feedstock (non-food-biomass) could be farmed for energy purposes, which enables better production per unit area of the land; and we could utilize the land efficiency. The feedstock of...

  4. Advance Directives for End-of-Life Care and the Role of Health Education Specialists: Applying the Theory of Reasoned Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremethick, Mary Jane; Johnson, Maureen K.; Carter, Mary R.

    2011-01-01

    Quality end-of-life care is subjective and based on individual values and beliefs. An advance directive provides a legal means of communicating these values and beliefs, as well as preferences in regards to end-of-life care when an individual is no longer able to make his or her desires known. In many nations, advance directives are underused…

  5. Hydrotreating of distillates from Spanish coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, A.M.; Martinez, M.T.; Cebolla, V.; Fernandez, I.; Miranda, J.L. (Inst. de Carboquimica, CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain))

    1993-02-01

    Distillates obtained from a first-stage Spanish coal liquefaction process have been catalytically hydrotreated in microreactor in two steps. A commercially available Harshaw HT-400 E (Co-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) catalyst, 10 MPa hydrogen pressure and two temperatures (400 and 425deg C) have been used. The results have been evaluated for heteroatoms removal, oils yield, boiling point distribution and aromaticity by several techniques (GC, FT-i.r., [sup 1]H n.m.r., ultrasonic extraction and liquid chromatography). At the first step of hydrotreating, preasphaltenes rather than asphaltenes have been hydrocracked to produce smaller-size polar compounds in the oil fraction but aromaticity has not varied significatively. In the second step, heteroatoms content have been considerably reduced and the product meets refinery specifications for nitrogen but does not meet sulphur refinery specifications for feedstocks. (orig.).

  6. Liquefaction and saccharification of mandarin orange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, N.; Oku, Y.; Kawamura, D.; Nagai, S.

    1979-01-01

    Liquefaction and saccharification of mandarin orange peel with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in an autoclave and with macerating enzymes from Aspergillus niger were studied. The acid hydrolysis with 0.8N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ under 1 kg/square cm for 15 minutes yielded 0.36 grams of reducing sugars from 1 gram of dried orange peel, approximately 36% of which was identified as glucose. Enzymic hydrolysis with 0.2% crude enzyme at 40 degrees for 24 hours yielded 0.59 grams of reducing sugars/g peal, consisting mainly of glucose, arabinose, and galacturonic acid. Comparison of the macerating enzyme with commercial available cellulase and pectinase indicated that the macerating enzyme of A. niger contained mainly pectinase with a little cellulase.

  7. Liquefaction and saccharification of mandarin orange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, N.; Oku, Y.; Kawamura, D.; Nagai, S.

    1979-01-01

    Liquefaction and saccharification of mandarin orange peel with H2SO4 in an autoclave and with macerating enzymes from Aspergillus niger were studied. The acid hydrolysis with 0.8N H2SO4 under 1 kg/square cm for 15 minutes yielded 0.36 grams of reducing sugars from 1 gram of dried orange peel, approximately 36% of which was identified as glucose. Enzymic hydrolysis with 0.2% crude enzyme at 40 degrees for 24 hours yielded 0.59 grams of reducing sugars/g peal, consisting mainly of glucose, arabinose, and galacturonic acid. Comparison of the macerating enzyme with commercial available cellulase and pectinase indicated that the macerating enzyme of A. niger contained mainly pectinase with a little cellulase.

  8. Mongolian coal liquefaction test; Mongorutan no ekika tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H.; Kubo, H. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Tsedevsuren, T. [National Research Center of Chemistry and Technology of Coal in Mongoria (Mongolia)

    1996-10-28

    This paper describes the results of liquefaction tests of Mongolian coals using an autoclave and a flow micro reactor. Uvdughudag coal, Hootiinhonhor coal, and Shivee-Ovoo coal were used for liquefaction tests with an autoclave. Oil yields of Uvdughudag and Hootiinhonhor coals were 55.56 wt% and 55.29 wt%, respectively, which were similar to that of Wyoming coal. Similar results were obtained, as to produced gas and water yields. These coals were found to be suitable for coal liquefaction. Lower oil yield, 42.55 wt% was obtained for Shivee-Ovoo coal, which was not suitable for liquefaction. Liquefaction tests were conducted for Uvdughudag coal with a flow micro reactor. The oil yield was 55.7 wt%, which was also similar to that of Wyoming coal, 56.1 wt%. Hydrogen consumption of Uvdughudag coal was also similar to that of Wyoming coal. From these, Uvdughudag coal can be a prospective coal for liquefaction. From the distillation distribution of oil, distillate fraction yield below 350{degree}C of Uvdughudag coal was 50.7 wt%, which was much higher than that of Wyoming coal, 35.6 wt%. Uvdughudag coal is a coal with high light oil fraction yield. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Two-stage liquefaction of a Spanish subbituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.T.; Fernandez, I.; Benito, A.M.; Cebolla, V.; Miranda, J.L.; Oelert, H.H. (Instituto de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain))

    1993-05-01

    A Spanish subbituminous coal has been processed in two-stage liquefaction in a non-integrated process. The first-stage coal liquefaction has been carried out in a continuous pilot plant in Germany at Clausthal Technical University at 400[degree]C, 20 MPa hydrogen pressure and anthracene oil as solvent. The second-stage coal liquefaction has been performed in continuous operation in a hydroprocessing unit at the Instituto de Carboquimica at 450[degree]C and 10 MPa hydrogen pressure, with two commercial catalysts: Harshaw HT-400E (Co-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and HT-500E (Ni-Mo/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]). The total conversion for the first-stage coal liquefaction was 75.41 wt% (coal d.a.f.), being 3.79 wt% gases, 2.58 wt% primary condensate and 69.04 wt% heavy liquids. The heteroatoms removal for the second-stage liquefaction was 97-99 wt% of S, 85-87 wt% of N and 93-100 wt% of O. The hydroprocessed liquids have about 70% of compounds with boiling point below 350[degree]C, and meet the sulphur and nitrogen specifications for refinery feedstocks. Liquids from two-stage coal liquefaction have been distilled, and the naphtha, kerosene and diesel fractions obtained have been characterized. 39 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Intensity measures for seismic liquefaction hazard evaluation of sloping site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志雄; 程印; 肖杨; 卢谅; 阳洋

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the correlation between a large number of widely used ground motion intensity measures (IMs) and the corresponding liquefaction potential of a soil deposit during earthquake loading. In order to accomplish this purpose the seismic responses of 32 sloping liquefiable site models consisting of layered cohesionless soil were subjected to 139 earthquake ground motions. Two sets of ground motions, consisting of 80 ordinary records and 59 pulse-like near-fault records are used in the dynamic analyses. The liquefaction potential of the site is expressed in terms of the the mean pore pressure ratio, the maximum ground settlement, the maximum ground horizontal displacement and the maximum ground horizontal acceleration. For each individual accelerogram, the values of the aforementioned liquefaction potential measures are determined. Then, the correlation between the liquefaction potential measures and the IMs is evaluated. The results reveal that the velocity spectrum intensity (VSI) shows the strongest correlation with the liquefaction potential of sloping site. VSI is also proven to be a sufficient intensity measure with respect to earthquake magnitude and source-to-site distance, and has a good predictability, thus making it a prime candidate for the seismic liquefaction hazard evaluation.

  11. Engaging Men and Boys in Advancing Women's Agency : Where We Stand and New Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Paul J.; Barker, Gary; McCleary-Sills, Jennifer; Morton, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in gender equality, women and girls still face disadvantages and limits on their agency. Men and boys can be key stakeholders and allies to increase women's agency. This paper focuses on examining men's attitudes and behaviors related to gender equality and violence perpetration to better understand how to engage men and boys as. It uses data collected from men and women f...

  12. Applications of small helium liquefaction facility based on 4K G-M cryocooler to the superconducting ECR ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting high charge state ECR ion source (SECRAL-Superconducting ECR ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) is a major project undertaken by Chinese Academy of Sciences. It consists of ion source block, low temperature and helium recovery system, microwave generating and feed-in system, external power supply, cooling system and beam transmission and diagnostic devices. The authors presented a small helium liquefaction facility made with 4K GM cryocooler. A test of the facility was made to demonstrate re-liquefaction of the evaporated helium from SECRAL. The testing operation indicates that the introduction of the facility greatly improved beam supply efficiency for SECRAL, but there are some problems remained to be resolved. (authors)

  13. Mechanistic approaches to understanding and predicting mammalian space use: Recent advances, future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The coming of age of global positioning system telemetry, in conjunction with recent theoretical innovations for formulating quantitative descriptions of how different ecological forces and behavioral mechanisms shape patterns of animal space use, has led to renewed interest and insight into animal home-range patterns. This renaissance is likely to continue as a result of ongoing synergies between these empirical and theoretical advances. In this article I review key developments that have oc...

  14. Imaging-Genetics in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Advances, Translational Impact, and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    StephanieH.Ameis; PeterSzatmari

    2012-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) refers to a group of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders that are unified by impairments in reciprocal social communication and a pattern of inflexible behaviors. Recent genetic advances have resolved some of the complexity of the genetic architecture underlying ASD by identifying several genetic variants that contribute to the disorder. Different etiological pathways associated with ASD may converge through effects on common molecular mechanisms, such as...

  15. Recent advances in direct-drive ICF target physics at the laboratory for laser energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal role of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is the development and validation of the direct-drive approach to inertial fusion. The LLE experimental and theoretical programs in support of this mission were organized to provide a moderate-gain option for the U.S. National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental implementation of the LLE program is carried out on the LLE's 30-kJ, 60-beam, UV OMEGA laser. This paper summarizes the status of the direct-drive ICF physics program at LLE with emphasis on the development of beam-smoothing techniques, long-scale-length plasma interaction experiments, direct-drive planar-foil hydrodynamic instability experiments, the effect of laser nonuniformity on target stability, integrated spherical target implosion experiments, design of direct-drive targets, development of target diagnostic techniques, and implementation of cryogenic-fuel-layering technology. (author)

  16. Direct methods for limit and shakedown analysis of structures advanced computational algorithms and material modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, Aurora; Weichert, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Articles in this book examine various materials and how to determine directly the limit state of a structure, in the sense of limit analysis and shakedown analysis. Apart from classical applications in mechanical and civil engineering contexts, the book reports on the emerging field of material design beyond the elastic limit, which has further industrial design and technological applications. Readers will discover that “Direct Methods” and the techniques presented here can in fact be used to numerically estimate the strength of structured materials such as composites or nano-materials, which represent fruitful fields of future applications.   Leading researchers outline the latest computational tools and optimization techniques and explore the possibility of obtaining information on the limit state of a structure whose post-elastic loading path and constitutive behavior are not well defined or well known. Readers will discover how Direct Methods allow rapid and direct access to requested information in...

  17. Recent advances in direct-drive ICF target physics at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal role of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is the development and validation of the direct-drive approach to inertial fusion. The LLE experimental and theoretical programs in support of this mission were organized to provide a moderate-gain option for the U.S. National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental implementation of the LLE program is carried out on the LLE's 30-kJ, 60-beam, UV OMEGA laser. This paper summarizes the status of the direct-drive ICF physics program at LLE with emphasis on the development of beam-smoothing techniques, long-scale-length plasma interaction experiments, direct-drive planar-foil hydrodynamic instability experiments, the effect of laser nonuniformity on target stability, integrated spherical target implosion experiments, design of direct-drive targets, development of target diagnostic techniques, and implementation of cryogenic-fuel-layering technology. (author)

  18. Upcycling potato peel waste - Data of the pre-screening of the acid-catalyzed liquefaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Patrícia; Bordado, João Carlos Moura; Mateus, Maria Margarida; Galhano Dos Santos, Rui

    2016-06-01

    Herein, the data acquired regarding the preliminary and exploratory experiments conducted with potato peel as a biomass source for the direct thermochemical liquefaction is disclosed. The procedure was carried out in a 2-ethylhexanol/DEG solvent mixture at 160 °C in the presence of p-Toluenesulfonic acid. The adopted procedure afforded a bio-oil in high yield (up to 93%) after only 30 min. For longer reaction times, higher amounts of solid residues were obtained leading, consequently, to lower yields. PMID:27182538

  19. Family consent, communication, and advance directives for cancer disclosure: a Japanese case and discussion.

    OpenAIRE

    Akabayashi, A.; Fetters, M. D.; Elwyn, T S

    1999-01-01

    The dilemma of whether and how to disclose a diagnosis of cancer or of any other terminal illness continues to be a subject of worldwide interest. We present the case of a 62-year-old Japanese woman afflicted with advanced gall bladder cancer who had previously expressed a preference not to be told a diagnosis of cancer. The treating physician revealed the diagnosis to the family first, and then told the patient: "You don't have any cancer yet, but if we don't treat you, it will progress to a...

  20. Liquefaction severity map for Aksaray city center (Central Anatolia, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yalcin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Turkey having a long history of large earthquakes have been subjected to progressive adjacent earthquakes. Starting in 1939, the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ produced a sequence of major earthquakes, of which the Mw 7.4 earthquake that struck western Turkey on 17 August 1999. Following the Erzincan earthquake in 1992, the soil liquefaction has been crucial important in the agenda of Turkey. Soil liquefaction was also observed widely during the Marmara and the Düzce Earthquake in 1999 (Sönmez, 2003. Aksaray city center locates in the central part of Turkey and the Tuzgolu Fault Zone passes through near the city center. The fault zone has been generated to moderate magnitude earthquakes. The geology of the Aksaray province basin contains Quaternary alluvial deposits formed by gravel, sand, silt, and clay layers in different thickness. The Tuzgolu Fault Zone (TFZ came into being after the sedimetation of alluvial deposits. Thus, the fault is younger from lithological units and it is active. In addition, the ground water level is very shallow, within approximately 3 m from the surface. In this study, the liquefaction potential of the Aksaray province is investigated by recent procedure suggested by Sonmez and Gokceoglu (2005. For this purpose, the liquefaction susceptibility map of the Aksaray city center for liquefaction is presented. In the analysis, the input parameters such as the depth of the upper and lower boundaries of soil layer, SPT-N values, fine content, clay content and the liquid limit were used for all layers within 20 m from the surface. As a result, the category of very high susceptibility liquefaction class was not observed for the earthquake scenario of Ms=5.2, 4.9% of the study area has high liquefaction susceptibility. The percentage of the moderately, low, and very low liquefied areas are 28.2%, 30.2%, and 36.3%, respectively. The rank of non-liquefied susceptibility area is less than 1%.

  1. Advancing Scientific Reasoning in Upper Elementary Classrooms: Direct Instruction Versus Task Structuring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazonder, A.W.; Wiskerke-Drost, Sjanou

    2015-01-01

    Several studies found that direct instruction and task structuring can effectively promote children’s ability to design unconfounded experiments. The present study examined whether the impact of these interventions extends to other scientific reasoning skills by comparing the inquiry activities of 5

  2. Objectification Theory and Psychology of Women: A Decade of Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Bonnie; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Fredrickson and Roberts (1997) proposed objectification theory as an integrative framework for understanding how women's socialization and experiences of sexual objectification are translated into mental health problems. This article reviews the past decade of research grounded in objectification theory and highlights needed directions for future…

  3. Co-liquefaction of the Elbistan Lignite and Poplar Sawdust. Part I: The Effect of the Liquefaction Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaca, H.; Acar, M.; Yilmaz, M.; Keklik, I. [Inonu University, Malatya (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the liquefaction of Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust, and the co-liquefaction of the Elbistan lignite and the poplar sawdust in an inert atmosphere and in non-catalytic conditions have been examined. Also, the effects of solvent/coal ratio and stirring speed on the total conversion derived as the result of the liquefaction process was attempted to be determined. Based on the results, although the effects of the solvent/coal ratio and the stirring speed on total conversion are similar for both the Elbistan lignite and the poplar sawdust, it was also noted that, under similar conditions, the conversion for the poplar sawdust was higher, as compared to the conversion of the Elbistan lignite. As the result of the liquefaction of Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust under inert atmospheric conditions, the total conversion was increased partially, depending on both solvent/coal ratio and the speed of stirring. However, it was also noted that the total conversion did not change to a significant extent in high solvent/coal ratios and in stirring speed. As the result of the co-liquefaction of the Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust under inert atmospheric conditions, total conversion was increased, based on the solvent/coal ratio. However, as in the case of the liquefaction of Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust, it was noted that the high solvent/coal ratios (i.e., solvent/coal ratios of higher than 2/1) did not have a significant effect on the total conversion that was derived as the result of the co-liquefaction of the Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust.

  4. THERMOGRAVIMETRIC STUDIES ON CONDENSED WOOD RESIDUES IN POLYHYDRIC ALCOHOLS LIQUEFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Hakki Alma

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available To further clarify reasons for formation of condensed residues during the last stage of wood liquefaction in the medium of polyhydric alcohols and sulfuric acid catalyst, the weight loss behaviors and thermal reaction kinetics of condensed residues were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Simultaneously, chemical methods were used to analyze the contents of lignin, cellulose, and holocellulose in the condensed residues. For all the unliquefied wood residues, the contents of cellulose decreased, and the residual ratios after TGA pyrolysis and the contents of lignin increased as a function of liquefaction time. Moreover, the highest weight loss rate went gradually to the higher temperature region after the liquefaction time and heating rate were extended. The values for apparent activation energy were lower at 150 minutes and 180 minutes and higher at 25 minutes. Liquefaction time had a smaller effect on the pyrolysis mechanism, as revealed by TGA. In conclusion, the thermal stabilities of condensed residues were higher than those of decomposed residues and wood. The condensation reaction occurred mainly during wood liquefaction, and condensed residues resulted possibly from mutual reaction among small molecules from decomposed lignin.

  5. Direct evidence of lymphatic function improvement after advanced pneumatic compression device treatment of lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Kristen E.; Rasmussen, John C.; Darne, Chinmay; Tan, I-Chih; Aldrich, Melissa B.; Marshall, Milton V.; Fife, Caroline E.; Maus, Erik A.; Smith, Latisha A.; Guilloid, Renie; Hoy, Sunday; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphedema affects up to 50% of all breast cancer survivors. Management with pneumatic compression devices (PCDs) is controversial, owing to the lack of methods to directly assess benefit. This pilot study employed an investigational, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging technique to evaluate lymphatic response to PCD therapy in normal control and breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) subjects. Lymphatic propulsion rate, apparent lymph velocity, and lymphatic vessel recruitment were mea...

  6. Direct puncture embolization for the treatment of advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the clinical application of direct puncture tumor embolization, which is used as a preoperative supplementary embolization,in treating juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). Methods: Twenty-nine patients were enrolled in this study. The shape and location of JNA were documented through the carotid angiography. Then, an 18-gauge needle was used to puncture the tumor. After the needle's position was confirmed to be in the right site and it was certain that no contrast leaked into the brain, 20-25% N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate was slowly injected under fluoroscopic guidance until the entire JNA was fully filled with it. Results: Angiography revealed that the JNA received its blood supply from both the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery in all 29 patients. After direct puncture tumor embolization the tumor stain became lessened and the distal end of the supplying arteries was not obviously displayed. Surgical resection was carried out within one week after embolization and the blood loss during the surgery was significantly reduced to 150-500 ml (mean 350 ml). Conclusion: Percutaneous direct puncture tumor embolization is a safe treatment for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, it can effectively occlude the tumor's vessels and markedly reduce the blood loss during the surgery. (authors)

  7. Catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of water hyacinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rawel; Balagurumurthy, Bhavya; Prakash, Aditya; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2015-02-01

    Thermal and catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of water hyacinth was performed at temperatures from 250 to 300 °C under various water hyacinth:H2O ratio of 1:3, 1:6 and 1:12. Reactions were also carried out under various residence times (15-60 min) as well as catalytic conditions (KOH and K2CO3). The use of alkaline catalysts significantly increased the bio-oil yield. Maximum bio-oil yield (23 wt%) comprising of bio-oil1 and bio-oil2 as well as conversion (89%) were observed with 1N KOH solution. (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR data showed that both bio-oil1 and bio-oil2 have high aliphatic carbon content. FTIR of bio-residue indicated that the usage of alkaline catalyst resulted in bio-residue samples with lesser oxygen functionality indicating that catalyst has a marked effect on nature of the bio-residue and helps to decompose biomass to a greater extent compared to thermal case. PMID:25240515

  8. Inapplicability of advance directives in a paternalistic setting: the case of a post-communist health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruja Jera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Albanian medical system and Albanian health legislation have adopted a paternalistic position with regard to individual decision making. This reflects the practices of a not-so-remote past when state-run facilities and a totalitarian philosophy of medical care were politically imposed. Because of this history, advance directives concerning treatment refusal and do-not-resuscitate decisions are still extremely uncommon in Albania. Medical teams cannot abstain from intervening even when the patient explicitly and repeatedly solicits therapeutic abstinence. The Albanian law on health care has no provisions regarding limits or withdrawal of treatment. This restricts the individual's healthcare choices. Discussion The question of 'medically futile' interventions and pointless life-prolonging treatment has been discussed by several authors. Dutch physicians call such interventions 'medisch zinloos' (senseless, and the Netherlands, as one of the first states to legislate on end-of-life situations, actually regulates such issues through appropriate laws. In contrast, leaving an 'advance directive' is not a viable option for Albanian ailing individuals of advanced age. Verbal requests are provided during periods of mental competence, but unfortunately such instructions are rarely taken seriously, and none of them has ever been upheld in a legal or other official forum. Summary End-of-life decisions, treatment refusal and do-not-resuscitate policies are hazardous options in Albania, from the legal point of view. Complying with them involves significant risk on the part of the physician. Culturally, the application of such instructions is influenced from a mixture of religious beliefs, death coping-behaviors and an immense confusion concerning the role of proxies as decision-makers. Nevertheless, Albanian tradition is familiar with the notion of 'amanet', a sort of living will that mainly deals the property and inheritance issues

  9. A carbon dioxide partial condensation direct cycle for advanced gas cooled fast and thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carbon dioxide partial condensation direct cycle concept has been proposed for gas cooled fast and thermal reactors. The fast reactor with the concept are evaluated to be a potential alternative option to liquid metal cooled fast reactors, providing comparable cycle efficiency at the same core outlet temperature, eliminating the safety problems, simplifying the heat transport system and making easier plant maintenance. The thermal reactor with the concept is expected to be an alternative solution to current high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) with helium gas turbines, allowing comparable cycle efficiency at the moderate temperature of 650 C instead of 800 C in HTGRs. (author)

  10. Human Identity Verification based on Heart Sounds: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    CERN Document Server

    Beritelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Identity verification is an increasingly important process in our daily lives, and biometric recognition is a natural solution to the authentication problem. One of the most important research directions in the field of biometrics is the characterization of novel biometric traits that can be used in conjunction with other traits, to limit their shortcomings or to enhance their performance. The aim of this work is to introduce the reader to the usage of heart sounds for biometric recognition, describing the strengths and the weaknesses of this novel trait and analyzing in detail the methods developed so far by different research groups and their performance.

  11. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions (Invited paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  12. Imaging-Genetics in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Advances, Translational Impact and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StephanieH.Ameis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD refers to a group of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders that are unified by impairments in reciprocal social communication and a pattern of inflexible behaviours. Recent genetic advances have resolved some of the complexity of the genetic architecture underlying ASD by identifying several genetic variants that contribute to the disorder. Different etiological pathways associated with ASD may converge through effects on common molecular mechanisms, such as synaptogenesis, neuronal motility, and axonal guidance. Recently, with more sophisticated techniques, neuroimaging and neuropathological studies have provided some consistency of evidence that altered structure, activity, and connectivity within complex neural networks is present in ASD, compared to typically developing children. The imaging-genetics approach promises to help bridge the gap between genetic variation, resultant biological effects on the brain, and production of complex neuropsychiatric symptoms. Here, we review recent findings from the developing field of imaging-genetics applied to ASD. Studies to date have indicated that relevant risk genes are associated with alterations in circuits that mediate socio-emotional, visuospatial and language processing. Longitudinal studies ideally focused on early development, in conjunction with investigation for gene-gene, and gene-environment interactions may move the promise of imaging-genetics in ASD closer to the clinical domain.

  13. Fairly direct hit. Advances in imaging of shotgun projectiles in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, Sebastian [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Peters, Alexander [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Klarhoefer, Markus [Siemens Healthcare, Zurich (Switzerland); Bolliger, Stephan A.; Thali, Michael J. [University of Zurich, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Anderson, Suzanne [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University of Notre Dame Australia, Radiology, Sydney School of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Federal Institute of Technology, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the magnetic properties of different types of projectiles and qualify the metal artefact reduction technique for diagnostic and/or forensic MRI. Ten different projectiles embedded in ordnance gelatine blocks underwent an in vitro 1.5-T MR study with seven sequences including a recently developed metal artefact reduction sequence (Advanced WARP) combining VAT (view-angle-tilting) and SEMAC (slice-encoding metal-artefact-correction). Resulting image quality (five-point scale: 1=best; 5=worst) was scored. Quantifiable magnetic characteristics were correlated with qualitative rating of the MR sequences and torque dislodgment. Metal artefact reduction sequence (median: 2.5) significantly (p < 0.001) improves depiction of projectiles in comparison to all other MR pulse sequences (median: 4.75). Images from diamagnetic composed bullets (median: 2) are much less disturbed compared to magnetic attracted ones (median: 5). Correlation (0.623) between deflection angle measurement (ferromagnetic mean 84.2 ; paramagnetic 62 ; diamagnetic mean 0 ) and median qualitative image quality was highly significant (p = 0.027). Torque dislodgement was distinct for elongated magnetic attracted projectiles. Significant improvement of MR imaging of projectiles using metal artefact reduction techniques has important implications for diagnostic/forensic work-up. The correlations between magnetic attraction force, deflection-angle results and image properties demonstrate that the MR safety of projectiles can be estimated with one of these methods. (orig.)

  14. Fairly direct hit. Advances in imaging of shotgun projectiles in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the magnetic properties of different types of projectiles and qualify the metal artefact reduction technique for diagnostic and/or forensic MRI. Ten different projectiles embedded in ordnance gelatine blocks underwent an in vitro 1.5-T MR study with seven sequences including a recently developed metal artefact reduction sequence (Advanced WARP) combining VAT (view-angle-tilting) and SEMAC (slice-encoding metal-artefact-correction). Resulting image quality (five-point scale: 1=best; 5=worst) was scored. Quantifiable magnetic characteristics were correlated with qualitative rating of the MR sequences and torque dislodgment. Metal artefact reduction sequence (median: 2.5) significantly (p < 0.001) improves depiction of projectiles in comparison to all other MR pulse sequences (median: 4.75). Images from diamagnetic composed bullets (median: 2) are much less disturbed compared to magnetic attracted ones (median: 5). Correlation (0.623) between deflection angle measurement (ferromagnetic mean 84.2 ; paramagnetic 62 ; diamagnetic mean 0 ) and median qualitative image quality was highly significant (p = 0.027). Torque dislodgement was distinct for elongated magnetic attracted projectiles. Significant improvement of MR imaging of projectiles using metal artefact reduction techniques has important implications for diagnostic/forensic work-up. The correlations between magnetic attraction force, deflection-angle results and image properties demonstrate that the MR safety of projectiles can be estimated with one of these methods. (orig.)

  15. Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With recent theoretical and empirical research in basic and applied psychology, human factors, and engineering, it is now sufficient to define an integrated approach to the deign of advanced displays for present and future nuclear power plants. Traditionally, the conventional displays have shown operators the individual variables on gauges, meters, strip charts, etc. This design approach requires the operators to mentally integrate the separately displayed variables and determine the implications for the plant state. This traditional approach has been known as the single-sensor-single-indicator display design and it places an intolerable amount of mental workload on operators during transients and abnormal conditions. This report discusses a new alternative approach which is the use of direct perception interfaces. Direct perception a interfaces display the underlying physical and system constraints of the situation in a directly perceptual way, such that the viewer need not reason about what is seen to identify system states, but can identify the state of the system perceptually. It is expected that displays which show the dynamics of fundamental physical laws should better support operator decisions and diagnoses of plant states. The purpose of this research project is to develop a suite of direct perception displays for PWR nuclear power plant operations

  16. Liquefaction under drained condition, from the lab to reality ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Cécile; Aharonov, Einat; Stojanova, Menka; Toussaint, Renaud

    2015-04-01

    Liquefaction constitutes a significant natural hazard in relation to earthquakes and landslides. This effect can cause buildings to tilt or sink into the soil, mud-volcanoes, floatation of buried objects, long-runout landslides, etc. In this work we present a new understanding regarding the mechanism by which buildings sink and tilt during liquefaction caused by earthquakes. Conventional understanding of liquefaction explains most observed cases as occurring in an undrained, under-compacted, layer of sandy soil saturated with water [1]: According to that understanding, the under compacted sandy layer has the tendency to compact when a load is applied. In our case the load comes from ground shaking during an earthquake. When the soil compacts, the fluid pore pressure rises. Because in undrained conditions the fluid cannot flow out, the pore pressure builds up. The weight of buildings is in this case transferred from the grains of the soil to the pore water. The soil loses its rigidity and it flows like a liquid. From this model scientists made theoretical and empirical laws for geotechnical use and buildings construction. Despite the success of this conventional model in many cases, liquefied soils were also observed under drained conditions, and in previously compacted soils, which doesn't agree with the assumption of the model quoted above. One of the famous liquefaction events is the Kobe port destruction during the 1995 earthquake. A simple calculation of the Deborah number following Goren et al ([2][3]) shows that the undrained constraint was not met below the Kobe port during the 1995 earthquake. We propose another model, of liquefaction in drained granular media. According to our model the mere presence of water in granular media is enough to cause liquefaction during an earthquake, provided that the water reaches close to the surface. Our computations are based on the buoyancy force, and we take into account the static fluid pressure only. For small

  17. Effects of catalysts on liquefaction of Agaricus versicolor (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, Halil

    2016-04-01

    Supercritical liquefaction process is used for producing energy from biomass. The common reaction conditions for supercritical liquefaction process are the 240-380 °C temperature range and 5-20 Mpa pressure values range. Agaricus versicolor (L.) was liquefied by acetone in an autoclave (75 mL) under high pressure with (aluminium oxide and calcium hydroxide) and without catalyst at 290 °C for producing bio-oil. The products of liquefaction (bio-oil) were analysed and characterized using various methods including elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. GC-MS identified 27 different compounds in the bio-oils obtained at 290 °C.

  18. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January--March 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    Current ERDA work in coal liquefaction is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and non-catalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. Coal liquefaction can now be achieved under more moderate processing conditions and more rapidly than was the case in the 1930's. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, including heavy boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel oil, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquid fuels also have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To determine the most efficient means of utilizing coal resources, ERDA is sponsoring the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. Nineteen projects under development are described and progress for each in the quarter is detailed briefly. (LTN)

  19. Risk evaluation of liquefaction on the site of Damien (Haiti)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, B. J.; Boisson, D.; Thimus, J.; Schroeder, C.

    2013-12-01

    Under the proposed relocation of all faculties to the campus of Damien, owned by Université d'Etat d'Haïti (UEH), the Unité de Recherche en Géotechnique (URGéo) of the Faculté des Sciences (FDS) of UEH conducted several operations whose objective was to evaluate the risk of liquefaction on this site. This abstract presents a comprehensive and coherent manner the entire processus of assessing the risk of liquefaction. This evaluation was conducted mainly from seismic thechniques, laboratory tests and the response of a one-dimensional soil column. Then, we summarize the results of this evaluation on the various techniques through synthetic maps interpretations of MASW 1D and H/V and also measures on site response to seismic loading from the SPT test applied to evaluation of liquefaction potential.

  20. Liquefaction mitigation in silty soils using composite stone columns and dynamic compaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Shenthan; R.Nashed; S.Thevanayagam; G. R. Martin

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an analytical methodology to evaluate the effectiveness ofvibro stone column (S.C.) and dynamic compaction (D.C.) techniques supplemented with wick drains to densify and mitigate liquefaction in saturated sands and non-plastic silty soils. It includes the following: (i) develop numerical models to simulate and analyze soil densification during S.C. installation and D.C. process, and (ii) identify parameters controlling post-improvement soil density in both cases, and (iii) develop design guidelines for densification of silty soils using the above techniques. An analytical procedure was developed and used to simulate soil response during S.C. and D.C. installations, and the results were compared with available case history data. Important construction design parameters and soil properties that affect the effectiveness of these techniques, and construction design choices suitable for sands and non-plastic silty soils were identified.The methodology is expected to advance the use of S.C. and D.C. in silty soils reducing the reliance on expensive field trials as a design tool. Thc ultimate outcome of this research will be design charts and design guidelines for using composite stone columns and composite dynamic compaction techniques in liquefaction mitigation of saturated silty soils.

  1. A modified criterion for wave-induced momentary liquefaction of sandy seabed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Gang Qi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the wave-induced soil liquefaction plays a key role in the geotechnical design for offshore foundations. The underlying shortcomings of the existing momentary liquefaction criteria are identified and clarified by mechanism analyses and the recent field observations. A modified criterion for the wave-induced momentary liquefaction of a sandy seabed is given to describe the vertical pore-pressure distributions. An improved approximation of the momentary liquefaction depth is further presented. Parametric study of the effects of the saturation degree of soils indicates that this modification is significant for the evaluation of wave-induced momentary liquefaction.

  2. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1996-03-01

    Extensive research continued on catalysts based on novel anion-treated (mainly sulfated) oxides and oxyhydroxides of iron [Fe{sub x}O{sub y}/SO{sub 4}]. In addition, sulfated oxides of tin as well as molybdenum promoted iron oxides were used. Incorporation of small amounts of sulfate, molybdate, or tungstate anions by wet precipitation/impregnation methods was found to increase the surface acidic character of iron oxides; more importantly, it reduced the grain sizes significantly with corresponding increases in specific surface areas. These anion-treated iron and tin oxides were more active for direct coal liquefaction and coal-heavy oil coprocessing than their untreated counterparts. With these catalyst systems, higher conversion levels are obtained as compared to the soluble precursors of iron and molybdenum at the same catalyst metalloading (3500 ppm iron and 50 ppm molybdenum with respect to coal). Sulfated iron oxides and oxyhydroxides were equally active as coal liquefaction catalysts. The sulfate, molybdate, and tungstate anions were found to have similar promotional effects on the properties and activities of iron oxides. One step in the synthesis of anion-treated iron and tin oxides is precipitation as hydroxides using either urea or ammonium hydroxide. The catalysts prepared using urea as a precipitation agent were more reproducible than those using ammonium, hydroxide in terms of activities and properties. These catalysts/catalyst precursors were characterized by several techniques to determine their physical (size and structure related) and chemical (acidity) properties. Sulfated and molybdated iron oxides were found to have grain sizes as small as 10-20 nm. An attempt was made to correlate the physicochemical properties of these catalysts with their activity for coal liquefaction.

  3. On recent advances and future research directions for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. J.; Soliman, M. O.; Manhardt, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper highlights some recent accomplishments regarding CFD numerical algorithm constructions for generation of discrete approximate solutions to classes of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Following an overview of turbulent closure modeling, and development of appropriate conservation law systems, a Taylor weak-statement semi-discrete approximate solution algorithm is developed. Various forms for completion to the final linear algebra statement are cited, as are a range of candidate numerical linear algebra solution procedures. This development sequence emphasizes the key building blocks of a CFD RNS algorithm, including solution trial and test spaces, integration procedure and added numerical stability mechanisms. A range of numerical results are discussed focusing on key topics guiding future research directions.

  4. Hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae's for bio oil production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Reddy, Harvind; Deng, Shuguang;

    process water for algae cultivation. GC-MS, elemental analyzer, calorimeter and nutrient analysis were used to analyze bio-crude, lipid-extracted algae and water samples produced in the hydrothermal liquefaction process. The highest bio-oil yield of 46% was obtained on Nannochloropsis salina at 310 °C...... and 107 bar. For Spirulina platensis algae sample, the highest bio-oil yield is 38% at 350 °C and 195 bar. Preliminary data also indicate that a lipid-extracted algae solid residue sample obtained in the hydrothermal liquefaction process contains a high level of proteins...

  5. Liquefaction of solid carbonaceous material with catalyst recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Avinash; Greene, Marvin I.

    1992-01-01

    In the two stage liquefaction of a carbonaceous solid such as coal wherein coal is liquefied in a first stage in the presence of a liquefaction solvent and the first stage effluent is hydrogenated in the presence of a supported hydrogenation catalyst in a second stage, catalyst which has been previously employed in the second stage and comminuted to a particle size distribution equivalent to 100% passing through U.S. 100 Mesh, is passed to the first stage to improve the overall operation.

  6. Liquefaction Microzonation of Babol City Using Artificial Neural Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhzad, F.; Choobbasti, A.J.; Barari, Amin

    2012-01-01

    that will be less susceptible to damage during earthquakes. The scope of present study is to prepare the liquefaction microzonation map for the Babol city based on Seed and Idriss (1983) method using artificial neural network. Artificial neural network (ANN) is one of the artificial intelligence (AI) approaches...... is proposed in this paper. To meet this objective, an effort is made to introduce a total of 30 boreholes data in an area of 7 km2 which includes the results of field tests into the neural network model and the prediction of artificial neural network is checked in some test boreholes, finally the liquefaction...

  7. MOTHER MK II: An advanced direct cycle high temperature gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MOTHER (MOdular Thermal HElium Reactor) power plant concepts employ high temperature gas reactors utilizing TRISO fuel, graphite moderator, and helium coolant, in combination with a direct Brayton cycle for electricity generation. The helium coolant from the reactor vessel passes through a Power Conversion Unit (PCU), which includes a turbine-generator, recuperator, precooler, intercooler and turbine-compressors, before being returned to the reactor vessel. The PCU substitutes for the reactor coolant system pumps and steam generators and most of the Balance Of Plant (BOP), including the steam turbines and condensers, employed by conventional nuclear power plants utilizing water cooled reactors. This provides a compact, efficient, and relatively simple plant configuration. The MOTHER MK I conceptual design, completed in the 1987 - 1989 time frame, was developed to economically meet the energy demands for extracting and processing heavy oil from the tar sands of western Canada. However, considerable effort was made to maximize the market potential beyond this application. Consistent with the remote and very high labour rate environment in the tar sands region, simplification of maintenance procedures and facilitation of 'change-out' in lieu of in situ repair was a design focus. MOTHER MK I had a thermal output of 288 MW and produced 120 MW electrical when operated in the electricity only production mode. An annular Prismatic reactor core was utilized, largely to minimize day-to-day operations activities. Key features of the power conversion system included two Power Conversion Units (144 MWth each), the horizontal orientation of all rotating machinery and major heat exchangers axes, high speed rotating machinery (17,030 rpm for the turbine-compressors and 10,200 rpm for the power turbine-generator), gas (helium) bearings for all rotating machinery, and solid state frequency conversion from 170 cps (at full power) to the grid frequency. Recognizing that the on

  8. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1994-10-01

    Accomplishments for the past year are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts some of the highlights are: very promising results have been obtained from the liquefaction of plastics, rubber tires, paper and other wastes, and the coliquefaction of wastes with coal; a number of water soluble coal liquefaction catalysts, iron, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum, have been comparatively tested; mossbauer spectroscopy, XAFS spectroscopy, TEM and XPS have been used to characterize a variety of catalysts and other samples from numerous consortium and DOE liquefaction projects and in situ ESR measurements of the free radical density have been conducted at temperatures from 100 to 600{degrees}C and H{sub 2} pressures up to 600 psi.

  9. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-07-14

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society.

  10. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

    2014-08-13

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. PMID:25024412

  11. Advances of direct drive schemes in laser fusion research at ILE Osaka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ILE Osaka is concentrating on the physical elements of fast ignition aiming at the proof of principle for ignition-and-burn of direct-drive laser fusion. A 1PW laser will be introduced to fast ignition experiments by the middle of 2001. A high intensity plasma experimental research system, HIPER, has been in operation for obtaining scientific data base relevant to ignition target. By irradiating a intense short pulse onto a long scale length plasma observed are penetration of a relativistically self-focused laser beam into over-dense region without considerable energy loss in under-dense region, MeV electrons generation with conversion efficiency of 25%, heating of compressed core plasma by irradiating a 100 ps, 1017W/cm2 pulse and 1 ps, 1019W/cm2 pulse. In the hydrodynamic instability, the initial imprint of hydrodynamic instability and Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate at wavelength less than 10 μm have been investigated extensively. (author)

  12. Direct observation of macro-layer for advanced understanding of critical heat flux mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Water and R134a boiling phenomena have investigated in the subcooled flow boiling. The results emphasize that the behavior of a liquid layer near the boiling surface plays the most important role in occurring boiling crisis. However, actually its dynamic behavior could not be investigated due to very fast and complex near-wall phenomena. Therefore, it is considered that an investigation in rather slower phenomena can provide the dynamic behavior of the liquid layer or its actual existence. Therefore, pool boiling experiment was tried to observe it. In vertical pool boiling, a thin liquid film adhering to a heater surface was directly observed underneath a massive vapor bubble. Its repeated life cycle continues with the periodic formation of a large vapor bubble. The liquid film of this structure plays a significant role on a heat transfer process. The liquid film results from internally trapping by means of both lateral and vertical coalescence of nucleate bubbles and externally supplying with spreading. The film consists of three parts such as liquid wetting area, dry spots, nucleating bubbles in charge of heat transfer from the heater surface during the growth period of a vapor bubble. Dryout proceeds with evaporation of the film starting from centers of some dry spots. Boiling crisis occurs by means of no wetting with interfering liquid resupply due to increase of wall temperature of repeated dryout. (authors)

  13. Advance care directives and the position in Ireland: what lessons can Ireland learn from the United Kingdom, the United States and Europe?

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Donnellan

    2008-01-01

    An Advance care directive entitles a person to request in advance either the refusal of or consent to certain medical treatment if that person is not competent to consent or refuse at the time such refusal or consent is required.  The 2003 Law Reform Commission’s Consultation Paper on Law and the Elderly briefly mentioned advance directives.  However, the Paper decided to leave the issue to a future Paper that would give a more comprehensive analysis.  There is no Irish legislation on the mat...

  14. ADVANCED BYPRODUCT RECOVERY: DIRECT CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF SO2 TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Weber

    1999-05-01

    Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its commercialization partner, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner Tufts, investigated a single-step process for direct, catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide from regenerable flue gas desulfurization processes to the more valuable elemental sulfur by-product. This development built on recently demonstrated SO{sub 2}-reduction catalyst performance at Tufts University on a DOE-sponsored program and is, in principle, applicable to processing of regenerator off-gases from all regenerable SO{sub 2}-control processes. In this program, laboratory-scale catalyst optimization work at Tufts was combined with supported catalyst formulation work at Engelhard, bench-scale supported catalyst testing at Arthur D. Little and market assessments, also by Arthur D. Little. Objectives included identification and performance evaluation of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. The catalyst formulation was improved significantly over the course of this work owing to the identification of a number of underlying phenomena that tended to reduce catalyst selectivity. The most promising catalysts discovered in the bench-scale tests at Tufts were transformed into monolith-supported catalysts at Engelhard. These catalyst samples were tested at larger scale at Arthur D. Little, where the laboratory-scale results were confirmed, namely that the catalysts do effectively reduce sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur when operated under appropriate levels of conversion and in conditions that do not contain too much water or hydrogen. Ways to overcome those limitations were suggested by the laboratory results. Nonetheless, at the end of Phase I, the catalysts did not exhibit the very stringent levels of activity or selectivity that would have permitted ready scale-up to pilot or commercial operation. Therefore, we chose not to pursue Phase II of this work which would have included further bench-scale testing

  15. Advance Care Directives and the Position in Ireland: What lessons can Ireland learn from the United Kingdom, the United States and Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Donnellan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available An Advance care directive entitles a person to request in advance either the refusal of or consent to certain medical treatment if that person is not competent to consent or refuse at the time such refusal or consent is required.  The 2003 Law Reform Commission’s Consultation Paper on Law and the Elderly briefly mentioned advance directives.  However, the Paper decided to leave the issue to a future Paper that would give a more comprehensive analysis.  There is no Irish legislation on the matter and consequently the legal position is unclear.  The English Mental Capacity Act 2005 has given recognition to advance directives under section 24.  It is interesting to note that only refusal is covered by the Act.  The 2005 Law Reform Commission Consultation Paper on Vulnerable Adults discusses the issue of advance directives in more detail.  This Paper will examine the Irish position of advance directives.  The British Mental Capacity Act and recent case law will provide a comparative analysis.  The UN Convention on the Protection of the Rights and Dignity of Persons with Disabilities will also be examined.

  16. Proceedings of the advanced research and technology development direct utilization, instrumentation and diagnostics contractors' review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiling, D.W. (USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (USA)); Goldberg, P.M. (eds.) (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The 1990 Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Direct Utilization, and Instrumentation and Diagnostics Contractors Review Meeting was held September 16--18, 1990, at the Hyatt at Chatham Center in Pittsburgh, PA. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, and the Pittsburgh and Morgantown Energy Technology Centers. Each year the meeting provides a forum for the exchange of information among the DOE AR TD contractors and interested parties. This year's meeting was hosted by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and was attended by 120 individuals from industry, academia, national laboratories, and other governmental agencies. Papers were presented on research addressing coal surface, science, devolatilization and combustion, ash behavior, emission controls for gases particulates, fluid bed combustion and utilization in diesels and turbines. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  17. Do Spanish Hospital Professionals Educate Their Patients About Advance Directives? : A Descriptive Study in a University Hospital in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María; Herreros, Benjamín; Martín, M Dolores; Molina, Julia; Kanouzi, Jack; Velasco, María

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown whether hospital-based medical professionals in Spain educate patients about advance directives (ADs). The objective of this research was to determine the frequency of hospital-based physicians' and nurses' engagement in AD discussions in the hospital and which patient populations merit such efforts. A short question-and-answer-based survey of physicians and nurses taking care of inpatients was conducted at a university hospital in Madrid, Spain. In total, 283 surveys were collected from medical professionals, of whom 71 per cent were female, with an average age of thirty-four years. Eighty-four per cent had never educated patients about ADs because of lack of perceived responsibility, time, or general knowledge of ADs. Patient populations that warranted AD discussions included those with terminal illnesses (77 per cent), chronic diseases (61 per cent), and elderly patients (43 per cent). Regarding degree of AD understanding in medical professionals: 57 per cent of medical professionals claimed sufficient general knowledge of ADs, 19 per cent understood particulars regarding AD document creation, and 16 per cent were aware of AD regulatory policies. Engagement in AD discussions was considered important by 83 per cent of medical professionals, with 79 per cent interested in participating in such discussions themselves. The majority of hospital physicians and nurses do not educate their patients about ADs, despite acknowledging their importance. Patient populations of highest priority included those with terminal diseases or chronic illness or who are of advanced age. PMID:26797513

  18. The latest developments and outlook for hydrogen liquefaction technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquefied hydrogen is presently mainly used for space applications and the semiconductor industry. While clean energy applications, for e.g. the automotive sector, currently contribute to this demand with a small share only, their demand may see a significant boost in the next years with the need for large scale liquefaction plants exceeding the current plant sizes by far. Hydrogen liquefaction for small scale plants with a maximum capacity of 3 tons per day (tpd) is accomplished with a Brayton refrigeration cycle using helium as refrigerant. This technology is characterized by low investment costs but lower process efficiency and hence higher operating costs. For larger plants, a hydrogen Claude cycle is used, characterized by higher investment but lower operating costs. However, liquefaction plants meeting the potentially high demand in the clean energy sector will need further optimization with regard to energy efficiency and hence operating costs. The present paper gives an overview of the currently applied technologies, including their thermodynamic and technical background. Areas of improvement are identified to derive process concepts for future large scale hydrogen liquefaction plants meeting the needs of clean energy applications with optimized energy efficiency and hence minimized operating costs. Compared to studies in this field, this paper focuses on application of new technology and innovative concepts which are either readily available or will require short qualification procedures. They will hence allow implementation in plants in the close future

  19. Determination of Liquefaction Potential using Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhzad, F; Choobbasti, A.J; Barari, Amin

    The authors propose an alternative general regression model based on neural networks, which enables analysis of summary data obtained by liquefaction analysis according to usual methods. For that purpose, the data from some thirty boreholes made during field investigations in Babol, in the Iranian...

  20. Finite Element Modelling of Seismic Liquefaction in Soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galavi, V.; Petalas, A.; Brinkgreve, R.B.J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical aspects of seismic liquefaction in soils as implemented in the finite element code, PLAXIS, is described in this paper. After description of finite element equations of dynamic problems, three practical dynamic boundary conditions, namely viscous boundary tractions, tied degrees of freedom

  1. Selective liquefaction of wheat straw in phenol and its fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongzhang; Zhang, Yuzhen; Xie, Shuangping

    2012-05-01

    For the first time, a method of phenol-selective liquefaction is proposed for the fractionation and multilevel conversion of lignocellulose. Through phenol-selective liquefaction, lignin and hemicellulose are liquefied, with large amounts of cellulose retained in the unliquefied residues. Using a phenol/straw ratio of 3 and a sulfuric acid concentration of 3%, large amounts of hemicellulose (≥85%) and lignin (≥70%) can be liquefied at 100 °C in 30 min, with a high quantity of cellulose (≥80%) retained. Unliquefied residues from selective liquefaction have higher susceptibility for enzymatic attack. Enzymatic hydrolyzation of residues can be as high as 65% in 48 h with 40.7 FPU/g of dry materials, which can then be used to prepare sugar platform intermediates. The liquefied products of wheat straw are then resinified with formaldehyde in the presence of NaOH as a catalyst and synthesized into phenol formaldehyde-type resins reaching up to GB/T 14732-2006 standards. Phenol selective liquefaction, a new technology for the fractionation of lignocellulose, achieves effective fractionation and multilevel conversion of straw components. Hence, it is an important tool to achieve full utilization of biomass and high value-added conversion of lignocellulose. PMID:22544687

  2. Thermochemical liquefaction characteristics of microalgae in sub- and supercritical ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Qiao; Chen, Liang [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha (China); Key Laboratory of Environment Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Changsha (China)

    2011-01-15

    Thermochemical liquefaction characteristics of Spirulina, a kind of high-protein microalgae, were investigated with the sub- and supercritical ethanol as solvent in a 1000 mL autoclave. The influences of various liquefaction parameters on the yields of products (bio-oil and residue) from the liquefaction of Spirulina were studied, such as the reaction temperature (T), the S/L ratio (R{sub 1}, solid: Spirulina, liquid: ethanol), the solvent filling ratio (R{sub 2}) and the type and dosage of catalyst. Without catalyst, the bio-oil yields were in the range of 35.4 wt.% and 45.3 wt.% depending on the changes of T, R{sub 1} and R{sub 2}. And the bio-oil yields increased generally with increasing T and R{sub 2}, while the bio-oil yields reduced with increasing R{sub 1}. The FeS catalyst was certified to be an ideal catalyst for the liquefaction of Spirulina microalgae for its advantages on promoting bio-oil production and suppressing the formation of residue. The optimal dosage of catalyst (FeS) was ranging from 5-7 wt.%. The elemental analyses and FT-IR and GC-MS measurements for the bio-oils revealed that the liquid products have much higher heating values than the crude Spirulina sample and fatty acid ethyl ester compounds were dominant in the bio-oils, irrespective of whether catalyst was used. (author)

  3. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July-September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    The status of coal liquefaction pilot plants supported by US DOE is reviewed under the following headings: company involved, location, contract, funding, process name, process description, flowsheet, history and progress during the July-September 1979 quarter. Supporting projects such as test facilities, refining and upgrading coal liquids, catalyst development, and gasification of residues from coal gasification plants are discussed similarly. (LTN)

  4. The latest developments and outlook for hydrogen liquefaction technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlig, K.; Decker, L. [Linde Kryotechnik AG, Pfungen, CH-8422 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-29

    Liquefied hydrogen is presently mainly used for space applications and the semiconductor industry. While clean energy applications, for e.g. the automotive sector, currently contribute to this demand with a small share only, their demand may see a significant boost in the next years with the need for large scale liquefaction plants exceeding the current plant sizes by far. Hydrogen liquefaction for small scale plants with a maximum capacity of 3 tons per day (tpd) is accomplished with a Brayton refrigeration cycle using helium as refrigerant. This technology is characterized by low investment costs but lower process efficiency and hence higher operating costs. For larger plants, a hydrogen Claude cycle is used, characterized by higher investment but lower operating costs. However, liquefaction plants meeting the potentially high demand in the clean energy sector will need further optimization with regard to energy efficiency and hence operating costs. The present paper gives an overview of the currently applied technologies, including their thermodynamic and technical background. Areas of improvement are identified to derive process concepts for future large scale hydrogen liquefaction plants meeting the needs of clean energy applications with optimized energy efficiency and hence minimized operating costs. Compared to studies in this field, this paper focuses on application of new technology and innovative concepts which are either readily available or will require short qualification procedures. They will hence allow implementation in plants in the close future.

  5. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ji-Lu, E-mail: triace@163.com; Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Wu, Hai-tang

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Swine carcasses can be converted to bio-oil by alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction. • It seems that the use of the bio-oil for heat or CHP is technically suitable. • Some valuable chemicals were found in the bio-oils. • The bio-oil and the solid residue constituted an energy efficiency of 93.63% for the feedstock. • The solid residue can be used as a soil amendment, to sequester C and for preparing activated carbon. - Abstract: It is imperative that swine carcasses are disposed of safely, practically and economically. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil was performed. Firstly, the effects of temperature, reaction time and pH value on the yield of each liquefaction product were determined. Secondly, liquefaction products, including bio-oil and solid residue, were characterized. Finally, the energy recovery ratio (ERR), which was defined as the energy of the resultant products compared to the energy input of the material, was investigated. Our experiment shows that reaction time had certain influence on the yield of liquefaction products, but temperature and pH value had bigger influence on the yield of liquefaction products. Yields of 62.2 wt% bio-oil, having a high heating value of 32.35 MJ/kg and a viscosity of 305cp, and 22 wt% solid residue were realized at a liquefaction temperature of 250 °C, a reaction time of 60 min and a pH value of 9.0. The bio-oil contained up to hundreds of different chemical components that may be classified according to functional groups. Typical compound classes in the bio-oil were hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, ketones and heterocyclics. The energy recovery ratio (ERR) reached 93.63%. The bio-oil is expected to contribute to fossil fuel replacement in stationary applications, including boilers and furnaces, and upgrading processes for the bio-oil may be used to obtain liquid transport fuels.

  6. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Swine carcasses can be converted to bio-oil by alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction. • It seems that the use of the bio-oil for heat or CHP is technically suitable. • Some valuable chemicals were found in the bio-oils. • The bio-oil and the solid residue constituted an energy efficiency of 93.63% for the feedstock. • The solid residue can be used as a soil amendment, to sequester C and for preparing activated carbon. - Abstract: It is imperative that swine carcasses are disposed of safely, practically and economically. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil was performed. Firstly, the effects of temperature, reaction time and pH value on the yield of each liquefaction product were determined. Secondly, liquefaction products, including bio-oil and solid residue, were characterized. Finally, the energy recovery ratio (ERR), which was defined as the energy of the resultant products compared to the energy input of the material, was investigated. Our experiment shows that reaction time had certain influence on the yield of liquefaction products, but temperature and pH value had bigger influence on the yield of liquefaction products. Yields of 62.2 wt% bio-oil, having a high heating value of 32.35 MJ/kg and a viscosity of 305cp, and 22 wt% solid residue were realized at a liquefaction temperature of 250 °C, a reaction time of 60 min and a pH value of 9.0. The bio-oil contained up to hundreds of different chemical components that may be classified according to functional groups. Typical compound classes in the bio-oil were hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, ketones and heterocyclics. The energy recovery ratio (ERR) reached 93.63%. The bio-oil is expected to contribute to fossil fuel replacement in stationary applications, including boilers and furnaces, and upgrading processes for the bio-oil may be used to obtain liquid transport fuels

  7. ParCYCLIC: finite element modelling of earthquake liquefaction response on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun; Lu, Jinchi; Law, Kincho H.; Elgamal, Ahmed

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents the computational procedures and solution strategy employed in ParCYCLIC, a parallel non-linear finite element program developed based on an existing serial code CYCLIC for the analysis of cyclic seismically-induced liquefaction problems. In ParCYCLIC, finite elements are employed within an incremental plasticity, coupled solid-fluid formulation. A constitutive model developed for simulating liquefaction-induced deformations is a main component of this analysis framework. The elements of the computational strategy, designed for distributed-memory message-passing parallel computer systems, include: (a) an automatic domain decomposer to partition the finite element mesh; (b) nodal ordering strategies to minimize storage space for the matrix coefficients; (c) an efficient scheme for the allocation of sparse matrix coefficients among the processors; and (d) a parallel sparse direct solver. Application of ParCYCLIC to simulate 3-D geotechnical experimental models is demonstrated. The computational results show excellent parallel performance and scalability of ParCYCLIC on parallel computers with a large number of processors. Copyright

  8. Liquefaction of bio-mass in hot-compressed water for the production of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymchyshyn, Matthew; Xu, Chunbao Charles

    2010-04-01

    Direct liquefaction of lignocellulosic wastes (sawdust and cornstalks) and two model bio-mass compounds (pure lignin and pure cellulose as references) has been conducted in hot-compressed water at temperatures from 250 to 350 degrees C in the presence of 2MPa H(2), for the production of phenolic compounds that may be suitable for the production of green phenol-formaldehyde resins. The liquefaction operations at 250 degrees C for 60 min produced the desirable product of phenolic/neutral oil at a yield of about 53, 32, 32 and 17 wt.% for lignin, sawdust, cornstalk and cellulose, respectively. The yield of phenolic/neutral oil for each feedstock was found to decrease with increasing temperature. As evidenced by GC-MS measurements, significant quantities of phenolic compounds such as 2-methoxy-phenol, 4-ethyl-2-methoxy-phenol, and 2,6-dimethoxy-phenol, were present in the resulting phenolic/neutral oils from the two lignocellulosic wastes and pure lignin. The relative concentration of phenolic compounds in the lignin-derived oil was as high as about 80%. As expected, the liquid products from cellulose contained essentially carboxylic acids and neutral compounds. Addition of Ba(OH)(2) and Rb(2)CO(3) catalysts were found to significantly increase both phenolic/neutral oil and gas yields for all feedstocks except for lignin. PMID:20031393

  9. Liquefaction and strong motion during the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, M.; Wang, C. Y.; Dreger, D. S.; Cox, S.

    2014-12-01

    Liquefaction is a major seismic hazard for engineered structures; thus improved ability to predict the potential for liquefaction in seismically active regions is badly needed. The 2010 Mw 7.1 Darfield event and its associated aftershock sequence caused numerous occurrences of liquefaction in the Canterbury region of New Zealand, providing an excellent opportunity to study the occurrence of liquefaction in coastal plains near an active mountain belt. In this study we utilize strong motion data from over 100 stations in the New Zealand region and examine a number of major liquefaction events associated with the Canterbury earthquake sequence. These data are used to construct empirical attenuation relationships of ground motion as functions of hypocentral distance. The attenuation relationships so derived for the Canterbury region are similar to those developed for Southern California. This similarity suggests some generality of ground motion attenuation in sedimentary basins, even between geographically disparate regions. These relationships are used to estimate the seismic energy density at each liquefaction site in the Canterbury region, which is compared with a global database of liquefaction occurrences. Some liquefaction sites in the Canterbury region experienced seismic energy densities near the lower threshold for liquefaction established for the global dataset, suggesting high sensitivity to liquefaction.

  10. Directional Advanced Intruder Handling Ad-hoc on Demand Distance Vector Protocol Using Divide and Conquer Strategy Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hemalatha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Aim of this study is to develop the protocol for identify the failure node, intruder node with power optimized routing protocol named Directional Advanced Intruder Handling Adhoc On demand Vector protocol. Mobile Ad-hoc Network is an infrastructure less network, nodes in mobile Ad-hoc are comprised to work with wireless nodes, can move freely and dynamically self organized in to arbitrary topologies. Over the past twenty years the development of Ad-hoc network was developed from tactical networks to Bluetooth, HyperLAN and IEEE 802.11. In the protocol stack of Ad-hoc network, the major issues on network layers, which has a responsibility to transfer the packets from one node to another. Many protocols have been proposed in Ad-hoc network, but none of the protocol is working under the principle of handling checking on packet delivery. This study presents the Directional Advanced Intruder Handling Ad-hoc on demand Vector protocol algorithm definition and implementation. The working principle of this protocol is checking the packet delivery to the destination. If any one of the nodes in the route is not forwarding the packet, that corresponding node will be identified and redirect the packet to the new route. For doing this checking this protocol uses divide and conquer strategy. The number hop between the source to destination is divided into two halves and check whether the up to the middle node the packet are flowing in a proper order or not. Recursively doing the divide and conquer of the route path, can identify the node which is not forward the packet to the next node. The design of this protocol itself able to identify the intruder in the routing path. Contains several stages from path discovery, packet transmits, apply divide and conquer strategy on route, identify the node which is not forward the packet, redirect the new path, alert all the nodes about the victim node. Finally performance of the protocol is improved with transmission

  11. Effect of in-situ solvent soaking and heating pre-treatment on coal conversion and oil yield during liquefaction of demineralized low-rank Malaysian coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A.M. Ishak; M.F. Abdullah; K. Ismail; M.O.A. Kadir; A.R. Mohamed [University Technology MARA, Perlis (Malaysia). Fuel Combustion Research Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Sciences

    2005-07-01

    The effect of in-situ solvent soaking and heating (SSH) pre-treatment on demineralized low-rank Malaysian coal towards coal conversion and oil yield during direct liquefaction was investigated. Demineralization of coal was carried out by leaching with strong protic acids such as HCl, HF and HNO{sub 3} whereby more than 95 % of mineral content in the coal was reduced. Apparently, the mineral matter that was removed by the HCl treatment (i.e. cationics) exhibits more catalytic effect during the liquefaction process. The reduction in the mineral content increased the coal porosity that enabled the solvent to penetrate into the coal macropores during the SSH pre-treatment process. The results of liquefaction on the pre-treated SSH demineralized coal at 420{sup o}C and at 4 MPa, however show comparable amount of coal conversion with slightly lower amount of oil yield being obtained with comparison to the raw and SSH-raw coals. Thus, besides the in-situ solvent soaking and heating pre-treatment, the presence of mineral matters in coal prove to be beneficial during coal liquefaction process.

  12. Advanced Parkinson’s disease effect on goal-directed and habitual processes involved in visuomotor associative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadila eHadj-Bouziane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present behavioral study readdresses the question of habit learning in Parkinson's disease. Patients were early onset, non-demented, dopa-responsive, candidates for surgical treatment, similar to those we found earlier as suffering greater dopamine depletion in the putamen than in the caudate nucleus. The task was the same conditional associative learning task as that used previously in monkeys and healthy humans to unveil the striatum involvement in habit learning. Sixteen patients and 20 age- and education-matched healthy control subjects learned sets of 3 visuo-motor associations between complex patterns and joystick displacements during two testing sessions separated by a few hours. We distinguished errors preceding versus following the first correct response to compare patients' performance during the earliest phase of learning dominated by goal-directed actions with that observed later on, when responses start to become habitual. The disease significantly retarded both learning phases, especially in patients under sixty years of age. However, only the late phase deficit was disease severity-dependent and persisted on the second testing session. These findings provide the first corroboration in Parkinson patients of two ideas well-established in the animal literature. The first is the idea that associating visual stimuli to motor acts is a form of habit learning that engages the striatum. It is confirmed here by the global impairment in visuo-motor learning induced by Parkinson's disease. The second idea is that goal-directed behaviors are predominantly caudate-dependent whereas habitual responses are primarily putamen-dependent. At the advanced Parkinson's disease stages tested here, dopamine depletion is greater in the putamen than in the caudate nucleus. Accordingly, the late phase of learning corresponding to the emergence of habitual responses was more vulnerable to the disease than the early phase dominated by goal-directed

  13. Advance care directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... order on your medical chart. Fill out an organ donation card and carry it in your wallet. Keep ... your important papers. You can find out about organ donation from your doctor. You can also have this ...

  14. Evaluation of Liquefaction Susceptibility of Clean Sands after Blast Densification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Posada, Carlos Alberto

    The effect of earthquakes on infrastructure facilities is an important topic of interest in geotechnical research. A key design issue for such facilities is whether or not liquefaction will occur during an earthquake. The consequences of this type of ground failure are usually severe, resulting in severe damage to a facility and in some cases the loss of human life. One approach to minimize the effect of liquefaction is to improve the ground condition by controlled blasting. The main limitations of the blast densification technique are that the design is mostly empirical and verification studies of densification have resulted in contradictory results in some case studies. In such cases, even though the ground surface settles almost immediately after blasting, common verification tests such as the cone penetration test (CPT), standard penetration test (SPT), and shear wave velocity test (Vs) suggest that the soil mass has not been improved at all. This raises concerns regarding the future performance of the soil and casts doubts on whether or not the improved deposit is still susceptible to liquefaction. In this work, a blast densification program was implemented at the Oakridge Landfill located in Dorchester County, SC, to gain information regarding the condition of a loose sand deposit during and after each blast event. In addition, an extensive laboratory testing program was conducted on reconstituted sand specimens to evaluate the mechanical behavior of saturated and gassy, medium dense sands during monotonic and cyclic loading. The results from the field and laboratory program indicate that gas released during blasting can remain trapped in the soil mass for several years, and this gas greatly affects the mechanical behavior of the sand. Gas greatly increases the liquefaction resistance of the soil. If the gas remains in the sand over the life of a project, then it will maintain this increased resistance to liquefaction, whether or not the penetration

  15. Post-liquefaction soil-structure interaction for buried structures: Sensitivity analysis studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The post liquefaction behavior of buried conduits is analyzed and sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the damage potential of the forces induced in the buried lifelines following seismically induced liquefaction of the surrounding soil. Various lifeline configurations and loading conditions are considered. The loading conditions considered are: buoyancy forces and permanent ground displacements parallel to the lifeline axis. Pertinent parameters for the soil-lifeline interaction following liquefaction are identified. (author)

  16. Evaluation of Liquefaction Return Period for Bangalore Based on Standard Penetration Test Data: Performance Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Vipin, K. S.; Sitharam, T. G.

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: The conventional liquefaction evaluation is based on a deterministic approach. However in this method the uncertainty in the earthquake loading is not properly taken into account. However recent research in this field indicates that this uncertainty in the earthquake loading has to be considered in the liquefaction potential evaluation. Moreover the evaluation of liquefaction return period is not possible in the conventional deterministic methods. This study explained the m...

  17. Evaluation of Liquefaction Return Period for Bangalore Based on Standard Penetration Test Data: Performance Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Vipin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The conventional liquefaction evaluation is based on a deterministic approach. However in this method the uncertainty in the earthquake loading is not properly taken into account. However recent research in this field indicates that this uncertainty in the earthquake loading has to be considered in the liquefaction potential evaluation. Moreover the evaluation of liquefaction return period is not possible in the conventional deterministic methods. This study explained the methods for evaluating the probability of liquefaction and the return period of liquefaction based on probabilistic approach. Approach: In this study the geotechnical data was collected from 450 bore holes in Bangalore, India, covering an area of 220 km2. The seismic hazard analysis for the study area is carried out using Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA and the peak acceleration at ground surface was evaluated for site class-D after considering local site effects. For assessment of site class, shear wave velocity profiles in the city had been obtained using Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW survey. Based on this data the probabilistic liquefaction analysis was done to evaluate the probability of liquefaction in the study area. Based on the performance based approach the liquefaction return period for the study area was also evaluated. Results: The results showed the variation of liquefaction susceptibility for the study area. The corrected standard penetration values required to prevent the liquefaction for return periods of 475 and 2500 years were also presented here. Conclusion/Recommendations: The spatial variation of probability of liquefaction and the factor of safety against liquefaction evaluated using the two methods match well for the study area.

  18. La perspectiva de las personas mayores sobre el testamento vital Elders´perspective about Advance Directives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Mª Barrio Cantalejo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes. La popularización del testamento vital (TV exige conocer la perspectiva que sobre él tienen sus potenciales usuarios. Cualquier intento de generalizar el TV sin evaluar cómo será recibido por las personas mayores está condenado al fracaso. Objetivo: Explorar la perspectiva de los mayores sobre el testamento vital. Diseño: Estudio cualitativo. 40 personas mayores, usuarios de 3 Centros de Salud y 1 Residencia Asistida de Madrid, se reunieron en 5 grupos de discusión en abril de 2004. Participantes: 14 mediadores captaron a 2-3 participantes cada uno. Se consideró que edad y residencia en medio familiar o institucional son las variables que más diferencian la elaboración de los discursos sobre el TV. Se utilizaron, pues, como criterios de segmentación, buscando heterogeneidad entre grupos y homogeneidad y heterogeneidad intragrupal. La saturación se consideró cuando las ideas expresadas resultaron recurrentes. Resultados: 4 ideas se extraen de los datos: 1 los mayores prefieren la planificación anticipada de decisiones al TV. 2 Su opinión sobre el TV se asocia a la vivencia singular de otros eventos en el final de la vida. 3 Conceden un papel relevante a la familia. 4 Desean conducir su propia vida, pero "sin papeles escritos". Conclusiones. La implementación del TV a través de una estrategia educativa e institucional se beneficiará si consideramos la perspectiva de la población mayor española sobre el TV.Background: The introduction of advance directives (AD require to examine the perspective their potential users have about. Any public policy about the implementation of ADs adressed to elders will fall if their perspective is unknown. Objective: To examine the elders' perspective about advance directives. Methods: Qualitative study. 40 elders, users of 3 Primary Health Care Center, and of 1 Nursing Home from Madrid. 5 focus groups were organized in 2004 April. Participants: 14 providers recruited 2

  19. Non-CAR resists and advanced materials for Massively Parallel E-Beam Direct Write process integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourteau, Marie-Line; Servin, Isabelle; Lepinay, Kévin; Essomba, Cyrille; Dal'Zotto, Bernard; Pradelles, Jonathan; Lattard, Ludovic; Brandt, Pieter; Wieland, Marco

    2016-03-01

    The emerging Massively Parallel-Electron Beam Direct Write (MP-EBDW) is an attractive high resolution high throughput lithography technology. As previously shown, Chemically Amplified Resists (CARs) meet process/integration specifications in terms of dose-to-size, resolution, contrast, and energy latitude. However, they are still limited by their line width roughness. To overcome this issue, we tested an alternative advanced non-CAR and showed it brings a substantial gain in sensitivity compared to CAR. We also implemented and assessed in-line post-lithographic treatments for roughness mitigation. For outgassing-reduction purpose, a top-coat layer is added to the total process stack. A new generation top-coat was tested and showed improved printing performances compared to the previous product, especially avoiding dark erosion: SEM cross-section showed a straight pattern profile. A spin-coatable charge dissipation layer based on conductive polyaniline has also been tested for conductivity and lithographic performances, and compatibility experiments revealed that the underlying resist type has to be carefully chosen when using this product. Finally, the Process Of Reference (POR) trilayer stack defined for 5 kV multi-e-beam lithography was successfully etched with well opened and straight patterns, and no lithography-etch bias.

  20. Characteristics estimation of coal liquefaction residue; Sekitan ekika zansa seijo no suisan ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itonaga, M.; Imada, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Okada, Y.; Inokuchi, K. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    The paper studied a possibility of estimating characteristics of coal liquefaction residue from liquefaction conditions in the case of fixing coal kind in the NEDOL process coal liquefaction PSU. Wyoming coal was used for the study, and the already proposed simplified liquefaction reaction models were used. Among material balances explained by the models, those of asphaltene, preasphaltene, THF insoluble matters are concerned with residue composition. Ash content is separately calculated from ash balance. Reaction velocity constants of simplified liquefaction reaction models which influence the residue composition were obtained by the multiple regression method from experimental results in the past. The estimation expression of residue viscosity was introduced from residue ash/composition. When the residue composition is estimated by the model from liquefaction conditions, and the residue viscosity is obtained using it, the higher the liquefaction temperature is, the higher the residue viscosity is. The result obtained well agreed the measuring result. The simplified liquefaction model of a certain coal kind has been established, and characteristics of residue can be estimated even at liquefaction conditions which have never been experienced before if there is a certain amount of the accumulated data on residue composition/characteristics. 4 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Liquefaction Susceptibility of Soils With Clay Particles from Earthquake-induced Landslides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chuan-sheng; JIANG Xin; ZHANG Xu

    2007-01-01

    The main reason for earthquake-induced landslides is liquefaction of soil, a process considered to occur mostly in sandy soils. Liquefaction can occur in clayey soils has also been reported and proven in the recent literature, but liquefaction in clayey soils still remains unclear and there are many questions that need to be addressed. In order to address these questions, an depth study on the liquefaction potential of clayey soils was conducted on the basis of field investigation and a series of laboratory tests on the samples collected from the sliding surface of the landslides. The liquefaction potential of the soils was studied by means of undrained cyclic ring-shear tests. Research results show that the liquefaction potential of sandy soils is higher than that of clayey soils given the same void ratio;the soil resistance to liquefaction rises with an increase in plasticity for clayey soils; relation between plasticity index and the liquefaction potential of soil can be used in practical application to estimate the liquefaction potential of soil.

  2. Engineering of Ground for Liquefaction Mitigation Using Granular Columnar Inclusions: Recent Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Liquefaction was the most hazardous damage during an earthquake. Ground improvement techniques were employed to mitigate liquefaction hazards. Most common methods to improve engineering properties of soils are densification, reinforcement, grouting/mixing and drainage. Among various remedial measures available, installation of columnar granular inclusions is the most widely adopted method for liquefaction mitigation. Approach: Columnar granular inclusions function as drains and permit rapid dissipation of earthquake induced pore pressures by virtue of their high permeability. Results: One of the chief benefits of ground treatment with granular piles is the densification of in situ ground by which the in-situ properties of the ground get modified to mitigate liquefaction potential. Further, the very high deformation modulus and stiffness of the granular pile material provide reinforcement for the in situ soil and offer another mechanism to mitigate liquefaction. The study described briefly the phenomenon of liquefaction and the associated features. A short discussion on various ground improvement methods available for liquefaction mitigation was presented highlighting the importance of columnar inclusions. Construction methods of different granular columnar inclusions like sand compaction piles/ granular piles were discussed briefly. Recent developments in the research of columnar granular inclusions as liquefaction counter measures were presented in relation to physical, numerical and analytical model studies. Conclusion/Recommendations: Columnar granular inclusions were demonstrated to be very effective for liquefaction mitigation in different case studies and research investigations.

  3. Research, development, demonstration, and early deployment policies for advanced-coal technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced-coal technologies will increasingly play a significant role in addressing China's multiple energy challenges. This paper introduces the current status of energy in China, evaluates the research, development, and demonstration policies for advanced-coal technologies during the Tenth Five-Year Plan, and gives policy prospects for advanced-coal technologies in the Eleventh Five-Year Plan. Early deployment policies for advanced-coal technologies are discussed and some recommendations are put forward. China has made great progress in the development of advanced-coal technologies. In terms of research, development, and demonstration of advanced-coal technologies, China has achieved breakthroughs in developing and demonstrating advanced-coal gasification, direct and indirect coal liquefaction, and key technologies of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and co-production systems. Progress on actual deployment of advanced-coal technologies has been more limited, in part due to insufficient supporting policies. Recently, industry chose Ultra Super Critical (USC) Pulverized Coal (PC) and Super Critical (SC) PC for new capacity coupled with pollution-control technology, and 300 MW Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) as a supplement

  4. Organosolv liquefaction of sugarcane bagasse catalyzed by acidic ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengjian; Long, Jinxing

    2016-08-01

    An efficient and eco-friendly process is proposed for sugarcane bagasse liquefaction under mild condition using IL catalyst and environmental friendly solvent of ethanol/H2O. The relationship between IL acidic strength and its catalytic performance is investigated. The effects of reaction condition parameters such as catalyst dosage, temperature, time and solvent are also intensively studied. The results show that ethanol/H2O has a significant promotion effect on the simultaneous liquefaction of sugarcane bagasse carbohydrate and lignin. 97.5% of the bagasse can be liquefied with 66.46% of volatile product yield at 200°C for 30min. Furthermore, the IL catalyst shows good recyclability where no significant loss of the catalytic activity is exhibited even after five runs. PMID:27115746

  5. INVESTIGATION INTO NATURAL GAS LIQUEFACTION METHODS, LNG TRANSPORT AND STORAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan AVCI

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG processes are very new in Turkey. The Government of Turkey, due to diversification of supply and balancing of seasonal load, decided to import LNG from Algeria. The first shipment in Marmara Ereğli import terminal has been carried out in the August the 3 rd, 1994. LNG after regasification will be injected into the main transmission pipeline. The share of LNG in the world natural gas trade was approixmately 22.1% in 1988. According to the forecast, LNG share will be rapidly spreading all over the world in near future. In this paper, treatment, liquefaction, transport, storage, regasification, distribution and utilisation of LNG are examined. Particular attention has given into liquefaction of natural gas.

  6. An economic analysis of three hydrogen liquefaction systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar-hydrogen energy systems have received some attention in recent years as viable alternatives to the present fossil-fuel based energy systems. This paper presents an economic analysis of three hydrogen liquefaction systems with an associated cost comparison. The analysis takes into account the energy cost, operation and maintenance, and fixed charges on capital investment. Electrical requirements of the compressors or energy cost of a liquefier are predominantly functions of the liquefier efficiency and are less dependent on the production rate required. The analysis showed that the cost of liquefying hydrogen is lowest for an optimized large-scale type liquid hydrogen plant and is highest for a simple conceptual liquid hydrogen plant. The liquefaction cost was also shown to reach a value of $0.63/kg for the optimized large-scale type plant at a production rate of 30,000 kg/h when the cost of electricity is $0.04/(kW h). (author)

  7. Corrosion problems and their countermeasures in coal liquefaction plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Takeo

    1988-06-05

    Problems in materials of coal liquefaction plants are described with emphasis placed on research results in U.S. The paper further describes the stress corrosion cracking (S.C.C.) of stainless steel and countermeasures against it taking an example from research carried out on the oil refinery plants, in similar environment. The operation of coal liquefaction plant is grouped to 6 processes: Coal preparation, slurry preheating, reaction column, gas separation column, pressure reduction, solids separation and distillation and each of the processes is investigated regarding sulfurization, erosion, erosion/corrosion, SCC (CI, polythionic acid), hydrogen erosion and organic acid corrosion. Examples of cases are given for SCC of stainless steel in each process and on-site tests are conducted with new materials. SCC occurred less frequently on the overlay welded portion, when it contained an adequate portion of delta-ferrite. (7 figs, 3 tabs, 54 refs)

  8. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  9. Ground Improvement for Liquefaction Mitigation at Existing Highway Bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Harry G.

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of using ground improvement at existing highway bridges to mitigate the risk of earthquake-induced liquefaction damage has been studied. The factors and phenomena governing the performance of the improved ground were identified and clarified. Potential analytical methods for predicting the treated ground performance were investigated and tested. Key factors affecting improved ground performance are the type, size, and location of the treated ground. The improved groun...

  10. Liquefaction of micro-algae with iron catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, T.; Nishihara, A.; Ueda, C.; Ohtsuki, M.; Ikenaga, N.; Suzuki, T. [Kansai University, Osaka (Japan). Department of Chemical Engineering

    1997-09-01

    Microalgae used for carbon dioxide fixation need to be used effectively before they degrade by microbiological process to yield CO{sub 2} once more. Liquefaction of Spirulina, a high-protein microalga, afforded {gt} 90 wt% of THF-soluble products and 60 wt% of hexane-soluble fractions, in the temperature range 300-425{degree}C under hydrogen in various organic solvents with highly dispersed catalysts. The oil yield increased from 52.3 to 66.9 wt% with Fe(CO){sub 5}-S catalyst at 350{degree}C for 60 min in tetralin under 5.0 MPa of hydrogen. Hydrogen activated by the dispersed catalyst contributed to an increase in oil yield. Liquefaction in water as solvent gave a higher oil yield of 78.3 wt% at 350{degree}C even under nitrogen. Liquefaction in toluene gave oil fractions of high carbon content and lower oxygen content, with a heating value of 32-33 MJ kg{sup -1}. On the contrary, oil fractions obtained in water had a lower carbon content and higher oxygen content, with a lower heating value of 26 MJ kg{sup -1}. The presence of moderate amount of water is considered to be effective for the production of oil of high heating value in high yield. FT-i.r. spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatograph showed that production of oil fractions proceeded via thermal decomposition of polypeptides and hydrolysis by water produced during liquefaction in organic solvents. 24 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Liquefaction of sunflower husks for biochar production / Nontembiso Piyo

    OpenAIRE

    Piyo, Nontembiso

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a carbon-rich and a potential solid biofuel, is produced during the liquefaction of biomass. Biochar can be combusted for heat and power, gasified, activated for adsorption applications, or applied to soils as a soil amendment and carbon sequestration agent. It is very important and advantageous to produce biochar under controlled conditions so that most of the carbon is converted. The main objective of the study was to investigate the effect of solvents, reaction temp...

  12. Mechanism of Liquefaction-Induced Large Settlements of Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Zaheer Ahmed Almani; Kamran Ansari; Ashfaque Ahmed Memon

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, mechanism of liquefaction-related large settlements of the soil-structure system during the earthquake was studied using numerical modelling. The isolated shallow strip plane strain footing pad, supporting a typical simple frame structure, was founded on the ground at the shallow depth from the level ground surface. This system was modelled as plane-strain using the FLAC (Fast Lagrangian Analysis of continua) 2D dynamic modelling and analysis code. This case focuses...

  13. The current status of coal liquefaction technologies - Panorama 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2008, a first coal liquefaction unit to produce motor fuel (20,000 BPSD) will come on-stream in Shenhua, China (in the Ercos region of Inner Mongolia). Other, more ambitious projects have been announced in China for between now and 2020. Since oil production is expected to peak in the medium term, this technology may develop regionally in the next 20 years to cover ever-increasing demand for motor fuel

  14. SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-11-19

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

  15. A Characterization and Evaluation of Coal Liquefaction Process Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    An updated assessment of the physico-chemical analytical methodology applicable to coal-liquefaction product streams and a review of the literature dealing with the modeling of fossil-fuel resid conversion to product oils are presented in this document. In addition, a summary is provided for the University of Delaware program conducted under this contract to develop an empirical test to determine relative resid reactivity and to construct a computer model to describe resid structure and predict reactivity.

  16. Hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis oceanica in different solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporgno, M P; Pruvost, J; Legrand, J; Lepine, O; Tazerout, M; Bengoa, C

    2016-08-01

    Although the hydrothermal liquefaction is considered a promising technology for converting microalgae into liquid biofuels, there are still some disadvantages. This paper demonstrated that the bio-oil yield can be significantly improved by adding alcohols as co-solvents and carrying out the conversion at mild conditions (microalgae (∼75% moisture) and alcohol concentrations which avoid both drying the microalgae and decreasing the amount of microalgae loaded in the reactor. PMID:27155795

  17. Preparation of mesoporous activated carbons from coal liquefaction residue for methane decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbo Zhang; Lijun Jin; Shengwei Zhu; Haoquan Hu

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous activated carbons were prepared from direct coal liquefaction residue (CLR) by KOH activation method,and the experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of KOH/CLR ratio,solvent for mixing the CLR and KOH,and carbonization procedure on the resultant carbon texture and catalytic activity for catalytic methane decomposition (CMD).The results showed that optimal KOH/CLR ratio of 2 ∶ 1;solvent with higher solubility to KOH or the CLR,and an appropriate carbonization procedure are conductive to improving the carbon pore structure and catalytic activity for CMD.The resultant mesoporous carbons show higher and more stable activity than microporous carbons.Additionally,the relationship between the carbon textural properties and the catalytic activity for CMD was also discussed.

  18. Liquefaction Susceptibility in the Northern Provinces of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supot Teachavorasinskun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: There are quite a few active faults recently found in the western and northern parts of Thailand, which could possibly induce earthquakes of magnitude (ML of 5.5-6.5. Although seismic design code has been enforced in the area since 1980, the fundamental knowledge on dynamic soil behavior has not been extensively attained. Approach: Collection of existing borehole information in the targeted areas to form a typical subsoil profile. This borehole information, together with analytical result obtained from logistic regression based on worldwide liquefaction database was used to conduct an effective stress analysis. Result: Literature reviews of the existing boreholes from the two largest provinces in the north, Chiang-Mai and Chiang-Rai, revealed that the areas were underlain by layers of loose to medium dense sand found at shallow depths. The corrected SPT N-value of those sand layers varies in the range of 5-20. A simple tool correlating the liquefaction probability, which correlated excess pore water pressure and peak ground acceleration, was proposed for the studied areas. Conclusion: The proposed correlation provided preliminary tool to evaluate risk of the shallow foundation from partial liquefaction in the two northern provinces of Thailand.

  19. Upcycling potato peel waste – Data of the pre-screening of the acid-catalyzed liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Patrícia; Bordado, João Carlos Moura; Mateus, Maria Margarida; Galhano dos Santos, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Herein, the data acquired regarding the preliminary and exploratory experiments conducted with potato peel as a biomass source for the direct thermochemical liquefaction is disclosed. The procedure was carried out in a 2-ethylhexanol/DEG solvent mixture at 160 °C in the presence of p-Toluenesulfonic acid. The adopted procedure afforded a bio-oil in high yield (up to 93%) after only 30 min. For longer reaction times, higher amounts of solid residues were obtained leading, consequently, to lower yields. PMID:27182538

  20. Advance Health Care Directives and “Public Guardian”: The Italian Supreme Court Requests the Status of Current and Not Future Inability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Paolo Busardò

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advance health care decisions animate an intense debate in several European countries, which started more than 20 years ago in the USA and led to the adoption of different rules, based on the diverse legal, sociocultural and philosophical traditions of each society. In Italy, the controversial issue of advance directives and end of life’s rights, in the absence of a clear and comprehensive legislation, has been over time a subject of interest of the Supreme Court. Since 2004 a law introduced the “Public Guardian,” aiming to provide an instrument of assistance to the person lacking in autonomy because of an illness or incapacity. Recently, this critical issue has once again been brought to the interest of the Supreme Court, which passed a judgment trying to clarify the legislative application of the appointment of the Guardian in the field of advance directives.

  1. Coal liquefaction technology. 1979-March, 1980 (citations from the American Petroleum Institute data base). Report for 1979-Mar 80. [318 abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-06-01

    Techniques and processes for the conversion of coal to liquid chemicals and fuels are cited in this bibliography covering world-wide literature. Included are studies covering in-situ combustion, process equipment, design, and performance. Coal desulfurization, cleaning, or preparation which does not directly involve the liquefaction process are not covered. (This updated bibliography contains 318 abstracts, all of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  2. Coal liquefaction technology. 1978-1979 (citations from the American Petroleum Institute data base). Report for 1978-79. [188 abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-06-01

    Techniques and processes for the conversion of coal to liquid chemicals and fuels are cited in this bibliography covering world-wide literature. Included are studies covering in-situ combustion, process equipment, design, and performance. Coal desulfurization, cleaning, or preparation which does not directly involve the liquefaction process are not covered. (This updated bibliography contains 188 abstracts, none of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  3. Nurses' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end-of-life care: a cross-sectional study in five countries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, Alice

    2016-01-28

    Nurses\\' knowledge regarding advance directives may affect their administration and completion in end-of-life care. Confidence among nurses is a barrier to the provision of quality end-of-life care. This study investigated nurses\\' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end-of-life care, in Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy and the USA using a cross-sectional descriptive design (n = 1089). In all countries, older nurses and those who had more professional experience felt more confident managing patients\\' symptoms at end-of-life and more comfortable stopping preventive medications at end-of-life. Nurses in the USA reported that they have more knowledge and experience of advance directives compared with other countries. In addition, they reported the highest levels of confidence and comfort in dealing with end-of-life care. Although legislation for advance directives does not yet exist in Ireland, nurses reported high levels of confidence in end-of-life care.

  4. Contribution of Morphological Awareness and Lexical Inferencing Ability to L2 Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension among Advanced EFL Learners: Testing Direct and Indirect Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongbo; Koda, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Within the Structural Equation Modeling framework, this study tested the direct and indirect effects of morphological awareness and lexical inferencing ability on L2 vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension among advanced Chinese EFL readers in a university in China. Using both regular z-test and the bootstrapping (data-based resampling)…

  5. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, the authors have planned a structured program including: Market/process/cost/evaluation; Lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; Lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; Bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and Utility review. Progress is reported from all three organizations.

  6. Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation briefly reviews the SiC/SiC major environmental and environment-fatigue degradations encountered in simulated turbine combustion environments, and thus NASA environmental barrier coating system evolution for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for meeting the engine performance requirements. The presentation will review several generations of NASA EBC materials systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. This paper will also focus on the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for next generation turbine engine applications. The current development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be briefly discussed.

  7. Editorial, Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because plasma-boundary physics encompasses some of the most important unresolved issues for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and future fusion power reactors, there is a strong interest in the fusion community for better understanding and characterization of plasma-wall interactions. Chemical and physical sputtering cause the erosion of the limiters/divertor plates and vacuum vessel walls (made of C, Be and W, for example) and degrade fusion performance by diluting the fusion fuel and excessively cooling the core, while carbon redeposition could produce long-term in-vessel tritium retention, degrading the superior thermo-mechanical properties of the carbon materials. Mixed plasma-facing materials are proposed, requiring optimization for different power and particle flux characteristics. Knowledge of material properties as well as characteristics of the plasma-material interaction are prerequisites for such optimizations. Computational power will soon reach hundreds of teraflops, so that theoretical and plasma science expertise can be matched with new experimental capabilities in order to mount a strong response to these challenges. To begin to address such questions, a Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions for Fusion (PSIF) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 21 to 23 March, 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers in fusion related plasma-wall interactions in order to address these topics and to identify the most needed and promising directions for study, to exchange opinions on the present depth of knowledge of surface properties for the main fusion-related materials, e.g., C, Be and W, especially for sputtering, reflection, and deuterium (tritium) retention properties. The goal was to suggest the most important next steps needed for such basic computational and experimental work to be facilitated

  8. SURFACE-MODIFIED COALS FOR ENHANCED CATALYST DISPERSION AND LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of the Department of Energy Sponsored project DE-FGF22-95PC95229 entitled, surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. The aims of the study were to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on the coal and to train and educate minority scientists in catalysts and separation science. Illinois No. 6 Coal (DEC-24) was selected for the study. The surfactants investigated included dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB), a cationic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, and Triton x-100, a neutral surfactant. Ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate was used as the molybdenum catalyst precursor. Zeta potential, BET, FTIR, AFM, UV-Vis and luminescence intensity measurements were undertaken to assess the surface properties and the liquefaction activities of the coal. The parent coal had a net negative surface charge over the pH range 2-12. However, in the presence of DDAB the negativity of the surface charge decreased. At higher concentrations of DDAB, a positive surface charge resulted. In contrast to the effect of DDAB, the zeta potential of the coal became more negative than the parent coal in the presence of SDS. Adsorption of Triton reduced the net negative charge density of the coal samples. The measured surface area of the coal surface was about 30 m{sup 2}/g compared to 77m{sup 2}/g after being washed with deionized water. Addition of the surfactants decreased the surface area of the samples. Adsorption of the molybdenum catalyst increased the surface area of the coal sample. The adsorption of molybdenum on the coal was significantly promoted by preadsorption of DDAB and SDS. Molybdenum adsorption showed that, over a wide range of concentrations and pH values, the DDAB treated coal adsorbed a higher amount of molybdenum than the samples treated with SDS. The infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the atomic force

  9. Heavy recycle solvent studies in two-stage coal liquefaction. Final technical report, September 1, 1982-December 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longanbach, J. R.

    1984-01-10

    The objective of this program has been to study the chemistry of the components with high boiling points in a direct coal liquefaction recycle solvent and to identify those components which lead to higher overall yields and improved product stability in the initial coal dissolution step of direct coal liquefaction processes. The major conclusions are: -454 C recycle solvent is primarily aromatic hydrocarbons (73%) and contains almost no asphaltenes; +454 C recycle solvent is primarily asphaltenes and aromatic hydrocarbons; recycle solvent also contains aliphatic hydrocarbons, N-containing aromatics and O-containing aromatics; heteroatoms in coal derived materials seem to be grouped by type, i.e. acidic O and basic N and sulfur occur together; under helium a small net amount of hydrogen and more CO and CO/sub 2/ are produced than under hydrogen; under hydrogen the amounts of H/sub 2/S and hydrocarbon gases are increased and a small amount of hydrogen gas is usually consumed; overall coal conversions to THF solubles are improved by adding more -454 C solvent but decreased by adding +454 C solvent; for added fractions of -454 C solvent the pecent conversion to THF solubles increases in the order aromatic hydrocarbons (+7.2) > aliphatic hydrocarbons (+0.8) > no added solvent (0.0) > N-containing aromatics (-0.9) > O-containing aromatics (-22.1); percent conversion to THF solubles using -454 C solvent with +454 C solvent fractions added decrease in the order aliphatics (+3.7) > aromatic hydrocarbons (+3.0) > no added solvent (0.0) > O-containing aromatics (-9.3) > N-containing aromatics (-13.3); of the +454 C solvent components, aromatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic hydrocarbons are beneficial but total only approx. 25% of the +454 C recycle solvent; and steric effects may be important in determining the effectiveness of the heavier solvent components as liquefaction solvents. 28 references, 25 figures, 31 tables.

  10. Co-production of bio-oil and propylene through the hydrothermal liquefaction of polyhydroxybutyrate producing cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jonathan; Bransgrove, Rachel; Beacham, Tracey A; Allen, Michael J; Meixner, Katharina; Drosg, Bernhard; Ting, Valeska P; Chuck, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    A polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) producing cyanobacteria was converted through hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) into propylene and a bio-oil suitable for advanced biofuel production. HTL of model compounds demonstrated that in contrast to proteins and carbohydrates, no synergistic effects were detected when converting PHB in the presence of algae. Subsequently, Synechocystis cf. salina, which had accumulated 7.5wt% PHB was converted via HTL (15% dry weight loading, 340°C). The reaction gave an overall propylene yield of 2.6%, higher than that obtained from the model compounds, in addition to a bio-oil with a low nitrogen content of 4.6%. No propylene was recovered from the alternative non-PHB producing cyanobacterial strains screened, suggesting that PHB is the source of propylene. PHB producing microorganisms could therefore be used as a feedstock for a biorefinery to produce polypropylene and advanced biofuels, with the level of propylene being proportional to the accumulated amount of PHB. PMID:26881334

  11. Japan`s sunshine project. 17.. 1992 annual summary of coal liquefaction and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the achievement of coal liquefaction and gasification technology development in the Sunshine Project for FY 1992. It presents the research and development of coal liquefaction which includes studies on reaction mechanism of coal liquefaction and catalysts for coal liquefaction, the research and development of coal gasification technologies which includes studies on gasification characteristics of various coals and improvement of coal gasification efficiency, the development of bituminous coal liquefaction which includes engineering, construction and operation of a bituminous coal liquefaction pilot plant and research by a process supporting unit (PSU), the development of brown coal liquefaction which includes research on brown coal liquefaction with a pilot plant and development of techniques for upgrading coal oil from brown coal, the development of common base technologies which includes development of slurry letdown valves and study on upgrading technology of coal-derived distillates, the development of coal-based hydrogen production technology with a pilot plant, the development of technology for entrained flow coal gasification, the assessment of coal hydrogasification, and the international co-operation. 4 refs., 125 figs., 39 tabs.

  12. 75 FR 62512 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas AGENCY... September 7, 2010, by Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC (Sabine Pass), requesting long-term, multi-contract... the future develops, the capacity to import LNG and with which trade is not prohibited by U.S. law...

  13. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January-March 1979. [US DOE supported

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Progress in DOE-supported coal liquefaction pilot plant projects is reported: company, location, contract, funding, process description, history and progress in the current quarter. Related projects discussed are: coking and gasification of liquefaction plant residues, filtration of coal liquids and refining of coal liquids by hydrogenation. (LTN)

  14. Static Liquefaction on Very Loose Hostun RF Sand: Experiments and Modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doanh, T.; Ibraim, E.; Dubujet, P.; Matiotti, R.; Herle, Ivo

    Rotterdam : Balkema, 1999 - (Lade, P.; Yamamuro, J.), s. 17-28 ISBN 90-5809-038-8. [Inter. Workshop on the Physics and Mechanics of Soil Liquefaction. Baltimore (US), 10.09.1998-11.09.1998] Keywords : static liquefaction * sand * laboratory experiments * constitutive models Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  15. Physician perspectives and compliance with patient advance directives: the role external factors play on physician decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkle Christopher M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following passage of the Patient Self Determination Act in 1990, health care institutions that receive Medicare and Medicaid funding are required to inform patients of their right to make their health care preferences known through execution of a living will and/or to appoint a surrogate-decision maker. We evaluated the impact of external factors and perceived patient preferences on physicians’ decisions to honor or forgo previously established advance directives (ADs. In addition, physician views regarding legal risk, patients’ ability to comprehend complexities involved with their care, and impact of medical costs related to end-of-life care decisions were explored. Methods Attendees of two Mayo Clinic continuing medical education courses were surveyed. Three scenarios based in part on previously court-litigated matters assessed impact of external factors and perceived patient preferences on physician compliance with patient-articulated wishes regarding resuscitation. General questions measured respondents’ perception of legal risk, concerns over patient knowledge of idiosyncrasies involved with their care, and impact medical costs may have on compliance with patient preferences. Responses indicating strength of agreement or disagreement with statements were treated as ordinal data and analyzed using the Cochran Armitage trend test. Results Three hundred eighty-eight of 951 surveys were completed (41% response rate. Eighty percent reported they were likely to honor a patient’s AD despite its 5 year age. Fewer than half (41% would honor the AD of a patient in ventricular fibrillation who had expressed a desire to “pass away in peace.” Few (17% would forgo an AD following a family’s request for continued resuscitative treatment. A majority (52% considered risk of liability to be lower when maintaining someone alive against their wishes than mistakenly failing to provide resuscitative efforts. A large percentage

  16. Liquefaction analysis from seismic velocities and determination of lagoon limits Kumluca/Antalya example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanık, Osman; Ekinci, Buket; Uyanık, N. Ayten

    2013-08-01

    This study analyzes liquefaction in the Kumluca/Antalya residential area and surroundings, using seismic velocities of soil deposits and the predominant period of the earthquake wave. The liquefaction analysis calculates shear-stress ratio, shear-resistance ratio and safety factor. Shear wave velocity used in liquefaction analysis was determined through surface waves. Moreover, the dynamic parameters of the ground were calculated through seismic velocities. Distributions of groundwater, shear wave velocity, adjusted shear wave velocity, predominant period of vibration, soil amplification and ground acceleration of the research area were mapped. In addition, the liquefied and non-liquefied areas as a result of liquefaction analysis in Kumluca were determined and presented as maps. Examining these maps, among all these maps, the limits of the lagoon sandbar and the old lake area were determined using only the liquefaction map.

  17. Benefit-cost analysis of selected DOE/OHER investments in coal liquefaction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaway, J.M.; Fillo, J.P.; Gray, R.H.; Felix, W.D.; Mahlum, D.D.

    1982-09-01

    Based in large part of the lack of specific information about the nature and magnitude of health impacts that could occur from commercialization of a coal liquefaction industry, DOE initiated a broad-based program to study the potential health and environmental fate and effects of process streams from several coal liquefaction process options. Responsibility for this research was assigned to OHER. Specific results of this research program that are important for the purpose of this analysis include findings that: the toxicity and teratogenic potential of coal liquids boiling below 450/sup 0/F is small; mutagenic and carcinogenic activity is typically expressed in coal liquids boiling above 750/sup 0/F; and mutagenic and carcinogenic activity increases markedly in coal liquids boiling above 800/sup 0/F. Based on the above findings, OHER funded research to evaluate the effect of various hydrotreatment levels on the biological activity of coal-derived liquids. Studies using the Ames assay or mammalian cell transformation assays indicated that hydrotreatment was effective in reducing biological activity of coal-derived liquids. Skin-painting studies demonstrated that carcinogenicity was also reduced by hydrotreatment. Studies in progress are evaluating the effects of hydrotreatment severity on biological activity. However, it appears reasonably clear that health risks can be reduced by hydrotreating only materials that boil above 750/sup 0/F. Materials boiling below 750/sup 0/ could be marketed directly without significant risk to individuals exposed to these products. The benefit-cost analysis presented is based on the premise that the cost differential between full and partial hydrotreatment provides the basis for approximating the potential benefits associated with the relevant OHER research investments.

  18. Coal liquefaction policy in China: Explaining the policy reversal since 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China has emerged as a leader in coal liquefaction. While the country's abundant coal resources and acute concerns about oil security help explain China's interest in liquefaction, the driving forces for this industry are complicated and policy has been inconsistent. Since 2006 Beijing has tried to slow down the development of liquefaction; even as China has become more dependent on imported oil, the central government has been wary about the large impact of liquefaction technologies on scarce resources such as water. However, local government officials in coal rich areas have strong incentives to pour investment into the technology, which helps explain the uneven development and policy. The future of coal liquefaction will depend on how these forces unfold along with major Beijing-led reforms in the Chinese coal industry, which is closing smaller mines and favoring the emergence of larger coal producing firms. Those reforms will have mixed effects on liquefaction. They temporarily contribute to higher prices for coal while over the longer term creating coal companies that have much greater financial and technical skills needed to deploy technologies such as coal liquefaction at a scale needed if this energy pathway is to be competitive with conventional sources of liquid fuel. - Highlights: ► We explain swings in Chinese policy on coal liquefaction, a possible substitute for imported oil. ► Since 2006 Beijing's support has waned due to fears about environmental impacts and cost of liquefaction. ► Local governments in some coal rich regions remain strongly supportive. ► Volatile oil prices and rising coal prices make this industry more risky than previously thought. ► Consolidation of the coal industry will have mixed effects on viability of liquefaction projects.

  19. Study on thermochemical liquefaction of biomass feedstocks; Biomass genryo no yuka hanno tokusei ni kansuru kisoteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-10

    Liquefaction is applied to various biomass wastes and unused biomass to study characteristics of the liquefaction in each case. The paper described the system of the conversion and use of biomass into energy, conducted the positioning of the liquefaction, and outlined a history of the liquefaction chemistry and the study. To obtain basic data of characteristics of the liquefaction of various biomass raw materials, the liquefaction was conducted changing operational factors for the purpose of clarifying the product distribution of oil and by-products and oil properties. A comprehensive consideration was made of the liquefaction based on basic data and literature reports on the liquefaction of various biomass. From the above-mentioned studies, it was concluded that the energy can be recovered in a form of oil by applying the liquefaction to various biomass materials. A series of the study clarified effects of various operational factors on characteristics of the liquefaction as well as effects of classification of biomass materials and composition of the materials on characteristics of the liquefaction. 141 refs., 78 figs., 56 tabs.

  20. Rationale for continuing R&D in indirect coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G. [MITRE Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this analysis is to use the world energy demand/supply model developed at MITRE to examine future liquid fuels supply scenarios both for the world and for the United States. This analysis has determined the probable extent of future oil resource shortages and the likely time frame in which the shortages will occur. The role that coal liquefaction could play in helping to alleviate this liquid fuels shortfall is also examined. The importance of continuing R&D to improve process performance and reduce the costs of coal-derived transportation fuel is quantified in terms of reducing the time when coal liquids will become competitive with petroleum.

  1. Analysis of engineering cycles power, refrigerating and gas liquefaction plant

    CERN Document Server

    Haywood, R W

    1991-01-01

    Extensively revised, updated and expanded, the fourth edition of this popular text provides a rigorous analytical treatment of modern energy conversion plant. Notable for both its theoretical and practical treatment of conventional and nuclear power plant, and its studies of refrigerating and gas-liquefaction plant. This fourth edition now includes material on topics of increasing concern in the fields of energy 'saving' and reduction of environmental pollution. This increased coverage deals specifically with the following areas: CHP (cogeneration) plant, studies of both gas and coal burning p

  2. Documenting Liquefaction Failures Using Satellite Remote Sensing and Artificial Intelligence Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, T.; Baise, L. G.; Gens, R.; Prakash, A.; Gupta, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    Historically, earthquake induced liquefaction is known to have caused extensive damage around the world. Therefore, there is a compelling need to characterize and map liquefaction after a seismic event. Currently, after an earthquake event, field-based mapping of liquefaction is sporadic and limited due to inaccessibility, short life of the failures, difficulties in mapping large aerial extents, and lack of resources. We hypothesize that as liquefaction occurs in saturated granular soils due to an increase in pore pressure, the liquefaction related terrain changes should have an associated increase in soil moisture with respect to the surrounding non-liquefied regions. The increase in soil moisture affects the thermal emittance and, hence, change detection using pre- and post-event thermal infrared (TIR) imagery is suitable for identifying areas that have undergone post-earthquake liquefaction. Though change detection using TIR images gives the first indication of areas of liquefaction, the spatial resolution of TIR images is typically coarser than the resolution of corresponding visible, near-infrared (NIR), and shortwave infrared (SWIR) images. We hypothesize that liquefaction induced changes in the soil and associated surface effects cause textural and spectral changes in images acquired in the visible, NIR, and SWIR. Although these changes can be from various factors, a synergistic approach taking advantage of the thermal signature variation due to changing soil moisture condition, together with the spectral information from high resolution visible, NIR, and SWIR bands can help to narrow down the locations of post-event liquefaction for regional documentation. In this study, we analyze the applicability of combining various spectral bands from different satellites (Landsat, Terra-MISR, IRS-1C, and IRS-1D) for documenting liquefaction failures associated with the magnitude 7.6 earthquake that occurred in Bhuj, India, in 2001. We combine the various spectral

  3. 精神障碍患者的预先指示权与自愿治疗%Mentally disordered patients' right to advance directives and voluntary treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙也龙

    2013-01-01

    《中华人民共和国精神卫生法》确立了精神障碍患者自愿治疗原则,预先指示权应是这项原则的重要内容.预先指示权不仅能够保障患者自治,而且也具有多重的现实意义.我国具有确立预先指示权的法律环境,但大众对预先指示权比较陌生,建议对其进行适当的提倡和推广.%Mental Health Law of the People's Republic of China establishes the principle of voluntary treatment for mentally disordered patients. The right to advance directives should be an important aspect of the principle of voluntary treatment because it can protect mentally disordered patients'autonomy and has multiple practical values. China has the legal environment to establish mentally disordered patients'right to advance directives. However, most Chinese people are not fairly familiar with this right Therefore it is suggested to advocate and promote the right to advance directives in China.

  4. Examination of DMT-based methods for evaluating the liquefaction potential of soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gordon Tung-Chin KUNG; Der-Her LEE; Pai-Hsiang TSAI

    2011-01-01

    The flat dilatometer test(DMT)has the potential to be a useful tool in the evaluation ofliquefaction potential of soils.In practice,it is necessary to carefully examine existing DMT-based methods for evaluating liquefaction potential.We conducted the DMT and cone penetration test(CPT)in high liquefaction potential areas to examine the existing DMT-based methods for liquefaction potential evaluation.Specifically,the DMT and CPT were conducted side-by-side at each of six in-situ sites,and thus it is feasible to utilize those test results to validate the existing DMT-based methods.The DMT parameter,horizontal stress index(KD),is used as an indicator for estimating liquefaction resistance of soils in terms of cyclic resistance ratio(CRR).The analysis results revealed that the existing KD-based liquefaction evaluation methods would overestimate the CRR of soils,which leads to overestimation of the factor of safety against liquefaction.Also,the estimations of DMT-KD values by using the CPT-qc as well as the correlation between DMT-Ko and CPT-qc proposed by the previous studies would be significantly smaller than field measurements.The results reflected that further validation of the existing DMT-based methods for liquefaction evaluation is desirable.

  5. Liquefaction and Product Identification of Main Chemical Compositions of Wood in Phenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qiu-hui; Zhao Guang-jie; Jie Shu-jun

    2005-01-01

    To clarify liquefaction ratios and their construction variations of the main chemical compositions of wood in phenol using phosphoric acid as a catalyst, the chemical ingredients of wood such as holocellulose, cellulose and lignin, were measured and extracted according to GB methods. With Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), the product identification of reactant before and after liquefaction in phenol was investigated. The molecular weights and their distributions of the liquefaction results (acetone soluble parts) were studied by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Results show that the molecular weights and their distributions of poplar and Chinese fir are almost the same. In poplar, the distribution of cellulose is the largest, and that of holocellulose the smallest after liquefaction. For Chinese fir, the distribution of holocellulose is the largest, and that of cellulose the smallest. After liquefaction of poplar cellulose, the change bands of FTIR spectrum observed below 1 600 cm-1, can be attributed to new substitute groups. The same is true for poplar lignin. For Chinese fir, the spectra of liquefaction results of all chemical compositions differ from that of wood meal. This reveals the more activity groups were produced because of the reactions between Chinese fir and phenol. The research shows that the liquefaction ratios of poplar decrease in the following order: holocellulose > lignin > cellulose, and those of Chinese fir in the order: lignin > cellulose > holocellulose.

  6. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunshan Song; Schobert, H.H.; Parfitt, D.P. [and others

    1997-11-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on exploring novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction and the effectiveness of temperature-programmed liquefaction using dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research was to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that could be used in low concentrations but exhibit relatively high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. We have synthesized and tested various catalyst precursors in liquefaction of subbituminous and bituminous coals and in model compound studies to examine how do the composition and structure of the catalytic precursors affect their effectiveness for coal liquefaction under different reaction conditions, and how do these factors affect their catalytic functions for hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, for cleavage of C-C bonds in polycyclic systems such as 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, for hydrogenolysis of C-O bond such as that in dinaphthylether, for hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds and other oxygen-containing compounds such as xanthene, and for hydrodesulfurization of polycyclic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene. The novel bimetallic and monometallic precursors synthesized and tested in this project include various Mo- and Fe-based compounds.

  7. Liquefaction phenomena associated with the Emilia earthquake sequence of May–June 2012 (Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emergeo Working Group

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the geological effects induced by the 2012 Emilia seismic sequence in the Po Plain. Extensive liquefaction phenomena were observed over an area of ~ 1200 km2 following the 20 May, ML 5.9 and 29 May, ML 5.8 mainshocks; both occurred on about E–W trending, S dipping blind thrust faults. We collected the coseismic geological evidence through field and aerial surveys, reports from local people and Web-based survey. On the basis of their morphologic and structural characteristics, we grouped the 1362 effects surveyed into three main categories: liquefaction (485, fractures with liquefaction (768, and fractures (109. We show that the quite uneven distribution of liquefaction effects, which appear concentrated and aligned, is mostly controlled by the presence of paleo-riverbeds, out-flow channels and fans of the main rivers crossing the area; these terrains are characterised by the pervasive presence of sandy layers in the uppermost 5 m, a local feature that, along with the presence of a high water table, greatly favours liquefaction. We also find that the maximum distance of observed liquefaction from the earthquake epicentre is ~ 30 km, in agreement with the regional empirical relations available for the Italian Peninsula. Finally, we observe that the contour of the liquefaction observations has an elongated shape almost coinciding with the aftershock area, the InSAR deformation area, and the I ≥ 6 EMS area. This observation confirms the control of the earthquake source on the liquefaction distribution, and provides useful hints in the characterisation of the seismogenic source responsible for historical and pre-historical liquefactions.

  8. Indirect thermal liquefaction process for producing liquid fuels from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    A progress report on an indirect liquefaction process to convert biomass type materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels by gasification followed by catalytic liquid fuels synthesis has been presented. A wide variety of feedstocks can be processed through the gasification system to a gas with a heating value of 500 + Btu/SCF. Some feedstocks are more attractive than others with regard to producing a high olefin content. This appears to be related to hydrocarbon content of the material. The H/sub 2//CO ratio can be manipulated over a wide range in the gasification system with steam addition. Some feedstocks require the aid of a water-gas shift catalyst while others appear to exhibit an auto-catalytic effect to achieve the conversion. H/sub 2/S content (beyond the gasification system wet scrubber) is negligible for the feedstocks surveyed. The water gas shift reaction appears to be enhanced with an increase in pyrolysis reactor temperature over the range of 1300 to 1700/sup 0/F. Reactor temperature in the Fischer-Tropsch step is a significant factor with regard to manipulating product composition analysis. The optimum temperature however will probably correspond to maximum conversion to liquid hydrocarbons in the C/sub 5/ - C/sub 17/ range. Continuing research includes integrated system performance assessment, alternative feedstock characterization (through gasification) and factor studies for gasification (e.g., catalyst usage, alternate heat transfer media, steam usage, recycle effects, residence time study) and liquefaction (e.g., improved catalysts, catalyst activity characterization).

  9. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunshan, Song; Kirby, S.; Schmidt, E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to explore bimetallic dispersed catalysts for more efficient coal liquefaction. Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting various aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. This paper describes recent results on (1) hydrodeoxygenation of O-containing polycyclic model compounds using novel organometallic catalyst precursors; and (2) activity and selectivity of dispersed Fe catalysts from organometallic and inorganic precursors for hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl) bibenzyl. The results showed that some iron containing catalysts have higher activity in the sulfur-free form, contrary to conventional wisdom. Adding sulfur to Fe precursors with Cp-ligands decreased the activity of the resulting catalyst. This is in distinct contrast to the cases with iron pentacarbonyl and superfine Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where S addition increased their catalytic activity substantially. A positive correlation between sulfur addition and increased activity can be seen, but a reversed trend between Fe cluster size and hydrocracking conversion could be observed, for carbonyl-type Fe precursors. It is apparent that the activity and selectivity of Fe catalysts for NMBB conversion depends strongly on both the type of ligand environment, the oxidation state and the number of intermetal bonds in the molecular precursor.

  10. Hydrothermal liquefaction of aquatic plants to bio-oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S.; Fu, H.; Chen, J. [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of producing bio-oils from aquatic plants by hydrothermal liquefaction using 2 typical aquatic plants as feedstocks, notably Enteromorpha prolifera and water hyacinth which are typical aquatic plants found in seawater and freshwater. Bio-oil production from these 2 feedstocks was studied in a batch reactor at controlled temperatures under an initial partial pressure of 2.0 MPa N2. The effects of temperature and reaction time on the liquefaction products yields were also studied. GC-MS and elemental analysis were carried out to analyze the composition of bio-oils. The bio-oil produced from Enteromorpha prolifera contained mainly fatty acids, esters and quite a few heterocyclic compounds. Phenols and their derivatives were found to be the main compounds in bio-oils produced from water hyacinth. An elemental analysis revealed that bio-oils produced from the 2 aquatic plants have higher energy density. It was concluded that the use of aquatic plants as feedstock for liquid fuel can contribute to environmental protection and sustainable energy development by reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Mechanism of Liquefaction-Induced Large Settlements of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheer Ahmed Almani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, mechanism of liquefaction-related large settlements of the soil-structure system during the earthquake was studied using numerical modelling. The isolated shallow strip plane strain footing pad, supporting a typical simple frame structure, was founded on the ground at the shallow depth from the level ground surface. This system was modelled as plane-strain using the FLAC (Fast Lagrangian Analysis of continua 2D dynamic modelling and analysis code. This case focuses on the basic mechanisms of liquefaction-induced large deformations of the structure during an earthquake and will provide a benchmark model case for comparison with the model case in which jet grouted columns are provided as ground reinforcement. The results showed that large settlements of shallow foundations in punching shear are triggered during cyclic excitation. These large settlements under the structure are driven by load of structure and earthquake excitation. Monotonic shear deformation, lateral shear deformations and volume change of soil are main phenomena under the structure when the pore pressure rises and soil is liquefied in cyclic loading.

  12. The Dual Role of Oxygen Functions in Coal Pretreatment and Liquefaction: Crosslinking and Cleavage Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Serio; Erik Kroo; Sylvie Charpenay; Peter Solomon

    1993-09-30

    The overall objective of this project was to elucidate and model the dual role of oxygen functions in thermal pretreatment and liquefaction of low rank coals through the application of analytical techniques and theoretical models. The project was an integrated study of model polymers representative of coal structures, raw coals of primarily low rank, and selectively modified coals in order to provide specific information relevant to the reactions of real coals. The investigations included liquefaction experiments in microautoclave reactors, along with extensive analysis of intermediate solid, liquid and gaseous products. Attempts were made to incorporate the results of experiments on the different systems into a liquefaction model.

  13. [Progress in the studies of semen delayed liquefaction from chronic prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-fei; Liang, Chao-zhao

    2007-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis (CP) is a common disease among adult men. It can result in male infertility mainly by alternating the semen quality, volume, pH, component, viscosity and liquefaction. There seems to be a strong association between CP and semen delayed liquefaction. Researches on the mechanism of semen delayed liquefaction resulting from CP mainly focus on the proteolytic ferment, plasminogen activator, prostate acid phosphatase, tissue factor, lack of zinc, and pH. This article briefly reviews the progress in these aspects. PMID:17302037

  14. Advance directives and physicians' orders in nursing home residents with dementia in Flanders, Belgium: prevalence and associated outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Vandervoort, An; Van den Block, Lieve; van der Steen, Jenny T; Vander Stichele, Robert; Bilsen, Johan; Deliens, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Background: Advance care planning (ACP) is an important element of high-quality care in nursing homes, especially for residents having dementia who are often incompetent in decision-making toward the end of life. The aim of this study was describe the prevalence of documented ACP among nursing home residents with dementia in Flanders, Belgium, and associated clinical characteristics and outcomes. Methods: All 594 nursing homes in Flanders were asked to participate in a retrospective cross...

  15. Advanced Manufacturing of Intermediate Temperature, Direct Methane Oxidation Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Durable Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation builds on the successes of the Phase I program by integrating our direct oxidation membrane electrode assembly (MEA) into a monolithic solid...

  16. Liquefaction susceptibility assessment in fluvial plains using airborne lidar: the case of the 2012 Emilia earthquake sequence area (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civico, R.; Brunori, C. A.; De Martini, P. M.; Pucci, S.; Cinti, F. R.; Pantosti, D.

    2015-11-01

    We report a case study from the Po River plain region (northern Italy), where significant liquefaction-related land and property damage occurred during the 2012 Emilia seismic sequence. We took advantage of a 1 m pixel lidar digital terrain model (DTM) and of the 2012 Emilia coseismic liquefaction data set to (a) perform a detailed geomorphological study of the Po River plain area and (b) quantitatively define the liquefaction susceptibility of the geomorphologic features that experienced different abundance of liquefaction. One main finding is that linear topographic highs of fluvial origin - together with crevasse splays, abandoned riverbeds and very young land reclamation areas - acted as a preferential location for the occurrence of liquefaction phenomena. Moreover, we quantitatively defined a hierarchy in terms of liquefaction susceptibility for an ideal fluvial environment. We observed that a very high liquefaction susceptibility is found in coincidence with fluvial landforms, a high-to-moderate liquefaction susceptibility within a buffer distance of 100 and 200 m from mapped fluvial landforms and a low liquefaction susceptibility outside fluvial landforms and relative buffer areas. Lidar data allowed a significant improvement in mapping with respect to conventionally available topographic data and/or aerial imagery. These results have significant implications for accurate hazard and risk assessment as well as for land-use planning. We propose a simple geomorphological approach for liquefaction susceptibility estimation. Our findings can be applied to areas beyond Emilia that are characterized by similar fluvial-dominated environments and prone to significant seismic hazard.

  17. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Indirect Liquefaction of Blended Biomass to Produce High Octane Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Canter, Christina E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Talmadge, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartley, Damon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Searcy, Erin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the SCSA of the production of renewable high octane gasoline (HOG) via indirect liquefaction (IDL) of lignocellulosic biomass. This SCSA was developed for both the 2015 SOT (Hartley et al., 2015; ANL, 2016; DOE, 2016) and the 2017 design case for feedstock logistics (INL, 2014) and for both the 2015 SOT (Tan et al., 2015a) and the 2022 target case for HOG production via IDL (Tan et al., 2015b). The design includes advancements that are likely and targeted to be achieved by 2017 for the feedstock logistics and 2022 for the IDL conversion process. In the SCSA, the 2015 SOT case for the conversion process, as modeled in Tan et al. (2015b), uses the 2015 SOT feedstock blend of pulpwood, wood residue, and construction and demolition waste (C&D). Moreover, the 2022 design case for the conversion process, as described in Tan et al. (2015a), uses the 2017 design case blend of pulpwood, wood residue, switchgrass, and C&D. The performance characteristics of this blend are consistent with those of a single woody feedstock (e.g., pine or poplar). We also examined the influence of using a single feedstock type on SCSA results for the design case. These single feedstock scenarios could be viewed as bounding SCSA results given that the different components of the feedstock blend have varying energy and material demands for production and logistics.

  18. Liquefaction of sawdust in 1-octanol using acidic ionic liquids as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zexiang; Zheng, Huaiyu; Fan, Liwei; Liao, Yiqiang; Ding, Bingjing; Huang, Biao

    2013-08-01

    Acidic ionic liquids (AILs) as a novel catalyst in biomass liquefaction can accord with the demand of green chemistry and enhance the development of biomass thermal chemical conversion. A series of AILs containing HSO4- were synthesized by the imidazolium cation functionalization and applied to the Chinese fir sawdust liquefaction in 1-octanol in this paper. The experimental results showed that the liquefaction rate was gradually improved with the AILs acidity increasing, and reached 71.5% when 1-(4-sulfobutyl)-3-methylmidazolium hydrosulfate was used as catalyst with the 6:1 mass ratio of 1-octanol to sawdust at 423K after 60 min. Lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose were orderly desquamated, and then depolymerized and liquefied with the catalyst acidity increasing in the sawdust liquefaction process. The light oil was mainly composed of the octyl ether and the octyl ester compounds, suggesting that the solvent may play an important role in producing the high octane rating biofuel. PMID:23770997

  19. Liquefaction of Tangier soils by using physically based reliability analysis modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubujet P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approaches that are widely used to characterize propensity of soils to liquefaction are mainly of empirical type. The potential of liquefaction is assessed by using correlation formulas that are based on field tests such as the standard and the cone penetration tests. These correlations depend however on the site where they were derived. In order to adapt them to other sites where seismic case histories are not available, further investigation is required. In this work, a rigorous one-dimensional modelling of the soil dynamics yielding liquefaction phenomenon is considered. Field tests consisting of core sampling and cone penetration testing were performed. They provided the necessary data for numerical simulations performed by using DeepSoil software package. Using reliability analysis, the probability of liquefaction was estimated and the obtained results were used to adapt Juang method to the particular case of sandy soils located in Tangier.

  20. Applied research and evaluation of process concepts for liquefaction and gasification of western coals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, W. H.

    1980-09-01

    Fourteen sections, including five subsections, of the final report covering work done between June 1, 1975 to July 31, 1980 on research programs in coal gasification and liquefaction have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  1. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C.; Huang, L.; Wenzel, K.; Saini, A.K.; Burgess, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1992-12-01

    During this quarterly period progress has been made in the following three subjects related to the effects of low-temperature thermal and catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. First, the liquefaction behavior of three bituminous coals with a carbon content ranging from 77% to 85% was evaluated spectroscopically by [sup 13]C NMR and pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to delineate the structural changes that occur in the coal during liquefaction. Complementary data includes ultimate and proximate analysis, along with optical microscopy for maceral determinations. Even though these are all bituminous coals they exhibit quite different physical and chemical characteristics. The coals vary in rank, ranging from HvC b to HvA b, in petrographic composition, different maceral percentages, and in chemical nature, percent of carbon and of volatiles. It is these variations that govern the products, their distribution, and conversion percentages. Some of the products formed can be traced to a specific maceral group. Second, pyrolysis-GC-MS and FTIR techniques were used to characterize Wyodak coal before and after drying in vacuum and in air and the residues from its thermal and catalytic liquefactions. The analysis of the air-dried coal shows a decrease in the phenolic type structures in the coal network and increase in the carbonyl structures as the oxidative drying proceeds. An enhanced decrease in the carbonyl structure is observed in the liquefaction residues from the raw coal as compared to that of the vacuum dried coal. The analyses of the liquefaction residues of the air-dried coal show an increase in the ether linkages which may have a negative impact on liquefaction. The extent of the solvent adduction also increases during liquefaction with the extent of oxidation of the coal. Finally, the effects of reaction conditions were investigated on conversion of low-rank coals using a Texas subbituminous coal.

  2. Effects of relative density and accumulated shear strain on post-liquefaction residual deformation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J.; M. Kazama; Kwon, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The damage caused by liquefaction, which occurs following an earthquake, is usually because of settlement and lateral spreading. Generally, the evaluation of liquefaction has been centered on settlement, that is, residual volumetric strain. However, in actual soil, residual shear and residual volumetric deformations occur simultaneously after an earthquake. Therefore, the simultaneous evaluation of the two phenomena and the clarification of their relationship are likely to e...

  3. Techno-economic optimisation of three gas liquefaction processes for small-scale applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Elmegaard, Brian; H. Bruun, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas liquefaction systems are based on refrigeration cycles, which can be subdivided into: the cascade, mixed refrigerant and expansion-based processes. They differ by their design configurations, components and working fluids, and thus have various operating conditions and equipment inven...... thermodynamic models leads to relative deviations of up to 1% for the power consumption and 20% for the network conductance. Particular caution should thus be exercised when extrapolating the results of process models to the design of actual gas liquefaction systems....

  4. Efficiency and economics of large scale hydrogen liquefaction. [for future generation aircraft requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen is being considered as a substitute for conventional hydrocarbon-based fuels for future generations of commercial jet aircraft. Its acceptance will depend, in part, upon the technology and cost of liquefaction. The process and economic requirements for providing a sufficient quantity of liquid hydrogen to service a major airport are described. The design is supported by thermodynamic studies which determine the effect of process arrangement and operating parameters on the process efficiency and work of liquefaction.

  5. Numerical simulation of liquefaction behaviour of granular materials using Discrete Element Method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T G Sitharam; S V Dinesh

    2003-09-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation of 3-dimensional assemblies of 1000 polydisperse sphere particles using Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to study the liquefaction behaviour of granular materials. Numerical simulations of cyclic triaxial shear tests under undrained conditions are performed at different confining pressures under constant strain amplitude. Results obtained in these numerical simulations indicate that with increase in confining pressure there is an increase in liquefaction resistance.

  6. Assessment of Long-Term Research Needs for Coal-Liquefaction Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.

    1980-03-01

    The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of J.M. Deutch (Under Secretary of DOE), E. Frieman (Director, Office of Energy Research) and G. Fumich, Jr. (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Fuels), has studied and reviewed currently funded coal-liquefaction technologies. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of critical research areas that affect the long-term development of coal-liquefaction technologies. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

  7. Experimental Study of Subcritical Water Liquefaction of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Zhe; Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse;

    2014-01-01

    (woody and non-woody) on the biomass conversion, bio-crude yield, and the qualities of products were studied. The results suggested that the addition of potassium carbonate as catalyst showed a positive effect on bio-crude yield, especially for wood, where it was enhanced to 47.48 wt%. Macroalgae showed...... found that the addition of K2CO3 lowered the solids quality in terms of the heating values, while it did not have apparent effect on the functional groups of solid residues. SEM analysis of the raw biomass and solid residues revealed that the char formation for wood, sawdust and macroalgae had initially......In this work, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of wood industry residues (wood, bark, sawdust) and macroalgae for producing biofuels has been investigated under subcritical water conditions (at temperature of 300 C), with and without the presence of catalyst. The effects of catalyst and biomass type...

  8. Co-liquefaction of Enriched Coal Maceral Constituents and Sawdust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王炀; 李庭琛; 任铮伟; 颜涌捷

    2002-01-01

    Co-liquefaction of coal and sawdust was studied in the presence of hydrogen-donor solvent, tetralin. Coal samples were prepared through floatation of the Xinwen coal, followed by enrichment of maceral constituents. Sample I was rich in vitrinite and Sample II fusinite. Effects of reaction temperature, time and initial cold H2 pressure were studied on conversion, yield, especially oil yield, through comparison between these two samples. Because it is more difficult to be liquefied, Sample II, is greatly affected by changes in temperature and time. However, it is almost independent of change in initial cold H2 pressure, owing to the role of tetralin as hydrogen vehicle. Certain product(s) formed from thermolysis of sawdust can help hydrogenation of the intermediate (asphaltene and preasphaltene) in further forming oil products.

  9. Economics of hydrogen production and liquefaction updated to 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    Revised costs for generating and liquefying hydrogen in mid-1980 are presented. Plant investments were treated as straight-forward escalations resulting from inflation. Operating costs, however, were derived in terms of the unit cost of coal, fuel gas and electrical energy to permit the determination of the influence of these parameters on the cost of liquid hydrogen. Inflationary influence was recognized by requiring a 15% discounted rate of return on investment for Discounted Cash Flow financing analysis, up from 12% previously. Utility financing was revised to require an 11% interest rate on debt. The scope of operation of the hydrogen plant was revised from previous studies to include only the hydrogen generation and liquefaction facilities. On-site fuel gas and power generation, originally a part of the plant complex, was eliminated. Fuel gas and power are now treated as purchased utilities. Costs for on-site generation of fuel gas however, are included.

  10. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in coal liquefaction processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, V. B.; Keiser, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The liquefaction of coal to produce clean-burning synthetic fuels has been demonstrated at the pilot plant level. However, some significant materials problems must be solved before scale-up to commercial levels of production can be completed. Failures due to inadequate materials performance have been reported in many plant areas: in particular, stress corrosion cracking has been found in austenitic stainless steels in the reaction and separation areas and several corrosion has been observed in fractionation components. In order to screen candidate materials of construction, racks of U-bend specimens in welded and as-wrought conditions and unstressed surveillance coupons were exposed in pilot plant vessels and evaluated. Failed components were analyzed on-site and by subsequent laboratory work. Laboratory tests were also performed. From these studies alloys have been identified that are suitable for critical plant locations. 19 figures, 7 tables.

  11. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July--September 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    ERDA's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and noncatalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, including heavy boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel oil, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids also have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, ERDA is sponsoring the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. Responsibility for the design, construction, and operation of these facilities is given and progress in the quarter is summarized. Several supporting or complementary projects are described similarly. (LTN)

  12. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    DOE's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels was begun by two of DOE's predecessor agencies: Office of Coal Research (OCR) in 1962, and ERDA. The Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior, had started work in the 1930's. Current work is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and noncatalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, especially boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, and gasoline, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, DOE is supporting the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. Each of these processes are described briefly.

  13. Japan`s New Sunshine Project. 20. 1995 annual summary of coal liquefaction and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The paper described a summary of the 1995 study on coal liquefaction and gasification under the New Sunshine Project. As for coal liquefaction, a study was made of liquefaction characteristics and catalysts of various coals. Also studied were liquefaction conditions for quality improvement of liquefaction products, an evaluation method of quality of coal liquid, and a utilization method of coal liquid. In order to prevent carbonization and realize effective liquefaction, a study was conducted for elucidation of the reaction mechanism of high pressure hydrogenation. In a 150t/d pilot plant using hydrogen transfer hydrogenation solvents, the NEDOL method was studied using various catalysts and kinds of coals. This is a step prior to data acquisition for engineering, actual construction of equipment and operation. A 1t/d process supporting unit is a unit to support it. The unit conducts studies on slurry letdown valves and synthetic iron sulfide catalysts, screening of Chinese coals, etc. As to coal gasification, the paper added to the basic research the combined cycle power generation using entrained flow coal gasification for improvement of thermal efficiency and environmental acceptability and the HYCOL method for hydrogen production. 68 refs., 40 figs.

  14. A novel process for small-scale pipeline natural gas liquefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel process was proposed to liquefy natural gas by utilizing the pressure exergy. • The process is zero energy consumption. • The maximum liquefaction rate of the process is 12.61%. • The maximum exergy utilization rate is 0.1961. • The economic analysis showed that the payback period of the process is quit short. - Abstract: A novel process for small-scale pipeline natural gas liquefaction is designed and presented. The novel process can utilize the pressure exergy of the pipeline to liquefy a part of natural gas without any energy consumption. The thermodynamic analysis including mass, energy balance and exergy analysis are adopted in this paper. The liquefaction rate and exergy utilization rate are chosen as the objective functions. Several key parameters are optimized to approach the maximum liquefaction rate and exergy utilization rate. The optimization results showed that the maximum liquefaction rate is 12.61% and the maximum exergy utilization rate is 0.1961. What is more, the economic performances of the process are also discussed and compared by using the maximum liquefaction rate and exergy utilization rate as indexes. In conclusion, the novel process is suitable for pressure exergy utilization due to its simplicity, zero energy consumption and short payback period

  15. Microbial liquefaction of peat for the production of synthetic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunasekaran, M.

    1988-01-01

    Objectives of this study were: to evaluate the potential of using various microorganisms to hydrolyse and liquify peat; to determine the optimal conditions for peat hydrolysis and liquefaction; to study the co-metabolizable substances; to separate the compounds present in liquified peat by alumina and silica acid chromatography and capillary gas chromatography; and to identify the compounds in liquified peat by capillary GC-Mass spectrometry. Organisms used in the study include: Coprinus comatus, Coriolus hirsutus, Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Lenzites trabea, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus ostreatus, P. sapidus, Polyporus adjustus, Neurospora sitophila, Rhizophus arrhizus, Bacillus subtilis, Acinetobacter sp. and Alcaligenes sp. The fungi were maintained and cultivated in potato dextrose agar at 30 C. The bacteria were maintained in nutrient agar at 30 C. We have also initiated work on coal solubilization in addition to the studies on peat liquefaction. A relatively new substratum or semi-solid base for culture media called Pluronic F-127, or Polyol (BASF, New Jersey). Objectives of this study were: (1) to study the growth patterns of Candida ML 13 on pluronic as substratum; (2) to determine the rate of microbial coal solubilization on pluronic F-127 amended in different growth media; (3) to separate the mycelial mat of Candida ML 13 from unsolubilized coal particles and solubilized coal products from pluronic F-127; (4) to determine the effects of pH on microbial coal solubilization in pluronic F-127 media; (5) the effect of concentration of pluronic F-127 in media on coal solubilization; and, (6) to study the role of extracellular factors secreted by Candida ML 13 on coal solubilization in pluronic F-127 media. Results are discussed. 4 refs.

  16. Impact of seismic hazard characterization on probability of liquefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to assess the sensitivity of safety factor against the onset of liquefaction to the characteristics of the seismic hazard data defined for the site. The site considered is a deep soil site, approximately 1,000 feet thick, for which hazard, laboratory and field geophysical data are available. The uniform hazard spectra (UHS) defined at the rock outcrop at a given return period are used to define the characteristics of the ground motion input to the site. Using a Monte Carlo procedure, a large number of input ground motions (500 cases) are defined at the rock outcrop. For each soil column analysis, peak induced shear stresses are then calculated throughout the soil overburden using the concept of upward propagating shear waves through the one dimensional soil column. Shear modulus and hysteretic damping characteristics used in these calculations are consistent with the experimental data available for the site. Corresponding soil shear strengths are estimated from Standard Penetration Test (SPT) blow count data determined from the site field investigation program. The Seed empirical correlations are used to estimate the soil shear strength or capacity needed to define the onset of liquefaction. Since the SPT blow counts are found to be essentially independent of shear wave velocity measurements at the site' blow counts for strength estimates are randomly selected from the available data for each soil layer to estimate shear strength. The median values of safety factors and their variability are then found for easy layer by analyzing the computed safety factors from each of the convolution calculations

  17. Research into materials for coal liquefaction equipment (II): corrosion resistance of 310-type stainless steels for high-temperature parts of coal liquefaction plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, N.; Yuki, H.; Sawaragi, Y.; Ogawa, K.; Shida, Y.; Kudoh, T.; Fujikawa, H.

    1985-01-01

    The development is reported of a 310-type stainless steel for use in the high-temperature parts of a coal liquefaction plant. Studies were made of the following items: 1) the stress- corrosion cracking susceptibility of a variety of materials in high-temperature H/sub 2/S-Cl/sup -/ and polythionic acids, 2) their corrosion resistance in liquefaction slurries, and 3) their weldability and high-temperature strength. The new 310-type steel which has been developed (low C content, N additions, grain size number of at least 5) gives good performance in respect of all these characteristics. 1 reference.

  18. Co-liquefaction of micro algae with coal. 2; Bisai sorui to sekitan no kyoekika hanno. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, C.; Matsui, T.; Otsuki, M.; Ikenaga, N.; Suzuki, T. [Kansai University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-28

    For the removal and recycle of CO2, a global warming gas, utilization of photosynthesis by micro algae is investigated. Formed micro algae are decomposed into CO2, H2O and CH4 again, which does not result in the permanent fixation. For the effective utilization of these micro algae, creation of petroleum alternate energy was tried through the co-liquefaction of micro algae with coal. Were investigated influences of the reaction temperature during the co-liquefaction and influences of catalysts, such as Fe(CO)5-S, Ru(CO)12, and Mo(CO)6-S, which are effective for the coal liquefaction. Micro algae, such as chlorella, spirulina, and littorale, and Yallourn brown coal were tested. It was found that co-liquefaction of micro algae with coal can be successfully proceeded under the same conditions as the liquefaction of coal. The oil yield obtained from the co-liquefaction in the presence of Fe(CO)5-S, an effective catalyst for coal liquefaction, agreed appropriately with the arithmetical mean value from separate liquefaction of coal and micro algae. It was suggested that pyrrhotite, an active species for coal liquefaction, was sufficiently formed by increasing the addition of sulfur. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. 78 FR 15715 - Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions I, LLC; Lavaca Bay Pipeline System, LLC; Notice of Intent To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... liquefaction, centrifugal refrigerant compressors, and associated infrastructure; Mooring structures and... (examples include construction right-of-way, contractor/pipe storage yards, compressor stations, and...

  20. Development of advanced pump impeller fabrication technology using direct nano- ceramic dispersion casting for long time erosion durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Chang Kyu; Lee, Min Ku; Park, Jin Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    Many components of pump impeller of nuclear power plants is generally made of stainless steel and Al-bronze with superior corrosion resistance to sea water. However, they should be replaced by one- to five-year period because of material damage by a very big cavitation impact load, even though their designed durability is twenty years. Especially, in case of Young-Gwang nuclear power plant located at the west sea, damage of components of pump impeller is so critical due to the additional damage by solid particle erosion and hence their replacement period is very short as several months compared to other nuclear power plants. In addition, it is very difficult to maintain and repair the components of pump impeller since there is no database on the exact durability and damage mechanism. Therefore, in this study, fabrication technology of new advanced materials modified by dispersion of nano-carbide and -oxide ceramics into the matrix is developed first. Secondly, technology to estimate the dynamic damage by solid particle erosion is established and hence applied to the prediction of the service life of the components of pump impeller.

  1. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. The kinetics of coal liquefaction distillation resid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, H.; Wang, S.; Campbell, D.

    1998-03-01

    Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc., the University of Delaware studied the mechanism and kinetics of coal liquefaction resid conversion. The program at Delaware was conducted between August 15, 1994, and April 30, 1997. It consisted of two primary tasks. The first task was to develop an empirical test to measure the reactivity toward hydrocracking of coal-derived distillation resids. The second task was to formulate a computer model to represent the structure of the resids and a kinetic and mechanistic model of resid reactivity based on the structural representations. An introduction and Summary of the project authored by CONSOL and a report of the program findings authored by the University of Delaware researchers are presented here.

  2. Preoperative Direct Puncture Embolization of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma in Combination with Transarterial Embolization: An Analysis of 22 Consecutive Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv Mingming, E-mail: lvmingming001@163.com; Fan, Xin-dong, E-mail: fanxindong@yahoo.com.cn [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ninth People' s Hospital (China); Su Lixin, E-mail: sulixin1975@126.com [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ninth People' s Hospital (China); Chen Dong, E-mail: chenjsun@public8.sta.net.cn [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Ninth People' s Hospital (China)

    2013-02-15

    ObjectiveThis study was designed to evaluate the clinical application of preoperative auxiliary embolization for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) by direct puncture embolization (DPE) of the tumor in combination with transarterial embolization (TAE). The study included 22 patients. An 18-gauge needle was used to puncture directly into the tumor, and 20-25 % N-butyl cyanoacrylate was injected under the guidance of fluoroscopy after confirming the placement of the needle into the JNA and no leaking into the surrounding tissue. Tumors were obstructed later via TAE. The supplying arteries of JNA were from branches of the internal carotid and external carotid arteries. Control angiography showed the obliteration of contrast stain in the entire tumor mass and the distal supplying arteries disappeared after DPE in combination with TAE. Surgical resection was performed within 4 days after embolization and none of the patients required blood transfusion. The use of DPE in combination with TAE was a safe, feasible, and efficacious method. It can devascularize effectively the JNAs and reduce intraoperative bleeding when JNAs are extirpated.

  3. Preoperative Direct Puncture Embolization of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma in Combination with Transarterial Embolization: An Analysis of 22 Consecutive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ObjectiveThis study was designed to evaluate the clinical application of preoperative auxiliary embolization for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) by direct puncture embolization (DPE) of the tumor in combination with transarterial embolization (TAE). The study included 22 patients. An 18-gauge needle was used to puncture directly into the tumor, and 20–25 % N-butyl cyanoacrylate was injected under the guidance of fluoroscopy after confirming the placement of the needle into the JNA and no leaking into the surrounding tissue. Tumors were obstructed later via TAE. The supplying arteries of JNA were from branches of the internal carotid and external carotid arteries. Control angiography showed the obliteration of contrast stain in the entire tumor mass and the distal supplying arteries disappeared after DPE in combination with TAE. Surgical resection was performed within 4 days after embolization and none of the patients required blood transfusion. The use of DPE in combination with TAE was a safe, feasible, and efficacious method. It can devascularize effectively the JNAs and reduce intraoperative bleeding when JNAs are extirpated.

  4. Energy optimization for liquefaction process of natural gas in peak shaving plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokarizadeh Haghighi Shirazi, M.; Mowla, D. [School of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Shiraz University, Zand Street, Shiraz, Fars (Iran)

    2010-07-15

    One of the most important sections in the gas peak shaving plant regarding the energy consumption is the liquefaction process of natural gas (NG). Thus, selection and development of this process with the lowest energy consumption, offer huge potential energy and cost benefits. Here, a single-stage mixed refrigerant (SMR) cryogenic cycle with two compression stages has been selected for producing Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). Energy consumption of the process as an objective function is optimized by describing key variables of the design. The proposed process's calculations of thermodynamic concepts and properties are applied in MATLAB software to generate the objective function; furthermore Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used as an optimization method. Concerning works done in this area, more key parameters - related directly to the objective function - are introduced in this paper. A low irreversibility is due to enhanced values of key parameters in the LNG heat exchanger observed under a low temperature difference between hot and cold composite curves. Finally, the exergy lost of equipments in the proposed process are evaluated and analyzed in details. (author)

  5. Process Development for Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Algae Feedstocks in a Continuous-Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Holladay, Johnathan E.

    2013-10-01

    Wet algae slurries can be converted into an upgradeable biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable biocrude product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 °C) in a continuous-flow, pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause process difficulties. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations of up to 35 wt% of dry solids. Catalytic hydrotreating was effectively applied for hydrodeoxygenation, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrodesulfurization of the biocrude to form liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics, allowing the water to be considered for recycle of nutrients to the algae growth ponds. As a result, high conversion of algae to liquid hydrocarbon and gas products was found with low levels of organic contamination in the byproduct water. All three process steps were accomplished in bench-scale, continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  6. Energy optimization for liquefaction process of natural gas in peak shaving plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important sections in the gas peak shaving plant regarding the energy consumption is the liquefaction process of natural gas (NG). Thus, selection and development of this process with the lowest energy consumption, offer huge potential energy and cost benefits. Here, a single-stage mixed refrigerant (SMR) cryogenic cycle with two compression stages has been selected for producing Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). Energy consumption of the process as an objective function is optimized by describing key variables of the design. The proposed process's calculations of thermodynamic concepts and properties are applied in MATLAB software to generate the objective function; furthermore Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used as an optimization method. Concerning works done in this area, more key parameters - related directly to the objective function - are introduced in this paper. A low irreversibility is due to enhanced values of key parameters in the LNG heat exchanger observed under a low temperature difference between hot and cold composite curves. Finally, the exergy lost of equipments in the proposed process are evaluated and analyzed in details.

  7. MAGNETO-CHEMICAL CHARACTER STUDIES OF NOVEL Fe CATALYSTS FOR COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty A. Akundi; Jian H. Zhang; A.N. Murty; S.V. Naidu

    2002-04-01

    The objectives of the present study are: (1) To synthesize iron catalysts: Fe/MoO{sub 3}, and Fe/Co/MoO{sub 3} employing two distinct techniques: Pyrolysis with organic precursors and Co-precipitation of metal nitrates; (2) To investigate the magnetic character of the catalysts before and after exposure to CO and CO+H{sub 2} by (a) Mossbauer study of Iron (b) Zerofield Nuclear Magnetic Resonance study of Cobalt, and (c) Magnetic character of the catalyst composite; (3) To study the IR active surface species of the catalyst while stimulating (CO--Metal, (CO+H{sub 2})--Metal) interactions, by FTIR Spectroscopy; and (4) To analyze the catalytic character (conversion efficiency and product distribution) in both direct and indirect liquefaction Process and (5) To examine the correlations between the magnetic and chemical characteristics. This report presents the results of our investigation on (a) the effect of metal loading (b) the effect of intermetallic ratio and (c) the effect of catalyst preparation procedure on (i) the magnetic character of the catalyst composite (ii) the IR active surface species of the catalyst and (iii) the catalytic yields for three different metal loadings: 5%, 15%, and 25% (nominal) for three distinct intermetallic ratios (Fe/Co = 0.3, 1.5, 3.0).

  8. Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional Single-Sensor-Single Indicator (SSSI) displays are poorly matched to the cognitive abilities of operators, especially for large and complex systems. It is difficult for operators to monitor very large arrays of displays and controls, and to integrate the information displayed therein. In addition, standard operating procedures (SOPs) are bulky (running to many hundreds of pages) and difficult to use, and operators may become lost. For these reasons, and also because it is becoming increasingly difficult to find replacements for aging hardware components, there is a trend towards computerized graphical interfaces for nuclear power plants (NPPs). There is, however, little rational theory for display design in this domain. This report describes some recent theoretical developments and shows how to develop displays which will greatly reduce the cognitive load on the operator and allow the use of perceptual rather than cognitive mechanisms while using SON and to support state diagnosis and fault management. The report outlines the conceptual framework within which such a new approach could be developed, and provides an example of how the operating procedures for the start-up sequence of a NPP could be realized. A detailed description of a set of displays for a graphical interface for the SON of the feedwater system is provided as an example of how the proposed approach could be realized, and a general account of how it would fit into the overall start-up sequence is given. Examples of open-quotes direct perceptionclose quotes or open-quotes ecologicalclose quotes configural state space displays to support the use of the proposed direct manipulation SOP interface are provided, and also a critical discussion which identifies some difficulties which may be anticipated should the general approach herein advocated be adopted

  9. Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.G.; Shaheen, S.; Moray, N. [and others

    1997-08-01

    Traditional Single-Sensor-Single Indicator (SSSI) displays are poorly matched to the cognitive abilities of operators, especially for large and complex systems. It is difficult for operators to monitor very large arrays of displays and controls, and to integrate the information displayed therein. In addition, standard operating procedures (SOPs) are bulky (running to many hundreds of pages) and difficult to use, and operators may become lost. For these reasons, and also because it is becoming increasingly difficult to find replacements for aging hardware components, there is a trend towards computerized graphical interfaces for nuclear power plants (NPPs). There is, however, little rational theory for display design in this domain. This report describes some recent theoretical developments and shows how to develop displays which will greatly reduce the cognitive load on the operator and allow the use of perceptual rather than cognitive mechanisms while using SON and to support state diagnosis and fault management. The report outlines the conceptual framework within which such a new approach could be developed, and provides an example of how the operating procedures for the start-up sequence of a NPP could be realized. A detailed description of a set of displays for a graphical interface for the SON of the feedwater system is provided as an example of how the proposed approach could be realized, and a general account of how it would fit into the overall start-up sequence is given. Examples of {open_quotes}direct perception{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}ecological{close_quotes} configural state space displays to support the use of the proposed direct manipulation SOP interface are provided, and also a critical discussion which identifies some difficulties which may be anticipated should the general approach herein advocated be adopted.

  10. Facile synthesis of Pt-Pd@Silicon nanostructure as an advanced electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Jafari-Asl, M.; Rezaei, B.; Abarghoui, M. Mokhtari; Farrokhpour, H.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, platinum-palladium (Pt-Pd) is assembled in-situ on the surface of porous silicon flour (PSiF) through chemical reduction of PtCl62-/PdCl42- and oxidation of the precursor solution SiF64-. The components and the morphological properties of the Pt-Pd on PSiF is investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques. In the next stage, screen printed graphene electrode (SPGE) is prepared by electro-reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide at the surface of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), which is subsequently characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, FE-SEM, and electrochemical methods. Finally, a combination of Pt-Pd@PSi nanostructure and SPGE is used for the electro-oxidation of methanol in direct methanol fuel cell. The electrochemical results demonstrate that the Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE exhibits an excellent electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation. In addition, the electron transfer kinetic of methanol oxidation on Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that the surface of Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE is not affected (poisoned) by intermediate products such as CO.

  11. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material: 2. Direct measures of particle properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Rubin, David M.

    2012-01-01

    1. In this, the second of a pair of papers on the structure of well-sorted natural granular material (sediment), new methods are described for automated measurements from images of sediment, of: 1) particle-size standard deviation (arithmetic sorting) with and without apparent void fraction; and 2) mean particle size in material with void fraction. A variety of simulations of granular material are used for testing purposes, in addition to images of natural sediment. Simulations are also used to establish that the effects on automated particle sizing of grains visible through the interstices of the grains at the very surface of a granular material continue to a depth of approximately 4 grain diameters and that this is independent of mean particle size. Ensemble root-mean squared error between observed and estimated arithmetic sorting coefficients for 262 images of natural silts, sands and gravels (drawn from 8 populations) is 31%, which reduces to 27% if adjusted for bias (slope correction between observed and estimated values). These methods allow non-intrusive and fully automated measurements of surfaces of unconsolidated granular material. With no tunable parameters or empirically derived coefficients, they should be broadly universal in appropriate applications. However, empirical corrections may need to be applied for the most accurate results. Finally, analytical formulas are derived for the one-step pore-particle transition probability matrix, estimated from the image's autocorrelogram, from which void fraction of a section of granular material can be estimated directly. This model gives excellent predictions of bulk void fraction yet imperfect predictions of pore-particle transitions.

  12. Design of a Natural Gas Liquefaction System with Minimum Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work an economic method for liquefying natural gas by diminishing its temperature by means of the Joule-Thomson effect is presented.The pressures from and to which the gas must be expanded arose from a thermodynamic calculation optimizing the cost per unit mass of Liquefied Natural Gas LNG).It was determined that the gas should be expanded from 200 atm to 4 atm.This expansion ratio can be used in different scales.Large Scale: liquefaction of gas at well.It takes advantage of the fact that the gas inside the well is stored at high pressure.The gas is expanded in a valve / nozzle and then compressed to the pressure of the local pipeline system.The objective of this project is to export natural gas as LNG, which is transported by ships to the markets of consumption.Using this method of liquefaction, the LNG production levels are limited to a fraction of the production of the well, due to the injection of the un condensed gas into the local pipelines system.Medium Scale: A high pressure pipeline is the source of the gas.The expansion is performed and then the gas is again compressed to the pressure of a lower pressure pipeline into which the gas is injected.The pressure reductions of natural gas are performed nearby big cities.The aim of this project scale is the storage of fuel for gas thermal power plants during periods of low energy consumption for later burning when the resource is limited. Another possibility that offers this size of plant is the transportation of gas to regions where the resource is unavailable.This transportation would be carried out by means of cistern trucks, in the same way that conventional liquid fuels are transported.Small scale: the place of production would be a CNG refueling station. The source of gas is in this case a gas pipeline of urban distribution and the gas should be compressed with the compressor of the refueling station.Compressors have generally low loading factor and the periods of time when they are not producing

  13. Advance directives in the perioperative setting: Managing ethical and legal issues when patient rights and perceived obligations of the healthcare provider conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen P; Howe, Christopher L

    2013-01-01

    Perhaps individual wishes are not always acknowledged or accepted when it comes to end-of-life care. This possibility, in conjunction with the experiences of healthcare risk managers, should cause concern in the healthcare risk management community. One particularly concerning issue where a persistent failure to honor a patient's wishes exists is with Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders in the perioperative arena. Despite a strong focus on informed consent and advance directives, evidence suggests a number of healthcare organizations either have no policy in place regarding DNR orders during the perioperative period, or, for those organizations that do have a policy, many call for automatic suspension of the DNR order without consultation with the patient. This latter practice poses many ethical, medico-legal, and regulatory concerns, and healthcare organizations with such a policy in place should strongly consider revisiting this practice. PMID:23609975

  14. Characterisation of Liquefaction Effects for Beyond-Design Basis Safety Assessment of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bán, Zoltán; Győri, Erzsébet; János Katona, Tamás; Tóth, László

    2015-04-01

    Preparedness of nuclear power plants to beyond design base external effects became high importance after 11th of March 2011 Great Tohoku Earthquakes. In case of some nuclear power plants constructed at the soft soil sites, liquefaction should be considered as a beyond design basis hazard. The consequences of liquefaction have to be analysed with the aim of definition of post-event plant condition, identification of plant vulnerabilities and planning the necessary measures for accident management. In the paper, the methodology of the analysis of liquefaction effects for nuclear power plants is outlined. The case of Nuclear Power Plant at Paks, Hungary is used as an example for demonstration of practical importance of the presented results and considerations. Contrary to the design, conservatism of the methodology for the evaluation of beyond design basis liquefaction effects for an operating plant has to be limited to a reasonable level. Consequently, applicability of all existing methods has to be considered for the best estimation. The adequacy and conclusiveness of the results is mainly limited by the epistemic uncertainty of the methods used for liquefaction hazard definition and definition of engineering parameters characterizing the consequences of liquefaction. The methods have to comply with controversial requirements. They have to be consistent and widely accepted and used in the practice. They have to be based on the comprehensive database. They have to provide basis for the evaluation of dominating engineering parameters that control the post-liquefaction response of the plant structures. Experience of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa plant hit by Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki earthquake of 16 July 2007 and analysis of site conditions and plant layout at Paks plant have shown that the differential settlement is found to be the dominating effect in case considered. They have to be based on the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment and allow the integration into logic

  15. Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

    1987-04-01

    Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  16. Catalytic activity of pyrite for coal liquefaction reaction; Tennen pyrite no shokubai seino ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, K.; Kozu, M.; Okada, T.; Kobayashi, M. [Nippon Coal Oil Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Since natural pyrite is easy to obtain and cheap as coal liquefaction catalyst, it is to be used for the 150 t/d scale NEDOL process bituminous coal liquefaction pilot plant. NEDO and NCOL have investigated the improvement of catalytic activity of pulverized natural pyrite for enhancing performance and economy of the NEDOL process. In this study, coal liquefaction tests were conducted using natural pyrite catalyst pulverized by dry-type bowl mill under nitrogen atmosphere. Mechanism of catalytic reaction of the natural pyrite was discussed from relations between properties of the catalyst and liquefaction product. The natural pyrite provided an activity to transfer gaseous hydrogen into the liquefaction product. It was considered that pulverized pyrite promotes the hydrogenation reaction of asphaltene because pulverization increases its contact rate with reactant and the amount of active points on its surface. It was inferred that catalytic activity of pyrite is affected greatly by the chemical state of Fe and S on its surface. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Rapid liquefaction of giant miscanthus feedstock in ethanol–water system for production of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Rapid water/ethanol liquefaction system was proposed for giant miscanthus feedstock. • The optimum liquefaction conditions were 280 °C and 15 min at water/ethanol ratio 50%. • Application of ZnCl2 catalyst enhanced liquefaction process significantly. • 52% bio-oil yield and 1% residue were obtained after 5 min when ZnCl2 catalyst used. - Abstract: Energy issues nowadays are one of the critical priorities for the United States. There is a strong desire and tremendous efforts employed towards replacing fossil fuels with sustainable alternative sources of energy. In this study, hydrothermal liquefaction with ethanol and water as co-solvents was applied on giant miscanthus (Miscanthus giganteus) perennial biomass feedstock. Four temperatures and six ethanol ratios were chosen for the study. The optimum combination of temperature and water/ethanol ratio was 280 °C and 50%, respectively. The effect of time, biomass to solvent ratio and catalyst type was studied as well. The best liquefaction results without applying catalysts (53% oil yield and 8% solid residue) were obtained after 15 min. When zinc chloride was used as catalyst, more than 52% of oil yield with 1% solid residue was obtained after 5 min. The crude bio-oil chemical composition was identified by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESSES: A REPORT EMPHASIZING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRODUCT MIX AND EFFICIENCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report covers environmental and economic aspects of three indirect liquefaction processes. Specifically, the following are addressed: U.S. coal resources; the Lurgi/Methanol, Lurgi/Methanol/Mobil M, and the Lurgi/Fischer-Tropsch indirect coal liquefaction processes; and envi...

  19. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Indirect Liquefaction of Blended Biomass to Produce High Octane Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Canter, Christina E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Talmadge, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartley, Damon S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) aims at developing and deploying technologies to transform renewable biomass resources into commercially viable, high-performance biofuels, bioproducts and biopower through public and private partnerships (DOE, 2015). BETO also performs a supply chain sustainability analysis (SCSA). This report describes the SCSA of the production of renewable high octane gasoline (HOG) via indirect liquefaction (IDL) of lignocellulosic biomass. This SCSA was developed for the 2017 design case for feedstock logistics (INL, 2014) and for the 2022 target case for HOG production via IDL (Tan et al., 2015). The design includes advancements that are likely and targeted to be achieved by 2017 for the feedstock logistics and 2022 for the IDL conversion process. The 2017 design case for feedstock logistics demonstrated a delivered feedstock cost of $80 per dry U.S. short ton by the year 2017 (INL, 2014). The 2022 design case for the conversion process, as modeled in Tan et al. (2015), uses the feedstock 2017 design case blend of biomass feedstocks consisting of pulpwood, wood residue, switchgrass, and construction and demolition waste (C&D) with performance properties consistent with a sole woody feedstock type (e.g., pine or poplar). The HOG SCSA case considers the 2017 feedstock design case (the blend) as well as individual feedstock cases separately as alternative scenarios when the feedstock blend ratio varies as a result of a change in feedstock availability. These scenarios could be viewed as bounding SCSA results because of distinctive requirements for energy and chemical inputs for the production and logistics of different components of the blend feedstocks.

  20. Advances in solar photoelectro-Fenton: Decolorization and mineralization of the Direct Yellow 4 diazo dye using an autonomous solar pre-pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Assessment of an autonomous solar pre-pilot plant for solar photoelectro-Fenton. • Total decolorization and 96-97% mineralization for solutions of Direct Yellow 4 diazo dye at pH 3.0. • More rapid dye decay and mineralization at 0.50 mmol dm−3 Fe2+ and maximum current of 5.0 A. • 11 aromatics, 22 hydroxylated derivatives and 9 carboxylic acids detected as intermediates. • Release of NH4+ and SO42−as main inorganic ions. - Abstract: Here, an overview on the advances in solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) is initially presented to show that it is the more potent electrochemical advanced oxidation process based on Fenton's reaction chemistry to remove organic pollutants from waters, due to the synergistic action of generated hydroxyl radicals and solar irradiation. As a novel advance for SPEF, an autonomous solar pre-pilot plant is proposed to make an energetically inexpensive process that can be viable at industrial level. The plant of 10 dm3 capacity contained a Pt/air-diffusion cell with 90.2 cm2 electrode area, coupled to a solar compound parabolic collectors (CPCs) photoreactor of 1.57 dm3 irradiation volume and to a solar photovoltaic panel that provides a maximum average current of 5.0 A. The oxidation ability of this plant was assessed by studying the degradation of Direct Yellow 4 (DY4) diazo dye, which involved the predominant destruction of organics by ·OH formed from Fenton's reaction between H2O2 generated at the cathode and added Fe2+, along with the photolysis of Fe(III)-carboxylate complexes with sunlight in the CPCs photoreactor. The effect of Fe2+ and dye contents as well as current on decolorization rate, substrate decay and mineralization rate was examined. About 96-97% mineralization was rapidly attained using 0.50 mmol dm−3 Fe2+ and up to 0.32 mmol dm−3 DY4 at 5.0 A. The DY4 decay always obeyed a pseudo-first-order kinetics. Eleven aromatic products, twenty two hydroxylated derivatives and nine short

  1. Stress corrosion studies in solvent refined coal liquefaction pilot plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, V.B.; Keiser, J.R.; Allen, M.D.; Lawrence, E.J.

    1980-12-01

    Coal liquefaction plants with 6000 ton/d capacity are currently being planned by DOE as a step toward commercial production of synthetic fossil fuels. These plants will demonstrate the large-scale viability of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process, which has been used since 1974 in two operating pilot plants: a 50-ton/d unit at Fort Lewis, Washington, and a 6-ton/d plant in Wilsonville, Alabama. Experience in these plants has shown that austenitic stainless steels are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking associated with residual stresses from cold working or welding. The corrodents responsible for the cracking have not yet been positively identified but are suspected to include polythionic acids and chlorides. To screen candidate materials of construction for resistance to stress corrosion cracking, racks of stressed U-bend specimens in welded and as-wrought conditions have been exposed at the Wilsonville and Fort Lewis SRC pilot plants. These studies have identified alloys that are suitable for critical plant applications.

  2. Stress-corrosion cracking studies in coal-liquefaction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, V.B.; Keiser, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Coal liquefaction plants with 6000 ton/d capacity are currently being planned by DOE as a step toward commercial production of synthetic fossil fuels. These plants will demonstrate the large-scale viability of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process, which has been used since 1974 in two operating pilot plants: a 50-ton/d unit at Fort Lewis, Washington, and a 6-ton/d plant in Wilsonville, Alabama. Experience in these plants has shown that austenitic stainless steels are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking associated with residual stresses from cold working or welding. The corrodants responsible for the cracking have not yet been positively identified but are suspected to include polythionic acids and chlorides. To screen candidate materials of construction for resistance to stress corrosion cracking, racks of stressed U-bend specimens in welded and as-wrought conditions have been exposed at the Wilsonville and Fort Lewis SRC pilot plants. These studies have identified alloys that are suitable for critical plant applications.

  3. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature- staged liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1991-09-01

    The general objectives of this research are (1) to investigate the use of highly dispersed catalysts for the pretreatment of coal by mild hydrogenation, (2) to identify the active forms of the catalysts under reaction conditions and (3) to clarify the mechanisms of catalysis. The ultimate objective is to ascertain if mild catalytic hydrogenation resulting in very limited or no coal solubilization is an advantageous pretreatment for the transformation of coal into transportable fuels. The experimental program will focus upon the development of effective methods of impregnating coal with catalysts, evaluating the conditions under which the catalysts are most active and establishing the relative impact of improved impregnation on conversion and product distributions obtained from coal hydrogenation. Liquefaction experiments of solvent-treated and untreated Blind Canyon (DECS-6) and Texas lignite (DECS-1) have been performed using ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (ATTM) and bis (dicarbonylcyclopentadienyl) iron (CPI) as catalyst precursors using temperature-staged conditions (275{degrees}C, 30 min; 425{degrees}C, 30 min). Solid state {sup 13}C NMR analysis was carried out for each coal and for selected residues. 12 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Exergoeconomic evaluation of single mixed refrigerant natural gas liquefaction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Exergoeconomic analysis is performed for single mixed refrigerant process. • Cost of exergy destruction and exergoeconomic factor are calculated. • Sensitivity of exergoeconomic factor is investigated. - Abstract: Exergy and exergoeconomic analysis is performed for single mixed refrigerant Linde and Air Products and Chemicals Inc, processes, which are among the most important and popular natural gas liquefaction processes. Cost of exergy destruction, exergoeconomic factor, exergy destruction and exergy efficiency are calculated. Results of exergy analysis demonstrates that exergy efficiency of Linde process is around 40.2%, and its total exergy destruction rate is 93,229 kW. The exergy efficiency and exergy destruction rate for Air Products and Chemicals Inc, process are 45.0% and 72,245 kW respectively. Results of exergoeconomic analysis suggests that maximum exergy destruction cost for Linde process is related to E-2 heat exchanger which is 34,072 $/h and for Air Products and Chemicals Inc, process maximum exergy destruction cost is related to E-2 heat exchanger with the value of 4125 kW. Sensitivity of cost of exergy destruction and exergoeconomic factor to operating variables of the processes are studied and analyzed

  5. An overview on the advanced oxidation processes applied for the treatment of water pollutants defined in the recently launched Directive 2013/39/EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana R; Nunes, Olga C; Pereira, Manuel F R; Silva, Adrián M T

    2015-02-01

    Environmental pollution is a recognized issue of major concern since a wide range of contaminants has been found in aquatic environment at ngL(-1) to μgL(-1) levels. In the year 2000, a strategy was defined to identify the priority substances concerning aquatic ecosystems, followed by the definition of environmental quality standards (EQS) in 2008. Recently it was launched the Directive 2013/39/EU that updates the water framework policy highlighting the need to develop new water treatment technologies to deal with such problem. This review summarizes the data published in the last decade regarding the application of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) to treat priority compounds and certain other pollutants defined in this Directive, excluding the inorganic species (cadmium, lead, mercury, nickel and their derivatives). The Directive 2013/39/EU includes several pesticides (aldrin, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, dicofol, dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan, isodrin, heptachlor, lindane, pentachlorophenol, chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinphos, dichlorvos, atrazine, simazine, terbutryn, diuron, isoproturon, trifluralin, cypermethrin, alachlor), solvents (dichloromethane, dichloroethane, trichloromethane and carbon tetrachloride), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and its derivatives (PFOS), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nonylphenol and octylphenol, as well as the three compounds included in the recommendation for the first watch list of substances (diclofenac, 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) and 17-beta-estradiol (E2)). Some particular pesticides (aclonifen, bifenox, cybutryne, quinoxyfen), organotin compounds (tributyltin), dioxins and dioxin-like compounds, brominated diphenylethers, hexabromocyclododecanes and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate are also defined in this Directive, but studies dealing with AOPs are missing. AOPs are recognized tools to destroy recalcitrant compounds or, at least, to transform them into biodegradable species

  6. HISTORICAL OCCURENCE OF LIQUEFACTION IN ZAGREB AREA AND ESTIMATION OF REOCCURENCE IN CASE OF ANOTHER STRONG EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Želimir Veinović

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available During the Great Zagreb's earthquake in 1880 consequences of the liquefaction have been detected at six sites in the vicinity of Zagreb as the occurrence of sand boils. Liquefaction takes place when loosely packed, water-logged sediments near the ground surface lose their strength in response to strong ground shaking. During the liquefaction, due to pore pressure buildup, water may be forced to the surface carrying sand particles through volcano-like sand boils. Important factor for liquefaction occurrence is the state of soil densification which relates to geological age of deposits. Results of the absolute dating of fossilized trees found in Sava's alluvium in the vicinity of Zagreb and the results of the penetration tests show that another earthquake with magnitude ≥ 6.3 can provoke liquefaction once again (the paper is published in Croatian.

  7. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  8. Liquefaction hazard mapping with LPI in the Greater Oakland, California, area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, T.L.; Bennett, M.J.; Noce, T.E.; Padovani, A.C.; Tinsley, J. C., III

    2006-01-01

    Cumulative frequency distributions of the liquefaction potential index (LPI) of surficial geologic units were used to define the liquefaction hazard in a 140-km2 area along the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay near Oakland, California. LPI values were computed for 202 cone penetration tests conducted in surficial geologic units in the study area. The hazard of each unit was defined by the cumulative frequency at LPI = 5. The distributions predict that 73% and 3%, respectively, of the area underlain by artificial fill and Holocene alluvial fan deposits will show surface manifestations of liquefaction during a M7.1 earthquake on the nearby Hayward Fault. The predictions are consistent with recent earthquakes in other areas where similar types of deposits experienced near-field ground motion. ?? 2006, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  9. Soil liquefaction testing and evaluation for Kozloduy nuclear power plant units 5 and 6. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of seismic evaluation of the Kozloduy nuclear power plant units 5 and 6, the region of the spray ponds was investigated because they are of great importance for proper functioning of the NPP in case of an accident. Spray pond is a water containing structure designed for creating a temperature drop of the circulating cooling water in case of an accident in the technical water supply. The region of the spray ponds is well studied in regard to geology and this enabled full-size investigation of the on the liquefaction potential of water saturated sands. In this In this study, three kinds of procedures were applied for estimating the liquefaction potential of water saturated sands. The results obtained were compared, analyzed and conclusions concerning liquefaction potential of water saturated sands drawn

  10. Liquefaction and FTIR analysis of two desert shrubs Salix psammophila and Caragana intermedia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chen-xia; Huang Jin-tian

    2006-01-01

    In order to extend the investigation of the characteristics of desert shrub liquefaction and the structure of liquefied desert shrubs, we studied the liquefaction of Salixpsammophila and Caragana intermedia in the presence of phenol and used FTIR analysis on unliquefied and liquefied S. psammophila and C. intermedia. The results showed that the liquefaction effects are enhanced with an increase in temperature, catalyst content and liquid ratio. FTIR analysis proved that more active functional groups appeared after S.psammophila and C. intermedia were liquefied in the presence of phenol. These results can provide a theoretical basis for the further utilization of liquefied S. psammophila and C. intermedia and the development of desert shrubs in a new utilization field.

  11. Hydrothermal liquefaction of Spirulina and Nannochloropsis Salina under subcritical and supercritical water conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Reddy, H.; Deng, S.;

    2013-01-01

    Six hydrothermal liquefaction experiments on Nannochloropsis salina and Spirulina platensis at subcritical and supercritical water conditions (220-375 °C, 20-255 bar) were carried out to explore the feasibility of extracting lipids from wet algae, preserving nutrients in lipid-extracted algae solid...... residue, and recycling process water for algae cultivation. GC-MS, elemental analyzer, FT-IR, calorimeter and nutrient analysis were used to analyze bio-crude, lipid-extracted algae and water samples produced in the hydrothermal liquefaction process. The highest bio-crude yield of 46% was obtained on...... Nannochloropsis salina at 350 °C and 175 bar. For Spirulina platensis algae sample, the optimal hydrothermal liquefaction condition appears to be at 310 °C and 115 bar, while the optimal condition for Nannochloropsis salina is at 350 °C and 175 bar. Preliminary data also indicate that a lipid-extracted algae...

  12. Physical modeling and visualization of soil liquefaction under high confining stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lenart González; Tarek Abdoun; Mourad Zeghal; Vivian Kallou; Michael K. Sharp

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of seismically-induced liquefaction of granular soils under high confining stresses are still not fully understood. Evaluation of these mechanisms is generally based on extrapolation of observed behavior at shallow depths.Three centrifuge model tests were conducted at RPI's experimental facility to investigate the effects of confining stresses on the dynamic response ora deep horizontal deposit of saturated sand. Liquefaction was observed at high confining stresses in each of the tests. A system identification procedure was used to estimate the associated shear strain and stress time histories.These histories revealed a response marked by shear strength degradation and dilative patterns. The recorded accelerations and pore pressures were employed to generate visual animations of the models. These visualizations revealed a liquefaction front traveling downward and leading to large shear strains and isolation of upper soil layers.

  13. Probabilistic evaluation of lateral extent of soil liquefaction under earthquake loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo simulation method for calculating the probability of soil liquefaction of a finite area in which the ground motion is propagated upward from the bedrock through the soil layers is presented. The vertical propagation of the ground motion through the soil layers is analyzed using random vibration analysis. To account for the variability of soil properties with depth, the soil deposit is divided into layers. Within each layer the horizontal statistical correlation of the undrained cyclic shearing strength against liquefaction is taken into consideration by describing it as a two-dimensional homogeneous random field. The method computes the probability of liquefaction spreading over a specified area under a given earthquake loading considering the effects of spatial correlation of soil properties. (orig.)

  14. Scenarios Susceptible to Induced Liquefaction Caused by High Magnitude Earthquakes in Santiago de Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuska Fernández-Diéguez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation was to define the zoning of soil liquefaction potential for the Guillermón Moncada Popular Council in the municipality of Santiago de Cuba. The engineering and geological conditions and seismic peculiarities favoring a seism to take place were assessed. The safety factor was re-calculated after determining possible maximum intensity values based on seismic magnitudes that can trigger the soil of the investigated area to liquefy. A scheme of the area´s soil susceptibility to liquefaction was obtained. Based on this result, it was concluded that the sectors that are most likely to experience soil liquefaction if an earthquake of magnitudes ranging between 7,75 and 8 occurs are located towards the center-east of the Popular Council with sandy-clayey soils being predominant. This information is very useful for the location and planning of engineering construction works in the area.

  15. Using SpaceClaimTD Direct for Modeling Components with Complex Geometries for the Thermal Desktop-Based Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabanich, William A., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    SpaceClaim/TD Direct has been used extensively in the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal model. This paper outlines the workflow for that aspect of the task and includes proposed best practices and lessons learned. The ASRG thermal model was developed to predict component temperatures and power output and to provide insight into the prime contractor's thermal modeling efforts. The insulation blocks, heat collectors, and cold side adapter flanges (CSAFs) were modeled with this approach. The model was constructed using mostly TD finite difference (FD) surfaces/solids. However, some complex geometry could not be reproduced with TD primitives while maintaining the desired degree of geometric fidelity. Using SpaceClaim permitted the import of original CAD files and enabled the defeaturing/repair of those geometries. TD Direct (a SpaceClaim add-on from CRTech) adds features that allowed the "mark-up" of that geometry. These so-called "mark-ups" control how finite element (FE) meshes are to be generated through the "tagging" of features (e.g. edges, solids, surfaces). These tags represent parameters that include: submodels, material properties, material orienters, optical properties, and radiation analysis groups. TD aliases were used for most tags to allow analysis to be performed with a variety of parameter values. "Domain-tags" were also attached to individual and groups of surfaces and solids to allow them to be used later within TD to populate objects like, for example, heaters and contactors. These tools allow the user to make changes to the geometry in SpaceClaim and then easily synchronize the mesh in TD without having to redefine the objects each time as one would if using TDMesher. The use of SpaceClaim/TD Direct helps simplify the process for importing existing geometries and in the creation of high fidelity FE meshes to represent complex parts. It also saves time and effort in the subsequent analysis.

  16. Using SpaceClaim/TD Direct for Modeling Components with Complex Geometries for the Thermal Desktop-Based Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabanich, William

    2014-01-01

    SpaceClaim/TD Direct has been used extensively in the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal model. This paper outlines the workflow for that aspect of the task and includes proposed best practices and lessons learned. The ASRG thermal model was developed to predict component temperatures and power output and to provide insight into the prime contractors thermal modeling efforts. The insulation blocks, heat collectors, and cold side adapter flanges (CSAFs) were modeled with this approach. The model was constructed using mostly TD finite difference (FD) surfaces solids. However, some complex geometry could not be reproduced with TD primitives while maintaining the desired degree of geometric fidelity. Using SpaceClaim permitted the import of original CAD files and enabled the defeaturing repair of those geometries. TD Direct (a SpaceClaim add-on from CRTech) adds features that allowed the mark-up of that geometry. These so-called mark-ups control how finite element (FE) meshes were generated and allowed the tagging of features (e.g. edges, solids, surfaces). These tags represent parameters that include: submodels, material properties, material orienters, optical properties, and radiation analysis groups. TD aliases were used for most tags to allow analysis to be performed with a variety of parameter values. Domain-tags were also attached to individual and groups of surfaces and solids to allow them to be used later within TD to populate objects like, for example, heaters and contactors. These tools allow the user to make changes to the geometry in SpaceClaim and then easily synchronize the mesh in TD without having to redefine these objects each time as one would if using TD Mesher.The use of SpaceClaim/TD Direct has helped simplify the process for importing existing geometries and in the creation of high fidelity FE meshes to represent complex parts. It has also saved time and effort in the subsequent analysis.

  17. Numerical computation of anti-liquefaction effect of lattice-type cement-mixed soil countermeasure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高玉峰; 杨雪玲; 沈扬; 周源

    2008-01-01

    Continuous soil-cement wall confinement method to resist liquefaction is a new kind of process. However, whether it also has a good effect on anti-liquefaction or not needs to be urgently answered for earthquake engineering. Quiet boundary is adopted on the lateral face while free field boundary is employed at the bottom. Byrne model on dynamic pore water pressure generation is accepted and natural seismic wave EI Centro whose peak acceleration is adjusted to 0.2 g in proportion is used for input. A double-layer foundation with sandy soil in the upper portion while clay soil in the lower part is chosen as the calculation model, which is 30 m in length and 20 m in width. The groundwater level is on the ground surface. Excess pore water pressure rate is considered as a liquefaction index in the three-dimensional non-linear earthquake response computation. The anti-liquefaction effectiveness and its influencing factors, such as confinement element area are studied. For the natural double-layer foundation, it is liquefied when the excess pore water pressure rate reaches 1.0 under the seismic load. Under the same earthquake load, the peak excess pore water pressure reduces to 0.56 after adopting reinforcement of the continuous soil-cement wall, which is 46% lower than before. It indicates that continuous soil-cement wall confinement method can attain the purpose of anti-liquefaction. Accordingly, it can be a sort of engineering measure to carry on the anti-liquefaction foundation treatment.

  18. Eldercare at Home: Advanced Directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which means someone who has the authority to act for another person. (Other terms that refer to the same role ... included in the medical record if the older person is admitted to a hospital or skilled ... Act, patients or their representatives will be asked if ...

  19. Nurses’ perceptions of advance directives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernestina Silva

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: Nurses have little experience with AD. They are available to respect the patient's will but did not feel able to address the issue on their own initiative. Most agree that the AD can “fail” if the patient does not reevaluate it periodically. Reflection and debate on the ethical issues surrounding AD should be promoted: promoting patient autonomy, care in vulnerable situations, team decisions and conscientious objection.

  20. Synergetic hydrothermal co-liquefaction of crude glycerol and aspen wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Helmer; Jasiunas, Lukas; Casamassima, Luca; Singh, Shashank; Jensen, Thomas; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup

    2015-01-01

    Crude glycerol-assisted hydrothermal co-liquefaction of aspen wood was studied in batch micro-reactors. An experimental matrix of 14 experiments was defined to investigate the effects of three different process parameters on the yields of biocrude and char, and on biocrude quality. Co-processing ......Crude glycerol-assisted hydrothermal co-liquefaction of aspen wood was studied in batch micro-reactors. An experimental matrix of 14 experiments was defined to investigate the effects of three different process parameters on the yields of biocrude and char, and on biocrude quality. Co...

  1. Reducing capital and operating costs in gas processing, liquefaction, and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LNG industry is unanimous that capital costs must be reduced throughout the chain, and especially at the liquefaction facility including associated gas processing and LNG storage. The Ken ai LNG plant provides an example of how both reduced capital and operating costs were attained. This paper will cover cost production strategies that can be applied to liquefaction processes in general, and will than focus on their realization in the Phillips Optimized Cascade LNG process. The paper concludes that reduced LNG plant costs are attainable. (Author)

  2. 3rd international conference on coal gasification and liquefaction, University of Pittsburgh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-01-01

    The third annual international conference on ''Coal Gasification and Liquefaction: What Needs to be Done Now'' was held at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA on August 3-5, 1976. The majority of the papers dealt with coal gasification and liquefaction (often on the basis of process pilot plant experience) and on flue gas desulfurization by a variety of processes; fewer papers involved fluidized bed combustion, combined cycle power plants, coal desulfurization, government policy on environmental effects and on synthetic fuels, etc. Twenty-eight papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  3. Characteristics of process oils from HTI coal/plastics co-liquefaction runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A. [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to provide timely analytical support to DOE`s liquefaction development effort. Specific objectives of the work reported here are presented. During a few operating periods of Run POC-2, HTI co-liquefied mixed plastics with coal, and tire rubber with coal. Although steady-state operation was not achieved during these brief tests periods, the results indicated that a liquefaction plant could operate with these waste materials as feedstocks. CONSOL analyzed 65 process stream samples from coal-only and coal/waste portions of the run. Some results obtained from characterization of samples from Run POC-2 coal/plastics operation are presented.

  4. Influence of alkali catalyst on product yield and properties via hydrothermal liquefaction of barley straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Z.; Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse;

    2015-01-01

    Barley straw was successfully converted to bio-crude by hydrothermal liquefaction at temperature of 280 e400 C using an alkali catalyst (K2CO3) in our previous work, and the maximum bio-crude yield was obtained at 300 C. This paper extends previous work on studying liquefaction behavior of barley...... compounds identified in bio-crude were carboxylic acids, phenolic compounds and ketones, irrespective of whether the catalyst was used. However, the distribution and relative content of these compounds were different. More phenolic compounds and less carboxylic acids were observed in the catalytic run. In...

  5. [A Quick Quantitative Analysis for Group Composition of Coal Liquefaction Oil by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen-jun; Wu, Mei-xiang; Hao, Jian-shu; Feng, Jie; Li, Wen-ying

    2015-07-01

    Gas chromatography is now the primary analysis method for the coal liquefaction oil. However, a simple and rapid quantification/qualification of the coal liquefaction oil can hardly be realized, because the coal liquefaction oil is in a heterogeneous state with a long boiling range. The aim of this study was to establish a rapid and accurate method for the quantification of phenolic compounds, aromatics and aliphatic hydrocarbons in coal liquefaction oil. A representative composition of coal liquefaction light oil, i.e., the distillate fractions of the boiling point range 180-200 degrees C, was chosen as the investigated object. The characteristic absorption peaks of the samples in the UV spectra (200-400 nm) were examined, using three kinds of solvents, cyclohexane, ethanol, 50 Wt% NaOH/ethanol mixture. Among them, the mixture solvent provided the best performance, where the aromatics interfered minimally with the quantification of phenolic compounds by avoiding the peak overlapping problem. By comparison of the UV absorption standard curves between the standard compounds (phenol, m-cresol, p-cresol and o-cresol) and the phenolic mixtures in coal liquefaction oil, m-cresol was selected for the quantification of phenolic compounds in coal liquefaction oil. The content of phenolic compounds was determined to be 32.14% according to the calibration curve of m-cresol at 290 nm, and this result is largely consistent with that determined by weighing after separation. Based on UV and GC analysis of the dephenolized oil, the standard curve of tetrahydronaphthalene at 266 nm was used for the quantification of aromatic hydrocarbons in coal liquefaction oil. The contents of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons were determined to be 44.91% and 22.95%, respectively. To verify the accuracy of the method, recovery of added standards in the oil samples was determined and found to be 104.3%-110.75% and 84.3%-91.75% for phenolic compounds and aromatics, respectively. These results

  6. Effect of catalysts on biopolymers phenolic resin by liquefaction process of soda lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquefaction of soda lignin was carried using phenol with 1:3 ratio. The reaction time was 90 minutes at 130 degree Celsius in the reflux system. The main product of liquefaction, phenolates lignin (PL), was analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), rheometer and thermalgravimetri analyzer (TGA). The sample synthesized from hydrochloric acid as catalyst gave excellent characteristics. FTIR spectrum consists of essential functional groups such as aromatic ring, alcohol and carbonyl. All samples obeyed the Arrhenius equation and showed pseudo-plastic properties. The percentage weight loss and degradation of PL samples were affected by the type of catalysts used. The synthesized PL was classified as biopolymers resin phenolic. (author)

  7. Kinetics assisted design of catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.T.; Foley, H.C.; Calkins, W.H.; Scouten, C.

    1998-02-01

    The thermal and catalytic reactions of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NBBM), a resid and coal model compound, were examined. Catalytic reaction of NBBM was carried out at 400 C under hydrogen with a series of transition metal-based catalytic materials including Fe(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3}, Fe(CO){sub 3}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}CS{sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 5}, Mo(CO){sub 6}, Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoS{sub 2}. Experimental findings and derived mechanistic insights were organized into molecular-level reaction models for NBBM pyrolysis and catalysis. Hydropyrolysis and catalysis reaction families occurring during NBBM hydropyrolysis at 420 C were summarized in the form of reaction matrices which, upon exhaustive application to the components of the reacting system, yielded the mechanistic reaction model. Each reaction family also had an associated linear free energy relationship (LFER) which provided an estimate of the rate constant k{sub i} given a structural property of species i or its reaction. Including the catalytic reaction matrices with those for the pyrolysis model provided a comprehensive NBBM catalytic reaction model and allowed regression of fundamental LFER parameters for the catalytic reaction families. The model also allowed specification of the property of an optimal catalyst. Iron, molybdenum and palladium were predicted to be most effective for model compound consumption. Due to the low costs associated with iron and its disposal, it is a good choice for coal liquefaction catalysis and the challenge remains to synthesize small particles able to access the full surface area of the coal macromolecule.

  8. Cooperative Research Program in Coal-Waste Liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Huffman

    2000-03-31

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste plastic and tires and the coprocessing of these waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was conducted by a committee that included nine representatives from the CFFS, six from the U.S. Department of Energy - Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), and four from Burns and Roe, Inc. The study included: (1) An assessment of current recycling practices, particularly feedstock recycling in Germany; (2) A review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability for various types of waste polymers; and (3) A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and an economic analysis for various feedstock mixes. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case with oil priced at $20 per barrel, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 9% to 20%, using tipping fees for waste plastic and tires typical of those existing in the U.S. The most profitable feedstock appeared to waste plastic alone, with a plant processing 300 t/d of plastic yielding ROI's from 13 to 27 %, depending on the tipping fees for waste plastic. Feedstock recycling of tires was highly dependent on the price that could be obtained for recovered carbon. Addition of even relatively small amounts (20 t/d) of coal to waste plastic and/or coal feeds lowered the ROI's substantially. It should also be noted that increasing the size of the plant significantly improved all ROI's. For example, increasing plant size from 300 t/d to1200 t/d approximately doubles the estimated ROI's for a waste plastic feedstock.

  9. Life cycle assessment of microalgae to biofuel: Thermochemical processing through hydrothermal liquefaction or pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Edward P.

    Microalgae are currently being investigated as a renewable transportation fuel feedstock based on various advantages that include high annual yields, utilization of poor quality land, does not compete with food, and can be integrated with various waste streams. This study focuses on directly assessing the impact of two different thermochemical conversion technologies on the microalgae-to-biofuel process through life cycle assessment. A system boundary of a "well to pump" (WTP) is defined and includes sub-process models of the growth, dewatering, thermochemical bio-oil recovery, bio-oil stabilization, conversion to renewable diesel, and transport to the pump. Models were validated with experimental and literature data and are representative of an industrial-scale microalgae-to-biofuel process. Two different thermochemical bio-oil conversion systems are modeled and compared on a systems level, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and pyrolysis. The environmental impact of the two pathways were quantified on the metrics of net energy ratio (NER), defined here as energy consumed over energy produced, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Results for WTP biofuel production through the HTL pathway were determined to be 1.23 for the NER and GHG emissions of -11.4 g CO2 eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. WTP biofuel production through the pyrolysis pathway results in a NER of 2.27 and GHG emissions of 210 g CO2 eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. The large environmental impact associated with the pyrolysis pathway is attributed to feedstock drying requirements and combustion of co-products to improve system energetics. Discussion focuses on a detailed breakdown of the overall process energetics and GHGs, impact of modeling at laboratory-scale compared to industrial-scale, environmental impact sensitivity to engineering systems input parameters for future focused research and development, and a comparison of results to literature.

  10. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, August 1992--October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.; Bortiatynski, J.; Burgess, C.; Dutta, R.; Gergova, K.; Lai, W.C.; Li, J.; McKinney, D.; Parfitt, D.; Peng, Y.; Sanghani, P.; Yoon, E.

    1993-02-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five borad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and miocrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Pyrolysis of four isomers of butylbenzene was investigated in static microautoclave reactors at 450{degrees}C under 0.69 MPa of UHP N{sub 2}. Thee rates of disappearance of substrates were found to depend upon the bonding energy of C{alpha}-C{beta} bond in the side chain in the initial period of pyrolysis reactions. Possible catalytic effects of metal surfaces on thermal degradation and deposit formation at temperatures >400{degrees}C have been studied. Carbon deposition depends on the composition of the metal surfaces, and also depends on the chemical compositions of the reactants. Thermal stressing of JP-8 was conducted in the presence of alumina, carbonaceous deposits recovered from earlier stressing experiments, activated carbon, carbon black, and graphite. The addition of different solid carbons during thermal stressing leads to different reaction mechanisms. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, along with {sup 13}C-labeling techniques, have been used to examine the thermal stability of a jet fuel sample mixed with 5% benzyl alcohol. Several heterometallic complexes consisting of two transition metals and sulfur in a single molecule were synthesized and tested as precursors of bimetallic dispersed catalysts for liquefaction of a Montana subbituminous and Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coals.

  11. Influence of the void ratio and the confining on the static liquefaction in slopes in shangi sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Mariano Ramos Cañón

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study on the onset of static liquefaction in slopes under undrained conditions of loading was developed based on a general liquefaction flow instability criterion for elastoplastic soils based on the concept of loss of controllability. The criterion is applied to the case of axisymmetric loading to detect the onset of static liquefaction. The criterion is used in conjunction with an elastoplastic model for sands and is tested by means of numerical simulations of element tests. The numerical results are compared with experimental evidence obtaining good agreement. A quantitative study of the influence of the mean pressure, void ratio and the anisotropy of stress on the onset of static liquefaction is presented for the Changi sand. From the analysis of the numerical results, it can be concluded that: a. the mobilized friction angle at the onset of liquefaction is not an intrinsic property of the material, but is a state variable b. Despite of the multiple variables involved in the process of generation of undrained instability, the state of stresses at the onset of static liquefaction can be conveniently represented by a linear relation between Dq/po and no . This graphical representation can be used in the practice of geotechnical engineering to quantify the margin of security against the static liquefaction of a sandy slope.

  12. The current status of coal liquefaction technologies - Panorama 2008; La liquefaction du charbon: ou en est-on aujourd'hui? - Panorama 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    In 2008, a first coal liquefaction unit to produce motor fuel (20,000 BPSD) will come on-stream in Shenhua, China (in the Ercos region of Inner Mongolia). Other, more ambitious projects have been announced in China for between now and 2020. Since oil production is expected to peak in the medium term, this technology may develop regionally in the next 20 years to cover ever-increasing demand for motor fuel.

  13. Elucidation of coal liquefaction mechanism by the use of tritium and 35S tracer methods. Effects of pyrrhotite and sulfur on hydrogen transfer in coal liquefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of addition of the catalyst (pyrrhotite) and sulfur on hydrogen transfer in liquefaction of Taiheiyo coal were investigated using tritium and 35S. The coal liquefaction was performed at the initial pressure of 5.9 MPa and at 400degC for 30 min with tetralin solvent and tritium-labelled hydrogen, with or without the synthesized pyrrhotite catalyst and sulfur (or 35S-labelled sulfur). The specific activities of tritium and 35S in the reaction products were measured with a liquid scintillation counter. Amounts of exchanged and transferred hydrogens between the gas phase and coal/solvent, were calculated from the distributions of tritium and changes in the composition of products. In the reaction with tritiated hydrogen and solvent, the dehydrogenation of tetralin to produce naphthalene and the hydrogen exchange reaction between gas phase and solvent were promoted by added catalyst and sulfur. Added sulfur produced hydrogen sulfide mainly with hydrogen of solvent. A part of added sulfur participated in the sulfur exchange reaction with the pyrrhotite catalyst. In the reaction with tritiated hydrogen, solvent and coal, the hydrogen addition and exchange to coal and liquefaction products increased with the addition of catalyst and sulfur. It was suggested the sulfur promoted the formation of tetralyl radical in the hydrogen transfer from solvent to coal. (author)

  14. Integrated Refrigeration and Storage for Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, A. M.; Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has used liquefied hydrogen (LH2) on a large scale since the beginning of the space program as fuel for the Centaur and Apollo upper stages, and more recently to feed the three space shuttle main engines. The LH2 systems currently in place at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch pads are aging and inefficient compared to the state-of-the-art. Therefore, the need exists to explore advanced technologies and operations that can drive commodity costs down, and provide increased capabilities. The Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) was developed at KSC to pursue these goals by demonstrating active thermal control of the propellant state by direct removal of heat using a cryocooler. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The key technology challenge was efficiently integrating the cryogenic refrigerator into the LH2 storage tank. A Linde LR1620 Brayton cycle refrigerator is used to produce up to 900W cooling at 20K, circulating approximately 22 g/s gaseous helium through the hydrogen via approximately 300 m of heat exchanger tubing. The GODU-LH2 system is fully operational, and is currently under test. This paper will discuss the design features of the refrigerator and storage system, as well as the current test results.

  15. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C.; Saini, A.; Huang, L.; Wenzel, K.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    Low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process. This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals in the subsequent liquefaction. This report describes the progress of our work during the first quarterly period. Substantial progress has been made in the spectroscopic characterization of fresh and THF-extracted samples of two subbituminous coals and fresh samples of three bituminous coals using cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid state {sup 13}C NMR and pyrolysis-GC-MS techniques. CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and pyrolysis-GC-MS provided important information on carbon distribution/functionality and molecular components/structural units, respectively, for these coal samples. Pyrolysis-GC-MS revealed that there are remarkable structural differences in structural units between the subbituminous coals and the bituminous coals. Furthermore, significant progress has been made in the pretreatments and spectroscopic characterization of catalytically and thermally pretreated as well as physically treated Wyodak subbituminous coal, and temperature-staged and temperature-programmed thermal and catalytic liquefaction of a Montana subbituminous coal.

  16. Chemistry and morphology of coal liquefaction. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 20, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, H.

    1981-09-01

    Six tasks are reported: selective synthesis of gasoline range components from synthesis gas; electron microscopic studies of coal during hydrogenation; catalyzed low-temperature hydrogenation of coal; selective hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, and alkylation of coal and coal liquids by organometallic systems; chemistry of coal solubilization and liquefaction; and coal conversion catalyst deactivation. (DLC)

  17. Chemistry and morphology of coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April 1, 1984-June 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, H.

    1984-06-01

    This report involves the effects of catalysts in the synthesis of gasoline-range hydrocarbons from synthesis gas, in the hydrogenation of model coal compounds (quinoline), in the carbon-water reaction and in the chemistry of coal dissolution and liquefaction. (LTN)

  18. Bio-char derived from sewage sludge by liquefaction: Characterization and application for dye adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng, Lijian [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environment Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Yuan, Xingzhong, E-mail: yxz@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environment Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Huang, Huajun [School of Land Resources and Environment, Jiangxi Agricultural University, Nanchang 330045 (China); Shao, Jianguang; Wang, Hou [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environment Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Chen, Xiaohong [School of Business, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Zeng, Guangming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environment Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SS liquefaction bio-chars were effective on MG and MB removal from aqueous. • MG adsorption capacity depended strongly on carboxylic and phenolic groups. • Metal release accounted for nearly 30% of the total MG adsorbed on bio-chars. • Acetone and low temperature favor effective adsorbent production by liquefaction. - Abstract: Bio-chars produced by liquefaction of sewage sludge with methanol, ethanol, or acetone as the solvent at 260–380 °C were characterized in terms of their elemental composition, thermogravimetric characteristics, surface area and pore size distribution, and oxygen-containing functional groups composition. The surface area and total volume of the bio-chars were low, but the contents of oxygen-containing functional groups were high. The bio-chars were effective on Malachite green (MG) and Methylene blue (MB) removal from aqueous solution. The MG adsorption equilibrium data showed excellent fit to the Langmuir model and the kinetic data fitted well to the Pseudo-second-order model. Thermodynamic investigations indicated that MG adsorption on bio-char was spontaneous and endothermic. The MG adsorption mechanism appears to be associated with cation release and functional group participation. Additionally, liquefaction of SS with acetone as the solvent at low temperature (280 °C) would favor the production of bio-char adsorbent in terms of bio-char yield and MG and MB adsorption capacity.

  19. Small-scale hydrogen liquefaction with a two-stage Gifford-McMahon cycle refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Akihiro; Maeda, Tetsuhiko; Ito, Hiroshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Energy Technology Research Institute, 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba East, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); Masuda, Masao; Kawakami, Yoshiaki; Kato, Atsushi [Takasago Thermal Engineering Co., Ltd., Research and Development Center, 3150 Iiyama Atsugi City, Kanagawa 243-0213 (Japan); Tange, Manabu [Shibaura Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 3-7-5 Toyosu Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8548 (Japan); Takahashi, Toru [University of Tsukuba, Department of Engineering Mechanics and Energy, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Matsuo, Masahiro [JECC Torisha Co., Ltd., 2-8-52 Yoshinodai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-0833 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    We manufactured a small-scale hydrogen liquefier with a two-stage 10 K Gifford-McMahon cycle (GM) refrigerator. It had a hydrogen tank with the volume of 30 L that was surrounded by a radiation shield. This liquefier continuously liquefied gaseous hydrogen with the volumetric flow rate of 12.1 NL/min. It corresponds to the liquefaction rate of 19.9 L/day for liquid hydrogen. We proposed a simple estimation method for the liquefaction rate and confirmed that the estimation method well explained the experimental result. To evaluate the estimation method, we applied the estimation method to other liquefiers. In case of a liquefier with the GM refrigerator, we confirmed the estimation method was available for predicting the liquefaction rate. However, in case of a liquefier with the pulse tube refrigerator, the results of the estimation indicated small values as compared with the experimental data. We discuss the details about the estimation method of the liquefaction rate for the small-scale liquefiers. (author)

  20. Hydrothermal liquefaction of Spirulina and Nannochloropsis salina under subcritical and supercritical water conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Saqib S; Reddy, Harvind; Deng, Shuguang; Hoffmann, Jessica; Spangsmark, Dorte; Madsen, Linda B; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Rosendahl, Lasse A

    2013-03-01

    Six hydrothermal liquefaction experiments on Nannochloropsis salina and Spirulina platensis at subcritical and supercritical water conditions (220–375 °C, 20–255 bar) were carried out to explore the feasibility of extracting lipids from wet algae, preserving nutrients in lipid-extracted algae solid residue, and recycling process water for algae cultivation. GC–MS, elemental analyzer, FT-IR, calorimeter and nutrient analysis were used to analyze bio-crude, lipid-extracted algae and water samples produced in the hydrothermal liquefaction process. The highest bio-crude yield of 46% was obtained on N. salina at 350 °C and 175 bar. For S. platensis algae sample, the optimal hydrothermal liquefaction condition appears to be at 310 °C and 115 bar, while the optimal condition for N. salina is at 350 °C and 175 bar. Preliminary data also indicate that a lipid-extracted algae solid residue sample obtained in the hydrothermal liquefaction process contains a high level of proteins. PMID:23376205

  1. Development technology of rigidity-drain pile and numerical analysis of its anti-liquefaction characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘汉龙; 陈育民; 赵楠

    2008-01-01

    Pile foundation is widely used in the offshore engineering. The pile can be seriously destroyed by the soil liquefaction during strong earthquakes. The potentials of liquefaction and damages of pile foundation due to the liquefaction can be reduced by the implementation of the drainage in the liquefiable foundation. A patented pile technology, named rigidity-drain pile, was introduced. The partial section of the pile body was filled by materials with higher penetrability which forms some effective drainage channels in the pile. The principles and construction methods were presented. 3D models for both rigidity-drain pile and ordinary pile were built in FLAC3D code. The dynamic loadings were applied on the bottom of the model. According to the numerical results, in the case of the rigidity-drain pile, the water in the relevant distance range around the pile flows toward the pile drainage, the contour of the pore pressure shows a funnel form. Contrast to the ordinary pile, the rigidity-drain pile can dissipate the accumulated excess pore water, maintain effective stress and obviously reduce the possibility of surrounding soil liquefaction.

  2. Bio-char derived from sewage sludge by liquefaction: Characterization and application for dye adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SS liquefaction bio-chars were effective on MG and MB removal from aqueous. • MG adsorption capacity depended strongly on carboxylic and phenolic groups. • Metal release accounted for nearly 30% of the total MG adsorbed on bio-chars. • Acetone and low temperature favor effective adsorbent production by liquefaction. - Abstract: Bio-chars produced by liquefaction of sewage sludge with methanol, ethanol, or acetone as the solvent at 260–380 °C were characterized in terms of their elemental composition, thermogravimetric characteristics, surface area and pore size distribution, and oxygen-containing functional groups composition. The surface area and total volume of the bio-chars were low, but the contents of oxygen-containing functional groups were high. The bio-chars were effective on Malachite green (MG) and Methylene blue (MB) removal from aqueous solution. The MG adsorption equilibrium data showed excellent fit to the Langmuir model and the kinetic data fitted well to the Pseudo-second-order model. Thermodynamic investigations indicated that MG adsorption on bio-char was spontaneous and endothermic. The MG adsorption mechanism appears to be associated with cation release and functional group participation. Additionally, liquefaction of SS with acetone as the solvent at low temperature (280 °C) would favor the production of bio-char adsorbent in terms of bio-char yield and MG and MB adsorption capacity

  3. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of the Microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigaard Christensen, Per; Peng, Gaël; Vogel, Frédéric; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2014-01-01

    The microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum was processed by hydrothermal liquefaction in order to assess the influence of reaction temperature and reaction time on the product and elemental distribution. The experiments were carried out at different reaction times (5 and 15 min) and over a wide range...

  4. Assessment of Susceptibility to Liquefaction of Saturated Road Embankment Subjected to Dynamic Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borowiec Anna

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Liquefaction has always been intensely studied in parts of the world where earthquakes occur. However, the seismic activity is not the only possible cause of this phenomenon. It may in fact be triggered by some human activities, such as constructing and mining or by rail and road transport.

  5. Verification of a Hypoplastic Model with Static Liquefaction Tests on Hostun RF Sand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herle, Ivo; Doanh, T.

    Rotterdam : Balkema, 1999 - (Jamiolkowski, M.), s. 525-532 ISBN 90-5809-075-2. [Int. Symposium Pre-failure Deformation Characteristics of Geomaterials. Torino (IT), 26.09.1999-29.09.1999] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2071901 Keywords : sand liquefaction * hypoplastic model * triaxial tests Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  6. Correlation of liquefaction resistance with shear wave velocity based on laboratory study using bender element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan-guo; CHEN Yun-min; KE Han

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies using field case history data yielded new criteria for evaluating liquefaction potential in saturated granular deposits based on in situ, stress-corrected shear wave velocity. However, the conditions of relatively insufficient case histories and limited site conditions in this approach call for additional data to more reliably define liquefaction resistance as a function of shear wave velocity. In this study, a series of undrained cyclic triaxial tests were conducted on saturated sand with shear wave velocity Vs measured by bender element. By normalizing the data with respect to minimum void ratio, the test results, incorporated with previously published laboratory data, statistically revealed good correlation of cyclic shear strength with small-strain shear modulus for sandy soils, which is almost irrespective of soil types and confining pressures. The consequently determined cyclic resistance ratio, CRR, was found to be approximately proportional to Vs4. Liquefaction resistance boundary curves were established by applying this relationship and compared to liquefaction criteria derived from seismic field measurements. Although in the range of Vs1>200 m/s the presented curves are moderately conservative, they are remarkably consistent with the published field performance criteria on the whole.

  7. Comparative Liquefaction Analyses Methods Depend on Spt (N1)60 and VsD and Sample Inegoel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we dealt with the liquefaction analyses methods depending on Shear Wave Velocity (Vs) and Standard Penetration Test (SPT (N1)60) results. Additionally geotechnical sections were composed from data which obtained seismic refraction, vertical electric sounding and mechanic drilling studies. Comparative liquefaction analysis results obtained from Vsd and SPT (N1)60 tests were given for the layers under the ground water table which was estimated from the sections. As a result, the liquefaction potential maps of Inegoel town were prepared

  8. Assessment of Susceptibility to Liquefaction of Saturated Road Embankment Subjected to Dynamic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Anna; Maciejewski, Krzysztof

    2014-03-01

    Liquefaction has always been intensely studied in parts of the world where earthquakes occur. However, the seismic activity is not the only possible cause of this phenomenon. It may in fact be triggered by some human activities, such as constructing and mining or by rail and road transport. In the paper a road embankment built across a shallow water reservoir is analyzed in terms of susceptibility to liquefaction. Two types of dynamic loadings are considered: first corresponding to an operation of a vibratory roller and second to an earthquake. In order to evaluate a susceptibility of soil to liquefaction, a factor of safety against triggering of liquefaction is used (FSTriggering). It is defined as a ratio of vertical effective stresses to the shear stresses both varying with time. For the structure considered both stresses are obtained using finite element method program, here Plaxis 2D. The plastic behavior of the cohesionless soils is modeled by means of Hardening Soil (HS) constitutive relationship, implemented in Plaxis software. As the stress tensor varies with time during dynamic excitation, the FSTriggering has to be calculated for some particular moment of time when liquefaction is most likely to occur. For the purposes of this paper it is named a critical time and established for reference point at which the pore pressures were traced in time. As a result a factor of safety distribution throughout embankment is generated. For the modeled structure, cyclic point loads (i.e., vibrating roller) present higher risk than earthquake of magnitude 5.4. Explanation why considered structure is less susceptible to earthquake than typical dam could lay in stabilizing and damping influence of water, acting here on both sides of the slope. Analogical procedure is applied to assess liquefaction susceptibility of the road embankment considered but under earthquake excitation. Only the higher water table is considered as it is the most unfavorable. Additionally the

  9. Influence of catalytic activity and reaction conditions on the product distribution in coal liquefaction; Sekitan ekikayu no seiseibutsu bunpu ni taisuru shokubai kassei oyobi hanno joken no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasuo, H.; Sakanishi, K.; Mochida, I. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Institute of Advanced Material Study

    1996-10-28

    The NiMo sulfide supported on Ketjen Black (KB) was more effective and yielded lighter oil products containing light fractions with their boiling point below 300{degree}C during the two stage liquefaction combining low temperature and high temperature hydrogenation the conventional NiMo/alumina catalyst and FeS2 catalyst. Although the NiMo/alumina yielded increased oil products during the two stage liquefaction, the lighter oil fractions did not increase and the heavier fractions increased mainly. This suggests that the hydrogenation of aromatic rings and successive cleavage of the rings are necessary for producing the light oil, which is derived from the sufficient hydrogenation of aromatic rings using catalysts. For the two stage reaction with NiMo/KB catalyst, it was considered that sufficient hydrogen was directly transferred to coal molecules at the first stage of the low temperature reaction, which promoted the solubilization of coal and the successive hydrogenation at the high temperature reaction. Thus, high activity of the catalyst must be obtained. It is expected that further high quality distillates can be produced through the optimization of catalysts and solvents at the two stage reaction. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Effect of hydrogen pressure on free radicals in direct coal liquefaction/coprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seehra, M.S.; Ibrahim, M.M. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to investigate the coprocessing of coal with waste tires and commingled plastics and to characterize the relevant catalysts, using high pressure/high temperature in-situ ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) spectroscopy. The recent results from high pressure ESR spectroscopy are emphasized. During this period, considerable progress was made in developing the high pressure capabilities in in-situ ESR spectroscopy and new results carried out in 1000 psi of H{sub 2}gas are presented. In these experiments, sapphire tubes were used to contain the high pressures at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C. Results of the experiments carried out under 1000 psi of H{sub 2} are compared with those under 1000 psi of non-interacting argon and with the earlier experiments in flowing H{sub 2} gas where the volatiles are removed by the flowing gas. In these experiments, the free radical density N of the Blind Canyon coal was measured at each temperature and pressure by double integration of the ESR signal and calibrating it against a standard. The details of the experimental apparatus and procedures have been described in earlier publications.

  11. Relationships of coal characteristics to coal reactivity for direct hydrogenation liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, R.M.; Voorhees, K.J.; Durfee, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Two suites of coals from the US have been liquefied in a batch stirred autoclave reactor under a set of standard conditions. Data from the reactor have permitted both the rate and extent of conversion to be measured. Rate of reaction and extent of conversion of coal have then been used as dependent variables for development of correlations for reactivity with basic coal chemical, geochemical, and structural properties. In general, use of a kinetic definition for reactivity has been shown to be superior in ranking relative reactivities among closely related coals, and for developing correlations with compositional parameters such as volatile matter, reactive macerals, and vitrinite reflectance. Carbon aromaticity as determined by /sup 13/C-NMR and structural parameters as determined by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry have also been found to be useful in providing insight into the relationship between coal structure and coal reactivity. 17 references.

  12. Development of liquefaction process of coal and biomass in supercritical water; Chorinkaisui wo mochiita sekitan biomass doji ekika process no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, H.; Matsumura, Y.; Tsutsumi, A.; Yoshida, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Masuno, Y.; Inaba, A. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Liquefaction of coal and biomass in supercritical water has been investigated, in which strong solubilization force of supercritical water against hydrocarbons is utilized. Free radicals are formed through the cleavage of covalent bonds in coal under the heating condition at around 400{degree}C during coal liquefaction. It is important to stabilize these unstable intermediate products by hydrogen transfer. On the other hand, hydrogen is not required for the liquefaction of biomass having higher H/C atomic ratio and oxygen content than those of coal. Co-liquefaction of coal and biomass was conducted using supercritical water, in which excess hydrogen from the liquefaction of biomass would be transferred to coal, resulting in the effective liquefaction of coal. Mixture of coal and cellulose was liquefied in supercritical water at 390{degree}C under the pressure of 25 MPa using a semi-continuous reactor, and the results were compared with those from the separate liquefaction of them. The co-liquefaction of coal and cellulose did not show any difference in the residue yield from the separate liquefaction of these, but led to the increased production of compounds with lower molecular weight. The liquefaction was completed in 15 minutes. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Liquefaction record of the great 1934 earthquake predecessors from the north Bihar alluvial plains of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, C. P.; John, Biju; Rajendran, Kusala; Sanwal, Jaishri

    2016-07-01

    The great 1934 Himalayan earthquake of moment magnitude (Mw) 8.1 generated a large zone of ground failure and liquefaction in north Bihar, India, in addition to the earthquakes of 1833 (Mw ~7.7) and 1988 (Mw 6.7) that have also impacted this region. Here, we present the results of paleoliquefaction investigations from four sites in the plains of north Bihar and one in eastern Uttar Pradesh. The liquefaction features generated by successive earthquakes were dated at AD 829-971, 886-1090, 907-1181, 1130-1376, 1112-1572, 1492-1672, 1733-1839, and 1814-1854. One of the liquefaction events dated at AD 829-971, 886-1090, and 907-1181 may correlate with the great earthquake of AD ~1100, recognized in an earlier study from the sections across the frontal thrust in central eastern Nepal. Two late medieval liquefaction episodes of AD 1130-1376 and 1492-1672 were also exposed in our sites. The sedimentary sections also revealed sandblows that can be attributed to the 1833 earthquake, a lesser magnitude event compared to the 1934. Liquefactions triggered by the 1934 and 1988 earthquakes were evident within the topmost level in some sections. The available data lead us to conjecture that a series of temporally close spaced earthquakes of both strong and large types, not including the infrequent great earthquakes like the 1934, have affected the Bihar Plains during the last 1500 years with a combined recurrence interval of 124 ± 63 years.

  14. Liquefaction record of the great 1934 earthquake predecessors from the north Bihar alluvial plains of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, C. P.; John, Biju; Rajendran, Kusala; Sanwal, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    The great 1934 Himalayan earthquake of moment magnitude (Mw) 8.1 generated a large zone of ground failure and liquefaction in north Bihar, India, in addition to the earthquakes of 1833 (Mw ~7.7) and 1988 (Mw 6.7) that have also impacted this region. Here, we present the results of paleoliquefaction investigations from four sites in the plains of north Bihar and one in eastern Uttar Pradesh. The liquefaction features generated by successive earthquakes were dated at AD 829-971, 886-1090, 907-1181, 1130-1376, 1112-1572, 1492-1672, 1733-1839, and 1814-1854. One of the liquefaction events dated at AD 829-971, 886-1090, and 907-1181 may correlate with the great earthquake of AD ~1100, recognized in an earlier study from the sections across the frontal thrust in central eastern Nepal. Two late medieval liquefaction episodes of AD 1130-1376 and 1492-1672 were also exposed in our sites. The sedimentary sections also revealed sandblows that can be attributed to the 1833 earthquake, a lesser magnitude event compared to the 1934. Liquefactions triggered by the 1934 and 1988 earthquakes were evident within the topmost level in some sections. The available data lead us to conjecture that a series of temporally close spaced earthquakes of both strong and large types, not including the infrequent great earthquakes like the 1934, have affected the Bihar Plains during the last 1500 years with a combined recurrence interval of 124 ± 63 years.

  15. Coseismic liquefaction phenomenon analysis by COSMO-SkyMed: 2012 Emilia (Italy) earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, Marco; Albano, Matteo; Saroli, Michele; Pulvirenti, Luca; Moro, Marco; Bignami, Christian; Falcucci, Emanuela; Gori, Stefano; Modoni, Giuseppe; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    The liquefaction phenomenon that occurred in the coseismic phase of the May 20, 2012 Emilia (Italy) earthquake (ML 5.9) is investigated. It was induced by the water pressure increase in the buried and confined sand layers. The level-ground liquefaction was the result of a chaotic ground oscillation caused by the earthquake shaking and the observed failures were due to the upward water flow caused by the excess of pore pressures. We exploited the capability of the differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR) technique to detect soil liquefactions and estimate their surface displacements, as well as the high sensitivity to surface changes of complex coherence, SAR backscattering and intensity correlation. To this aim, a set of four COSMO-SkyMed X-band SAR images, covering the period April 1-June 6, 2012, was used. Geological-geotechnical analysis was also performed in order to ascertain if the detected SAR-based surface effects could be due to the compaction induced by liquefaction of deep sandy layers. In this regards, the results obtained from 13 electrical cone penetrometer tests show the presence of a fine to medium sandy layer at depths, ranging between 9 and 13 m, which probably liquefied during the earthquake, inducing vertical displacements between 3 and 16 cm. The quantitative results from geological-geotechnical analysis and the surface punctual effects measured by DInSAR are in good agreement, even if some differences are present, probably ascribable to the local thickness and depth variability of the sandy layer, or to lack of deformation detection due to DInSAR decorrelation. The adopted approach permitted us to define the extent of the areas that underwent liquefaction and to quantify the local subsidence related to these phenomena. The latter achievement provides useful information that must be considered in engineering practices, in terms of expected vertical deformations.

  16. Catalytic subcritical water liquefaction of flax straw for high yield of furfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is substantial interest in the application of biomass as a renewable fuel or for production of chemicals. Flax straw can be converted into valuable chemicals and biofuels via liquefaction in sub-critical water. In this study, the yield of furfural and the kinetics of flax straw liquefaction under sub-critical water conditions were investigated using a high-pressure autoclave reactor. The liquefaction was conducted in the temperature range of 175–325 °C, pressure of 0.1 MPa–8 MPa, retention time in the range of 0 min–120 min, and flax straw mass fraction (wF) of 5–20 %. Also, the effect of acid catalysts on furfural yield was studied. The kinetic parameters of flax straw liquefaction were determined using nonlinear regression of the experimental data, assuming second-order kinetics. The apparent activation energy was found to be 27.97 kJ mol−1 while the reaction order was 2.0. The optimum condition for furfural yield was at 250 °C, 6.0 MPa, wF of 5% and 0 retention time after reaching set conditions. An acid catalyst was found to selectively favour furfural yield with 40% flax straw conversion. - Highlights: • Flax straw liquefaction in subcritical water. • Creation of a reaction pathway that can be used to optimized furfural production. • Acid catalyst selectively favoured furfural yield with respect to other liquid products. • At the highest process temperature of 325 °C, a carbon conversion of 40% was achieved. • Activation energy and reaction order was 28 kJ/mol and 2.0 respectively

  17. Effects of relative density and accumulated shear strain on post-liquefaction residual deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The damage caused by liquefaction, which occurs following an earthquake, is usually because of settlement and lateral spreading. Generally, the evaluation of liquefaction has been centered on settlement, that is, residual volumetric strain. However, in actual soil, residual shear and residual volumetric deformations occur simultaneously after an earthquake. Therefore, the simultaneous evaluation of the two phenomena and the clarification of their relationship are likely to evaluate post-liquefaction soil behaviors more accurately. Hence, a quantitative evaluation of post-liquefaction damage will also be possible. In this study, the effects of relative density and accumulated shear strain on post-liquefaction residual deformations were reviewed through a series of lateral constrained-control hollow cylindrical torsion tests under undrained conditions. In order to identify the relationship between residual shear and residual volumetric strains, this study proposed a new test method that integrates monotonic loading after cyclic loading, and K0-drain after cyclic loading – in other words, the combination of cyclic loading, monotonic loading, and the K0 drain. In addition, a control that maintained the lateral constrained condition across all the processes of consolidation, cyclic loading, monotonic loading, and drainage was used to reproduce the anisotropy of in situ ground. This lateral constrain control was performed by controlling the axial strain, based on the assumption that under undrained conditions, axial and lateral strains occur simultaneously, and unless axial strain occurs, lateral strain does not occur. The test results confirmed that the recovery of effective stresses, which occur during monotonic loading and drainage after cyclic loading, respectively, result from mutually different structural restoration characteristics. In addition, in the ranges of 40–60% relative density and 50–100% accumulated shear strain, relative

  18. Earthquake Risk - EARTHQUAKE_LIQUEFACTION_IN: Earthquake Paleoliquefaction Sites in Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:24,000, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — EARTHQUAKE_LIQUEFACTION_IN is a point shapefile that shows sites where paleoliquefaction features have been identified in the field by Pat Munson of the Indiana...

  19. Liquefaction and other ground failures in Imperial County, California, from the April 4, 2010, El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrink, Timothy P.; Pridmore, Cynthia L.; Tinsley, John C., III; Sickler, Robert R.; Brandenberg, Scott J.; Stewart, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    The Colorado River Delta region of southern Imperial Valley, California, and Mexicali Valley, Baja California, is a tectonically dynamic area characterized by numerous active faults and frequent large seismic events. Significant earthquakes that have been accompanied by surface fault rupture and/or soil liquefaction occurred in this region in 1892 (M7.1), 1915 (M6.3; M7.1), 1930 (M5.7), 1940 (M6.9), 1950 (M5.4), 1957 (M5.2), 1968 (6.5), 1979 (6.4), 1980 (M6.1), 1981 (M5.8), and 1987 (M6.2; M6.8). Following this trend, the M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010, ruptured approximately 120 kilometers along several known faults in Baja California. Liquefaction caused by the M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake was widespread throughout the southern Imperial Valley but concentrated in the southwest corner of the valley, southwest of the city centers of Calexico and El Centro where ground motions were highest. Although there are few strong motion recordings in the very western part of the area, the recordings that do exist indicate that ground motions were on the order of 0.3 to 0.6g where the majority of liquefaction occurrences were found. More distant liquefaction occurrences, at Fites Road southwest of Brawley and along Rosita Canal northwest of Holtville were triggered where ground motions were about 0.2 g. Damage to roads was associated mainly with liquefaction of sandy river deposits beneath bridge approach fills, and in some cases liquefaction within the fills. Liquefaction damage to canal and drain levees was not always accompanied by vented sand, but the nature of the damage leads the authors to infer that liquefaction was involved in the majority of observed cases. Liquefaction-related damage to several public facilities - Calexico Waste Water Treatment Plant, Fig Lagoon levee system, and Sunbeam Lake Dam in particular - appears to be extensive. The cost to repair these facilities to prevent future liquefaction damage will likely be prohibitive. As

  20. Penilaian Risiko Terhadap Pipa Bawah Laut East Java Gas Pipeline (EJGP) Pertagas Akibat Soil Liquefaction Karena Gempa Bumi

    OpenAIRE

    Astri M. Firucha; Wahyudi Wahyudi; Kriyo Sambodho

    2012-01-01

    Kegagalan sistem perpipaan bawah laut sering terjadi karena adanya fenomena alam pengaruh lingkungan dari gelombang, arus dan gempa bumi. Fenomena alam yang terjadi pada pipa bawah laut meliputi, scouring, soil liquefaction, dan landslide yang kemudian berakibat pada settlement. Pada penelitian ini dilakukan analisis mengenai penilaian risiko terhadap pipa bawah laut East Java Gas Pipeline (EJGP) milik PT. Pertagas yang kemungkinan terjadi soil liquefaction karena gempa bumi. Sistem perpipaan...