WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced deuterium fusion

  1. Advanced Deuterium Fusion Rocket Propulsion for Manned Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    Excluding speculations about future breakthrough discoveries in physics, it is shown that with what is at present known, and also what is technically feasible, manned space flight to the limits of the solar system and beyond deep into the Oort cloud is quite possible. Using deuterium as the rocket fuel of choice, abundantly available on the comets of the Oort cloud, rockets driven by deuterium fusion can there be refuelled. To obtain a high thrust with high specific impulse favours the propulsion by deuterium micro-bombs, and it is shown that the ignition of deuterium micro-bombs is possible by intense GeV proton beams, generated in space by using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated billion volt capacitor. The cost to develop this kind of a propulsion system in space would be very high, but it can also be developed on Earth by a magnetically insulated Super Marx Generator. Since the ignition of deuterium is theoretically possible with the Super Marx Generator, making obsolete the ignition of deuterium-tritium with a laser, where 80% of the energy goes into neutrons, this would also mean a breakthrough in fusion research, and therefore would justify the large development costs.

  2. Advanced Deuterium Fusion Rocket Propulsion For Manned Deep Space Missions

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Dr Friedwardt

    2009-01-01

    Excluding speculations about future breakthrough discoveries in physics, it is shown that with what is at present known, and also what is technically feasible, manned space flight to the limits of the solar system and beyond deep into the Oort cloud is quite well possible. Using deuterium as the rocket fuel of choice, abundantly available on the comets of the Oort cloud, rockets driven by deuterium fusion, can there be refueled. To obtain a high thrust with a high specific impulse, favors the propulsion by deuterium micro-bombs, and it is shown that the ignition of deuterium micro-bombs is possible by intense GeV proton beams, generated in space by using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated billion volt capacitor. The cost to develop this kind of propulsion system in space would be very high, but it can also be developed on earth by a magnetically insulated Super Marx Generator. Since the ignition of deuterium is theoretically possible with the Super Marx Generator, rather than deuterium-tritium ...

  3. Is Deuterium Nuclear Fusion Catalyzed by Antineutrinos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomer, Isaac

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis of Fischbach and Jenkins that neutrinos emitted from the sun accelerate radioactive decay is noted. It is thought that neutrinos accelerate beta decay by reacting with neutron-rich nuclides to form a beta particle and a daughter product, with no antineutrino emitted. Conversely, it is proposed that antineutrinos can react with proton-rich nuclides to cause positron decay, with no neutrino emitted. It is also proposed that the nuclear fusion of the hydrogen bomb is triggered not only by the energy of the igniting fission bomb, but by the antineutrinos created by the rapid beta decay of the daughter products in the fission process. The contemplated mechanism for antineutrino initiated fusion is the following: 1. The antineutrinos from the fission daughter products cause positron decay of deuterium by the process outlined above. 2. In a later fusion step, these positrons subsequently react with neutrons in deuterium to create antineutrinos. Electrons are unavailable to annihilate positrons in the plasma of the hydrogen bomb. 3. These antineutrinos thereafter react with more deuterium to form positrons, thereby propagating a chain reaction. )

  4. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Croci, G.; Ericsson, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Griesmayer, E.; Grosso, G.; Kaveney, G.; Nocente, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Rebai, M.; Syme, B.; Tardocchi, M.

    2014-04-01

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  5. Contribution of Beam-Driven Fusion in Pure Deuterium Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The urgent and ultimate goal of the fusion research is to accomplish a fusion reactor functioning practically. Though the first fusion reactor is expected to use a DT fuel, most fusion researchers have studied H or D plasmas instead of DT plasma because of radioactivity and resource problems. DD plasma experiments, now a usual trend, can give useful information on the fusion plasma physics, tritium retention, alpha particle transport, neutronics, and so on at a safe controlled radiation level. The KSTAR tokamak, all-superconductor world level fusion research device, has been operated with pure deuterium plasmas since the 2010 campaign, however, the thermal fusion reaction rate is still far below significant because of low plasma temperature. The NBI system equipped on the KSTAR tokamak can deliver more than 1.5 MW input power of deuterium neutral beam at 100 keV with one ion source, which have contributed to making H-mode plasmas for several seconds. The next goal of the NBI input power at the 2012 campaign is 3.5 MW with two ion sources. Hot ions generated from the deuterium neutral beam injected into the D plasma can produce beam-driven fusion reactions at a much more notable level than thermal ones. Contribution of deuterium neutral beam injection on the fusion reactions in a D plasma is preliminarily assessed here

  6. Fusion advanced studies Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful development of ITER and DEMO scenarios requires preparatory activities on devices that are smaller than ITER, sufficiently flexible and capable of investigating the peculiar physics of burning plasma conditions. The aim of the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST) proposal [2.1] (formerly FT3 [2.2]) is to show that the preparation of ITER scenarios and the development of new expertise for the DEMO design and RD can be effectively implemented on a new facility. FAST will a) operate with deuterium plasmas, thereby avoiding problems associated with tritium, and allow investigation of nonlinear dynamics (which are important for understanding alpha particle behaviour in burning plasmas) by using fast ions accelerated by heating and current drive systems; b) work in a dimensionless parameter range close to that of ITER; c) test technical innovative solutions, such as full-tungsten plasma-facing components and an advanced liquid metal divertor target for the first wall/divertor, directly relevant for ITER and DEMO; d) exploit advanced regimes with a much longer pulse duration than the current diffusion time; e) provide a test bed for ITER and DEMO diagnostics; f) provide an ideal framework for model and numerical code benchmarks, their verification and validation in ITER/ DEMO-relevant plasma conditions

  7. Deuterium behavior in first-wall materials for nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma-wall interactions play an important part while choosing materials for the first wall in future fusion reactors. Moreover, the use of tritium as a fuel will impose safety limits regarding the total amount present in the tokamak. Previous analyses of first-wall samples exposed to fusion plasma highlighted an in-bulk migration of deuterium (as an analog to tritium) in carbon materials. Despite its limited value, this retention is problematic: contrary to co-deposited layers, it seems very unlikely to recover easily the deuterium retained in such a way. Because of the difficult access to in situ samples, most published studies on the subject were carried out using post-mortem sample analysis. In order to access to the dynamic of the phenomenon and come apart potential element redistribution during storage, we set up a bench intended for simultaneous low-energy ion implantation, reproducing the deuterium interaction with first-wall materials, and high-energy micro beam analysis. Nuclear reaction analysis performed at the micrometric scale (μNRA) allows to characterize deuterium repartition profiles in situ. This analysis technique was confirmed to be non-perturbative of the mechanisms studied. We observed on the experimental data set that the material surface (0-1 μm) display a high and nearly constant deuterium content, with a uniform distribution. On the contrary, in-bulk deuterium (1-11 μm) localizes in preferential trapping sites related to the material microstructure. In-bulk deuterium inventory seems to increase with the incident fluence, in spite of the wide data scattering attributed to the structure variation of studied areas. Deuterium saturation at the surface as well as in-depth migration are instantaneous; in-vacuum storage leads to a small deuterium global desorption. Observations made via μNRA were coupled with results from other characterization techniques. X-ray μtomography allowed to identify porosities as the preferential trapping sites

  8. Blankets for tritium catalyzed deuterium (TCD) fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TCD fusion fuel cycle - where the 3He from the D(D,n)3He reaction is transmuted, by neutron capture in the blanket, into tritium which is fed back to the plasma - was recently recognized as being potentially more promising than the Catalyzed Deuterium (Cat-D) fuel cycle for tokamak power reactors. It is the purpose of the present work to assess the feasibility of, and to identify promising directions for designing blankets for TCD fusion reactors

  9. Deuterium behavior in first-wall materials for nuclear fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Elodie

    2012-01-01

    Plasma-wall interactions play an important part while choosing materials for the first wall in future fusion reactors. Moreover, the use of tritium as a fuel will impose safety limits regarding the total amount present in the tokamak. Previous analyses of first-wall samples exposed to fusion plasma highlighted an in-bulk migration of deuterium (used as an analog to tritium) in carbon materials. Despite its limited value, this retention is problematic: contrary to co-deposited layers, it seems...

  10. Deuterium Clusters Fusion Induced by the Intense Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-Jie; CHEN Jia-Bin; WANG Hong-Bin; JIAO Chun-Ye; HE Ying-Ling; WEN Tian-Shu; WEN Xian-Lun; CHEN Ming; ZHENG Zhi-Jian; GU Yu-Qiu; ZHANG Bao-Han; RHEE Yong-Joo; NAM Sung-Mo; HAN Jae-Min; RHEE Yong-Woo; YEA Kwon-Hae

    2007-01-01

    Neutrons (2.45 MeV) from deuterium cluster fusion induced by the intense femtosecond (30 fs) laser pulse are experimentally demonstrated. The average neutron yield 103 per shot is obtained. It is found that the yield slightly increases with the increasing laser spot size. No neutron can be observed when the laser intensity Ⅰ <4.3×1015 W/cm2.

  11. Fusion product diagnostics planned for Large Helical Device deuterium experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium experiment on the Large Helical Device (LHD) is now being planned at the National Institute for Fusion Science. The fusion product diagnostics systems currently considered for installation on LHD are described in this paper. The systems will include a time-resolved neutron yield monitor based on neutron gas counters, a time-integrated neutron yield monitor based on activation techniques, a multicollimator scintillation detector array for diagnosing spatial distribution of neutron emission rate, 2.5 MeV neutron spectrometer, 14 MeV neutron counter, and prompt γ-ray diagnostics.

  12. Historic Experiments in Radiationless Deuterium Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Talbot

    2001-04-01

    [1989-1991] Fleischmann & Pons observe excess heat in D2O electrolysis using Pd cathodes; confirmed in other studies. See "Excess Heat & Why Cold Fusion Research Has Prevailed" by Charles Beaudette. -- [1993] Fleischmann and Pons discover hours-long heat production in Pd cathodes after electrolysis turn-off. -- [1993, 1999] Miles & B. Bush, McKubre & Tanzella using mass spectrometers observe helium-4 in the electrolysis off-gas at rate of 1 helium atom per 24 MeV of released heat. -- [1994] Arata & Zhang develop DS-cathode, which produces months-long watts of excess heat 10 times in a row using Arata & Zhang protocol. -- [1999] DS-cathode technology is successfully transferred to SRI. -- [1998, 1999] Case observes and McKubre et al. verify heat and helium-4 generated in D2-loaded 0.5% Pd-on-carbon catalyst. -- [1997, 2000] Arata & Zhang observe by-product helium-3. Clarke collaborating with McKubre et al. observes helium-3 in materials from a previously-run DS cathode at helium-3/helium-4 ratio 10000 times atmospheric value. Time increase in helium-3 measures post-run tritium content, supports tritium observations by Will & Cedzynska (1991).

  13. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 1024 ions m−2. Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  14. Systematic analysis of advanced fusion fuel in inertial fusion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, G.; Eliezer, S.; Henis, Z.; Piera, M.; Martinez-Val, J. M.

    1997-04-01

    Aneutronic fusion reactions can be considered as the cleanest way to exploit nuclear energy. However, these reactions present in general two main drawbacks.—very high temperatures are needed to reach relevant values of their cross sections—Moderate (and even low) energy yield per reaction. This value is still lower if measured in relation to the Z number of the reacting particles. It is already known that bremsstrahlung overruns the plasma reheating by fusion born charged-particles in most of the advanced fuels. This is for instance the case for proton-boron-11 fusion in a stoichiometric plasma and is also so in lithium isotopes fusion reactions. In this paper, the use of deuterium-tritium seeding is suggested to allow to reach higher burnup fractions of advanced fuels, starting at a lower ignition temperature. Of course, neutron production increases as DT contents does. Nevertheless, the ratio of neutron production to energy generation is much lower in DT-advanced fuel mixtures than in pure DT plasmas. One of the main findings of this work is that some natural resources (as D and Li-7) can be burned-up in a catalytic regime for tritium. In this case, neither external tritium breeding nor tritium storage are needed, because the tritium inventory after the fusion burst is the same as before it. The fusion reactor can thus operate on a pure recycling of a small tritium inventory.

  15. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to ∼9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS ∼6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored

  16. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosea, J.; Adler, J.H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D. [and others

    1994-09-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to {approx}9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS {approx}6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored.

  17. Fuel provision for nonbreeding deuterium-tritium fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonbreeding D-T reactors have decisive advantages in minimum size, unit cost, variety of applications, and ease of heat removal over reactors using any other fusion cycle, and significant advantages in environmental and safety characteristics over breeding D-T reactors. Considerations of relative energy production demonstrate that the most favorable source of tritium for a widely deployed system of nonbreeding D-T reactors is the very large (approx. 10 GW thermal) semi-catalyzed-deuterium (SCD), or sub-SCD reactor, where none of the escaping 3He (> 95%) or tritium (< 25%) is reinjected for burn-up. Feasibility of the ignited SCD tokamak reactor requires spatially averaged betas of 15 to 20% with a magnetic field at the TF coils of 12 to 13 Tesla

  18. Some experiments on cold fusion by deuterium hydrogen gas infusion in titanium metal alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New results on cold fusion are reported where three different experimental situations have been tried: a) deuterium gas loaded titanium; b) deuterium gas loaded Ti0.8Zr0.2CrMn alloy and c) titanium and the Ti0.8Zr0.2CrMn alloy loaded with a mixture of deuterium and hydrogen gases. With these experiments, new thermodynamical non equilibrium conditions were achieved and the possibility of cold fusion between protons and deuterons was also tested. Three independent neutron detectors and one NaI(Tl) were utilized. Despite some large values reported in the literature for the fusion rate, an upper limit of only 8 x 10-24 fusions/sper deuterium pair or per deuterium-hydrogen pair was determined within the attained accuracy. (author)

  19. Reactor prospects of muon-catalyzed fusion of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is conjectured that the number of fusion events catalyzed by a single muon is orders of magnitude greater for deuterium and tritium concentrated in a transition metal than in gaseous form and that the recent observation of 2.5-MeV neutrons from a D2O electrolytic cell with palladium and titanium cathodes can thereby be interpreted in terms of cosmic muon-catalyzed deuterium-deuterium fusion. This suggests a new fusion reactor reactor consisting of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metal fuel elements in a fusion core that surrounds an accelerator-produced muon source. The feasibility of net energy production in such a reactor is established in terms of requirements on the number of fusion events catalyzed per muon. The technological implications for a power reactor based on this concept are examined. The potential of such a concept as a neutron source for materials testing and tritium and plutonium production is briefly discussed

  20. Hypervelocity Impact Fusion with Compressed Deuterium-Tritium Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Olariu, S

    1998-01-01

    The neutron yields observed in inertial confinement fusion experiments for higher convergence ratios are about two orders of magnitude smaller than the neutron yields predicted by one-dimensional models, the discrepancy being attributed to the development of instabilities. We consider the possibility that ignition and a moderate gain could be achieved with existing laser facilities if the laser driver energy is used to produce only the radial compression of the fuel capsule to high densities but relatively low temperatures, while the ignition of the fusion reactions in the compressed fuel capsule will be effected by a synchronized hypervelocity impact. A positively-charged incident projectile can be accelerated to velocities of 3.5 x 10^6 m/s, resulting in ignition temperatures of about 4 keV, by a conventional low-beta linac having a length of 13 km if deuterium-tritium densities of 570 g/cm^3 could be obtained by laser-driven compression.

  1. Fusion neutron and ion emission from deuterium and deuterated methane cluster plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on the interaction of intense, ultrafast pulses with large van der Waals bonded clusters have shown that these clusters can explode with substantial kinetic energy and that the explosion of deuterium clusters can drive nuclear fusion reactions. Producing explosions in deuterated methane clusters with a 100 fs, 100 TW laser pulse, it is found that deuterium ions are accelerated to sufficiently high kinetic energy to drive deuterium nuclear fusion. From measurements of cluster size and ion energy via time of flight methods, it is found that these exploding deuterated methane clusters exhibit higher ion energies than explosions of comparably sized neat deuterium clusters, in accord with recent theoretical predictions. From measurements of the plume size and peak density, the relative contribution to the fusion yield from both beam target and intrafilament fusion is discussed

  2. Advanced fusion concepts project summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, are described. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain title, persons responsible, funding, purpose, approach, recent progress, future plans, planned milestones, graduate students and other staff, and recent publications

  3. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  4. Advanced fusion concepts program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the prospects for the eventual development of a tokamak-based fusion reactor appear promising at the present time, the Department of Energy maintains a vigorous program in alternate magnetic fusion concepts. Several of the concepts presently supported include the toroidal reversed field pinch, Tormac, Elmo Bumpy Torus, and various linear options. Recent technical accomplishments and program evaluations indicate that the possibility now exists for undertaking the next development stage, a proof-of-principle experiment, for a few of the most promising alternate concepts

  5. Review of deuterium--tritium results from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K. M.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Anderson, J W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, C. W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N. L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Chang, C. S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dendy, R.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M. J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marmar, E. S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mazzucato, E.; Mauel, M.; McCarthy, M. P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O`Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Sesnic, S.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Strachan, J. D.; Stodiek, W.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Tighe, W.; Timberlake, J. R.; Tobita, K.; Towner, H. H.; Tuszewski, M.; Halle, A. Von; Vannoy, C.; Viola, M.; Goeler, S. Von; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wester, R.; White, R.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Winston, J.; Wright, K.; Wong, K. L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zavereev, V.; Zweben, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    The first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas using nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. At present the maximum fusion power of 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-βp discharge following a current rampdown. The fusion power density in a core of the plasma is ≈ 2.8 MW m₋3, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) at 1500 MW total fusion power. The energy confinement time, τE, is observed to increase in D–T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the ni (0) Ti(0) τE product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-βp discharges. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating of a D–T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP simulations. Initial measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from He gas puffing experiments. The loss of alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed. D–T experiments on TFTR will continue to explore the assumptions of the ITER design and to examine some of the physics issues associated with an advanced tokamak reactor.

  6. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac

  7. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac. (MOW)

  8. Deuterium-Tritium Simulations of the Enhanced Reversed Shear Mode in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Manickam, J.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff

    1997-04-01

    The potential performance, in deuterium-tritium plasmas, of a new enhanced con nement regime with reversed magnetic shear (ERS mode) is assessed. The equilibrium conditions for an ERS mode plasma are estimated by solving the plasma transport equations using the thermal and particle dif- fusivities measured in a short duration ERS mode discharge in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [F. M. Levinton, et al., Phys. Rev. Letters, 75, 4417, (1995)]. The plasma performance depends strongly on Zeff and neutral beam penetration to the core. The steady state projections typically have a central electron density of {approx}2:5x10 20 m{sup -3} and nearly equal central electron and ion temperatures of {approx}10 keV. In time dependent simulations the peak fusion power, {approx} 25 MW, is twice the steady state level. Peak performance occurs during the density rise when the central ion temperature is close to the optimal value of {approx} 15 keV. The simulated pressure profiles can be stable to ideal MHD instabilities with toroidal mode number n = 1, 2, 3, 4 and {infinity} for {beta}{sub norm} up to 2.5; the simulations have {beta}{sub norm} {le} 2.1. The enhanced reversed shear mode may thus provide an opportunity to conduct alpha physics experiments in conditions imilar to those proposed for advanced tokamak reactors.

  9. Overview of advanced fuel fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status and issues related to the development of advanced fuel fusion are discussed. D-3He is a key advanced fuel since it has the potential of igniting in a variety of confinement concepts. However, to obtain a plentiful source of 3He, either lunar mining or breeding becomes necessary. Highly non-Maxwellian plasmas, such as might occur in beam-beam fusion concepts, are necessary to address fuels like p-11B which have the added advantages of a more aneutronic character and plentiful fuel supply. Such plasmas appear very difficult to achieve but several possible approaches such as electrostatic confinement are noted. 52 refs., 13 figs, 5 tabs

  10. Preparations for deuterium--tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L.A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Biglow, T.S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M.J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Ja

    1994-05-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. [bold 21], 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinert[sup TM] system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium--deuterium (D--D) run to simulate expected deuterium--tritium (D--T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D--T experiments using D--D have been performed. The physics objectives of D--T operation are production of [approx]10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium--tritium plasmas, evaluation of [alpha]-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined [alpha] particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D--T experiments are reviewed.

  11. Preparations for deuterium tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, G. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinet{sup {trademark}} system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of {approximately} 10 megawatts (MW) of fusion power, evaluation of confinement and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of {alpha}-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined {alpha}-particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed.

  12. Preparations for deuterium tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinettrademark system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of ∼ 10 megawatts (MW) of fusion power, evaluation of confinement and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of α-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined α-particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed

  13. Experiments on palladium- and titanium-deuterium systems with reference to studies on ''cold fusion''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work performed at Risoe in connection with the claims of ''cold fusion'' is summarised in this report. The main purpose of the whole experiment was to analyse if structural anomalies of deuterated metals could support the occurrence of fusion processes in such systems by x-ray and neutron powder diffraction methods. Two types of systems were investigated. The first one was an electrolytic cell with palladium as electrode. No anomalous properties in the composition and positions of deuterium were found in this case. The other one was a titanium-deuterium-gas system which was studied in order to reproduce the ''Frascati experiment''. However, no neutrons above the background level were observed in spite of the very sensitive detector system. By neutron diffraction of this system a 70% titanium-dideuterium phase was found. (author)

  14. Hypervelocity Impact Fusion with Compressed Deuterium-Tritium Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Olariu, Silviu

    1998-01-01

    The neutron yields observed in inertial confinement fusion experiments for higher convergence ratios are about two orders of magnitude smaller than the neutron yields predicted by one-dimensional models, the discrepancy being attributed to the development of instabilities. We consider the possibility that ignition and a moderate gain could be achieved with existing laser facilities if the laser driver energy is used to produce only the radial compression of the fuel capsule to high densities ...

  15. Fusion power production from TFTR plasmas fueled with deuterium and tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, J. D.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, Cris W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N. L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C. Z.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Darrow, D. S.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Gentile, C.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kugel, H.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Loughlin, M. J.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levinton, F. M.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D. K.; Martin, A.; Mazzucato, E.; Majeski, R.; Marmar, E.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Nagy, A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Nishitani, T.; Norris, M.; O’Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Pitcher, S.; Ramsey, A. T.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scott, S. D.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J. A.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Synakowski, E.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J. L.; Thompson, M. E.; Tuszewski, M.; Vannoy, C.; von Halle, A.; von Goeler, S.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K. L.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.

    1994-05-01

    Peak fusion power production of 6.2 ± 0.4 MW has been achieved in TFTR plasmas heated by deuterium and tritium neutral beams at a total power of 29.5 MW. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha particle density of 1.2 x 1017 m ₋3 without the appearance of either disruptive magnetohydrodynamics events or detectable changes in Alfvén wave activity. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles agreed with the approximately 5% losses expected from alpha particles which are born on unconfined orbits.

  16. Fusion power production from TFTR plasmas fueled with deuterium and tritium*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, J. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Adler, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Alling, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Synakowski, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States). et al.

    1994-03-01

    Peak fusion power production of 6.2 ± 0.4 MW has been achieved in TFTR plasmas heated by deuterium and tritium neutral beams at a total power of 29.5 MW. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha particle density of 1.2 x 1017 m₋3 without the appearance of either disruptive MHD events or detectable changes in Alfvén wave activity. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles agreed with the approximately 5% losses expected from alpha particles which are born on unconfined orbits.

  17. Fusion power production from TFTR plasmas fueled with deuterium and tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak fusion power production of 6.2 ± 0.4 MW has been achieved in TFTR plasmas heated by deuterium and tritium neutral beams at a total power of 29.5 MW. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha particle density of 1.2 x 1017 m-3 without the appearance of either disruptive MHD events or detectable changes in Alfven wave activity. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles agreed with the approximately 5% losses expected from alpha particles which are born on unconfined orbits

  18. Fusion power production from TFTR plasmas fueled with deuterium and tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak fusion power production of 6.2±0.4 MW has been achieved in TFTR plasmas heated by deuterium and tritium neutral beams at a total power of 29.5 MW. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha particle density of 1.2x1017 m-3 without the appearance of either disruptive magnetohydrodynamics events or detectable changes in Alfven wave activity. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles agreed with the approximately 5% losses expected from alpha particles which are born on unconfined orbits

  19. Experimental Determination of the Possible Deuterium - Deuterium Fusion Reaction Originated in a Single Cavitation Bubble Luminescence System Using CDCL3 and D2 O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We focus this work on the measurement of the possible Deuterium - Deuterium reaction in a SCBL (Single Cavitation Bubble Luminescence) system.We measure the possible reaction at the bubble generation time and at the bubble collapse time. We use a Nd:YAG laser and CDCl3 and D2 O as a medium to generate the bubble. Since CDCl3 accommodation coefficient is best than that of D2 O, it is expected a greater collapse force than using D2 O.To benefit the bubble collapse violence, we diminish the temperature of the liquids.To avoid false neutron detection, we developed a measuring system with high background reject using the characteristic experiment times.No neutrons attributable to Deuterium - Deuterium fusion reaction were measured

  20. Intense deuterium nuclear fusion of pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally within highly deuterated atom clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embedded nano-Pd particles of 5 nm in size instantly abundant D-atoms more than 250% in the atomic ratio against Pd-atoms at room temperature when they are kept in D2 gas pressurized to less than 10 atm. In such ultrahigh densities, 2-4 D-atoms can be coagulated inside each octahedral space of Pd lattice (pycnodeuterium-lump). When a stimulation energy such as latticequake causing by ultrasonic wave was supplied to those highly deuterated Pd particles, intense deuterium nuclear fusion (''solid fusion'') was generated there and both excess heat and 4He gas were abundantly produced. Naturally, these facts can not be realized at all in bulk Pd. The results show that the nuclear fusion occurs without any hazardous rays in pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally inside the each cell of the host metal lattice. These unit cells correspond to minimum unit of the solid fusion reactor as a ''Lattice Reactor''. (author)

  1. Intense deuterium nuclear fusion of pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally within highly deuterated atom clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshiaki, A; Zhang, Y C

    2002-01-01

    Embedded nano-Pd particles of 5 nm in size instantly abundant D-atoms more than 250% in the atomic ratio against Pd-atoms at room temperature when they are kept in D sub 2 gas pressurized to less than 10 atm. In such ultrahigh densities, 2-4 D-atoms can be coagulated inside each octahedral space of Pd lattice (pycnodeuterium-lump). When a stimulation energy such as latticequake causing by ultrasonic wave was supplied to those highly deuterated Pd particles, intense deuterium nuclear fusion (''solid fusion'') was generated there and both excess heat and sup 4 He gas were abundantly produced. Naturally, these facts can not be realized at all in bulk Pd. The results show that the nuclear fusion occurs without any hazardous rays in pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally inside the each cell of the host metal lattice. These unit cells correspond to minimum unit of the solid fusion reactor as a ''Lattice Reactor''. (author)

  2. Advances in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on inertial confinement fusion which has made a great progress. In fact several significant scientific developments have been achieved in the last few years. These have presented the ICF community with the opportunity to advance to a new step in the ICF research. The key issues of laser fusion are to attain a high absorption of laser light in a plasma, to prevent preheating of the fuel during the compression and to achieve highly efficient implosion by the ablation and uniform compression of the fuel due to the homogeneous deposition of laser energy on the pellet surface. Direct drive and indirect drive have been investigated. The progress in both schemes is described. The neutron yield reaches 1013 per shot and the compressed fuel density is now about 600 times of the liquid density

  3. Advanced Concepts: Aneutronic Fusion Power and Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Aneutronic Fusion for In-Space thrust, power. Clean energy & potential nuclear gains. Fusion plant concepts, potential to use advanced fuels. Methods to harness ionic momentum for high Isp thrust plus direct power conversion into electricity will be presented.

  4. Volume ignition of inertial confinement fusion of deuterium-helium(3) and hydrogen-boron(11) clean fusion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since DT laser fusion with 10-MJ laser pulses for 1000-MJ output now offers the physics solution for an economical fusion energy reactor, the conditions are evaluated assuming that controlled ICF reactions will become possible in the future using clean nuclear fusion fuel such as deuterium-helium(3) or hydrogen-boron(11). Using the transparent physics mechanisms of volume ignition of the fuel capsules, it is shown that the volume ignition for strong reduction of the optimum initial temperature can be reached for both types of fuel if a compression about 100 times higher than those in present-day laser compression experiments is attained in the future. Helium(3) laser-pulse energies are then in the same range as for DT, but ten times higher energies will be required for hydrogen-boron(11). (Author)

  5. The First Decommissioning of a Fusion Reactor Fueled by Deuterium-Tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles A. Gentile; Erik Perry; Keith Rule; Michael Williams; Robert Parsells; Michael Viola; James Chrzanowski

    2003-10-28

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Plasma Physics Laboratory of Princeton University (PPPL) was the first fusion reactor fueled by a mixture of deuterium and tritium (D-T) to be decommissioned in the world. The decommissioning was performed over a period of three years and was completed safely, on schedule, and under budget. Provided is an overview of the project and detail of various factors which led to the success of the project. Discussion will cover management of the project, engineering planning before the project started and during the field work as it was being performed, training of workers in the field, the novel adaptation of tools from other industry, and the development of an innovative process for the use of diamond wire to segment the activated/contaminated vacuum vessel. The success of the TFTR decommissioning provides a viable model for the decommissioning of D-T burning fusion devices in the future.

  6. The First Decommissioning of a Fusion Reactor Fueled by Deuterium-Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Plasma Physics Laboratory of Princeton University (PPPL) was the first fusion reactor fueled by a mixture of deuterium and tritium (D-T) to be decommissioned in the world. The decommissioning was performed over a period of three years and was completed safely, on schedule, and under budget. Provided is an overview of the project and detail of various factors which led to the success of the project. Discussion will cover management of the project, engineering planning before the project started and during the field work as it was being performed, training of workers in the field, the novel adaptation of tools from other industry, and the development of an innovative process for the use of diamond wire to segment the activated/contaminated vacuum vessel. The success of the TFTR decommissioning provides a viable model for the decommissioning of D-T burning fusion devices in the future

  7. Reactivation coefficient of muon-catalyzed deuterium-tritium fusion and its enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahaski, H.

    1986-03-01

    The reactivation process of a muon that is stuck to an alpha-particle produced in muon-catalyzed deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion is studied for the different isotope targets P, D, and T by using the born approximation calculation of charge-transfer cross sections. The isotope dependence is small compared with the large isotope effects observed by Jones et al. The authors calculated density dependence is very similar to that of Bracci and Fiorentini, and it is not as large as that observed by Jones et al. The enhancement of muon reactivation by application of a high-intensity electric field to the target is studied. Even when the very high electrical field of 40 mv/cm is applied to a liquid hydrogen target, the enhancement is small because of the isotropic emission of an alpha particle in unpolarized D-T fusion. Even in polarized D-T fusion, the enhancement is small.

  8. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0) give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u−1. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu) cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles HN(0) of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm) escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D2 gas (at <1 mbar pressure) is measured and compensated for under various conditions. Heat release of a few W is observed, at up to 50% higher energy than the total laser input thus a gain of 1.5. This is uniquely high for the use of deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods

  9. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Holmlid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0 give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u−1. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles HN(0 of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D2 gas (at <1 mbar pressure is measured and compensated for under various conditions. Heat release of a few W is observed, at up to 50% higher energy than the total laser input thus a gain of 1.5. This is uniquely high for the use of deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods.

  10. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario.

  11. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario

  12. Measurement of limiter heating due to fusion product losses during high fusion power deuterium-tritium operation of TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary analysis has been completed on measurements of limiter heating during high fusion power deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation of TFTR, in an attempt to identify heating from alpha particle losses. Recent operation of TFTR with a 50-50 mix of D-T has resulted in fusion power output (∼ 6.2 MW) orders of magnitude above what was previously achieved on TFTR. A significantly larger absolute number of particles and energy from fusion products compared to D-D operation is expected to be lost to the limiters. Measurements were made in the vicinity of the midplane (± 30 degree) with thermocouples mounted on the tiles of an outboard limiter. Comparisons were made -between discharges which were similar except for the mix of deuterium and tritium beam sources. Power and energy estimates of predicted alpha losses were as high as 0.13 MW and 64 kJ. Depending on what portion of the limiters absorbed this energy, temperature rises of up to 42 degrees C could be expected, corresponding to a heat load of 0.69 MJ/m2 over a 0.5 sec period, or a power load of 1.4 MW/m2. There was a measurable increase in the limiter tile temperature as the fusion power yield increased with a more reactive mixture of D and T at constant beam power during high power D-T operation. Analysis of the data is being conducted to see if the alpha heating component can be extracted. Measured temperature increases were no greater than 1 degree C, indicating that there was probably neither an unexpectedly large fraction of lost particles nor unexpected localization of the losses. Limits on the stochastic ripple loss contribution from alphas can be deduced

  13. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  14. Evidence for production of tritium via cold fusion reactions in deuterium gas loaded in palladium (Paper No. B4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were conducted to observe cold fusion reaction in deuterium gas loaded palladium. Two types of palladium samples were used. One was commercially procured palladium-silver alloy without any surface treatment and the other was palladium black powder prepared from PdCl2. Deuterium absorption by the powder was very fast, but the same was slow in the alloy. The loading procedure was first to heat the sample to 600degC for two hours under vacuum of better than 10-5mm, cooling to room temperature followed by contact with deuterium gas at 1 atm. and finally keeping for equilibration for several hours in atmosphere free of both moisture and oxygen. Samples were then kept in contact with distilled water for a few hours to extract tritium by isotopic exchange into the water. Tritium activity was measured by liquid scintillation counting. Tritium/deuterium ratio was found to be two-three times more in the case of Pd-Ag foils as compared to Pd powder. The ratio is in the range 10-12 to 10-11 which is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that in the initial deuterium gas used for loading. Autoradiographs of Pd-Ag foils loaded with deuterium showed fogging due to tritium betas. These observations show that deuterium loading of Pd also induces cold fusion in Pd lattice. (M.G.B.). 5 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  15. Ways towards pure deuterium inertial confinement fusion through the attainment of gigavolt potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-01-01

    The attainment of ultrahigh electric potentials by suppressing the stepped leader breakdown of a highly charged conductor levitated in a spiraling Taylor flow opens up the possibility of order of magnitude larger driver energies for the ignition of thermonuclear reactions by inertial confinement. In reaching gigavolt potentials, intense 1016 Watt, GeV ion beams become possible. Together with their large self-magnetic field, these beams should be powerful enough to launch a thermonuclear micro-detonation into pure deuterium, compressed and ignited by such beams. In high gain laser fusion the proton flash from the micro-explosion is likely to destroy the optical laser ignition apparatus, and it is not explained how to avoid this danger. The possible attainment of gigavolt potentials could make laser fusion obsolete.

  16. Applications of deuterium-tritium equation of state based on density functional theory in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate equation of state for deuterium-tritium mixture is of crucial importance in inertial confinement fusion. The equation of state can determine the compressibility of the imploding target and the energy deposited into the fusion fuel. In the present work, a new deuterium-tritium equation of state, which is calculated according to quantum molecular dynamic and orbital free molecular dynamic simulations, has been used to study the target implosion hydrodynamics. The results indicate that the peak density predicted by the new equation of state is ∼10% higher than the quotidian equation of state data. During the implosion, the areal density and neutron yield are also discussed

  17. Magnetized Target Fusion in Advanced Propulsion Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cylar, Rashad

    2003-01-01

    The Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) Propulsion lab at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has a program in place that has adopted to attempt to create a faster, lower cost and more reliable deep space transportation system. In this deep space travel the physics and development of high velocity plasma jets must be understood. The MTF Propulsion lab is also in attempt to open up the solar system for human exploration and commercial use. Fusion, as compared to fission, is just the opposite. Fusion involves the light atomic nuclei combination to produce denser nuclei. In the process, the energy is created by destroying the mass according to the distinguished equation: E = mc2 . Fusion energy development is being pursued worldwide as a very sustainable form of energy that is environmentally friendly. For the purposes of space exploration fusion reactions considered include the isotopes of hydrogen-deuterium (D2) and tritium (T3). Nuclei have an electrostatic repulsion between them and in order for the nuclei to fuse this repulsion must be overcome. One technique to bypass repulsion is to heat the nuclei to very high temperatures. The temperatures vary according to the type of reactions. For D-D reactions, one billion degrees Celsius is required, and for D-T reactions, one hundred million degrees is sufficient. There has to be energy input for useful output to be obtained form the fusion To make fusion propulsion practical, the mass, the volume, and the cost of the equipment to produce the reactions (generally called the reactor) need to be reduced by an order of magnitude or two from the state-of-the-art fusion machines. Innovations in fusion schemes are therefore required, especially for obtaining thrust for propulsive applications. Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is one of the innovative fusion concepts that have emerged over the last several years. MSFC is working with Los Alamos National Laboratory and other research groups in studying the

  18. Numerical simulation by a random particle method of Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions in a plasma*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Fréderique

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose and we justify a Monte-Carlo algorithm which solves a spatially homogeneous kinetic equation of Boltzmann type that models the fusion reaction between a deuterium ion and a tritium ion, and giving an α particle and a neutron. The proposed algorithm is validated with the use of explicit solutions of the kinetic model obtained by replacing the fusion cross-section by a Maxwellian cross section. On propose et on justifie un algorithme de type Monte-Carlo permettant de résoudre un modèle cinétique homogène en espace de type Boltzmann modélisant la réaction de fusion entre un ion deutérium et un ion tritium, et donnant une particule α et un neutron. L’algorithme proposé est par ailleurs validé via des solutions explicites du modèle cinétique obtenues en remplaçant la section efficace de fusion par une section efficace maxwellienne.

  19. Advanced fusion concepts project summaries: 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications

  20. Advanced Fusion Concepts project summaries, FY 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications

  1. Basic study of cold fusion. 2. Development of the measurement system of deuterium loading ratio in palladium cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measurement system of deuterium loading ratio in the palladium cathode, which is one of the most important factors for cold fusion phenomena, especially excess heat generation, has been introduced to the simultaneous measurement device of heat, neutron and gamma-ray of heavy water electrolysis that had been developed. Pressure of the gas phase in the closed electrolysis cell and electro-conductivity of the palladium cathode were measured to calculate the deuterium loading ratio. The measured ratio by means of each method is adequate compared with the reported results, and turned out to reach approximately 0.87. Simultaneous and continuous measurement of deuterium loading ratio with heat and neutron made reproduction of the situation of cold fusion phenomena and precision measurement of the heat generation possible. (author)

  2. Evidence for stratification of deuterium-tritium fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Manuel, M J-E; Rinderknecht, H G; Sinenian, N; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Delettrez, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; McNabb, D P; Amendt, P A; Boyd, R N; Rygg, J R; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Bacher, A D

    2012-02-17

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (dd) and T(t,2n)(4)He (tt) reaction yields have been compared with those of the D(t,n)(4)He (dt) reaction yield, using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. In these experiments, carried out on the OMEGA laser, absolute spectral measurements of dd protons and tt neutrons were obtained. From these measurements, it was concluded that the dd yield is anomalously low and the tt yield is anomalously high relative to the dt yield, an observation that we conjecture to be caused by a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. This effect may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility. PMID:22401216

  3. Advanced Fusion Concepts project summaries. FY 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate studients, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. The individual project summaries are prepared by the principle investigators in collaboration with the Advanced Fusion Concepts (AFC) Branch. In addition to the project summaries, statements of branch objectives, and budget summaries are also provided

  4. Advanced synfuel production with fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers a nearly inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  5. First-principles opacity table of warm dense deuterium for inertial-confinement-fusion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Goncharov, V N; Boehly, T R; Epstein, R; McCrory, R L; Skupsky, S

    2014-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of a warm dense deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture is important for reliable design of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The opacity of a warm dense DT shell essentially determines how much radiation from hot coronal plasmas can be deposited in the DT fuel of an imploding capsule. Even for the simplest species of hydrogen, the accurate calculation of their opacities remains a challenge in the warm-dense matter regime because strong-coupling and quantum effects play an important role in such plasmas. With quantum-molecular-dynamics (QMD) simulations, we have derived a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) of deuterium (and the DT mixture by mass scaling) for a wide range of densities from ρ(D)=0.5 to 673.518g/cm(3) and temperatures from T=5000K up to the Fermi temperature T(F) for each density. Compared with results from the astrophysics opacity table (AOT) currently used in our hydrocodes, the FPOT of deuterium from our QMD calculations has shown a significant increase in opacity for strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions by a factor of 3-100 in the ICF-relevant photon-energy range. As conditions approach those of classical plasma, the opacity from the FPOT converges to the corresponding values of the AOT. By implementing the FPOT of deuterium and the DT mixture into our hydrocodes, we have performed radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for low-adiabat cryogenic DT implosions on the OMEGA laser and for direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility. The simulation results using the FPOT show that the target performance (in terms of neutron yield and energy gain) could vary from ∼10% up to a factor of ∼2 depending on the adiabat of the imploding DT capsule; the lower the adiabat, the more variation is seen in the prediction of target performance when compared to the AOT modeling. PMID:25314551

  6. Fusion energy production from a deuterium-tritium plasma in the JET tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments in the Joint European Torus (JET), culminating in the first tokamak discharges in deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures, were undertaken (restricted by vessel activation and tritium usage). The objectives were to: (i) produce more than 1 MW fusion power in a controlled way; (ii) validate transport codes and provide a basis for predicting the performance of D-T plasmas from measurements made in deuterium (D) plasmas; (iii) determine tritium retention in the torus systems and to establish the effectiveness of discharge cleaning techniques for tritium removal; (iv) demonstrate the tritium usage technology and (v) establish safe procedures for handling tritium in compliance with the regulatory requirements. A single-null X-point divertor onto the upper carbon target, with reversed field was chosen. D plasmas were heated by high power, long duration D neutral beams from fourteen sources and fuelled also by up to two neutral beam sources injecting tritium. Three hot ion H-mode discharges are described: a high performance pure D discharge; a D-T discharge with a 1% mixture of tritium fed to one neutral beam source; and a D-T discharge with 100% tritium fed to two neutral beam sources. The TRANSP code was used to check the internal consistency of the measured data and determine the origin of the measured neutron fluxes. In the best D-T discharge, the tritium concentration was about 11% of the time of peak performance, when the total neutron emission rate was 6.0x1017 neutrons/s. The integrated total neutron yield over the high power phase lasting 2 s, was 7.2x1017 neutrons, ±7%. The actual fusion amplification factor, QDT, was about 0.15. With optimal tritium concentration, this pulse would have produced a fusion power of approx. 5 MW and a nominal QDT approx. 0.46. (For the pure D discharge these numbers are approx. 11 MW and 1.14: the total fusion power would have exceeded the total losses in the equivalent D-T discharge.) Essentially all tritium introduced into

  7. Executive summary: advanced-fuel fusion systems, the D-3He satellite approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation was made of the potential advantages and feasibility of fusion power plants designed to employ near-term non-D--T fuels such as deuterium and D-3He. The following topics are discussed here: (1) cost studies and net-energy analysis, (2) D-3He Bumpy Torus satellite, (3) exploratory studies of a D-3He field-reversed mirror satellite, (4) preliminary advanced fuel pellet studies, and (5) 3He neutral beam injector

  8. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a} {approx} 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q{sub 0} > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions.

  9. Deuterium--tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)] have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium - tritium (D--T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high li). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (qa∼4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-li plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D--T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D--T plasmas with q0>1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfvn eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. First-principles thermal conductivity of warm-dense deuterium plasmas for inertial confinement fusion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Boehly, T R; Kress, J D; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S

    2014-04-01

    Thermal conductivity (κ) of both the ablator materials and deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel plays an important role in understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The extensively used Spitzer model for thermal conduction in ideal plasmas breaks down for high-density, low-temperature shells that are compressed by shocks and spherical convergence in imploding targets. A variety of thermal-conductivity models have been proposed for ICF hydrodynamic simulations of such coupled and degenerate plasmas. The accuracy of these κ models for DT plasmas has recently been tested against first-principles calculations using the quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) method; although mainly for high densities (ρ > 100 g/cm3), large discrepancies in κ have been identified for the peak-compression conditions in ICF. To cover the wide range of density-temperature conditions undergone by ICF imploding fuel shells, we have performed QMD calculations of κ for a variety of deuterium densities of ρ = 1.0 to 673.518 g/cm3, at temperatures varying from T = 5 × 103 K to T = 8 × 106 K. The resulting κQMD of deuterium is fitted with a polynomial function of the coupling and degeneracy parameters Γ and θ, which can then be used in hydrodynamic simulation codes. Compared with the "hybrid" Spitzer-Lee-More model currently adopted in our hydrocode lilac, the hydrosimulations using the fitted κQMD have shown up to ∼20% variations in predicting target performance for different ICF implosions on OMEGA and direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The lower the adiabat of an imploding shell, the more variations in predicting target performance using κQMD. Moreover, the use of κQMD also modifies the shock conditions and the density-temperature profiles of the imploding shell at early implosion stage, which predominantly affects the final target performance. This is in contrast to the previous speculation that κQMD changes mainly the

  11. Recent advances and challenges for diode-pumped solid-state lasers as an inertial fusion energy driver candidate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss how solid-state laser technology can serve in the interests of fusion energy beyond the goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which is now being constructed to ignite a deuterium-tritium target to fusion conditions in the laboratory for the first time. We think that advanced solid-state laser technology can offer the repetition-rate and efficiency needed to drive a fusion power plant, in contrast to the single-shot character of NIF. As discuss below, we propose that a gas-cooled, diode-pumped Yb:S-FAP laser can provide a new paradigm for fusion laser technology leading into the next century

  12. Advanced lasers for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Projections indicate that MJ/MW laser systems, operating with efficiencies in escess of 1 percent, are required to drive laser fusion power reactors. Moreover, a premium in pellet performance is anticipated as the wavelength of the driver laser system is decreased. Short wavelength laser systems based on atomic selenium (lambda = 0.49μ), terbium molcular vapors (0.55μ), thulium doped dielectric solids (0.46μ), and on pulse compressions of KrF excimer laser radiaton (0.27μ) have been proposed and studied for this purpose. The technological scalability and efficiency of each of these systems is examined in this paper. All of these systems are projected to meet minimum systems requirements. Amont them, the pulse-compressed KrF system is projected to have the highest potential efficiency (6%) and the widest range of systems design options

  13. Advanced lasers for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupke, W.F.

    1978-11-01

    Projections indicate that MJ/MW laser systems, operating with efficiencies in escess of 1 percent, are required to drive laser fusion power reactors. Moreover, a premium in pellet performance is anticipated as the wavelength of the driver laser system is decreased. Short wavelength laser systems based on atomic selenium (lambda = 0.49..mu..), terbium molcular vapors (0.55..mu..), thulium doped dielectric solids (0.46..mu..), and on pulse compressions of KrF excimer laser radiaton (0.27..mu..) have been proposed and studied for this purpose. The technological scalability and efficiency of each of these systems is examined in this paper. All of these systems are projected to meet minimum systems requirements. Amont them, the pulse-compressed KrF system is projected to have the highest potential efficiency (6%) and the widest range of systems design options.

  14. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Calvani, P.; Croci, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girolami, M.; Griesmayer, E.; Grosso, G.; Pillon, M.; Trucchi, D. M.; Gorini, G.

    2014-11-01

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction occurring between neutrons and 12C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  15. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Cheng, B.; Glimm, J.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  16. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3600 (United States); Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  17. Time distributions of muon catalyzed fusion events in deuterium calculated using the existing theoretical predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time distributions of muon-catalyzed fusion events in deuterium are calculated in the temperature range T=35 - 1000 K using the recent predictions for the μCF parameters. The kinetic graph taken into consideration includes spin structure of dμ and ddμ together with the corresponding hyperfine and back decay transitions. Comparison of the calculated curves with the experimental data at T=35 K and 300 K is presented. In general, the data suggest the resonant rates which are smaller than recently calculated. An attempt is made to fit the data using the resonance and back decay rates rescaled by a common factor. The fits show that the rates should be reduced at least by a factor of about three. However, this assumption is not sufficient for a consistent description of the time distributions at both temperatures and more data are needed to resolve the existing ambiguity. The corresponding curves are calculated also for other temperatures. 29 refs., 6 figs. (author)

  18. Advanced fusion concepts project summaries, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Applied Plasma Physics Division of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. Each project summary was written by the respective principal investigator using the format: title, principal investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. This report is organized into three sections: Section one contains five summaries describing work in the reversed-field pinch program being performed by a diversified group of contractors, these include a national laboratory, a private company, and several universities. Section two contains eight summaries of work from the compact toroid area which encompasses field-reversed configurations, spheromaks, and heating and formation experiments. Section three contains summaries from two other programs, a density Z-pinch experiment and high-beta Q machine experiment. The intent of this collection of project summaries is to help the contractors of the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch understand their relationship with the rest of the branch's activities. It is also meant to provide background to those outside the program by showing the range of activities of interest of the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch

  19. A comparative study of various advanced fusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of comparing the merits and demerits of various advanced fuel cycles, parametric studies of operation conditions are examined. The effects of nuclear elastic collisions and synchrotron radiation are taken into account. It is found that the high-#betta# Catalyzed DD fuel cycle with the transmutation of fusion-produced tritium into helium-3 is most feasible from the point of view of neutron production and tritium handling. The D-D fuel cycles seem to be less attractive compared to the Catalyzed DD. The p-11B and p-6Li fusion plasmas hardly attain the plasma Q value relevant to reactors. (author)

  20. Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine (CFARII) power cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine (CFARII) power cycle is a direct plasma energy conversion scheme for inertial fusion (ICF) and magnetically-insulated, inertially confined fusion (MICF) reactors utilizing: (1) conversion of plasma thermal ionization and thermal energy into kinetic energy of a supersonic plasma jet, (2) conversion of the plasma jet kinetic energy into DC electricity by slowing down in an ''impulse'' type of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator, and (3) condensation and heat rejection of the exhaust plasma on droplets of recirculating condensate (''raindrop'' condensor). A preliminary evaluation of a particular reference case CFARII Balance-of-Plant (BoP) is found sufficiently attractive (52% gross cycle efficiency, 40 million 1991 $ BoP for 1 GWe gross electric) to warrant further work on several design issues

  1. Ion Acceleration and D-D Nuclear Fusion in Laser-Generated Plasma from Advanced Deuterated Polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Deuterated polyethylene targets have been irradiated by means of a 1016 W/cm2 laser using 600 J pulse energy, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and 70 micron spot diameter. The plasma parameters were measured using on-line diagnostics based on ion collectors, SiC detectors and plastic scintillators, all employed in time-of-flight configuration. In addition, a Thomson parabola spectrometer, an X-ray streak camera, and calibrated neutron dosimeter bubble detectors were employed. Characteristic protons and neutrons at maximum energies of 3.0 MeV and 2.45 MeV, respectively, were detected, confirming that energy spectra of reaction products coming from deuterium-deuterium nuclear fusion occur. In thick advanced targets a fusion rate of the order of 2 × 108 fusions per laser shot was calculated.

  2. AMS depth profiling of tritium and deuterium - A new and sensitive tool for diagnose In fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The upgraded Ultra Clean Injector (UCI) of the Munich Accelerator Laboratory was used to measure T and D depth profiling with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The measurements were performed on carbon long term samples (LTS) placed between the vessel wall protection tiles of the ASDEX-Upgrade fusion experiment. The improvement of plasma confinement and stability after introducing the CDH-mode has been determined. The localization of a plasma disruption phenomenon was demonstrated. Complete toroidal and poloidal distribution of tritium depth profiles and inventory of tritium release in the tokamak were measured. Depth profiling of deuterium provided information about the quality of the neutral beam injection and efficiency of the fusion reaction in the tokamak. (authors)

  3. Series lecture on advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems concerning fusion reactors are presented and discussed in this series lecture. At first, the D-T tokamak is explained. The breeding of tritium and the radioactive property of tritium are discussed. The hybrid reactor is explained as an example of the direct use of neutrons. Some advanced fuel reactions are proposed. It is necessary to make physics consideration for burning advanced fuel in reactors. The rate of energy production and the energy loss are important things. The bremsstrahlung radiation and impurity radiation are explained. The simple estimation of the synchrotron radiation was performed. The numerical results were compared with a more detailed calculation of Taimor, and the agreement was quite good. The calculation of ion and electron temperature was made. The idea to use the energy more efficiently is that one can take X-ray or neutrons, and pass them through a first wall of a reactor into a second region where they heat the material. A method to convert high temperature into useful energy is the third problem of this lecture. The device was invented by A. Hertzberg. The lifetime of the reactor depends on the efficiency of energy recovery. The idea of using spin polarized nuclei has come up. The spin polarization gives a chance to achieve a large multiplication factor. The advanced fuel which looks easiest to make go is D plus He-3. The idea of multipole is presented to reduce the magnetic field inside plasma, and discussed. Two other topics are explained. (Kato, T.)

  4. Ultra-dense deuterium: A possible nuclear fuel for inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ejection of deuterons with kinetic energy release (KER) of 630 eV was proved recently by measuring the laser-induced ion time-of-flight (TOF-MS) with two different detectors at different distances [S. Badiei, P.U. Andersson, L. Holmlid, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 282 (2009) 70]. Realizing that the only possible energy release mechanism is Coulomb explosions, the D-D distance in the ultra-dense deuterium was determined to be constant at 2.3 pm. Using a long TOF-MS path now gives improved resolution. We show the strong effect of collisions in the ultra-dense material, and demonstrate that the kinetic energy of the ions increases with laser pulse power but that the number of ions formed is independent of the laser pulse power. This indicates special properties of the material. We also show that the two forms of condensed deuterium D(1) and D(-1) can be observed simultaneously as well resolved mass spectra of different forms. No intermediate bond lengths are observed. The two forms of deuterium are stable and well separated in bond length. We suggest that they switch rapidly back and forth as predicted by theory. A loosely built form with planar clusters of D(1) is observed here to be related to D(-1) formation.

  5. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies. PMID:27441240

  6. Deuterium high pressure target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the deuterium high-pressure target is presented. The target having volume of 76 cm3 serves to provide the experimental research of muon catalyzed fusion reactions in ultra-pure deuterium in the temperature range 80-800 K under pressures of up to 150 MPa. The operation of the main systems of the target is described: generation and purification of deuterium gas, refrigeration, heating, evacuation, automated control system and data collection system

  7. Deuterium High Pressure Target

    CERN Document Server

    Perevozchikov, V; Vinogradov, Yu I; Vikharev, M D; Ganchuk, N S; Golubkov, A N; Grishenchkin, S K; Demin, A M; Demin, D L; Zinov, V G; Kononenko, A A; Lobanov, V N; Malkov, I L; Yukhimchuk, S A

    2001-01-01

    The design of the deuterium high-pressure target is presented. The target having volume of 76 cm^3 serves to provide the experimental research of muon catalyzed fusion reactions in ultra-pure deuterium in the temperature range 80-800 K under pressures of up to 150 MPa. The operation of the main systems of the target is described: generation and purification of deuterium gas, refrigeration, heating, evacuation, automated control system and data collection system.

  8. Comment on 'Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions'

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Hua; Bonasera, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Recent implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility reported by Casey et al.[1], displayed an anomalously low dd proton yield and a high tt neutron yield as compared to dt fusion reactions, explained as a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. We suggest that in the com- pression stage the fuel is out of equilibrium. Ions are inward accelerated to a velocity v0 independent on the particle type. Yield ratios are simply given by the ratios of fusion cross-sections obta...

  9. Ablation of a Deuterium Pellet in a Fusion Plasma Viewed as a Stopping Power Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    sublimation energy of hydrogen isotopes, shortly after the direct impact of the electrons, a dense cloud forms around the pellet. This cloud of ablated material then serves as a stopping medium for the incoming electrons, thus prolongs the pellet life-time. As a result, the deep penetration of the pellet into......At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low...

  10. ABLATION OF A DEUTERIUM PELLET IN A FUSION PLASMA VIEWED AS A STOPPING POWER PROBLEM

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, C

    1983-01-01

    At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low sublimation energy of hydrogen isotopes, shortly after the direct impact of the electrons, a dense cloud forms around the pellet. This cloud of ablated material then serves as a stopping medium for the...

  11. Advancing Fusion by Innovations: Smaller, Quicker, Cheaper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Chuyanov, V. A.; Kingham, D.;

    2015-01-01

    On the path to Fusion power, the construction of ITER is on-going, however there is not much progress in performance improvements of tokamaks in the last 15 years, Fig.1. One possible reason for this stagnation is the lack of innovations in physics and technology that could be implemented...... with this approach in which progress is expected mainly from the increase in the size of a Fusion device. Such innovations could be easier to test and use in much smaller (and so cheaper and quicker to build) compact Fusion devices. In this paper we propose a new path to Fusion energy based on a compact high field...

  12. Advances in the real-time interpretation of fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Fusion Collaboratory Project is developing a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for all aspects of magnetic fusion energy research by creating a robust, user-friendly collaborative environment and deploying this to the more than one thousand fusion scientists in forty institutions who perform magnetic fusion research in the US. Work specifically focusing on advancing real-time interpretation of fusion experiments includes collocated collaboration in tokamak control rooms via shared display walls, remote collaboration using Internet based audio and video, and pseudo-real-time data analysis via the National Fusion Energy Grid (FusionGrid). The technologies being developed and deployed will also scale to the next generation experimental devices such as ITER

  13. Comment: why are the 'cold fusion' experiments of deuterium as hard to reproduce?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particular conditions of the experiments described by Fleischmann and Pons, relative to 'cold nuclear fusion' are examined. The possible role played by the platinum anode and the alkaline LiOD solution is discussed. A series of less expected electrochemical reactions leading to a possible lithium deposit (incorporation) on/to the palladium cathode are considered. (author) 13 refs

  14. Comment on 'Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions'

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility reported by Casey et al.[1], displayed an anomalously low dd proton yield and a high tt neutron yield as compared to dt fusion reactions, explained as a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. We suggest that in the com- pression stage the fuel is out of equilibrium. Ions are inward accelerated to a velocity v0 independent on the particle type. Yield ratios are simply given by the ratios of fusion cross-sections obtained at the same velocity. A 'Hubble' type model gives also a reasonable description of the data. These considerations might be relevant for implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility as well.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of deuterium-beryllium interactions under fusion reactor conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Safi, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Beryllium (Be) is a strong candidate as plasma-facing material for the main wall of future fusion reactors. Thus, its erosion plays a key role in predicting the reactor's life-time and viability. MD simulations can be a powerful tool to study Be behavior under high plasma particle flux. In this work, beryllium sputtering due to D bombardment is studied using MD simulations. We have analyzed the fundamental mechanisms for Be erosion considering some important parameters that ...

  16. In depth fusion flame spreading with a deuterium-tritium plane fuel density profile for plasma block ignition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Malekynia; S.S.Razavipour

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state fuel ignition was given by Chu and Bobin according to the hydrodynamic theory at x =0 qualitatively.A high threshold energy flux density,i.e.,E* =4.3 x 1012 J/m2,has been reached.Recently,fast ignition by employing clean petawatt-picosecond laser pulses was performed.The anomalous phenomena were observed to be based on suppression of prepulses.The accelerated plasma block was used to ignite deuterium-tritium fuel at solid-state density.The detailed analysis of the thermonuclear wave propagation was investigated.Also the fusion conditions at x ≠ 0 layers were clarified by exactly solving hydrodynamic equations for plasma block ignition.In this paper,the applied physical mechanisms are determined for nonlinear force laser driven plasma blocks,thermonuclear reaction,heat transfer,electron-ion equilibration,stopping power of alpha particles,bremsstrahlung,expansion,density dependence,and fluid dynamics.New ignition conditions may be obtained by using temperature equations,including thc dcnsity profile that is obtained by the continuity equation and expansion velocity.The density is only a function of x and independent of time.The ignition energy flux density,E*t,for the x ≠ 0 layers is 1.95 × 1012 J/m2.Thus threshold ignition energy in comparison with that at x =0 layers would be reduced to less than 50 percent.

  17. Fuel ion ratio determination in NBI heated deuterium tritium fusion plasmas at JET using neutron emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, C.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Skiba, M.; Weiszflog, M.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2015-02-01

    The fuel ion ratio (nt/nd) is of central importance for the performance and control of a future burning fusion plasma, and reliable measurements of this quantity are essential for ITER. This paper demonstrates a method to derive the core fuel ion ratio by comparing the thermonuclear and beam-thermal neutron emission intensities, using a neutron spectrometer. The method is applied to NBI heated deuterium tritium (DT) plasmas at JET, using data from the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer. The trend in the results is consistent with Penning trap measurements of the fuel ion ratio at the edge of the plasma, but there is a discrepancy in the absolute values, possibly owing to the fact that the two measurements are weighted towards different parts of the plasma. It is suggested to further validate this method by comparing it to the traditionally proposed method to estimate nt/nd from the ratio of the thermal DD and DT neutron emission components. The spectrometer requirements for measuring nt/nd at ITER are also briefly discussed.

  18. Effects of cluster size and spatial laser intensity distribution on fusion neutron generation by laser driven Deuterium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    A three dimensional molecular dynamic code is used to study the generation of fusion neutrons from Coulomb explosion of Deuterium clusters driven by intense near infra-red (NIR) laser ($\\lambda=800nm$) of femtosecond pulse duration ($\\tau=50 fs$) under beam-target interaction scheme. We have considered various clusters of average sizes ($\\langle R_0\\rangle$=80,140,200\\AA) which are irradiated by a laser of peak spatial-temporal intensity of 1$\\times10^{18} W/cm^{2}$. The effects of cluster size and spatial laser intensity distribution on ion energies due to the Coulomb explosion of the cluster are included by convolution of single cluster single intensity ion energy distribution function (IEDF) over a range of cluster sizes and laser intensities. The final convoluted IEDF gets broadened on both lower and higher energy sides due to this procedure. Furthermore, the neutron yield which takes into account the convoluted IEDF, also gets modified by a factor of $\\sim$2 compared to the case when convolution effects ...

  19. Context Representation and Fusion: Advancements and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Masood Khattak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The acceptance and usability of context-aware systems have given them the edge of wide use in various domains and has also attracted the attention of researchers in the area of context-aware computing. Making user context information available to such systems is the center of attention. However, there is very little emphasis given to the process of context representation and context fusion which are integral parts of context-aware systems. Context representation and fusion facilitate in recognizing the dependency/relationship of one data source on another to extract a better understanding of user context. The problem is more critical when data is emerging from heterogeneous sources of diverse nature like sensors, user profiles, and social interactions and also at different timestamps. Both the processes of context representation and fusion are followed in one way or another; however, they are not discussed explicitly for the realization of context-aware systems. In other words most of the context-aware systems underestimate the importance context representation and fusion. This research has explicitly focused on the importance of both the processes of context representation and fusion and has streamlined their existence in the overall architecture of context-aware systems’ design and development. Various applications of context representation and fusion in context-aware systems are also highlighted in this research. A detailed review on both the processes is provided in this research with their applications. Future research directions (challenges are also highlighted which needs proper attention for the purpose of achieving the goal of realizing context-aware systems.

  20. Transition from Beam-Target to Thermonuclear Fusion in High-Current Deuterium Z -Pinch Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offermann, Dustin T.; Welch, Dale R.; Rose, Dave V.; Thoma, Carsten; Clark, Robert E.; Mostrom, Chris B.; Schmidt, Andrea E. W.; Link, Anthony J.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion yields from dense, Z -pinch plasmas are known to scale with the drive current, which is favorable for many potential applications. Decades of experimental studies, however, show an unexplained drop in yield for currents above a few mega-ampere (MA). In this work, simulations of DD Z -Pinch plasmas have been performed in 1D and 2D for a constant pinch time and initial radius using the code Lsp, and observations of a shift in scaling are presented. The results show that yields below 3 MA are enhanced relative to pure thermonuclear scaling by beamlike particles accelerated in the Rayleigh-Taylor induced electric fields, while yields above 3 MA are reduced because of energy lost by the instability and the inability of the beamlike ions to enter the pinch region.

  1. Relevance of advanced nuclear fusion research: Breakthroughs and obstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    An in depth understanding of the collective modes that can be excited in a wide range of high-energy plasmas is necessary to advance nuclear fusion research in parallel with other fields that include space and astrophysics in particular. Important achievements are shown to have resulted from implementing programs based on this reality, maintaining a tight connection with different areas of investigations. This involves the undertaking of a plurality of experimental approaches aimed at understanding the physics of fusion burning plasmas. At present, the most advanced among these is the Ignitor experiment involving international cooperation, that is designed to investigate burning plasma regimes near ignition for the first time.

  2. Advanced neutron diagnostics for ITER fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented from the neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) diagnosis of JET plasma performed with the MPR during the DTE1 campaign of 1997 and the recent TTE of 2003. The NES diagnostic capabilities at JET are presently being drastically enhanced by an upgrade of the MPR (MPRu) and a new 2.5-MeV TOF neutron spectrometer (TOFOR). The principles of MPRu and TOFOR are described and illustrated with the diagnostic role they will play in the high performance fusion experiments in the forward program of JET largely aimed at supporting ITER. The importance for the JET NES effort for ITER is discussed. (author)

  3. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-06-15

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles' exhaust momentum can be used directly to produce high Isp thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p-11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  4. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles "exhaust" momentum can be used directly to produce high ISP thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p- 11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  5. Advanced neutron diagnostics for ITER fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostics functions of neutron measurements are reviewed as well as the roles played by neutron yield monitors, cameras and spectrometers. The importance of recent developments in neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) diagnostics is emphasized. Results are presented from NES diagnosis of JET plasma performed with the MPR during the DTE1 campaign of 1997 and the recent TTE of 2003. The NES diagnostic capabilities at JET are presently being enhanced by an upgrade of the MPR (MPRu) and a new 2.5-MeV TOF neutron spectrometer (TOFOR). The principles of MPRu and TOFOR are described and illustrated with the diagnostic role they will play in the high performance fusion experiments in the forward program of JET largely aimed at supporting ITER. The importance for the JET NES effort for ITER is discussed

  6. Deuterium microbomb rocket propulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-01-01

    Large scale manned space flight within the solar system is still confronted with the solution of two problems: 1. A propulsion system to transport large payloads with short transit times between different planetary orbits. 2. A cost effective lifting of large payloads into earth orbit. For the solution of the first problem a deuterium fusion bomb propulsion system is proposed where a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited in a small cylindrical assembly of deuterium with a gigavolt-multimeg...

  7. Fusion reactor design towards radwaste minimum with advanced shield material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept of fusion reactor design is proposed to minimize the radioactive waste of the reactor. The main point of the concept is to clear massive structural components located outside the neutron shield from regulatory control. The concept requires some reinforcement of shielding with an advanced shield material such as a metal hydride, detriation, and tailoring of a detrimental element from the superconductor. Our assessment confirmed a large impact of the concept on radwaste reduction, in that it reduces the radwaste fraction of a fusion reactor A-SSTR2 from 92 wt.% to 17 wt.%. (author)

  8. Fusion - 2050 perspective (in Polish)

    OpenAIRE

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The results of strongly exothermic reaction of thermonuclear fusion between nuclei of deuterium and tritium are: helium nuclei and neutrons, plus considerable kinetic energy of neutrons of over 14 MeV. DT nuclides synthesis reaction is probably not the most favorable one for energy production, but is the most advanced technologically. More efficient would be possibly aneutronic fusion. The EU by its EURATOM agenda prepared a Road Map for research and implementation of Fusion as a commercial m...

  9. Determination of critical velocity and fractions of suprathermal electrons in the implosion of deuterium-tritium pellets by the inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper physical processes related to the production of suprathermal electrons by the Inertial Confinement Fusion have been analyzed. The critical velocity suprathermal electrons emerge with, in the implosion of the Deuterium-Tritium pellets, by means of the application of laser, have been calculated. To determinate this critical velocity the authors consider electric fields generated by laser and magnetic fields self-generated by implosion of pellet. Starting on this velocity the authors consider a gegenerate electron's model and having in mind values of the temperature, they have applied statistics of Fermi, Maxwell-Boltzmann and relativistic Maxwell-Boltzmann. Fractions of suprathermal electrons and its concentration to each value of electrons concentration ne, as function of energy, have been calculated. Conditions of applicability have been applied to aforementioned statistics to utilize them in hydrodynamic codes related to inertial Confinement Fusion

  10. Advances in U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past two years, the US heavy ion fusion science program has made significant experimental and theoretical progress in simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter targets, high-brightness beam transport, advanced theory and numerical simulations, and heavy ion target physics for fusion. First experiments combining radial and longitudinal compression π of intense ion beams propagating through background plasma resulted in on-axis beam densities increased by 700X at the focal plane. With further improvements planned in 2008, these results enable initial ion beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin next year. They are assessing how these new techniques apply to higher-gain direct-drive targets for inertial fusion energy

  11. Inertial fusion reactors using Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine (CFARII) MHD conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates the potential performance (efficiency and cost) of inertial fusion reactors assumed capable of vaporizing blankets of various working materials to a temperature (10,000-20,000 K) suitable for economical MHD conversion in a Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine II (CFARII) power cycle. Using a conservative model, 1-D neutronics calculations of the fraction of fusion yield captured as a function of the blanket thickness of Flibe, lithium and lead-lithium blankets are used to determine the optimum blanket thickness for each material to minimize CoE for various assumed fusion yields, 'generic' driver costs, and target gains. Lithium-hydride blankets are also evaluated using an extended neutronics model. Generally optimistic ('advanced') combinations of lower driver cost/joule and higher target gain are assumed to allow high enough fusion yields to vaporize and ionize target blankets thick enough to stop most 14 MeV neutrons, and to breed tritium. A novel magnetized, prestressed reactor chamber concept is modeled together with previously developed models for the CFARII Balance-of-Plant (BoP), consisting of a supersonic plasma jet, MHD generator, and 'raindrop' condensor. High fusion yields (20 to 80 GJ) are found necessary to heat and ionize the Flibe, lithium, and lead-lithium blankets for MHD conversion, with initial solid thicknesses sufficient to capture most of the fusion yield. Much smaller fusion yields (1 to 20 GJ) are required for lithium-hybride blankets. For Flibe, lithium, and lead-lithium blankets, improvements in target gain and/or driver cost/joule, characterized by a 'Bang per Buck' figure-of-merit of > or ∼20 joules yield per driver Dollar, would be required for competitive CoE, while a figure-of-merit of > or ∼1 joule yield per driver Dollar would suffice for lithium-hybride blankets. Advances in targets/driver costs would benefit any IFE reactor, but the very low CFARII BoP costs (contributing only 3 mills/kWh for CoE) allows this

  12. Mass Producing Targets for Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Kendall, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Metal-encapsulating technique advances prospects of controlling nuclear fusion. Prefilled fusion targets form at nozzle as molten metal such as tin flows through outer channel and pressurized deuterium/tritium gas flows through inner channel. Molten metal completely encloses gas charge as it drops off nozzle.

  13. Editorial, Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because plasma-boundary physics encompasses some of the most important unresolved issues for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and future fusion power reactors, there is a strong interest in the fusion community for better understanding and characterization of plasma-wall interactions. Chemical and physical sputtering cause the erosion of the limiters/divertor plates and vacuum vessel walls (made of C, Be and W, for example) and degrade fusion performance by diluting the fusion fuel and excessively cooling the core, while carbon redeposition could produce long-term in-vessel tritium retention, degrading the superior thermo-mechanical properties of the carbon materials. Mixed plasma-facing materials are proposed, requiring optimization for different power and particle flux characteristics. Knowledge of material properties as well as characteristics of the plasma-material interaction are prerequisites for such optimizations. Computational power will soon reach hundreds of teraflops, so that theoretical and plasma science expertise can be matched with new experimental capabilities in order to mount a strong response to these challenges. To begin to address such questions, a Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions for Fusion (PSIF) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 21 to 23 March, 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers in fusion related plasma-wall interactions in order to address these topics and to identify the most needed and promising directions for study, to exchange opinions on the present depth of knowledge of surface properties for the main fusion-related materials, e.g., C, Be and W, especially for sputtering, reflection, and deuterium (tritium) retention properties. The goal was to suggest the most important next steps needed for such basic computational and experimental work to be facilitated

  14. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions

  15. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D(3He,p)4He and D(T,n)4He occur, as the primary fusion products 3He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (∼5–100 mg/cm2), the secondary D-3He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques

  16. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G., E-mail: hgr@mit.edu; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-08-15

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He and D(T,n){sup 4}He occur, as the primary fusion products {sup 3}He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (∼5–100 mg/cm{sup 2}), the secondary D-{sup 3}He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  17. Direct observation of particles with energy >10 MeV/u from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Holmlid, Leif

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear fusion in ultra-dense deuterium D(-1) induced by 0.2 J pulses with 5 ns pulse length ejects ions with energies in the MeV range. The ns-resolved signal to a collector can be observed directly on an oscilloscope, showing ions arriving with energies in the range 2-14 MeV u-1 at flight times 12-100 ns, mainly protons from the fusion process and deuterons ejected by proton collisions. Electrons and photons give almost no contribution to the fast signal. The observed signal at several mA peak current corresponds to 1x10^13 particles released per laser shot and to an energy release > 1 J assuming isotropic formation and average particle energy of 3 MeV as observed. A movable slit close to the laser target gives spatial resolution of the signal generation, showing almost only fast ions from the point of laser impact and penetrating photons from the plasma outside the laser impact point. The initial photon pulse from the fusion process is observed by a photomultiplier detector on-line.

  18. Advanced diagnostics for magnetic and inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a collection of papers, written by specialists in the field, on advanced topics of nuclear fusion diagnostics. The 78 contributions were originally presented at the International Conference on Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Fusion held at Villa Monastero, Italy in September 2001. Both magnetically confined and inertial fusion programmes are quite extensively covered, with more emphasis given to the former scheme. In the case of magnetic confinement, since the present international programme is strongly focused on next-step devices, particular attention is devoted to techniques and technologies viable in an environment with strong neutron fluxes. Indeed, in the first section, the various methods are considered in the perspective of performing the measurements of the relevant parameters in conditions approaching a burning plasma, mainly in the Tokamak configuration. The most demanding requirements, like the implications of the use of tritium and radiation resistance, are reviewed and the most challenging open issues, which require further research and development, are also clearly mentioned. The following three sections are devoted to some of the most recent developments in plasma diagnostics, which are grouped according to the following classification: 'Neutron and particle diagnostics', 'Optical and x-ray diagnostics' and 'Interferometry, Polarimetry and Thomson Scattering'. In these chapters, several of the most recent results are given, covering measurements taken on the most advanced experiments around the world. Here the developments described deal more with the requirements imposed by the physical issues to be studied. They are therefore more focused on the approaches adopted to increase the spatial and time resolution of the diagnostics, on some methods to improve the characterisation of the turbulence and on fast particles. Good coverage is given to neutron diagnostics, which are assuming increasing relevance as the plasma

  19. Contributions to the course and workshop on basic and advanced fusion plasmas diagnostic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three papers read at the Course and workshop on basic and advanced fusion plasmas diagnostic techniques held in Varenna from 3 to 13 September 1986 and prepared by searchers of Fusion Department of ENEA are reported

  20. EPRI Asilomar papers: on the possibility of advanced fuel fusion reactors, fusion-fission hybrid breeders, small fusion power reactors, Asilomar, California, December 15--17, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An EPRI Ad Hoc Panel met in Asilomar, California for a three day general discussion of topics of particular interest to utility representatives. The three main topics considered were: (1) the possibility of advanced fuel fusion reactors, (2) fusion-fission hybrid breeders, and (3) small fusion power reactors. The report describes the ideas that evolved on these three topics. An example of a ''neutron less'' fusion reactor using the p-11B fuel cycle is described along with the critical questions that need to be addressed. The importance to the utility industry of using fusion neutrons to breed fission fuel for LWRs is outlined and directions for future EPRI research on fusion-fission systems are recommended. The desirability of small fusion power reactors to enable the early commercialization of fusion and for satisfying users' needs is discussed. Areas for possible EPRI research to help achieve this goal are presented

  1. Development of advanced coatings for ITER and future fusion devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel

    ZURICH: TRANS TECH PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2010 - (VINCENZINI, P.; MONTAVON, G.), s. 47-65. (Advances in Science and Technology. 66). ISSN 1662-0356. [INTERNATIONAL CERAMICS CONGRESS/12th./. Montecatini Terme (IT), 06.06.2010-11.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : fusion materials * coatings * ITER * DEMO * plasma facing components * blanket Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy http://www.scientific.net/AST.66.47

  2. Advanced fusion plasma diagnostics. Task IIIB. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the Task IIIB program at UCLA has been to initiate, develop and demonstrate advanced diagnostic systems and techniques relevant to mainline fusion devices such as TFTR, ''Big DEE'', MFTF-B, and TEXT. The main activities carried out under IIIB have centered around the development of multichannel detector arrays for interferometry, scattering and polarimetry applications, high power far infrared sources and α-particle distribution measurements. Historically, the program philosophy has been to take advantage of UCLA's unique location in the midst of the center of the US aerospace and microwave electronics industry to enter into cooperative research and development programs with nearby high technology laboratories. This technology is then transferred to the fusion program at low cost. An increasingly important role which was latterly successfully implemented within the program was the dissemination of diagnostics information to the fusion community. This was achieved by a variety of means: organizing and participating in topical workshops and writing review articles on the state-of-the-art in a number of areas

  3. Investigation of advanced materials for fusion alpha particle diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonheure, G., E-mail: g.bonheure@fz-juelich.de [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association “Euratom-Belgian State”, Royal Military Academy, Avenue de la Renaissance, 30 Kunstherlevinglaan, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Van Wassenhove, G. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association “Euratom-Belgian State”, Royal Military Academy, Avenue de la Renaissance, 30 Kunstherlevinglaan, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Hult, M.; González de Orduña, R. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Strivay, D. [Centre Européen d’Archéométrie, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Atomique et de Spectroscopie, Université de Liège (Belgium); Vermaercke, P. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Delvigne, T. [DSI SPRL, 3 rue Mont d’Orcq, Froyennes B-7503 (Belgium); Chene, G.; Delhalle, R. [Centre Européen d’Archéométrie, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Atomique et de Spectroscopie, Université de Liège (Belgium); Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.; Neubauer, O. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We examine the feasibility of alpha particle measurements in ITER. ► We test advanced material detectors borrowed from the GERDA neutrino experiment. ► We compare experimental results on TEXTOR tokamak with our detector response model. ► We investigate the detector response in ITER full power D–T plasmas. ► Advanced materials show good signal to noise ratio and alpha particle selectivity. -- Abstract: Fusion alpha particle diagnostics for ITER remain a challenging task. Standard escaping alpha particle detectors in present tokamaks are not applicable to ITER and techniques suitable for fusion reactor conditions need further research and development [1,2]. The activation technique is widely used for the characterization of high fluence rates inside neutron reactors. Tokamak applications of the neutron activation technique are already well developed [3] whereas measuring escaping ions using this technique is a novel fusion plasma diagnostic development. Despite low alpha particle fluence levels in present tokamaks, promising results using activation technique combined with ultra-low level gamma-ray spectrometry [4] were achieved before in JET [5,6]. In this research work, we use new advanced detector materials. The material properties beneficial for alpha induced activation are (i) moderate neutron cross-sections (ii) ultra-high purity which reduces neutron-induced background activation and (iii) isotopic tailoring which increases the activation yield of the measured activation product. Two samples were obtained from GERDA[7], an experiment aimed at measuring the neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. These samples, made of highly pure (9 N) germanium highly enriched to 87% in isotope Ge-76, were irradiated in real D–D fusion plasma conditions inside the TEXTOR tokamak. Comparison of the calculated and the experimentally measured activity shows good agreement. Compared to previously investigated high temperature ceramic material [8

  4. ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK A271 ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology Program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility

  5. The ARIES-AT advanced tokamak, Advanced technology fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ARIES-AT study was initiated to assess the potential of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant and to identifying physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving attractive and competitive fusion power in order to guide fusion R and D. The 1000-MWe ARIES-AT design has a major radius of 5.2 m, a minor radius of 1.3 m, a toroidal β of 9.2% (β N = 5.4) and an on-axis field of 5.6 T. The plasma current is 13 MA and the current-drive power is 35 MW. The ARIES-AT design uses the same physics basis as ARIES-RS, a reversed-shear plasma. A distinct difference between ARIES-RS and ARIES-AT plasmas is the higher plasma elongation of ARIES-AT (κ x = 2.2) which is the result of a 'thinner' blanket leading to a large increase in plasma β to 9.2% (compared to 5% for ARIES-RS) with only a slightly higher β N. ARIES-AT blanket is a simple, low-pressure design consisting of SiC composite boxes with a SiC insert for flow distribution that does not carry any structural load. The breeding coolant (Pb-17Li) enters the fusion core from the bottom, and cools the first wall while traveling in the poloidal direction to the top of the blanket module. The coolant then returns through the blanket channel at a low speed and is superheated to ∼1100 deg. C. As most of the fusion power is deposited directly into the breeding coolant, this method leads to a high coolant outlet temperature while keeping the temperature of the SiC structure as well as interface between SiC structure and Pb-17Li to about 1000 deg. C. This blanket is well matched to an advanced Brayton power cycle, leading to an overall thermal efficiency of ∼59%. The very low afterheat in SiC composites results in exceptional safety and waste disposal characteristics. All of the fusion core components qualify for shallow land burial under U.S. regulations (furthermore, ∼90% of components qualify as Class-A waste, the lowest level). The ARIES

  6. Study of an advanced D-T tokamak fusion reactor with compact fusion advanced rankine (CFAR) cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress of the CFAR (Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine) cycle concept for a D-T tokamak reactor is presented with emphasis on how an enthalpy extraction can be achieved by a nonequilibrium disk-type MHD generator. For the gas stagnation temperatures of 3,000 K, enthalpy extraction in excess of 50% is found to be achievable, leading to a 40% overall plant efficiency with application of recuperative heat cycle and recently advanced thermoelectric converters. About 6 ton/sec mercury flow is required to remove fusion energy while achieving the 3,000 K gas stagnation temperature prior to the MHD generator. Studies of plasma parameters in the steady-state operation regime subject to plasma physics constraints, the minimum power in the start up phase required for ignition, effects of MHD magnet to the plasma confining magnetic fields, neutron and microwave superheat, and mercury corrosion test of ceramic rods for 2,000 hours are also described. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  7. An Advanced Tokamak Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF-AT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, V. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Stambaugh, R. D.

    2010-11-01

    A Fusion Development Facility (FDF) is a candidate for FNSF-AT. It is a compact steady-state machine of moderate gain that uses AT physics to provide the neutron fluence required for fusion nuclear science development. FDF is conceived as a double-null plasma with high elongation and triangularity, predicted to allow good confinement of high plasma pressure. Steady-state is achieved with high bootstrap current and radio frequency current drive. Neutral beam injection and 3D non-resonant magnetic field can provide edge plasma rotation for stabilization of MHD and access to Quiescent H-mode. The estimated power exhaust is somewhat lower than that of ITER because of higher core radiation and stronger tilting of the divertor plates. FDF is capable of further developing all elements of AT physics, qualifying them for an advanced performance DEMO. The latest concept has accounted for realistic neutron shielding and divertor implementation. Self-consistent evolution of the transport profiles and equilibrium will quantify the stability and confinement required to meet the FNS mission.

  8. Fusion and fission of atomic clusters: recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2005-01-01

    We review recent advances made by our group in finding optimized geometries of atomic clusters as well as in description of fission of charged small metal clusters. We base our approach to these problems on analysis of multidimensional potential energy surface. For the fusion process we have...... developed an effective scheme of adding new atoms to stable cluster geometries of larger clusters in an efficient way. We apply this algorithm to finding geometries of metal and noble gas clusters. For the fission process the analysis of the potential energy landscape calculated on the ab initio level...... of theory allowed us to obtain very detailed information on energetics and pathways of the different fission channels for the Na^2+_10 clusters....

  9. ARIES-AT: An advanced tokamak, advanced technology fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ARIES-AT study was initiated to assess the potential of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant. Several avenues were pursued in order to arrive at plasmas with a higher β and better bootstrap alignment compared to ARIES-RS that led to plasmas with higher βN and β. Advanced technologies that are examined in detail include: (1) Possible improvements to the overall system by using high-temperature superconductors, (2) Innovative SiC blankets that lead to a high thermal cycle efficiency of ∼60%; and (3) Advanced manufacturing techniques which aim at producing near-finished products directly from raw material, resulting in low-cost, and reliable components. The 1000-MWe ARIES-AT design has a major radius of 5.4 m, minor radius of 1.3 M, a toroidal β of 9.2% (βN=6.0) and an on-axis field of 5.6 T. The plasma current is 13 MA and the current drive power is 24 MW. The ARIES-AT study shows that the combination of advanced tokamak modes and advanced technology leads to attractive fusion power plant with excellent safety and environmental characteristics and with a cost of electricity (5c/kWh), which is competitive with those projected for other sources of energy. (author)

  10. Deuterium microbomb rocket propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-01-01

    Large scale manned space flight within the solar system is still confronted with the solution of two problems: 1. A propulsion system to transport large payloads with short transit times between different planetary orbits. 2. A cost effective lifting of large payloads into earth orbit. For the solution of the first problem a deuterium fusion bomb propulsion system is proposed where a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited in a small cylindrical assembly of deuterium with a gigavolt-multimegampere proton beam, drawn from the magnetically insulated spacecraft acting in the ultrahigh vacuum of space as a gigavolt capacitor. For the solution of the second problem, the ignition is done by argon ion lasers driven by high explosives, with the lasers destroyed in the fusion explosion and becoming part of the exhaust.

  11. Advanced fusion technology research and development. Annual report to the U.S. Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK-B135 The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility, the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility. The report summarizes GA's FY00 work in the areas of Fusion Power Plant Studies, Next Step Options, Advanced Liquid Plasma Facing Surfaces, Advanced Power Extraction Study, Plasma Interactive Materials, Radiation Testing of Magnetic Coil, Vanadium Component Demonstration, RF Technology, Inertial Fusion Energy Target Supply System, ARIES Integrated System Studies, and Spin-offs Brochure. The work in these areas continues to address many of the issues that must be resolved for the successful construction and operation of next-generation experiments and, ultimately, the development of safe, reliable, economic fusion power plants

  12. Theoretical Framework for Anomalous Heat Without High-Energy Particles from Deuteron Fusion in Deuterium-Transition Metal Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cold fusion, two conflicting intuitive pictures have caused confusion. A local picture, involving particle-particle interaction, has been dominant for most physicists. However, we suggest that a second, nonlocal, 'counter-intuitive' picture is more appropriate because it places greater emphasis on the behavior of matter distributions and their interaction with the associated environment. This picture is relevant in solids because when charged particles possess large DeBroglie wavelengths, they frequently interact coherently, in a wavelike fashion, in which momentum is conserved globally but not locally. These wavelike effects can become important in periodically ordered solids since they may lead to large momentum transfer from an isolated location to many locations at once. The local picture fails to incorporate these kinds of effects. How hydrogen (H) nuclei can become delocalized is illustrated by anomalies in the diffusivity and vibrational behavior of H in transition metals. Also, it is well-known that in many-body systems, discontinuities in the local momentum (wave function cusps) can explain how near-perfect overlap between charged particles can occur at close separation (which may explain how the Coulomb barrier can be circumvented). We explore implications of these effects on cold fusion

  13. Design and techniques for fusion blanket neutronics experiments using an accelerator-based deuterium-tritium neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments performed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute/U.S. Department of Energy collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics are designed with consideration of geometrical and material configurations. The general guide that is used to design the engineering-oriented neutronics experiment, which uses an accelerator-based 14-MeV neutron source, is discussed and compared with neutronics characteristics of the reactor models. Preparation of the experimental assembly, blanket materials, and the neutron source is described. A variety of techniques for measuring the nuclear parameters such as the tritium production rate are developed or introduced through the collaboration as a basis of the neutronics experiments. The features of these techniques are discussed with the experimental error and compared with each other. 25 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Advanced fusion technologies developed for JT-60 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modification of JT-60U is planned as a full superconducting tokamak (JT-60SC). The objectives of the JT-60SC program are to establish scientific and technological bases for the steady-state operation of high performance plasmas and utilization of reduced-activation materials in economically and environmentally attractive DEMO reactor. Advanced fusion technologies relevant to DEMO reactor have been developed in the superconducting magnet technology and plasma facing components for the design of JT-60SC. To achieve a high current density in a superconducting strand, Nb3Al strands with a high copper ratio of 4 have been newly developed for the toroidal field coils (TFC) of JT-60SC. The R and D to demonstrate applicability of Nb3Al conductor to the TFC by a react-and-wind technique have been carried out using a full-size Nb3Al conductor. A full-size NbTi conductor with low AC loss using Ni-coated strands has been successfully developed. A forced cooling divertor component with high heat transfer using screw tubes has been developed for the first time. The heat removal performance of the CFC target was successfully demonstrated on the electron beam irradiation stand. (author)

  15. Advances in the national inertial fusion program of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He X.T.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The planned inertial confinement fusion (ICF ignition in China in around 2020 is to be accomplished in three steps. The first is carrying out target physics experiments in the existing laser facilities SG-II, SG-IIIP and SG-IIU (operating in 2012 of output energy 3-24 kJ at 3ω. Results have been obtained for better understanding the implosion dynamics and radiation transport. Recent studies include efficiency of radiation generation, hydrodynamic instabilities, shock waves in cryogenic targets, opacity measurements using kJ lasers, etc. Hydrodynamic codes (the LARED series have been developed and experimentally verified with over 5000 shots, and are applied to investigating target physics and ignition target design. For fast ignition, a large number of experiments and numerical simulations have led to improved understanding relevant to target design, hot electron transport, collimation by the spontaneous magnetic fields in overdense plasmas, etc. In addition to the SG-II, SG-IIU and SG-IIIP, the SG-III laser facility with energy of 200–400 kJ at 3ω shall operate in 2014 and be used for advanced target physics research. In the last step, the 1.5 MJ SG-IV laser facility still under design will be used to investigate ignition and burning.

  16. Neutronics integral experiments of lithium-oxide fusion blanket with heterogeneous configurations using deuterium-tritium neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronics experiment for two types of heterogeneous blankets are performed in the Phase-IIC experiments of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute/U.S. Department of Energy collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics. The experimental system uses the same geometry as the previous Phase-IIA series, which was a closed geometry that used a neutron source enclosure of lithium carbonate. The heterogeneities selected for testing are the beryllium edge-on and the water coolant channel assemblies that appear in typical blankets. In the former, the beryllium and the lithium-oxide (Li2O) layers are piled up alternately in the front part of the test blanket. In the latter, the two simulated water cooling channels are emplaced vertically in the Li2O blanket. These channels produce a steep gradient of neutron flux and a significant spectrum change around the material boundary. The calculation accuracy and measurement method for these transient regions are key areas of interest in the experiments. The measurements are performed for the tritium production rate and the other nuclear parameters as well as the previous experiments. The void effect is found to not be negligible around the heterogeneous region for the detector with a low-energy response. At the same time, enhancements of tritium production are seen near the beryllium and hydrogenous material. However, the current Monte Carlo calculation shows good agreement with the experiment even in such a boundary. 22 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Experimental results on advanced inertial fusion schemes obtained within the HiPER project

    OpenAIRE

    Honrubia Checa, José Javier; Batani, D; al., et

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents de results of experiments conducted within the Work Package 10 (fusion experimental programme) of the HiPER project. The aim of these experiments was to study the physics relevant for advanced ignition schemes for inertial confinement fusion, i.e. the fast ignition and the shock ignition. Such schemes allow to achieve a higher fusion gain compared to the indirect drive approach adopted in the National Ignition Facility in United States, which is important for the fut...

  18. Advance of the Japanese fusion program into big science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion reactor development is one of the top priority national projects in Japan. Although the Japanese fusion program was started at a relatively late date, it is characterized by an extremely fast growth, strong participation of industry, and comprehensive research activities, especially on alternative concepts, at various universities. Intensive cooperation exists also with the United States on Tokamak facilities. Major efforts in Japan are the Tokamak program of JAERI, for which the most important machine under construction is JT-60, a large Tokamak of the JET generation, which is to be operational by 1984. The Japanese fusion budget, including estimated personnel costs, in 1981 exceeded the aggregate European fusion budget. (orig.)

  19. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new

  20. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. K.; Lee, K. W.; Hwang, C. K.; Hong, B. G.; Hong, G. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-01

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new.

  1. Simulations investigating the effect of a deuterium-tritium-ice coating on the motion of the gold cone surface in a re-entrant cone-guided fast ignition inertial confinement fusion capsule

    OpenAIRE

    Pasley, J.; Stephens, R

    2007-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional multigroup radiation hydrodynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the motion of the gold plasma generated at the surface of the embedded gold cone in a re-entrant cone-guided inertial confinement fusion capsule. The effect of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers, and other possible tampers, of varying thickness, upon the motion of the gold cone plasma has been investigated. The effect of the x-ray drive spectrum incident upon the ice layer is also explore...

  2. Nuclear processes in deuterium/natural hydrogen-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survey presents the analysis of the phenomena taking place in deuterium - metal and natural hydrogen - metal systems under cold fusion experimental conditions. The cold fusion experiments have shown that the generation of heat and helium in the deuterium-metal system without emission of energetic gamma-quanta is the result of occurrence of a chain of chemical, physical and nuclear processes observed in the system, culminating in both the fusion of deuterium nuclei and the formation of a virtual, electron-modified excited 4He nucleus. The excitation energy of the helium nucleus is transferred to the matrix through emission of conversion electrons, and that, under appropriate conditions, provides a persistent synthesis of deuterium. The processes occurring in the deuterium/natural hydrogen - metal systems have come to be known as chemonuclear DD- and HD-fusion. The mechanism of stimulation of weak interaction reactions under chemonuclear deuterium fusion conditions by means of strong interaction reactions has been proposed. The results of numerous experiments discussed in the survey bear witness to the validity of chemonuclear fusion. From the facts discussed it is concluded that the chemonuclear deuterium fusion scenario as presented in this paper may serve as a basis for expansion of deeper research and development of this ecologically clean energy source. It is shown that the natural hydrogen-based system, containing 0.015% of deuterium, also has good prospects as an energy source. The chemonuclear fusion processes do not require going beyond the scope of traditional physics for their explanation

  3. External costs of silicon carbide fusion power plants compared to other advanced generation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechon, Y. E-mail: yolanda.lechon@ciemat.es; Cabal, H.; Saez, R.M.; Hallberg, B.; Aquilonius, K.; Schneider, T.; Lepicard, S.; Ward, D.; Hamacher, T.; Korhonen, R

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed in the framework of the Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF3), which is jointly conducted by Euratom and the fusion associations. Assessments of monetarized external impacts of the fusion fuel-cycle were previously performed (SERF1 and SERF2). Three different power plant designs were studied, with the main difference being the structural materials and cooling system used. In this third phase of the SERF project the external costs of three additional fusion power plant models using silicon carbide as structural material have been analysed. A comparison with other advanced generation technologies expected to be in use around 2050, when the first fusion power plant would be operative, has also been performed. These technologies include advanced fossil technologies, such as Natural Gas Combined Cycle, Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with carbon sequestration technologies; fuel cells and renewable technologies including geothermal energy, wind energy and photovoltaic systems with energy storage devices. Fusion power plants using silicon carbide as structural material have higher efficiencies than plants using steel and this fact has a very positive effect on the external costs per kW h. These external costs are in the lowest range of the external costs of advanced generation technologies indicating the outstanding environmental performance of fusion power.

  4. External costs of silicon carbide fusion power plants compared to other advanced generation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed in the framework of the Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF3), which is jointly conducted by Euratom and the fusion associations. Assessments of monetarized external impacts of the fusion fuel-cycle were previously performed (SERF1 and SERF2). Three different power plant designs were studied, with the main difference being the structural materials and cooling system used. In this third phase of the SERF project the external costs of three additional fusion power plant models using silicon carbide as structural material have been analysed. A comparison with other advanced generation technologies expected to be in use around 2050, when the first fusion power plant would be operative, has also been performed. These technologies include advanced fossil technologies, such as Natural Gas Combined Cycle, Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with carbon sequestration technologies; fuel cells and renewable technologies including geothermal energy, wind energy and photovoltaic systems with energy storage devices. Fusion power plants using silicon carbide as structural material have higher efficiencies than plants using steel and this fact has a very positive effect on the external costs per kW h. These external costs are in the lowest range of the external costs of advanced generation technologies indicating the outstanding environmental performance of fusion power

  5. Advances in statistical multisource-multitarget information fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahler, Ronald PS

    2014-01-01

    This is the sequel to the 2007 Artech House bestselling title, Statistical Multisource-Multitarget Information Fusion. That earlier book was a comprehensive resource for an in-depth understanding of finite-set statistics (FISST), a unified, systematic, and Bayesian approach to information fusion. The cardinalized probability hypothesis density (CPHD) filter, which was first systematically described in the earlier book, has since become a standard multitarget detection and tracking technique, especially in research and development.Since 2007, FISST has inspired a considerable amount of research

  6. Fusion Canada issue 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion Canada's publication of the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is the CFFTP Industrial Impact Study, CCFM/TdeV Update:helium pumping, research funds, and deuterium in beryllium - high temperature behaviour. 3 figs

  7. Fusion - 2050 perspective (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The results of strongly exothermic reaction of thermonuclear fusion between nuclei of deuterium and tritium are: helium nuclei and neutrons, plus considerable kinetic energy of neutrons of over 14 MeV. DT nuclides synthesis reaction is probably not the most favorable one for energy production, but is the most advanced technologically. More efficient would be possibly aneutronic fusion. The EU by its EURATOM agenda prepared a Road Map for research and implementation of Fusion as a commercial method of thermonuclear energy generation in the time horizon of 2050.The milestones on this road are tokomak experiments JET, ITER and DEMO, and neutron experiment IFMIF. There is a hope, that by engagement of the national government, and all research and technical fusion communities, part of this Road Map may be realized in Poland. The infrastructure build for fusion experiments may be also used for material engineering research, chemistry, biomedical, associated with environment protection, power engineering, security, ...

  8. Development of innovative fuelling systems for fusion energy science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of innovative fueling systems in support of magnetic fusion energy, particularly the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is described. The ITER fuelling system will use a combination of deuterium-tritium (D-T) gas puffing and pellet injection to achieve and maintain ignited plasmas. This combination will provide a flexible fuelling source with D-T pellets penetrating beyond the separatrix to sustain the ignited fusion plasma and with deuterium-rich gas fuelling the edge region to meet divertor requirements in a process called isotopic fuelling. More advanced systems with potential for deeper penetration, such as multistage pellet guns and compact toroid injection, are also described

  9. Concept definition of an FRC/DD-3He advanced fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posibilities of advanced fusion fuel cycle reactors are investigated. Characteristics of various D - D fusion fuel cycles are clarified and which magnetic confinement method can fit the most efficient advanced fuel cycle reactor is examined. A concept definition is considered for an advanced fusion reactor with DD - 3He fuel cycle in which the plasma is confined in a field-reversed configuration or field-reversed mirror. The concept definition is developed with emphasis on the feasibility of a steady-state self-ignited DD - 3He plasma with temperatures of 100 keV, the production method, the formation of ambipolar potential in the ambient plasma and the design of plasma energy direct convertor. (author)

  10. Pionic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Strauch, Th; Anagnostopoulos, D; Bühler, P; Covita, D S; Gorke, H; Gotta, D; Gruber, A; Hirtl, A; Indelicato, P; Bigot, E -O Le; Nekipelov, M; Santos, J M F dos; Schmid, Ph; Schlesser, S; Simons, L M; Trassinelli, M; Veloso, J F C A; Zmeskal, J

    2010-01-01

    The strong interaction shift $\\epsilon$ and broadening {\\Gamma} in pionic deuterium have been determined in a high statistics study of the {\\pi}D(3p - 1s) X-ray transition using a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. The pionic deuterium shift will provide constraints for the pion-nucleon isospin scattering lengths extracted from measurements of shift and broadening in pionic hydrogen. The hadronic broadening is related to pion absorption and production at threshold. The results are \\epsilon = (-2356 {\\pm} 31)meV (repulsive) and {\\Gamma}1s = (1171+23/-49) meV yielding for the complex {\\pi}D scattering length a = [-(24.99 {\\pm} 0.33) + i (6.22+0.12/-0.26 )]x10-3/m{\\pi}. From the imaginary part, the threshold parameter for pion production is obtained to be {\\alpha} = (251 +5/-11) {\\mu}b. This allows, in addition, and by using results from pion absorption in 3He at threshold, the determination of the effective couplings g0 and g1 for s-wave pion absorption on isoscalar and isovector NN pairs.

  11. Pionic deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, T.; Gotta, D.; Nekipelov, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Santos, J.M.F. dos [Coimbra University, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Anagnostopoulos, D.F. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ioannina (Greece); Buehler, P.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Schmid, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institut for Subatomic Physics, Vienna (Austria); Covita, D.S. [Coimbra University, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Particle Physics, Villigen (Switzerland); Gorke, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronik, Juelich (Germany); Indelicato, P.; Le Bigot, E.O.; Schlesser, S.; Trassinelli, M. [UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Paris (France); Simons, L.M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Particle Physics, Villigen (Switzerland); Veloso, J.F.C.A. [Aveiro University, I3N, Department of Physics, Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-07-15

    The strong-interaction shift {epsilon}{sub 1s}{sup {pi}}{sup D} and broadening {gamma}{sub 1s}{sup {pi}}{sup D} in pionic deuterium have been determined in a high statistics study of the {pi}D(3p-1s) X-ray transition using a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. The pionic deuterium shift will provide constraints for the pion-nucleon isospin scattering lengths extracted from measurements of shift and broadening in pionic hydrogen. The hadronic broadening is related to pion absorption and production at threshold. The results are {epsilon}{sub 1s}{sup {pi}}{sup D}=(-2356 {+-} 31) meV (repulsive) and {gamma}{sub 1s}{sup {pi}}{sup D} meV yielding for the complex {pi}D scattering length a{sub {pi}}{sub D}=[-(24.99 {+-}0.33)+i(6.22{sub -0.26} {sup +0.12}) ]x 10{sup -3} m{sub {pi}}{sup -1}. From the imaginary part, the threshold parameter for pion production is obtained to be {alpha} = (251{sub -11} {sup +5}){mu}b. This allows, in addition, and by using results from pion absorption in {sup 3}He at threshold, the determination of the effective couplings g{sub 0} and g{sub 1} for s-wave pion absorption on isoscalar and isovector NN pairs. (orig.)

  12. Advances in the national inertial fusion program of China

    OpenAIRE

    He X.T.; Zhang W.Y.

    2013-01-01

    The planned inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition in China in around 2020 is to be accomplished in three steps. The first is carrying out target physics experiments in the existing laser facilities SG-II, SG-IIIP and SG-IIU (operating in 2012) of output energy 3-24 kJ at 3ω. Results have been obtained for better understanding the implosion dynamics and radiation transport. Recent studies include efficiency of radiation generation, hydrodynamic instabilities, shock waves in cryogenic targ...

  13. Neutral beams for magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant advances in forming energetic beams of neutral hydrogen and deuterium atoms have led to a breakthrough in magnetic fusion: neutral beams are now heating plasmas to thermonuclear temperatures, here at LLL and at other laboratories. For example, in our 2XIIB experiment we have injected a 500-A-equivalent current of neutral deuterium atoms at an average energy of 18 keV, producing a dense plasma (1014 particles/cm3) at thermonuclear energy (14 keV or 160 million kelvins). Currently, LLL and LBL are developing beam energies in the 80- to 120-keV range for our upcoming MFTF experiment, for the TFTR tokamak experiment at Princeton, and for the Doublet III tokamak experiment at General Atomic. These results increase our long-range prospects of producing high-intensity beams of energies in the hundreds or even thousands of kilo-electron-volts, providing us with optimistic extrapolations for realizing power-producing fusion reactors

  14. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  15. Advanced fusion reactor design using remountable HTc SC magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept of fusion reactor design is proposed using remountable high critical temperature (HTc) superconducting (SC) magnet. There are two advantages using this system. First one is that the magnet system can be composed by parts, which means it easy to replace the damaged magnet module. The second one is that it becomes possible to access the reactor first wall easily. In order to realize this system, we have performed experiments using HTc SC tape. The experimental results indicate that the resistance of the jointed region becomes about 60 μΩ, which shows the feasibility of this concept. Using this system the remountable first wall system also has the feasibility based on thermomechanical analysis. (author)

  16. Advanced SiC composites for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Schwarz, O.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This is a short review of the motivation for and progress in the development of ceramic matrix composites for fusion. Chemically vapor infiltrated silicon carbide (SiC) composites have been fabricated from continuous fibers of either SiC or graphite and tested for strength and thermal conductivity. Of significance is the the Hi-Nicalon{trademark} SiC based fiber composite has superior unirradiated properties as compared to the standard Nicalon grade. Based on previous results on the stability of the Hi-Nicalon fiber, this system should prove more resistant to neutron irradiation. A graphite fiber composite has been fabricated with very good mechnical properties and thermal conductivity an order of magnitude higher than typical SiC/SiC composites.

  17. Report of Nuclear Fusion Reactor Engineering Research Meeting. 6. Advanced reactor engineering technology for nuclear fusion demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research meeting has been held every year, and the 6th meeting was held on January 17, 1995 at University of Tokyo. As the type of a demonstration reactor, tokamak type and helical type were set up, and the topics on the various subjects of their reactor engineering technology were presented, and active discussion was carried out. At the meeting, lectures were given on the reactor engineering technology required for a prototype reactor, the material technology supposed for a demonstration reactor, thermal-electric conversion and the direct electricity generation using Nernst effect, the advanced manufacturing technology of functional, structural materials, the application of high temperature superconductors to nuclear fusion reactors, the reactor engineering technology required for a helical type demonstration reactor, and tokamak demonstration reactor and the common technology of fission and fusion. This report is the summary of these lecture materials. The useful knowledges were obtained for considering the development of nuclear fusion reactor technology hereafter in this meeting. (K.I.)

  18. A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

    2006-08-01

    This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create

  19. A National Collaboratory To Advance The Science Of High Temperature Plasma Physics For Magnetic Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create

  20. Deuterium z-pinch as a powerful source of multi-MeV ions and neutrons for advanced applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klir, D.; Shishlov, A. V.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kubes, P.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Rezac, K.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Cikhardt, J.; Cikhardtova, B.; Dudkin, G. N.; Fursov, F. I.; Garapatsky, A. A.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Krasa, J.; Kravarik, J.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Orcikova, H.; Padalko, V. N.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Sila, O.; Turek, K.; Varlachev, V. A.; Velyhan, A.; Wagner, R.

    2016-03-01

    A novel configuration of a deuterium z-pinch has been used to generate a nanosecond pulse of fast ions and neutrons. At a 3 MA current, the peak neutron yield of (3.6 ± 0.5) × 1012 was emitted within 20 ns implying the production rate of 1020 neutrons/s. High neutron yields resulted from the magnetization of MeV deuterons inside plasmas. Whereas deuterons were trapped in the radial direction, a lot of fast ions escaped the z-pinch along the z-axis. A large number of >25 MeV ions were emitted into a 250 mrad cone. The cut-off energy of broad energy spectra of hydrogen ions approached 40 MeV. The total number of >1 MeV and >25 MeV deuterons were 1016 and 1013, respectively. Utilizing these ions offers a real possibility of various applications, including the increase of neutron yields or the production of short-lived isotopes in samples placed in ion paths. On the basis of our experiments with various samples, we concluded that a single shot would have been sufficient to obtain GBq positron activity of 13N isotopes via the 12C(d,n)13N reaction. Furthermore, the first z-pinch generated neutron radiograph produced by ≈20 ns pulses is presented in this paper.

  1. Advanced computational tools and methods for nuclear analyses of fusion technology systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of advanced computational tools and methods developed recently for nuclear analyses of Fusion Technology systems such as the experimental device ITER ('International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor') and the intense neutron source IFMIF ('International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility'). These include Monte Carlo based computational schemes for the calculation of three-dimensional shut-down dose rate distributions, methods, codes and interfaces for the use of CAD geometry models in Monte Carlo transport calculations, algorithms for Monte Carlo based sensitivity/uncertainty calculations, as well as computational techniques and data for IFMIF neutronics and activation calculations. (author)

  2. Fusion of heavy ions in advanced focused discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field distortion elements (FDEs) in the interelectrode gap of focused discharge machines with a peak current of ≥0.6 MA have been successfully used for increasing the current density in the pinch at the stage of maximum compression. A suitable FDE increases the neutron emission per shot, Yn, by a factor of ≥5 as compared with the value of Yn from DD fusion reactions in the same machine operating under identical conditions but without an FDE. The variations of the current distribution with and without an FDE (peak current density and current sheath width in the interelectrode gap) are monitored from magnetic probe signals and are of the order of 20%. With a doping by pressure of 2-8% of the filling gas of the discharge chamber with CD4 or N2 the reactions 12C(d,n)13N(β+) or 14N(d,n)15O(β+), of the order of ∼ 1% of the DD reactions in the same shot, are detected. The location and linear dimensions (n = AW02, A approx.= 1.3x108 neutrons/(kJ)2 (where W0 is the energy in kJ of the capacitor bank which feeds the discharge) for 5 kJ 0 n) are virtually eliminated. All reaction yields and ion energy spectrum data are consistent with the view that the bulk of the reactions occur in a multiplicity of localized regions with a density of >1020cm-3. (author). 14 refs, 2 figs

  3. Effect of deposited tungsten on deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharapov, V.M.; Gavrilov, L.E. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulikauskas, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    Usually ion or plasma beam is used for the experiment with beryllium which simulates the interaction of plasma with first wall in fusion devices. However, the use of thermal or subthermal atoms of hydrogen isotopes seems to be useful for that purpose. Recently, the authors have studied the deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium. The experimental setup is shown, and is explained. By means of elastic recoil detection (ERD) technique, it was shown that in the exposure to D atoms at 740 K, deuterium is distributed deeply into the bulk, and is accumulated up to higher concentration than the case of the exposure to molecular deuterium. The depth and concentration of deuterium distribution depend on the exposure time, and those data are shown. During the exposure to atomic deuterium, oxide film grew on the side of a sample facing plasma. In order to understand the mechanism of deuterium trapping, the experiment was performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). The influence that the tungsten deposit from the heated cathode exerted to the deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium was investigated. These results are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Advanced Simulation of Electron Heat Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  5. Advanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E X B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  6. An Advanced Plasma-material Test Station for R&D on Materials in a Fusion Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A new era of fusion research has started with ITER under construction and DEMO for power demonstration on the horizon. However, the related fusion reactor material science requires further development before DEMO can be designed. One of the most crucial and most complex outstanding science issues to be solved is the plasma surface interaction (PSI) in the hostile environment of a nuclear reactor. Not only are materials exposed to unprecedented steady-state and transient power fluxes, but they are also exposed to unprecedented neutron fluxes. Both the ion fluxes and the neutron fluxes will change the properties and the micro-structure of the plasma-facing materials (PFM) significantly, even to the extent that their structural integrity is compromised. A new PMTS (Plasma Material Test Station) is proposed to address these challenges, utilizing a new high-intensity plasma source concept. This device will be well suited to test toxic, as well as irradiated material samples. The advanced plasma source is based on an RF based plasma production and heating system. The source is electrode-less, so that impurity generation in the source region that could invalidate the interpretation of PSI processes will be minimized. This is especially important for high fluence experiments, accelerated lifetime studies and reduced maintenance in a radiological managed environment. B2-Eirene simulations demonstrate that ion fluxes in excess of 1024 m-2s-1 should be achievable at the target delivering power fluxes of > 30 MW/m2. Upstream temperatures at the exit of the source system should be high enough (Te > 30 eV) to study also radiative dissipation of heat fluxes in this device. The RF source system consists of a helicon antenna for plasma production and additional electron as well as ion heating to increase electron and ion temperature separately. A pre-prototype helicon antenna has been tested at moderate magnetic fields. A maximum electron density of ne = 4.0 x 1019 m-3

  7. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Adler, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Alling, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Synakowski, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States). et al.

    1994-03-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ~20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles.

  8. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ∼20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles

  9. A concept for next step advanced tokamak fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept is introduced for initiating the design study of a special class of tokamak, which has a magnetic confinement configuration intermediate between contemporary advanced tokamak and the recently established spherical torus (ST, also well known by the name 'spherical tokamak'). The leading design parameter in the present proposal is a dimensionless geometrical parameter the machine aspect ratio A = R0/a0 = 2.0, where the parameters a0 and R0 denote, respectively, the plasma (equatorial)minor radius and the plasma major radius. The aim of this choice is to technologically and experimentally go beyond the aspect ratio frontier (R0/a0 ≅ 2.5) of present day tokamaks and enter a broad unexplored domain existing on the (a0, R0) parameter space in current international tokamak database, between the data region already moderately well covered by the advanced conventional tokamaks and the data region planned to be covered by STs. Plasma minor radius a0 has been chosen to be the second basic design parameter, and consequently, the plasma major radius R0 is regarded as a dependent design parameter. In the present concept, a nominal plasma minor radius a0 = 1.2 m is adopted to be the principal design value, and smaller values of a0 can be used for auxiliary design purposes, to establish extensive database linkage with existing tokamaks. Plasma minor radius can also be adjusted by mechanical and/or electromagnetic means to smaller values during experiments, for making suitable data linkages to existing machines with higher aspect ratios and smaller plasma minor radii. The basic design parameters proposed enable the adaptation of several confinement techniques recently developed by STs, and thereby a specially arranged central-bore region insider the envisioned tokamak torus, with retrieved space in the direction of plasma minor radius, will be available for technological adjustments and maneuvering to facilitate implementation of engineering instrumentation and real

  10. Deuterium isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium-containing molecules are separated and enriched by exposing commercially available ethylene, vinyl chloride, 1,2-dichloroethane or propylene to the radiation of tuned infrared lasers to selectively decompose these compounds into enriched molecular products containing deuterium atoms. The deuterium containing molecules can be easily separated from the starting material by absorption, distillation or other simple chemical separation techniques and methods. After evaporation such deuterium containing molecules can be burned to form water with an enriched deuterium content or pyrolyzed to form hydrogen gas with an enriched deuterium content. (author)

  11. Safety and economical requirements of conceptual fusion power reactors in co-existing advanced fission plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An EPR fission plant is expected to operate from 2010 to 2070. In this time range a new generation of advanced fission reactors and several stages of fusion reactors from ITER to DEMO will emerge. Their viability in the competitive socio-economic environment and also their possible synergy benefits are discussed in this paper. The studied cases involve the Finnish EPR, Generation IV, and the EFDA Power Plant Conceptual Study Models A-D. The main focus is on economic and safety assessments. Some cross-cutting issues of technologies are discussed. Concerning the economic potential of both conceptual fusion power plants and those of Generation IV candidates, we have used the present Finnish EPR as a reference. Comparisons using various pricing methods are made for fusion and Generation IV: mass flow analyses together with engineering, construction and financial margins form one method and another one is based on simple scaling relations between components or structures with common technology level. In all these studies fusion competitiveness has to be improved in terms of plant availability and internal power recirculation. At present the best fission plants have a plant availability close to 95% and an internal power recirculation of the order of 3-4%. The operation and maintenance solutions of Model C and D show the right way for fusion. A remarkable rise of the fuel costs of present LWRs would first make the Generation IV breeder options and thereafter the fusion plants more competitive. The costs of safety related components, such as the containment and the equipment for severe accident mitigation (e.g. the core catcher in a LWR), should be accounted for and the extent to which the inherent fusion safety features could compensate such expenses should be analysed. For an overall assessment of the various nuclear options both internal and external costs are considered. (author)

  12. Recent Advances in Registration, Integration and Fusion of Remotely Sensed Data: Redundant Representations and Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Wojciech; Le Moigne-Stewart, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, sophisticated mathematical techniques have been successfully applied to the field of remote sensing to produce significant advances in applications such as registration, integration and fusion of remotely sensed data. Registration, integration and fusion of multiple source imagery are the most important issues when dealing with Earth Science remote sensing data where information from multiple sensors, exhibiting various resolutions, must be integrated. Issues ranging from different sensor geometries, different spectral responses, differing illumination conditions, different seasons, and various amounts of noise need to be dealt with when designing an image registration, integration or fusion method. This tutorial will first define the problems and challenges associated with these applications and then will review some mathematical techniques that have been successfully utilized to solve them. In particular, we will cover topics on geometric multiscale representations, redundant representations and fusion frames, graph operators, diffusion wavelets, as well as spatial-spectral and operator-based data fusion. All the algorithms will be illustrated using remotely sensed data, with an emphasis on current and operational instruments.

  13. Experimental results on advanced inertial fusion schemes obtained within the HiPER project

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Batani, D.; Gizzi, L.A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Honrubia, J.; Antonelli, L.; Morace, A.; Volpe, L.; Santos, J.J.; Schurtz, G.; Hulin, S.; Ribeyre, X.; Nicolai, P.; Vauzour, B.; Dorchies, F.; Nazarov, W.; Pasley, J.; Richetta, M.; Lancaster, K.; Spindloe, C.; Tolley, M.; Neely, D.; Kozlová, Michaela; Nejdl, Jaroslav; Rus, Bedřich; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2012), s. 3-10. ISSN 0029-5922. [International Workshop and Summer School on Towards Fusion Energy /10./. Kudowa Zdroj, 12.06.2011-18.06.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : advanced ignition schemes * fast ignition * shock ignition Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.507, year: 2012

  14. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tomamak Fusion Test reactor has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled with nominally equal densities of deuterium and tritium. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ∼20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α particles created by the D-T fusion reactions

  15. High-Energy Ion Emission from Cooled Deuterium Clusters in 20 TW Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-Jie; HUANG Wen-Zhong; WANG Guang-Chang; ZHOU Wei-Min; ZHANG Shuang-Gen; WANG Xiang-Xian; ZHOU Kai-Nan; WANG Xiao-Dong; HUANG Xiao-Jun; NI Guo-Quan; GU Yu-Qiu; WANG Hong-Bin; ZHENG Zhi-Jian; GE Fang-Fang; WEN Xian-Lun; JIAO Chun-Ye; HE Ying-Ling; WEN Tian-Shu

    2005-01-01

    @@ High-energy ion emission from intense-ultrashort (30fs) laser-pulse-cooled deuterium-cluster (80K) interaction is measured. The deuterium ions have an average energy 20 keV, which greatly exceeds Zweiback's expectation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 2634]. These fast deuterium ions can be used to drive fusion and have a broad prospect.

  16. Advanced tokamak research at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in support of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion energy research aims to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable energy system. The tokamak, a doughnut shaped plasma confined by magnetic fields generated by currents flowing in external coils and the plasma, is a leading concept. Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in the DIII-D tokamak seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation. This necessitates replacing the inherently pulsed inductive method of driving plasma current. Our approach emphasizes high pressure to maximize fusion gain while maximizing the self-driven bootstrap current, along with external current profile control. This requires integrated, simultaneous control of many characteristics of the plasma with a diverse set of techniques. This has already resulted in noninductive conditions being maintained at high pressure on current relaxation timescales. A high degree of physical understanding is facilitated by a closely coupled integrated modelling effort. Simulations are used both to plan and interpret experiments, making possible continued development of the models themselves. An ultimate objective is the capability to predict behaviour in future AT experiments. Analysis of experimental results relies on use of the TRANSP code via the FusionGrid, and our use of the FusionGrid will increase as additional analysis and simulation tools are made available

  17. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas

  18. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: summary of activities, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities described in this summary of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division are diverse, yet united by a common theme: it is our purpose to explore technologically advanced techniques for the production, acceleration, or transport of high-energy beams. These beams may be the heavy ions of interest in nuclear science, medical research, and heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; they may be beams of deuterium and hydrogen atoms, used to heat and confine plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments; they may be ultrahigh-energy protons for the next high-energy hadron collider; or they may be high-brilliance, highly coherent, picosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation

  19. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven proton-boron fusion reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margarone, Daniele; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, Andriy; Krása, Josef; Kucharik, M.; Morrissey, Michael; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Bellutti, P.; Korn, Georg

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2015 - (Awwal, A.; Lane, M.), "93450F-1"-"93450F-8". (Proceedings of SPIE. 9345). ISBN 978-1-62841-435-6. ISSN 0277-786X. [Biennial Conference on High Power Lasers for Fusion Research /3./. San Francisco (US), 20150210] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : proton-boron fusion * advanced targets * laser-induced nuclear reactions Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V)

  20. Study on advanced cancer treatment method using quantum beam fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study on advanced cancer treatment method using quantum beam fusion technology aims at the realization of the fusion therapy device between boron neutron capture therapy device and THz wave hyperthermia device. To achieve this purpose, it is necessary to develop an intra-body transmission technology of THz beams. From the transmission experiment of 0.2 THz wave using sapphire microfiber, it has been found that the transmission of THz microbeam into the intra-body cancer affected part is possible. As the technologies to commercially realize the intra-body transmission of THz beams, this paper describes the coupler for transmission, flexible corrugated horn, and the micro-fabrication techniques of microfibers. In addition, the authors conducted the development of an optical fiber type rotary encoder for the long-distance transmission of THz waves, and confirmed that the effects of vibration did not exist through the evaluation of vibration durability. (A.O.)

  1. A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large

  2. The scaling of economic and performance parameters of DT and advanced fuel fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the plasma stability index beta and the fusion power density in the plasma were treated as independent variables to determine how they influenced three economic performance parameters of fusion reactors burning the DT and four advanced fusion fuel cycles. The economic/performance parameters included the total power produced per unit length of reactor; the mass per unit length, and the specific mass in kilograms/kilowatt. The scaling of these parameters with beta and fusion power density was examined for a common set of engineering assumptions on the allowable wall loading limits, the maximum magnetic field existing in the plasma, average blanket mass density, etc. It was found that the power per unit length decreased as the plasma power density and beta increased. This is a consequence of the fact that the first wall is a bottleneck in the energy flow from the plasma to the generating equipment, and the wall power flux will exceed wall loading limits if the plasma radius exceeds a critical value. If one wished to build an engineering test reactor which produced a burning plasma at the lowest possible initial cost, and without regard to whether such a reactor would ultimately produce the cheapest power, then one would minimize the mass per unit length. The mass per unit length decreases with increasing plasma power density and beta, with the DT reaction being the most expensive at a fixed plasma power density (because of its thicker blanket), and the least expensive at a fixed value of beta, at least up to values of beta of 50%. The specific mass, in kg/kw, which is a rough measure of the cost of the power generated by the reactor, shows an opposite trend. It increases with increasing plasma power density and beta. At a given plasma power density and low beta, the DT reaction gives the lowest specific mass, but at a fixed beta above 10%, the advanced fuel cycles have the lowest specific mass

  3. Perspectives for the high field approach in fusion research and advances within the Ignitor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, B.; Airoldi, A.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; Belforte, G.; Boggio-Sella, E.; Cardinali, A.; Cenacchi, G.; Conti, F.; Costa, E.; D'Amico, A.; Detragiache, P.; De Tommasi, G.; DeVellis, A.; Faelli, G.; Ferraris, P.; Frattolillo, A.; Giammanco, F.; Grasso, G.; Lazzaretti, M.; Mantovani, S.; Merriman, L.; Migliori, S.; Napoli, R.; Perona, A.; Pierattini, S.; Pironti, A.; Ramogida, G.; Rubinacci, G.; Sassi, M.; Sestero, A.; Spillantini, S.; Tavani, M.; Tumino, A.; Villone, F.; Zucchi, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Ignitor Program maintains the objective of approaching D-T ignition conditions by incorporating systematical advances made with relevant high field magnet technology and with experiments on high density well confined plasmas in the present machine design. An additional objective is that of charting the development of the high field line of experiments that goes from the Alcator machine to the ignitor device. The rationale for this class of experiments, aimed at producing poloidal fields with the highest possible values (compatible with proven safety factors of known plasma instabilities) is given. On the basis of the favourable properties of high density plasmas produced systematically by this line of machines, the envisioned future for the line, based on novel high field superconducting magnets, includes the possibility of investigating more advanced fusion burn conditions than those of the D-T plasmas for which Ignitor is designed. Considering that a detailed machine design has been carried out (Coppi et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 104013), the advances made in different areas of the physics and technology that are relevant to the Ignitor project are reported. These are included within the following sections of the present paper: main components issues, assembly and welding procedures; robotics criteria; non-linear feedback control; simulations with three-dimensional structures and disruption studies; ICRH and dedicated diagnostics systems; anomalous transport processes including self-organization for fusion burning regimes and the zero-dimensional model; tridimensional structures of the thermonuclear instability and control provisions; superconducting components of the present machine; envisioned experiments with high field superconducting magnets.

  4. Inertial thermonuclear fusion by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of deuterium tritium (DT) magnetic or inertial thermonuclear fusion are given. Even if results would be better with heavy ions beams, most of the results on fusion are obtained with laser beams. Technical and theoretical aspects of the laser fusion are presented with an extrapolation to the future fusion reactor. (A.B.). 34 refs., 17 figs

  5. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wiffen, F.W. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Fusion Energy

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  6. A concept of an advanced inertia fusion reactor; TAKANAWA-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept of an advanced inertia fusion reactor: TAKANAWA-I is proposed. A pellet with DT ignitor and DD major fuel, Pb wet walls, C or SiC blocks for shielding, and SiC vessels in the water pool are employed. This reactor does not need blanckets for T breeding, since T is supplied through DD reaction, and has low induced radioactivities. These and a simple structure might give a hopeful prediction of economical and safe advantages and mitigate difficulties of reactor technologies, especially remote maintenance of the reactor. (author)

  7. IAEA technical meeting on nuclear data library for advanced systems - Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Technical Meeting on 'Nuclear Data Library for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices' was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 31 October to 2 November 2007. The main objective of the initiative has been to define a proposal and detailed plan of activities for a Co-ordinated Research Project on this subject. Details of the discussions which took place at the meeting, including a review of the current activities in the field, a list of recommendations and a proposed timeline schedule for the CRP are summarized in this report. (author)

  8. Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors (Workshop Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ''Workshop on Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors'' was convened to determine the degree to which an increased effort in modeling and simulation could help bridge the gap between the data that is needed to support the implementation of these advanced nuclear technologies and the data that can be obtained in available experimental facilities. The need to develop materials capable of performing in the severe operating environments expected in fusion and fission (Generation IV) reactors represents a significant challenge in materials science. There is a range of potential Gen-IV fission reactor design concepts and each concept has its own unique demands. Improved economic performance is a major goal of the Gen-IV designs. As a result, most designs call for significantly higher operating temperatures than the current generation of LWRs to obtain higher thermal efficiency. In many cases, the desired operating temperatures rule out the use of the structural alloys employed today. The very high operating temperature (up to 1000 C) associated with the NGNP is a prime example of an attractive new system that will require the development of new structural materials. Fusion power plants represent an even greater challenge to structural materials development and application. The operating temperatures, neutron exposure levels and thermo-mechanical stresses are comparable to or greater than those for proposed Gen-IV fission reactors. In addition, the transmutation products created in the structural materials by the high energy neutrons produced in the DT plasma can profoundly influence the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of these materials. Although the workshop addressed issues relevant to both Gen-IV and fusion reactor materials, much of the discussion focused on fusion; the same focus is reflected in this report. Most of the physical models and computational methods presented during the

  9. Retention of deuterium in damaged low-activation steel Rusfer (EK-181) after gas and plasma exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitsyn, A.V. [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Golubeva, A.V., E-mail: anna-golubeva@yandex.ru [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bobyr, N.P.; Khripunov, B.I. [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cherkez, D.I., E-mail: cherkez@list.ru [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Petrov, V.B. [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mayer, M.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Alimov, V.Kh. [Max-Planck-Institut fürPlasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Klimov, N.S.; Putrik, A. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk (Russian Federation); Chernov, V.M.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M.V. [A.A. Bochvar Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gasparyan, Yu.M.; Efimov, V.S. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic–martensitic steels (RAFMS) are advanced structural materials for the construction of future fusion reactors with high fluxes of neutrons, such as DEMO or a Fusion Neutron Source (FNS). In the present work the influence of different damages on deuterium retention in the RAFM Rusfer (Chernov et al., 2007) was investigated. Three different types of damage were applied: (i)irradiation by 20 MeV W{sup 6+} ions to a damage fluence of 0.89 dpa (1.4 × 10{sup 18} ions/m{sup 2}). Tungsten ion irradiation was used as proxy for displacement damage created by neutrons; (ii)heat loads in the QSPA-T facility with 10 pulses of 0.5 MJ/m{sup 2} with a duration of 0.5 ms; (iii)low-temperature hydrogen plasma irradiation in the LENTA facility at 320 and 600 K to a fluence of 10{sup 25} H/m{sup 2}. The hydrogen isotope retention properties of the damaged and undamaged material were investigated by exposure to deuterium gas several weeks after damaging. The deuterium retention was investigated in the temperature range of RT–773 K at pressure 10{sup 4} Pa. Deuterium depth profiles were measured a month after gas exposure by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) using the D({sup 3}He,p)α nuclear reaction. Deuterium retention in damaged and undamaged Rusfer in the temperature range of 300–600 K has a maximum at 500 K for all types of damage investigated. The typical value of deuterium concentration in the bulk is 10{sup −3} at.%. Peculiarities of D retention in damaged samples are discussed.

  10. Fine target of deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fine target of deuterium on a tantalum plate by the absorption method is obtained. In order to obtain the de gasification temperature an induction generator of high frequency is used and the deuterium pass is regulated by means of a palladium valve. Two vacuum measures are available, one to measure the high vacuum in the de gasification process of the tantalum plate and the other, for low vacuum, to measure the deuterium inlet in the installation and the deuterium pressure change in the installation after the absorption in the tantalum plate. A target of 48 μ gr/cm2 thick is obtained. (Author) 1 refs

  11. Accelerated rogue waves generated by soliton fusion at the advanced stage of supercontinuum formation in photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Driben, Rodislav

    2012-01-01

    Soliton fusion is a fascinating and delicate phenomenon that manifests itself in optical fibers in case of interaction between co-propagating solitons with small temporal and wavelengths separation. We show that the mechanism of acceleration of trailing soliton by dispersive waves radiated from the preceding one provides necessary conditions for soliton fusion at the advanced stage of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers. As a result of fusion large intensity robust light structures arise and propagate over significant distances. In presence of small random noise the delicate condition for the effective fusion between solitons can easily be broken, making the fusion induced giant waves a rare statistical event. Thus oblong-shaped giant accelerated waves become excellent candidates for optical rogue waves.

  12. Preface to Special Topic: Advances in Radio Frequency Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has long been recognized that auxiliary plasma heating will be required to achieve the high temperature, high density conditions within a magnetically confined plasma in which a fusion “burn” may be sustained by copious fusion reactions. Consequently, the application of radio and microwave frequency electromagnetic waves to magnetically confined plasma, commonly referred to as RF, has been a major part of the program almost since its inception in the 1950s. These RF waves provide heating, current drive, plasma profile control, and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stabilization. Fusion experiments employ electromagnetic radiation in a wide range of frequencies, from tens of MHz to hundreds of GHz. The fusion devices containing the plasma are typically tori, axisymmetric or non, in which the equilibrium magnetic fields are composed of a strong toroidal magnetic field generated by external coils, and a poloidal field created, at least in the symmetric configurations, by currents flowing in the plasma. The waves are excited in the peripheral regions of the plasma, by specially designed launching structures, and subsequently propagate into the core regions, where resonant wave-plasma interactions produce localized heating or other modification of the local equilibrium profiles. Experimental studies coupled with the development of theoretical models and advanced simulation codes over the past 40+ years have led to an unprecedented understanding of the physics of RF heating and current drive in the core of magnetic fusion devices. Nevertheless, there are serious gaps in our knowledge base that continue to have a negative impact on the success of ongoing experiments and that must be resolved as the program progresses to the next generation devices and ultimately to “demo” and “fusion power plant.” A serious gap, at least in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequencies and partially in the lower hybrid frequency ranges, is the difficulty in coupling large amount of

  13. Advances and challenges in deformable image registration: From image fusion to complex motion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Julia A; Heinrich, Mattias P; Papież, Bartłomiej W; Brady, Sir J Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of medical image registration has significantly advanced from multi-modal image fusion to highly non-linear, deformable image registration for a wide range of medical applications and imaging modalities, involving the compensation and analysis of physiological organ motion or of tissue changes due to growth or disease patterns. While the original focus of image registration has predominantly been on correcting for rigid-body motion of brain image volumes acquired at different scanning sessions, often with different modalities, the advent of dedicated longitudinal and cross-sectional brain studies soon necessitated the development of more sophisticated methods that are able to detect and measure local structural or functional changes, or group differences. Moving outside of the brain, cine imaging and dynamic imaging required the development of deformable image registration to directly measure or compensate for local tissue motion. Since then, deformable image registration has become a general enabling technology. In this work we will present our own contributions to the state-of-the-art in deformable multi-modal fusion and complex motion modelling, and then discuss remaining challenges and provide future perspectives to the field. PMID:27364430

  14. Chemical response of lithiated graphite with deuterium irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, C N; B. Heim; Allain, Jean Paul

    2011-01-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has been found to enhance plasma performance for graphite walled fusion devices such as TFTR, CDX-U, T-11M, TJ-II and NSTX. Among observed plasma enhancements is a reduction in edge density and reduced deuterium recycling. The mechanism by which lithiated graphite retains deuterium is largely unknown. Under controlled laboratory conditions, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to observe the chemical changes that occur on ATJ graphite after lithium depositi...

  15. Proceeding of JSPS-CAS Core-University Program (CUP) on superconducting key technology for advanced fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JSPS-CAS Core University Program (CUP) seminar on 'Superconducting Key Technology for Advanced Fusion Device' was held in Xi'an, China from October 18 to 21, 2010. This seminar was organized in the framework of the CUP in the field of plasma and nuclear fusion. This seminar honored by NIFS and ASIPP is aim to have a wide discussion on the new application and achievements on superconducting technology of nuclear fusion reactor. The superconducting technology on fusion reactor involves the fields on high current superconductor and magnet, quench protection, current control, cooling of the magnet, and reliability of large scale refrigerator. The technology on ITER high temperature superconductor current leads and the conductor test of JT-60SA are discussed in this seminar. Thirty-four oral talks and two summary talks were presented in this seminar. Total number of the participants was 34, including 12 Japanese participants. (author)

  16. Deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretz, N.L.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Evensen, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, R.; Fu, G.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Giola, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F.M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M.J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.K.; Marmar, E.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mauel, M.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mirnov, S.V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J.A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; OConnor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S.F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A.L.; Raftapoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmunsen, D.A.; Redi, M.H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A.L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbaugh, S.A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S.D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.

    1995-09-01

    A peak fusion power production of 9.3{plus_minus}0.7 MW has been achieved on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in deuterium plasmas heated by co and counter injected deuterium and tritium neutral beams with a total power of 33.7 MW. The ratio of fusion power output to heating power input is 0.27. At the time of the highest neutron flux the plasma conditions are: {ital T}{sub {ital e}}(0)=11.5 keV, {ital T}{sub {ital i}}(0)=44 keV, {ital n}{sub {ital e}}(0)=8.5{times}10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}, and {l_angle}{ital Z}{sub eff}{r_angle}=2.2 giving {tau}{sub {ital E}}=0.24 s. These conditions are similar to those found in the highest confinement deuterium plasmas. The measured D-T neutron yield is within 7% of computer code estimates based on profile measurements and within experimental uncertainties. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha fraction of 0.2% and central fusion power density of 2 MW/m{sup 3} similar to that expected in a fusion reactor. Even though the alpha velocity exceeds the Alfven velocity throughout the time of high neutron output in most high power plasmas, MHD activity is similar to that in comparable deuterium plasmas and Alfven wave activity is low. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles is about 3% of the total as expected from alphas which are born on unconfined orbits. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas with similar externally applied conditions, the stored energy in electrons and ions is about 25% higher indicating improvements in confinement associated with D-T plasmas and consistent with modest electron heating expected from alpha particles. ICRF heating of D-T plasmas using up to 5.5 MW has resulted in 10 keV increases in central ion and 2.5 keV increases in central electron temperatures in relatively good agreement with code predictions. In these cases heating on the magnetic axis at 2{Omega}{sub {ital T}} gave up to 80% of the ICRF energy to ions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A peak fusion power production of 9.3±0.7 MW has been achieved on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in deuterium plasmas heated by co and counter injected deuterium and tritium neutral beams with a total power of 33.7 MW. The ratio of fusion power output to heating power input is 0.27. At the time of the highest neutron flux the plasma conditions are: Te(0)=11.5 keV, Ti(0)=44 keV, ne(0)=8.5x1019 m-3, and left-angle Zeff right-angle=2.2 giving τE=0.24 s. These conditions are similar to those found in the highest confinement deuterium plasmas. The measured D-T neutron yield is within 7% of computer code estimates based on profile measurements and within experimental uncertainties. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha fraction of 0.2% and central fusion power density of 2 MW/m3 similar to that expected in a fusion reactor. Even though the alpha velocity exceeds the Alfven velocity throughout the time of high neutron output in most high power plasmas, MHD activity is similar to that in comparable deuterium plasmas and Alfven wave activity is low. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles is about 3% of the total as expected from alphas which are born on unconfined orbits. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas with similar externally applied conditions, the stored energy in electrons and ions is about 25% higher indicating improvements in confinement associated with D-T plasmas and consistent with modest electron heating expected from alpha particles. ICRF heating of D-T plasmas using up to 5.5 MW has resulted in 10 keV increases in central ion and 2.5 keV increases in central electron temperatures in relatively good agreement with code predictions. In these cases heating on the magnetic axis at 2ΩT gave up to 80% of the ICRF energy to ions. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  18. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  19. Fusion connection: contributions to industry, defense, and basic science resulting from scientific advances made in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion research has led to significant contributions in many different areas of industry, defense, and basic science. This diversity is represented visually in the introductory figure which shows both a radio galaxy, and a microchip produced by plasma etching. Some of these spin-off technologies are discussed

  20. Materials research for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  1. Thick SS316 materials TIG welding development activities towards advanced fusion reactor vacuum vessel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. Ramesh; Gangradey, R.

    2012-11-01

    Advanced fusion reactors like ITER and up coming Indian DEMO devices are having challenges in terms of their materials design and fabrication procedures. The operation of these devices is having various loads like structural, thermo-mechanical and neutron irradiation effects on major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, magnets and blanket modules. The concept of double wall vacuum vessel (VV) is proposed in view of protecting of major reactor subsystems like super conducting magnets, diagnostic systems and other critical components from high energy 14 MeV neutrons generated from fusion plasma produced by D-T reactions. The double walled vacuum vessel is used in combination with pressurized water circulation and some special grade borated steel blocks to shield these high energy neutrons effectively. The fabrication of sub components in VV are mainly used with high thickness SS materials in range of 20 mm- 60 mm of various grades based on the required protocols. The structural components of double wall vacuum vessel uses various parts like shields, ribs, shells and diagnostic vacuum ports. These components are to be developed with various welding techniques like TIG welding, Narrow gap TIG welding, Laser welding, Hybrid TIG laser welding, Electron beam welding based on requirement. In the present paper the samples of 20 mm and 40 mm thick SS 316 materials are developed with TIG welding process and their mechanical properties characterization with Tensile, Bend tests and Impact tests are carried out. In addition Vickers hardness tests and microstructural properties of Base metal, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Weld Zone are done. TIG welding application with high thick SS materials in connection with vacuum vessel requirements and involved criticalities towards welding process are highlighted.

  2. Advances in implosion physics, alternative targets design, and neutron effects on heavy ion fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupling of a new radiation transport (RT) solver with an existing multimaterial fluid dynamics code (ARWEN) using Adaptive Mesh Refinement named DAFNE, has been completed. In addition, improvements were made to ARWEN in order to work properly with the RT code, and to make it user-friendlier, including new treatment of Equations of State, and graphical tools for visualization. The evaluation of the code has been performed, comparing it with other existing RT codes (including the one used in DAFNE, but in the single-grid version). These comparisons consist in problems with real input parameters (mainly opacities and geometry parameters). Important advances in Atomic Physics, Opacity calculations and NLTE atomic physics calculations, with participation in significant experiments in this area, have been obtained. Early published calculations showed that a DTx fuel with a small tritium initial content (xe and to enhance radiation losses, reducing the plasma temperature, Ti. The neutron activation of all natural elements in First Structural Wall (FSW) component of an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) reactor for waste management, and the analysis of activation of target debris in NIF-type facilities has been completed. Using an original efficient modeling for pulse activation, the FSW behavior in inertial fusion has been studied. A radiological dose library coupled to the ACAB code is being generated for assessing impact of environmental releases, and atmospheric dispersion analysis from HIF reactors indicate the uncertainty in tritium release parameters. The first recognition of recombination barriers in SiC, modify the understanding of the calculation of displacement per atom, dpa, to quantify the collisional damage. An important analysis has been the confirmation, using Molecular Dynamics (MD) with an astonishing agreement, of the experimental evidence of low-temperature amorphization by damage accumulation in SiC, which could modify extensively its viability as a

  3. Fusion--fision hybrid breeders: economic and performance issues, role of advanced converters, interdependence between fission and fusion programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper considers nuclear breeding systems (i.e., production of fissile fuel from fertile materials). The range of breeding technologies considered is deliberately wide. We include systems which breed by using internal neutron sources--a reactor-breeder, exemplified by the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR)--and systems which breed by using external neutron sources--exemplified in this paper primarily by hybrid fusion-fission breeders

  4. Deuterium-tritium TFTR plasmas in the high poloidal beta regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium-tritium plasmas with enhanced energy confinement and stability have been produced in the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR. Confinement enhancement H triple-bond τE/τEITER-89P > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current Ip = 0.85 - 1.46 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, βNdia triple-bond 108 tperpendicular > aB0/Ip = 3 has been obtained in these plasma,s exceeding the βN limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, li. Fusion power exceeding 6.7 MW with a fusion power gain QDT = 0.22 has been produced with reduced alpha particle first orbit loss provided by the increased li

  5. Analysis of fusion neutron production in EAST with neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The neutron emission rate increases rapidly with high-power deuterium beam injected into deuterium plasmas. It is necessary to calculate the neutron production in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) for the radiation safety. Purpose: We aim to provide reference for developing new detection systems of fusion neutron and neutron radiation shielding design. Methods: Neutron emission rate was calculated using the typical particle model and analysis method. The relationships were analyzed among the fusion neutron production and the ion density, ion temperature, neutral beam energy and neutral beam power respectively. Results: The results demonstrated that the total fusion neutron production was 1016 n·s-1 with 80-keV, 4-MW neutral beam injection. Conclusion: Neutron intensity in EAST will increase by a factor of ten when appropriate neutral beam injection is applied. It can be referred for further performance improvement and radiation protection of EAST. (authors)

  6. Thermal Resonance Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We first show a possible mechanism to create a new type of nuclear fusion, thermal resonance fusion, i.e. low energy nuclear fusion with thermal resonance of light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium or tritium. The fusion of two light nuclei has to overcome the Coulomb barrier between these two nuclei to reach up to the interacting region of nuclear force. We found nuclear fusion could be realized with thermal vibrations of crystal lattice atoms coupling with light atoms at low energy by reso...

  7. A mode-transforming polarization-rotatable launcher for the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) fusion energy experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) requires high-power microwaves for startup and plasma heating. Power from a gyrotron oscillator tube at 53.2 GHz will be used to ionize and heat the plasma by the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) process. The confining magnetic field of the device is either 0.95 or 1.9T. The gyrotron tube generates 200 kW in the TE02 mode, which is transported in an overmoded 6.35-cm-diam circular waveguide to the ATF vacuum vessel. The launcher consists of a mode-converting Vlasov section, which converts the nonpolarized TE02 wave into a linearly polarized narrow beam. The beam reflects off a tiled spherical reflector grating and is focused at the center of the plasma. The polarization can be rotated to optimize the absorption efficiency by rotating the grating in the spherical reflector. Overall system efficiency is kept high by making the twist reflector large enough to catch the Vlasov converter sidelobe power, which is partially due to mode conversion in the waveguide system. The launcher design and laboratory measurements are discussed. 3 refs., 3 figs

  8. Tritium catalyzed deuterium tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary assessment of the promise of the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium (TCD) tokamak power reactors relative to that of deuterium-tritium (D-T) and catalyzed deuterium (Cat-D) tokamaks is undertaken. The TCD mode of operation is arrived at by converting the 3He from the D(D,n)3He reaction into tritium, by neutron capture in the blanket; the tritium thus produced is fed into the plasma. There are three main parts to the assessment: blanket study, reactor design and economic analysis and an assessment of the prospects for improvements in the performance of TCD reactors (and in the promise of the TCD mode of operation, in general)

  9. Suppression of Weibel Instabilities in Advanced Fast Ignition Laser Fusion Pellets by Two Cone-Guided Relativistic Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V.

    2007-11-01

    I propose utilization of two cone-guided relativistic laser beams in antiparallel interaction with the fusion pellet as a novel approach for the suppression of Weibel instabilities in the core of advanced fast ignition pellets.ootnotetextM. Tabak, J. Hammer, M.E. Glinsky, W.L. Kruer, S. C. Wilks, J. Woodworth, E. M. Campbell, and M.D. Perry, Phys. Plasmas 1 (5), 1626 (1994). The propagation of generated suprathermal electron beam toward the core may lead to the appearance of colossal (˜10MG), small scale (L˜velocity of light/local electron plasma frequencyootnotetextV. Stefan, Suppression of Weibel Instabilities by High-Harmonic Electron Bernstein Modes in Advanced Fast Ignition Laser Fusion Pellets.APS-2006. October 30-November 3, 2006; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. magnetic fields. This would suppress the transport of magnetic fields into the core of the pellet and may eliminate the difficulties in the nonlinear-relativistic treatment of magnetized core plasma.

  10. FAST, the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus, a proposal for a facility in support of the development of fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FAST is a new machine proposed to support ITER experimental exploitation as well as to anticipate DEMO relevant physics and technology. FAST is aimed at studying, in burning plasma relevant conditions, fast particle physics, plasma operations and plasma wall interaction in an integrated way. FAST has the capability to approach all the ITER scenarios significantly closer than present day experiments by using Deuterium plasmas. The necessity of achieving ITER relevant performance with a moderate cost has led to conceiving a compact Tokamak (R=1.82 m, a= 0.64 m) with high toroidal field (BT up to 8.5 T) and plasma current (Ip up to 8 MA). In order to study fast particle behaviours in conditions similar to those of ITER, the project has been provided with a dominant Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating System (ICRH; 30 MW on the plasma). Moreover, the experiment foresees the use of 6 MW of Lower Hybrid (LHCD), essentially for plasma control and for non-inductive Current Drive, and of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH, 4MW) for localized electron heating and plasma control. The ports have been designed to accommodate up to 10 MW of negative beams (NNBI) in the energy range of 0.5-1 MeV. The total power input will be in the 30-40 MW range in the different plasma scenarios with a wall power load comparable with that of ITER (P/R∼22 MW/m). All the ITER scenarios will be studied: from the reference H-mode, with plasma edge and ELMs characteristics similar to the ITER ones (Q up to ≅ 2.5), to a full current drive scenario, lasting around 170 s. The first wall as well as the divertor plates will be of Tungsten in order to ensure reactor relevant operation regimes. The divertor itself is designed to be completely removable by remote handling. This will allow studying (in view of DEMO) the behaviour of innovative divertor concepts, such as those based on liquid Lithium. FAST is capable of operations with very long pulses, up to 170 s, despite that it is a copper machine

  11. Thermal Resonance Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We first show a possible mechanism to create a new type of nuclear fusion, thermal resonance fusion, i.e. low energy nuclear fusion with thermal resonance of light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium or tritium. The fusion of two light nuclei has to overcome the Coulomb barrier between these two nuclei to reach up to the interacting region of nuclear force. We found nuclear fusion could be realized with thermal vibrations of crystal lattice atoms coupling with light atoms at low energy by resonance to overcome this Coulomb barrier. Thermal resonances combining with tunnel effects can greatly enhance the probability of the deuterium fusion to the detectable level. Our low energy nuclear fusion mechanism research - thermal resonance fusion mechanism results demonstrate how these light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium, can be fused in the crystal of metal, such as Ni or alloy, with synthetic thermal vibrations and resonances at different modes and energies experimentally. The probability of tunnel effect at dif...

  12. Deuterium thermodesorption from pyrographite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results on the deuterium thermodesorption from pyrographite materials implanted with 25 keV ions to a fluence ranging from 1 · 1017 cm-2 to 8 · 10 18 cm-2 are reported. The deuterium release were studied during implantation. To investigate the process of deuterium desorption the pyrographite samples were neutron irradiated to a fluence of 1 · 1019...1 · 10 21 cm-2 in the temperature interval 70...80 degree C prior to deuterium implantation

  13. Deuterium retention and release from tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a future fusion reactor requires an understanding of the hydrogen isotope (protium, deuterium, and tritium) retention and recycling that will occur during operation. Retention of the hydrogen isotopes is particularly important if the isotope is tritium. Retention of large quantities of tritium in the reactor plasma-facing components increases the fuel costs of the reactor and presents a safety concern. Tungsten is still one of the most promising materials in magnetic fusion energy as a plasma facing material. In the past, it has been used only sparingly due to the problem of excessive radiation losses in the plasma when tungsten is present in the plasma. Tungsten's use in fusion devices will increase in the future. Unfortunately, a prediction of tritium retention during realistic plasma conditions is difficult since there are a few reliable reports about interaction for the simplest interaction of gaseous hydrogen isotopes with tungsten at elevated temperatures. The discrepancy between data is large even for the most important material properties, such as the diffusion constant and solubility. We report the results of long term and precise measurements of hydrogen evolution kinetics at 1000 0C followed by low pressure exposures to deuterium at 500 0C and 1000 0C. (author)

  14. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic modes analysis and control of Fusion Advanced Studies Torus high-current scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main FAST (Fusion Advanced Studies Torus) goals is to have a flexible experiment capable to test tools and scenarios for safe and reliable tokamak operation, in order to support ITER and help the final DEMO design. In particular, in this paper, we focus on operation close to a possible border of stability related to low-q operation. To this purpose, a new FAST scenario has then been designed at Ip = 10 MA, BT = 8.5 T, q95 ≈ 2.3. Transport simulations, carried out by using the code JETTO and the first principle transport model GLF23, indicate that, under these conditions, FAST could achieve an equivalent Q ≈ 3.5. FAST will be equipped with a set of internal active coils for feedback control, which will produce magnetic perturbation with toroidal number n = 1 or n = 2. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode analysis and feedback control simulations performed with the codes MARS, MARS-F, CarMa (both assuming the presence of a perfect conductive wall and using the exact 3D resistive wall structure) show the possibility of the FAST conductive structures to stabilize n = 1 ideal modes. This leaves therefore room for active mitigation of the resistive mode (down to a characteristic time of 1 ms) for safety purposes, i.e., to avoid dangerous MHD-driven plasma disruption, when working close to the machine limits and magnetic and kinetic energy density not far from reactor values

  16. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; T.K. Mau; R.L. Miller; F. Najmabadi; V.S. Chan; M.S. Chu; R. LaHaye; L.L. Lao; T.W. Petrie; P. Politzer; H.E. St. John; P. Snyder; G.M. Staebler; A.D. Turnbull; W.P. West

    2003-10-07

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented.

  17. Multimodal options for materials research to advance the basis for fusion energy in the ITER era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Möslang, A.; Muroga, T.; Tanigawa, H.

    2013-10-01

    Well-coordinated international fusion materials research on multiple fundamental feasibility issues can serve an important role during the next ten years. Due to differences in national timelines and fusion device concepts, a parallel-track (multimodal) approach is currently being used for developing fusion energy. An overview is given of the current state-of-the-art of major candidate materials systems for next-step fusion reactors, including a summary of existing knowledge regarding operating temperature and neutron irradiation fluence limits due to high-temperature strength and radiation damage considerations, coolant compatibility information, and current industrial manufacturing capabilities. There are two inter-related overarching objectives of fusion materials research to be performed in the next decade: (1) understanding materials science phenomena in the demanding DT fusion energy environment, and (2) application of this knowledge to develop and qualify materials to provide the basis for next-step facility construction authorization by funding agencies and public safety licensing authorities. The critical issues and prospects for development of high-performance fusion materials are discussed along with recent research results and planned activities of the international materials research community.

  18. Suppression of Weibel Instabilities by High Harmonic Electron Bernstein Modes in Advanced Fast Ignition Laser Fusion Pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V.

    2006-10-01

    A novel mechanism for the suppression of Weibel instabilities in the core of advanced fast ignition pellets is addressed. The propagation of generated suprathermal electron beam toward the core may lead to the appearance of colossal (˜10MG), small scale (L˜c/φpe, c---velocity of light, φpe---local electron plasma frequency) magnetic fields. The suppression synergy of high harmonic electron Bernstein, (EB), modes and Weibel modes, (WB), in the cone-attached laser fusion pellets is based on nonlinear mode-mode coupling. EB modes are excited by ignition, a cone guided, or implosion laser beams. High harmonic EB modes easily propagate to the core of the pellet whereby they nonlinearly interact with, and suppress, the WB. The suppression synergy is maximized at the simultaneous action of ignition and implosion lasers. E. S. Weibel, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2,83 (1959) in the core of advanced fast ignition pellets M. Tabak, J. Hammer, M.E. Glinsky, W.L. Kruer, S. C. Wilks, J. Woodworth, E. M. Campbell, and M.D. Perry, Phys. Plasmas 1 (5), 1626 (1994). V. Stefan, (a) Quasi-Stationary B-Fields due to Weibel Instability in FI Laser Fusion Pellets; (b) Pellet Core Heating Via High Harmonic EB Modes in FI Laser Fusion. 35th Annual A.A.C, 2005,

  19. Effect of noble gas ion pre-irradiation on deuterium retention in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L.; Zhao, Z. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Yuan, Y.; Morgan, T. W.; Guo, L. P.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B. Y.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.; Lu, G. H.

    2016-02-01

    Impurity seeding of noble gases is an effective way of decreasing the heat loads onto the divertor targets in fusion devices. To investigate the effect of noble gases on deuterium retention, tungsten targets have been implanted by different noble gas ions and subsequently exposed to deuterium plasma. Irradiation induced defects and deuterium retention in tungsten targets have been characterized by positron annihilation Doppler broadening and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Similar defect distributions are observed in tungsten irradiated by neon and argon, while it is comparatively low in the case of helium. The influence of helium pre-irradiation on deuterium trapping is found to be small based on the desorption spectrum compared with that of the pristine one. Neon and argon pre-irradiation leads to an enhancement of deuterium trapping during plasma exposure. The influence on deuterium retention is found to be argon > neon > helium when comparing at a similar crystal damage level.

  20. Muon-catalyzed fusion-an energy production perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fission reaction can be catalyzed in a suitable fusion fuel by muons, which can temporarily form very tightly bound mu-molecules. Muons can be produced by the decay of negative pions, which, in turn, have been produced by an accelerated beam of light ions impinging on a target. Muon-catalyzed fusion is appropriately called cold fusion because the nuclear fusion also occurs at room temperature. For practical fusion energy generation, it appears to be necessary to have a fuel mixture of deuterium and tritium at about liquid density and at a temperature of the order of 1000 K. The current status of muon-catalyzed fusion is limited to demonstrations of scientific breakeven by showing that it is possible to sustain an energy balance between muon production and catalyzed fusion. Conceptually, a muon-catalyzed fusion reactor is seen to be an energy amplifier that increases by fusion reactions that energy invested in nuclear pion-muon beams. The physical quantity that determines this balance is Xμ, the number of fusion reactions each muon can catalyze before it is lost. Showing the feasibility of useful power production is equivalent to showing that Xμ can exceed a sufficiently large number, which is estimated to be ∼104 if standard technology is used or ∼103 if more advanced physics and technology can be developed. Since a muon can be produced with current technology for an expenditure of ∼5000 MeV and 17.6 MeV is produced per fusion event, it follows that Xμ ∼ 250 would be a significant demonstration of scientific breakeven. Therefore, the energy cost of producing muons must be reduced substantially before muon-catalyzed fusion reactors could seriously be considered. The physics of muon-catalyzed fusion is summarized and discussed. Muon catalysis is surveyed for the following systems: proton-deuteron, deuteron-deuteron, deuteron-triton, and non-hydrogen elements. 95 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Assessment of advanced materials development in the European Fusion long-term Technology Programme. Report to the FTSC-P by the Advanced Materials Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the transition to the next, fifth, framework program, and the resources available, the European Commission (EC) requested to launch an assessment for the Advanced Materials area, as part of the European Fusion Technology Programme. A working group chaired by the Materials Field Coordinator assessed the current status of the programme with the view to prepare its future focusing on one class of materials, as expressed by the FTSC-P. Two classes of materials: SiC/SiC ceramic composites and low activation alloys on the basis of V, Ti and Cr are presently in the Advanced Materials area. They are all in very early stages of development with a view to their application in fusion power reactors. All have adverse properties that could exclude their use. SiC/SiC ceramic composites have by far the highest potential operating temperature, contributing greatly to the efficiency of fusion power reactors. At the same time it is also the development with the highest development loss risk. This class of materials needs an integrated approach of design, manufacturing and materials development different from alloy development. The alloys with vanadium and titanium as base element have limited application windows due to their inherent properties. If the development of RAFM steels continues as foreseen, the development of V and Ti alloys is not justifiable in the frame of the advanced materials programme. The oxide dispersion strengthened variant of RAFM steels might reach similar temperature limits: about 900K. Chromium based alloys hold the promise of higher operating temperatures, but the knowledge and experience in fusion applications is limited. Investigating the potential of chromium alloys is considered worthwhile. The alloys have comparable activation hazards and early recycling potential, with properly controlled compositions. Recycling of the SiC/SiC class of materials needs further investigation. The working group concludes that at this stage no contender can be

  2. A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schissel, David P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Abla, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Burruss, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Feibush, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Fredian, T. W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Goode, M. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Greenwald, M. J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Keahey, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Leggett, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Li, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); McCune, D. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Papka, M. E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Randerson, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Sanderson, A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Stillerman, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Thompson, M. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Uram, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wallace, G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2012-12-20

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES Grid (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

  3. A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES Grid(FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

  4. Deuterium labeled cannabinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex reactions involving ring opening, ring closure and rearrangements hamper complete understanding of the fragmentation processes in the mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of cannabinoids. Specifically labelled compounds are very powerful tools for obtaining more insight into fragmentation mechanisms and ion structures and therefore the synthesis of specifically deuterated cannabinoids was undertaken. For this, it was necessary to investigate the preparation of cannabinoids, appropriately functionalized for specific introduction of deuterium atom labels. The results of mass spectrometry with these labelled cannabinoids are described. (Auth.)

  5. Mirror fusion test facility plasma diagnostics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past 25 years, experiments with several magnetic mirror machines were performed as part of the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Program at LLL. The latest MFE experiment, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), builds on the advances of earlier machines in initiating, stabilizing, heating, and sustaining plasmas formed with deuterium. The goals of this machine are to increase ion and electron temperatures and show a corresponding increase in containment time, to test theoretical scaling laws of plasma instabilities with increased physical dimensions, and to sustain high-beta plasmas for times that are long compared to the energy containment time. This paper describes the diagnostic system being developed to characterize these plasma parameters

  6. Cold fusion ICCF11: fire under the ice bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many papers presented at this conference focused on quantum condensation in metal alloys with deuterium but important issues like where the energy released during the cold fusion of deuterium nuclei goes or what physical phenomenon triggers cold fusion stay without valid answers. Some Russian scientists have discovered that neutrinos, under very particular conditions, can get excited and could become magnetic monopoles. (A.C.)

  7. Cold nuclear fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    In normal temperature condition, the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance method, realize the combination of deuterium and tritium, helium and lithium... And with a magnetic moment of light nuclei controlled cold nuclear collide fusion, belongs to the nuclear energy research and development in the field of applied technology "cold nuclear collide fusion". According to the similarity of the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance system, the different velocity and energy of the ion be...

  8. Transport of recycled deuterium to the plasma core in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report a study of the fueling of the plasma core by recycling in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). They have analyzed discharges fueled by deuterium recycled from the limiter and tritium-only neutral beam injection. In these plasmas, the DT neutron rate provides a measure of the deuterium influx into the core plasma. They find a reduced influx with plasmas using lithium pellet conditioning and with plasmas of reduced major (and minor) radius. Modeling with the DEGAS neutrals code shows that the dependence on radius can be related to the penetration of neutrals through the scrape-off layer

  9. Transport of recycled deuterium to the plasma core in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Jassby, D.L.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stotler, D.P.; Strachan, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    The authors report a study of the fueling of the plasma core by recycling in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). They have analyzed discharges fueled by deuterium recycled from the limiter and tritium-only neutral beam injection. In these plasmas, the DT neutron rate provides a measure of the deuterium influx into the core plasma. They find a reduced influx with plasmas using lithium pellet conditioning and with plasmas of reduced major (and minor) radius. Modeling with the DEGAS neutrals code shows that the dependence on radius can be related to the penetration of neutrals through the scrape-off layer.

  10. Transport of Recycled Deuterium to the Plasma Core in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Jassby, D.L.; Park, H.; Skinner, C.H.; et al

    1997-10-01

    We report a study of the fueling of the plasma core by recycling in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)]. We have analyzed discharges fueled by deuterium recycled from the limiter and tritium-only neutral beam injection. In these plasmas, the DT neutron rate provides a measure of the deuterium influx into the core plasma. We find a reduced influx with plasmas using lithium pellet conditioning and with plasmas of reduced major (and minor) radius. Modeling with the DEGAS neutrals code shows that the dependence on radius can be related to the penetration of neutrals through the scrape-off layer.

  11. Deuterium desorption behavior of solid tritium breeding material, lithium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several types of blanket module, solid breeder/water or helium cooling, LiPb breeder/helium cooling, liquid LiN and Flibe, have been developed toward both ITER and a demonstration reactor in Japan. In the solid breeder blanket cooled by water, pellets of Li2TiO3 will be employed as tritium breeding material. Structure material in this blanket is low activation ferritic steel, F82H. The operation temperature is limited below approximately 820 K owing to swelling caused by neutron irradiation. Tritium produced by fusion neutrons in this breeding material has to be desorbed under a blanket operation for tritium recovery to be easy. The blanket module, however, has a spatial distribution of temperature. Thus, the tritium desorption behavior has to be clarified in order to make a scheme for tritium recovery. In the present study, a solid breeding material, Li2TiO3, was irradiated by 1.7 keV deuterium ions, and an amount of retained deuterium and deuterium desorption behavior were investigated using a thermal desorption. Dependence of deuterium fluence on amount of retained deuterium was also obtained. In order to examine trapping mechanisms of deuterium in Li2TiO3, similar experiments were conducted for Li and Ti. Deuterium implanted to Li2TiO3 desorbed in forms of HD, D2, HDO and D2O. The amount of deuterium desorbed in form of HD was a few times larger than those of other gas species. The desorption peak appeared at 600 K, but significant desorption up to 900 K was observed. The range of temperature in the lithium titanate of the blanket module is assumed from 550 K to 1200 K. These results suggest that the tritium produced in the blanket is partly not desorbed. Thus, the spatial distribution of temperature in the blanket has to be controlled for the tritium to be desorbed during the operation. The desorption spectra of deuterium in Li2TiO3 were similar to those of Li. This suggests that most of implanted deuterium is trapped in forms of Li-D and Li-OD. Based upon the

  12. Perspectives of fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New and practically inexhaustible sources of energy must be developed for the period when oil, coal and uranium will become scarce and expensive. Nuclear fusion holds great promise as one of these practically inexhaustible energy sources. Based on the deuteriumtritium reaction with tritium obtained from naturally occuring lithium, which is also widely available in Europe, the accessible energy resources in the world are 3.1012 to 3.1016 toe; based on the deuterium-deuterium reaction, the deuterium content of the oceans corresponds to 1020 toe. It is presently envisaged that in order to establish fusion as a large-scale energy source, three major thresholds must be reached: - Scientific feasibility, - Technical feasibility, i.e. the proof that the basic technical problems of the fusion reactor can be solved. - Commercial feasibility, i.e. proof that fusion power reactors can be built on an industrial scale, can be operated reliably and produce usable energy at prices competitive with other energy sources. From the above it is clear that the route to commercial fusion will be long and costly and involve the solution of extremely difficult technical problems. In view of the many steps which have to be taken, it appears unlikely that commercial fusion power will be in general use within the next 50 years and by that time world-wide expenditure on research, development and demonstration may well have exceeded 100 Bio ECU. (author)

  13. Nuclear Data Libraries for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL-3). Summary report from the Second Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second Research Co-ordination Meeting of the Nuclear Data Libraries for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL - 3) was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 23 to 26 March 2010. A summary of the meeting is given in this report along with the discussions which took place. An important outcome of the meeting was the decision to provide ENDF data libraries (FENDL-3/T) by April 2011. Finally, a list of task assignments was prepared together with the plan for future CRP activities. (author)

  14. Summary report from 1. research coordination meeting on nuclear data libraries for advance systems - fusion devices (FENDL - 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Research Co-ordination Meeting of the Nuclear Data Libraries for Advance Systems - Fusion Devices (FENDL - 3) was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 2 to 5 December 2008. A summary of the meeting is given in this report along with discussions which took place. An important outcome of the meeting was the agreement to create a new FENDL-3.0 Starter Library. Finally, a list of task assignments was prepared together with the plan for future CRP activities. (author)

  15. Conceptual design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) based on an advanced scenario of plasma operation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which is being developed at JAERI as a next-generation tokamak following JT-60 has the major purpose of realizing a self-ignited, long-burning DT plasma and demonstrating engineering feasibility. The paper emphasizes the advanced scenario of FER plasma operation and control and the advantage in engineering design made possible by the scenario. The FER concept is discussed, which is based on quasi-steady-state operation by a lower-hybrid-wave current drive or steady-state operation by three candidate radiofrequency waves, impurity control by a cold and dense divertor plasma and vertical position control of a highly elongated plasma. (author)

  16. Advances on the clinical applications of the image fusion techniques in coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of coronary heart disease increasingly depends on referring and combining the information from a variety of imaging techniques. The fusion imaging of the anatomy and function provides a convenient 'one stop' examination which improves the existing imaging examination process. The development of the image fusion techniques, such as SPECT/coronary angiography, SPECT/CT, especially PET/CT, has shown a larger value in the diagnosis, risk stratification, clinical treatment guidance and efficacy prognosis of coronary heart disease than a single imaging examination, while the more complete data of the image and the quantitative analysis provide more useful information for the clinic. (authors)

  17. Economic analysis of advanced fuel fusion reactors and derivation of scaling law for COE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Social acceptance of fusion reactors depends largely on their economic viability. To investigate this issue, we estimate and compare the cost of electricity (COE) among D-T, D-3He, and D-D fusion reactors. Three types of confinement systems are evaluated: the tokamak reactor (TR), the spherical tokamak reactor (STR), and helical reactor (HR). For each reactor type, COE parameter surveys are performed and new scaling laws for COE are derived. The COE for D-3He and D-D is high and depends more strongly on plasma beta value and maximum magnetic field strength than that of D-T. (author)

  18. Studies on advanced superconductors for fusion device. Pt. 1. Present status of Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Kyoji; Yamamoto, Junya [eds.

    1996-03-01

    Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors have been developed with great expectation as an advanced high-field superconductor to be used in fusion devices of next generation. Furthermore, Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors are being developed for NMR magnet and superconducting generator as well as for cryogen-free superconducting magnet. A variety of fabrication procedures, such as bronze process, internal tin process and Nb tube method, have been developed based on the diffusion reaction. Recently, Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors with ultra-thin filaments have been fabricated for AC use. Both high-field and AC performances of Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors have been significantly improved by alloying addition. The Ti-doped Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor has generated 21.5T at 1.8K operation. This report summarizes manufacturing procedures, superconducting performances and applications of Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors fabricated through different processes in different countries. More detailed subjects included in this report are high-field properties, AC properties, conductors for fusion with large current capacities, stress-strain effect and irradiation effect as well as standardization of critical current measurement method regarding to Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors. Comprehensive grasp on the present status of Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors provided by this report will act as a useful data base for the future planning of fusion devices. (author). 172 refs.

  19. The HiPER project for inertial confinement fusion and some experimental results on advanced ignition schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the goals and some of the results of experiments conducted within the Working Package 10 (Fusion Experimental Programme) of the HiPER Project. These experiments concern the study of the physics connected to 'advanced ignition schemes', i.e. the fast ignition and the shock ignition approaches to inertial fusion. Such schemes are aimed at achieving a higher gain, as compared with the classical approach which is used in NIF, as required for future reactors, and make fusion possible with smaller facilities. In particular, a series of experiments related to fast ignition were performed at the RAL (UK) and LULI (France) Laboratories and studied the propagation of fast electrons (created by a short-pulse ultra-high-intensity beam) in compressed matter, created either by cylindrical implosions or by compression of planar targets by (planar) laser-driven shock waves. A more recent experiment was performed at PALS and investigated the laser–plasma coupling in the 1016 W cm−2 intensity regime of interest for shock ignition.

  20. The HiPER project for inertial confinement fusion and some experimental results on advanced ignition schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batani, D.; Koenig, M.; Baton, S.; Perez, F.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Honrubia, J.; Antonelli, L.; Morace, A.; Volpe, L.; Santos, J.; Schurtz, G.; Hulin, S.; Ribeyre, X.; Fourment, C.; Nicolai, P.; Vauzour, B.; Gremillet, L.; Nazarov, W.; Pasley, J.; Richetta, M.; Lancaster, K.; Spindloe, Ch; Tolley, M.; Neely, D.; Kozlová, M.; Nejdl, J.; Rus, B.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Dorchies, F.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the goals and some of the results of experiments conducted within the Working Package 10 (Fusion Experimental Programme) of the HiPER Project. These experiments concern the study of the physics connected to 'advanced ignition schemes', i.e. the fast ignition and the shock ignition approaches to inertial fusion. Such schemes are aimed at achieving a higher gain, as compared with the classical approach which is used in NIF, as required for future reactors, and make fusion possible with smaller facilities. In particular, a series of experiments related to fast ignition were performed at the RAL (UK) and LULI (France) Laboratories and studied the propagation of fast electrons (created by a short-pulse ultra-high-intensity beam) in compressed matter, created either by cylindrical implosions or by compression of planar targets by (planar) laser-driven shock waves. A more recent experiment was performed at PALS and investigated the laser-plasma coupling in the 1016 W cm-2 intensity regime of interest for shock ignition.

  1. Developing the Pulsed Fission-Fusion (PuFF) Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert B.; Cassibry, Jason; Bradley, David; Fabisinski, Leo; Statham, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    In September 2013 the NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) organization awarded a phase I contract to the PuFF team. Our phase 1 proposal researched a pulsed fission-fusion propulsion system that compressed a target of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) as a mixture in a column, surrounded concentrically by Uranium. The target is surrounded by liquid lithium. A high power current would flow down the liquid lithium and the resulting Lorentz force would compress the column by roughly a factor of 10. The compressed column would reach criticality and a combination of fission and fusion reactions would occur. Our Phase I results, summarized herein, review our estimates of engine and vehicle performance, our work to date to model the fission-fusion reaction, and our initial efforts in experimental analysis.

  2. US Scientific Discory through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program & Fusion Energy Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. Tang

    2007-01-01

    @@ The development of a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable is a truly formidable scientific and technological challenge facing the world in the twenty-first century. This demands basic scientific understanding that can enable the innovations to make fusion energy practical.

  3. Development of neutron spectrometer toward deuterium plasma diagnostics in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron spectrometer based on coincident counting of associated particles has been developed for deuterium plasma diagnostics on Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science. Efficient detection of 2.5 MeV neutron with high energy resolution would be achievable by coincident detection of a scattered neutron and a recoiled proton associated with an elastic scattering of incident neutron in a plastic scintillator as a radiator. The calculated neutron spectra from deuterium plasma heated by neutral beam injection indicate that the energy resolution of better than 7% is required for the spectrometer to evaluate energetic deuterium confinement. By using a prototype of the proposed spectrometer, the energy resolution of 6.3% and the detection efficiency of 3.3x10-7 count/neutron were experimentally demonstrated for 2.5 MeV monoenergetic neutron, respectively.

  4. Recent findings on blistering and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high-fluence deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    features of microstructure. For plasma exposure at 315 K, blistering occurred more significantly on the un-recrystallized and single crystal W samples than the partially and fully recrystallized W samples. The un-recrystallized W sample showed the largest retention ratio at the same fluence. Preliminary PA measurements suggested the possibility of vacancy generation in the near-surface region of tungsten due to the deuterium plasma exposure. References: [1]W.M. Shu, et al., Nucl. Fusion 47 (2007) 201-209. [2]W.M. Shu, et al., Phys. Scr. T128 (2007) 96-99. (authors)

  5. Demonstrating a Target Supply for Inertial Fusion Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A central feature of an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plant is a target that has been compressed and heated to fusion conditions by the energy input of the driver. The technology to economically manufacture and then position cryogenic targets at chamber center is at the heart of future IFE power plants. For direct drive IFE (laser fusion), energy is applied directly to the surface of a spherical CH polymer capsule containing the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion fuel at approximately 18K. For indirect drive (heavy ion fusion, HIF), the target consists of a similar fuel capsule within a cylindrical metal container or 'hohlraum' which converts the incident driver energy into x-rays to implode the capsule. For either target, it must be accurately delivered to the target chamber center at a rate of about 5-10Hz, with a precisely predicted target location. Future successful fabrication and injection systems must operate at the low cost required for energy production (about $0.25/target, about 104 less than current costs). Z-pinch driven IFE (ZFE) utilizes high current pulses to compress plasma to produce x-rays that indirectly heat a fusion capsule. ZFE target technologies utilize a repetition rate of about 0.1 Hz with a higher yield.This paper provides an overview of the proposed target methodologies for laser fusion, HIF, and ZFE, and summarizes advances in the unique materials science and technology development programs

  6. Analysis of the requirements for economic magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A generic reactor model is used to examine the economic viability of electricity generation by magnetic fusion. The simple model uses components which are representative of those used in previous reactor studies of deuterium-tritium burning tokamaks, stellarators, bumpy tori, reverse field pinches and tandem mirrors. Conservative costing assumptions are made. The generic reactor is not a tokamak but rather it is intended to emphasize what is common to all magnetic fusion reactors. The reactor uses a superconducting toroidal coil set to produce the dominant magnetic field. To this extent it is a less good approximation to systems, such as the reversed field pinch in which the main field is produced by a plasma current. The main output of the study is the cost of electricity as a function of the weight and size of the fusion core - blanket, shield, structure and coils. The model shows that a 1200 MW/sub e/ power plant with a fusion core weight of about 10,000 tonnes should be competitive in the future with fission and fossil plants. Sensitivity studies of varying the assumptions show that this result is not sensitively dependent on any given assumption. Of particular importance is the result that this scale of fusion reactor may be realized with only moderate advances in physics and technology capabilities. For a fusion-fission hybrid with a high support ratio for fission reactors, the fusion island is not such a critical driver as for electricity production. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Advances in HYDRA and its applications to simulations of inertial confinement fusion targets

    OpenAIRE

    Marinak M.M.; Kerbel G.D.; Koning J.M.; Patel M.V.; Sepke S.M.; McKinley M.S.; O'Brien M.J.; Procassini R.J.; Munro D.

    2013-01-01

    A new set of capabilities has been implemented in the HYDRA 2D/3D multiphysics inertial confinement fusion simulation code. These include a Monte Carlo particle transport library. It models transport of neutrons, gamma rays and light ions, as well as products they generate from nuclear and coulomb collisions. It allows accurate simulations of nuclear diagnostic signatures from capsule implosions. We apply it to here in a 3D simulation of a National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition capsule whi...

  8. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samulyak, Roman V. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  9. Deuterium effects in cancer biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its discovery many experiments were conducted for explaining the effects of deuterium on biological systems. It was observed, in many studies, that by increasing the deuterium concentration, structural, metabolic and functional alterations at different extents are produced, which can lead to organism's death. On the other hand effects of concentration reduction are much less studied. Existing data in literature, with regard to intrinsic deuterium reduction effects on different carcinomas are rather scarce. In vitro studies of deuterium level reduction has evidenced an inhibiting effect upon the cellular proliferation in different tumoral cellular lines: M14 cellular lines (human melanoma), PC3 (prostate cancer) and MCF7 (breast cancer). In vivo researches made on experimental tumours, have shown that the deuterium level reduction determines partial or complete regressions in xenotransplanted tumours, while in veterinary oncological clinic, partial or total tumoral regression were observed in different spontaneous tumours in dogs and cats. (authors)

  10. Deuterium Retention and Physical Sputtering of Low Activation Ferritic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    T, Hino; K, Yamaguchi; Y, Yamauchi; Y, Hirohata; K, Tsuzuki; Y, Kusama

    2005-04-01

    Low activation materials have to be developed toward fusion demonstration reactors. Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate materials of the first wall, vacuum vessel and blanket components, respectively. Although changes of mechanical-thermal properties owing to neutron irradiation have been investigated so far, there is little data for the plasma material interactions, such as fuel hydrogen retention and erosion. In the present study, deuterium retention and physical sputtering of low activation ferritic steel, F82H, were investigated by using deuterium ion irradiation apparatus. After a ferritic steel sample was irradiated by 1.7 keV D+ ions, the weight loss was measured to obtain the physical sputtering yield. The sputtering yield was 0.04, comparable to that of stainless steel. In order to obtain the retained amount of deuterium, technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was employed to the irradiated sample. The retained deuterium desorbed at temperature ranging from 450 K to 700 K, in the forms of DHO, D2, D2O and hydrocarbons. Hence, the deuterium retained can be reduced by baking with a relatively low temperature. The fluence dependence of retained amount of deuterium was measured by changing the ion fluence. In the ferritic steel without mechanical polish, the retained amount was large even when the fluence was low. In such a case, a large amount of deuterium was trapped in the surface oxide layer containing O and C. When the fluence was large, the thickness of surface oxide layer was reduced by the ion sputtering, and then the retained amount in the oxide layer decreased. In the case of a high fluence, the retained amount of deuterium became comparable to that of ferritic steel with mechanical polish or SS 316L, and one order of magnitude smaller than that of graphite. When the ferritic steel is used, it is required to remove the surface oxide layer for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention. Ferritic steel sample was

  11. Cosmic Deuterium and Social Networking Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Suer, T.-A.; Lubowich, D. A.; Glaisyer, T.

    2006-08-01

    For the education of newcomers to a scientific field and for the convenience of students and workers in the field, it is helpful to have all the basic scientific papers gathered. For the study of deuterium in the Universe, in 2004-5 we set up http://www.cosmicdeuterium.info with clickable links to all the historic and basic papers in the field and to many of the current papers. Cosmic deuterium is especially important because all deuterium in the Universe was formed in the epoch of nucleosynthesis in the first 1000 seconds after the Big Bang, so study of its relative abundance (D:H~1:100,000) gives us information about those first minutes of the Universe's life. Thus the understanding of cosmic deuterium is one of the pillars of modern cosmology, joining the cosmic expansion, the 3 degree cosmic background radiation, and the ripples in that background radiation. Studies of deuterium are also important for understanding Galactic chemical evolution, astrochemistry, interstellar processes, and planetary formation. Some papers had to be scanned while others are available at the Astrophysical Data System, adswww.harvard.edu, or to publishers' Websites. By 2006, social networking software (http:tinyurl.com/ zx5hk) had advanced with popular sites like facebook.com and MySpace.com; the Astrophysical Data System had even set up MyADS. Social tagging software sites like http://del.icio.us have made it easy to share sets of links to papers already available online. We have set up http://del.icio.us/deuterium to provide links to many of the papers on cosmicdeuterium.info, furthering previous del.icio.us work on /eclipses and /plutocharon. It is easy for the site owner to add links to a del.icio.us site; it takes merely clicking on a button on the browser screen once the site is opened and the desired link is viewed in a browser. Categorizing different topics by keywords allows subsets to be easily displayed. The opportunity to expose knowledge and build an ecosystem of web

  12. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing

  13. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92196 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  14. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  15. Ignition of deuterium based fuel cycles in a high beta system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A steady state self-consistent plasma modeling applied to a system having close to unity, such as FRC or like, is found to be quite effective in solving the problems independently of any anomalous process and proves the existence of ignited state of deuterium based fuel cycles. The temperature ranges that the plasma falls into ignited state are obtained as a function of relative feeding rates of tritium and 3He to deuterium's. We find pure DD cycle will not ignite so that 3He or/and tritium must be added as catalyzer to achieve ignition. Standing on the points to construct a cleaner system yielding smaller amount of 14 MeV neutrons and to burn the fuel in steady state for long periods of time, we have confirmed superiority of the complex composed of the master reactor of 3He-Cat.D cycle (catalyzed DD cycle reinjecting only fusion produced 3He) and the satellite reactor of 3He enriched D3He cycle. In case storage of tritium for 3He by β- decay is turned out not to be allowed environmentally, we may utilize conventional catalyzed DD cycle although 14 MeV neutron yields will be increased by 35 % over the complex. It is demonstrated that advanced fuel cycle reactors can be very simple in constructions and compact in size such that the field strength and the plasma volume of the order of JT-60's may be enough for 1000 MW power plant. (author)

  16. Direct Fusion Drive for a Human Mars Orbital Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paluszek, Michael [Princeton Satellite Systems; Pajer, Gary [Princeton Satellite Systems; Razin, Yosef [Princeton Satellite Systems; Slonaker, James [Princeton Satellite Systems; Cohen, Samuel [PPPL; Feder, Russ [PPPL; Griffin, Kevin [Princeton University; Walsh, Matthew [Princeton University

    2014-08-01

    The Direct Fusion Drive (DFD) is a nuclear fusion engine that produces both thrust and electric power. It employs a field reversed configuration with an odd-parity rotating magnetic field heating system to heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. The engine uses deuterium and helium-3 as fuel and additional deuterium that is heated in the scrape-off layer for thrust augmentation. In this way variable exhaust velocity and thrust is obtained.

  17. Muon Capture in Deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, P; Mosconi, B; Smejkal, J

    2009-01-01

    Model dependence of the capture rates of the negative muon capture in deuterium is studied starting from potential models and the weak two-body meson exchange currents constructed in the tree approximation and also from an effective field theory. The tree one-boson exchange currents are derived from the hard pion chiral Lagrangians of the $N \\Delta \\pi \\rho \\omega a_1$ system. If constructed in conjunction with the one-boson exchange potentials, the capture rates can be calculated consistently. On the other hand, the effective field theory currents, constructed within the heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, contain a low energy constant $\\hat d ^R$ that cannot be extracted from data at the one-particle level nor determined from the first principles. Comparative analysis of the results for the doublet transition rate allows us to extract the constant $\\hat d ^R$.

  18. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  19. Advances in inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory-temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  20. In-Service Design and Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report on ''In-Service Design and Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation'' (DE-FG03-01ER54632) consists of a series of summaries of work that has been published, or presented at meetings, or both. It briefly describes results on the following topics: (1) A Transport and Fate Model for Helium and Helium Management; (2) Atomistic Studies of Point Defect Energetics, Dynamics and Interactions; (3) Multiscale Modeling of Fracture consisting of: (3a) A Micromechanical Model of the Master Curve (MC) Universal Fracture Toughness-Temperature Curve Relation, KJc(T - To), (3b) An Embrittlement DTo Prediction Model for the Irradiation Hardening Dominated Regime, (3c) Non-hardening Irradiation Assisted Thermal and Helium Embrittlement of 8Cr Tempered Martensitic Steels: Compilation and Analysis of Existing Data, (3d) A Model for the KJc(T) of a High Strength NFA MA957, (3e) Cracked Body Size and Geometry Effects of Measured and Effective Fracture Toughness-Model Based MC and To Evaluations of F82H and Eurofer 97, (3f) Size and Geometry Effects on the Effective Toughness of Cracked Fusion Structures; (4) Modeling the Multiscale Mechanics of Flow Localization-Ductility Loss in Irradiation Damaged BCC Alloys; and (5) A Universal Relation Between Indentation Hardness and True Stress-Strain Constitutive Behavior. Further details can be found in the cited references or presentations that generally can be accessed on the internet, or provided upon request to the authors. Finally, it is noted that this effort was integrated with our base program in fusion materials, also funded by the DOE OFES

  1. Studies on advanced superconductors for fusion device. Pt. 2. Metallic superconductors other than Nb{sub 3}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, K.; Yamamoto, J.; Mito, T. [eds.

    1997-03-01

    A comprehensive report on the present status of the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors was published as the NIFS-MEMO-20 in March, 1996 (Part 1 of this report series). The second report of this study covers various progress so far achieved in the research and development on advanced metallic superconductors other than Nb{sub 3}Sn. Among different A15 crystal-type compounds, Nb{sub 3}Al has been fabricated into cables with large current-carrying capacity for fusion device referring its smaller sensitivity to mechanical strain than Nb{sub 3}Sn. Other high-field A15 superconductors, e.g. V{sub 3}Ga, Nb{sub 3}Ge and Nb{sub 3}(Al,Ge), have been also fabricated through different novel processes as promising alternatives to Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors. Meanwhile, B1 crystal-type NbN and C15 crystal-type V{sub 2}(Hf,Zr) high-field superconductors are characterized by their excellent tolerance to mechanical strain and neutron irradiation. Chevrel-type PbMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} compound has gained much interests due to its extremely high upper critical field. In addition, this report includes the recent progress in ultra-fine filamentary NbTi wires for AC use, and that in NbTi/Cu magnetic shields necessary in the application of high magnetic field. The data on the decay of radioactivity in a variety of metals relating to fusion superconducting magnet are also attached as appendices. We hope that this report might contribute substantially as a useful reference for the planning of fusion apparatus of next generation as well as that of other future superconducting devices. (author)

  2. Targeting leukemic fusion proteins with small interfering RNAs: recent advances and therapeutic potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria THOMAS; Johann GREIL; Olaf HEIDENREICH

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference has become an indispensable research tool to study gene functions in a wide variety of organisms.Because of their high efficacy and specificity,RNA interference-based approaches may also translate into new therapeutic strategies to treat human diseases.In particular,oncogenes such as leukemic fusion proteins,which arise from chromosomal translocations,are promising targets for such gene silencing approaches,because they are exclusively expressed in precancerous and cancerous tissues,and because they are frequently indispensable for maintaining the malignant phenotype.This review summarizes recent developments in targeting leukemia-specific genes and discusses problems and approaches for possible clinical applications.

  3. Introduction condition of a tokamak fusion power plant as an advanced technology in world energy scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study reveals the following two introduction conditions of a tokamak fusion power plant in a long term world energy scenario. The first condition is the electric breakeven condition, which is required for the fusion energy to be recognized as a suitable candidate of an alternative energy source in the long term world energy scenario. As for the plasma performance (normalized beta value βN, confinement improvement factor for H-mode HH, the ratio of plasma density to Greenwald density limit fnGW), the electric breakeven condition requires the simultaneous achievement of 1.2NGWtmax=16 T, thermal efficiency ηe=30%, and current drive power PNBIN∼1.8, HH∼1.0, and fnGW∼0.9, which correspond to the ITER reference operation parameters, have a strong potential to achieve the electric breakeven condition. The second condition is the economic breakeven condition, which is required to be selected as an alternative energy source. By using a long term world energy and environment model, the potential of the fusion energy in the long term world energy scenario is being investigated. Under the constraint of 550 ppm CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, a breakeven price for introduction of the fusion energy in the year 2050 is estimated from 65mill/kWh to 135mill/kWh, which is considered as the economic breakeven condition in the present study. Under the conditions of Btmax=16T, ηe=40%, plant availability 60%, and a radial build with/without CS coil, the economic breakeven condition requires βN∼2.5 for 135mill/kWh of higher breakeven price case and βN∼6.0 for 65mill/kWh of lower breakeven price case. Finally, the demonstration of steady state operation with βN∼3.0 in the ITER project leads to the prospect to achieve the upper region of breakeven price in the world energy scenario. (author)

  4. Advances in HYDRA and its applications to simulations of inertial confinement fusion targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinak M.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new set of capabilities has been implemented in the HYDRA 2D/3D multiphysics inertial confinement fusion simulation code. These include a Monte Carlo particle transport library. It models transport of neutrons, gamma rays and light ions, as well as products they generate from nuclear and coulomb collisions. It allows accurate simulations of nuclear diagnostic signatures from capsule implosions. We apply it to here in a 3D simulation of a National Ignition Facility (NIF ignition capsule which models the full capsule solid angle. This simulation contains a severely rough ablator perturbation and provides diagnostics signatures of capsule failure due to excessive instability growth.

  5. Advances in HYDRA and its applications to simulations of inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new set of capabilities has been implemented in the HYDRA 2D/3D multiphysics inertial confinement fusion simulation code. These include a Monte Carlo particle transport library. It models transport of neutrons, gamma rays and light ions, as well as products they generate from nuclear and coulomb collisions. It allows accurate simulations of nuclear diagnostic signatures from capsule implosions. We apply it to here in a 3D simulation of a National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition capsule which models the full capsule solid angle. This simulation contains a severely rough ablator perturbation and provides diagnostics signatures of capsule failure due to excessive instability growth. (authors)

  6. Hard-core deuterium fibre Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel fusion concept is considered, related to present day deuterium fibre pinch experiments. The hard core is allowed to persist during the discharge, being completely ablated only at the end of the pulse. The Lawson requirement ητΕ> 1022M-3s for the catalysed D-D reaction is exceeded at a plasma temperature >30 keV by using high power generators with short pulse times of order a few ns. (au)

  7. Feature-level fusion of laser scanner and video data for advanced driver assistance systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kämpchen, Nico

    2007-01-01

    Advanced driver assistance systems aim at an improved traffic safety, enhanced comfort and driving pleasure. Sensors perceive the objects surrounding the vehicle and produce an environment description. The assistance systems support the driver by assessing the situation recognized by this vehicle environment description. Current research in the area of advanced driver assistance systems aims at increased functionality. Comfort systems, such as the ACC, are expected to support the driver not o...

  8. Recent advances in high current vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Qi Nian Sheng; Prasad, R R; Krishnan, M S; Anders, A; Kwan, J; Brown, I

    2001-01-01

    For a heavy ion fusion induction linac driver, a source of heavy ions with charge states 1+-3+, approx 0.5 A current beams, approx 20 mu s pulse widths and approx 10 Hz repetition rates is required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program to date, but suffer from heating problems for large areas and contamination. They are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states in short and long pulse bursts and high beam current density. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications was investigated. We have modifie...

  9. The advanced 3D method for activation analysis of fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method allows analyzing the complex objects activated by neutrons (e.g. fusion reactors) combining advantages of the 3D radiation transport by MCNP program with calculations of multiple activation and radioactive decay chains by FISPACT program. The problem of preparing the gamma-ray sources in cells of 3D geometry was solved by creation of an interface between the MCNP and FISPACT programs. The interface allows optimizing the process of activation analysis by revealing dominant sources of radiation. The developed interface essentially reduces the time needed for calculations. The main advantage of the method is realization of so-called 'multibox' procedure for decay gamma source sampling during decay gamma transport in very large and complex fusion reactor models. Shutdown dose rate calculations are faster (up to 600 times in ITER cryostat) in comparison with applied MCNP standard source definition by using an external user-supplied source subroutine of the 'multibox' procedure. The offered method is intended for solution of the activation tasks with deep penetration of radiation. The method was used in the engineering design of ITER-FEAT and RF DEMO-S

  10. D-D nuclear fusion processes induced in polyethylene foams by TW Laser-generated plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deuterium-Deuterium fusion processes were generated by focusing the 3 TW PALS Laser on solid deuterated polyethylene targets placed in vacuum. Deuterium ion acceleration of the order of 4 MeV was obtained using laser irradiance Iλ2 ∼ 5 × 1016 W μm2/cm2 on the target. Thin and thick targets, at low and high density, were irradiated and plasma properties were monitored “on line” and “off line”. The ion emission from plasma was monitored with Thomson Parabola Spectrometer, track detectors and ion collectors. Fast semiconductor detectors based on SiC and fast plastic scintillators, both employed in time-of-flight configuration, have permitted to detect the characteristic 3.0 MeV protons and 2.45 MeV neutrons emission from the nuclear fusion reactions. From massive absorbent targets we have evaluated the neutron flux by varying from negligible values up to about 5 × 107 neutrons per laser shot in the case of foams targets, indicating a reaction rate of the order of 108 fusion events per laser shot using “advanced targets”.

  11. Advances in compact proton spectrometers for inertial-confinement fusion and plasma nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact wedge-range-filter proton spectrometers cover proton energies ∼3–20 MeV. They have been used at the OMEGA laser facility for more than a decade for measuring spectra of primary D3He protons in D3He implosions, secondary D3He protons in DD implosions, and ablator protons in DT implosions; they are now being used also at the National Ignition Facility. The spectra are used to determine proton yields, shell areal density at shock-bang time and compression-bang time, fuel areal density, and implosion symmetry. There have been changes in fabrication and in analysis algorithms, resulting in a wider energy range, better accuracy and precision, and better robustness for survivability with indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments.

  12. An Overview of High Energy Short Pulse Technology for Advanced Radiography of Laser Fusion Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C J; Key, M; Britten, J; Beach, R; Beer, G; Brown, C; Bryan, S; Caird, J; Carlson, T; Crane, J; Dawson, J; Erlandson, A C; Fittinghoff, D; Hermann, M; Hoaglan, C; Iyer, A; Jones, L; Jovanovic, I; Komashko, A; Landen, O; Liao, Z; Molander, W; Mitchell, A; Moses, E; Nielsen, N; Nguyen, H; Nissen, J; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Risinger, L; Rushford, M; Skulina, K; Spaeth, M; Stuart, B; Tietbohl, G; Wattellier, B

    2004-06-18

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF-class, Nd:glass laser systems are reviewed. High energy short pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on the NIF. Development of meter-scale, high efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of HEPW pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fiber-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for high energy petawatt pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  13. Catalyzed deuterium fueled tandem mirror reactor assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was part of a Department of Energy supported alternate fusion fuels program at Science Applications International Corp. The purpose of this portion of the study is to perform an assessment of a conceptual tandem mirror reactor (TMR) that is fueled by the catalyzed-deuterium (Cat-d) fuel cycle with respect to the physics, technology, safety, and cost. Achievable stable betas and magnet configurations are found to be comparable for the Cat-d and d-t fueled TMR. A comparison with respect to cost, reactor performance, and technology requirements for a Cat-d fueled reactor and a comparable d-t fueled reactor such as MARS is also made

  14. A burning plasma program strategy to advance fusion energy. Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, Burning Plasma Strategy Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-09-01

    Fusion energy shows great promise to contribute to securing the energy future of humanity. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are strong reasons to pursue fusion energy now. The world effort to develop fusion energy is at the threshold of a new stage in its research: the investigation of burning plasmas. This investigation, at the frontier of the physics of complex systems, would be a huge step in establishing the potential of magnetic fusion energy to contribute to the world’s energy security. The defining feature of a burning plasma is that it is self-heated: the 100 million degree temperature of the plasma is maintained mainly by the heat generated by the fusion reactions themselves, as occurs in burning stars. The fusion-generated alpha particles produce new physical phenomena that are strongly coupled together as a nonlinear complex system. Understanding all elements of this system poses a major challenge to fundamental plasma physics. The technology needed to produce and control a burning plasma presents challenges in engineering science similarly essential to the development of fusion energy.

  15. Nuclear fusion: sixty years of efforts, great advances and challenges. May nuclear fusion replace fossil energies? The Grail which makes start-ups dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first article proposes an overview of sixty years of researches, investments and realisations aimed at a better knowledge and control of nuclear fusion to solve the Planet's energy problems. After a brief overview of the Sun as an example, and while presenting the principle of magnetic fusion in a tokamak, some key figures illustration the development of ITER, the authors describe magnetic fusion as the royal road to nuclear fusion (challenges for the ITER project, development of Stellarator as a concurrent of tokamaks), and inertial fusion as an alternate approach (principle, military interest, plasma physics). They also indicate other approaches based on a change of energy source, a change in ignition process, or a change in fuel. In a second article, the author discusses the economic perspectives of nuclear fusion: a supposed unlimited fuel, existence of radioactive releases and pollution, operation risks and costs, technical challenges to be faced, a development to be amortised on more than a century except if more compact processes are elaborated and developed. The author also discusses issues of profitability and of proliferation. The third and last article comments the existence of many start-ups, notably financed by Silicon Valley rich companies, which invest in researches and projects on nuclear fusion. They try to develop more compact systems, and aim at manufacturing their first prototypes by 2020. On the other side, academics remain doubtful about their ability to reach their objectives

  16. Deuterium inventory in tungsten after plasma exposure. A microstructural survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten is a promising material for armouring the plasma-facing wall of future nuclear fusion experiments and power plants. It has a very high melting point, good thermal conductivity and is highly resistant against physical sputtering by energetic particles from the plasma. It also has a very low solubility for hydrogen isotopes. This is important both for safety and also for economic reasons, in particular with regard to the radioactive fusion fuel tritium. Due to this low solubility, the retention of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten materials after exposure to a plasma is dominated by the trapping of hydrogen isotopes at tungsten lattice defects. Therefore, a strong dependence of the hydrogen isotope retention on the microstructure of the tungsten is to be expected. This work describes a survey study of tungsten with different microstructures exposed to deuterium plasmas under a wide range of different plasma exposure conditions. The isotope deuterium was used because its natural abundance is much smaller than that of hydrogen (i.e., 1H). This allows detecting even very small amounts retained in the tungsten practically without background signal. Furthermore, the use of deuterium allows utilising the nuclear reaction 2D(3He,p)4He for depth-resolved quantification of the deuterium inventory up to depths of several microns. In order to standardise the specimens as far as possible, they were all cut from the same initial material from a single manufacturing batch. After a chemo-mechanical polishing procedure, which produces a well-defined surface, the specimens were annealed at either of four different temperatures in order to modify the grain structure and the dislocation density. These were then characterised by scanning electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were subsequently exposed in a fully characterised deuterium plasma source at different specimen temperatures, ion energies and deuterium fluences. In addition to

  17. Materials research for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  18. Cold nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganov, E.N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@coldfusion-power.com [Cold Fusion Power, International (United States); Bavizhev, M.D. [LLC “Radium”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Buryakov, M.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Dabagov, S.B. [RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovatyuk, V.M.; Lobastov, S.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction’s theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300–700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of {sup 4}He{sup ∗}.

  19. Cold nuclear fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, E. N.; Bavizhev, M. D.; Buryakov, M. G.; Dabagov, S. B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Lobastov, S. P.

    2015-07-01

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction's theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300-700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of 4He∗.

  20. Cold nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction’s theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300–700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of 4He∗

  1. Phenomenological nuclear reaction description in deuterium-saturated palladium and synthesized structure in dense deuterium gas under γ-quanta irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observed phenomena on the changes of chemical compositions in our previous reports allowed us to develop a phenomenological nuclear fusion-fission model with taking into consideration the elastic and inelastic scattering of photoprotons and photoneutrons, heating of surrounding deuterium nuclei, following D-D fusion reactions and fission of middle-mass nuclei by 'hot' protons, deuterons and various-energy neutrons. Such chain processes could produce the necessary number of neutrons, 'hot' deuterons for explanation of the observed experimental results. The developed approach can be a basis for creation of deuterated nuclear fission reactors (DNFR) with high-density deuterium gas and so-called deuterated metals. Also, the developed approach can be used for the study of nuclear reactions in high-density deuterium or tritium gases and deuterated metals

  2. Primordial Deuterium Abundance Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A; Takahara, F; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Kegel, Wilhelm H.; Takahara, Fumio

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium abundances measured recently from QSO absorption-line systems lie in the range from 3 10^{-5} to 3 10^{-4}, which shed some questions on standard big bang theory. We show that this discordance may simply be an artifact caused by inadequate analysis ignoring spatial correlations in the velocity field in turbulent media. The generalized procedure (accounting for such correlations) is suggested to reconcile the D/H measurements. An example is presented based on two high-resolution observations of Q1009+2956 (low D/H) [1,2] and Q1718+4807 (high D/H) [8,9]. We show that both observations are compatible with D/H = 4.1 - 4.6 10^{-5}, and thus support SBBN. The estimated mean value = 4.4 10^{-5} corresponds to the baryon-to-photon ratio during SBBN eta = 4.4 10^{-10} which yields the present-day baryon density Omega_b h^2 = 0.015.

  3. 91039: Magnetic fusion: The DOE fusion energy sciences program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowberg, R.E.

    1997-01-24

    For over 40 years, the U.S. has been trying to harness the energy source of the hydrogen bomb to produce electricity. Controlling fusion, the nuclear reaction that powers the sun, requires confining and heating deuterium and tritium nuclei to the point where they will collide (a D-T reaction) producing nuclear energy in a sustained, regulated way. One path to this goal, called magnetic fusion energy (MFE), is to use very strong magnetic fields to confine a deuterium and tritium plasma while heating it to fusion temperatures. The potential benefits from fusion are enormous. The fuel resources are vast. Radioactive waste would be generated from a D-T reaction, but the long term buildup would be orders of magnitude less than that of a comparable fission reactor.

  4. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  5. Advances of direct drive schemes in laser fusion research at ILE Osaka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ILE Osaka is concentrating on the physical elements of fast ignition aiming at the proof of principle for ignition-and-burn of direct-drive laser fusion. A 1PW laser will be introduced to fast ignition experiments by the middle of 2001. A high intensity plasma experimental research system, HIPER, has been in operation for obtaining scientific data base relevant to ignition target. By irradiating a intense short pulse onto a long scale length plasma observed are penetration of a relativistically self-focused laser beam into over-dense region without considerable energy loss in under-dense region, MeV electrons generation with conversion efficiency of 25%, heating of compressed core plasma by irradiating a 100 ps, 1017W/cm2 pulse and 1 ps, 1019W/cm2 pulse. In the hydrodynamic instability, the initial imprint of hydrodynamic instability and Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate at wavelength less than 10 μm have been investigated extensively. (author)

  6. Development of advanced blanket materials for solid breeder blanket of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of advanced solid breeding blanket in the DEMO reactor requires the tritium breeder and neutron multiplier that can withstand the high temperature and high fluence, and the development of such as advanced blanket materials has been carried out by the cooperation activities among JAERI, universities and industries in Japan. The Li2TiO3 pebble fabricated by wet process is a reference material as a tritium breeder, but the stability on high temperature has to be improved for application to DEMO blanket. As one of such the improved materials, TiO2-doped Li2TiO3 pebbles were successfully fabricated and TiO2-doped Li2TiO3 has been studied. For the advanced neutron multiplier, the beryllides that have high melting point and good chemical stability have been studied. Some characterization of Be12Ti was conducted, and it became clear that Be12Ti had lower swelling and tritium inventory than that of beryllium metal. The pebble fabrication study for Be12Ti was also performed and Be12Ti pebbles were successfully fabricated. From these activities, the bright prospect was obtained to realize the DEMO blanket by the application of TiO2-doped Li2TiO3 and beryllides. (author)

  7. Deuterium exchange between hydrofluorocarbons and amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention consists of a process for obtaining a compound enriched in deuterium which comprises the known method of exposing a gaseous hydrofluorocarbon to infrared laser radiation of a predetermined frequency to selectively cause a chemical reaction involving hydrofluorocarbon molecules containing deuterium without substantially affecting hydrofluorocarbon molecules not containing deuterium, thereby producing, as reaction products, a compound enriched in deuterium and hydrofluorocarbon depleted in deuterium; combined with a new method, which comprises enriching the deuterium content of the depleted hydrofluorocarbon by contacting the depleted hydrofluorocarbon with an alkali metal amide and an amine having a concentration of deuterium at least that which will yield an increase in deuterium concentration of the hydrofluorocarbon upon equilibration, whereby the amine becomes depleted in deuterium

  8. Canadian contributions to the safety and environmental aspects of fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since next-step fusion devices will be fuelled with mixtures of tritium and deuterium, the knowledge base and tritium handling experience associated with the operation of CANDU reactors is viewed as relevant to the development of safe fusion technology. Fusion safety issues will be compared with fission safety experience, after which specific Canadian activities in support of fusion safety will be overviewed. In addition, recommendations for appropriate fusion safety criteria will be summarized. 18 refs

  9. Edge Plasma Physics Issues for the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST) in Reactor Relevant Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The issue of First wall materials and compatibility with ITER /DEMO relevant plasmas is among the RD missions for possible new European plasma fusion devices that the FAST project will address. FAST can operate with ITER relevant values of P/R (up to 22 MW/m, against the ITER 24 MW/m, inclusive of the α particles power), thanks to its compactness; thus it can investigate the physics of large heat loads on divertor plates. The FAST divertor will be made of bulk W tiles, for basic operations, but also fully toroidal divertor targets made of liquid lithium (L-Li) are foreseen. To have reliable predictions of the thermal loads on the divertor plates and of the core plasma purity a number of numerical self-consistent simulations have been made for the H-mode and steady-state scenario by using the code COREDIV. This code, already validated in the past on experimental data (namely JET, FTU, Textor), is able to describe self-consistently the core and edge plasma in a tokamak device by imposing the continuity of energy and particle fluxes and of particle densities and temperatures at the separatrix. In the present work the results of such calculations will be illustrated, including heat loads on the divertor. The overall picture shows that, marginally in the intermediate and, necessarily in the high density H-mode scenarios (e>=2 and 5·1020 m-3 respectively), impurity seeding should be foreseen with W as target material: however, only a small amount of Ar (0.03% atomic concentration), not affecting the core purity, is sufficient to maintain the divertor peak loads below 18 MW/m2, that represents the safety limit for the W mono block technology, presently accepted for the ITER divertor tiles. Li always needs additional impurities for decreasing divertor heat loads, the Zeff value being ≤ than 1.8. At low plasma densities (but ≥ 1.3·1020 m-3), typical of steady state regimes, W by alone is effective in dissipating the input power by radiative losses, without excessive

  10. Edge plasma issues of the tokamak FAST (Fusion Advanced Studies Torus) in reactor relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the R and D missions for possible new European plasma fusion devices, the FAST project will address the issue of 'First wall materials and compatibility with ITER /DEMO relevant plasmas'. FAST can operate with ITER relevant values of P/R (up to 22 MW/m, against the ITER 24 MW/m, inclusive of the alpha particles power), thanks to its compactness; thus it can investigate the physics of large heat loads on divertor plates. The FAST divertor will be made of bulk W tiles, for basic operations, but also fully toroidal divertor targets made of liquid lithium (L-Li) are foreseen. Viability tests of such a solution for DEMO divertor will be carried out as final step of an extended program started on FTU tokamak by using a liquid lithium limITER. To have reliable predictions of the thermal loads on the divertor plates and of the core plasma purity a number of numerical self-consistent simulations have been made for the H-mode and steady-state scenario by using the code COREDIV. This code, already validated in the past on experimental data (namely JET, FTU, Textor), is able to describe self-consistently the core and edge plasma in a tokamak device by imposing the continuity of energy and particle fluxes and of particle densities and temperatures at the separatrix. In the present work the results of such calculations will be illustrated, including heat loads on the divertor. The overall picture shows that at the low plasma densities typical of steady state regimes W is effective in dissipating input power by radiative losses, while Li needs additional impurities (Ar, Ne). In the intermediate and, mainly, in the high density H-mode scenarios impurity seeding is needed with either Li or W as target material, but a small (0.08% atomic concentration) amount of Ar, not affecting the core purity, is sufficient to maintain the divertor peak loads below 18 MW/m2 that represents the safety limit for the W monoblock technology, presently accepted for the ITER divertor tiles. The

  11. Magnetically Catalyzed Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Heyl, Jeremy S.; Hernquist, Lars

    1996-01-01

    We calculate the reaction cross-sections for the fusion of hydrogen and deuterium in strong magnetic fields as are believed to exist in the atmospheres of neutron stars. We find that in the presence of a strong magnetic field ($B \\gsim 10^{12}$G), the reaction rates are many orders of magnitude higher than in the unmagnetized case. The fusion of both protons and deuterons are important over a neutron star's lifetime for ultrastrong magnetic fields ($B \\sim 10^{16}$G). The enhancement may have...

  12. Study of Advanced Railgun Hydrogen Pellet Injectors for Fusion Reactor Refueling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tony Levone

    An advanced railgun system has been developed to assess its feasibility as a hypervelocity hydrogen pellet injector for magnetically confined plasmas. It consists of a pellet generator/gas gun assembly for freezing hydrogen pellets and injecting them into the railgun at velocities as high as 1.5 km/s. A plasma armature is formed by ionizing the low-Z propellant gas behind the pellet and firing the railgun. This fuseless operation prevents high-Z impurities from entering the reactor during pellet injection. The railgun system has several features that distinguish it from its predecessors, including: (1) a more compact, versatile pellet generator, (2) a new gas gun configuration that produces significantly higher pellet speeds, (3) a perforated coupling piece between the gas gun and railgun to prevent spurious arcing, and (4) ablation-resistant sidewalls, perforated sidewalls and transaugmentation to reduce inertial and viscous drag, the primary obstacles to achieving hypervelocity. A unique system of sophisticated controls and diagnostics has been assembled to operate the railgun system and assess its performance, including fully automated pellet freezing and gas gun operation, an automatic timing circuit that is immune to mistriggering caused by pellet fragmentation or electromagnetic interference, a streak camera, photostations, light gates, current trans formers, B-dot probes, laser interferometry and optical spectroscopy. Free-arc and hydrogen pellet experiments were conducted to evaluate various railgun designs. Transaugmented and simple railguns 1.2 and 2 m long were tested. The performances of railguns using Mullite, solid Lexan and perforated Lexan sidewalls were compared. The railgun theory of operation and anticipated losses are also examined. The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The advanced railgun system has set several world records for bare hydrogen pellet velocity, including a 3.3 km/s shot on

  13. Advanced materials characterization and modeling using synchrotron, neutron, TEM, and novel micro-mechanical techniques - A European effort to accelerate fusion materials development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Fu, C.-C.; Kaprolat, A.;

    2013-01-01

    For the realization of fusion as an energy source, the development of suitable materials is one of the most critical issues. The required material properties are in many aspects unique compared to the existing solutions, particularly the need for necessary resistance to irradiation with neutrons...... having energies up to 14 MeV. In addition to withstanding the effects of neutrons, the mechanical stability of structural materials has to be maintained up to high temperatures. Plasma-exposed materials must be compatible with the fusion plasma, both with regard to the generation of impurities injected...... as testing under neutron flux-induced conditions. For the realization of a DEMO power plant, the materials solutions must be available in time. The European initiative FEMaS-CA – Fusion Energy Materials Science – Coordination Action – aims at accelerating materials development by integrating advanced...

  14. The Development of RF Heating of Magnetically Confined Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q = 0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed

  15. The development of RF heating of magnetically confined deuterium-tritium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q=0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed

  16. Cold nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In normal temperature condition, the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance method, realize the combination of deuterium and tritium, helium and lithium... And with a magnetic moment of light nuclei controlled cold nuclear collide fusion, belongs to the nuclear energy research and development in the field of applied technology "cold nuclear collide fusion". According to the similarity of the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance system, the different velocity and energy of the ion beam mixing control, developed ion speed dc transformer, it is cold nuclear fusion collide, issue of motivation and the nuclear power plant start-up fusion and power transfer system of the important equipment, so the merger to apply for a patent

  17. Muon catalyzed fusion under compressive conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The viability of a symbiotic combination of Muon Catalyzed Fusion (μCF) and high density generation processes has been investigated. The muon catalyzed fusion reaction rates are formulated in the temperature and density range found under moderate compressive conditions. Simplified energy gain and power balance calculations indicate that significant energy gain occurs only if standard type deuterium-tritium (dt) fusion is ignited. A computer simulation of the hydrodynamics and fusion kinetics of a spherical deuterium-tritium pellet implosion including muons is performed. Using the muon catalyzed fusion reaction rates formulated and under ideal conditions, the pellet ignites (and thus has a significant energy gain) only if the initial muon concentration is approximately 1017 cm-3. The muons need to be delivered to the pellet within a very short-time (≅ 1 ns). The muon pulse required in order to make the high density and temperature muon catalyzed fusion scheme viable is beyond the present technology for muon production. (orig.)

  18. Cost assessment of a generic magnetic fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A generic reactor model is used to examine the economic viability of generating electricity by magnetic fusion. The simple model uses components that are representative of those used in previous reactor studies of deuterium-tritium-burning tokamaks, stellarators, bumpy tori, reversed-field pinches (RFPs), and tandem mirrors. Conservative costing assumptions are made. The generic reactor is not a tokamak; rather, it is intended to emphasize what is common to all magnetic fusion rectors. The reactor uses a superconducting toroidal coil set to produce the dominant magnetic field. To this extent, it is not as good an approximation to systems such as the RFP in which the main field is produced by a plasma current. The main output of the study is the cost of electricity as a function of the weight and size of the fusion core - blanket, shield, structure, and coils. The model shows that a 1200-MW(e) power plant with a fusion core weight of about 10,000 tonnes should be competitive in the future with fission and fossil plants. Studies of the sensitivity of the model to variations in the assumptions show that this result is not sensitively dependent on any given assumption. Of particular importance is the result that a fusion reactor of this scale may be realized with only moderate advances in physics and technology capabilities

  19. Production and injection of hydrogen-deuterium mixed pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mixed solid pellet of hydrogen and deuterium could be produced in the single pellet injector. The pellet is used to examine an improvement of plasma confinement in ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) wave heated discharges. The mixed pellets were maken from the mixed gas with the different ratio of hydrogen to mixed gas (H + D). The composition of the pellet is not equal to that of the mixed gas before freezing. The in-flight mixed pellets with about 769 m/s keep their cylindrical shape, e.g. the pellets are not broken. The present results will indicate the possibility of pellet mixed deuterium and tritium, which will be necessary to in future thermonuclear fusion reactor. (author)

  20. Inelastic x-ray scattering from shocked liquid deuterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S P; Falk, K; Gregori, G; Radha, P B; Hu, S X; Boehly, T R; Crowley, B J B; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Gericke, D O; Döppner, T; Meyerhofer, D D; Murphy, C D; Sangster, T C; Vorberger, J

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation-driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Ly(α) line emission at 2.96 keV. These first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5  eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×10(23)  cm(-3), and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results. PMID:23368573

  1. Deuterium Retention and Microstructural Evolution of D2+ -Irradiated Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: A variety of important characteristics associated with the interaction of hydrogen plasma with the metallic walls of fusion devices are either entirely due to, or at least strongly influenced by surface impurities and chemical composition. Understanding of the roles of additional elements in defect structure evolution and deuterium uptake is important for the design of fusion reactor materials. The influence of deuterium on material microstructure, deuterium trapping and release was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, thermal desorption spectrometry and the nuclear reactions D(3He,p)4He. Reemission, retention and evolution of depth distribution profiles of deuterium in stainless steels (06Kh18Ni10, 08Kh18Ni10Ti, 12Kh18Ni10Ti, the commercially available and modified 316L and Cr12Mn20W2V) were studied for 12 keV D2+ implantation up to 1.1019- 1.1022 D/m2 at room and 600 K temperatures followed by annealing from 290 to 1500 K. Changes in hardness were measured using Vickers hardness indentation. Total amount of retained deuterium in Kh18-Ni10 SS saturated for ion fluencies above 4.0.1021 D/m2 and maximum saturation level was 2.1021 D/m2. The radiation-induced dislocation microstructure had no well-defined influence on the deuterium trapping. The results of performed experiments provide evidence of hydrogen trapping at irradiation vacancies end their complexes. A behavior of the deuterium retention is influenced by the manufacturing process and the sample history of stainless steels. Certain thermo-mechanical treatments stimulate the nucleation of martensitic phase acting as an anomalous strong gas trap, so the retained deuterium desorbs mainly at around 1200 K. (authors)

  2. Data management, code deployment, and scientific visualization to enhance scientific discovery in fusion research through advanced computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term vision of the Fusion Collaboratory described in this paper is to transform fusion research and accelerate scientific understanding and innovation so as to revolutionize the design of a fusion energy source. The Collaboratory will create and deploy collaborative software tools that will enable more efficient utilization of existing experimental facilities and more effective integration of experiment, theory, and modeling. The computer science research necessary to create the Collaboratory is centered on three activities: security, remote and distributed computing, and scientific visualization. It is anticipated that the presently envisioned Fusion Collaboratory software tools will require 3 years to complete

  3. Computer programs for capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes for laser fusion and other advanced technology facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three FORTRAN programs, CAPITAL, VENTURE, and INDEXER, have been developed to automate computations used in assessing the economic viability of proposed or conceptual laser fusion and other advanced-technology facilities, as well as conventional projects. The types of calculations performed by these programs are, respectively, capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes. The codes permit these three topics to be addressed with considerable sophistication commensurate with user requirements and available data

  4. Fokker-Planck Modelling of Delayed Loss of Charged Fusion Products in TFTR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenstrasser, J.W.; Goloborod' ko, V.Ya.; Reznik, S.N.; Yavorskij, V.A.; Zweben, S.

    1998-08-01

    The results of a Fokker-Planck simulation of the ripple-induced loss of charged fusion products in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) are presented. It is shown that the main features of the measured "delayed loss" of partially thermalized fusion products, such as the differences between deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium discharges, the plasma current and major radius dependencies, etc., are in satisfactory agreement with the classical collisional ripple transport mechanism. The inclusion of the inward shift of the vacuum flux surfaces turns out to be necessary for an adequate and consistent explanation of the origin of the partially thermalized fusion product loss to the bottom of TFTR.

  5. Tritium-assisted fusion breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report undertakes a preliminary assessment of the prospects of tritium-assisted D-D fuel cycle fusion breeders. Two well documented fusion power reactor designs - the STARFIRE (D-T fuel cycle) and the WILDCAT (Cat-D fuel cycle) tokamaks - are converted into fusion breeders by replacing the fusion electric blankets with 233U producing fission suppressed blankets; changing the Cat-D fuel cycle mode of operation by one of the several tritium-assisted D-D-based modes of operation considered; adjusting the reactor power level; and modifying the resulting plant cost to account for the design changes. Three sources of tritium are considered for assisting the D-D fuel cycle: tritium produced in the blankets from lithium or from 3He and tritium produced in the client fission reactors. The D-D-based fusion breeders using tritium assistance are found to be the most promising economically, especially the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium mode of operation in which the 3He exhausted from the plasma is converted, by neutron capture in the blanket, into tritium which is in turn fed back to the plasma. The number of fission reactors of equal thermal power supported by Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium fusion breeders is about 50% higher than that of D-T fusion breeders, and the profitability is found to be slightly lower than that of the D-T fusion breeders

  6. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of Fusion Welds Involving Alloys for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    Projections for large increases in the global demand for electric power produced by the burning of fossil fuels, in combination with growing environmental concerns surrounding these fuel sources, have sparked initiatives in the United States, Europe, and Asia aimed at developing a new generation of coal fired power plant, termed Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC). These plants are slated to operate at higher steam temperatures and pressures than current generation plants, and in so doing will offer increased process cycle efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Several gamma' precipitation strengthened Ni-based superalloys have been identified as candidates for the hottest sections of these plants, but the microstructural instability and poor creep behavior (compared to wrought products) of fusion welds involving these alloys present significant hurdles to their implementation and a gap in knowledge that must be addressed. In this work, creep testing and in-depth microstructural characterization have been used to provide insight into the long-term performance of these alloys. First, an investigation of the weld metal microstructural evolution as it relates to creep strength reductions in A-USC alloys INCONELRTM 740, NIMONICRTM 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and HaynesRTM 282RTM (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) was performed. gamma'-precipitate free zones were identified in two of these three alloys, and their development was linked to the evolution of phases that precipitate at the expense of gamma'. Alloy 282 was shown to avoid precipitate free zone formation because the precipitates that form during long term aging in this alloy are poor in the gamma'-forming elements. Next, the microstructural evolution of INCONELRTM 740H (a compositional variant of alloy 740) during creep was investigated. Gleeble-based interrupted creep and creep-rupture testing was used to

  7. Deuterium burning in Jupiter interior

    OpenAIRE

    Coraddu, Massimo; Lissia, Marcello; Mezzorani, Giuseppe; Quarati, Piero

    2001-01-01

    We show that moderate deviations from the Maxwell-Boltzmann energy distribution can increase deuterium reaction rates enough to contribute to the heating of Jupiter. These deviations are compatible with the violation of extensivity expected from temperature and density conditions inside Jupiter.

  8. Solid deuterium centrifuge pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet injectors are needed to fuel long pulse tokamak plasmas and other magnetic confinement devices. For this purpose, an apparatus has been developed that forms 1.3-mm-diam pellets of frozen deuterium at a rate of 40 pellets per second and accelerates them to a speed of 1 km/s. Pellets are formed by extruding a billet of solidified deuterium through a 1.3-mm-diam nozzle at a speed of 5 cm/s. The extruding deuterium is chopped with a razor knife, forming 1.3-mm right circular cylinders of solid deuterium. The pellets are accelerated by synchronously injecting them into a high speed rotating arbor containing a guide track, which carries them from a point near the center of rotation to the periphery. The pellets leave the wheel after 1500 of rotation at double the tip speed. The centrifuge is formed in the shape of a centrifugal catenary and is constructed of high strength KEVLAR/epoxy composite. This arbon has been spin-tested to a tip speed of 1 km/s

  9. Condensed Matter Deuterium Cluster Target for Study of Pycnonuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoling; George, Miley

    2009-11-01

    Fusion reactions have two main classes: thermonuclear and the pycnonuclear. Thermonuclear fusion occurs in low density high temperature plasmas, and is very sensitive to the ion temperature due to Columbic repulsion effects. As the density increases, the Columbic potential barrier is depressed by increased electron screening, allowing fusion at lower temperatures. This type of nuclear reaction is termed a pycnonuclear fusion and is the basis for astrophysical fusion. Ichimarua [1] proposed a laboratory study of this process using explosive mechanical compression of H/D to metallic densities, which would be extremely difficult to implement. Instead, our recent research suggests that metallic-like H/D ``clusters'' can be formed in dislocation loops of thin Palladium foils through electrochemical processes. [2] If this technique is used as a laser compression target, the compressed cluster density would allow study of pycnonuclear reactions. This provides a means of studying astrophysical fusion process, and could also lead to an important non-cryogenic ICF target. [2] [4pt] [1] S. Ichimaru, H. Kitamura. Phys. Plasmas, 6, 2649 (1999) [0pt] [2] G. Miley and X. Yang, Deuterium Cluster Target for Ultra-High Density, 18TH TOFE, San Francisco, CA Sep. 28 -- Oct. 2, 2008

  10. Fusion power for space propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, R.; Rayle, W.; Reinmann, J.

    1972-01-01

    Principles of operation, interplanetary orbit-to-orbit mission capabilities, technical problems, and environmental safeguards are examined for thermonuclear fusion propulsion systems. Two systems examined include (1) a fusion-electric concept in which kinetic energy of charged particles from the plasma is converted into electric power (for accelerating the propellant in an electrostatic thrustor) by the van de Graaf generator principle and (2) the direct fusion rocket in which energetic plasma lost from the reactor has a suitable amount of added propellant to obtain the optimum exhaust velocity. The deuterium-tritium and the deuterium/helium-3 reactions are considered as suitable candidates, and attention is given to problems of cryogenic refrigeration systems, magnet shielding, and high-energy particle extraction and guidance.

  11. Ab initio Methodology for Calculating Elastic Constant and Sound Velocity for Hydrogen and Deuterium in Molecular Solid Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, Carlo; Perlado Martin, Jose Manuel; Cuesta Lopez, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes play a critical role both in inertial and magnetic confinement Nuclear Fusion. Since the preferent fuel needed for this technology is a mixture of deuterium and tritium. The study of these isotopes particularly at very low temperatures carries a technological interest in other applications. The present line promotes a deep study on the structural configuration that hydrogen and deuterium adopt at cryogenic temperatures and at high pressures. Typical conditions occurring in...

  12. Quantification of structural materials for reactor systems: synergy's in materials for fusion/fission reactors and advanced fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear technology a lot of experience has been accumulated meanwhile from reactor programmes for ferritic alloys, austenitic steels and Ni-based alloys as main component materials during R and D, design, construction and operation. Generally materials are a key issue for a safe and reliable operation of -NPPs. Many grades investigated are of interest for the design of GenIVs and fusion reactors. Synergisms of materials, material technologies, mechanical data, corrosion and other topics -for the qualification of materials for nuclear systems are generally discussed and information on a qualification procedure is compiled. Also some lessons learned from fabrication, test programmes or operation of NPPs are provided. A special problem is the fusion system because a final validation for alloy performance in the long term will need irradiation under realistic -fusion condition anticipated in a high-energetic, fusion-specific intense neutron source such as (IFMIF), the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility. (author)

  13. The management of fusion waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion reactors based on the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle will generate radioactive waste as a result of neutron irradiation of the structural materials and absorption of the tritium fuel. An important issue is whether the volume of this waste and the risks associated with it can be reduced to a sufficiently low level that the environmental advantage of fusion can be maintained without incurring unacceptable additional costs. Information is presented on the radioactive waste expected from the decommissioning of three generations of fusion devices - the JET experiment, NET, and power reactors. The characteristics and probable volumes of this waste are considered, together with the risks associated with its disposal. (orig.)

  14. Fusion Canada issue 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Canada-Europe Accords: 5 year R and D collaboration for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) AECL is designated to arrange and implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) while EUROTAM is responsible for operating Europe's Fusion R and D programs plus MOU and EDA. The MOU includes tokamaks, plasma physics, fusion technology, fusion fuels and other approaches to fusion energy (as alternatives to tokamaks). STOR-M Tokamak was restarted at the University of Saskatchewan following upgrades to the plasma chamber to accommodate the Compact Toroid (CT) injector. The CT injector has a flexible attachment thus allowing for injection angle adjustments. Real-time video images of a single plasma discharge on TdeV showing that as the plasma density increases, in a linear ramp divertor, the plasma contact with the horizontal plate decreases while contact increases with the oblique plate. Damage-resistant diffractive optical elements (DOE) have been developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research by Gentac Inc. and the National Optics Institute, laser beam homogeniser and laser harmonic separator DOE can also be made using the same technology. Studies using TdeV indicate that a divertor will be able to pump helium from the tokamak with a detached-plasma divertor but helium extraction performance must first be improved, presently the deuterium:helium retention radio-indicates that in order to pump enough helium through a fusion reactor, too much deuterium-tritium fuel would be pumped out. 2 fig

  15. Water detritiation for present and future fusion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All fusion reactors that use deuterium-tritide (DT) for fuel will produce tritium-containing water. The quantity and quality (tritium per unit volume) of tritiated water produced depends on several factors. In general, however, the higher the reactor availability the greater the quantity and quality of water produced. This water must be collected and processed to avoid worker exposure and release to the environment. The options for disposition of this water are limited, and in more advanced reactors the tritium contained in water could represent a significant loss to the fuel cycle. The technology currently exists or is being developed to support near term, low availability machines. The technology to support more advanced concepts must be identified and further developed so that it is available when needed

  16. Hot muonic deuterium and tritium from cold targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments are described which use a solid hydrogen layer to form muonic hydrogen isotopes in vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to study the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation. 10 refs.,4 figs

  17. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  18. Types of nuclear fusion in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author has been fortunate enough to encounter both types of nuclear fusions, and so hereby presents a theory regarding these two fusion types. The first phenomenon that may be considered in thermonuclear d-d fusion in a vacuum crack within a solid. When a platinum plate is connected to a positive electrode and a palladium-alloy plate is connected to a negative electrode in deuterium and a 200-V electrolysis current is passed through them, neutrons, helium 3, and 3.27 MeV of heat are obtained. The fact that such a phenomenon is produced despite the low voltage suggests the following: first, a vacuum microcrack is produced within the palladium alloy. Next, a large quantity of Bose-particle deuterium nuclei flow into the crack as impurities due to the Kondo effect. Accordingly, the effect of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle (ΔxΔp ≥ h) is exerted, the movement-position range of the deuterium nucleus becomes extremely small (x → 0), and the movement amount gradually increases (p(mv) → ∞). Integrating this movement amount yields ∫ mv dv=1/2mv2 + C, and when the movement energy of this 1/2 mv2 exceeds 10 keV, thermonuclear fusion occurs. The second phenomenon is that of the experiment conducted by Iwamura et al. this is elemental transmutation due to nonthermal nuclear fusion in a solid by deuterium permeation. In this case, coating the surface of the palladium alloy facing the deuterium gas with cesium resulted in the creation of praseodymium, and coating the surface with strontium resulted in the creation of molybdenum. Common points in these phenomena are the facts that the atomic number increased by 4 and the atomic mass by 8. In this regard, it appears that the transmutation was the result of nuclear fusion of the cesium or strontium with two compound nuclei of deuterium. (author)

  19. Tritium and workers in fusion devices-lessons learnt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion machines from all over the world have contributed to the knowledge accumulated in fusion science. This knowledge has been applied to design new experimental fusion machines and in particular ITER. Only two fusion devices based on magnetic confinement have used deuterium and tritium fuels to-date-the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, TFTR, in Princeton, USA, and JET, the European tokamak. These machines have demonstrated that the fusion reaction is achievable with these fuels, and have provided valuable lessons on radioprotection-related issues as concerns tritium and workers. Dedicated tritium installations for fusion research and development have also contributed to this knowledge base.

  20. Tritium and workers in fusion devices-lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rodrigo, Lina; Elbez-Uzan, Joelle; Alejaldre, Carlos

    2009-09-01

    Fusion machines from all over the world have contributed to the knowledge accumulated in fusion science. This knowledge has been applied to design new experimental fusion machines and in particular ITER. Only two fusion devices based on magnetic confinement have used deuterium and tritium fuels to-date-the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, TFTR, in Princeton, USA, and JET, the European tokamak. These machines have demonstrated that the fusion reaction is achievable with these fuels, and have provided valuable lessons on radioprotection-related issues as concerns tritium and workers. Dedicated tritium installations for fusion research and development have also contributed to this knowledge base. PMID:19690360

  1. Deuterium - depleted water. Achievements and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium - depleted water represents water that has an isotopic content lower than 145 ppm D/(D+H) which is the natural isotopic content of water. The research conducted at ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, regarding deuterium - depleted water were completed by the following patents: - technique and installation for deuterium - depleted water production; - distilled water with low deuterium content; - technique and installation for the production of distilled water with low deuterium content; - mineralized water with low deuterium content and technique to produce it. The gold and silver medals won at international salons for inventions confirmed the novelty of these inventions. Knowing that deuterium content of water has a big influence on living organisms, beginning with 1996, the ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, deuterium - depleted water producer, co-operated with Romanian specialized institutes for biological effects' evaluation of deuterium - depleted water. The role of natural deuterium in living organisms was examined by using deuterium - depleted water instead of natural water. These investigations led to the following conclusions: 1. deuterium - depleted water caused a tendency towards the increase of the basal tone, accompanied by the intensification of the vasoconstrictor effects of phenylefrine, noradrenaline and angiotensin; the increase of the basal tone and vascular reactivity produced by the deuterium - depleted water persists after the removal of the vascular endothelium; -2. animals treated with deuterium - depleted water showed an increase of the resistance both to sublethal and to lethal gamma radiation doses, suggesting a radioprotective action by the stimulation of non-specific immune defence mechanism; 3, deuterium - depleted water stimulates immune defence reactions, represented by the opsonic, bactericidal and phagocyte capacity of the immune system, together with increase in the numbers of polymorphonuclear neutrophils; 4. investigations regarding artificial

  2. Ignition of a deuterium micro-detonation with a gigavolt super marx generator

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-01-01

    The Centurion-Halite experiment demonstrated the feasibility of igniting a deuterium-tritium micro-explosion with an energy of not more than a few megajoule, and the Mike test, the feasibility of a pure deuterium explosion with an energy of more than 10^6 megajoule. In both cases the ignition energy was supplied by a fission bomb explosive. While an energy of a few megajoule, to be released in the time required of less than 10^-9 sec, can be supplied by lasers and intense particle beams, this is not enough to ignite a pure deuterium explosion. Because the deuterium-tritium reaction depends on the availability of lithium, the non-fusion ignition of a pure deuterium fusion reaction would be highly desirable. It is shown that this goal can conceivably be reached with a "Super Marx Generator", where a large number of "ordinary" Marx generators charge (magnetically insulated) fast high voltage capacitors of a second stage Marx generator, called a "Super Marx Generator", ultimately reaching gigavolt potentials with...

  3. End product economics and fusion research program priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that deuterium based fusion fuels and reactors based on them face severe technological disadvantages in comparison with fission based systems as power sources for central station electric power plants. The author postulates the most plausible deuterium based fusion reactor consistent with the physics of the fusion reaction itself and compares this reactor (called ''OMR-DT'') with existing fission reactors. Since neutrons are the main problem in fusion, the author suggests that a great deal more effort should be given to the study of non-Maxwellian plasmas with the emphasis on neutron-free fuel cycles. The author also suggests that the deuterium based fusion driver may play its best role as a fissile fuel producer

  4. Laser spectroscopy of muonic deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Fernandes, Luis M. P.; Amaro, Fernando D.; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M. R.; Covita, Daniel S.; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L.; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A. M.; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M. B.; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; dos Santos, Joaquim M. F.; Schaller, Lukas A.; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F. C. A.; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    The deuteron is the simplest compound nucleus, composed of one proton and one neutron. Deuteron properties such as the root-mean-square charge radius rd and the polarizability serve as important benchmarks for understanding the nuclear forces and structure. Muonic deuterium μd is the exotic atom formed by a deuteron and a negative muon μ–. We measured three 2S-2P transitions in μd and obtain rd = 2.12562(78) fm, which is 2.7 times more accurate but 7.5σ smaller than the CODATA-2010 value rd = 2.1424(21) fm. The μd value is also 3.5σ smaller than the rd value from electronic deuterium spectroscopy. The smaller rd, when combined with the electronic isotope shift, yields a “small” proton radius rp, similar to the one from muonic hydrogen, amplifying the proton radius puzzle.

  5. Emission of deuterium from SS 316L after plasma bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of the recycling (particle re-emission) behaviour of hydrogen isotopes from the first wall structures to the plasma of a fusion reactor is a crucial issue in plasma-wall interaction research, because the plasma performance will strongly depend on the time-scale and magnitude of this phenomenon. Deuterium recycling measurements from AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel surfaces have been performed in an experimental facility capable of reproducing particle flux densities and ion energies similar to those of ITER. The recycling flux has been evaluated. It is strongly dependent upon the impinging particle flux while target temperature and particle energy do not play a significant role. From these measurements a recombination coefficient for the system deuterium-AISI 316L has been calculated. The values are quite low, hence indicating that the AISI 316L sample target used was covered by an oxide layer that inhibits recombination. Moreover, the chemical composition of the recycling flux is pure molecular deuterium. ((orig.))

  6. SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHISSEL, D.P.; ABLA, G.; BURRUSS, J.R.; FEIBUSH, E.; FREDIAN, T.W.; GOODE, M.M.; GREENWALD, M.J.; KEAHEY, K.; LEGGETT, T.; LI, K.; McCUNE, D.C.; PAPKA, M.E.; RANDERSON, L.; SANDERSON, A.; STILLERMAN, J.; THOMPSON, M.R.; URAM, T.; WALLACE, G.

    2006-08-31

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large

  7. Capabilities of nitrogen admixed cryogenic deuterium pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharov, Igor; Sergeev, Vladimir [SPU, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lang, Peter; Ploeckl, Bernhard; Cavedon, Marco [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kocsis, Gabor; Szepesi, Tamas [Wigner RCP RMI, Budapest (Hungary); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    Operation at high core density with high energy confinement - as foreseen in a future fusion reactor like DEMO - is being investigated at ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The efficiency of pellet fuelling from the high-field side usually increases with increasing injection speed. Due to the fragile nature of the deuterium ice, however, the increment of pellet mass losses and subsequent pellet fragmentations take place when the speed is increased. Studies show, that admixing of a small amount of nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into D{sub 2} gas can be favorable for the mechanical stability of pellets. This might be helpful for deeper pellet penetration. Besides, seeding by N{sub 2} can enhance plasma performance due to both increasing the energy confinement time and reducing the divertor heat load in the envisaged ELMy H-mode plasma scenario. Fuelling efficiency of N{sub 2}-admixed solid D{sub 2} pellets and their nitrogen seeding capabilities were investigated. It was found that both the overall plasma density increase and the measured averaged pellet penetration depth were smaller in case of the admixed (1% mol. in the gas resulting in about 0.8% in the ice) pellet fuelling. Possibility of the N{sub 2}-seeding by admixed pellets was confirmed by CXRS measurements of N{sup 7+} content in plasma.

  8. Deuterium and big bang nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of deuterium absorption in high redshift quasar absorption systems provide a direct inference of the deuterium abundance produced by big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). With measurements and limits from five independent absorption systems, we place strong constraints on the primordial ratio of deuterium to hydrogen, (D/H)p = 3.4 ± 0.3 x 10-5 [1,2]. We employ a direct numerical treatment to improve the estimates of critical reaction rates and reduce the uncertainties in BBN predictions of D/H and 7Li/H by a factor of three[3] over previous efforts[4]. Using our measurements of (D/H)p and new BBN predictions, we find at 95% confidence the baryon density ρb = (3.6 ± 0.4) x 10-31 g cm-3 (Ωbh265 = 0.045 ± 0.006 in units of the critical density), and cosmological baryon-photon ratio η = (5.1 ± 0.6) x 10-10

  9. Accelerator and fusion research division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations

  10. The Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST): a Proposal for an ITER Satellite Facility in Support of the Development of Fusion Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FAST is the conceptual design for a new machine proposed to support ITER experimental exploitation as well as to anticipate DEMO relevant physics and technology. FAST is aimed at integrated investigations of fast particle physics, plasma operations and plasma wall interaction in burning plasma relevant conditions. In Deuterium plasma operations, FAST has the capability to simultaneously approach relevant dimensionless physical parameters in all the ITER scenarios. The necessity of achieving ITER relevant power densities and performance with moderate cost has led to a compact Tokamak design (R=1.82 m , a= 0.64 m), with a high toroidal field (BT up to 8.5 T) and plasma current (Ip up to 8 MA). In order to study fast particle behaviours with dimensionless parameters similar to ITER, the project is based on a dominant Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating system (ICRH; 30 MW coupled to the plasma). Moreover, the experiment foresees 6 MW of Lower Hybrid (LH), essentially for plasma control and for non-inductive current drive, and of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH; 4MW) for localized electron heating and plasma control. Ports have been designed to also accommodate up to 10 MW of negative neutral beam injection (NNBI) in the energy range of 0.5-1 MeV. The total power input is in the 30-40 MW range in the different plasma scenarios, with a wall power load comparable with that of ITER (P/R∼22 MW/m). All ITER scenarios can be studied: starting from the reference H-mode, with plasma edge and ELMs characteristics similar to those of ITER (Q up to ∼ 2.5), and arriving to full non-inductive current drive scenarios lasting ∼ 160 s, Under these conditions, first wall as well as divertor plates will be made of tungsten. The divertor itself is designed to be completely removable by remote handling. This will allow studying, in view of DEMO, the behaviour of innovative divertor concepts, such as those foreseeing the use of liquid lithium. FAST is capable to operate with

  11. The Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST): a proposal for an ITER satellite facility in support of the development of fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FAST is a new machine proposed to support ITER experimental exploitation as well as to anticipate DEMO relevant physics and technology. FAST is aimed at studying, under burning plasma relevant conditions, fast particle (FP) physics, plasma operations and plasma wall interaction in an integrated way. FAST has the capability to approach all the ITER scenarios significantly closer than the present day experiments using deuterium plasmas. The necessity of achieving ITER relevant performance with a moderate cost has led to conceiving a compact tokamak (R = 1.82 m, a = 0.64 m) with high toroidal field (BT up to 8.5 T) and plasma current (Ip up to 8 MA). In order to study FP behaviours under conditions similar to those of ITER, the project has been provided with a dominant ion cyclotron resonance heating system (ICRH; 30 MW on the plasma). Moreover, the experiment foresees the use of 6 MW of lower hybrid (LHCD), essentially for plasma control and for non-inductive current drive, and of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH, 4 MW) for localized electron heating and plasma control. The ports have been designed to accommodate up to 10 MW of negative neutral beams (NNBI) in the energy range 0.5-1 MeV. The total power input will be in the 30-40 MW range under different plasma scenarios with a wall power load comparable to that of ITER (P/R ∼ 22 MW m-1). All the ITER scenarios will be studied: from the reference H mode, with plasma edge and ELMs characteristics similar to the ITER ones (Q up to ∼1.5), to a full current drive scenario, lasting around 170 s. The first wall (FW) as well as the divertor plates will be of tungsten in order to ensure reactor relevant operation regimes. The divertor itself is designed to be completely removable by remote handling. This will allow us to study (in view of DEMO) the behaviour of innovative divertor concepts, such as those based on liquid lithium. FAST is capable of operating with very long pulses, up to 170 s, despite being a

  12. Catalyzed deuterium fueled reversed-field pinch reactor assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is part of a Department of Energy supported alternate fusion fuels program at Science Applications International Corporation. The purpose of this portion of the study is to perform an assessment of a conceptual compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR) that is fueled by the catalyzed-deuterium (Cat-d) fuel cycle with respect to physics, technology, safety, and cost. The Cat-d CRFPR is compared to a d-t fueled fusion reactor with respect to several issues in this study. The comparison includes cost, reactor performance, and technology requirements for a Cat-d fueled CRFPR and a comparable cost-optimized d-t fueled conceptual design developed by LANL

  13. Metal liner-driven quasi-isentropic compression of deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinwurm, Marcus; Bland, Simon N.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.

    2013-09-01

    Properties of degenerate hydrogen and deuterium (D) at pressures of the order of terapascals are of key interest to Planetary Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion. In order to recreate these conditions in the laboratory, we present a scheme, where a metal liner drives a cylindrically convergent quasi-isentropic compression in a D fill. We first determined an external pressure history for driving a self-similar implosion of a D shell from a fictitious flow simulation [D. S. Clark and M. Tabak, Nucl. Fusion 47, 1147 (2007)]. Then, it is shown that this D implosion can be recreated inside a beryllium liner by shaping the current pulse. For a peak current of 10.8 MA cold and nearly isochoric D is assembled at around 12 500 kg/m3. Finally, our two-dimensional Gorgon simulations show the robustness of the implosion method to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability when using a sufficiently thick liner.

  14. Metal liner-driven quasi-isentropic compression of deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinwurm, Marcus; Bland, Simon N.; Chittenden, Jeremy P. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    Properties of degenerate hydrogen and deuterium (D) at pressures of the order of terapascals are of key interest to Planetary Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion. In order to recreate these conditions in the laboratory, we present a scheme, where a metal liner drives a cylindrically convergent quasi-isentropic compression in a D fill. We first determined an external pressure history for driving a self-similar implosion of a D shell from a fictitious flow simulation [D. S. Clark and M. Tabak, Nucl. Fusion 47, 1147 (2007)]. Then, it is shown that this D implosion can be recreated inside a beryllium liner by shaping the current pulse. For a peak current of 10.8 MA cold and nearly isochoric D is assembled at around 12 500 kg/m{sup 3}. Finally, our two-dimensional Gorgon simulations show the robustness of the implosion method to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability when using a sufficiently thick liner.

  15. Suprathermal deuterium ions produced by nuclear elastic scattering of ICRH driven He3 ions in JET plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the suprathermal tail of the energy distribution function of deuterium ions, in plasmas containing MeV energy ICRH driven minority He3 ions and majority deuterium ions, revealed that the suprathermal tail ion density exceeded by nearly an order of magnitude that expected due to nuclear elastic scattering (NES) of He3 projectile ions on deuterium target ions. The experiments were performed on the Joint European Torus (JET), measurements of the line-of-sight integrated energy distribution functions of He3 and suprathermal deuterium ions were made using a high energy neutral particle analyzer. The NES or 'knock-on' deuterium ion energy distribution function was simulated using the FPP-3D Fokker-Plank code (Zaitsev et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 1340) which solves the 3D trajectory averaged kinetic equations in JET tokamak geometry while taking into account NES of He3 ions on the deuterium ions. The required input energy distribution function of ICRH driven He3 ions was simulated using the SELFO code (Hedin et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 527). The comparison between measurement and simulation in the He3 ICRH experiments is contrasted with an analogous previous comparison between measurements and simulation of JET plasmas in which 3.5 MeV DT fusion alpha-particles were the projectile ions, where measurement and simulation roughly agreed. Possible explanations for the observed excess knock-on deuterium tail in the experiments with He3 minority ICRH are discussed. The importance of D + He3 fusion products as additional drivers of suprathermal fuel ions is underlined

  16. Deuterium content variation of human blood serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report, for the first time, the variation of deuterium content of blood serum of the patients with cancer disease. The tumorous cell, because of the higher growth speed , is deuterium consuming. The deuterium content of blood serum of cancerous human is diminished by about 5-7 ppm compared with that of the healthy individual. This effect is in accordance with some previous results. The replacement of tap water with deuterium depleted water in a drinking water of tumorous mice diminished the growth rate of tumors and the slight increase in the deuterium concentration stimulates growth because it is more easy for the cells to elevate the intracellular deuterium concentration up to the threshold level. (authors)

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments in cryogenic deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2005-10-01

    We report on experiments under way at the Omega laser, using cryogenic deuterium to study Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in laser targets. These instabilities are important in astrophysical situations (e.g., mixing of the different shells during a supernova explosion) and in inertial fusion (during the compression stage of a fusion target). They can be studied in small (˜1 mm) shock tubes filled with one heavy and one light material, with an interface between the two materials that is machined to seed the instability. A high-energy laser (˜5 kJ) drives a shock from the heavy to the light material. The evolution of the interface is studied using gated x-ray cameras, where x-ray illumination is obtained from additional laser beams focused on metal backlighter foils. Traditionally the heavy material is CH (1 g/cm^3) doped with I or Br for improved contrast, while the light material is a low-density (˜0.1 g/cm^3) C foam. The goal of the current experiments is to determine if contrast can be improved even further by replacing the foam with cryogenic deuterium, which has a density similar to the foam, but a lower x-ray opacity allowing clearer images, including images taken at late times in the evolution. Work performed under the auspices of the Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-48.

  18. Deuterium transport and trapping in aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model of diffusion and evolution of the density of deuterium in metals is presented. A model of the deuterium evolution in the presence of uniform and nonuniform distributions of traps, as well as perfectly reflecting and partially permeable boundary conditions is discussed. Computers are compared with experimental results describe deuterium distribution after fatigue crack growth of 2219 and 7075 aluminum alloys in a D2O water vapor environment and after ion implantation

  19. Industrial production of fusion energy will be the next step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlled Fusion may provide mankind with an inexhaustible source of energy. Several highly attractive features are intrinsic to this way of energy production: a high safety level due to the impossibility of non-controlled reaction; low original and induced activities of the fuel, waste and construction materials, the possibility to place power stations close to megalopolises, and negligible terrorist opportunities at fusion enterprises. More than fifty years have been spent by researchers in many countries before the International Fusion Community decided this year to build the first International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER - in Cadarache (France). The reason for such a long development is the very complicated behaviour of high-temperature plasma - a special state of matter that allows nuclei of hydrogen to react, setting free a huge amount of energy due to mass loss. Basic and applied research in high-temperature plasma has influenced a significant number of areas in Science and Technology. There are two approaches to Controlled Fusion based on magnetic and inertial confinement. The magnetic confinement approach at present seems to be closer to the fusion energy production stage. The idea of the tokamak device invented at the Kurchatov Institute fifty years ago turned out to be very productive and allowed us to realize the fusion of Deuterium and Tritium under conditions very close to breakeven. We know a lot about the tokamak plasma today. However, new advances are foreseen to be achieved in contemporary and future experiments. The main activity is shifting now to the problem of plasma-wall interaction, low activation materials and technologies activating resources in an industrial reactor, which would be of commercial interest. Intensive work in this field is foreseen, and the Fast Track Programme formulated by the European Union emphasizes the necessity of promptly solving basic problems of fusion energy production. After the construction of

  20. On the change in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state

    OpenAIRE

    Caillabet, Laurent; Canaud, Benoit; Salin, Gwenaël; Mazevet, Stéphane; Loubeyre, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EoS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target (Hu et al., PRL 104, 235003 (2010)). We use here an advanced multi-phase equation of state (EoS), based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over po...

  1. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  2. Results of an attempt to measure increased rates of the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n in a nonelectrochemical cold fusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Decker, Arthur J.; Blue, James W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to look for evidence of deuterium fusion in palladium. The experiment, which involved introducing deuterium into the palladium filter of a hydrogen purifier, was designed to detect neutrons produced in the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n as well as heat production. The neutron counts for deuterium did not differ significantly from background or from the counts for a hydrogen control. Heat production was detected when deuterium, but not hydrogen, was pumped from the purifier.

  3. Development of key fusion technologies at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent operational phase in JET in which Deuterium-Tritium fuel was used (DTE1) resulted in record breaking fusion performance. In addition to important contributions in plasma physics, the JET Team has also made major advances in demonstrating the viability of some of the key technologies required for the realisation of future fusion power. Two of the most important technological areas which have been successfully demonstrated in JET are the ITER scale tritium processing plant and the exchange of the divertor and maintenance of the interior of JET by totally remote means. The experiment also provided the first data on tritium retention and co-deposition in a diverted tokamak. Of the 35g of tritium injected into the JET torus, about 6g remained in the tokamak. The amount resides mainly on cool surfaces at the inboard divertor side. The precise, safe and timely execution of the remote handling shutdown proved that the design, function, performance and operational methodology of the RH equipment prepared over the years at JET are appropriate for the successful and rapid replacement of components in an activated tokamak environment. (author)

  4. Further discussion on full atomic theory of the cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full atom theory for the cold fusion mechanism has been reported in my previous paper. The deuterium atoms inter the interstitial position in the crystal of palladium and expand into a closed spherical full atom. The valence electrons are completely in the ball and move around the deuteron. The repulsion of neighboring deuteron is shielded, so neighboring deuterons are easily accessible and produce deuteron fusion. How the interaction between the two negative deuterium ions in ionic crystal cause the fusion did not do detailed discussion. Present article will discuss this issue further in detail. (author)

  5. Magnetic fusion technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Fusion Technology describes the technologies that are required for successful development of nuclear fusion power plants using strong magnetic fields. These technologies include: ? magnet systems, ? plasma heating systems, ? control systems, ? energy conversion systems, ? advanced materials development, ? vacuum systems, ? cryogenic systems, ? plasma diagnostics, ? safety systems, and ? power plant design studies. Magnetic Fusion Technology will be useful to students and to specialists working in energy research.

  6. Neutron yield enhancement in laser-induced deuterium-deuterium fusion using a novel shaped target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron yields have direct correlation with the energy of incident deuterons in experiments of laser deuterated target interaction [Roth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 044802 (2013) and Higginson et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 100703 (2011)], while deuterated plasma density is also an important parameter. Experiments at the Shenguang II laser facility have produced neutrons with energy of 2.45 MeV using d (d, n) He reaction. Deuterated foil target and K-shaped target were employed to study the influence of plasma density on neutron yields. Neutron yield generated by K-shaped target (nearly 106) was two times higher than by foil target because the K-shaped target results in higher density plasma. Interferometry and multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the importance of plasma density for enhancement of neutron yields

  7. Advancing of Land Surface Temperature Retrieval Using Extreme Learning Machine and Spatio-Temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As a critical variable to characterize the biophysical processes in ecological environment, and as a key indicator in the surface energy balance, evapotranspiration and urban heat islands, Land Surface Temperature (LST retrieved from Thermal Infra-Red (TIR images at both high temporal and spatial resolution is in urgent need. However, due to the limitations of the existing satellite sensors, there is no earth observation which can obtain TIR at detailed spatial- and temporal-resolution simultaneously. Thus, several attempts of image fusion by blending the TIR data from high temporal resolution sensor with data from high spatial resolution sensor have been studied. This paper presents a novel data fusion method by integrating image fusion and spatio-temporal fusion techniques, for deriving LST datasets at 30 m spatial resolution from daily MODIS image and Landsat ETM+ images. The Landsat ETM+ TIR data were firstly enhanced based on extreme learning machine (ELM algorithm using neural network regression model, from 60 m to 30 m resolution. Then, the MODIS LST and enhanced Landsat ETM+ TIR data were fused by Spatio-temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm for Temperature mapping (SADFAT in order to derive high resolution synthetic data. The synthetic images were evaluated for both testing and simulated satellite images. The average difference (AD and absolute average difference (AAD are smaller than 1.7 K, where the correlation coefficient (CC and root-mean-square error (RMSE are 0.755 and 1.824, respectively, showing that the proposed method enhances the spatial resolution of the predicted LST images and preserves the spectral information at the same time.

  8. FIRE, A Test Bed for ARIES-RS/AT Advanced Physics and Plasma Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall vision for FIRE [Fusion Ignition Research Experiment] is to develop and test the fusion plasma physics and plasma technologies needed to realize capabilities of the ARIES-RS/AT power plant designs. The mission of FIRE is to attain, explore, understand and optimize a fusion dominated plasma which would be satisfied by producing D-T [deuterium-tritium] fusion plasmas with nominal fusion gains ∼10, self-driven currents of ∼80%, fusion power ∼150-300 MW, and pulse lengths up to 40 s. Achieving these goals will require the deployment of several key fusion technologies under conditions approaching those of ARIES-RS/AT. The FIRE plasma configuration with strong plasma shaping, a double null pumped divertor and all metal plasma-facing components is a 40% scale model of the ARIES-RS/AT plasma configuration. ''Steady-state'' advanced tokamak modes in FIRE with high beta, high bootstrap fraction, and 100% noninductive current drive are suitable for testing the physics of the ARIES-RS/A T operating modes. The development of techniques to handle power plant relevant exhaust power while maintaining low tritium inventory is a major objective for a burning plasma experiment. The FIRE high-confinement modes and AT-modes result in fusion power densities from 3-10 MWm-3 and neutron wall loading from 2-4 MWm-2 which are at the levels expected from the ARIES-RS/AT design studies

  9. Measurement of inertial confinement fusion reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion reaction rate is an important parameter for measuring compression during the implosion in inertial confinement fusion experiment. We have developed a system for fusion reaction history measurement with high temporal resolution. The system is composed of plastic scintillator and nose cone, optical system and streak camera. We have applied this system on the SG-III prototype for fusion reaction rate measuring. For the first time, fusion reaction rate history have been measured for deuterium-tritium filled targets with neutrons yields about 1010. We have analyzed possible influence factor during fusion reaction rate measuring. It indicates that the instrument measures fusion reaction bang time at temporal resolutions as low as 30 ps.(authors)

  10. Reactor for boron fusion with picosecond ultrahigh power laser pulses and ultrahigh magnetic field trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Miley, G H; Kirchhoff, G

    2015-01-01

    Compared with the deuterium tritium (DT) fusion, the environmentally clean fusion of protons with 11B is extremely difficult. When instead of nanosecond laser pulses for thermal-ablating driven ignition, picosecond pulses are used, a drastic change by nonlinearity results in ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This radically changes to economic boron fusion by a measured new avalanche ignition.

  11. The ABC effect in double-pionic fusion to deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the first exclusive measurements of the reaction pd→pdπ0π0 have been carried out at beam energies of Tp=1.03 and 1.35 GeV at CELSIUS storage ring in Uppsala/Sweden. The reaction pn→dπ0π0 has been measured as quasifree pd→ pspecdπ0π0 reaction with a spectator proton pspec of very small momentum. Since all particles except of the spectator proton have been measured, the spectator 4-momentum could be reconstructed by kinematical fits with 3 overconstraints. Hence one could exploit the Fermi motion of the target neutron to cover a range of relative energies in the pn-system for a given beam energy. The π0π0 channel, which is purely isoscalar and free of any isovector contributions, shows a large low-mass enhancement in the Mπ0π0 spectrum, which is much larger than observed in the inclusive measurements and also larger than predicted in previous ΔΔ calculations. In contrast to these and also to the inclusive data a high-mass enhancement in the Mπ0π0 spectrum was not observed and is meanwhile interpreted as 3π and η-meson production. All exclusive data can be described, if one assumes a resonance in the isoscalar pn-system, which dominantly decays via the isoscalar ΔΔ system. With this so-called s-channel resonance ansatz a very good description of the data in the total cross section as well as in the differential spectra has been achieved. Mass and width of this isoscalar dibaryonic resonance are MR∼2.36 GeV/c2 and ΓR∼80 MeV, respectively. (orig.)

  12. The ABC effect in double-pionic fusion to deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakimova, Olena

    2009-04-17

    In this work the first exclusive measurements of the reaction pd{yields}pd{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} have been carried out at beam energies of T{sub p}=1.03 and 1.35 GeV at CELSIUS storage ring in Uppsala/Sweden. The reaction pn{yields}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} has been measured as quasifree pd{yields} p{sub spec}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} reaction with a spectator proton p{sub spec} of very small momentum. Since all particles except of the spectator proton have been measured, the spectator 4-momentum could be reconstructed by kinematical fits with 3 overconstraints. Hence one could exploit the Fermi motion of the target neutron to cover a range of relative energies in the pn-system for a given beam energy. The {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel, which is purely isoscalar and free of any isovector contributions, shows a large low-mass enhancement in the M{sub {pi}{sup 0}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}} spectrum, which is much larger than observed in the inclusive measurements and also larger than predicted in previous {delta}{delta} calculations. In contrast to these and also to the inclusive data a high-mass enhancement in the M{sub {pi}{sup 0}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}} spectrum was not observed and is meanwhile interpreted as 3{pi} and {eta}-meson production. All exclusive data can be described, if one assumes a resonance in the isoscalar pn-system, which dominantly decays via the isoscalar {delta}{delta} system. With this so-called s-channel resonance ansatz a very good description of the data in the total cross section as well as in the differential spectra has been achieved. Mass and width of this isoscalar dibaryonic resonance are M{sub R}{approx}2.36 GeV/c{sup 2} and {gamma}{sub R}{approx}80 MeV, respectively. (orig.)

  13. Polarization of solid deuterium-tritium fuel for nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of using polarized DT-fuel are discussed. An outline is given of the standard methods employed to produce polarized solid hydrogen targets for nuclear physics. The applicability of these methods for obtaining polarized DT is analysed. Large polarizations seem to be realisable in spite of the tritium decay heat, which hinders the attainment of low temperatures. (orig.)

  14. Hot fusion, cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication of observations of nuclear fusion reactions in electrolysis experiments has led to hope that an easy way to domesticate this major source of energy had been found. In this article are recalled the classical solutions which are studied for hot fusion, the state of the art the difficulties and the perspectives, followed by the present situation concerning the experiments related to what has been called, perhaps a little too quickly, cold fusion

  15. The HiPER project for inertial confinement fusion and some experimental results on advanced ignition schemes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Batani, D.; Koenig, M.; Baton, S.; Perez, F.; Gizzi, L.A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Honrubia, J.; Antonelli, L.; Morace, A.; Volpe, L.; Santos, J.; Schurtz, G.; Hulin, S.; Kozlová, Michaela; Nejdl, Jaroslav; Rus, Bedřich

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 12 (2011), s. 1-13. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : HiPER Project * PALS * laser-plasma coupling * fast electrons * inertial fusion Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.425, year: 2011

  16. Experiments in cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models

  17. Ignition curves for deuterium/helium-3 fuel in spherical tokamak reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Motevalli S M; Fadaei F

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, ignition curve for deuterium/helium-3 fusion reaction is studied. Four fusion reactions are considered. Zero-dimensional model for the power balance equation has been used. The closed ignition curves for $\\rho$ = constant (ratio of particle to energy confinement time) have been derived. The results of our calculations show that ignited equilibria for deuterium/helium-3 fuel in a spherical tokamak is only possible for $\\rho$ = 5.5 and 6. Then, by using the energy confinement scaling and parameters of the spherical tokamak reactor, the plasma stability limits have been obtained in $n_e, T$ plane and, to determine the thermal instability of plasma, the time dependent transport equations have been solved.

  18. Helium processing for deuterium/helium burns in ITER's physics phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, P.A.; Sze, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements for vacuum pumping and fuel processing for deuterium/helium (D/{sup 3}He) burns in the physics operating phase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) were assessed. These burns are expected to have low fusion power (100 MW), short burn times ({le}30 s), limited operation (2000 shots), and a fractional burn {approximately}0.3%. For the physics phase, the fuel processing system will include several units to separate deuterium and helium (activated charcoal bed, SAES getter and a Pd/Ag diffuser), as well as an isotopic separation system to separate {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He. The needed vacuum system's cryosorption surface area may be as large as 10 m{sup 2} if the burn time is {approximately}200 s, the fractional burn is <0.3%, or the fusion power is >100 MW. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  19. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  20. Laser fusion program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program is structured to proceed through a series of well defined fusion milestones to proof of the scientific feasibility, of laser fusion with the Shiva Nova system. Concurrently, those key technical areas, such as advanced lasers, which are required to progress beyond proof of feasibility, are being studied. We have identified and quantified the opportunities and key technical issues in military applications, such as weapons effects simulations, and in civilian applications, such as central-station electric power production. We summarize the current status and future plans for the laser fusion program at LLL, emphasizing the civilian applications of laser fusion

  1. A semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion

    CERN Document Server

    McBride, Ryan D

    2015-01-01

    Presented is a semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). This model accounts for several key aspects of MagLIF, including: (1) preheat of the fuel (optionally via laser absorption); (2) pulsed-power-driven liner implosion; (3) liner compressibility with an analytic equation of state, artificial viscosity, internal magnetic pressure, and ohmic heating; (4) adiabatic compression and heating of the fuel; (5) radiative losses and fuel opacity; (6) magnetic flux compression with Nernst thermoelectric losses; (7) magnetized electron and ion thermal conduction losses; (8) end losses; (9) enhanced losses due to prescribed dopant concentrations and contaminant mix; (10) deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium primary fusion reactions for arbitrary deuterium to tritium fuel ratios; and (11) magnetized alpha-particle fuel heating. We show that this simplified model, with its transparent and accessible physics, can be used to reproduce the general 1D behavior presented throughout the original Ma...

  2. Characterization of deuterium retention and co-deposition of fuel with lithium on the divertor tile of EAST using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cong, E-mail: cli@mail.dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Dongye [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Hu, Zhenhua [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Xingwei [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Luo, Guang-Nan; Hu, Jiansheng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Ding, Hongbin, E-mail: hding@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-08-15

    A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system has been developed to measure and monitor the composition evolution on plasma facing materials (PFMs) of Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). As a necessity and important proof of principle experiment, LIBS analysis has been performed for lithium–deuterium co-deposition layer diagnosis of EAST divertor tiles in lab experiments. The distribution of deuterium retention has been obtained from the depth of 0.5–4 μm in the divertor tiles. The deuterium/hydrogen concentration ratio was estimated as 0.17 ± 0.02 in lithium–deuterium co-deposition layer. Moreover, the depth profile behaviors of lithium and deuterium indicate that the deuterium retention in divertor tile came from lithium–deuterium co-deposition processes during deuterium discharge in EAST. This work would improve the understanding of deuterium retention and lithium–deuterium co-deposition mechanism and give a guidance to optimize the LIBS system which will be a unique and useful diagnostic approach in EAST 2014-campaign.

  3. Characterization of deuterium retention and co-deposition of fuel with lithium on the divertor tile of EAST using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system has been developed to measure and monitor the composition evolution on plasma facing materials (PFMs) of Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). As a necessity and important proof of principle experiment, LIBS analysis has been performed for lithium–deuterium co-deposition layer diagnosis of EAST divertor tiles in lab experiments. The distribution of deuterium retention has been obtained from the depth of 0.5–4 μm in the divertor tiles. The deuterium/hydrogen concentration ratio was estimated as 0.17 ± 0.02 in lithium–deuterium co-deposition layer. Moreover, the depth profile behaviors of lithium and deuterium indicate that the deuterium retention in divertor tile came from lithium–deuterium co-deposition processes during deuterium discharge in EAST. This work would improve the understanding of deuterium retention and lithium–deuterium co-deposition mechanism and give a guidance to optimize the LIBS system which will be a unique and useful diagnostic approach in EAST 2014-campaign

  4. Equations of state for hydrogen and deuterium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerley, Gerald Irwin (Kerley Technical Services, Appomattox, VA)

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the complete revision of a deuterium equation of state (EOS) model published in 1972. It uses the same general approach as the 1972 EOS, i.e., the so-called 'chemical model,' but incorporates a number of theoretical advances that have taken place during the past thirty years. Three phases are included: a molecular solid, an atomic solid, and a fluid phase consisting of both molecular and atomic species. Ionization and the insulator-metal transition are also included. The most important improvements are in the liquid perturbation theory, the treatment of molecular vibrations and rotations, and the ionization equilibrium and mixture models. In addition, new experimental data and theoretical calculations are used to calibrate certain model parameters, notably the zero-Kelvin isotherms for the molecular and atomic solids, and the quantum corrections to the liquid phase. The report gives a general overview of the model, followed by detailed discussions of the most important theoretical issues and extensive comparisons with the many experimental data that have been obtained during the last thirty years. Questions about the validity of the chemical model are also considered. Implications for modeling the 'giant planets' are also discussed.

  5. Some fusion perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the concepts of nuclear fusion reactions, advanced fusion fuels, environmental impacts, etc., are explored using the following general outline: I. Principles of Fusion (Nuclear Fuels and Reactions, Lawson Condition, n tau vs T, Nuclear Burn Characteristics); II. Magnetic Mirror Possibilities (the Ion Layer and Electron Layer, Exponential Build-up at MeV energies, Lorentz trapping at GeV energies); III. Pellet Fuel Fusion Prospects (Advanced Pellet Fuel Fusion Prospects, Burn Characteristics and Applications, Excitation-heating Prospects for Runaway Ion Temperatures). Inasmuch as the outline is very skeletal, a significant research and development effort may be in order to evaluate these prospects in more detail and hopefully ''harness the H-bomb'' for peaceful applications, the author concludes. 28 references

  6. Simulation science for fusion plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Sudo, S.; Skoric, M.M.; Watanabe, T-H.; Todo, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Miura, H; Ito, A; Ohtani, H.; Usami, S.; Nakamura, H; ITO, Atsushi; Ishiguro, S.; Tomita, Y.; Takayama, A.; M. Sato

    2008-01-01

    The world fusion effort has embarked into a new age with the construction of ITER in Cadarache, France, which will be the first magnetic confinement fusion plasma experiment dominated by the self-heating of fusion reactions. In order to operate and control burning plasmas and next generation demo fusion reactors, an advanced capability for comprehensive integrated computer simulations that are fully verified and validated against experimental data will be necessary. The ultimate goal is to pr...

  7. Measurements of fusion neutrons from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion Experiments on the Z accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E. C.; Awe, T. J.; Torres, J. A.; Jones, B.; Bur, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Styron, J. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Strong evidence of thermonuclear neutron production has been observed during Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z accelerator. So far, these experiments have utilized deuterium fuel and produced primary DD fusion neutron yields up to 2e12 with electron and ion stagnation temperatures in the 2-3 keV range. We present MagLIF neutron measurements and compare to other data and implosion simulations. In addition to primary DD and secondary DT yields and ion temperatures, other complex physics regarding the degree of fuel magnetization and liner density are elucidated by the neutron measurements. Neutron diagnostic development for deuterium and future deuterium-tritium fuel experiments are also discussed. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Current activities in the interactive joint research at Tohoku University. Advanced evaluation of radiation effects on fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science of the Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (hereafter the 'Center') was founded in 1969 and has been playing a vital role as the joint-use research center in Japan to assess the dynamic and static effects of neutron irradiation on the physical and mechanical properties of a variety of structural and functional materials through the use of nuclear reactors in Japan and overseas. The Center is now also open to researchers overseas. As a new initiative, the Center started an interactive joint research scheme on nuclear fusion reactor engineering with the NIFS in fiscal 2010. The interactive joint research aims at pioneering inter-disciplinary fields that connect neutron reactor engineering with other nuclear fusion sciences, and at conducting activities primarily on the key research subjects through inter-research-center collaboration. For this, a TDS (Thermal Desorption Spectrometer) with an ion gun (IG-TDS) has been installed in the radiation controlled area at the Center. Development of a compact divertor plasma simulator (C-DPS) system that will be integrated with the IG-TDS apparatus is in progress. It is prospected that the Center could play a leading role in international collaborative studies of neutron irradiation effects on plasma material interaction, along with other major research institutes over the world. (author)

  9. Measurement of anomalous neutron from deuterium/solid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments on both D2O electrolysis and thermal cycle of deuterium absorbed Ti Turnings are designed to examine the anomalous phenomena in Deuterium/Solid System. A neutron detector containing 16 BF3 tubes with a detection limit of 0.38 n/s for two hour counting is used for electrolysis experiments. No neutron counting rate statistically higher than detection limit is observed from Fleischmann and Pons type experiments. An HLNCC-II neutron detector equipped with 18 3He tubes and a JSR-11 shift register unit with a detection limit of 0.20 n/s for a two hour run are employed to study the neutron signals in D2 gas experiments. Ten batches of dry fusion samples are tested, among them, seven batches with neutron burst signals occur roughly at the temperature from -100 degrees centigrade to near room temperature. In the first four runs of a typical sample batch, seven neutron bursts are observed with neutron numbers from 15 to 482,which are 3 and 75 times, respectively, higher than the uncertainty of background. However, no bursts happened for H2 dummy samples running in between and afterwards and for sample batch after certain runs

  10. Measurement of anomalous neutron from deuterium/solid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments on both D2O electrolysis and thermal cycle of deuterium absorbed Ti Turnings are designed to examine the anomalous phenomena in Deuterium/Solid System. A neutron detector containing 16 BF3 tubes with a detection limit of 0.38 n/s for two hour counting is used for electrolysis experiments. No neutron counting rate statistically higher than detection limit is observed from Fleischmann and Pons type experiments. An HLNCC-II neutron detector equipped with 18 3He tubes and JSR-11 shift register unit with a detection limit of 0.20 n/s for a two hour run are employed to study the neutron signals in D2 gas experiments. Ten batches of dry fusion samples are tested, among them, seven batches with neutron burst signals occur roughly at the temperature from -100 degrees centigrade to near room temperature. In the first four runs of a typical sample batch, seven neutron bursts are observed with neutron numbers from 15 to 482, which are 3 and 75 times, respectively, higher than the uncertainty of background. However, no bursts happened for H2 dummy samples running in-between and afterwards and for sample batch after certain runs

  11. Heat load and deuterium plasma effects on SPS and WSP tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilémová Monika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten is a prime choice for armor material in future nuclear fusion devices. For the realization of fusion, it is necessary to address issues related to the plasma–armor interactions. In this work, several types of tungsten material were studied, i.e. tungsten prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS and by water stabilized plasma spraying (WSP technique. An intended surface porosity was created in the samples to model hydrogen/helium bubbles. The samples were subjected to a laser heat loading and a radiation loading of deuterium plasma to simulate edge plasma conditions of a nuclear fusion device (power density of 108 W/cm2 and 107 W/cm2, respectively, in the pulse intervals up to 200 ns. Thermally induced changes in the morphology and the damage to the studied surfaces are described. Possible consequences for the fusion device operation are pointed out.

  12. Mars manned fusion spaceship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, James; Buchholtz, Brent; Ward, Paul; Freuh, Jim; Jensen, Eric

    1991-01-01

    Fusion Propulsion has an enormous potential for space exploration in the near future. In the twenty-first century, a usable and efficient fusion rocket will be developed and in use. Because of the great distance between other planets and Earth, efficient use of time, fuel, and payload is essential. A nuclear spaceship would provide greater fuel efficiency, less travel time, and a larger payload. Extended missions would give more time for research, experiments, and data acquisition. With the extended mission time, a need for an artificial environment exists. The topics of magnetic fusion propulsion, living modules, artificial gravity, mass distribution, space connection, and orbital transfer to Mars are discussed. The propulsion system is a magnetic fusion reactor based on a tandem mirror design. This allows a faster, shorter trip time and a large thrust to weight ratio. The fuel proposed is a mixture of deuterium and helium-3. Helium-3 can be obtained from lunar mining. There will be minimal external radiation from the reactor resulting in a safe, efficient propulsion system.

  13. Book of abstracts of the joint EC-IAEA topical meeting on development of new structural materials for advanced fission and fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials performance and reliability are key issues for the safety and competitiveness of future nuclear installations: Generation IV nuclear systems for increased sustainability, advanced systems for non-electrical uses of nuclear energy, partitioning and transmutation systems, as well as thermo-nuclear fusion systems. These systems will have to feature high thermal efficiency and optimized utilization of fuel combined with minimized nuclear waste. For the sustainability of the nuclear option, there is a renewed interest worldwide in new reactor systems, closed fuel cycle research and technology development, and nuclear process heat applications. This requires the development and qualification of new high temperature structural materials with improved radiation and corrosion resistance. To achieve the challenging materials performance parameters, focused research and targeted testing of new candidate materials are necessary. Recent developments regarding new classes of materials with improved microstructural features, such as fibre-reinforced ceramic composite materials, oxide dispersion strengthened steels or advanced ferritic-martensitic steels are promising since they combine good radiation resistance and corrosion properties with high-temperature strength and toughness. In view of a successful and timely implementation of design parameters, in particular for primary circuits, new structural materials have to be qualified during the next decade. To this end an international R and D effort is being undertaken. Recent progress in materials science, supported by computer modelling and advanced materials characterisation techniques, has the potential to accelerate the process of new structural materials development. The scope of the meeting is information exchange and cross-fertilisation of various disciplines, including an overview of recent status of world-wide R and D activities. A comprehensive review of the designs of fission as well as fusion reactor systems

  14. Numerical study of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of laser-irradiated deuterium and deuterium-tritium targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marocchino, Alberto; Atzeni, Stefano; Schiavi, Angelo

    2010-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at the ablation front of laser-irradiated planar targets is investigated by two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations. The linear evolution of perturbations seeded either by surface roughness or target inhomogeneity is studied for perturbation wavelengths in the range 10≤λ≤400 μm and laser intensity 4×1012≤I≤4×1014 W/cm2 (with laser wavelength λlaser=0.35 μm). Thin and thick cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium (DT) planar targets are considered. For targets irradiated at constant intensity, it is found that perturbations with wavelength below a given threshold perform damped oscillations, while perturbations above such a threshold are unstable and oscillate with growing amplitude. This is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions by Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)], according to which ablation related processes stabilize perturbations with kDc≫1, where Dc is the distance between the ablation front and critical density for laser propagation. For kDcdamped after an initial growth. In a thin target, initial perturbations, either damped or amplified by RMI and LDI, seed the subsequent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, it is shown that RMI growth of fusion targets can be reduced by using laser pulses including an initial adiabat-shaping picket (originally proposed to reduce the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instability).

  15. Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    hydrogen (deuterium and tritium), are derived from water and the metal lithium, a relatively abundant resource. The fuels are virtually inexhaustible and they are available worldwide. Deuterium from one gallon of seawater would provide the equivalent energy of 300 gallons of gasoline, or over a half ton of coal. This energy is released when deuterium and tritium nuclei are fused together to form a helium nucleus and a neutron. The neutron is used to breed tritium from lithium. The energy released is carried by the helium nucleus (3.5 MeV) and the neutron (14 MeV). The energetic helium nucleus heats the fuel, helping to sustain the fusion reaction. Once the helium cools, it is collected and becomes a useful byproduct. A fusion power plant would produce no climate-changing gases.

  16. An overview of LLNL high-energy short-pulse technology for advanced radiography of laser fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and possibly other large-scale Nd : glass lasers are reviewed. High-energy short-pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on NIF. Development of metre-scale, high-efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of high energy petawatt (HEPW) pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fibre-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for HEPW pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion. (author)

  17. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 142 Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  18. The phases of deuterium at extreme densities

    OpenAIRE

    Bedaque, Paulo F.; Buchoff, Michael I.; Cherman, Aleksey

    2010-01-01

    We consider deuterium compressed to higher than atomic, but lower than nuclear densities. At such densities deuterium is a superconducting quantum liquid. Generically, two superconducting phases compete, a "ferromagnetic" and a "nematic" one. We provide a power counting argument suggesting that the dominant interactions in the deuteron liquid are perturbative (but screened) Coulomb interactions. At very high densities the ground state is determined by very small nuclear interaction effects th...

  19. Generation of Mie size microdroplet aerosols with applications in laser-driven fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a tunable source of Mie scale microdroplet aerosols that can be used for the generation of energetic ions. To demonstrate this potential, a terawatt Ti:Al2O3 laser focused to 2x1019 W/cm2 was used to irradiate heavy water (D2O) aerosols composed of micron-scale droplets. Energetic deuterium ions, which were generated in the laser-droplet interaction, produced deuterium-deuterium fusion with approximately 2x103 fusion neutrons measured per joule of incident laser energy.

  20. Neutrons and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of energy from fusion reactions does not require neutrons in the fundamental sense that they are required in a fission reactor. Nevertheless, the dominant fusion reaction, that between deuterium and tritium, yields a 14 MeV neutron. To contrast a fusion reactor based on this reaction with the fission case, 3 x 1020 such neutrons produced per gigawatt of power. This is four times as many neutrons as in an equivalent fission reactor and they carry seven times the energy of the fission neutrons. Thus, they dominate the energy recovery problem and create technological problems comparable to the original plasma confinement problem as far as a practical power producing device is concerned. Further contrasts of the fusion and fission cases are presented to establish the general role of neutrons in fusion devices. Details of the energy deposition processes are discussed and those reactions necessary for producing additional tritium are outlined. The relatively high energy flux with its large intensity will activate almost any materials of which the reactor may be composed. This activation is examined from the point of view of decay heat, radiological safety, and long-term storage. In addition, a discussion of the deleterious effects of neutron interactions on materials is given in some detail; this includes the helium and hydrogen producing reactions and displacement rate of the lattice atoms. The various materials that have been proposed for structural purposes, for breeding, reflecting, and moderating neutrons, and for radiation shielding are reviewed from the nuclear standpoint. The specific reactions of interest are taken up for various materials and finally a report is given on the status and prospects of data for fusion studies

  1. Understanding Fuel Magnetization and Mix Using Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, P. F.; Knapp, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Porter, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.155003] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  2. Numerical study of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of laser-irradiated deuterium and deuterium-tritium targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at the ablation front of laser-irradiated planar targets is investigated by two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations. The linear evolution of perturbations seeded either by surface roughness or target inhomogeneity is studied for perturbation wavelengths in the range 10≤λ≤400 μm and laser intensity 4x1012≤I≤4x1014 W/cm2 (with laser wavelength λlaser=0.35 μm). Thin and thick cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium (DT) planar targets are considered. For targets irradiated at constant intensity, it is found that perturbations with wavelength below a given threshold perform damped oscillations, while perturbations above such a threshold are unstable and oscillate with growing amplitude. This is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions by Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)], according to which ablation related processes stabilize perturbations with kDc>>1, where Dc is the distance between the ablation front and critical density for laser propagation. For kDcc on laser intensity I (roughly Dc∝I, according to the present simulations). Direct-drive laser fusion targets are irradiated by time-shaped pulses, with a low intensity initial foot. In this case, perturbations with wavelengths below some threshold (about 10 μm, for typical ignition-class all-DT targets) are damped after an initial growth. In a thin target, initial perturbations, either damped or amplified by RMI and LDI, seed the subsequent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, it is shown that RMI growth of fusion targets can be reduced by using laser pulses including an initial adiabat-shaping picket (originally proposed to reduce the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instability).

  3. Status and problems of fusion reactor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, U

    2001-03-01

    Thermonuclear fusion of deuterium and tritium constitutes an enormous potential for a safe, environmentally compatible and sustainable energy supply. The fuel source is practically inexhaustible. Further, the safety prospects of a fusion reactor are quite favourable due to the inherently self-limiting fusion process, the limited radiologic toxicity and the passive cooling property. Among a small number of approaches, the concept of toroidal magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas has achieved most impressive scientific and technical progress towards energy release by thermonuclear burn of deuterium-tritium fuels. The status of thermonuclear fusion research activity world-wide is reviewed and present solutions to the complicated physical and technological problems are presented. These problems comprise plasma heating, confinement and exhaust of energy and particles, plasma stability, alpha particle heating, fusion reactor materials, reactor safety and environmental compatibility. The results and the high scientific level of this international research activity provide a sound basis for the realisation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), whose goal is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of a fusion energy source for peaceful purposes. PMID:11402837

  4. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  5. Cryogenic hydrogen data pertinent to magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To aid future hydrogen fusion researchers, I have correlated the measured physical and chemical properties of the hydrogens below 300K. I have further estimated these properties for deuterium--deuterium tritide--tritium (D2--DT--T2) fusion fuel. My resulting synthesis offers a timely view and review of cryogenic hydrogen properties, plus some hydrogen data to room temperature. My general thrust is for workers new to the field, although my discussion of the scientific background of the material would suit specialists

  6. Concept of a charged fusion product diagnostic for NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of a new diagnostic for NSTX to determine the time dependent charged fusion product emission profile using an array of semiconductor detectors is presented. The expected time resolution of 1-2 ms should make it possible to study the effect of magnetohydrodynamics and other plasma activities (toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE), neoclassical tearing modes (NTM), edge localized modes (ELM), etc.) on the radial transport of neutral beam ions. First simulation results of deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion proton yields for different detector arrangements and methods for inverting the simulated data to obtain the emission profile are discussed.

  7. Deuterium contents in animal organisms in presence of natural abundance and depleted deuterium aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium,the stable heavy isotope of hydrogen, when more abundant than the natural values (i.e. 144 ppm), as in heavy water, induces significant alterations in the anatomy and physiology of animal or vegetal cells. Such alterations eventually entail the death of the cell. On the other hand some products with depleted deuterium have antagonistic effects due to deuterium removal from the cells. The paper reports results of measurements of deuterium concentration in various biological samples in studies about distribution of deuterium depleted agents in organisms. The biological samples studied came from a lot of individuals fed in a regime of depleted deuterium. The mass spectrometric analyses of these biological samples showed that dispersion of deuterium depleted agents inside the organisms is determined by several endo- and exogenous factors. The paper describes the specific procedures of sampling the biological materials destined to isotopic analyses, the extraction of water in vacuum, the methods of deuterium concentration determination and finally presents a discussion of the results reported

  8. Fluence dependence of deuterium retention in oxidized SS-316

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Sachiko; Matsuyama, Masao; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Asakura, Yamato; Okuno, Kenji

    2011-10-01

    The ion fluence dependence of deuterium retention in SS-316 during oxidation at a temperature of 673 K was studied to evaluate the dynamics of deuterium retention in the oxide layer of SS-316. The correlation between the chemical state of stainless steel and deuterium retention was evaluated using XPS and TDS. It was found that the major deuterium desorption temperatures were located at around 660 K and 935 K, which correspond to the desorption of deuterium trapped as hydroxide. The deuterium retention increased with increasing deuterium ion fluence, since the deuterium retention as hydroxide increased significantly. However, retention saturated at an ion fluence of ˜2.5 × 10 21 D + m -2. The XPS result showed that FeOOD was formed on the surface, although pure Fe also remained in the oxide layer. These facts indicate the nature of the oxide layer have a key role in deuterium trapping behavior.

  9. Deuterium enrichment of interstellar dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Majumdar, Liton; Sahu, Dipen

    2016-07-01

    High abundance of some abundant and simple interstellar species could be explained by considering the chemistry that occurs on interstellar dusts. Because of its simplicity, the rate equation method is widely used to study the surface chemistry. However, because the recombination efficiency for the formation of any surface species is highly dependent on various physical and chemical parameters, the Monte Carlo method is best suited for addressing the randomness of the processes. We carry out Monte-Carlo simulation to study deuterium enrichment of interstellar grain mantle under various physical conditions. Based on the physical properties, various types of clouds are considered. We find that in diffuse cloud regions, very strong radiation fields persists and hardly a few layers of surface species are formed. In translucent cloud regions with a moderate radiation field, significant number of layers would be produced and surface coverage is mainly dominated by photo-dissociation products such as, C, CH_3, CH_2D, OH and OD. In the intermediate dense cloud regions (having number density of total hydrogen nuclei in all forms ˜2 × 10^4 cm^{-3}), water and methanol along with their deuterated derivatives are efficiently formed. For much higher density regions (˜10^6 cm^{-3}), water and methanol productions are suppressed but surface coverage of CO, CO_2, O_2, O_3 are dramatically increased. We find a very high degree of fractionation of water and methanol. Observational results support a high fractionation of methanol but surprisingly water fractionation is found to be low. This is in contradiction with our model results indicating alternative routes for de-fractionation of water.

  10. Determination of atom percent deuterium in deuterium gas using a vibrating-probe density meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom percent deuterium may be effectively analyzed in a mixture of hydrogen and deuterium gases from the density determination of the mixture of water-heavy water which is formed after the gas sample is converted to an oxide and condensed. The density can be accurately measured by using a vibrating-tube density meter which is standardized with air and pure water or other density standards. This deuterium determination requires no empirical standardization against known deuterium standards. The sample gas in a helium carrier is passed through a hot copper oxide tube; the hydrogen and deuterium oxides are condensed in a liquid-nitrogen cooled collection bulb, which was designed for effective entrapment and prevention of sample exposure to the atmosphere

  11. On the Core Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Ratio and Temperature Measurements in DEMO

    CERN Document Server

    Kiptily, V G

    2014-01-01

    Comparing with ITER, the experimental fusion machine under constraction, the next step test fusion power plant, DEMO will be characterized by very long pulse/steady-state operation and much higher plasma volume and fusion power. The substantially increased level of neutron and gamma fluxes will require reducing the physical access to the plant. It means some conventional diagnostics for the fusion plasma control will be not suitable in DEMO. Development of diagnostics along with the machine design is a primary task for the test plant. The deuterium- tritium fuel ratio and temperature are among important parameters, which should be under control. In this letter a novel technique for the core fuel ratio and temperature diagnostics is proposed. It is based on measurements and comparison of the rates T(p,{\\gamma})4He and D(T,{\\gamma})5He nuclear reactions that take place in the hot deuterium-tritium plasma. Based on detection of high energy gamma-rays, this diagnostic is robust, efficient and does not require dir...

  12. The Role of the JET Project in Global Fusion Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1983-01-01

    The aim of nuclear fusion research is to make fusion energy available as a new energy source. Fusion processes occur naturally in the sun, where hydrogen nuclei release energy by combining to form helium. A fusion reactor on earth will require even higher temperatures than in the interior...... of the sun, and it will be based on deuterium and tritium reactions. JET (Joint European Torus) is a major fusion experiment now under construction near Abingdon in the UK It is aimed at producing conditions approximating those necessary in a fusion reactor. The results expected from JET should permit...... a realistic evaluation of the prospects for fusion power and serve as a basis for the design of the next major fusion experiment....

  13. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  14. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm-1, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs

  15. Advances in the development of interaction between the codes MCNPX and ANSYS Fluent and their fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advances are presented in the project for the development of a code of interaction between MCNPX y el ANSYS Fluent. Following the flow of the work carried out during the development of the project will study of the most appropriate remeshing algorithms between both codes. In addition explain the selection and implementation of methods to verify internally the correct transmission of the variables involved between both nets. Finally the selection of cases for verification and validation of the interaction between both codes in each of the possible fields of application will be exposed.

  16. Lasers for inertial confinement fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a discussion of the advances that have taken place in the development of lasers for inertial confinement fusion research since the AECL Laser Fusion Working Party study (AECL-4840) in 1973. It is intended primarily as input to the current Fusion Status Study Group but also as general background information for the Laser Fusion Progress section of the Physics Advanced Systems Study Committee. (auth)

  17. Remote sensing image fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano; Garzelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis of more than ten years of experience, Remote Sensing Image Fusion covers methods specifically designed for remote sensing imagery. The authors supply a comprehensive classification system and rigorous mathematical description of advanced and state-of-the-art methods for pansharpening of multispectral images, fusion of hyperspectral and panchromatic images, and fusion of data from heterogeneous sensors such as optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and integration of thermal and visible/near-infrared images. They also explore new trends of signal/image processing, such as

  18. Method of deuterium isotope separation using ethylene and ethylene dichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compounds enriched in deuterium may be obtained from ethylene, vinyl chloride, 1,2-dichloroethane, or propylene by laser isotope separation. Normal molecules of these organic compounds are exposed to infrared laser radiation of a suitable wavelength. Substantially all of the deuterium-containing molecules exposed to the laser can be selectively dissociated and the deuterium-containing products separated from the starting material and other reaction products. The deuterium-containing molecules can be burned to form water with an enriched deuterium content, or pyrolized to form hydrogen gas enriched in deuterium

  19. Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project annual report 93/94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project exists to develop fusion technologies and apply them worldwide in today's advanced fusion projects and to apply these technologies in fusion and tritium research facilities. CFFTP concentrates on developing capability in fusion fuel cycle systems, in tritium handling technologies and in remote handling. This is an annual report for CFFTP and as such also includes a financial report

  20. Present status of deuterium and tritium separation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the research on the separation of hydrogen isotopes has become to be noticed suddenly in Japan. One of the technologies which must be established in near future is the problem concerning tritium. It is roughly divided into two aspects. The one is the technology of treating tritium as the environmental problem in nuclear facilities, and the other is the technology of handling the tritium of 10 million Ci level accompanying the development of nuclear fusion reactors and the technology of tritium production. These technologies include the process of hydrogen isotope separation. On December 4 and 5, 1980, the symposium concerning the separation of deuterium and tritium was held in the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, and 27 papers were presented. In this report, only the researches concerning hydrogen isotope separation among them are introduced. As for the hydrogen isotope separation by the isotope exchange method between water and hydrogen, the development of hydrophobic catalysts and the types of the exchange columns are explained. The hydrogen isotope separation by water distillation has been practically used. As for the tritium separation in the fuel system of nuclear fusion reactors, deep cooling distillation system, the permeation method through Pd-alloy membranes and thermal diffusion method are described. Also the separation of hydrogen isotopes by adsorption is reported. (Kako, I.)

  1. EMP Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    KUNTAY, Isık

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel fusion scheme, called EMP Fusion, which has the promise of achieving breakeven and realizing commercial fusion power. The method is based on harnessing the power of an electromagnetic pulse generated by the now well-developed flux compression technology. The electromagnetic pulse acts as a means of both heating up the plasma and confining the plasma, eliminating intermediate steps. The EMP Fusion device is simpler compared to other fusion devices and this reduces...

  2. Fusion Power Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment

  3. Advanced digital subtraction angiography and MR fusion imaging protocol applied to accurate placement of flow diverter device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faragò, Giuseppe; Caldiera, Valentina; Tempra, Giovanni; Ciceri, Elisa

    2016-02-01

    In recent years there has been a progressive increase in interventional neuroradiology procedures, partially due to improvements in devices, but also to the simultaneous development of technologies and radiological images. Cone beam CT (Dyna-CT; Siemens) is a method recently used to obtain pseudo CT images from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with a flat panel detector. Using dedicated software, it is then possible to merge Dyna-CT images with images from a different source. We report here the usefulness of advanced DSA techniques (Syngo-Dyna CT, three-dimensional DSA iPilot) for the treatment of an intracranial aneurysm with a flow diverter device. Merging MR and Dyna-CT images at the end of the procedure proved to be a simple and rapid additional method of verifying the success of the intervention. PMID:25589548

  4. Capillarity and dielectrophoresis of liquid deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ponderomotive force, exerted upon all dielectric liquids by a non-uniform electric field, can be used for the remote, voltage-controlled manipulation of 10 to 100 μL volumes of cryogenic liquids. This liquid dielectrophoretic (DEP) effect, imposed by specially designed electrodes, combines with capillarity to influence the hydrostatic equilibria of liquid deuterium. A simple, one-dimensional model accurately predicts the measured meniscus rise of D2 against gravity for sufficiently wide, parallel electrodes. For narrow electrodes, where the sidewalls influence the equilibrium, a finite element solution using the Surface Evolver software correctly describes the shape of the meniscus. A bifurcation phenomenon previously observed for room temperature dielectrics is also observed in liquid deuterium. Cryo-DEP actuation has potential applications ranging from metering precise volumes of liquid deuterium for laser target fuelling to manipulation of liquid nitrogen for cryo-preservation of biological samples.

  5. Capillarity and dielectrophoresis of liquid deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T B [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Gram, R; Harding, D R [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Kentch, K, E-mail: jones@ece.rochester.ed [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)

    2009-11-21

    The ponderomotive force, exerted upon all dielectric liquids by a non-uniform electric field, can be used for the remote, voltage-controlled manipulation of 10 to 100 {mu}L volumes of cryogenic liquids. This liquid dielectrophoretic (DEP) effect, imposed by specially designed electrodes, combines with capillarity to influence the hydrostatic equilibria of liquid deuterium. A simple, one-dimensional model accurately predicts the measured meniscus rise of D{sub 2} against gravity for sufficiently wide, parallel electrodes. For narrow electrodes, where the sidewalls influence the equilibrium, a finite element solution using the Surface Evolver software correctly describes the shape of the meniscus. A bifurcation phenomenon previously observed for room temperature dielectrics is also observed in liquid deuterium. Cryo-DEP actuation has potential applications ranging from metering precise volumes of liquid deuterium for laser target fuelling to manipulation of liquid nitrogen for cryo-preservation of biological samples.

  6. Deuterium NMR, induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were studied. Induced cholesteric lyomesophases based on potassium laurate (KL) system, with small amounts of cholesterol added, were studied by deuterium NMR and by polarizing microscopy. Order profiles obtained from deuterium NMR of KL perdenderated chains in both induced cholesteric and normal mesophases were compared. The intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were based on the amphiphile potassium N-lauroyl serinate (KLNS) in the resolved levo form. The study of the type I intrinsic cholesteric mesophase was made by optical microscopy under polarized light and the type II intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophase was characterized by deuterium NMR. The new texture was explained by the use of the theory of disclinations developed for thermotropic liquid crystals, specially for cholesteric type. (M.J.C.)

  7. Neutrino and Antineutrino Interactions in Deuterium

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment uses BEBC filled with deuterium and exposed to the wide-band neutrino beam N1. The use of deuterium as the target material allows to study interactions on both neutrons and protons. The charge of the target nucleon can be inferred from the number of positive and negative particles in the final state. \\\\ \\\\ Some of the physics aims of this experiment are to measure separately the cross sections @s^n and @s^p on neutrons and protons to determine the structure functions F|n(x,Q|2) and F|p(x,Q|2), the fragmentation functions D(z,Q|2) and the ratio of neutral to charged current interactions. \\\\ \\\\ Additional problems under investigation are the production of nucleon isobars, and of resonances in general, the production of strange and of charmed particles, and the problems of deuterium structure.

  8. Deuterium production by cosmological cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the various low-energy interactions that take place at high redshifts (z approximately 100) between a (hypothetical) flux of cosmological cosmic rays (''CCR'': protons and α particles), and the ambient gaseous medium, deuterium production is interesting in view of the relevance of this element to big-bang cosmology. The production cross-sections are discussed in detail. The abundance of deuterium produced by this process is computed by normalizing the CCR flux so as to account for the approximately 1-100 MeV γ-ray background spectrum. The resulting D (and 3He) abundances may reach approximately 20% of their observed value. It is also shown how the results can be compared with those obtained recently by Epstein et al. on deuterium production by ''pregalactic cosmic rays''. (author)

  9. Inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these notes, we discuss inertially confined thermonuclear fusion obtained by means of spherically imploded deuterium-tritium fuel. The emphasis is on the 'inner part' of ICF physics, on the implosion dynamics, central fuel ignition, and energy gain, rather than on the problems of beam/target interaction. Section 1 summarizes the basic concept of ICF and recent achievements on fuel compression and briefly indicates advantages and disadvantages of different driver beams. The key parameters for energy gain are discussed in Section 2 in terms of a model, and some recent results on the gas dynamics of central collapse, final compression and formation of the ignition spark are presented in Section 3. (orig.)

  10. Deuterium-incorporated gate oxide of MOS devices fabricated by using deuterium ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aspect of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device reliability, deuterium-incorporated gate oxide could be utilized to suppress the wear-out that is combined with oxide trap generation. An alternative deuterium process for the passivation of oxide traps or defects in the gate oxide of MOS devices has been suggested in this study. The deuterium ion is delivered to the location where the gate oxide resides by using an implantation process and subsequent N2 annealing process at the back-end of metallization process. A conventional MOS field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with a 3-nm-thick gate oxide and poly-to-ploy capacitor sandwiched with 20-nm-thick SiO2 were fabricated in order to demonstrate the deuterium effect in our process. An optimum condition of ion implantation was necessary to account for the topography of the overlaying layers in the device structure and to minimize the physical damage due to the energy of the implanted ion. Device parameter variations, the gate leakage current, and the dielectric breakdown phenomenon were investigated in the deuterium-ion-implanted devices. We found the isotope effect between hydrogen- and deuterium-implanted devices and an improved electrical reliability in the deuterated gate oxide. This implies that deuterium bonds are generated effectively at the Si/SiO2 interface and in the SiO2 bulk.

  11. A review of the R and D status in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadian contributions to the field of fusion follow the division of resources into investigations of Tokamak plasmas and next laser-matter interaction. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Programme will permit carryover of recognized Canadian expertise with tritium handling and remote operations to nuclear fusion. Canada could be a supplier of all three fuels that will be burned in the current and next generation of Tokamaks: deuterium, tritium and lithium. Whereas Canada could be seen as a reliable source for these fuels, it is important that we take steps to market not only the fuels but also skills, technology and services associated with the fuel cycle for fusion reactors

  12. Revitalizing Fusion via Fission Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2001-10-01

    Existing tokamaks could generate significant nuclear fuel. TFTR, operating steady state with DT might generate enough fuel for a 300 MW nuclear reactor. The immediate goals of the magnetic fusion program would necessarily shift from a study of advanced plasma regimes in larger sized devices, to mostly known plasmas regimes, but at steady state or high duty cycle operation in DT plasmas. The science and engineering of breeding blankets would be equally important. Follow on projects could possibly produce nuclear fuel in large quantity at low price. Although today there is strong opposition to nuclear power in the United States, in a 21st century world of 10 billion people, all of whom will demand a middle class life style, nuclear energy will be important. Concern over greenhouse gases will also drive the world toward nuclear power. There are studies indicating that the world will need 10 TW of carbon free energy by 2050. It is difficult to see how this can be achieved without the breeding of nuclear fuel. By using the thorium cycle, proliferation risks are minimized. [1], [2]. 1 W. Manheimer, Fusion Technology, 36, 1, 1999, 2.W. Manheimer, Physics and Society, v 29, #3, p5, July, 2000

  13. Measurement of ionization in shock-compressed deuterium using x-ray Thomson scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, P.; Doeppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Unites, W.; Desjarlais, M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2010-11-01

    There is currently significant interest in the behavior of dense hydrogen under shock conditions, with applications ranging from planetary science to inertial confinement fusion. Here, we present the first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on warm, dense deuterium in the collective regime. The experiment, performed on LLNL's Janus laser, used one 2 ns beam to drive a shock at a nominal pressure of 0.5 MBar into a deuterium target held at liquid conditions (19 K). A second 2 ns pulse pumped the Si Ly-α x-ray probe at 2 keV. Scattered x-rays were collected at 45 degrees in the forward direction and spectrally dispersed with a HOPG crystal spectrometer. A plasmon was detected, providing a direct measure of electron density. Simultaneous velocity interferometry was performed to determine pressure, allowing ionization state to be inferred. These results are compared to ab initio and hydrodynamic simulations.

  14. Comparison between x-ray scattering and velocity-interferometry measurements from shocked liquid deuterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K; Regan, S P; Vorberger, J; Crowley, B J B; Glenzer, S H; Hu, S X; Murphy, C D; Radha, P B; Jephcoat, A P; Wark, J S; Gericke, D O; Gregori, G

    2013-04-01

    The equation of state of light elements is essential to understand the structure of Jovian planets and inertial confinement fusion research. The Omega laser was used to drive a planar shock wave in the cryogenically cooled deuterium, creating warm dense matter conditions. X-ray scattering was used to determine the spectrum near the boundary of the collective and noncollective scattering regimes using a narrow band x-ray source in backscattering geometry. Our scattering spectra are thus sensitive to the individual electron motion as well as the collective plasma behavior and provide a measurement of the electron density, temperature, and ionization state. Our data are consistent with velocity-interferometry measurements previously taken on the same shocked deuterium conditions and presented by K. Falk et al. [High Energy Density Phys. 8, 76 (2012)]. This work presents a comparison of the two diagnostic systems and offers a detailed discussion of challenges encountered. PMID:23679534

  15. Helium processing for deuterium/helium burns in ITER's physics phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The requirements for vacuum pumping and fuel processing for deuterium/helium (D/3He) burns in the physics operating phase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) were assessed. These burns are expected to have low fusion power (100 MW), short burn times (≤30 s), limited operation (2000 shots), and a fractional burn ∼0.3%. For the physics phase, the fuel processing system will include several units to separate deuterium and helium (activated charcoal bed, SAES getter and a Pd/Ag diffuser), as well as an isotopic separation system to separate 3He and 4He. The needed vacuum system's cryosorption surface area may be as large as 10 m2 if the burn time is ∼200 s, the fractional burn is 100 MW. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  16. Metal liner-driven cylindrically convergent isentropic compression of cryogenic deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinwurm, Marcus; Bland, Simon N.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.

    2014-05-01

    In order to take advantage of geometrical convergence, we investigated a method, where a beryllium liner drives a cylindrical shockless compression in a cryogenic deuterium fill. The metal liner acts as a current carrier as well as a pressure boundary to the fill. The required driving pressure was obtained through a fictitious flow (FF) simulation [D S Clark and M Tabak 2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 1147]. A current model that can recreate the FF compression inside the liner by shaping the current pulse, is then introduced. This method also allows efficient compression of hydrogen at low entropy, enabling the recreation of conditions present in the interior of gas giants and potentially the observation of a transition into a metallic state. Our two-dimensional simulations show that thick liners remain robust to magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth, suggesting that cylindrical isentropic ramp compression is a promising scheme for extending deuterium's experimentally measured equation of state.

  17. Tritium analysis in deuterium gas and deuterated metals of the IVb group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the study of the possibility of D-D nuclear fusion reaction in metallic lattices, tritium detection is one of the ways to demonstrate that such a reaction has taken place. In the tests based on heavy water electrolysis tritium production has been ascertained. It seemed worthwhile to look if, also in the process of metals deuteration, tritium is being produced. In order to detect a possible production it is necessary to analyze both the deuterium used for the operation and the deuterated metals. A system based on the oxidation of deuterium and tritium to water, trapping in a cold trap and finally counting in a scintillation spectrometer has been set up. The possible source of error are discussed. 2 tabs., 3 figs., 13 refs

  18. Recombination in deuterium plasma at cryogenic temperatures (down to 130 K)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ions H3+ and D3+ play an important role in the kinetics of media of astrophysical interest but also in laboratory produced plasmas (discharges, fusion plasmas). In the presented study variable temperature flowing afterglow with Langmuir probe (VT-FALP) was used to study plasma decay in D2/He mixture at temperatures down to 130 K and total pressure up to 10 Torr. Large extend of partial number densities of D2 (1012 - 3 x 1015 cm-3) were used in the experiments. Langmuir probes and mass spectrometers were applied to monitor decay of the plasma during the afterglow. The study is a continuation of our previous measurements of recombination rate coefficients of D3+ and D5+ ions. In these studies we observed dependence of the recombination rate coefficient on partial pressure of deuterium indicating that third-body assisted recombination is efficient and significantly contributes to recombination in decaying deuterium-containing plasma. (authors)

  19. Cold neutron scattering in imperfect deuterium crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The differential cross sections for cold neutron scattering in mosaic deuterium crystals have been calculated for various target temperatures. The theoretical results are compared with the recent experimental data for the neutron wavelengths $\\lambda\\approx$~1--9~\\AA. It is shown that the structures of observed Bragg peaks can be explained by the mosaic spread of about $3^{\\circ}$ and contributions from a~limited number of crystal orientations. Such a~crystal structure should be also taken into account in ultracold neutron upscattering due to the coherent phonon annihilation in solid deuterium.

  20. Continuum emission from irradiated solid deuterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forrest, J.A.; Brooks, R.L.; Hunt, J.L.; Stenum, B.; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.; Gürtler, P.; Magnotta, F.; Mapoles, E.R.; Souers, P.C.; Collins, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    A new emission feature from the spectrum of irradiated solid deuterium has been observed in the very near-infrared spectral region. Experiments from three laboratories, using different excitation conditions, have confirmed the observation. Comparison of the timing and temperature dependence of the...... spectral feature to the information previously available from electron spin resonance studies of solid deuterium, points to atomic association as the underlying cause. We shall show the connection of this emission to the occurrence of thermal spikes and optical flashes, previously observed in solid...

  1. Monte Carlo simulation for Kaonic deuterium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The SIDDHARTA experiment at the DAFNE collider measured the shift and with of the ground level in kaonic hydrogen caused by the strong interaction between the kaons and protons. The measurement of the X-ray transitions to the 1s level in kaonic deuterium will allow, together with the available results from kaonic hydrogen, to extract the isospin- dependent antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths. I will present the Monte Carlo simulation of the SIDDHARTA-2 setup, in the framework of GEANT4. The program is used to optimize the critical parameters of the setup in order to perform the kaonic deuterium measurement. (author)

  2. Prospects for bubble fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I. [Tyumen Institute of Mechanics of Multiphase Systems (TIMMS), Marx (Russian Federation); Lahey, R.T. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  3. Recent findings on blistering and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high-fluence deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blistering and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high-fluence (up to 1027 D/m2) of high-flux (1022 D+/m2/s) and low-energy (38 eV) deuterium plasma were examined in the temperature range of 315-1000 K with scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam, thermal desorption spectroscopy and positron annihilation. There were cavities inside small blisters with the maximum ratio of height against diameter of about 0.7, whereas there were voids/holes along the grain boundary beneath most large blisters but no hollow lid formed. Blistering and deuterium retention showed a significant dependence upon fluence and exposure temperature.

  4. Once more about cold nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the experiments on the search for cold nuclear d-d fusion in chemically pure titanium are given both for electrolysis of heavy water D2O and for titanium saturation with gaseous deuterium. The saturation took place at the temperature of 77K and pressure of 50 and 150 atm. A round of experiments with temperature varying from 1 to 600 atm was carried out. The limiting values of the partial rate of the nuclear reaction of d-d fusion with neutron production were obtained per deuteron (at the 95% confidence level): λf≤4x10-25 s-1(experiment with electrolysis), λf≤7x10-28 s-1 (experiment with gaseous deuterium). 7 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  5. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Fusion power is generated when hot deuterium and tritium nuclei react, producing alpha particles and 14 MeV neutrons. These neutrons escape the reaction plasma and are absorbed by the surrounding material structure of the plant, transferring the heat of the reaction to an external cooling circuit. In such high-energy neutron irradiation environments, extensive atomic displacement damage and transmutation production of helium affect the mechanical properties of materials. Among these effect...

  6. Choice of coils for a fusion reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Romeo; Garabedian, Paul R.

    2007-01-01

    In a fusion reactor a hot plasma of deuterium and tritium is confined by a strong magnetic field to produce helium ions and release energetic neutrons. The 3D geometry of a stellarator provides configurations for such a device that reduce net toroidal current that might lead to disruptions. We construct smooth coils generating an external magnetic field designed to prevent the plasma from deteriorating.

  7. Fusion energy production during ion injection into a nonneutral plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on values of fusion energy multiplication >1 which have been shown to be possible during energetic deuterium injection into high-electron-temperature (Te > 3 keV), quasi-neutral tritium plasmas. The high-temperature requirement is eliminated when a nonneutral plasma is the beam's target. Fusion energy multiplication factors >1 can be obtained in a low-temperature (< 100 eV), nonneutral tritium plasma

  8. Neutron Spectroscopy Studies of Heating Effects in Fusion Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Henriksson, Hans

    2003-01-01

    High power fusion plasmas produced in the world’s largest facility for magnetic confinement experiments (JET), have been studied using the neutron emission measured with the magnetic proton recoil (MPR) spectrometer. The MPR has been used to observe plasmas since 1996 including those of deuterium-tritium leading to several fusion records and corresponding observational achievements of neutron emission spectroscopy. Noteworthy are novel studies of the complex states of fuel ions arising throug...

  9. Social Aspects of Cold Fusion: 23 Years Later

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalski L.

    2012-01-01

    The field of Cold Fusion, now called Condensed Matter Nuclear Science (CMNS), re- mains controversial. The original 1989 claim made by M. Fleischmann and S. Pons was that a chemical process in an electrolytic cell could initiate a nuclear reaction–fusion of two deuterium nuclei. More recent CMNS claims, made by experimental scientists, are: emission of charged nuclear projectiles during electrolysis; accumulation of 4 He; production of radioactive isotopes; and transmutat...

  10. Autocatalytic fission-fusion microexplosions for nuclear pulse propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    2000-12-01

    Autocatalytic fission-fusion microexplosions, mutually amplifying fission and fusion reactions, are proposed for propulsion. Autocatalytic fission-fusion microexplosions can be realized by imploding a shell of uranium 235 (or plutonium) onto a magnetized deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma. After having reached a high temperature, the DT plasma releases fusion neutrons making fission reactions in the fissile shell increasing the implosion velocity which in turn increases the fusion reaction rate until full ignition of the DT plasma. To implode the fissile shell a small amount of high explosive and to magnetize the DT plasma a small auxiliary electric discharge are required. In comparison to nuclear bomb pulse propulsion, the energy released per pulse is much smaller and the efficiency higher. And in comparison to laser- or particle-beam-ignited fusion microexplosions, there is no need for a massive fusion ignition driver.

  11. EURATOM strategy towards fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development (Research and Development) activities in controlled thermonuclear fusion have been carried out since the 60's of the last century aiming at providing a new clean, powerful, practically inexhaustive, safe, environmentally friend and economically attractive energy source for the sustainable development of our society.The EURATOM Fusion Programme (EFP) has the leadership of the magnetic confinement Research and Development activities due to the excellent results obtained on JET and other specialized devices, such as ASDEX-Upgrade, TORE SUPRA, FTU, TCV, TEXTOR, CASTOR, ISTTOK, MAST, TJ-II, W7-X, RFX and EXTRAP. JET is the largest tokamak in operation and the single device that can use deuterium and tritium mixes. It has produced 16 MW of fusion power, during 3 seconds, with an energy amplification of 0.6. The next steps of the EFP strategy towards fusion energy are ITER complemented by a vigorous Accompanying Programme, DEMO and a prototype of a fusion power plant. ITER, the first experimental fusion reactor, is a large-scale project (35-year duration, 10000 MEuros budget), developed in the frame of a very broad international collaboration, involving EURATOM, Japan, Russia Federation, United States of America, Korea, China and India. ITER has two main objectives: (i) to prove the scientific and technical viability of fusion energy by producing 500 MW, during 300 seconds and a energy amplification between 10 and 20; and (ii) to test the simultaneous and integrated operation of the technologies needed for a fusion reactor. The Accompanying Programme aims to prepare the ITER scientific exploitation and the DEMO design, including the development of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). A substantial part of this programme will be carried out in the frame of the Broader Approach, an agreement signed by EURATOM and Japan. The main goal of DEMO is to produce electricity, during a long time, from nuclear fusion reactions. The

  12. The primordial abundance of deuterium: ionization correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Ryan; Pettini, Max

    2016-01-01

    We determine the relative ionization of deuterium and hydrogen in low metallicity damped Lyman α (DLA) and sub-DLA systems using a detailed suite of photoionization simulations. We model metal-poor DLAs as clouds of gas in pressure equilibrium with a host dark matter halo, exposed to the Haardt & Madau background radiation of galaxies and quasars at redshift z ≃ 3. Our results indicate that the deuterium ionization correction correlates with the H I column density and the ratio of successive ion stages of the most commonly observed metals. The N(N II)/N(N I) column density ratio provides the most reliable correction factor, being essentially independent of the gas geometry, H I column density, and the radiation field. We provide a series of convenient fitting formulae to calculate the deuterium ionization correction based on observable quantities. The ionization correction typically does not exceed 0.1 per cent for metal-poor DLAs, which is comfortably below the current measurement precision (2 per cent). However, the deuterium ionization correction may need to be applied when a larger sample of D/H measurements becomes available.

  13. Photochemical deuterium separation: problems and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marling, J.B.; Herman, I.P.

    1978-09-01

    Photochemical separation of deuterium is examined to determine if either an ultraviolet or an infrared laser-based technology offers greater promise for development into an industrially viable heavy water production process. The three systems to be discussed are multiple-photon dissociation of organic molecules by pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser; CO or CO/sub 2/ laser-induced bimolecular reactions; and single-photon induced molecular dissociation by ultraviolet laser. Multiple-photon dissociation by CO/sub 2/ laser is attractive, since it utilizes an already developed high-power and efficient laser technology. Furthermore, single-step deuterium enrichment factors exceeding 1000-fold have been observed in the CF/sub 2/ = CFD photo-product from multiple-photon dissociation of dichlorotrifluoroethane, satisfying the high isotopic selectivity for economically viable photochemical deuterium separation. Its major drawback at present is the need to operate at low pressure. IR laser-induced bimolecular reactions may permit operation at higher pressure, and attractive processes include the methane + halogen and acetylene + hydrogen halide reaction systems. Single-photon induced ultraviolet dissociation using formaldehyde permits relatively high pressure operation, high single-step deuterium enrichment factors, and near-unity quantum yield. However, uv laser average power, efficiency, and lifetime, even based on the new XeCl or KrF excimer systems, still need substantial development to be used in an industrially viable process.

  14. Deuterium in New Zealand rivers and streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 750 deuterium measurements on rivers and streams in New Zealand are reported. Monthly samples were collected for periods of several years from a number of representative rivers. These show irregular storm-to-storm as well as seasonal deuterium variations. The seasonal variations range from as low as 1 per mille for lake-fed rivers to 8-10 per mille for rivers with large spring snow-melt contributions. Variations in mean annual ΔD values are believed to reflect changes in climatic variables; the present data will be used to compare with future changes. The bulk of the data are single samples; these show a geographic variation related to the altitude, latitude and climatic character of the catchments, with the highest deuterium contents (ΔD = -20 per mille) occurring in the far north, and lowest contents (-80 per mille) in the inland Otago region. Regression equations derived for the ΔD dependence on altitude (h) and latitude (l), are ΔD = -0.0169 h - 30.2 and westerly influence. Eastern climatic zones have lower deuterium contents because of rainout effects on the axial ranges. Contours of constant

  15. Emission of Secondary Electrons from Solid Deuterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.

    An experimental facility was built where films of solid deuterium of known thickness could be made and where they could be irradiated with pulsed beams of electrons (up to 3 keV) and light ions (up to 10 keV). Studies of secondary electron emission were made and the secondary electron emission...

  16. The use of deuterium in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whenever a corporal function experiences a disturbance reflected either by changes in metabolic activity or modifications of the importance of pools of certain molecules the possibility exists of making use of isotopes in diagnosis. This paper discusses the use of deuterium to measure total body water and extravascular water in the lungs, and gives examples of clinical applications

  17. Fusion research programme in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shishir Deshpande; Predhiman Kaw

    2013-10-01

    The fusion energy research program of India is summarized in the context of energy needs and scenario of tokamak advancements on domestic and international fronts. In particular, the various technologies that will lead us to ultimately build a fusion power reactor are identified along with the steps being taken for their indigenous development.

  18. Change in inertial confinement fusion implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillabet, L; Canaud, B; Salin, G; Mazevet, S; Loubeyre, P

    2011-09-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an inertial confinement fusion target [S. X. Hu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010)]. Here we use an advanced multiphase EOS, based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EOS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3 ns) in the shock timing of the implosion. PMID:22026681

  19. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images

  20. Quantitative characterization of inertial confinement fusion capsules using phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium, Be(Cu), shell. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) shell. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam shells were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately characterized using phase contrast enhanced x-ray images

  1. Results from recent deuterium-tritium experiments in the Joint European Torus Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief overview of Joint European Torus (JET) experimental results obtained in the recent deuterium-tritium Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) experiments carried out in JET is presented. A fusion power of 16.1 MW has been produced in an Elm-free H-mode at 4.2 Ma/3.6b with the transient value of the fusion amplification factor of 0.9. Alpha particle heating has been unambiguously observed. In the ITER-like Elm H-modes of operation, the H-mode threshold power was found to scale inversely with atomic mass. JET confinement data which are identical to ITER in many dimensionless parameters scale close to gyro-Bohm and point to ignition in ITER. In the optimised shear regime, internal transport barriers were established for the first time in D-T and a fusion power of 8.2 MW was produced even though full optimisation was not possible within the imposed neutron budget

  2. Neutron penumbral imaging of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a new technique, penumbral coded-aperture imaging, the first neutron images of laser-driven, inertial-confinement fusion targets were obtained. With these images the deuterium-tritium burn region within a compressed target can be measured directly. 4 references, 11 figures

  3. Deuterium fractionation in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punanova, A.; Caselli, P.; Pon, A.; Belloche, A.; André, Ph.

    2016-03-01

    Context. In cold (T 104 cm-3) interstellar clouds, molecules such as CO are significantly frozen onto dust grain surfaces. Deuterium fractionation is known to be very efficient in these conditions as CO limits the abundance of H3+, which is the starting point of deuterium chemistry. In particular, N2D+ is an excellent tracer of dense and cold gas in star-forming regions. Aims: We measure the deuterium fraction, RD, and the CO depletion factor, fd, towards a number of starless and protostellar cores in the L1688 region of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex and search for variations based upon environmental differences across L1688. The kinematic properties of the dense gas traced by the N2H+ and N2D+ (1-0) lines are also discussed. Methods: Deuterium fraction has been measured via observations of the J = 1-0 transition of N2H+ and N2D+ towards 33 dense cores in different regions of L1688. We estimated the CO depletion factor using C17O(1-0) and 850 μm dust continuum emission from the SCUBA survey. We carried out all line observations with the IRAM 30 m antenna. Results: The dense cores show large (≃2-40%) deuterium fractions with significant variations between the sub-regions of L1688. The CO depletion factor also varies from one region to another (between ≃1 and 7). Two different correlations are found between deuterium fraction and CO depletion factor: cores in regions A, B2, and I show increasing RD with increasing fd, similar to previous studies of deuterium fraction in pre-stellar cores; cores in regions B1, B1B2, C, E, F, and H show a steeper RD - fd correlation with large deuterium fractions occurring in fairly quiescent gas with relatively low CO freeze-out factors. These are probably recently formed, centrally concentrated starless cores, which have not yet started the contraction phase towards protostellar formation. We also find that the deuterium fraction is affected by the amount of turbulence, dust temperature, and distance from heating sources

  4. Compound cryopump for fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kovari, M; Shephard, T

    2013-01-01

    We reconsider an old idea: a three-stage compound cryopump for use in fusion reactors such as DEMO. The helium "ash" is adsorbed on a 4.5 K charcoal-coated surface, while deuterium and tritium are adsorbed at 15-22 K on a second charcoal-coated surface. The helium is released by raising the first surface to ~30 K. In a separate regeneration step, deuterium and tritium are released at ~110 K. In this way, the helium can be pre-separated from other species. In the simplest design, all three stages are in the same vessel, with a single valve to close the pump off from the tokamak during regeneration. In an alternative design, the three stages are in separate vessels, connected by valves, allowing the stages to regenerate without interfering with each other. The inclusion of the intermediate stage would not affect the overall pumping speed significantly. The downstream exhaust processing system could be scaled down, as much of the deuterium and tritium could be returned directly to the reactor. This could reduce ...

  5. Fusion Studies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  6. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    This dissertation investigates fusion rings, which are Grothendieck groups of rigid, monoidal, semisimple, abelian categories. Special interest is in rational fusion rings, i.e., fusion rings which admit a finite basis, for as commutative rings they may be presented as quotients of polynomial rings...... by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum...

  7. Elements of power plant design for inertial fusion energy. Final report of a coordinated research project 2000-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two major approaches in fusion energy research: magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). The basic physics of IFE (compression and ignition of small fuel pellets containing deuterium and tritium) is being increasingly understood. Based on recent advances by individual countries, IFE has reached a stage at which benefits could be obtained from a coordinated approach in the form of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Elements of Power Plant Design for Inertial Fusion Energy. This CRP helped Member States to promote the development of plasma/fusion technology transfer and to emphasize safety and environmental advantages of fusion energy. The CRP was focused on interface issues including those related to, - the driver/target interface (e.g. focusing and beam uniformity required by the target), - the driver/chamber interface (e.g. final optics and magnets protection and shielding), - and the target/chamber interface (e.g. target survival during injection, target positioning and tracking in the chamber). The final report includes an assessment of the state of the art of the technologies required for an IFE power plant (drivers, chambers, targets) and systems integration as presented and evaluated by members of the CRP. Additional contributions by cost free invited experts to the final RCM are included. The overall objective of this CRP was to foster the inertial fusion energy development by improving international cooperation. The variety of contributions compiled in this TECDOC reflects, that the goal of stimulating the exchange of knowledge was well achieved. Further the CRP led to the creation of a network, which not only exchanged their scientific results, but also developed healthy professional relations and strong mutual interest in the work of the group members

  8. Fusion Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This first issue of a quarterly newsletter announces the startup of the Tokamak de Varennes, describes Canada's national fusion program, and outlines the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Program. A map gives the location of the eleven principal fusion centres in Canada. (L.L.)

  9. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  10. Parameters critical to muon-catalyzed fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated that muon catalysis cycling rates increase rapidly with increasing deuterium-tritium gas temperatures and densities. Furthermore, muon-capture losses are significantly smaller than predicted before the experiments. There remains a significant gap between observation and theoretical expectation for the muon-alpha sticking probability in dense d-t mixtures. We have been able to achieve muon-catalyzed yields of 150 fusion/muon (average). While the fusion energy thereby released significantly exceeds expectations, enhancements by nearly a factor of twenty would be needed to realize energy applications for a pure (non-hybrid) muon-catalyzed fusion reactor. The process could be useful in tritium-breeding schemes. We have also explored a new form of cold nuclear fusion which occurs when hydrogen isotopes are loaded into metals. 22 refs., 10 figs

  11. Investigation of condensed matter fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on muon-catalyzed fusion led to research on a possible new type of fusion occurring in hydrogen isotopes embedded in metal lattices. While the nuclear-product yields observed to date are so small as to require careful further checking, rates observed over short times appear sufficiently large to suggest that significant neutrons and triton yields could be realized -- if the process could be understood and controlled. During 1990, we have developed two charged-particle detection systems and three new neutron detectors. A segmented, high-efficiency neutron counter was taken into 600 m underground in a mine in Colorado for studies out of the cosmic-ray background. Significant neutron emissions were observed in this environment in both deuterium-gas-loaded metals and in electrolytic cells, confirming our earlier observations

  12. Θ+ Search at HERMES with Deuterium and Hydrogen Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siguang; Schnell, Gunar

    The previous search at HERMES for narrow baryon states excited in quasi-real photo-production, decaying through the channel Θ + to pKS0 to pπ + π - , has been extended. Improved decay-particle reconstruction, more advanced particle identification, and increased event samples are employed. The structure that was observed earlier at an invariant mass of 1528 MeV shifts to 1522 MeV in the new analysis of data with a deuterium target, with a drop of statistical significance to about 2σ. The number of events above background is 68 - 31 + 98(stat) ± 13(sys). No such structure is observed in the hydrogen data set.

  13. Fusion hybrids for generation of advanced (231Pa+232U+233U+234U)-fuel in closed (U-Pu-Th)-fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology of controlled thermonuclear fusion (CTF) is traditionally regarded as a practically inexhaustible energy source. However, development, mastering, broad deployment of fast breeder reactors and closure of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) can also extend fuel base of nuclear power industry (NPI) up to practically unlimited scales. Under these conditions, it seems reasonable to introduce into a circle of the CTF-related studies the works directed towards solving some principal problems which can appear in a large-scale NPI in closed NFC. The first challenge is a large scale of operations in NFC back-end that should be reduced by achieving substantially higher fuel burn-up in power nuclear reactors. The use of 231Pa-232Th-232U-233U fuel in light-water reactor (LWR) opens a possibility of principle to reach very high (about 30% HM) or even ultra-high fuel burn-up. The second challenge is a potential unauthorized proliferation of fissionable materials. As is known, a certain remarkable quantity of 232U being introduced into uranium fraction of nuclear fuel can produce a serious barrier against switching the fuel over to non-energy purposes. Involvement of hybrid thermonuclear reactors (HTR) into NPI structure can substantially facilitate resolving these problems. If HTR will be involved into NPI structure, then main HTR mission consists not in energy generation but in production of nuclear fuel with a certain isotope composition. The present paper analyzes some neutron-physical features in production of advanced nuclear fuels in thorium HTR blankets. The obtained results demonstrated that such a nuclear fuel may be characterized by very stable neutron-multiplying properties during full LWR operation cycle and by enhanced proliferation resistance too. The paper evaluates potential benefits from involvement of HTR with thorium blanket into the international closed NFC. (author)

  14. Fusion development and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: superconducting magnet technology high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies -- Aries; ITER physics; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development

  15. Compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact, high-power-density approaches to fusion power are proposed to improve economic viability through the use of less-advanced technology in systems of considerably reduced scale. The rationale for and the means by which these systems can be achieved are discussed, as are unique technological problems

  16. Advanced compact accelerator neutron generator technology for active neutron interrogation field work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to a need for security screening instruments capable of detecting explosives and nuclear materials there is growing interest in neutron generator systems suitable for field use for applications broadly referred to as active neutron interrogation (ANI). Over the past two years Thermo Electron Corporation has developed a suite of different compact accelerator neutron generator products specifically designed for ANI field work to meet this demand. These systems incorporate hermetically-sealed particle accelerator tubes designed to produce fast neutrons using either the deuterium-deuterium (En = 2.5 MeV) or deuterium-tritium (En = 14.1 MeV) fusion reactions. Employing next-generation features including advanced sealed-tube accelerator designs, all-digital control electronics and innovative housing configurations these systems are suitable for many different uses. A compact system weighing less than 14 kg (MP 320) with a lifetime exceeding 1000 hours has been developed for portable applications. A system for fixed installations (P 325) has been developed with an operating life exceeding 4500 hours that incorporates specific serviceability features for permanent facilities with difficult-to-access shield blocks. For associated particle imaging (API) investigations a second-generation system (API 120) with an operating life of greater than 1000 hours has been developed for field use in which a high resolution fiberoptic imaging plate is specially configured to take advantage of a neutron point-source spot size of ∼2 mm. (author)

  17. Analysis of Overlapped and Noisy Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Guttman, Miklos; Weis, David D.; John R Engen; Lee, Kelly K.

    2013-01-01

    Noisy and overlapped mass spectrometry data hinders the sequence coverage that can be obtained from Hydrogen Deuterium exchange analysis, and places a limit on the complexity of the samples that can be studied by this technique. Advances in instrumentation have addressed these limits, but as the complexity of the biological samples under investigation increases, these problems are reencountered. Here we describe the use of binomial distribution fitting with asymmetric linear squares regressio...

  18. Assessment of fusion reactor development. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symposium on assessment of fusion reactor development was held to make clear critical issues, which should be resolved for the commercial fusion reactor as a major energy source in the next century. Discussing items were as follows. (1) The motive force of fusion power development from viewpoints of future energy demand, energy resources and earth environment for 'Sustainable Development'. (2) Comparison of characteristics with other alternative energy sources, i.e. fission power and solar cell power. (3) Future planning of fusion research and advanced fuel fusion (D3He). (4) Critical issues of fusion reactor development such as Li extraction from the sea water, structural material and safety. (author)

  19. Atomic physics in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Inertial Confinement Fusion Program plans to start advanced pulsed power experiments at the end of 2001. The enhancement of plasma diagnostics technique and target design demand a profound understanding of atomic processes. Advances are reviewed

  20. Advantages and Limitations of Solid Layer Experiments in Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the discovery that muonic deuterium at energies near a few eV could travel distances of the order of 1 mm in condensed hydrogen, and in particular that muonic tritium and muonic deuterium could emerge from the surface of a solid hydrogen layer, the advantages of solid targets have enabled the study of several processes important in muon catalyzed fusion. A review of the results is presented, emphasizing the strengths and limitations of the use of solid hydrogen layer targets.

  1. Fusion in a magnetically-shielded-grid inertial electrostatic confinement device

    OpenAIRE

    Hedditch, John; Bowden-Reid, Richard; Khachan, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented that shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively-biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales....

  2. BARC studies in cold fusion (April-September 1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is a compilation of accounts of investigations of various aspects of cold fusion phenomenon during the period April-September 1989 at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay. The report is divided into three parts, namely, Part A, Part B and Part C. Part A consists of 11 papers covering cold fusion through electrolysis channel, while Part B consists of 4 papers covering cold fusion through the route of deuterium loading in the gas phase. Part C consists 5 papers discussing theoretical aspects of cold fusion phenomenon. Some of the papers in the Part C are published as Journal articles. Results show that: (1) d-d fusion reaction does occur in both electrolytic and deuterium loaded palladium and titanium metal lattices at ambient temperature, (2) neutrons and tritium are produced at the same time, but overall neutron to tritium ratio is very low indicating that tritium is the main end product and cold fusion is 'aneutronic' in nature, (3) neutron emission follows Poisson distribution pattern i.e. neutrons are emitted one at a time, however, 15 to 20 per cent of emitted neutrons are generated in bunches or bursts, (4) cold fusion is essentially a surface phenomenon and (5) for detection of tritium in the products of cold fusion, autoradiography is a reliable technique. (M.G.B.)

  3. The primordial deuterium abundance problems and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A; Kegel, W H; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Takahara, Fumio; Kegel, Wilhelm H.

    1997-01-01

    The current status of extragalactic deuterium abundance is discussed using two examples of `low' and `high' D/H measurements. We show that the discordance of these two types of D abundances may be a consequence of the spatial correlations in the stochastic velocity field. Within the framework of the generalized procedure (accounting for such effects) one finds good agreement between different observations and the theoretical predictions for standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN). In particular, we show that the deuterium absorption seen at z = 2.504 toward Q1009+2956 and the H+D Ly-alpha profile observed at z = 0.701 toward Q1718+4807 are compatible with D/H $\\sim 4.1 - 4.6\\times10^{-5}$. This result supports SBBN and, thus, no inhomogeneity is needed. The problem of precise D/H measurements is discussed.

  4. Deuterium and tritium diffusion and permeation barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium permeation barriers have been successfully formed on Ni. One approach using Al+ ion implantation followed by thermal oxidation reduced the permeability by a factor of ∼2. In another approach, permeability was reduced by a factor of ∼50 using pack-aluminized Ni. Al2O3 layers ∼1000 A thick have been formed on Ni by sputter deposition. These have been shown to act as permeation barriers but as yet no measurements of the permeability have been obtained. Thin film Ni samples have now been produced that have deuterium diffusion coefficients that are within a factor of 4 of bulk values. A preliminary measurement has been carried out that indicates a reduction in diffusion coefficient due to radiation damage

  5. Deuterium retention in Tore Supra long discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium retention is a crucial point to investigate for next step machines using carbon plasma facing components. In order to address this issue, particle balance has been performed on Tore Supra long discharges, allowing to estimate the wall deuterium inventory. In these conditions, large dynamic deuterium retention rates have been observed (up to 50% of the injected fuel). This paper presents a summary of the experimental results in terms of wall retention during the shot and particle recovery after the shot, as well as after glow discharges and disruptions. Particle balance integrated over a campaign is also estimated and compared with the D inventory deduced from sample analysis. Different mechanisms are then reviewed in order to explain this particle balance, from D particle implantation to carbon porosity filling and co-deposition. Rough estimates of each process contribution to the retention rates are given and compared with the experimental observations. (authors)

  6. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPIELMAN,RICK B.

    2000-01-01

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

  7. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999

  8. Speed of sound in solid molecular hydrogen-deuterium: Quantum Molecular Dynamics Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Carlo Luis; Perlado, Jose Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Uniformity of the solid layer is one of the critical points for an efficient ignition of the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) target. During the compression process this layer, perturbations grow as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Knowing the mechanical properties of this layer and its thermo-mechanical limits is necessary if we want to control or to minimize these instabilities. In this work we have used a simplified approach, replacing the DT ice system with a mixture of hydrogen-deuterium (HD) because beta decay of tritium complicates the analysis in the former case. Through simulation with ab initio methods we have calculated the elastic constants, the bulk modulus and sound velocity for hydrogen isotopes in solid molecular state. In this work we present the results for hydrogen-deuterium mixtures 50%-50%, at 15 K and with a compression which covers the range of 1 to 15 GPa. This system is interesting for study the early stages of the dynamic compression and provides conditions that are close to the manufacture of DT target in inertial confinement fusion. Discontinuities in the curve that have been observed on pure hydrogen, which are associated with phase transitions and the phase hysteresis.

  9. Investigation of compression of puffing neon by deuterium current and plasma sheath in plasma focus discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubes, P.; Cikhardt, J.; Cikhardtova, B.; Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kortanek, J. [Czech Technical University Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents the results of the research of the influence of compressed neon, injected by the gas-puff nozzle in front of the anode axis by the deuterium current and plasma sheath on the evolution of the pinch, and neutron production at the current of 2 MA. The intense soft X-ray emission shows the presence of neon in the central region of the pinch. During the implosion and stopping of the plasma sheath, the deuterium plasma penetrates into the internal neon layer. The total neutron yield of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 11} has a similar level as in the pure deuterium shots. The neutron and hard X-ray pulses from fusion D-D reaction are as well emitted both in the phase of the stopping implosion and during the evolution of instabilities at the transformation of plasmoidal structures and constrictions composed in this configuration from both gases. The fast deuterons can be accelerated at the decay of magnetic field of the current filaments in these structures.

  10. Primordial Deuterium Abundance and Cosmic Baryon Density

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of cosmic abundances of the light elements with the density of baryonic stars and gas in the universe today provides a critical test of big bang theory and a powerful probe of the nature of dark matter. A new technique allows determination of cosmic deuterium abundances in quasar absorption clouds at large redshift, allowing a new test of big bang homogeneity in diverse, very distant systems. The first results of these studies are summarized, along with their implications. The ...

  11. Cosmological implications of two conflicting deuterium abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constraints on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and on cosmological parameters from conflicting deuterium observations in different high redshift QSO systems are discussed. The high deuterium observations by Carswell et al., Songaila et al., and Rugers and Hogan are consistent with 4He and 7Li observations and standard BBN (Nν =3) and allows Nν≤3.6 at 95% C.L., but are inconsistent with local observations of D and 3He in the context of conventional theories of stellar and galactic evolution. In contrast, the low deuterium observations by Tytler, Fan, and Burles and Burles and Tytler are consistent with the constraints from local galactic observations, but require Nν=1.9±0.3 at 68% C.L., excluding standard BBN at 99.9% C.L., unless the systematic uncertainties in the 4He observations have been underestimated by a large amount. The high and low primordial deuterium abundances imply, respectively, ΩBh2=0.005 endash 0.01 and ΩBh2=0.02 endash 0.03 at 95% C.L. When combined with the high baryon fraction inferred from x-ray observations of rich clusters, the corresponding total mass densities (for 50≤H0≤90) are ΩM=0.05 endash 0.20 and ΩM=0.2 endash 0.7, respectively (95% C.L.). The range of ΩM corresponding to high D is in conflict with dynamical constraints (Ωm≥0.2 endash 0.3) and with the shape parameter constraint (Γ=ΩMh=0.25±0.05) from large scale structure formation in CDM and ΛCDM models. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  12. Fusion Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recreating the energy production process of the Sun - nuclear fusion - on Earth in a controlled fashion is one of the greatest challenges of this century. If achieved at affordable costs, energy supply security would be greatly enhanced and environmental degradation from fossil fuels greatly diminished. Fusion Physics describes the last fifty years or so of physics and research in innovative technologies to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for energy production. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been involved since its establishment in 1957 in fusion research. It has been the driving force behind the biennial conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, today known as the Fusion Energy Conference. Hosted by several Member States, this biennial conference provides a global forum for exchange of the latest achievements in fusion research against the backdrop of the requirements for a net energy producing fusion device and, eventually, a fusion power plant. The scientific and technological knowledge compiled during this series of conferences, as well as by the IAEA Nuclear Fusion journal, is immense and will surely continue to grow in the future. It has led to the establishment of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which represents the biggest experiment in energy production ever envisaged by humankind.

  13. Temperature dependence of deuterium retention in tungsten deposits by deuterium ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, K., E-mail: kadzu@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Uehara, K.; Date, H.; Fukada, S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Watanabe, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Tungsten (W) deposits were formed by hydrogen plasma sputtering and blisters were observed on the surface. The W deposits and W foils were exposed to deuterium ions with 2 keV-D{sup 2+} to doses of 1.0 × 10{sup 21} D{sup 2+}/m{sup 2} at 294 and 773 K in addition to 573 K in the present authors’ previous work. Hydrogen isotopes release behaviors from the W deposits and W foils were observed by the thermal desorption spectroscopy method. The amount of deuterium released from the W deposit was considerably larger than that from W foil. The obtained deuterium retention in D/m{sup 2} was in the range of deuterium retention in polycrystalline tungsten. Not only implanted deuterium but also hydrogen, which was incorporated during the sputtering-deposition process, were released from the W deposits. A hydrogen release peak at around 1100 K was observed for the W deposits. This is considered to be due to the rupture of the blisters.

  14. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R ampersand D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R ampersand D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase

  15. Nuclear relaxation of deuterium--tritium adsorbed onto silica aerogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The longitudinal nuclear relaxation times of tritons in equilibrium deuterium--tritium (eD--T, actually D2--DT--T2 ) adsorbed onto amorphous silica aerogel has been measured from 4.2 to 23 K from 0.5 to 6.2 monolayers of coverage. Below 7 K, the relaxation time dramatically increases with decreasing temperature, especially for low coverages. A value of 16 s for 0.5 monolayer at 4.2 K may be compared with the usual electric quadrupole--quadrupole (EQQ) determined relaxation time of 0.1 s. It is shown that absorption of 10% of the tritium beta particle energy occurs in aerogel fully loaded with D--T. This decreases the concentration of J=1 T2 and increases the nuclear relaxation time. Similar energy absorption calculations in the thin layers shows that long relaxation times are expected, and that the measured values must be caused by spin--lattice relaxation with the aerogel surface. Both (temperature)-7 and exponential mechanisms are considered with no final decision being possible. Electric field gradients from the aerogel walls are considered the likely relaxation mechanism. These findings suggest that a long triton relaxation time may be achievable in ultrapure DT in the silica aerogel. Such a result would be of considerable importance to nuclear polarized inertial confinement fusion targets

  16. Role of Fusion Energy in a Sustainable Global Energy Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion can play an important role in sustainable global energy because it has an available and unlimited fuel supply and location not restricted by climate or geography. Further, it emits no greenhouse gases. It has no potential for large energy releases in an accident, and no need for more than about 100 years retention for radioactive waste disposal. Substantial progress in the realization of fusion energy has been made during the past 20 years of research. It is now possible to produce significant amounts of energy from controlled deuterium and tritium (DT) reactions in the laboratory. This has led to a growing confidence in our ability to produce burning plasmas with significant energy gain in the next generation of fusion experiments. As success in fusion facilities has underpinned the scientific feasibility of fusion, the high cost of next-step fusion facilities has led to a shift in the focus of international fusion research towards a lower cost development path and an attractive end product. The increasing data base from fusion research allows conceptual fusion power plant studies, of both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches to fusion, to translate commercial requirements into the design features that must be met if fusion is to play a role in the world's energy mix; and identify key R and D items; and benchmark progress in fusion energy development. This paper addresses the question, ''Is mankind closer or farther away from controlled fusion than a few decades ago?'' We review the tremendous scientific progress during the last 10 years. We use the detailed engineering design activities of burning plasma experiments as well as conceptual fusion power plant studies to describe our visions of attractive fusion power plants. We use these studies to compare technical requirements of an attractive fusion system with present achievements and to identify remaining technical challenges for fusion. We discuss scenarios for fusion energy deployment in the

  17. The Primordial Abundance of Deuterium: Ionization correction

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We determine the relative ionization of deuterium and hydrogen in low metallicity damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA systems using a detailed suite of photoionization simulations. We model metal-poor DLAs as clouds of gas in pressure equilibrium with a host dark matter halo, exposed to the Haardt & Madau (2012) background radiation of galaxies and quasars at redshift z~3. Our results indicate that the deuterium ionization correction correlates with the H I column density and the ratio of successive ion stages of the most commonly observed metals. The N(N II) / N(N I) column density ratio provides the most reliable correction factor, being essentially independent of the gas geometry, H I column density, and the radiation field. We provide a series of convenient fitting formulae to calculate the deuterium ionization correction based on observable quantities. The ionization correction typically does not exceed 0.1 per cent for metal-poor DLAs, which is comfortably below the current measurement precision (2...

  18. Deuterium Fractionation in the Ophiuchus Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Punanova, A; Pon, A; Belloche, A; André, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We measure the deuterium fraction, RD, and the CO-depletion factor, fd, toward a number of starless and protostellar cores in the L1688 region of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex and search for variations based upon environmental differences across L1688. The kinematic properties of the dense gas traced by the N2H+ and N2D+ (1-0) lines are also discussed. Methods. RD has been measured via observations of the J=1-0 transition of N2H+ and N2D+ toward 33 dense cores in different regions of L1688. fd estimates have been done using C17O(1-0) and 850 micron dust continuum emission from the SCUBA survey. All line observations were carried out with the IRAM 30 meter antenna. Results. The dense cores show large (2-40%) deuterium fractions, with significant variations between the sub-regions of L1688. The CO-depletion factor also varies from one region to another (1-7). Two different correlations are found between deuterium fraction and CO-depletion factor: cores in regions A, B2 and I show increasing RD wit...

  19. Muon transfer from deuterium to helium

    CERN Document Server

    Augsburger, M A; Breunlich, W H; Cargnelli, M; Chatellard, D; Egger, J P; Gartner, B; Hartmann, F J; Huot, O; Jacot-Guillarmod, R; Kammel, P; King, R; Knowles, P; Kosak, A; Lauss, B; Marton, J; Mühlbauer, M; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Prymas, W; Schaller, L A; Schellenberg, L; Schneuwly, H; Tresch, S; Von Egidy, T; Zmeskal, J

    2003-01-01

    We report on an experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland measuring x rays from muon transfer from deuterium to helium. Both the ground state transfer via the exotic dmu3,4He* molecules and the excited state transfer from mud* were measured. The use of CCD detectors allowed x rays from 1.5 keV to 11 keV to be detected with sufficient energy resolution to separate the transitions to different final states in both deuterium and helium. The x-ray peaks of the dmu3He* and dmu4He* molecules were measured with good statistics. For the D2+3He mixture, the peak has its maximum at E_dmu3He = 6768 +- 12 eV with FWHM Gamma_dmu3He = 863 +- 10 eV. Furthermore the radiative branching ratio was found to be kappa_dmu3He = 0.301 +- 0.061. For the D_2+4He mixture, the maximum of the peak lies at E_dmu4He = 6831 +- 8 eV and the FWHM is Gamma_dmu4He = 856 +- 10 eV. The radiative branching ratio is kappa_dmu4He = 0.636 +- 0.097. The excited state transfer is limited by the probability to reach the deuterium...

  20. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

    2014-05-01

    Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C/min up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 °C samples) and four (for 500 °C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 °C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 °C to 600 °C after 1st annealing

  1. Fusion reactivity characterization of a spherically convergent ion focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction rate in a spherically convergent ion focus is observed to significantly exceed the rate predicted by a collisionless flow model. However, a careful consideration of ion-neutral collisions and the trapped neutral density in the cathode account for the extra reactivity without invoking anomalous ion trapping in the converged core region. This conclusion is supported by proton collimation measurements, which indicate that the bulk of the observed reactivity originates outside the core region. In addition, a classical flow model, where charge exchange collisional effects on the ion and fast neutral distributions are included, provides fusion rate estimates that are quantitatively consistent with the observed D-D fusion neutron production rate. (author)

  2. Fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs

  3. Alternate fusion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review summarizes the status of alternate fusion concepts and plans for their future. The concepts selected for review are those employing electromagnetic confinement for which there have been reasonable predictions of net energy gain from pure fusion and which have shown significant recent development or are the subjects of ongoing international activity. They include advanced tokamaks, stellarators, the spherical torus, reversed-field pinch and dense z-field pinch devices, field reversed configuration, and spheromaks. In addition, an overall view of the status of each concept with respect to achieving ignition and to reactor designs is presented

  4. The perspectives of fusion energy: The roadmap towards energy production and fusion energy in a distributed energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2014-01-01

    at very high temperature where all matter is in the plasma state as the involved energies are orders of magnitude higher than typical chemical binding energies. It is one of the great science and engineering challenges to construct a viable power plant based on fusion energy. Fusion research is a......Controlled thermonuclear fusion has the potential of providing an environmentally friendly and inexhaustible energy source for mankind. Fusion energy, which powers our sun and the stars, is released when light elements, such as the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, fuse together. This occurs...... world-wide international collaboration and is in a crucial new phase with the construction of the international fusion experimental reactor, ITER, in Cadarache, France, which will be largest energy experiment in the world, and a milestone on the way to fusion energy. The recently adopted European...

  5. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described

  6. Review on Recent Developments in Laser Driven Inertial Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ghoranneviss; Salar Elahi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of the laser in 1960 hopes were based on using its very high energy concentration within very short pulses of time and very small volumes for energy generation from nuclear fusion as “Inertial Fusion Energy” (IFE), parallel to the efforts to produce energy from “Magnetic Confinement Fusion” (MCF), by burning deuterium-tritium (DT) in high temperature plasmas to helium. Over the years the fusion gain was increased by a number of magnitudes and has reached nearly break-even after nume...

  7. Muon-catalyzed fusion theory: Introduction and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muon-catalyzed fusion (μCF) has proved to be a fruitful subject for basic physics research as well as a source of cold nuclear fusion. Experiments have demonstrated that over 100 fusions per muon can be catalyzed by formation of the dtμ molecule in mixtures of deuterium and tritium. After a brief review of the subject's history, the dtμ catalysis cycle and the principal relations used in its analysis are described. Some of the important processes in the μCF cycle are then discussed. Finally, the status of current research is appraised. 52 refs., 7 figs

  8. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

    1980-10-01

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described.

  9. Fusion Simulation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. (1). Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical

  10. Nuclear energy and fusion-fission hybrid reactor for pure energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next two decades are very critical for nuclear energy development. The commercial fast reactor may be in use around 2035; it is also possible that magnetically confined fusion, laser fusion and z-pinch fusion will be demonstrated at that time. A fusion demonstration reactor can be a pure fusion or a fusion-fission hybrid. The latter can lower the fusion power and mitigate the radiation damage of high energy neutrons to materials. On the other hand, the supply of deuterium and tritium as fuel for fusion can only last a few hundred years. We describe here a hybrid for pure energy use which can make full use of uranium and is proliferation resistant, as no separation of uranium and plutonium is needed in post-processing. The union of fission, fusion, and a pure energy hybrid can contribute to the large scale use of nuclear energy in the near future, and supply mankind for more than a thousand years. (authors)

  11. Controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last fifty years the researches on controlled thermonuclear fusion reached great performance in the magnetic confinement (tokamaks) as in the inertial confinement (lasers). But the state of the art is not in favor of the apparition of the fusion in the energy market before the second half of the 21 century. To explain this opinion the author presents the fusion reactions of light nuclei and the problems bound to the magnetic confinement. (A.L.B.)

  12. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)3He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3He(d,p)4He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  13. The challenges of fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new boss of the world's biggest fusion experiment cannot afford to fail. Kaname Ikeda will soon be a name on many physicists' lips. Though the outgoing Japanese ambassador to Croatia and former science administrator is not currently widely known, that will all change when he starts work later this month as director general of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Set to be built at Cadarache near Marseille in southern France - assuming the ITER treaty is ratified - this Euro10bn facility is designed to show that fusion could be turned into a practical energy source.To do so would be huge achievement. Fusion reactors could play a massive role in meeting the world's rapidly growing demand for energy. They promise to be environmentally friendly and relatively safe to operate, while the raw materials they need are plentiful. However, early progress in fusion research led plasma physicists to be over optimistic about this energy source, and a commercial fusion plant remains as far off in the future as it was back in the 1970s. Ikeda therefore has a tough job on his hands, as he readily admits in our interview with him (see p12; print version only). It will be no mean feat to build ITER on time and to budget, and Ikeda will have to draw heavily on his undoubted diplomatic skills to ensure that everyone involved in this complex international project gets on. ITER is hugely ambitious in engineering terms, with vast superconducting magnets needed to confine a deuterium-tritium plasma within a doughnut-shaped 'tokamak' vessel. Numerous technical challenges will have to be addressed to ensure ITER fulfils its goal of releasing more energy than it consumes. These include choosing which material to line the inner wall of the tokamak with, overcoming the accumulation of radioactive tritium on this surface, and controlling the properties of the plasma. Fortunately, such issues are being addressed at the recently upgraded Joint European Torus near Oxford

  14. Analysis of primary damage in silicon carbide under fusion and fission neutron spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Daxi; Zang, Hang; Zhang, Peng; Xi, Jianqi; Li, Tao; Ma, Li; He, Chaohui

    2014-12-01

    Irradiation parameters on primary damage states of SiC are evaluated and compared for the first wall of ITER under deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) operation, the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and high flux isotope reactor (HFIR). With the same neutron fluence, the studied fusion spectra produce more damage and much higher gas production than the fission spectra. Due to comparable gas production and similar weighted primary recoil spectra, HFIR is considered suitable to simulate the neutron irradiation in an HTGR. In contrast to the significant differences between the weighted primary recoil spectra of the fission and the fusion spectra, the weighted secondary recoil spectra of HFIR and HTGR match those of DD and DT, indicating that displacement cascades by the fission and the fusion irradiation are similar when the damage distribution among damaged regions by secondary recoils is taken into account.

  15. Fusion Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    SNARE proteins constitute the minimal machinery needed for membrane fusion. SNAREs operate by forming a complex, which pulls the lipid bilayers into close contact and provides the mechanical force needed for lipid bilayer fusion. At the chemical synapse, SNARE-complex formation between the vesicu......SNARE proteins constitute the minimal machinery needed for membrane fusion. SNAREs operate by forming a complex, which pulls the lipid bilayers into close contact and provides the mechanical force needed for lipid bilayer fusion. At the chemical synapse, SNARE-complex formation between...

  16. Fusion Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans

  17. New Laser Fusion and Its Gain by Intense Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuo Imasaki; Dazhi Li

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of a new approach of laser fusion in plasma without implosion has been proposed and is discussed using an intense laser. The cross section of the nuclear reaction is increased by enhancing the penetrability of nuclei through the Coulomb barrier. In this approach, an intense laser field of more than 100 PW was required to distort the Coulomb barrier to obtain enough penetrability. An energy gain even with Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) reaction can be obtained using this scheme in D...

  18. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median ± SD, 16.0 ± 3.7 vs. 8.0 ± 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced pancreatic

  19. Mineralized water depleted in deuterium and production technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineralized water depleted in deuterium is similar to natural water but has an isotopic content of 30-120 ppm D/(D+H). One can obtain mineralized water depleted in deuterium both in continuous and in discontinuous way by mixing deuterium depleted water with strong mineralized water obtained by vacuum distillation at atmospheric pressure of natural water. The mixture is saturated with oxygen by bubbling dry air into it at ambient temperature. This invention allows obtaining a product depleted in deuterium similar to natural water with biostimulating properties that can be used as developing medium for living organisms or for human use. The invention has the following qualities: allows the production of deuterium depleted water with chemical composition similar to natural water; allows the precise control of deuterium content in the product. (authors)

  20. Deuterium excess in precipitation and its climatological significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The climatological significance of the deuterium excess parameter for tracing precipitation processes is discussed with reference to data collected within the IAEA/WMO Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) programme. Annual and monthly variations in deuterium excess, and their primary relationships with δ18O, temperature, vapour pressure and relative humidity are used to demonstrate fundamental controls on deuterium excess for selected climate stations and transects. The importance of deuterium excess signals arising from ocean sources versus signals arising from air mass modification during transport over the continents is reviewed and relevant theoretical development is presented. While deuterium excess shows considerable promise as a quantitative index of precipitation processes, the effectiveness of current applications using GNIP is largely dependent on analytical uncertainty (∼2.1 per mille), which could be improved to better than 1 per mille through basic upgrades in routine measurement procedures for deuterium analysis. (author)