WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced deuterium fusion

  1. Advanced Deuterium Fusion Rocket Propulsion For Manned Deep Space Missions

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Dr Friedwardt

    2009-01-01

    Excluding speculations about future breakthrough discoveries in physics, it is shown that with what is at present known, and also what is technically feasible, manned space flight to the limits of the solar system and beyond deep into the Oort cloud is quite well possible. Using deuterium as the rocket fuel of choice, abundantly available on the comets of the Oort cloud, rockets driven by deuterium fusion, can there be refueled. To obtain a high thrust with a high specific impulse, favors the propulsion by deuterium micro-bombs, and it is shown that the ignition of deuterium micro-bombs is possible by intense GeV proton beams, generated in space by using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated billion volt capacitor. The cost to develop this kind of propulsion system in space would be very high, but it can also be developed on earth by a magnetically insulated Super Marx Generator. Since the ignition of deuterium is theoretically possible with the Super Marx Generator, rather than deuterium-tritium ...

  2. Core Deuterium Fusion and Radius Inflation in Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaikumar, Prashanth; Rachid Ouyed

    2016-06-01

    Several laboratory-based studies have shown that the Deuterium fusion cross-section is enhanced in a solid deuterated target as compared to a gas target, attributable to enhanced mobility of deuterons in a metal lattice. As an application, we propose that, for core temperatures and compositions characterizing hot Jupiters, screened Deuterium fusion can occur deep in the interior, and show that the amount of radius inflation from this effect can be important if there is sufficient rock-ice in the core. The mechanism of screened Deuterium fusion, operating in the above temperature range, is generally consistent with the trend in radius anomaly with planetary equilibrium temperature. We also explore the trend with planetary mass using a simple analytic model.

  3. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslandes, Alec, E-mail: acd@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Guenette, Mathew C. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Corr, Cormac S. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Karatchevtseva, Inna [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Thomsen, Lars [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Ionescu, Mihail [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10{sup 24} ions m{sup −2}. Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four.

  4. Muon Catalyzed Fusion in 3 K Solid Deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Knowles, P E; Bailey, J M; Beer, G A; Beveridge, J L; Fujiwara, M C; Huber, T M; Jacot-Guillarmod, R; Kammel, P; Kim, S K; Kunselman, A R; Marshall, G M; Martoff, C J; Mason, G R; Mulhauser, F; Olin, A; Petitjean, C; Porcelli, T A; Zmeskal, J; Zmeskal, and J.

    1997-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion in deuterium has traditionally been studied in gaseous and liquid targets. The TRIUMF solid-hydrogen-layer target system has been used to study the fusion reaction rates in the solid phase of D_2 at a target temperature of 3 K. Products of two distinct branches of the reaction were observed; neutrons by a liquid organic scintillator, and protons by a silicon detector located inside the target system. The effective molecular formation rate from the upper hyperfine state of $\\mu d$ and the hyperfine transition rate have been measured: $\\tilde{\\lambda}_(3/2)=2.71(7)_{stat.}(32)_{syst.} The molecular formation rate is consistent with other recent measurements, but not with the theory for isolated molecules. The discrepancy may be due to incomplete thermalization, an effect which was investigated by Monte Carlo calculations. Information on branching ratio parameters for the s and p wave d+d nuclear interaction has been extracted.

  5. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...... enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast...

  6. Hypervelocity Impact Fusion with Compressed Deuterium-Tritium Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Olariu, S

    1998-01-01

    The neutron yields observed in inertial confinement fusion experiments for higher convergence ratios are about two orders of magnitude smaller than the neutron yields predicted by one-dimensional models, the discrepancy being attributed to the development of instabilities. We consider the possibility that ignition and a moderate gain could be achieved with existing laser facilities if the laser driver energy is used to produce only the radial compression of the fuel capsule to high densities but relatively low temperatures, while the ignition of the fusion reactions in the compressed fuel capsule will be effected by a synchronized hypervelocity impact. A positively-charged incident projectile can be accelerated to velocities of 3.5 x 10^6 m/s, resulting in ignition temperatures of about 4 keV, by a conventional low-beta linac having a length of 13 km if deuterium-tritium densities of 570 g/cm^3 could be obtained by laser-driven compression.

  7. Helium-3 Generation from the Interaction of Deuterium Plasma inside a Hydrogenated Lattice: Red Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Leal-Escalante, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Helium-3 has been created in a nuclear fusion reaction by fusing deuterium ions from deuterium plasma with hydrogen ions in a “RED” (the Spanish word for net) or crystal lattice, a method we called red fusion ("Fusion en la red cristalina"), because is a new method to make nuclear fusion reaction. In this paper, it will be show the experimental results where the helium-3 has been generated for the first time in this kind of new method to confine deuterium and hydrogen inside the RED or lattice of the hydrogenated crystal and that confinement inside the RED facilitated overcoming the Coulomb barrier between them and helium-3 and phonons are produced in this fusion reaction. The results of a long time research in which helium-3, has been created in a fusion reaction inside the lattice or RED of the crystal that contained hydrogen after adequate interaction of deuterium plasma at appropriate high temperature and magnetic confinement of the Mirror/Cusp Plasma Machine at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, designed by the authors. Several mass spectra and visible light spectrum where the presence of helium-3 was detected are shown. The experiment was repeated more than 200 times showing always the generation of helium-3. In this experiment no gamma rays were detected. For this experiment several diagnostic instruments were used. The data collection with these control instrumentation are shown. Thus, it is an important new way to generate Helium-3. reserved.

  8. First Measurements of Deuterium-Tritium and Deuterium-Deuterium Fusion Reaction Yields in Ignition-Scalable Direct-Drive Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Shmayda, W. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2017-03-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) and deuterium-deuterium neutron yield ratio in cryogenic inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments is used to examine multifluid effects, traditionally not included in ICF modeling. This ratio has been measured for ignition-scalable direct-drive cryogenic DT implosions at the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997), 10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2] using a high-dynamic-range neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. The experimentally inferred yield ratio is consistent with both the calculated values of the nuclear reaction rates and the measured preshot target-fuel composition. These observations indicate that the physical mechanisms that have been proposed to alter the fuel composition, such as species separation of the hydrogen isotopes [D. T. Casey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 075002 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.075002], are not significant during the period of peak neutron production in ignition-scalable cryogenic direct-drive DT implosions.

  9. Complementary Advanced Fusion Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    homographic computer vision image fusion, out-of-sequence measurement and track data handling, Nash bargaining approaches to sensor management... homographic fusion notions are identified together with the Nash approach, the pursuit-evasion approach to threat situation outcome determination, and the

  10. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac. (MOW)

  11. Hypervelocity Impact Fusion with Compressed Deuterium-Tritium Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Olariu, Silviu

    1998-01-01

    The neutron yields observed in inertial confinement fusion experiments for higher convergence ratios are about two orders of magnitude smaller than the neutron yields predicted by one-dimensional models, the discrepancy being attributed to the development of instabilities. We consider the possibility that ignition and a moderate gain could be achieved with existing laser facilities if the laser driver energy is used to produce only the radial compression of the fuel capsule to high densities ...

  12. Fusion Advanced Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Guebaly, Laila; Henderson, Douglass; Wilson, Paul; Blanchard, Jake

    2017-03-24

    During the January 1, 2013 – December 31, 2015 contract period, the UW Fusion Technology Institute personnel have actively participated in the ARIES-ACT and FESS-FNSF projects, led the nuclear and thermostructural tasks, attended several project meetings, and participated in all conference calls. The main areas of effort and technical achievements include updating and documenting the nuclear analysis for ARIES-ACT1, performing nuclear analysis for ARIES-ACT2, performing thermostructural analysis for ARIES divertor, performing disruption analysis for ARIES vacuum vessel, and developing blanket testing strategy and Materials Test Module for FNSF.

  13. Intense deuterium nuclear fusion of pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally within highly deuterated atom clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshiaki, A; Zhang, Y C

    2002-01-01

    Embedded nano-Pd particles of 5 nm in size instantly abundant D-atoms more than 250% in the atomic ratio against Pd-atoms at room temperature when they are kept in D sub 2 gas pressurized to less than 10 atm. In such ultrahigh densities, 2-4 D-atoms can be coagulated inside each octahedral space of Pd lattice (pycnodeuterium-lump). When a stimulation energy such as latticequake causing by ultrasonic wave was supplied to those highly deuterated Pd particles, intense deuterium nuclear fusion (''solid fusion'') was generated there and both excess heat and sup 4 He gas were abundantly produced. Naturally, these facts can not be realized at all in bulk Pd. The results show that the nuclear fusion occurs without any hazardous rays in pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally inside the each cell of the host metal lattice. These unit cells correspond to minimum unit of the solid fusion reactor as a ''Lattice Reactor''. (author)

  14. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Holmlid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0 give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u−1. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles HN(0 of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D2 gas (at <1 mbar pressure is measured and compensated for under various conditions. Heat release of a few W is observed, at up to 50% higher energy than the total laser input thus a gain of 1.5. This is uniquely high for the use of deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods.

  15. Measurement of limiter heating due to fusion product losses during high fusion power deuterium-tritium operation of TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janos, A.; Owens, D.K.; Darrow, D.; Redi, M.; Zarnstorff, M.; Zweben, S.

    1995-03-01

    Preliminary analysis has been completed on measurements of limiter heating during high fusion power deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation of TFTR, in an attempt to identify heating from alpha particle losses. Recent operation of TFTR with a 50-50 mix of D-T has resulted in fusion power output ({approx} 6.2 MW) orders of magnitude above what was previously achieved on TFTR. A significantly larger absolute number of particles and energy from fusion products compared to D-D operation is expected to be lost to the limiters. Measurements were made in the vicinity of the midplane ({plus_minus} 30{degree}) with thermocouples mounted on the tiles of an outboard limiter. Comparisons were made -between discharges which were similar except for the mix of deuterium and tritium beam sources. Power and energy estimates of predicted alpha losses were as high as 0.13 MW and 64 kJ. Depending on what portion of the limiters absorbed this energy, temperature rises of up to 42 {degrees}C could be expected, corresponding to a heat load of 0.69 MJ/m{sup 2} over a 0.5 sec period, or a power load of 1.4 MW/m{sup 2}. There was a measurable increase in the limiter tile temperature as the fusion power yield increased with a more reactive mixture of D and T at constant beam power during high power D-T operation. Analysis of the data is being conducted to see if the alpha heating component can be extracted. Measured temperature increases were no greater than 1 {degree}C, indicating that there was probably neither an unexpectedly large fraction of lost particles nor unexpected localization of the losses. Limits on the stochastic ripple loss contribution from alphas can be deduced.

  16. Ways towards pure deuterium inertial confinement fusion through the attainment of gigavolt potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-01-01

    The attainment of ultrahigh electric potentials by suppressing the stepped leader breakdown of a highly charged conductor levitated in a spiraling Taylor flow opens up the possibility of order of magnitude larger driver energies for the ignition of thermonuclear reactions by inertial confinement. In reaching gigavolt potentials, intense 1016 Watt, GeV ion beams become possible. Together with their large self-magnetic field, these beams should be powerful enough to launch a thermonuclear micro-detonation into pure deuterium, compressed and ignited by such beams. In high gain laser fusion the proton flash from the micro-explosion is likely to destroy the optical laser ignition apparatus, and it is not explained how to avoid this danger. The possible attainment of gigavolt potentials could make laser fusion obsolete.

  17. Deuterium--tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, M.G.; Batha, S.; Beer, M.; Bell, R.E.; Belov, A.; Berk, H.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Breizman, B.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Callen, J.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, C.S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Dendy, R.O.; Dorland, W.; Duong, H.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.J.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Goloborodko, V.Y.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.W.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Hill, K.W.; Hogan, J.; Hooper, B.; Hosea, J.C.; Houlberg, W.A.; Hughes, M.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kesner, J.; Kim, J.S.; Kissick, M.; Krasilnikov, A.V.; Kugel, H.; Kumar, A.; Lam, N.T.; Lamarche, P.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F.M.; Ludescher, C.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.P.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Mauel, M.; Mazzucato, E.; McChesney, J.; McCune, D.C.; McKee, G.; McGuire, K.M.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mirnov, S.V.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Okabayashi, M.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Park, W.; Paul, S.F.; Petrov, M.P.; Phillips, C.K.; Phillips, M.; Phillips, P.; Ramsey, A.T.; Rice, B.; Redi, M.H.; Rewoldt, G.; Reznik, S.; Roquemore, A.L.; Rogers, J.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Skinner, C.H.; Stevenson, T.; Strait, E.J.; Stratton, B.C.; Strachan, J.D.; Stodiek, W.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Thompson, M.E.; von Goeler, S.; Von Halle, A.; Walters, R.T.; Wang, S.; White, R.; Wieland, R.M.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J.R.; Wong, K.L.; Wurden, G.A.; Yamada, M.; Yavorski, V.; Young, K.M.; Zakharov, L.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 2176 (1995)] have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium{endash}tritium (D--T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through {ital in situ} deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a}{approx}4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D--T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D--T plasmas with q{sub 0}{gt}1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfvn eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a} {approx} 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q{sub 0} > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions.

  19. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Calvani, P.; Croci, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girolami, M.; Griesmayer, E.; Grosso, G.; Pillon, M.; Trucchi, D. M.; Gorini, G.

    2014-11-01

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction occurring between neutrons and 12C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  20. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzaniga, C., E-mail: carlo.cazzaniga@mib.infn.it; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G. [University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, via Roberto Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Rebai, M.; Giacomelli, L. [University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, via Roberto Cozzi 53, Milano (Italy); Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Trucchi, D. M. [CNR-ISM, Research Area Roma 1, Via Salaria km 29.300, 00015-Monterotondo Scalo (Rm) (Italy); Griesmayer, E. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Pillon, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the {sup 12}C(n, α){sup 9}Be reaction occurring between neutrons and {sup 12}C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  1. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3600 (United States); Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  2. Advanced algorithms for distributed fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, A.; Smith, C.; Colony, M.; Bowman, C.; Pei, R.; Huynh, T.; Brown, C.

    2008-03-01

    The US Military has been undergoing a radical transition from a traditional "platform-centric" force to one capable of performing in a "Network-Centric" environment. This transformation will place all of the data needed to efficiently meet tactical and strategic goals at the warfighter's fingertips. With access to this information, the challenge of fusing data from across the batttlespace into an operational picture for real-time Situational Awareness emerges. In such an environment, centralized fusion approaches will have limited application due to the constraints of real-time communications networks and computational resources. To overcome these limitations, we are developing a formalized architecture for fusion and track adjudication that allows the distribution of fusion processes over a dynamically created and managed information network. This network will support the incorporation and utilization of low level tracking information within the Army Distributed Common Ground System (DCGS-A) or Future Combat System (FCS). The framework is based on Bowman's Dual Node Network (DNN) architecture that utilizes a distributed network of interlaced fusion and track adjudication nodes to build and maintain a globally consistent picture across all assets.

  3. Single Crystal Growth and Formation of Defects in Deuterium-Tritium Ice Layers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernov, A A; Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Atherton, L J; Johnson, M A; Hamza, A V; Kucheyev, S O; Lugten, J B; Mapoles, E A; Moody, J D; Salmonson, J D; Sater, J D

    2008-09-05

    We identify vapor-etched grain boundary grooves on the solid-vapor interface as the main source of surface roughness in the Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel layers which are solidified and then cooled. Current inertial confinement fusion target designs impose stringent limits to the cross sectional area and total volume of these grooves. Formation of these grain boundaries occurs over timescales of hours as the dislocation network anneals, and is inevitable in a plastically deformed material. Therefore, either cooling on a much shorter time scale or a technique that requires no cooling after solidification should be used to minimize the fuel layer surface roughness.

  4. Integrated Simulation Studies of Plasma Performances and Fusion Reactions in the Deuterium Experiment of LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Homma, M.; Maeta, S.; Saito, Y.; Fukuyama, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Takahashi, H.; Nakano, H.; Osakabe, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Tanaka, K.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Isobe, M.; Tomita, H.; Ogawa, K.; LHD Exp Group Team

    2016-10-01

    The deuterium experiment project from 2017 is planned in LHD, where the deuterium NBI heating beams with the power more than 30MW are injected into the deuterium plasma. Principal objects of this project are to clarify the isotope effect on the heat and particle transport in the helical plasma and to study energetic particle confinement in a helical magnetic configuration measuring triton burn-up neutrons. We study the deuterium experiment plasma of LHD applying the integrated simulation code, TASK3D [Murakami, PPCF2015], and the 5-D drift kinetic equation solver, GNET [Murakami, NF2006]. (i) More than 20% of ion temperature increment is obtained in the deuterium plasma (nD /nH +nD = 0.8) due to the isotope effect assuming the turbulent transport model based on the H/He plasma experiment of LHD. (ii) The triton burn-up simulation shows the triton slowing down distribution and the strong magnetic configuration dependency of the triton burn-up ratio in LHD. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26420851.

  5. Fusion Energy-Production from a Deuterium-Tritium Plasma in the Jet Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebut, P. H.; Gibson, A.; Huguet, M.; Adams, J. M.; Alper, B.; Altmann, H.; Andersen, A.; Andrew, P.; Angelone, M.; Aliarshad, S.; Baigger, P.; Bailey, W.; Balet, B.; Barabaschi, P.; Barker, P.; Barnsley, R.; Baronian, M.; Bartlett, D. V.; Baylor, L.; Bell, A. C.; Benali, G.; Bertoldi, P.; Bertolini, E.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bickley, A. J.; Binder, D.; Bindslev, H.; Bonicelli, T.; Booth, S. J.; Bosia, G.; Botman, M.; Boucher, D.; Boucquey, P.; Breger, P.; Brelen, H.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brooks, D.; Brown, A.; Brown, T.; Brusati, M.; Bryan, S.; Brzozowski, J.; Buchse, R.; Budd, T.; Bures, M.; Businaro, T.; Butcher, P.; Buttgereit, H.; Caldwellnichols, C.; Campbell, D. J.; Card, P.; Celentano, G.; Challis, C. D.; Chankin, A. V.; Cherubini, A.; Chiron, D.; Christiansen, J.; Chuilon, P.; Claesen, R.; Clement, S.; Clipsham, E.; Coad, J. P.; Coffey, I. H.; Colton, A.; Comiskey, M.; Conroy, S.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, D.; Cooper, S.; Cordey, J. G.; Core, W.; Corrigan, G.; Corti, S.; Costley, A. E.; Cottrell, G.; Cox, M.; Cripwell, P.; Dacosta, O.; Davies, J.; Davies, N.; de Blank, H.; De Esch, H.; Dekock, L.; Deksnis, E.; Delvart, F.; Dennehinnov, G. B.; Deschamps, G.; Dickson, W. J.; Dietz, K. J.; Dmitrenko, S. L.; Dmitrieva, M.; Dobbing, J.; Doglio, A.; Dolgetta, N.; Dorling, S. E.; Doyle, P. G.; Duchs, D. F.; Duquenoy, H.; Edwards, A.; Ehrenberg, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Elevant, T.; Erents, S.K.; Eriksson, L. G.; Fajemirokun, H.; Falter, H.; Freiling, J.; Freville, F.; Froger, C.; Froissard, P.; Fullard, K.; Gadeberg, M.; Galetsas, A.; Gallagher, T.; Gambier, D.; Garribba, M.; Gaze, P.; Giannella, R.; Gill, R. D.; Girard, A.; Gondhalekar, A.; Goodall, D.; Gormezano, C.; Gottardi, N. A.; Gowers, C.; Green, B. J.; Grievson, B.; Haange, R.; Haigh, A.; Hancock, C. J.; Harbour, P. J.; Hartrampf, T.; Hawkes, N. C.; Haynes, P.; Hemmerich, J. L.; Hender, T.; Hoekzema, J.; Holland, D.; Hone, M.; Horton, L.; How, J.; Huart, M.; Hughes, I.; Hughes, T. P.; Hugon, M.; Huo, Y.; Ida, K.; Ingram, B.; Irving, M.; Jacquinot, J.; Jaeckel, H.; Jaeger, J. F.; Janeschitz, G.; Jankovicz, Z.; Jarvis, O. N.; Jensen, F.; Jones, E. M.; Jones, H. D.; Jones, Lpdf; Jones, S.; Jones, T. T. C.; Junger, J. F.; Junique, F.; Kaye, A.; Keen, B. E.; Keilhacker, M.; Kelly, G. J.; Kerner, W.; Khudoleev, A.; Konig, R.; Konstantellos, A.; Kovanen, M.; Kramer, G.; Kupschus, P.; Lasser, R.; Last, J. R.; Laundy, B.; Laurotaroni, L.; Laveyry, M.; Lawson, K.; Lennholm, M.; Lingertat, J.; Litunovski, R. N.; Loarte, A.; Lobel, R.; Lomas, P.; Loughlin, M.; Lowry, C.; Lupo, J.; Maas, A. C.; Machuzak, J.; Macklin, B.; Maddison, G.; Maggi, C. F.; Magyar, G.; Mandl, W.; Marchese, V.; Marcon, G.; Marcus, F.; Mart, J.; Martin, D.; Martin, E.; Martinsolis, R.; Massmann, P.; Matthews, G.; McBryan, H.; McCracken, G.; McKivitt, J.; Meriguet, P.; Miele, P.; Miller, A.; Mills, J.; Mills, S. F.; Millward, P.; Milverton, P.; Minardi, E.; Mohanti, R.; Mondino, P. L.; Montgomery, D.; Montvai, A.; Morgan, P.; Morsi, H.; Muir, D.; Murphy, G.; Myrnas, R.; Nave, F.; Newbert, G.; Newman, M.; Nielsen, P.; Noll, P.; Obert, W.; Obrien, D.; Orchard, J.; Orourke, J.; Ostrom, R.; Ottaviani, M.; Pain, M.; Paoletti, F.; Papastergiou, S.; Parsons, W.; Pasini, D.; Patel, D.; Peacock, A.; Peacock, N.; Pearce, R. J. M.; Pearson, D.; Peng, J. F.; Desilva, R. P.; Perinic, G.; Perry, C.; Petrov, M.; Pick, M. A.; Plancoulaine, J.; Poffe, J. P.; Pohlchen, R.; Porcelli, F.; Porte, L.; Prentice, R.; Puppin, S.; Putvinskii, S.; Radford, G.; Raimondi, T.; Deandrade, M. C. R.; Reichle, R.; Reid, J.; Richards, S.; Righi, E.; Rimini, F.; Robinson, D.; Rolfe, A.; Ross, R. T.; Rossi, L.; Russ, R.; Rutter, P.; Sack, H. C.; Sadler, G.; Saibene, G.; Salanave, J. L.; Sanazzaro, G.; Santagiustina, A.; Sartori, R.; Sborchia, C.; Schild, P.; Schmid, M.; Schmidt, G.; Schunke, B.; Scott, S. M.; Serio, L.; Sibley, A.; Simonini, R.; Sips, A.C.C.; Smeulders, P.; Smith, R.; Stagg, R.; Stamp, M.; Stangeby, P.; Stankiewicz, R.; Start, D. F.; Steed, C. A.; Stork, D.; Stott, P.E.; Stubberfield, P.; Summers, D.; Summers, H.; Svensson, L.; Tagle, J. A.; Talbot, M.; Tanga, A.; Taroni, A.; Terella, C.; Terrington, A.; Tesini, A.; Thomas, P. R.; Thompson, E.; Thomsen, K.; Tibone, F.; Tiscornia, A.; Trevalion, P.; Tubbing, B.; Vanbelle, P.; Vanderbeken, H.; Vlases, G.; von Hellermann, M.; Wade, T.; Walker, C.; Walton, R.; Ward, D.; Watkins, M. L.; Watkins, N.; Watson, M. J.; Weber, S.; Wesson, J.; Wijnands, T. J.; Wilks, J.; Wilson, D.; Winkel, T.; Wolf, R.; Wong, D.; Woodward, C.; Wu, Y.; Wykes, M.; Young, D.; Young, I. D.; Zannelli, L.; Zolfaghari, A.; Zwingmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes a series of experiments in the Joint European Torus (JET), culminating in the first tokamak discharges in deuterium-tritium fuelled mixtures. The experiments were undertaken within limits imposed by restrictions on vessel activation and tritium usage. The objectives were: (i) to

  6. Ion acceleration and D-D nuclear fusion in laser-generated plasma from advanced deuterated polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-23

    Deuterated polyethylene targets have been irradiated by means of a 1016 W/cm2 laser using 600 J pulse energy, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and 70 micron spot diameter. The plasma parameters were measured using on-line diagnostics based on ion collectors, SiC detectors and plastic scintillators, all employed in time-of-flight configuration. In addition, a Thomson parabola spectrometer, an X-ray streak camera, and calibrated neutron dosimeter bubble detectors were employed. Characteristic protons and neutrons at maximum energies of 3.0 MeV and 2.45 MeV, respectively, were detected, confirming that energy spectra of reaction products coming from deuterium-deuterium nuclear fusion occur. In thick advanced targets a fusion rate of the order of 2 × 108 fusions per laser shot was calculated.

  7. Ion Acceleration and D-D Nuclear Fusion in Laser-Generated Plasma from Advanced Deuterated Polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Deuterated polyethylene targets have been irradiated by means of a 1016 W/cm2 laser using 600 J pulse energy, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and 70 micron spot diameter. The plasma parameters were measured using on-line diagnostics based on ion collectors, SiC detectors and plastic scintillators, all employed in time-of-flight configuration. In addition, a Thomson parabola spectrometer, an X-ray streak camera, and calibrated neutron dosimeter bubble detectors were employed. Characteristic protons and neutrons at maximum energies of 3.0 MeV and 2.45 MeV, respectively, were detected, confirming that energy spectra of reaction products coming from deuterium-deuterium nuclear fusion occur. In thick advanced targets a fusion rate of the order of 2 × 108 fusions per laser shot was calculated.

  8. Impact of First-Principles Property Calculations of Warm-Dense Deuterium/Tritium on Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of the properties of warm dense deuterium/tritium (DT) is essential to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In the warm-dense-matter regime, routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, strong-coupling and degeneracy effects play an important role in determining plasma properties. Using first-principles methods of both path-integral Monte Carlo and quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD), we have performed systematic investigation of the equation of state, thermal conductivity, and opacity for DT over a wide range of densities and temperatures. These first-principles properties have been incorporated into our hydrocodes. When compared to hydro simulations using standard plasma models, significant differences in 1-D target performance have been identified for simulations of DT implosions. For low-adiabat (α Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  9. Ablation of a Deuterium Pellet in a Fusion Plasma Viewed as a Stopping Power Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    At present, the most exploited technology to refuel a future fusion reactor is the high speed injection of macroscopic size pellet of solid hydrogen isotopes. The basic idea is that the ablation of a pellet in a fusion reactor is mainly caused by thermal electrons (~ 10 keV) /1/. Due to the low s...

  10. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Tanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  11. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  12. Comment on 'Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions'

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility reported by Casey et al.[1], displayed an anomalously low dd proton yield and a high tt neutron yield as compared to dt fusion reactions, explained as a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. We suggest that in the com- pression stage the fuel is out of equilibrium. Ions are inward accelerated to a velocity v0 independent on the particle type. Yield ratios are simply given by the ratios of fusion cross-sections obtained at the same velocity. A 'Hubble' type model gives also a reasonable description of the data. These considerations might be relevant for implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility as well.

  13. In depth fusion flame spreading with a deuterium-tritium plane fuel density profile for plasma block ignition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Malekynia; S.S.Razavipour

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state fuel ignition was given by Chu and Bobin according to the hydrodynamic theory at x =0 qualitatively.A high threshold energy flux density,i.e.,E* =4.3 x 1012 J/m2,has been reached.Recently,fast ignition by employing clean petawatt-picosecond laser pulses was performed.The anomalous phenomena were observed to be based on suppression of prepulses.The accelerated plasma block was used to ignite deuterium-tritium fuel at solid-state density.The detailed analysis of the thermonuclear wave propagation was investigated.Also the fusion conditions at x ≠ 0 layers were clarified by exactly solving hydrodynamic equations for plasma block ignition.In this paper,the applied physical mechanisms are determined for nonlinear force laser driven plasma blocks,thermonuclear reaction,heat transfer,electron-ion equilibration,stopping power of alpha particles,bremsstrahlung,expansion,density dependence,and fluid dynamics.New ignition conditions may be obtained by using temperature equations,including thc dcnsity profile that is obtained by the continuity equation and expansion velocity.The density is only a function of x and independent of time.The ignition energy flux density,E*t,for the x ≠ 0 layers is 1.95 × 1012 J/m2.Thus threshold ignition energy in comparison with that at x =0 layers would be reduced to less than 50 percent.

  14. Advances in multi-sensor data fusion: algorithms and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiang; Zhuang, Dafang; Huang, Yaohuan; Fu, Jingying

    2009-01-01

    With the development of satellite and remote sensing techniques, more and more image data from airborne/satellite sensors have become available. Multi-sensor image fusion seeks to combine information from different images to obtain more inferences than can be derived from a single sensor. In image-based application fields, image fusion has emerged as a promising research area since the end of the last century. The paper presents an overview of recent advances in multi-sensor satellite image fusion. Firstly, the most popular existing fusion algorithms are introduced, with emphasis on their recent improvements. Advances in main applications fields in remote sensing, including object identification, classification, change detection and maneuvering targets tracking, are described. Both advantages and limitations of those applications are then discussed. Recommendations are addressed, including: (1) Improvements of fusion algorithms; (2) Development of "algorithm fusion" methods; (3) Establishment of an automatic quality assessment scheme.

  15. Advances in Multi-Sensor Data Fusion: Algorithms and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingying Fu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available With the development of satellite and remote sensing techniques, more and more image data from airborne/satellite sensors have become available. Multi-sensor image fusion seeks to combine information from different images to obtain more inferences than can be derived from a single sensor. In image-based application fields, image fusion has emerged as a promising research area since the end of the last century. The paper presents an overview of recent advances in multi-sensor satellite image fusion. Firstly, the most popular existing fusion algorithms are introduced, with emphasis on their recent improvements. Advances in main applications fields in remote sensing, including object identification, classification, change detection and maneuvering targets tracking, are described. Both advantages and limitations of those applications are then discussed. Recommendations are addressed, including: (1 Improvements of fusion algorithms; (2 Development of “algorithm fusion” methods; (3 Establishment of an automatic quality assessment scheme.

  16. Scientific and technological advancements in inertial fusion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, D. E.

    2013-10-01

    Scientific advancements in inertial fusion energy (IFE) were reported on at the IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, October 2012. Results presented transect the different ways to assemble the fuel, different scenarios for igniting the fuel, and progress in IFE technologies. The achievements of the National Ignition Campaign within the USA, using the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to indirectly drive laser fusion, have found beneficial the achievements in other IFE arenas such as directly driven laser fusion and target fabrication. Moreover, the successes at NIF have pay-off to alternative scenarios such as fast ignition, shock ignition, and heavy-ion fusion as well as to directly driven laser fusion. This synergy is summarized here, and future scientific studies are detailed.

  17. Magneto-inertia confinement approach (MICA) to fusion in dynamic Z-pinch formed from a frozen deuterium-tritium tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikuta, Kazunari

    1988-02-01

    This paper reconsiders the magneto-inertia confinement approach to fusion in dynamic z-pinch with a new method of generating a hot plasma using a frozen deuterium-tritium (D-T) tube as an initial condition. If modern pulsed power technology can induce the high current of the order of 10 MA along the tube, the dense z-pinch plasma formed from the electro-magnetical implosion of thin tubular D-T ice with a radius of about 1 mm can satisfy the Lawson criterion for its 1 cm length.

  18. Advanced fusion MHD power conversion using the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Logan, B.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA); Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1988-10-01

    The CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept for a tokamak reactor involves the use of a high-temperature Rankine cycle in combination with microwave superheaters and nonequilibrium MHD disk generators to obtain a compact, low-capital-cost power conversion system which fits almost entirely within the reactor vault. The significant savings in the balance-of-plant costs are expected to result in much lower costs of electricity than previous concepts. This paper describes the unique features of the CFAR cycle and a high- temperature blanket designed to take advantage of it as well as the predicted performance of the MHD disk generators using mercury seeded with cesium. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Context Representation and Fusion: Advancements and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Masood Khattak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The acceptance and usability of context-aware systems have given them the edge of wide use in various domains and has also attracted the attention of researchers in the area of context-aware computing. Making user context information available to such systems is the center of attention. However, there is very little emphasis given to the process of context representation and context fusion which are integral parts of context-aware systems. Context representation and fusion facilitate in recognizing the dependency/relationship of one data source on another to extract a better understanding of user context. The problem is more critical when data is emerging from heterogeneous sources of diverse nature like sensors, user profiles, and social interactions and also at different timestamps. Both the processes of context representation and fusion are followed in one way or another; however, they are not discussed explicitly for the realization of context-aware systems. In other words most of the context-aware systems underestimate the importance context representation and fusion. This research has explicitly focused on the importance of both the processes of context representation and fusion and has streamlined their existence in the overall architecture of context-aware systems’ design and development. Various applications of context representation and fusion in context-aware systems are also highlighted in this research. A detailed review on both the processes is provided in this research with their applications. Future research directions (challenges are also highlighted which needs proper attention for the purpose of achieving the goal of realizing context-aware systems.

  20. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles "exhaust" momentum can be used directly to produce high ISP thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p- 11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  1. Mass Producing Targets for Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Kendall, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Metal-encapsulating technique advances prospects of controlling nuclear fusion. Prefilled fusion targets form at nozzle as molten metal such as tin flows through outer channel and pressurized deuterium/tritium gas flows through inner channel. Molten metal completely encloses gas charge as it drops off nozzle.

  2. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G., E-mail: hgr@mit.edu; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-08-15

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He and D(T,n){sup 4}He occur, as the primary fusion products {sup 3}He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (∼5–100 mg/cm{sup 2}), the secondary D-{sup 3}He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  3. First-principles studies on the equation of state, thermal conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium (DT) and polystyrene (CH) for inertial confinement fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles (FP) methods, we have performed ab initio compute for the equation of state (EOS), thermal conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium (DT) in a wide range of densities and temperatures for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications. These systematic investigations have recently been expanded to accurately compute the plasma properties of CH ablators under extreme conditions. In particular, the first-principles EOS and thermal-conductivity tables of CH are self-consistently built from such FP calculations, which are benchmarked by experimental measurements. When compared with the traditional models used for these plasma properties in hydrocodes, significant differences have been identified in the warm dense plasma regime. When these FP-calculated properties of DT and CH were used in our hydrodynamic simulations of ICF implosions, we found that the target performance in terms of neutron yield and energy gain can vary by a factor of 2 to 3, relative to traditional model simulations.

  4. Self-ignition of an advanced fuel field-reversed configuration reactor by fusion product heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, M.; Ohi, S.; Okamoto, M.; Momota, H.; Wakabayashi, J.

    1987-09-01

    A self-ignition of a deuterium-deuterium (D-D)-/sup 3/He fuel field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma by fusion product heating is studied by using the point plasma model, where an FRC plasma equilibrium is taken into account. It is numerically demonstrated that the D-D-/sup 3/He plasma can be evolved from a deuterium-tritium burning plasma in a controlled manner by means of a compression-decompression control as well as a fueling control. It is also indicated that the increase of a trapped flux is effective for suppressing the excessive elongation of a plasma during the transition. The proposed method may provide a solution to the problem on plasma heating to attain a D-D-/sup 3/He self-ignition.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, PE; Wootton, A.; Gorini, G.; Sindoni, E.; Batani, D.

    2003-02-01

    This book is a collection of papers, written by specialists in the field, on advanced topics of nuclear fusion diagnostics. The 78 contributions were originally presented at the International Conference on Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Fusion held at Villa Monastero, Italy in September 2001. Both magnetically confined and inertial fusion programmes are quite extensively covered, with more emphasis given to the former scheme. In the case of magnetic confinement, since the present international programme is strongly focused on next-step devices, particular attention is devoted to techniques and technologies viable in an environment with strong neutron fluxes. Indeed, in the first section, the various methods are considered in the perspective of performing the measurements of the relevant parameters in conditions approaching a burning plasma, mainly in the Tokamak configuration. The most demanding requirements, like the implications of the use of tritium and radiation resistance, are reviewed and the most challenging open issues, which require further research and development, are also clearly mentioned. The following three sections are devoted to some of the most recent developments in plasma diagnostics, which are grouped according to the following classification: `Neutron and particle diagnostics', `Optical and x-ray diagnostics' and `Interferometry, Polarimetry and Thomson Scattering'. In these chapters, several of the most recent results are given, covering measurements taken on the most advanced experiments around the world. Here the developments described deal more with the requirements imposed by the physical issues to be studied. They are therefore more focused on the approaches adopted to increase the spatial and time resolution of the diagnostics, on some methods to improve the characterisation of the turbulence and on fast particles. Good coverage is given to neutron diagnostics, which are assuming increasing relevance as the plasma

  6. Resonant Formation of $d\\mu t$ Molecules in Deuterium An Atomic Beam Measurement of Muon Catalyzed dt Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Bailey, J M; Beer, G A; Beveridge, J L; Faifman, M P; Huber, T M; Kammel, P; Kim, S K; Knowles, P E; Kunselman, A R; Maier, M; Markushin, V E; Marshall, G M; Martoff, C J; Mason, G R; Mulhauser, F; Olin, A; Petitjean, C; Porcelli, T A; Wozniak, J; Zmeskal, J

    2000-01-01

    Resonant formation of $d\\mu t$ molecules in collisions of muonic tritium ($\\mu t$) on D$_2$ was investigated using a beam of $\\mu t$ atoms, demonstrating a new direct approach in muon catalyzed fusion studies. Strong epithermal resonances in $d\\mu t$ formation were directly revealed for the first time. From the time-of-flight analysis of $2036\\pm 116$ $dt$ fusion events, a formation rate consistent with $0.73\\pm (0.16)_{meas} \\pm (0.09)_{model}$ times the theoretical prediction was obtained. For the largest peak at a resonance energy of $0.423 \\pm 0.037$ eV, this corresponds to a rate of $(7.1 \\pm 1.8) \\times 10^9$ s$^{-1}$, more than an order of magnitude larger than those at low energies.

  7. Advances in data representation for hard/soft information fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimland, Jeffrey C.; Coughlin, Dan; Hall, David L.; Graham, Jacob L.

    2012-06-01

    Information fusion is becoming increasingly human-centric. While past systems typically relegated humans to the role of analyzing a finished fusion product, current systems are exploring the role of humans as integral elements in a modular and extensible distributed framework where many tasks can be accomplished by either human or machine performers. For example, "participatory sensing" campaigns give humans the role of "soft sensors" by uploading their direct observations or as "soft sensor platforms" by using mobile devices to record human-annotated, GPS-encoded high quality photographs, video, or audio. Additionally, the role of "human-in-the-loop", in which individuals or teams using advanced human computer interface (HCI) tools such as stereoscopic 3D visualization, haptic interfaces, or aural "sonification" interfaces can help to effectively engage the innate human capability to perform pattern matching, anomaly identification, and semantic-based contextual reasoning to interpret an evolving situation. The Pennsylvania State University is participating in a Multi-disciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program funded by the U.S. Army Research Office to investigate fusion of hard and soft data in counterinsurgency (COIN) situations. In addition to the importance of this research for Intelligence Preparation of the Battlefield (IPB), many of the same challenges and techniques apply to health and medical informatics, crisis management, crowd-sourced "citizen science", and monitoring environmental concerns. One of the key challenges that we have encountered is the development of data formats, protocols, and methodologies to establish an information architecture and framework for the effective capture, representation, transmission, and storage of the vastly heterogeneous data and accompanying metadata -- including capabilities and characteristics of human observers, uncertainty of human observations, "soft" contextual data, and information pedigree

  8. A preliminary study of a D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket using compact fusion advanced Brayton (CFAB) cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Ohnishi, M.; Yamamoto, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Key issues on a D-T Tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket concept using CFAB (Compact Fusion Advanced Brayton) cycle are presented. Although the previously proposed and studied compact fusion advanced Rankine cycle using mercury liquid metal has shown, in general, excellent performance characteristics in extracting energy and electricity with high efficiency by the {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} nonequilibrium MHD disk generator, and in enhancing safety potential, there was a fear about uses of hazardous mercury as primary coolant as well as its limited natural resources. To overcome these disadvantages while retaining the advantage features of a ultra-high temperature coolant inherent in the synchrotron energy-enhanced D-T tokamak reactor, a compact fusion advanced Brayton cycle using helium was reexamined which was once considered relatively not superior in the CFAR study, at the expense of high, but acceptable circulation power, lower heat transfer characteristics, and probably of a little bit reduced safety.

  9. Fusion and fission of atomic clusters: recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2005-01-01

    We review recent advances made by our group in finding optimized geometries of atomic clusters as well as in description of fission of charged small metal clusters. We base our approach to these problems on analysis of multidimensional potential energy surface. For the fusion process we have...... developed an effective scheme of adding new atoms to stable cluster geometries of larger clusters in an efficient way. We apply this algorithm to finding geometries of metal and noble gas clusters. For the fission process the analysis of the potential energy landscape calculated on the ab initio level...... of theory allowed us to obtain very detailed information on energetics and pathways of the different fission channels for the Na^2+_10 clusters....

  10. Advanced fusion technologies developed for JT-60 superconducting tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakasai, A.; Ishida, S.; Matsukawa, M.; Akino, N.; Ando, T.; Arai, T.; Ezato, K.; Hamada, K.; Ichige, H.; Isono, T.; Kaminaga, A.; Kato, T.; Kawano, K.; Kikuchi, M.; Kizu, K.; Koizumi, N.; Kudo, Y.; Kurita, G.; Masaki, K.; Matsui, K.; Miura, Y. M.; Miya, N.; Miyo, Y.; Morioka, A.; Nakajima, H.; Nunoya, Y.; Oikawa, A.; Okuno, K.; Sakurai, S.; Sasajima, T.; Satoh, K.; Shimizu, K.; Takeji, S.; Takenaga, K.; Tamai, H.; Taniguchi, M.; Tobita, K.; Tsuchiya, K.; Urata, K.; Yagyu, J.

    2004-02-01

    Modification of JT-60 as a full superconducting tokamak (JT-60SC) is planned. The objectives of the JT-60SC programme are to establish scientific and technological bases for steady-state operation of high performance plasmas and utilization of reduced-activation materials in an economically and environmentally attractive DEMO reactor. Advanced fusion technologies relevant to the DEMO reactor have been developed for the superconducting magnet technology and plasma facing components of the JT-60SC design. To achieve a high current density in a superconducting strand, Nb3Al strands with a high copper ratio of 4 have been newly developed for the toroidal field coils (TFCs) of JT-60SC. The R&D to demonstrate the applicability of the Nb3Al conductor to TFCs by a react-and-wind technique has been carried out using a full-size Nb3Al conductor. A full-size NbTi conductor with low ac loss using Ni-coated strands has been successfully developed. A forced cooling divertor component with high heat transfer using screw tubes has been developed for the first time. The heat removal performance of the carbon fibre composite target was successfully demonstrated on an electron beam irradiation stand.

  11. On the role of atomic metastability in the production of Balmer line radiation from ‘cold’ atomic hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogenic ion impurities in fusion edge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, J. D.

    2012-03-01

    Published arguments, which assign an important role to atomic metastability in the production of ‘narrow’ Zeeman component radiation from the boundary region of fusion plasmas, are examined critically in relation to l-redistribution by proton and electron collisions, and mixing of unperturbed atomic states by the ion microfield and microfield gradient. It is concluded that these important processes indeed severely constrain the contribution from ‘metastable’ states to the generation of the hydrogen Balmer spectra, for electron concentrations above 1012 cm-3, as pointed out before by the present author (Hey et al 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3555). The analysis of collision-induced l-redistribution represents an extension of that used previously (Hey et al 1996 Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36 583), applicable up to higher electron densities. For comparison purposes, we also consider the question of metastability of ionized helium in a low-temperature plasma, and that of some common hydrogenic impurities (C5+ and Ne9+) in a hydrogen (deuterium) fusion plasma. While for low nuclear charge Z the metastability of 2s1/2 levels is quenched by the plasma environment, it is much reduced in high-Z ions owing to the rapid increase with Z of the two-photon electric dipole (2E1) and magnetic dipole (M1) spontaneous transition rates to the ground state, whereas the role of the plasma in these cases is less important. The main new principle elaborated in this work is the sensitivity of atomic line strengths, and hence collision strengths, to perturbation by the plasma environment for transitions between fine-structure sublevels of the same principal quantum number. As the plasma microfield strength grows, ‘allowed’ transitions diminish in strength, while ‘forbidden’ transitions grow. However, owing to violation of the parity selection rule, there is an overall loss of collision strength available to transitions, resulting from the appearance of significant

  12. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. K.; Lee, K. W.; Hwang, C. K.; Hong, B. G.; Hong, G. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-01

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new.

  13. NATO Advanced Study Institute entitled Physics of Plasma-Wall Interactions in Controlled Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Behrisch, R; Physics of plasma-wall interactions in controlled fusion

    1986-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion is one of the possible candidates for long term energy sources which will be indispensable for our highly technological society. However, the physics and technology of controlled fusion are extremely complex and still require a great deal of research and development before fusion can be a practical energy source. For producing energy via controlled fusion a deuterium-tritium gas has to be heated to temperatures of a few 100 Million °c corres­ ponding to about 10 keV. For net energy gain, this hot plasma has to be confined at a certain density for a certain time One pro­ mising scheme to confine such a plasma is the use of i~tense mag­ netic fields. However, the plasma diffuses out of the confining magnetic surfaces and impinges on the surrounding vessel walls which isolate the plasma from the surrounding air. Because of this plasma wall interaction, particles from the plasma are lost to the walls by implantation and are partially reemitted into the plasma. In addition, wall...

  14. Fusion - 2050 perspective (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The results of strongly exothermic reaction of thermonuclear fusion between nuclei of deuterium and tritium are: helium nuclei and neutrons, plus considerable kinetic energy of neutrons of over 14 MeV. DT nuclides synthesis reaction is probably not the most favorable one for energy production, but is the most advanced technologically. More efficient would be possibly aneutronic fusion. The EU by its EURATOM agenda prepared a Road Map for research and implementation of Fusion as a commercial method of thermonuclear energy generation in the time horizon of 2050.The milestones on this road are tokomak experiments JET, ITER and DEMO, and neutron experiment IFMIF. There is a hope, that by engagement of the national government, and all research and technical fusion communities, part of this Road Map may be realized in Poland. The infrastructure build for fusion experiments may be also used for material engineering research, chemistry, biomedical, associated with environment protection, power engineering, security, ...

  15. External costs of silicon carbide fusion power plants compared to other advanced generation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechon, Y. E-mail: yolanda.lechon@ciemat.es; Cabal, H.; Saez, R.M.; Hallberg, B.; Aquilonius, K.; Schneider, T.; Lepicard, S.; Ward, D.; Hamacher, T.; Korhonen, R

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed in the framework of the Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF3), which is jointly conducted by Euratom and the fusion associations. Assessments of monetarized external impacts of the fusion fuel-cycle were previously performed (SERF1 and SERF2). Three different power plant designs were studied, with the main difference being the structural materials and cooling system used. In this third phase of the SERF project the external costs of three additional fusion power plant models using silicon carbide as structural material have been analysed. A comparison with other advanced generation technologies expected to be in use around 2050, when the first fusion power plant would be operative, has also been performed. These technologies include advanced fossil technologies, such as Natural Gas Combined Cycle, Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with carbon sequestration technologies; fuel cells and renewable technologies including geothermal energy, wind energy and photovoltaic systems with energy storage devices. Fusion power plants using silicon carbide as structural material have higher efficiencies than plants using steel and this fact has a very positive effect on the external costs per kW h. These external costs are in the lowest range of the external costs of advanced generation technologies indicating the outstanding environmental performance of fusion power.

  16. Advances in statistical multisource-multitarget information fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahler, Ronald PS

    2014-01-01

    This is the sequel to the 2007 Artech House bestselling title, Statistical Multisource-Multitarget Information Fusion. That earlier book was a comprehensive resource for an in-depth understanding of finite-set statistics (FISST), a unified, systematic, and Bayesian approach to information fusion. The cardinalized probability hypothesis density (CPHD) filter, which was first systematically described in the earlier book, has since become a standard multitarget detection and tracking technique, especially in research and development.Since 2007, FISST has inspired a considerable amount of research

  17. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  18. Effect of deposited tungsten on deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharapov, V.M.; Gavrilov, L.E. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulikauskas, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    Usually ion or plasma beam is used for the experiment with beryllium which simulates the interaction of plasma with first wall in fusion devices. However, the use of thermal or subthermal atoms of hydrogen isotopes seems to be useful for that purpose. Recently, the authors have studied the deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium. The experimental setup is shown, and is explained. By means of elastic recoil detection (ERD) technique, it was shown that in the exposure to D atoms at 740 K, deuterium is distributed deeply into the bulk, and is accumulated up to higher concentration than the case of the exposure to molecular deuterium. The depth and concentration of deuterium distribution depend on the exposure time, and those data are shown. During the exposure to atomic deuterium, oxide film grew on the side of a sample facing plasma. In order to understand the mechanism of deuterium trapping, the experiment was performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). The influence that the tungsten deposit from the heated cathode exerted to the deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium was investigated. These results are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Advanced Scintillator Detectors for Neutron Imaging in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert-Kleinrath, Verena; Danly, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Simpson, Raspberry; Volegov, Petr; Wilde, Carl

    2016-10-01

    The neutron imaging team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been providing two-dimensional neutron imaging of the inertial confinement fusion process at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for over five years. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool in which position-sensitive detectors register neutrons emitted in the fusion reactions, producing a picture of the burning fuel. Recent images have revealed possible multi-dimensional asymmetries, calling for additional views to facilitate three-dimensional imaging. These will be along shorter lines of sight to stay within the existing facility at NIF. In order to field imaging capabilities equivalent to the existing system several technological challenges have to be met: high spatial resolution, high light output, and fast scintillator response to capture lower-energy neutrons, which have scattered from non-burning regions of fuel. Deuterated scintillators are a promising candidate to achieve the timing and resolution required; a systematic study of deuterated and non-deuterated polystyrene and liquid samples is currently ongoing. A test stand has been implemented to measure the response function, and preliminary data on resolution and light output have been obtained at the LANL Weapons Neutrons Research facility.

  20. A modified technique of four-bone fusion for advanced carpal collapse (SLAC/SNAC wrist).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-López, A; Perez-Ubeda, M J; Marco, F; Molina, M; López-Duran, L

    2001-08-01

    This study reports the outcome of 16 patients treated with a modified four-bone fusion for symptomatic stage II and III advanced carpal collapse. The technique is based on fusion of the capitate, lunate, hamate and triquetrum using an autogenous corticocancellous bone-graft fixed with screws. The void left behind after scaphoid excision was filled with an extensor carpi radialis longus anchovy. After an average follow up of 3 years; there were 13 excellent and three good outcomes. In every patient pain relief was achieved with preservation of joint motion and grip strength. All the patients were able to return to their previous activities and jobs. Radiographic evaluation showed bone fusion in all 16 patients with a slight decrease in carpal height but a well preserved radiolunate joint space. In conclusion, this technique provides immediate stable fixation and early mobilization and assures bone fusion.

  1. Advanced SiC composites for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Schwarz, O.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This is a short review of the motivation for and progress in the development of ceramic matrix composites for fusion. Chemically vapor infiltrated silicon carbide (SiC) composites have been fabricated from continuous fibers of either SiC or graphite and tested for strength and thermal conductivity. Of significance is the the Hi-Nicalon{trademark} SiC based fiber composite has superior unirradiated properties as compared to the standard Nicalon grade. Based on previous results on the stability of the Hi-Nicalon fiber, this system should prove more resistant to neutron irradiation. A graphite fiber composite has been fabricated with very good mechnical properties and thermal conductivity an order of magnitude higher than typical SiC/SiC composites.

  2. The internal propagation of fusion flame with the strong shock of a laser driven plasma block for advanced nuclear fuel ignition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Malekynia; S.S.Razavipour

    2013-01-01

    An accelerated skin layer may be used to ignite solid state fuels.Detailed analyses were clarified by solving the hydrodynamic equations for nonlinear force driven plasma block ignition.In this paper,the complementary mechanisms are included for the advanced fuel ignition:external factors such as lasers,compression,shock waves,and sparks.The other category is created within the plasma fusion as reheating of an alpha particle,the Bremsstrahlung absorption,expansion,conduction,and shock waves generated by explosions.With the new condition for the control of shock waves,the spherical deuterium-tritium fuel density should be increased to 75 times that of the solid state.The threshold ignition energy flux density for advanced fuel ignition may be obtained using temperature equations,including the ones for the density profile obtained through the continuity equation and the expansion velocity for the r ≠ 0 layers.These thresholds are significantly reduced in comparison with the ignition thresholds at x =0 for solid advanced fuels.The quantum correction for the collision frequency is applied in the case of the delay in ion heating.Under the shock wave condition,the spherical protonboron and proton-lithium fuel densities should be increased to densities 120 and 180 times that of the solid state.These plasma compressions are achieved through a longer duration laser pulse or X-ray.

  3. Evolution of dispersion in the cosmic deuterium abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorkin, Irina; Silk, Joseph; Petitjean, Patrick; Olive, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Deuterium is created during Bing Bang Nucleosynthesis, and, in contrast to the other light stable nuclei, can only be destroyed thereafter by fusion in stellar interiors. In this paper we study the cosmic evolution of the deuterium abundance in the interstellar medium and its dispersion using realistic galaxy evolution models. We find that models that reproduce the observed metal abundance are compatible with observations of the deuterium abundance in the local ISM and z ~ 3 absorption line systems. In particular, we reproduce the low astration factor which we attribute to a low global star formation efficiency. We calculate the dispersion in deuterium abundance arising from different structure formation histories in different parts of the Universe. Our model also predicts an extremely tight correlation between deuterium and metal abundances which could be used to measure the primordial deuterium abundance.

  4. Characteristics of confinement and fusion reactivity in JT-60U high-{beta}{rho} and TFTR supershot regimes with deuterium neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.K.; Bell, M.G.; Yamada, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high performance regimes achieved in JT-60U and TFTR have produced peak DD fusion neutron rates up to 5.6 {times} 10{sup 16}/s for similar heating beam powers, in spite of considerable differences in machine operation and plasma configuration. A common scaling for the DD fusion neutron rate (S{sub DD} {proportional_to} P{sub abs}{sup 2.0} H{sub ne} V{sub p}{sup {minus}0.9}) is obtained, where P{sub abs} and H{sub ne} are the absorbed beam power and beam fueling peaking factor, respectively, and V{sub p} is the plasma volume. The maximum stored energy obtained in each machine has been up to 5.4 MJ in TFTR and 8.7 MJ in JT-60U. Further improvements in the fusion neutron rate and the stored energy are limited by the {beta}-limit in Troyon range, {beta}{sub N} {approximately} 2.0--2.5. A common scaling for the stored energy (W{sub tot} {proportional_to} P{sub abs}V{sub p}H{sub ne}{sup 0.2}) is also proposed.

  5. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: summary of activities, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    The activities described in this summary of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division are diverse, yet united by a common theme: it is our purpose to explore technologically advanced techniques for the production, acceleration, or transport of high-energy beams. These beams may be the heavy ions of interest in nuclear science, medical research, and heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; they may be beams of deuterium and hydrogen atoms, used to heat and confine plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments; they may be ultrahigh-energy protons for the next high-energy hadron collider; or they may be high-brilliance, highly coherent, picosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation.

  6. Recent Advances in Registration, Integration and Fusion of Remotely Sensed Data: Redundant Representations and Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Wojciech; Le Moigne-Stewart, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, sophisticated mathematical techniques have been successfully applied to the field of remote sensing to produce significant advances in applications such as registration, integration and fusion of remotely sensed data. Registration, integration and fusion of multiple source imagery are the most important issues when dealing with Earth Science remote sensing data where information from multiple sensors, exhibiting various resolutions, must be integrated. Issues ranging from different sensor geometries, different spectral responses, differing illumination conditions, different seasons, and various amounts of noise need to be dealt with when designing an image registration, integration or fusion method. This tutorial will first define the problems and challenges associated with these applications and then will review some mathematical techniques that have been successfully utilized to solve them. In particular, we will cover topics on geometric multiscale representations, redundant representations and fusion frames, graph operators, diffusion wavelets, as well as spatial-spectral and operator-based data fusion. All the algorithms will be illustrated using remotely sensed data, with an emphasis on current and operational instruments.

  7. A CONCEPT FOR NEXT STEP ADVANCED TOKAMAK FUSION DEVICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A concept is introduced for initiating the design study of a special class of tokamak,which has a magnetic confinement configuration intermediate between contemporary advanced tokamak and the recently established spherical torus (ST,also well known by the name "spherical tokamak").The leading design parameter in the present proposal is a dimensionless geometrical parameter, the machine aspect ratio A=R0/a0=2.0,where the parameters a0 and R0 denote,respectively,the plasma (equatorial) minor radius and the plasma major radius.The aim of this choice is to technologically and experimentally go beyond the aspect ratio frontier (R0/a0≈2.5) of present day tokamaks and enter a broad unexplored domain existing on the (a0,R0) parameter space in current international tokamak database,between the data region already moderately well covered by the advanced conventional tokamaks and the data region planned to be covered by STs.Plasma minor radius a0 has been chosen to be the second basic design parameter, and consequently,the plasma major radius R0 is regarded as a dependent design parameter.In the present concept,a nominal plasma minor radius a0=1.2m is adopted to be the principal design value,and smaller values of a0 can be used for auxiliary design purposes,to establish extensive database linkage with existing tokamaks.Plasma minor radius can also be adjusted by mechanical and/or electromagnetic means to smaller values during experiments,for making suitable data linkages to existing machines with higher aspect ratios and smaller plasma minor radii.The basic design parameters proposed enable the adaptation of several confinement techniques recently developed by STs,and thereby a specially arranged central-bore region inside the envisioned tokamak torus,with retrieved space in the direction of plasma minor radius,will be available for technological adjustments and maneuverings to facilitate implementation of engineering instrumentation and real time high

  8. Retention of deuterium in damaged low-activation steel Rusfer (EK-181) after gas and plasma exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitsyn, A.V. [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Golubeva, A.V., E-mail: anna-golubeva@yandex.ru [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bobyr, N.P.; Khripunov, B.I. [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cherkez, D.I., E-mail: cherkez@list.ru [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Petrov, V.B. [NRC ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mayer, M.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Alimov, V.Kh. [Max-Planck-Institut fürPlasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Klimov, N.S.; Putrik, A. [SRC RF TRINITI, Troitsk (Russian Federation); Chernov, V.M.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M.V. [A.A. Bochvar Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gasparyan, Yu.M.; Efimov, V.S. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic–martensitic steels (RAFMS) are advanced structural materials for the construction of future fusion reactors with high fluxes of neutrons, such as DEMO or a Fusion Neutron Source (FNS). In the present work the influence of different damages on deuterium retention in the RAFM Rusfer (Chernov et al., 2007) was investigated. Three different types of damage were applied: (i)irradiation by 20 MeV W{sup 6+} ions to a damage fluence of 0.89 dpa (1.4 × 10{sup 18} ions/m{sup 2}). Tungsten ion irradiation was used as proxy for displacement damage created by neutrons; (ii)heat loads in the QSPA-T facility with 10 pulses of 0.5 MJ/m{sup 2} with a duration of 0.5 ms; (iii)low-temperature hydrogen plasma irradiation in the LENTA facility at 320 and 600 K to a fluence of 10{sup 25} H/m{sup 2}. The hydrogen isotope retention properties of the damaged and undamaged material were investigated by exposure to deuterium gas several weeks after damaging. The deuterium retention was investigated in the temperature range of RT–773 K at pressure 10{sup 4} Pa. Deuterium depth profiles were measured a month after gas exposure by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) using the D({sup 3}He,p)α nuclear reaction. Deuterium retention in damaged and undamaged Rusfer in the temperature range of 300–600 K has a maximum at 500 K for all types of damage investigated. The typical value of deuterium concentration in the bulk is 10{sup −3} at.%. Peculiarities of D retention in damaged samples are discussed.

  9. Deuterium abundance and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Vidal-Madjar, A; Lemoine, M

    1996-01-01

    We review the status of the measurements of the deuterium abundance from the local interstellar medium to the solar system and high redshifts absorbers toward quasars. We present preliminary results toward a white dwarf and a QSO. We conclude that the deuterium evolution from the Big-Bang to now is still not properly understood.

  10. Fusion Reactivity in the Case of Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞国扬; 常永斌; 沈林芳

    2003-01-01

    By applying the integral-variable-change technique,an explicit expression of deuterium-tritium fusion reactivity in the case of second harmonic ion cyclotron resonant heating on deuterium is obtained.

  11. High performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbagh, S.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; Batha, S.H. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States); Bell, M.G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Plasmas composed of nominally equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium (DT) have been created in TFTR with the goals of producing significant levels of fusion power and of examining the effects of DT fusion alpha particles. Conditioning of the limiter by the injection of lithium pellets has led to an approximate doubling of the energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, in supershot plasmas at high plasma current (I{sub p} {le} 2.5 MA) and high heating power (P{sub b} {le} 33 MW). Operation with DT typically results in an additional 20% increase in {tau}{sub E}. In the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR, confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.5 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasmas, exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Confinement of alpha particles appears to be classical and losses due to collective effects have not been observed. While small fluctuations in fusion product loss were observed during ELMs, no large loss was detected in DT plasmas.

  12. Developing and validating advanced divertor solutions on DIII-D for next-step fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hill, D. N.; Leonard, A. W.; Allen, S. L.; Stangeby, P. C.; Thomas, D.; Unterberg, E. A.; Abrams, T.; Boedo, J.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Buchenauer, D.; Bykov, I.; Canik, J. M.; Chrobak, C.; Covele, B.; Ding, R.; Doerner, R.; Donovan, D.; Du, H.; Elder, D.; Eldon, D.; Lasa, A.; Groth, M.; Guterl, J.; Jarvinen, A.; Hinson, E.; Kolemen, E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lore, J.; Makowski, M. A.; McLean, A.; Meyer, B.; Moser, A. L.; Nygren, R.; Owen, L.; Petrie, T. W.; Porter, G. D.; Rognlien, T. D.; Rudakov, D.; Sang, C. F.; Samuell, C.; Si, H.; Schmitz, O.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wampler, W.; Wang, H.; Watkins, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    A major challenge facing the design and operation of next-step high-power steady-state fusion devices is to develop a viable divertor solution with order-of-magnitude increases in power handling capability relative to present experience, while having acceptable divertor target plate erosion and being compatible with maintaining good core plasma confinement. A new initiative has been launched on DIII-D to develop the scientific basis for design, installation, and operation of an advanced divertor to evaluate boundary plasma solutions applicable to next step fusion experiments beyond ITER. Developing the scientific basis for fusion reactor divertor solutions must necessarily follow three lines of research, which we plan to pursue in DIII-D: (1) Advance scientific understanding and predictive capability through development and comparison between state-of-the art computational models and enhanced measurements using targeted parametric scans; (2) Develop and validate key divertor design concepts and codes through innovative variations in physical structure and magnetic geometry; (3) Assess candidate materials, determining the implications for core plasma operation and control, and develop mitigation techniques for any deleterious effects, incorporating development of plasma-material interaction models. These efforts will lead to design, installation, and evaluation of an advanced divertor for DIII-D to enable highly dissipative divertor operation at core density (n e/n GW), neutral fueling and impurity influx most compatible with high performance plasma scenarios and reactor relevant plasma facing components (PFCs). This paper highlights the current progress and near-term strategies of boundary/PMI research on DIII-D.

  13. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wiffen, F.W. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Fusion Energy

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  14. Deuterium-tritium TFTR plasmas in the high poloidal beta regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Deuterium-tritium plasmas with enhanced energy confinement and stability have been produced in the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR. Confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.46 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasma,s exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Fusion power exceeding 6.7 MW with a fusion power gain Q{sub DT} = 0.22 has been produced with reduced alpha particle first orbit loss provided by the increased l{sub i}.

  15. Effect of noble gas ion pre-irradiation on deuterium retention in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; Zhao, Z. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Yuan, Y.; Morgan, T. W.; Guo, L. P.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B. Y.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.; Lu, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Impurity seeding of noble gases is an effective way of decreasing the heat loads onto the divertor targets in fusion devices. To investigate the effect of noble gases on deuterium retention, tungsten targets have been implanted by different noble gas ions and subsequently exposed to deuterium plasma

  16. Preface to Special Topic: Advances in Radio Frequency Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuccillo, Angelo A.; Phillips, Cynthia K.; Ceccuzzi, Silvio

    2014-06-01

    It has long been recognized that auxiliary plasma heating will be required to achieve the high temperature, high density conditions within a magnetically confined plasma in which a fusion "burn" may be sustained by copious fusion reactions. Consequently, the application of radio and microwave frequency electromagnetic waves to magnetically confined plasma, commonly referred to as RF, has been a major part of the program almost since its inception in the 1950s. These RF waves provide heating, current drive, plasma profile control, and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stabilization. Fusion experiments employ electromagnetic radiation in a wide range of frequencies, from tens of MHz to hundreds of GHz. The fusion devices containing the plasma are typically tori, axisymmetric or non, in which the equilibrium magnetic fields are composed of a strong toroidal magnetic field generated by external coils, and a poloidal field created, at least in the symmetric configurations, by currents flowing in the plasma. The waves are excited in the peripheral regions of the plasma, by specially designed launching structures, and subsequently propagate into the core regions, where resonant wave-plasma interactions produce localized heating or other modification of the local equilibrium profiles. Experimental studies coupled with the development of theoretical models and advanced simulation codes over the past 40+ years have led to an unprecedented understanding of the physics of RF heating and current drive in the core of magnetic fusion devices. Nevertheless, there are serious gaps in our knowledge base that continue to have a negative impact on the success of ongoing experiments and that must be resolved as the program progresses to the next generation devices and ultimately to "demo" and "fusion power plant." A serious gap, at least in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequencies and partially in the lower hybrid frequency ranges, is the difficulty in coupling large amount of power to the

  17. In-Service Design & Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. R. Odette; G. E. Lucas

    2005-11-15

    This final report on "In-Service Design & Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation" (DE-FG03-01ER54632) consists of a series of summaries of work that has been published, or presented at meetings, or both. It briefly describes results on the following topics: 1) A Transport and Fate Model for Helium and Helium Management; 2) Atomistic Studies of Point Defect Energetics, Dynamics and Interactions; 3) Multiscale Modeling of Fracture consisting of: 3a) A Micromechanical Model of the Master Curve (MC) Universal Fracture Toughness-Temperature Curve Relation, KJc(T - To), 3b) An Embrittlement DTo Prediction Model for the Irradiation Hardening Dominated Regime, 3c) Non-hardening Irradiation Assisted Thermal and Helium Embrittlement of 8Cr Tempered Martensitic Steels: Compilation and Analysis of Existing Data, 3d) A Model for the KJc(T) of a High Strength NFA MA957, 3e) Cracked Body Size and Geometry Effects of Measured and Effective Fracture Toughness-Model Based MC and To Evaluations of F82H and Eurofer 97, 3-f) Size and Geometry Effects on the Effective Toughness of Cracked Fusion Structures; 4) Modeling the Multiscale Mechanics of Flow Localization-Ductility Loss in Irradiation Damaged BCC Alloys; and 5) A Universal Relation Between Indentation Hardness and True Stress-Strain Constitutive Behavior. Further details can be found in the cited references or presentations that generally can be accessed on the internet, or provided upon request to the authors. Finally, it is noted that this effort was integrated with our base program in fusion materials, also funded by the DOE OFES.

  18. Advances and challenges in deformable image registration: From image fusion to complex motion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Julia A; Heinrich, Mattias P; Papież, Bartłomiej W; Brady, Sir J Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of medical image registration has significantly advanced from multi-modal image fusion to highly non-linear, deformable image registration for a wide range of medical applications and imaging modalities, involving the compensation and analysis of physiological organ motion or of tissue changes due to growth or disease patterns. While the original focus of image registration has predominantly been on correcting for rigid-body motion of brain image volumes acquired at different scanning sessions, often with different modalities, the advent of dedicated longitudinal and cross-sectional brain studies soon necessitated the development of more sophisticated methods that are able to detect and measure local structural or functional changes, or group differences. Moving outside of the brain, cine imaging and dynamic imaging required the development of deformable image registration to directly measure or compensate for local tissue motion. Since then, deformable image registration has become a general enabling technology. In this work we will present our own contributions to the state-of-the-art in deformable multi-modal fusion and complex motion modelling, and then discuss remaining challenges and provide future perspectives to the field.

  19. Fusion of optimized indicators from Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) for driver drowsiness detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Iván García; Bergasa, Luis Miguel; Bronte, Sebastián; Yebes, Jose Javier; Almazán, Javier; Arroyo, Roberto

    2014-01-09

    This paper presents a non-intrusive approach for monitoring driver drowsiness using the fusion of several optimized indicators based on driver physical and driving performance measures, obtained from ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistant Systems) in simulated conditions. The paper is focused on real-time drowsiness detection technology rather than on long-term sleep/awake regulation prediction technology. We have developed our own vision system in order to obtain robust and optimized driver indicators able to be used in simulators and future real environments. These indicators are principally based on driver physical and driving performance skills. The fusion of several indicators, proposed in the literature, is evaluated using a neural network and a stochastic optimization method to obtain the best combination. We propose a new method for ground-truth generation based on a supervised Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). An extensive evaluation of indicators, derived from trials over a third generation simulator with several test subjects during different driving sessions, was performed. The main conclusions about the performance of single indicators and the best combinations of them are included, as well as the future works derived from this study.

  20. Fusion of Optimized Indicators from Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS for Driver Drowsiness Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván G. Daza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a non-intrusive approach for monitoring driver drowsiness using the fusion of several optimized indicators based on driver physical and driving performance measures, obtained from ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistant Systems in simulated conditions. The paper is focused on real-time drowsiness detection technology rather than on long-term sleep/awake regulation prediction technology. We have developed our own vision system in order to obtain robust and optimized driver indicators able to be used in simulators and future real environments. These indicators are principally based on driver physical and driving performance skills. The fusion of several indicators, proposed in the literature, is evaluated using a neural network and a stochastic optimization method to obtain the best combination. We propose a new method for ground-truth generation based on a supervised Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS. An extensive evaluation of indicators, derived from trials over a third generation simulator with several test subjects during different driving sessions, was performed. The main conclusions about the performance of single indicators and the best combinations of them are included, as well as the future works derived from this study.

  1. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues.

  2. Highly spin-polarized deuterium atoms from the UV dissociation of Deuterium Iodide

    CERN Document Server

    Sofikitis, D; Koumarianou, G; Jiang, H; Bougas, L; Samartzis, P C; Andreev, A; Rakitzis, T P

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarisation of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) nuclear spins increases the D-T fusion reaction rate by ~50%, thus lowering the breakeven limit for the achievement of self-sustained fusion, and controls the emission direction of the reaction products for improved reactor efficiency. However, the important D-D polarization-dependent fusion reaction has not yet been measured, due to the low density of conventional polarized deuterium beams of ~10$^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$, limited by collisions on the ms-timescale of production. Here we demonstrate that hyperpolarised D atoms are produced by the 270 nm photodissociation of deuterium iodide (DI), yielding ~60% nuclear D polarization after ~1.6 ns, ~10$^6$ times faster than conventional methods, allowing collision-limited densities of ~10$^{18}$ cm$^{-3}$. Such ultrahigh densities of polarized D atoms open the way for the study of high-signal polarized D-D reactions. We discuss the possibility of the production of high-density pulsed polarized beams, and of polarized D...

  3. Reactor applications of the compact fusion advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle for a D-T tokamak fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, H.A.; Logan, B.G.; Campbell, R.B.

    1988-03-01

    We have made a preliminary design of a D-T fusion reactor blanket and MHD power conversion system based on the CFAR concept, and found that the performance and costs for the reference cycle are very attractive. While much remains to be done, the potential advantage of liquid metal Rankine cycles for fusion applications are much clearer now. These include low pressures and mass flow rates, a nearly isothermal module shell which minimizes problems of thermal distortion and stresses, and an insensitivity to pressure losses in the blanket so that the two-phase MHD pressure drops in the boilling part of the blanket and the ordinary vapor pressure drops in the pebble-bed superheating zones are acceptable (the direct result of pumping a liquid rather than having to compress a gas). There are no moving parts in the high-temperature MHD power generators, no steam bottoming plant is required, only small vapor precoolers and condensers are needed because of the high heat rejection trmperatures, and only a relatively small natural-draft heat exhanger is required to reject the heat to the atmosphere. The net result is a very compact fusion reactor and power conversion system which fit entirely inside an 18 meter radius reactor vault. Although we have not yet performed a detailed cost analysis, preliminary cost estimates indicate low capital costs and a very attractive cost of electricity. 11 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Thick SS316 materials TIG welding development activities towards advanced fusion reactor vacuum vessel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. Ramesh; Gangradey, R.

    2012-11-01

    Advanced fusion reactors like ITER and up coming Indian DEMO devices are having challenges in terms of their materials design and fabrication procedures. The operation of these devices is having various loads like structural, thermo-mechanical and neutron irradiation effects on major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, magnets and blanket modules. The concept of double wall vacuum vessel (VV) is proposed in view of protecting of major reactor subsystems like super conducting magnets, diagnostic systems and other critical components from high energy 14 MeV neutrons generated from fusion plasma produced by D-T reactions. The double walled vacuum vessel is used in combination with pressurized water circulation and some special grade borated steel blocks to shield these high energy neutrons effectively. The fabrication of sub components in VV are mainly used with high thickness SS materials in range of 20 mm- 60 mm of various grades based on the required protocols. The structural components of double wall vacuum vessel uses various parts like shields, ribs, shells and diagnostic vacuum ports. These components are to be developed with various welding techniques like TIG welding, Narrow gap TIG welding, Laser welding, Hybrid TIG laser welding, Electron beam welding based on requirement. In the present paper the samples of 20 mm and 40 mm thick SS 316 materials are developed with TIG welding process and their mechanical properties characterization with Tensile, Bend tests and Impact tests are carried out. In addition Vickers hardness tests and microstructural properties of Base metal, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Weld Zone are done. TIG welding application with high thick SS materials in connection with vacuum vessel requirements and involved criticalities towards welding process are highlighted.

  5. Measurement of anomalous nuclear reaction in deuterium-loaded metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Song-Sheng; Li Jing-Huai; Wang Jian-Qing; He Ming; Wu Shao-Yong; Zhang Hong-Tao; Yao Shun-He; Zhao Yong-Gang

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment for testing natural nuclear fusion at low temperature searching for evidence of the origin of 3He from natural nuclear fusion in deep Earth.The experiment was carried out using deuterium-loaded titanium foil samples and powder sample.Detection of charged particle was carried out using a low-level charged particle spectrometer.An Al foil was used as an energy absorber for identification of charged particle.Although the counting rate is very low in the experiment,the emission of energetic particle from the sample is obscrved and the particle is identified as a proton having energy about 2.8 MeV after exiting the titanium sample.This work provides a positive result for the emission of charged particle in the deuterium-loaded titanium foil samples at low temperature,but a negative result for the deuterium-loaded titanium powder sample.The average reaction yield is deduced to be(0.46±0.08)protons/h for the foil samples.With the suggestion that the proton originates from d-d reaction,we of the deuterium-loaded titanium powder sample suggests that the reaction yield might be correlated with the density or microscopic variables of deuterium-loaded titanium materials.The negative result also indicates that d-d reaction catalysed by μ-meson from cosmic ray can be excluded in the samples in this experiment.

  6. Deuterium Retention and Physical Sputtering of Low Activation Ferritic Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Hino; K. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamauchi; Y. Hirohata; K. Tsuzuki; Y.Kusama

    2005-01-01

    Low activation materials have to be developed toward fusion demonstration reactors. Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate materials of the first wall,vacuum vessel and blanket components, respectively. Although changes of mechanical-thermal properties owing to neutron irradiation have been investigated so far, there is little data for the plasma material interactions, such as fuel hydrogen retention and erosion. In the present study,deuterium retention and physical sputtering of low activation ferritic steel, F82H, were investigated by using deuterium ion irradiation apparatus.After a ferritic steel sample was irradiated by 1.7 kev D+ ions, the weight loss was measured to obtain the physical sputtering yield. The sputtering yield was 0.04, comparable to that of stainless steel. In order to obtain the retained amount of deuterium, technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was employed to the irradiated sample. The retained deuterium desorbed at temperature ranging from 450 K to 700 K, in the forms of DHO, D2, D2O and hydrocarbons. Hence, the deuterium retained can be reduced by baking with a relatively low temperature. The fluence dependence of retained amount of deuterium was measured by changing the ion fluence. In the ferritic steel without mechanical polish, the retained amount was large even when the fluence was low. In such a case, a large amount of deuterium was trapped in the surface oxide layer containing O and C. When the fluence was large, the thickness of surface oxide layer was reduced by the ion sputtering, and then the retained amount in the oxide layer decreased. In the case of a high fluence, the retained amount of deuterium became comparable to that of ferritic steel with mechanical polish or SS 316 L, and one order of magnitude smaller than that of graphite. When the ferritic steel is used, it is required to remove the surface oxide layer for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention.Ferritic steel sample was

  7. The temperature and ion energy dependence of deuterium retention in lithium films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzi, Luxherta; Koel, Bruce E.; Skinner, Charles H.

    2016-10-01

    Lithium conditioning of plasma facing components in magnetic fusion devices has improved plasma performance and lowered hydrogen recycling. For applications of lithium in future high heat flux and long pulse duration machines it is important to understand and parameterize deuterium retention in lithium. This work presents surface science studies of deuterium retention in lithium films as a function of surface temperature, incident deuterium ion energy and flux. Initial experiments are performed on thin (3-30 ML) lithium films deposited on a single crystal molybdenum substrate to avoid effects due to grain boundaries, intrinsic defects and impurities. A monoenergetic and mass-filtered deuterium ion beam was generated in a differentially pumped Colutron ion gun. Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the elemental composition and temperature programmed desorption was used to measure the deuterium retention under the different conditions. Support was provided through DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schissel, David P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Abla, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Burruss, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Feibush, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Fredian, T. W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Goode, M. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Greenwald, M. J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Keahey, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Leggett, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Li, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); McCune, D. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Papka, M. E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Randerson, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Sanderson, A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Stillerman, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Thompson, M. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Uram, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wallace, G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2012-12-20

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES Grid (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

  9. Muon capture in deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, P.; Truhlík, E.; Mosconi, B.; Smejkal, J.

    2010-06-01

    Model dependence of the capture rates of the negative muon capture in deuterium is studied starting from potential models and the weak two-body meson exchange currents constructed in the tree approximation and also from an effective field theory. The tree one-boson exchange currents are derived from the hard pion chiral Lagrangians of the NΔπρωa system. If constructed in conjunction with the one-boson exchange potentials, the capture rates can be calculated consistently. On the other hand, the effective field theory currents, constructed within the heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, contain a low energy constant d that cannot be extracted from data at the one-particle level nor determined from the first principles. Comparative analysis of the results for the doublet transition rate allows us to extract the constant d.

  10. Direct Fusion Drive for a Human Mars Orbital Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paluszek, Michael [Princeton Satellite Systems; Pajer, Gary [Princeton Satellite Systems; Razin, Yosef [Princeton Satellite Systems; Slonaker, James [Princeton Satellite Systems; Cohen, Samuel [PPPL; Feder, Russ [PPPL; Griffin, Kevin [Princeton University; Walsh, Matthew [Princeton University

    2014-08-01

    The Direct Fusion Drive (DFD) is a nuclear fusion engine that produces both thrust and electric power. It employs a field reversed configuration with an odd-parity rotating magnetic field heating system to heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. The engine uses deuterium and helium-3 as fuel and additional deuterium that is heated in the scrape-off layer for thrust augmentation. In this way variable exhaust velocity and thrust is obtained.

  11. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2006-04-28

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  12. US Scientific Discory through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program & Fusion Energy Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. Tang

    2007-01-01

    @@ The development of a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable is a truly formidable scientific and technological challenge facing the world in the twenty-first century. This demands basic scientific understanding that can enable the innovations to make fusion energy practical.

  13. D-D nuclear fusion processes induced in polyethylene foams by TW Laser-generated plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deuterium-Deuterium fusion processes were generated by focusing the 3 TW PALS Laser on solid deuterated polyethylene targets placed in vacuum. Deuterium ion acceleration of the order of 4 MeV was obtained using laser irradiance Iλ2 ∼ 5 × 1016 W μm2/cm2 on the target. Thin and thick targets, at low and high density, were irradiated and plasma properties were monitored “on line” and “off line”. The ion emission from plasma was monitored with Thomson Parabola Spectrometer, track detectors and ion collectors. Fast semiconductor detectors based on SiC and fast plastic scintillators, both employed in time-of-flight configuration, have permitted to detect the characteristic 3.0 MeV protons and 2.45 MeV neutrons emission from the nuclear fusion reactions. From massive absorbent targets we have evaluated the neutron flux by varying from negligible values up to about 5 × 107 neutrons per laser shot in the case of foams targets, indicating a reaction rate of the order of 108 fusion events per laser shot using “advanced targets”.

  14. Primordial Deuterium Abundance Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A; Takahara, F; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Kegel, Wilhelm H.; Takahara, Fumio

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium abundances measured recently from QSO absorption-line systems lie in the range from 3 10^{-5} to 3 10^{-4}, which shed some questions on standard big bang theory. We show that this discordance may simply be an artifact caused by inadequate analysis ignoring spatial correlations in the velocity field in turbulent media. The generalized procedure (accounting for such correlations) is suggested to reconcile the D/H measurements. An example is presented based on two high-resolution observations of Q1009+2956 (low D/H) [1,2] and Q1718+4807 (high D/H) [8,9]. We show that both observations are compatible with D/H = 4.1 - 4.6 10^{-5}, and thus support SBBN. The estimated mean value = 4.4 10^{-5} corresponds to the baryon-to-photon ratio during SBBN eta = 4.4 10^{-10} which yields the present-day baryon density Omega_b h^2 = 0.015.

  15. Cold nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganov, E.N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@coldfusion-power.com [Cold Fusion Power, International (United States); Bavizhev, M.D. [LLC “Radium”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Buryakov, M.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Dabagov, S.B. [RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovatyuk, V.M.; Lobastov, S.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction’s theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300–700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of {sup 4}He{sup ∗}.

  16. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samulyak, Roman V. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  17. Materials research for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  18. Temperature derivatives for fusion reactivity of D-D and D-T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenbrunner, James R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makaruk, Hanna Ewa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-29

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) and deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction rates are observable using leakage gamma flux. A direct measurement of γ-rays with equipment that exhibits fast temporal response could be used to infer temperature, if the detector signal is amenable for taking the logarithmic time-derivative, alpha. We consider the temperature dependence for fusion cross section reactivity.

  19. Studies on advanced superconductors for fusion device. Pt. 2. Metallic superconductors other than Nb{sub 3}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, K.; Yamamoto, J.; Mito, T. [eds.

    1997-03-01

    A comprehensive report on the present status of the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors was published as the NIFS-MEMO-20 in March, 1996 (Part 1 of this report series). The second report of this study covers various progress so far achieved in the research and development on advanced metallic superconductors other than Nb{sub 3}Sn. Among different A15 crystal-type compounds, Nb{sub 3}Al has been fabricated into cables with large current-carrying capacity for fusion device referring its smaller sensitivity to mechanical strain than Nb{sub 3}Sn. Other high-field A15 superconductors, e.g. V{sub 3}Ga, Nb{sub 3}Ge and Nb{sub 3}(Al,Ge), have been also fabricated through different novel processes as promising alternatives to Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors. Meanwhile, B1 crystal-type NbN and C15 crystal-type V{sub 2}(Hf,Zr) high-field superconductors are characterized by their excellent tolerance to mechanical strain and neutron irradiation. Chevrel-type PbMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} compound has gained much interests due to its extremely high upper critical field. In addition, this report includes the recent progress in ultra-fine filamentary NbTi wires for AC use, and that in NbTi/Cu magnetic shields necessary in the application of high magnetic field. The data on the decay of radioactivity in a variety of metals relating to fusion superconducting magnet are also attached as appendices. We hope that this report might contribute substantially as a useful reference for the planning of fusion apparatus of next generation as well as that of other future superconducting devices. (author)

  20. Targeting leukemic fusion proteins with small interfering RNAs: recent advances and therapeutic potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria THOMAS; Johann GREIL; Olaf HEIDENREICH

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference has become an indispensable research tool to study gene functions in a wide variety of organisms.Because of their high efficacy and specificity,RNA interference-based approaches may also translate into new therapeutic strategies to treat human diseases.In particular,oncogenes such as leukemic fusion proteins,which arise from chromosomal translocations,are promising targets for such gene silencing approaches,because they are exclusively expressed in precancerous and cancerous tissues,and because they are frequently indispensable for maintaining the malignant phenotype.This review summarizes recent developments in targeting leukemia-specific genes and discusses problems and approaches for possible clinical applications.

  1. Advances in HYDRA and its applications to simulations of inertial confinement fusion targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinak M.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new set of capabilities has been implemented in the HYDRA 2D/3D multiphysics inertial confinement fusion simulation code. These include a Monte Carlo particle transport library. It models transport of neutrons, gamma rays and light ions, as well as products they generate from nuclear and coulomb collisions. It allows accurate simulations of nuclear diagnostic signatures from capsule implosions. We apply it to here in a 3D simulation of a National Ignition Facility (NIF ignition capsule which models the full capsule solid angle. This simulation contains a severely rough ablator perturbation and provides diagnostics signatures of capsule failure due to excessive instability growth.

  2. Radiation induced deuterium absorption for RB-SiC, HP-SiC, silicon and graphite loaded during electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, T.; Moroño, A., E-mail: morono@ciemat.es; Hodgson, E.R.; Malo, M.; Verdú, M.; Sánchez, F.J.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Radiation enhanced deuterium absorption occurs for RB-SiC. • This type of radiation enhanced absorption is related to Si rather than to C. • Most of the radiation induced absorbed deuterium is released at about the foreseen blanket operation temperature. - Abstract: Absorption, diffusion, and desorption of hydrogen isotopes are expected to occur during operation in future fusion reactors and these processes will strongly depend on the irradiation conditions, neutron flux and purely ionizing radiation. The main aim of the work is to address the electron irradiation induced absorption of hydrogen isotopes in RB-SiC. Deuterium loading was carried out with both the sample and the surrounding deuterium gas exposed to 1.8 MeV electron irradiation in order to evaluate the radiation enhanced deuterium absorption. Thermo stimulated desorption (TSD) measurements were carried out for both electron irradiated and unirradiated samples in order to evaluate the possible radiation enhanced retention of the previously loaded deuterium. The materials subjected to the deuterium loading process were also studied by SIMS. Noticeable radiation enhanced deuterium absorption was observed. Most of the deuterium absorbed during irradiation was thermally released at about 600 °C.

  3. Recent advances in high current vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Qi Nian Sheng; Prasad, R R; Krishnan, M S; Anders, A; Kwan, J; Brown, I

    2001-01-01

    For a heavy ion fusion induction linac driver, a source of heavy ions with charge states 1+-3+, approx 0.5 A current beams, approx 20 mu s pulse widths and approx 10 Hz repetition rates is required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program to date, but suffer from heating problems for large areas and contamination. They are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states in short and long pulse bursts and high beam current density. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications was investigated. We have modifie...

  4. Advanced Nanocomposite Coatings of Fusion Bonded Epoxy Reinforced with Amino-Functionalized Nanoparticles for Applications in Underwater Oil Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Saliba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of fusion-bonded epoxy coatings can be improved through advanced composite coatings reinforced with nanomaterials. Hence, in this study a novel organic-inorganic nanocomposite finish was designed, synthesized, and characterized, achieved by adding γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane modified silica nanoparticles produced via sol-gel process in epoxy-based powder. After the curing process of the coating reinforced with nanoparticles, the formation of a homogenous novel nanocomposite with the development of interfacial reactions between organic-inorganic and inorganic-inorganic components was observed. These hybrid nanostructures produced better integration between nanoparticles and epoxy matrix and improved mechanical properties that are expected to enhance the overall performance of the system against underwater corrosion.

  5. Cold nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In normal temperature condition, the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance method, realize the combination of deuterium and tritium, helium and lithium... And with a magnetic moment of light nuclei controlled cold nuclear collide fusion, belongs to the nuclear energy research and development in the field of applied technology "cold nuclear collide fusion". According to the similarity of the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance system, the different velocity and energy of the ion beam mixing control, developed ion speed dc transformer, it is cold nuclear fusion collide, issue of motivation and the nuclear power plant start-up fusion and power transfer system of the important equipment, so the merger to apply for a patent

  6. KSTAR Severe Accident Analysis using MELCOR : Ex-vessel Coolant Pipe Break with Failure of Fusion Power Termination System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Bo; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To investigate the consequence of severe accidents in fusion reactor, a number of thermal hydraulics simulation codes were used (ECART, INTRA, ATHENA/RELAP and so on). MELCOR is chosen as the thermal hydraulics code to simulate the consequence of radioactive material release from accident in preliminary safety report. Capability of the simulation code for fusion reactor severe accident analysis is ability to simulate the hydraulic system in ITER and the transport phenomenon of radionuclides. MELCOR is a fully integrated code that models the accidents in Light Water Reactor (LWR). There are three kinds of radioactive materials in fusion reactor; tritium (or Tiritiated water: HTO), activation products (AP) of divertor or first-wall and activated corrosion products(ACP). In generic Site Safety Report (GSSR), the release guidelines for tritium and activation products are listed for normal operation, incidents, and accidents. And this guidelines presented in Table 1. Not only ITER, the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) is also developing fusion research reactor. The scale of facility is smaller than ITER but this small scale of facility offers the experimental flexibility to develop fusion technology. The major differences between KSTAR and ITER systems are presented in Table 2. Fusion source difference between KSTAR and ITER is D-D fusion reaction (Deuterium-Deuterium fusion reaction) and D-T fusion reaction (Deuterium-Tritium fusion reaction). This D-D fusion makes one tritium by 50 percent chance. The radioactivity of tritium is small to consider compared to radioactive materials in nuclear fission reactor. This reaction is presented in equation (1) In the present work, conservatively estimated tritium inventory amount in KSTAR is used with one of the most severe accident in ITER; Ex-vessel pipe break with Fusion Power Termination System (FPTS). The MELCOR KSTAR input is made by scaling down the ITER input deck. So, the detail system is not same

  7. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  8. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M J; Bond, E J; Clancy, T J; Eckart, M J; Khater, H Y; Glebov, V Yu

    2012-10-01

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator∕photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y(n)) measurements from below 10(9) (DD) to nearly 10(15) (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y(n) precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of ± 10% and precision of ± 1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y(n) measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  9. Study of high gain spherical shell ICF targets containing uniform layers of liquid deuterium tritium fuel. A numericial model for analyzing thermal layering of liquid mixtures of hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical inertial confinement fusion target: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, E.M.; Kim, Kyekyoon [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    A numerical model has been developed to describe the thermally induced behavior of a liquid layer of hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target and to calculate the far-field temperature gradient which will sustain a uniform liquid layer. This method is much faster than the trial-and-error method previously employed. The governing equations are the equations of continuity, momentum, energy, mass diffusion-convection, and conservation of the individual isotopic species. Ordinary and thermal diffusion equations for the diffusion of fluxes of the species are included. These coupled equations are solved by a finite-difference method using upwind schemes, variable mesh, and rigorous boundary conditions. The solution methodology unique to the present problem is discussed in detail. in particular, the significance of the surface tension gradient driven flows (also called Marangoni flows) in forming uniform liquid layers inside ICF targets is demonstrated. Using the theoretical model, the values of the externally applied thermal gradients that give rise to uniform liquid layers of hydrogen inside a cryogenic spherical-shell ICF target are calculated, and the results compared with the existing experimental data.

  10. Passive in-vehicle driver breath alcohol detection using advanced sensor signal acquisition and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungblad, Jonas; Hök, Bertil; Allalou, Amin; Pettersson, Håkan

    2017-04-03

    The research objective of the present investigation is to demonstrate the present status of passive in-vehicle driver breath alcohol detection and highlighting the necessary conditions for large scale implementation of such a system. Completely passive detection has remained a challenge mainly because of the requirements on signal resolution combined with the constraints of vehicle integration. The work is part of the DADSS (driver alcohol detection system for safety) program aiming at massive deployment of alcohol sensing systems which could potentially save thousands of American lives annually. The work reported here builds on earlier investigations, in which it has been shown that detection of alcohol vapor in the proximity of a human subject may be traced to that subject by means of simultaneous recording of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the same location. Sensors based on infrared spectroscopy were developed to detect and quantify low concentrations of alcohol and CO2. In the present investigation, alcohol and CO2 were recorded at various locations in a vehicle cabin while human subjects were performing normal in-step procedures and driving preparations. A video camera directed to the driver position was recording images of the driver's upper body parts including the face, and the images were analyzed with respect to features of significance to the breathing behavior and breath detection, such as mouth opening and head direction. Improvement of the sensor system with respect to signal resolution including algorithm and software development, and fusion of the sensor and camera signals was successfully implemented and tested before starting the human study. In addition, experimental tests and simulations were performed with the purpose of connecting human subject data with repeatable experimental conditions. The results include occurrence statistics of detected breaths by signal peaks of CO2 and alcohol. From the statistical data, the accuracy of breath alcohol

  11. Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Carboni, G

    1973-01-01

    The author has calculated the various contributions to 2s-2p splitting for muonic deuterium. An instantaneous potential is constructed between the muon and the nucleus. Except for the Coulomb potential, all the remaining terms are treated as a perturbation. The effects taken into account are fine structure, magnetic and electric hyperfine structure, muonic Lamb shift, vacuum polarisation, nuclear polarisation and nuclear size. (11 refs).

  12. Advanced materials characterization and modeling using synchrotron, neutron, TEM, and novel micro-mechanical techniques - A European effort to accelerate fusion materials development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Fu, C.-C.; Kaprolat, A.

    2013-01-01

    For the realization of fusion as an energy source, the development of suitable materials is one of the most critical issues. The required material properties are in many aspects unique compared to the existing solutions, particularly the need for necessary resistance to irradiation with neutrons...... having energies up to 14 MeV. In addition to withstanding the effects of neutrons, the mechanical stability of structural materials has to be maintained up to high temperatures. Plasma-exposed materials must be compatible with the fusion plasma, both with regard to the generation of impurities injected...... as testing under neutron flux-induced conditions. For the realization of a DEMO power plant, the materials solutions must be available in time. The European initiative FEMaS-CA – Fusion Energy Materials Science – Coordination Action – aims at accelerating materials development by integrating advanced...

  13. Total ankle replacement or ankle fusion in painful advanced hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2015-12-01

    In advanced painful hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle, the last resort is surgical treatment (ankle arthrodesis [AA] or total ankle replacement [TAR]). There is a controversy in the literature on which of the two procedures is more appropriate. A review of the literature was performed to clarify such a controversy. The first search engine was MedLine (keywords: total ankle replacement, ankle arthrodesis). Seventy articles were found in MedLine. Of these, only 16 were selected and reviewed because they were strictly focused on the topic of this article. The second search engine was the Cochrane Library, where only nine systematic reviews were found on the role of TAR and AA in non-hemophilia patients. TAR and AA provide pain relief and patient satisfaction in hemophilia patients in the short term. The available non-hemophilia literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. My current view is that AA may be preferable in most hemophilia patients.

  14. Capabilities of nitrogen admixed cryogenic deuterium pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharov, Igor; Sergeev, Vladimir [SPU, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lang, Peter; Ploeckl, Bernhard; Cavedon, Marco [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kocsis, Gabor; Szepesi, Tamas [Wigner RCP RMI, Budapest (Hungary); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    Operation at high core density with high energy confinement - as foreseen in a future fusion reactor like DEMO - is being investigated at ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The efficiency of pellet fuelling from the high-field side usually increases with increasing injection speed. Due to the fragile nature of the deuterium ice, however, the increment of pellet mass losses and subsequent pellet fragmentations take place when the speed is increased. Studies show, that admixing of a small amount of nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into D{sub 2} gas can be favorable for the mechanical stability of pellets. This might be helpful for deeper pellet penetration. Besides, seeding by N{sub 2} can enhance plasma performance due to both increasing the energy confinement time and reducing the divertor heat load in the envisaged ELMy H-mode plasma scenario. Fuelling efficiency of N{sub 2}-admixed solid D{sub 2} pellets and their nitrogen seeding capabilities were investigated. It was found that both the overall plasma density increase and the measured averaged pellet penetration depth were smaller in case of the admixed (1% mol. in the gas resulting in about 0.8% in the ice) pellet fuelling. Possibility of the N{sub 2}-seeding by admixed pellets was confirmed by CXRS measurements of N{sup 7+} content in plasma.

  15. Study of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in directly driven cryogenic-deuterium targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, J. D.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Direct-drive, Rayleigh-Taylor growth experiments in liquid deuterium (D{sub 2}) were performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar cryogenic targets at a laser intensity of {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. These are the first Rayleigh-Taylor measurements in deuterium at conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion using a mass preimposed initial modulation. The measured modulation optical depths are in agreement with the 2D hydrodynamics code DRACO using flux-limited local thermal transport, providing an important step in the experimental validation of simulations for direct-drive ignition.

  16. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  17. Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K.M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I{sub i}) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I{sub i} discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  18. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of Fusion Welds Involving Alloys for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    Projections for large increases in the global demand for electric power produced by the burning of fossil fuels, in combination with growing environmental concerns surrounding these fuel sources, have sparked initiatives in the United States, Europe, and Asia aimed at developing a new generation of coal fired power plant, termed Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC). These plants are slated to operate at higher steam temperatures and pressures than current generation plants, and in so doing will offer increased process cycle efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Several gamma' precipitation strengthened Ni-based superalloys have been identified as candidates for the hottest sections of these plants, but the microstructural instability and poor creep behavior (compared to wrought products) of fusion welds involving these alloys present significant hurdles to their implementation and a gap in knowledge that must be addressed. In this work, creep testing and in-depth microstructural characterization have been used to provide insight into the long-term performance of these alloys. First, an investigation of the weld metal microstructural evolution as it relates to creep strength reductions in A-USC alloys INCONELRTM 740, NIMONICRTM 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and HaynesRTM 282RTM (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) was performed. gamma'-precipitate free zones were identified in two of these three alloys, and their development was linked to the evolution of phases that precipitate at the expense of gamma'. Alloy 282 was shown to avoid precipitate free zone formation because the precipitates that form during long term aging in this alloy are poor in the gamma'-forming elements. Next, the microstructural evolution of INCONELRTM 740H (a compositional variant of alloy 740) during creep was investigated. Gleeble-based interrupted creep and creep-rupture testing was used to

  19. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  20. Deuterium accelerator experiments for APT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hertz, Kristin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Cowgill, Donald F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories in California initiated an experimental program to determine whether tritium retention in the tube walls and permeation through the tubes into the surrounding coolant water would be a problem for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), and to find ways to mitigate the problem, if it existed. Significant holdup in the tube walls would limit the ability of APT to meet its production goals, and high levels of permeation would require a costly cleanup system for the cooling water. To simulate tritium implantation, a 200 keV accelerator was used to implant deuterium into Al 6061-T and SS3 16L samples at temperatures and particle fluxes appropriate for APT, for times varying between one week and five months. The implanted samples were characterized to determine the deuterium retention and Permeation. During the implantation, the D(d,p)T nuclear reaction was used to monitor the build-up of deuterium in the implant region of the samples. These experiments increased in sophistication, from mono-energetic deuteron implants to multi-energetic deuteron and proton implants, to more accurately reproduce the conditions expected in APT. Micron-thick copper, nickel, and anodized aluminum coatings were applied to the front surface of the samples (inside of the APT walls) in an attempt to lower retention and permeation. The reduction in both retention and permeation produced by the nickel coatings, and the ability to apply them to the inside of the APT tubes, indicate that both nickel-coated Al 6061-T6 and nickel-coated SS3 16L tubes would be effective for use in APT. The results of this work were submitted to the Accelerator Production of Tritium project in document number TPO-E29-Z-TNS-X-00050, APT-MP-01-17.

  1. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  2. Deuterium retention after deuterium plasma implantation in tungsten pre-damaged by fast C+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, V. S.; Gasparyan, Yu M.; Pisarev, A. A.; Khripunov, B. I.; Koidan, V. S.; Ryazanov, A. I.; Semenov, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    Thermal desorption of deuterium from W was investigated. Virgin samples and samples damaged by 10 MeV C 3+ ions were implanted from plasma in the LENTA facility at 370 K and 773 K. In comparison with the undamaged sample, deuterium retention in the damaged sample slightly increased in the case of deuterium implantation at RT, but decreased in the case of deuterium implantation at 773 K. At 773 K, deuterium was concluded to diffuse far behind the D ion range in the virgin sample, while C implantation region was concluded to be a barrier for D diffusion in the damaged sample.

  3. Synthesis of deuterium labeled plant ethylene precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, K.C. [Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Rapoport, H. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of {beta}-deuterium labeled 2-keto-4-methylbutyric acid were investigated. Vinyl chloride was first reacted with the ethyl oxalyl chloride moiety using aluminum chloride as condensing agent and the addition of methyl mercaptan followed. Deuterium labeling was achieved by using NaBD{sub 4} reduction in pyridine. (author).

  4. The ABC effect in double-pionic fusion to deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakimova, Olena

    2009-04-17

    In this work the first exclusive measurements of the reaction pd{yields}pd{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} have been carried out at beam energies of T{sub p}=1.03 and 1.35 GeV at CELSIUS storage ring in Uppsala/Sweden. The reaction pn{yields}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} has been measured as quasifree pd{yields} p{sub spec}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} reaction with a spectator proton p{sub spec} of very small momentum. Since all particles except of the spectator proton have been measured, the spectator 4-momentum could be reconstructed by kinematical fits with 3 overconstraints. Hence one could exploit the Fermi motion of the target neutron to cover a range of relative energies in the pn-system for a given beam energy. The {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel, which is purely isoscalar and free of any isovector contributions, shows a large low-mass enhancement in the M{sub {pi}{sup 0}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}} spectrum, which is much larger than observed in the inclusive measurements and also larger than predicted in previous {delta}{delta} calculations. In contrast to these and also to the inclusive data a high-mass enhancement in the M{sub {pi}{sup 0}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}} spectrum was not observed and is meanwhile interpreted as 3{pi} and {eta}-meson production. All exclusive data can be described, if one assumes a resonance in the isoscalar pn-system, which dominantly decays via the isoscalar {delta}{delta} system. With this so-called s-channel resonance ansatz a very good description of the data in the total cross section as well as in the differential spectra has been achieved. Mass and width of this isoscalar dibaryonic resonance are M{sub R}{approx}2.36 GeV/c{sup 2} and {gamma}{sub R}{approx}80 MeV, respectively. (orig.)

  5. New method of a "point-like" neutron source creation based on sharp focusing of high-current deuteron beam onto deuterium-saturated target for neutron tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, S.; Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.

    2017-02-01

    A possibility of a compact powerful point-like neutron source creation is discussed. Neutron yield of the source based on deuterium-deuterium (D-D) reaction is estimated at the level of 1011 s‑1 (1013 s‑1 for deuterium-tritium reaction). The fusion takes place due to bombardment of deuterium- (or tritium) loaded target by high-current focused deuterium ion beam with energy of 100 keV. The ion beam is formed by means of high-current quasi-gasdynamic ion source of a new generation based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge in an open magnetic trap sustained by powerful microwave radiation. The prospects of proposed generator for neutron tomography are discussed. Suggested method is compared to the point-like neutron sources based on a spark produced by powerful femtosecond laser pulses.

  6. Reactor for boron fusion with picosecond ultrahigh power laser pulses and ultrahigh magnetic field trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Miley, G H; Kirchhoff, G

    2015-01-01

    Compared with the deuterium tritium (DT) fusion, the environmentally clean fusion of protons with 11B is extremely difficult. When instead of nanosecond laser pulses for thermal-ablating driven ignition, picosecond pulses are used, a drastic change by nonlinearity results in ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This radically changes to economic boron fusion by a measured new avalanche ignition.

  7. Ignition curves for deuterium/helium-3 fuel in spherical tokamak reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Motevalli S M; Fadaei F

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, ignition curve for deuterium/helium-3 fusion reaction is studied. Four fusion reactions are considered. Zero-dimensional model for the power balance equation has been used. The closed ignition curves for $\\rho$ = constant (ratio of particle to energy confinement time) have been derived. The results of our calculations show that ignited equilibria for deuterium/helium-3 fuel in a spherical tokamak is only possible for $\\rho$ = 5.5 and 6. Then, by using the energy confinement scaling and parameters of the spherical tokamak reactor, the plasma stability limits have been obtained in $n_e, T$ plane and, to determine the thermal instability of plasma, the time dependent transport equations have been solved.

  8. Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Vanderhaeghen, Marc [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Carlson, Carl E. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    We consider the two-photon exchange contribution to the 2P-2S Lamb shift in muonic deuterium in the framework of forward dispersion relations. The dispersion integrals are evaluated with minimal model dependence using experimental data on elastic deuteron form factors and inelastic electron-deuteron scattering, both in the quasielastic and hadronic range. The subtraction constant that is required to ensure convergence of the dispersion relation for the forward Compton amplitude T{sub 1} (ν,Q{sup 2}) is related to the deuteron magnetic polarizability β(Q{sup 2}) and represents the main source of uncertainty in our analysis. We obtain for the Lamb shift ΔE{sub 2P-2S} = 1.620±0.190 meV and discuss ways to further reduce this uncertainty.

  9. Magnetic fusion technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Fusion Technology describes the technologies that are required for successful development of nuclear fusion power plants using strong magnetic fields. These technologies include: ? magnet systems, ? plasma heating systems, ? control systems, ? energy conversion systems, ? advanced materials development, ? vacuum systems, ? cryogenic systems, ? plasma diagnostics, ? safety systems, and ? power plant design studies. Magnetic Fusion Technology will be useful to students and to specialists working in energy research.

  10. A semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion

    CERN Document Server

    McBride, Ryan D

    2015-01-01

    Presented is a semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). This model accounts for several key aspects of MagLIF, including: (1) preheat of the fuel (optionally via laser absorption); (2) pulsed-power-driven liner implosion; (3) liner compressibility with an analytic equation of state, artificial viscosity, internal magnetic pressure, and ohmic heating; (4) adiabatic compression and heating of the fuel; (5) radiative losses and fuel opacity; (6) magnetic flux compression with Nernst thermoelectric losses; (7) magnetized electron and ion thermal conduction losses; (8) end losses; (9) enhanced losses due to prescribed dopant concentrations and contaminant mix; (10) deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium primary fusion reactions for arbitrary deuterium to tritium fuel ratios; and (11) magnetized alpha-particle fuel heating. We show that this simplified model, with its transparent and accessible physics, can be used to reproduce the general 1D behavior presented throughout the original Ma...

  11. Equations of state for hydrogen and deuterium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerley, Gerald Irwin (Kerley Technical Services, Appomattox, VA)

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the complete revision of a deuterium equation of state (EOS) model published in 1972. It uses the same general approach as the 1972 EOS, i.e., the so-called 'chemical model,' but incorporates a number of theoretical advances that have taken place during the past thirty years. Three phases are included: a molecular solid, an atomic solid, and a fluid phase consisting of both molecular and atomic species. Ionization and the insulator-metal transition are also included. The most important improvements are in the liquid perturbation theory, the treatment of molecular vibrations and rotations, and the ionization equilibrium and mixture models. In addition, new experimental data and theoretical calculations are used to calibrate certain model parameters, notably the zero-Kelvin isotherms for the molecular and atomic solids, and the quantum corrections to the liquid phase. The report gives a general overview of the model, followed by detailed discussions of the most important theoretical issues and extensive comparisons with the many experimental data that have been obtained during the last thirty years. Questions about the validity of the chemical model are also considered. Implications for modeling the 'giant planets' are also discussed.

  12. Sputtering and codeposition of silicon carbide with deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Rion A.

    2003-03-01

    Due to its excellent thermal properties, silicon carbide is being considered as a possible plasma-facing material for fusion devices. If used as a plasma-facing material, the energetic hydrogen isotope ions and charge-exchanged neutrals escaping from the plasma will sputter the silicon carbide. To assess the tritium inventory problems that will be generated by the use of this material, it is necessary that we know the codeposition properties of the redeposited silicon carbide. To determine the codeposition properties, the deuterium plasma experiment at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California has been used to directly compare the deuterium sputtering and codeposition of silicon carbide with that of graphite. A Penning discharge at a flux of 6×10 19 D/m 2 and an energy of ≈300 eV was used to sputter silicon and carbon from a pair of 0.05 m diameter silicon carbide disks. The removal rate of deuterium gas from the fixed volume of the system isolated from all other sources and sinks was used to measure the codeposition probability (probability that a hydrogen isotope atom will be removed through codeposition per ion striking the sample surface). A small catcher plate used to capture a fraction of the codeposited film was analyzed using Auger spectroscopy. This analysis showed the film to begin with a high carbon to silicon ratio due to preferential sputtering of the carbon. As the film became thicker, the ratio of the depositing material changed over to the (1:1) value that must eventually be attained.

  13. EDITORIAL: Plasma Surface Interactions for Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Because plasma-boundary physics encompasses some of the most important unresolved issues for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and future fusion power reactors, there is a strong interest in the fusion community for better understanding and characterization of plasma wall interactions. Chemical and physical sputtering cause the erosion of the limiters/divertor plates and vacuum vessel walls (made of C, Be and W, for example) and degrade fusion performance by diluting the fusion fuel and excessively cooling the core, while carbon redeposition could produce long-term in-vessel tritium retention, degrading the superior thermo-mechanical properties of the carbon materials. Mixed plasma-facing materials are proposed, requiring optimization for different power and particle flux characteristics. Knowledge of material properties as well as characteristics of the plasma material interaction are prerequisites for such optimizations. Computational power will soon reach hundreds of teraflops, so that theoretical and plasma science expertise can be matched with new experimental capabilities in order to mount a strong response to these challenges. To begin to address such questions, a Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma Surface Interactions for Fusion (PSIF) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 21 to 23 March, 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers in fusion related plasma wall interactions in order to address these topics and to identify the most needed and promising directions for study, to exchange opinions on the present depth of knowledge of surface properties for the main fusion-related materials, e.g., C, Be and W, especially for sputtering, reflection, and deuterium (tritium) retention properties. The goal was to suggest the most important next steps needed for such basic computational and experimental work to be facilitated

  14. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds (2006-01-0531)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t1/2 can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  15. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  16. Measurements of fusion neutrons from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion Experiments on the Z accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E. C.; Awe, T. J.; Torres, J. A.; Jones, B.; Bur, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Styron, J. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Strong evidence of thermonuclear neutron production has been observed during Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z accelerator. So far, these experiments have utilized deuterium fuel and produced primary DD fusion neutron yields up to 2e12 with electron and ion stagnation temperatures in the 2-3 keV range. We present MagLIF neutron measurements and compare to other data and implosion simulations. In addition to primary DD and secondary DT yields and ion temperatures, other complex physics regarding the degree of fuel magnetization and liner density are elucidated by the neutron measurements. Neutron diagnostic development for deuterium and future deuterium-tritium fuel experiments are also discussed. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Heat load and deuterium plasma effects on SPS and WSP tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilémová Monika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten is a prime choice for armor material in future nuclear fusion devices. For the realization of fusion, it is necessary to address issues related to the plasma–armor interactions. In this work, several types of tungsten material were studied, i.e. tungsten prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS and by water stabilized plasma spraying (WSP technique. An intended surface porosity was created in the samples to model hydrogen/helium bubbles. The samples were subjected to a laser heat loading and a radiation loading of deuterium plasma to simulate edge plasma conditions of a nuclear fusion device (power density of 108 W/cm2 and 107 W/cm2, respectively, in the pulse intervals up to 200 ns. Thermally induced changes in the morphology and the damage to the studied surfaces are described. Possible consequences for the fusion device operation are pointed out.

  18. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 142 Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  19. Fusion ignition research experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale Meade

    2000-07-18

    Understanding the properties of high gain (alpha-dominated) fusion plasmas in an advanced toroidal configuration is the largest remaining open issue that must be addressed to provide the scientific foundation for an attractive magnetic fusion reactor. The critical parts of this science can be obtained in a compact high field tokamak which is also likely to provide the fastest and least expensive path to understanding alpha-dominated plasmas in advanced toroidal systems.

  20. Advancing of Land Surface Temperature Retrieval Using Extreme Learning Machine and Spatio-Temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As a critical variable to characterize the biophysical processes in ecological environment, and as a key indicator in the surface energy balance, evapotranspiration and urban heat islands, Land Surface Temperature (LST retrieved from Thermal Infra-Red (TIR images at both high temporal and spatial resolution is in urgent need. However, due to the limitations of the existing satellite sensors, there is no earth observation which can obtain TIR at detailed spatial- and temporal-resolution simultaneously. Thus, several attempts of image fusion by blending the TIR data from high temporal resolution sensor with data from high spatial resolution sensor have been studied. This paper presents a novel data fusion method by integrating image fusion and spatio-temporal fusion techniques, for deriving LST datasets at 30 m spatial resolution from daily MODIS image and Landsat ETM+ images. The Landsat ETM+ TIR data were firstly enhanced based on extreme learning machine (ELM algorithm using neural network regression model, from 60 m to 30 m resolution. Then, the MODIS LST and enhanced Landsat ETM+ TIR data were fused by Spatio-temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm for Temperature mapping (SADFAT in order to derive high resolution synthetic data. The synthetic images were evaluated for both testing and simulated satellite images. The average difference (AD and absolute average difference (AAD are smaller than 1.7 K, where the correlation coefficient (CC and root-mean-square error (RMSE are 0.755 and 1.824, respectively, showing that the proposed method enhances the spatial resolution of the predicted LST images and preserves the spectral information at the same time.

  1. Can Deuterium Formation Be Measured?

    CERN Document Server

    Soberman, R K; Soberman, Robert K.; Dubin, Maurice

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental PP reaction has never been attempted in the laboratory as theory states it cannot be measured within the human life span. This forms the foundation of stellar nucleosynthesis and the standard solar model. Yet numerous observations including the Sun's obvious variability argue the theory is flawed and the reaction occurs in times many orders of magnitude shorter than prediction. Considering the consequence to accepted models and controlled fusion, testing is warranted.

  2. The perspectives of fusion energy: The roadmap towards energy production and fusion energy in a distributed energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2014-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion has the potential of providing an environmentally friendly and inexhaustible energy source for mankind. Fusion energy, which powers our sun and the stars, is released when light elements, such as the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, fuse together. This occurs......-wide international collaboration and is in a crucial new phase with the construction of the international fusion experimental reactor, ITER, in Cadarache, France, which will be largest energy experiment in the world, and a milestone on the way to fusion energy. The recently adopted European Roadmap to fusion energy...

  3. Understanding fuel magnetization and mix using secondary nuclear reactions in magneto-inertial fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, P F; Knapp, P F; Hansen, S B; Gomez, M R; Hahn, K D; Sinars, D B; Peterson, K J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Awe, T J; Harding, E; Jennings, C A; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Cuneo, M E; Geissel, M; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Herrmann, M C; Hess, M H; Johns, O; Lamppa, D C; Martin, M R; McBride, R D; Porter, J L; Robertson, G K; Rochau, G A; Rovang, D C; Ruiz, C L; Savage, M E; Smith, I C; Stygar, W A; Vesey, R A

    2014-10-10

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  4. Surface morphology and deuterium retention of tungsten after low- and high-flux deuterium plasma exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, M. H. J. 't; Balden, M.; Manhard, A.; Mayer, M.; Elgeti, S.; Kleyn, A. W.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma

    2014-01-01

    The surface morphology and deuterium retention were investigated of polycrystalline tungsten targets that were exposed to deuterium plasmas at widely varying conditions. By changing only one parameter at a time, the isolated effects of flux, time and pre-damaging on surface modifications and deuteri

  5. Deuterium enrichment of interstellar dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Majumdar, Liton; Sahu, Dipen

    2016-07-01

    High abundance of some abundant and simple interstellar species could be explained by considering the chemistry that occurs on interstellar dusts. Because of its simplicity, the rate equation method is widely used to study the surface chemistry. However, because the recombination efficiency for the formation of any surface species is highly dependent on various physical and chemical parameters, the Monte Carlo method is best suited for addressing the randomness of the processes. We carry out Monte-Carlo simulation to study deuterium enrichment of interstellar grain mantle under various physical conditions. Based on the physical properties, various types of clouds are considered. We find that in diffuse cloud regions, very strong radiation fields persists and hardly a few layers of surface species are formed. In translucent cloud regions with a moderate radiation field, significant number of layers would be produced and surface coverage is mainly dominated by photo-dissociation products such as, C, CH_3, CH_2D, OH and OD. In the intermediate dense cloud regions (having number density of total hydrogen nuclei in all forms ˜2 × 10^4 cm^{-3}), water and methanol along with their deuterated derivatives are efficiently formed. For much higher density regions (˜10^6 cm^{-3}), water and methanol productions are suppressed but surface coverage of CO, CO_2, O_2, O_3 are dramatically increased. We find a very high degree of fractionation of water and methanol. Observational results support a high fractionation of methanol but surprisingly water fractionation is found to be low. This is in contradiction with our model results indicating alternative routes for de-fractionation of water.

  6. Status and problems of fusion reactor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, U

    2001-03-01

    Thermonuclear fusion of deuterium and tritium constitutes an enormous potential for a safe, environmentally compatible and sustainable energy supply. The fuel source is practically inexhaustible. Further, the safety prospects of a fusion reactor are quite favourable due to the inherently self-limiting fusion process, the limited radiologic toxicity and the passive cooling property. Among a small number of approaches, the concept of toroidal magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas has achieved most impressive scientific and technical progress towards energy release by thermonuclear burn of deuterium-tritium fuels. The status of thermonuclear fusion research activity world-wide is reviewed and present solutions to the complicated physical and technological problems are presented. These problems comprise plasma heating, confinement and exhaust of energy and particles, plasma stability, alpha particle heating, fusion reactor materials, reactor safety and environmental compatibility. The results and the high scientific level of this international research activity provide a sound basis for the realisation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), whose goal is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of a fusion energy source for peaceful purposes.

  7. Concept of a charged fusion product diagnostic for NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeglin, W. U.; Valenzuela Perez, R. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The concept of a new diagnostic for NSTX to determine the time dependent charged fusion product emission profile using an array of semiconductor detectors is presented. The expected time resolution of 1-2 ms should make it possible to study the effect of magnetohydrodynamics and other plasma activities (toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE), neoclassical tearing modes (NTM), edge localized modes (ELM), etc.) on the radial transport of neutral beam ions. First simulation results of deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion proton yields for different detector arrangements and methods for inverting the simulated data to obtain the emission profile are discussed.

  8. Polarimetric Intensity Parameterization of Radar and Other Remote Sensing Sources for Advanced Exploitation and Data Fusion: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Ramin Sabry Ramin Sabry Defence Scientist Approved by Original signed by Paris Vachon Paris Vachon A/Head, Radar Applications and Space Technologies...En se basant sur ce qui précède, on étudie les caractéristiques communes, l’interfonctionnement et la fusion de divers produits de capteurs ...polarimétriques dans diverses régions du spectre, p. ex. le radar classique ou le radar à synthèse d’ouverture et des capteurs électro-optiques, et on formule

  9. Deuterium Fractionation just after the Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, D.; Sakai, N.; Yamamoto, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have recently conducted a five-point strip observation of the DCO+, H13CO+, DNC, HN13C, and N2H+ lines toward low mass Class I protostar L1551 IRS5, and have evaluated the deuterium fractionation ratios DCO+/HCO+ and DNC/HNC. The DCO+/HCO+ ratio is found to be lower toward the protostar position than those toward the adjacent positions. On the other hand, the DNC/HNC ratio does not show such a decrease toward the protostar position. This suggests that the deuterium fractionation ratio of the neutral species is conserved after the star formation. If so, the deuterium fractionation of the neutral species can be used as a novel tracer to investigate the initial condition of the star formation process.

  10. Neutrino and Antineutrino Interactions in Deuterium

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment uses BEBC filled with deuterium and exposed to the wide-band neutrino beam N1. The use of deuterium as the target material allows to study interactions on both neutrons and protons. The charge of the target nucleon can be inferred from the number of positive and negative particles in the final state. \\\\ \\\\ Some of the physics aims of this experiment are to measure separately the cross sections @s^n and @s^p on neutrons and protons to determine the structure functions F|n(x,Q|2) and F|p(x,Q|2), the fragmentation functions D(z,Q|2) and the ratio of neutral to charged current interactions. \\\\ \\\\ Additional problems under investigation are the production of nucleon isobars, and of resonances in general, the production of strange and of charmed particles, and the problems of deuterium structure.

  11. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  12. Alphavirus Entry and Membrane Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Kielian

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of enveloped animal viruses has greatly advanced our understanding of the general properties of membrane fusion and of the specific pathways that viruses use to infect the host cell. The membrane fusion proteins of the alphaviruses and flaviviruses have many similarities in structure and function. As reviewed here, alphaviruses use receptor-mediated endocytic uptake and low pH-triggered membrane fusion to deliver their RNA genomes into the cytoplasm. Recent advances in understanding the biochemistry and structure of the alphavirus membrane fusion protein provide a clearer picture of this fusion reaction, including the protein’s conformational changes during fusion and the identification of key domains. These insights into the alphavirus fusion mechanism suggest new areas for experimental investigation and potential inhibitor strategies for anti-viral therapy.

  13. Direct conversion of fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Deuterium and tritium are expected to be used as fuel in the first fusion reactors. Energy is released as kinetic energy of ions and neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. One way to convert the kinetic energy to electrical energy, is to let the ions and neutrons hit the reactor wall and convert the heat that is caused by the particle bombardment to electrical energy with ordinary thermal conversion. If the kinetic energy of the ions instead is converted directly to electrical energy, a higher efficiency of the energy conversion is possible. The majority of the fusion energy is released as kinetic energy of neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. Fusion reactions such as the D-D reactions, the D-{sup 3}He reaction and the p-{sup 11}B reaction, where a larger part of the fusion energy becomes kinetic energy of charged particles, appears therefore more suitable for direct conversion. Since they have lower reactivity than the D-T reaction, they need a larger {beta}B{sup 2}{sub 0} to give sufficiently high fusion power density. Because of this, the fusion configurations spherical torus (ST) and field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high {beta} values are possible, appear interesting. Rosenbluth and Hinton come to the conclusion that efficient direct conversion isn't possible in closed field line systems and that open geometries, which facilitate direct conversion, provide inadequate confinement for D-{sup 3}He. It is confirmed in this study that it doesn't seem possible to achieve as high direct conversion efficiency in closed systems as in open systems. ST and FRC fusion power plants that utilize direct conversion seem however interesting. Calculations with the help of Maple indicate that the reactor parameters needed for a D-D ST and a D{sub 3} He ST hopefully are possible to achieve. The best energy conversion option for a D-D or D{sub 3} He ST appears to be direct electrodynamic conversion (DEC) together with ordinary thermal conversion

  14. Proximal row carpectomy vs four corner fusion for scapholunate (Slac) or scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (Snac) wrists: a systematic review of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulford, J S; Ceulemans, L J; Nam, D; Axelrod, T S

    2009-04-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) and scaphoid excision with four-corner fusion (4CF) are common motion-preserving, salvage procedures for the treatment of wrists with scaphoid nonunion (SNAC) or scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC). A systematic review was undertaken to clarify controversies regarding which of these procedures has the better outcome. We collated 52 articles that examine outcomes for SNAC or SLAC patients undergoing PRC or 4CF. Although the lack of unbiased trials must be acknowledged, this systematic review confirms that both procedures give improvements in pain and subjective outcome measures for patients with symptomatic and appropriately staged SLAC or SNAC wrists. PRC may provide better postoperative range of movement and lacks the potential complications specific to 4CF (nonunion, hardware issues and dorsal impingement). However, the risk of subsequent osteoarthritis is significantly higher in PRC patients despite the majority being asymptomatic at the time of review. Grip strength, pain relief and subjective outcomes are similar in both treatment groups.

  15. The Role of the JET Project in Global Fusion Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1983-01-01

    The aim of nuclear fusion research is to make fusion energy available as a new energy source. Fusion processes occur naturally in the sun, where hydrogen nuclei release energy by combining to form helium. A fusion reactor on earth will require even higher temperatures than in the interior...... of the sun, and it will be based on deuterium and tritium reactions. JET (Joint European Torus) is a major fusion experiment now under construction near Abingdon in the UK It is aimed at producing conditions approximating those necessary in a fusion reactor. The results expected from JET should permit...... a realistic evaluation of the prospects for fusion power and serve as a basis for the design of the next major fusion experiment....

  16. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  17. Dust particle formation due to interaction between graphite and helicon deuterium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwashita, Shinya, E-mail: shinya.iwashita@rub.de [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nishiyama, Katsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shiratani, Masaharu, E-mail: siratani@ed.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    The collection of dust particles using divertor simulation helicon plasmas has been carried out to examine dust formation due to the interaction between a graphite target and deuterium plasmas, which are planned to operate in the large helical device (LHD) at the Japanese National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). The collected dust particles are classified into three types: (i) small spherical particles below 400 nm in size, (ii) agglomerates whose primary particles have a size of about 10 nm, and (iii) large flakes above 1 {mu}m in size. These features are quite similar to those obtained through hydrogen plasma operation, indicating that the dust formation mechanisms due to the interaction between a carbon wall and a plasma of deuterium, which is the isotope of hydrogen, is probably similar to those of hydrogen.

  18. Remote sensing image fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano; Garzelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis of more than ten years of experience, Remote Sensing Image Fusion covers methods specifically designed for remote sensing imagery. The authors supply a comprehensive classification system and rigorous mathematical description of advanced and state-of-the-art methods for pansharpening of multispectral images, fusion of hyperspectral and panchromatic images, and fusion of data from heterogeneous sensors such as optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and integration of thermal and visible/near-infrared images. They also explore new trends of signal/image processing, such as

  19. Prospects for bubble fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I. [Tyumen Institute of Mechanics of Multiphase Systems (TIMMS), Marx (Russian Federation); Lahey, R.T. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  20. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Fusion power is generated when hot deuterium and tritium nuclei react, producing alpha particles and 14 MeV neutrons. These neutrons escape the reaction plasma and are absorbed by the surrounding material structure of the plant, transferring the heat of the reaction to an external cooling circuit. In such high-energy neutron irradiation environments, extensive atomic displacement damage and transmutation production of helium affect the mechanical properties of materials. Among these effect...

  1. From the similarities between neutrons and radon to advanced radon-detection and improved cold fusion neutron-measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, L.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    Neutrons and radon are both ubiquitous in the earth's crust. The neutrons of terrestrial origin are strongly related to radon since they originate mainly from the interactions between the alpha particles from the decays of radioactive-gas (namely Radon and Thoron) and the light nuclei. Since the early studies in the field of neutrons, the radon gas was used to produce neutrons by (α, n) reactions in beryllium. Another important similarity between radon and neutrons is that they can be detected only through the radiations produced respectively by decays or by nuclear reactions. These charged particles from the two distinct nuclear processes are often the same (namely alpha-particles). A typical neutron detector is based on a radiator facing a alpha-particle detector, such as in the case of a neutron film badge. Based on the similarity between neutrons and radon, a film badge for radon has been recently proposed. The radon film badge, in addition to be similar, may be even identical to the neutron film badge. For these reasons, neutron measurements can be easily affected by the presence of unpredictable large radon concentration. In several cold fusion experiments, the CR-39 plastic films (typically used in radon and neutron film-badges), have been the detectors of choice for measuring neutrons. In this paper, attempts will be made to prove that most of these neutron-measurements might have been affected by the presence of large radon concentrations.

  2. Compound cryopump for fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kovari, M; Shephard, T

    2013-01-01

    We reconsider an old idea: a three-stage compound cryopump for use in fusion reactors such as DEMO. The helium "ash" is adsorbed on a 4.5 K charcoal-coated surface, while deuterium and tritium are adsorbed at 15-22 K on a second charcoal-coated surface. The helium is released by raising the first surface to ~30 K. In a separate regeneration step, deuterium and tritium are released at ~110 K. In this way, the helium can be pre-separated from other species. In the simplest design, all three stages are in the same vessel, with a single valve to close the pump off from the tokamak during regeneration. In an alternative design, the three stages are in separate vessels, connected by valves, allowing the stages to regenerate without interfering with each other. The inclusion of the intermediate stage would not affect the overall pumping speed significantly. The downstream exhaust processing system could be scaled down, as much of the deuterium and tritium could be returned directly to the reactor. This could reduce ...

  3. Fuel gain exceeding unity in an inertially confined fusion implosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Kline, J L; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacPhee, A G; Milovich, J L; Pak, A; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Salmonson, J D; Springer, P T; Tommasini, R

    2014-02-20

    Ignition is needed to make fusion energy a viable alternative energy source, but has yet to be achieved. A key step on the way to ignition is to have the energy generated through fusion reactions in an inertially confined fusion plasma exceed the amount of energy deposited into the deuterium-tritium fusion fuel and hotspot during the implosion process, resulting in a fuel gain greater than unity. Here we report the achievement of fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the US National Ignition Facility using a 'high-foot' implosion method, which is a manipulation of the laser pulse shape in a way that reduces instability in the implosion. These experiments show an order-of-magnitude improvement in yield performance over past deuterium-tritium implosion experiments. We also see a significant contribution to the yield from α-particle self-heating and evidence for the 'bootstrapping' required to accelerate the deuterium-tritium fusion burn to eventually 'run away' and ignite.

  4. Change in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions upon Using an Ab Initio Multiphase DT Equation of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillabet, L.; Canaud, B.; Salin, G.; Mazevet, S.; Loubeyre, P.

    2011-09-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an inertial confinement fusion target [S. X. Hu , Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.235003]. Here we use an advanced multiphase EOS, based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EOS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3 ns) in the shock timing of the implosion.

  5. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    suggesting that fusion partners may specifically select each other and that heterogeneity between the partners seems to play a role. Therefore, we set out to directly test the hypothesis that fusion factors have a heterogenic involvement at different stages of nuclearity. Therefore, we have analyzed...... on the nuclearity of fusion partners. While CD47 promotes cell fusions involving mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts, syncytin-1 promotes fusion of two multi-nucleated osteoclasts, but also reduces the number of fusions between mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts. Furthermore, CD47 seems to mediate fusion mostly through......Investigations addressing the molecular keys of osteoclast fusion are primarily based on end-point analyses. No matter if investigations are performed in vivo or in vitro the impact of a given factor is predominantly analyzed by counting the number of multi-nucleated cells, the number of nuclei per...

  6. High-Gain Magnetized Inertial Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetized inertial fusion (MIF) could substantially ease the difficulty of reaching plasma conditions required for significant fusion yields, but it has been widely accepted that the gain is not sufficient for fusion energy. Numerical simulations are presented showing that high-gain MIF is possible in cylindrical liner implosions based on the MagLIF concept [S. A. Slutz et al Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.3333505] with the addition of a cryogenic layer of deuterium-tritium (DT). These simulations show that a burn wave propagates radially from the magnetized hot spot into the surrounding much denser cold DT given sufficient hot-spot areal density. For a drive current of 60 MA the simulated gain exceeds 100, which is more than adequate for fusion energy applications. The simulated gain exceeds 1000 for a drive current of 70 MA.

  7. Advanced Electronic Systems for HEP Experiments, Astroparticle Physics, Accelerator Technology, FELs and Fusion; 2013 WILGA January Symposium (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The cycle of WILGA conferences [wilga.ise.pw.edu.pl] on Photonics and Web Engineering, Advanced Electronic Systems, under the auspices of IEEE, SPIE, KEiT PAN and WEiTI PW was initiated in 1998 by a Research Team PERG/ELHEP ISE PW. The WILGA conferences take place two times a year and the participants are young scientists from this country and abroad. This paper debates chosen topical tracks and some papers presented during the 31 WILGA Conference, which took place on 8-10 February 2013 at the Faculty of WEiTI PW. The conference was attended by over 60 persons. Here we discuss closer the subjects of biomedical electronics and informatics, as well as chosen aspects of applications of advanced electronic circuits and systems. The next 32 WILGA Conference will take place on 27 May – 02 June 2013 in WUT WILGA resort near Warsaw. Proposed conference papers are submitted via the WILGA Conference web page. Email for the correspondence is: photonics@ise.pw.edu.pl. The papers are published in journals Elektronika, I...

  8. The primordial deuterium abundance problems and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A; Kegel, W H; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Takahara, Fumio; Kegel, Wilhelm H.

    1997-01-01

    The current status of extragalactic deuterium abundance is discussed using two examples of `low' and `high' D/H measurements. We show that the discordance of these two types of D abundances may be a consequence of the spatial correlations in the stochastic velocity field. Within the framework of the generalized procedure (accounting for such effects) one finds good agreement between different observations and the theoretical predictions for standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN). In particular, we show that the deuterium absorption seen at z = 2.504 toward Q1009+2956 and the H+D Ly-alpha profile observed at z = 0.701 toward Q1718+4807 are compatible with D/H $\\sim 4.1 - 4.6\\times10^{-5}$. This result supports SBBN and, thus, no inhomogeneity is needed. The problem of precise D/H measurements is discussed.

  9. Emission of Secondary Electrons from Solid Deuterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental facility was built where films of solid deuterium of known thickness could be made and where they could be irradiated with pulsed beams of electrons (up to 3 keV) and light ions (up to 10 keV). Studies of secondary electron emission were made and the secondary electron emission...... coefficient ϵ was measured for deuterium for various angles of incidence at electron energies of 0.5–3.0 keV. For normal incidence ϵ is quite small; it is well below one for all particle energies. It is seen that the angular dependence of ϵ is given by , where θ is the angle of incidence....

  10. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  11. Erosion and deuterium retention in ion-irradiated tungsten under plasma exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khripunov, B., E-mail: Khripunov_BI@nrcki.ru [NRC Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Gureev, V.; Koidan, V.; Kornienko, S.; Latushkin, S.; Petrov, V.; Ryazanov, A.; Semenov, E.; Stolyarova, V.; Danelyan, L. [NRC Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Kulikauskas, V.; Zatekin, V. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Unezhev, V. [NRC Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Effect of radiation damage on tungsten response to plasma exposure is examined. Samples of tungsten W 99.95 wt% were irradiated with fast {sup 12}C{sup 3+} ions at 10 MeV to fluence of (1–2) × 10{sup 17} ion/cm{sup 2} to produce damage in the range 1–40 dpa relevant to the level of interest for fusion research. Exposure of the irradiated tungsten to deuterium plasma on linear simulator in erosion condition provided D-ion total fluence (1–3) × 10{sup 21} D{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at ion energy 250 eV. Swelling effect has been observed, and important changes in the structure of the irradiated material have been found (SEM). Erosion of the damaged layer was evaluated at Y{sub d-w} ≅ (3–5) ⋅ 10{sup −3} at/ion. The retained deuterium profiles have been taken by ERDA, maximal deuterium concentration reached 6–8 at.% in the layer ∼30 nm deep corresponding to 2–3 dpa. Comparison of D-retention was made for C- and He-irradiated tungsten for this level of damage.

  12. Strangeness photoproduction on the deuterium target

    OpenAIRE

    Shende, Sugat Vyankatesh

    2007-01-01

    More information on the nucleon excitation function can be gained by studying the photoproduction experiments. In these experiments, the nucleon inside the nucleous is excited by shooting a high energy photon beam. The excited spectrum of the nucleon is then studied by measuring the energy and momentum of the decayed particles. The K0 photoproduction on the deuterium target (gamma d -> K0 Sigma+ n) has been studied first time from the experiment presented in this thesis. This experiment has b...

  13. Applications of deuterium oxide in human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bila, Wendell Costa; Mariano, Reysla Maria da Silveira; Silva, Valmin Ramos; Santos, Maria Emília Soares Martins Dos; Lamounier, Joel Alves; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Galdino, Alexsandro Sobreira

    2017-02-06

    The main aim goal of this review was to gather information about recent publications related to deuterium oxide (D2O), and its use as a scientific tool related to human health. Searches were made in electronic databases Pubmed, Scielo, Lilacs, Medline and Cochrane. Moreover, the following patent databases were consulted: EPO (Espacenet patent search), USPTO (United States Patent and Trademark Office) and Google Patents, which cover researches worldwide related to innovations using D2O.

  14. Temperature dependence of deuterium retention in tungsten deposits by deuterium ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, K., E-mail: kadzu@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Uehara, K.; Date, H.; Fukada, S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Watanabe, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Tungsten (W) deposits were formed by hydrogen plasma sputtering and blisters were observed on the surface. The W deposits and W foils were exposed to deuterium ions with 2 keV-D{sup 2+} to doses of 1.0 × 10{sup 21} D{sup 2+}/m{sup 2} at 294 and 773 K in addition to 573 K in the present authors’ previous work. Hydrogen isotopes release behaviors from the W deposits and W foils were observed by the thermal desorption spectroscopy method. The amount of deuterium released from the W deposit was considerably larger than that from W foil. The obtained deuterium retention in D/m{sup 2} was in the range of deuterium retention in polycrystalline tungsten. Not only implanted deuterium but also hydrogen, which was incorporated during the sputtering-deposition process, were released from the W deposits. A hydrogen release peak at around 1100 K was observed for the W deposits. This is considered to be due to the rupture of the blisters.

  15. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS AND CHALLENGES IN HYDROGEN/DEUTERIUM EXCHANGE MASS SPECTROMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange (HDX) has been applied, since the 1930s, as an analytical tool to study the structure and dynamics of (small) biomolecules. The popularity of using HDX to study proteins increased drastically in the last two decades due to the successful combination with mass spectrometry (MS). Together with this growth in popularity, several technological advances have been made, such as improved quenching and fragmentation. As a consequence of these experimental improvemen...

  16. Fusion Studies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  17. Fusion research programme in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shishir Deshpande; Predhiman Kaw

    2013-10-01

    The fusion energy research program of India is summarized in the context of energy needs and scenario of tokamak advancements on domestic and international fronts. In particular, the various technologies that will lead us to ultimately build a fusion power reactor are identified along with the steps being taken for their indigenous development.

  18. Deuterium Fractionation in the Ophiuchus Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Punanova, A; Pon, A; Belloche, A; André, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We measure the deuterium fraction, RD, and the CO-depletion factor, fd, toward a number of starless and protostellar cores in the L1688 region of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex and search for variations based upon environmental differences across L1688. The kinematic properties of the dense gas traced by the N2H+ and N2D+ (1-0) lines are also discussed. Methods. RD has been measured via observations of the J=1-0 transition of N2H+ and N2D+ toward 33 dense cores in different regions of L1688. fd estimates have been done using C17O(1-0) and 850 micron dust continuum emission from the SCUBA survey. All line observations were carried out with the IRAM 30 meter antenna. Results. The dense cores show large (2-40%) deuterium fractions, with significant variations between the sub-regions of L1688. The CO-depletion factor also varies from one region to another (1-7). Two different correlations are found between deuterium fraction and CO-depletion factor: cores in regions A, B2 and I show increasing RD wit...

  19. The Primordial Abundance of Deuterium: Ionization correction

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We determine the relative ionization of deuterium and hydrogen in low metallicity damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA systems using a detailed suite of photoionization simulations. We model metal-poor DLAs as clouds of gas in pressure equilibrium with a host dark matter halo, exposed to the Haardt & Madau (2012) background radiation of galaxies and quasars at redshift z~3. Our results indicate that the deuterium ionization correction correlates with the H I column density and the ratio of successive ion stages of the most commonly observed metals. The N(N II) / N(N I) column density ratio provides the most reliable correction factor, being essentially independent of the gas geometry, H I column density, and the radiation field. We provide a series of convenient fitting formulae to calculate the deuterium ionization correction based on observable quantities. The ionization correction typically does not exceed 0.1 per cent for metal-poor DLAs, which is comfortably below the current measurement precision (2...

  20. Diffusion, trapping, and isotope exchange of plasma implanted deuterium in ion beam damaged tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Joseph Lincoln

    Tritium accumulation in nuclear fusion reactor materials is a major concern for practical and safe fusion energy. This work examines hydrogen isotope exchange as a tritium removal technique, analyzes the effects of neutron damage using high energy copper ion beams, and introduces a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the concentration of trapped atoms. Tungsten samples were irradiated with high energy (0.5 - 5 MeV) copper ions for controlled levels of damage - 10-3 to 10-1 displacements per atom (dpa) - at room temperature. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma at constant temperature (˜ 380 K) to a high fluence of 1024 ions/m2, where retention is at is maximized (i.e. saturated). By then subsequently exposing these samples to fractions of this fluence with hydrogen plasma, isotope exchange rates were observed. The resulting deuterium still trapped in the tungsten is then measured post mortem. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) gives the depth resolved deuterium retention profile with the 3He(D,p) 4He reaction, and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) gives the total amount of deuterium trapped in the tungsten by heating a sample in vacuum up to 1200 K and measuring the evaporated gas molecules with a residual gas analyzer. Isotope exchange data show that hydrogen atoms can displace trapped deuterium atoms efficiently only up to the first few microns, but does not affect the atoms trapped at greater depths. In ion damaged tungsten, measurements showed a significant increase in retention in the damage region proportional to dpa 0.66, which results in a significant spike in total retention, and isotope exchange in damaged samples is still ineffective at depths greater than a few microns. Thus, isotope exchange is not an affective tritium removal technique; however, these experiments have shown that trapping in material defects greatly affects diffusion. These experiments lead to a simplified diffusion model with defect densities as the only free

  1. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

    2014-05-01

    Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C/min up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 °C samples) and four (for 500 °C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 °C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 °C to 600 °C after 1st annealing

  2. Deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, J.D.; Adler, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Three initial campaigns to increase the fusion power in DT plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [TFTR] prior to July 1994 are described. The first campaign was dedicated to obtaining >5 MW of fusion power while avoiding MHD events similar to the JET X-event. The second was aimed at producing maximum fusion power irrespective of proximity to MHD limits, and achieved 9 MW limited by a disruption. The third campaign increased the energy confinement time using lithium pellet conditioning with the hope of increasing the ratio of alpha heating to beam heating.

  3. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum...

  4. Sequence-specific conformational flexibility of SNARE transmembrane helices probed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Walter; Poschner, Bernhard C; Stalz, Holger; Heck, Albert J; Langosch, Dieter

    2008-08-01

    SNARE proteins mediate fusion of intracellular eukaryotic membranes and their alpha-helical transmembrane domains are known to contribute to lipid bilayer mixing. Synthetic transmembrane domain peptides were previously shown to mimic the function of SNARE proteins in that they trigger liposome fusion in a sequence-specific fashion. Here, we performed a detailed investigation of the conformational dynamics of the transmembrane helices of the presynaptic SNAREs synaptobrevin II and syntaxin 1a. To this end, we recorded deuterium/hydrogen-exchange kinetics in isotropic solution as well as in the membrane-embedded state. In solution, the exchange kinetics of each peptide can be described by three different classes of amide deuteriums that exchange with different rate constants. These are likely to originate from exchange at different domains of the helices. Interestingly, the rate constants of each class vary with the TMD sequence. Thus, the exchange rate is position-specific and sequence-specific. Further, the rate constants correlate with the previously determined membrane fusogenicities. In membranes, exchange is retarded and a significant proportion of amide hydrogens are protected from exchange. We conclude that the conformational dynamics of SNARE TMD helices is mechanistically linked to their ability to drive lipid mixing.

  5. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

    1980-10-01

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described.

  6. Virtual experiment of pyroelectric fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasseri, Mohammad Mehdi, E-mail: mnasseri@aeoi.org.ir

    2015-11-01

    The virtual experiment of pyroelectric fusion was conducted by Geant4 simulator. Despite the limitations of the code for simulating the pyroelectric fusion experiment precisely, the following interesting results were obtained. Two crystals were separated by a certain distance. A constant electric field with varying intensities was applied between the crystals. As initial particles, deuterium ions were emitted to deuterated polypropylene (CD{sub 2}). This virtual experiment showed that the number of ions that hit the target, for different distances between the crystals, increases with the increase of the intensity of the electric field; however, further increase of the electric field results in the reduction of the number of hit ions, which attains a constant value of about 57% of the initial number of ions. For a (D, D) fusion reaction to occur, the distance between the two crystals should be <1.5 cm and for a (D, T) fusion reaction to occur, this distance could be up to 2 cm. The energy spectra of ions for low and high electric fields were narrow and long and wide and short, respectively.

  7. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPIELMAN,RICK B.

    2000-01-01

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

  8. Deuterium implantation into Y2O3-doped and pure tungsten: Deuterium retention and blistering behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M.; Jacob, W.; Manhard, A.; Gao, L.; Balden, M.; von Toussaint, U.; Zhou, Z.

    2017-04-01

    The blistering and near-surface deuterium retention of a Y2O3-doped tungsten (W) and two different pure W grades were studied after exposure to deuterium (D) plasma at elevated temperatures (370, 450 and 570 K). Samples were exposed to a deuterium fluence of 6 × 1024 D m-2 applying a moderate ion flux of about 9 × 1019 D m-2 s-1 at an ion energy of 38 eV/D. Morphological modifications at the surface were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The D depth profiles and the accumulated D inventories within the topmost 8 μm were determined by nuclear reaction analysis. Blistering and deuterium retention were strongly dependent on the implantation temperature. In addition, blistering was sensitively influenced by the used tungsten grade, although the total amount of retained D measured by nuclear reaction analysis was comparable. Among the three different investigated tungsten grades, Y2O3-doped W exhibited the lowest degree of surface modification despite a comparable total D retention.

  9. Novel PEFC Application for Deuterium Isotope Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayoshi Matsushima

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC with a Nafion membrane for isotopic separation of deuterium (D was investigated. Mass analysis at the cathode side indicated that D diffused through the membrane and participated in an isotope exchange reaction. The exchange of D with protium (H in H2O was facilitated by a Pt catalyst. The anodic data showed that the separation efficiency was dependent on the D concentration in the source gas, whereby the water produced during the operation of the PEFC was more enriched in D as the D concentration of the source gas was increased.

  10. Lamb shift in the muonic deuterium atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutov, A. A.; Martynenko, A. P. [Samara State University, Pavlov street 1, 443011, Samara (Russian Federation); Samara State University, Pavlov Street 1, 443011, Samara, Russia and Samara State Aerospace University named after academician S.P. Korolyov, Moskovskoye Shosse 34, 443086, Samara (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    We present an investigation of the Lamb shift (2P{sub 1/2}-2S{sub 1/2}) in the muonic deuterium ({mu}D) atom using the three-dimensional quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics. The vacuum polarization, nuclear-structure, and recoil effects are calculated with the account of contributions of orders {alpha}{sup 3}, {alpha}{sup 4}, {alpha}{sup 5}, and {alpha}{sup 6}. The results are compared with earlier performed calculations. The obtained numerical value of the Lamb shift at 202.4139 meV can be considered a reliable estimate for comparison with forthcoming experimental data.

  11. Lamb shift in muonic deuterium atom

    CERN Document Server

    Krutov, A A

    2011-01-01

    We present new investigation of the Lamb shift (2P_{1/2}-2S_{1/2}) in the muonic deuterium (mu d) atom using the three-dimensional quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics. The vacuum polarization, nuclear structure and recoil effects are calculated with the account of contributions of orders alpha^3, alpha^4, alpha^5 and alpha^6. The results are compared with earlier performed calculations. The obtained numerical value of the Lamb shift 202.3616 meV can be considered as a reliable estimate for the comparison with forthcoming experimental data.

  12. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  13. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Pablant, N. A.; Stagner, L.

    2016-11-01

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. These challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model.

  14. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meezan, N. B., E-mail: meezan1@llnl.gov; Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  15. Fusion energy in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using a magnetically shielded grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedditch, John, E-mail: john.hedditch@sydney.edu.au; Bowden-Reid, Richard, E-mail: rbow3948@physics.usyd.edu.au; Khachan, Joe, E-mail: joe.khachan@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Whales 2006 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented, which shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  16. Fusion in a magnetically-shielded-grid inertial electrostatic confinement device

    CERN Document Server

    Hedditch, John; Khachan, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented that shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively-biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  17. Georgia Tech Studies of Sub-Critical Advanced Burner Reactors with a D-T Fusion Tokamak Neutron Source for the Transmutation of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, W. M.

    2009-09-01

    The possibility that a tokamak D-T fusion neutron source, based on ITER physics and technology, could be used to drive sub-critical, fast-spectrum nuclear reactors fueled with the transuranics (TRU) in spent nuclear fuel discharged from conventional nuclear reactors has been investigated at Georgia Tech in a series of studies which are summarized in this paper. It is found that sub-critical operation of such fast transmutation reactors is advantageous in allowing longer fuel residence time, hence greater TRU burnup between fuel reprocessing stages, and in allowing higher TRU loading without compromising safety, relative to what could be achieved in a similar critical transmutation reactor. The required plasma and fusion technology operating parameter range of the fusion neutron source is generally within the anticipated operational range of ITER. The implications of these results for fusion development policy, if they hold up under more extensive and detailed analysis, is that a D-T fusion tokamak neutron source for a sub-critical transmutation reactor, built on the basis of the ITER operating experience, could possibly be a logical next step after ITER on the path to fusion electrical power reactors. At the same time, such an application would allow fusion to contribute to meeting the nation's energy needs at an earlier stage by helping to close the fission reactor nuclear fuel cycle.

  18. On the change in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state

    CERN Document Server

    Caillabet, Laurent; Salin, Gwenaël; Mazevet, Stéphane; Loubeyre, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EoS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target (Hu et al., PRL 104, 235003 (2010)). We use here an advanced multi-phase equation of state (EoS), based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EoS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3ns) in the shock timing of the implosion.

  19. Thermal desorption of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markin, A.V.; Chernikov, V.N.; Zakharov, A.P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    By means of TDS measurements it is shown that the desorption of deuterium from Be implanted with 5 keV D ions to fluences, {Phi}, from 1x10{sup 20} D/m{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} proceeds in one high temperature stage B, while at {Phi} {ge} 1.2x10{sup 21}D/m{sup 2} one more stage A is added. The desorption maximum A is narrow and consists of two peaks A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} at about 460 K and 490 K, respectively. Peak A{sub 1} is attributed to the desorption of deuterium from the walls of opened channels formed under D ion implantation. Peak {sub A}2 is a consequence of the opening of a part of closed bubbles/channels to the outer surface. The position of maximum B shifts noticeably and nonsteadily on the fluence in a range from 850 to 1050 K. The origin of this maximum is the liberation of D atoms bound at vacancy complexes discussed previously by Wampler. The dependence of Tm(B) on the fluence is governed by the interaction of freely migrating D atoms with partly opened or fully closed gas cavity arrangements which are created under temperature ramping, but differently in specimens implanted with D ions to different fluences.

  20. Sputtering of solid deuterium by He-ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Pedrys, R.

    2001-01-01

    Sputtering of solid deuterium by bombardment of 3He+ and 4He+ ions was studied. Some features are similar to hydrogen ion bombardment of solid deuterium, but for the He-ions a significant contribution of elastic processes to the total yield can be identified. The thin-film enhancement is more...

  1. (Un)true deuterium abundance in the Galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanović, Tijana; Steigman, Gary; Fields, Brian D.

    2010-04-01

    Deuterium has a special place in cosmology, nuclear astrophysics, and galactic chemical evolution, because of its unique property that it is only created in the big bang nucleosynthesis while all other processes result in its net destruction. For this reason, among other things, deuterium abundance measurements in the interstellar medium (ISM) allow us to determine the fraction of interstellar gas that has been cycled through stars, and set constraints and learn about different Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models. However, recent indications that deuterium might be preferentially depleted onto dust grains complicate our understanding about the meaning of measured ISM deuterium abundances. For this reason, recent estimates by Linsky et al. (2006) have yielded a lower bound to the “true”, undepleted, ISM deuterium abundance that is very close to the primordial abundance, indicating a small deuterium astration factor contrary to the demands of many GCE models. To avoid any prejudice about deuterium dust depletion along different lines of sight that are used to determine the “true” D abundance, we propose a model-independent, statistical Bayesian method to address this issue and determine in a model-independent manner the undepleted ISM D abundance. We find the best estimate for the gas-phase ISM deuterium abundance to be (D/H)ISM ≥ (2.0 ± 0.1) × 10-5. Presented are the results of Prodanović et al. (2009).

  2. 78 FR 48863 - Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Fusion... that the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee will be renewed for a two-year period beginning on..., priorities, and strategies for advancing plasma science, fusion science and fusion technology--the...

  3. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-09

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  4. Fusion research at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    The ORNL Fusion Program includes the experimental and theoretical study of two different classes of magnetic confinement schemes - systems with helical magnetic fields, such as the tokamak and stellarator, and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) class of toroidally linked mirror systems; the development of technologies, including superconducting magnets, neutral atomic beam and radio frequency (rf) heating systems, fueling systems, materials, and diagnostics; the development of databases for atomic physics and radiation effects; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; and the design of advanced demonstration fusion devices. The program involves wide collaboration, both within ORNL and with other institutions. The elements of this program are shown. This document illustrates the program's scope; and aims by reviewing recent progress.

  5. Medical Image Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Rafizadeh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in medical imaging in the past two decades have enable radiologists to create images of the human body with unprecedented resolution. MRI, PET,... imaging devices can quickly acquire 3D images. Image fusion establishes an anatomical correlation between corresponding images derived from different examination. This fusion is applied either to combine images of different modalities (CT, MRI or single modality (PET-PET."nImage fusion is performed in two steps:"n1 Registration: spatial modification (eg. translation of model image relative to reference image in order to arrive at an ideal matching of both images. Registration methods are feature-based and intensity-based approaches."n2 Visualization: the goal of it is to depict the spatial relationship between the model image and refer-ence image. We can point out its clinical application in nuclear medicine (PET/CT.

  6. Optical design of a laser system for nuclear fusion research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Metz, J

    1971-07-01

    High power laser improvements, high quality aspheric lenses, and sharp focusing on a solid deuterium target enable us to get numerous nuclear fusion reactions inside the deuterium plasma. Since Maiman successfully built the first light amplifier in 1960 [Nature 187, 493 (1960)] and Terhune performed air breakdown experiments in 1962 ["Optical Third Harmonic Generation," Comptes rendus de la 3ème Conférence Internationale d'Electronique Quantique, Paris, 11-15 février 1963, P. Grivet and N. Bloembergen, Eds. (Dunod, Paris, 1964), pp. 1559-15761, the laser has been thought of as a valuable energy source for fusion devices. Now a kind of race has started toward high temperature plasmas created by powerful lasers. However, the peak power of solid state laser is limited by glass damage, pump efficiences, and unwanted effects such as superradiance. So it is necessary to improve all the optical properties of the laser and the focusing of the lens on the target. In this paper, requirements for fusion implying a very high flux will be stated. Successive optical designs will be described together with measurement methods, and the contribution of optical improvements to the occurrence of nuclear fusion reaction in deuterium targets will be evaluated.

  7. Influence of tungsten microstructure and ion flux on deuterium plasma-induced surface modifications and deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; M. Reinhart,; Dittmar, T.; Matveev, D.; Linsmeier, C.; Breuer, U.; Kreter, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of surface temperature, particle flux density and material microstructure on the surface morphology and deuterium retention was studied by exposing tungsten targets (20 μm and 40 μm grain size) to deuterium plasma at the same particle fluence (1026 m−2) and i

  8. Retention and release mechanisms of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkofler, M.; Reinelt, M.; Linsmeier, Ch.

    2011-06-01

    The fraction of deuterium (D) that is retained upon irradiation of beryllium (Be) as well as the temperatures at which implanted D is released are of importance for the international fusion experiment ITER, where Be will be used as an armor material. The influence of single parameters on retention and release is investigated in laboratory experiments performed under well defined conditions with the aim to identify dominant underlying mechanisms and thus be able to predict the behavior of the Be wall in ITER. Recent progress in the quantification of retained fractions and release temperatures as well as in the understanding of the governing mechanisms is presented. The retained fraction upon implantation of D at 1 keV into Be(1 1 2¯ 0) to fluences far below the saturation threshold of 10 21 m -2 is almost 95%, the remaining 5% being attributed to reflection at the surface. At these low fluences, no dependence of the retained fractions on implantation energy is observed. At fluences of the order of 10 21 m -2 and higher, saturation of the irradiated material affects the retention, leading to lower retained fractions. Furthermore, at these fluences the retained fractions decrease with decreasing implantation energies. Differences in the retained fractions from implanted Be(1 1 2¯ 0) and polycrystalline Be are explained by anisotropic diffusion of interstitials during implantation, leading to an amount of surviving D-trap complexes that depends on surface-orientation. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) spectra are recorded after implantation of fluences of the order of 10 19 m -2 at various energies and simulated by means of a newly developed code based on coupled reaction-diffusion systems (CRDS). The asymmetric shape of the TPD peaks is reproduced by introducing a local D accumulation process into the model.

  9. Deuterium retention in mixed C–W–D films co-deposited in magnetron discharge in deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krat, S., E-mail: stepan.krat@gmail.com; Gasparyan, Yu; Efimov, V.; Mednikov, A.; Zibrov, M.; Pisarev, A.

    2013-07-15

    Deuterium retention in C–D and C–W–D mixed films deposited in a magnetron discharge in deuterium was studied. The deuterium content in the C–D films was in the range D/C = 0.65–0.75 for grounded substrates and 0.45–0.6 if a bias of −60 V was applied. The deuterium content in the C–W–D films was in the range of D/(C + W) = 0.2–0.4 without strong dependence on the C/W ratio (in the range of 0.7–10) and the substrate potential (in the range from 0 to −60 V). Deuterium release from the C–W–D films was observed at lower temperatures than that from the C–D films.

  10. Deuterium Abundance in Consciousness and Current Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.

    We utilize the deuterium-hydrogen abundances and their role in setting limits on the mass and other conditions of cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. We calculate the dependence of a set of physical variables such as density, temperature, energy mass, entropy and other physical variable parameters through the evolution of the universe under the Schwarzschild conditions as a function from early to present time. Reconciliation with the 3°K and missing mass is made. We first examine the Schwarzschild condition; second, the geometrical constraints of a multidimensional Cartesian space on closed cosmologies, and third we will consider the cosmogenesis and evolution of the universe in a multidimensional Cartesian space, obeying the Schwarzschild condition. Implications of this model for matter creation are made. We also examine experimental evidence for closed versus open cosmologies; x-ray detection of the "missing mass" density. Also the interstellar deuterium abundance, along with the value of the Hubble constant set a general criterion on the value of the curvature constant, k. Once the value of the Hubble constant, H is determined, the deuterium abundance sets stringent restrictions on the value of the curvature constant k by an detailed discussion is presented. The experimental evidences for the determination of H and the primary set of coupled equations to determine D abundance is given. 'The value of k for an open, closed, or flat universe will be discussed in terms of the D abundance which will affect the interpretation of the Schwarzschild, black hole universe. We determine cosmology solutions to Einstein's field obeying the Schwarzschild solutions condition. With this model, we can form a reconciliation of the black hole, from galactic to cosmological scale. Continuous creation occurs at the dynamic blackhole plasma field. We term this new model the multiple big bang or "little whimper model". We utilize the deuteriumhydrogen abundances and their role in

  11. Control of a laser inertial confinement fusion-fission power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Edward I.; Latkowski, Jeffery F.; Kramer, Kevin J.

    2015-10-27

    A laser inertial-confinement fusion-fission energy power plant is described. The fusion-fission hybrid system uses inertial confinement fusion to produce neutrons from a fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium. The fusion neutrons drive a sub-critical blanket of fissile or fertile fuel. A coolant circulated through the fuel extracts heat from the fuel that is used to generate electricity. The inertial confinement fusion reaction can be implemented using central hot spot or fast ignition fusion, and direct or indirect drive. The fusion neutrons result in ultra-deep burn-up of the fuel in the fission blanket, thus enabling the burning of nuclear waste. Fuels include depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, spent nuclear fuel, thorium, and weapons grade plutonium. LIFE engines can meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the highly undesirable stockpiles of depleted uranium, spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials.

  12. Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, P.

    2012-08-29

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

  13. Channeling Effect in Polycrystalline Deuterium-Saturated CVD Diamond Target Bombarded by Deuterium Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bagulya, A V; Negodaev, M A; Rusetskii, A S; Chubenko, A P; Ralchenko, V G; Bolshakov, A P

    2014-01-01

    At the ion accelerator HELIS at the LPI, the neutron yield is investigated in DD reactions within a polycrystalline deuterium-saturated CVD diamond, during an irradiation of its surface by a deuterium ion beam with the energy less than 30 keV. The measurements of the neutron flux in the beam direction are performed in dependence on the target angle, \\b{eta}, with respect to the beam axis. These measurements are performed using a multichannel detector based on He3 counters. A significant anisotropy in neutron yield is observed, it was higher by a factor of 3 at \\b{eta}=0 compared to that at \\b{eta} = +-45{\\deg}. The possible reasons for the anisotropy, including ion channeling, are discussed.

  14. What controls deuterium excess in global precipitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pfahl

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The deuterium excess (d of precipitation is widely used in the reconstruction of past climatic changes from ice cores. However, its most common interpretation as moisture source temperature cannot directly be inferred from present-day water isotope observations. Here, we use a new empirical relation between d and near-surface relative humidity together with reanalysis data to globally predict d of surface evaporation from the ocean. The very good quantitative agreement of the predicted hemispherically averaged seasonal cycle with observed d in precipitation indicates that moisture source relative humidity, and not sea surface temperature, is the main driver of d variability on seasonal time scales. There is no convincing evidence that RH might be less important for long-term palaeoclimatic d changes compared to moisture source temperature variations. Ice core d data may thus have to be reinterpreted, focusing on climatic influences on relative humidity during evaporation, in particular related to atmospheric circulation changes.

  15. A semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ryan D.; Slutz, Stephen A.

    2015-05-01

    Presented is a semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). This model accounts for several key aspects of MagLIF, including: (1) preheat of the fuel (optionally via laser absorption); (2) pulsed-power-driven liner implosion; (3) liner compressibility with an analytic equation of state, artificial viscosity, internal magnetic pressure, and ohmic heating; (4) adiabatic compression and heating of the fuel; (5) radiative losses and fuel opacity; (6) magnetic flux compression with Nernst thermoelectric losses; (7) magnetized electron and ion thermal conduction losses; (8) end losses; (9) enhanced losses due to prescribed dopant concentrations and contaminant mix; (10) deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium primary fusion reactions for arbitrary deuterium to tritium fuel ratios; and (11) magnetized α-particle fuel heating. We show that this simplified model, with its transparent and accessible physics, can be used to reproduce the general 1D behavior presented throughout the original MagLIF paper [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. We also discuss some important physics insights gained as a result of developing this model, such as the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated.

  16. A semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Ryan D.; Slutz, Stephen A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Presented is a semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). This model accounts for several key aspects of MagLIF, including: (1) preheat of the fuel (optionally via laser absorption); (2) pulsed-power-driven liner implosion; (3) liner compressibility with an analytic equation of state, artificial viscosity, internal magnetic pressure, and ohmic heating; (4) adiabatic compression and heating of the fuel; (5) radiative losses and fuel opacity; (6) magnetic flux compression with Nernst thermoelectric losses; (7) magnetized electron and ion thermal conduction losses; (8) end losses; (9) enhanced losses due to prescribed dopant concentrations and contaminant mix; (10) deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium primary fusion reactions for arbitrary deuterium to tritium fuel ratios; and (11) magnetized α-particle fuel heating. We show that this simplified model, with its transparent and accessible physics, can be used to reproduce the general 1D behavior presented throughout the original MagLIF paper [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. We also discuss some important physics insights gained as a result of developing this model, such as the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated.

  17. Operation and commissioning of IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) LIPAc injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Y., E-mail: okumura.yoshikazu@jaea.go.jp, E-mail: rjgobin@cea.fr; Knaster, J.; Ayala, J.-M.; Marqueta, A.; Perez, M.; Pruneri, G.; Scantamburlo, F. [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Obuchi-Omotedate, 039-3212 Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Gobin, R., E-mail: okumura.yoshikazu@jaea.go.jp, E-mail: rjgobin@cea.fr; Bolzon, B.; Chauvin, N.; Chel, S.; Harrault, F.; Senée, F.; Valette, M. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191 Gif/Yvette (France); Heidinger, R.; Cara, P.; Gex, D.; Phillips, G. [F4E, Fusion for Energy, BFD Department, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ichimiya, R.; Ihara, A. [JAEA, Division of Rokkasho BA Project, Obuchi-Omotedate, 039-3212 Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); and others

    2016-02-15

    The objective of linear IFMIF prototype accelerator is to demonstrate 125 mA/CW deuterium ion beam acceleration up to 9 MeV. The injector has been developed in CEA Saclay and already demonstrated 140 mA/100 keV deuterium beam [R. Gobin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 02A918 (2014)]. The injector was disassembled and delivered to the International Fusion Energy Research Center in Rokkasho, Japan. After reassembling the injector, commissioning has started in 2014. Up to now, 100 keV/120 mA/CW hydrogen and 100 keV/90 mA/CW deuterium ion beams have been produced stably from a 10 mm diameter extraction aperture with a low beam emittance of 0.21 π mm mrad (rms, normalized). Neutron production by D-D reaction up to 2.4 × 10{sup 9} n/s has been observed in the deuterium operation.

  18. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  19. Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results in predictable healing. Autograft is currently the “gold standard” source of bone for a fusion. The ... pump. With this technique, the patient presses a button that delivers a predetermined amount of narcotic pain ...

  20. Fusion development and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development.

  1. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  2. Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

  3. Accelerator Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, Klaus H.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  4. Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

    2011-05-01

    The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

  5. Deuterium cluster jet produced at moderate backing pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbin Wang; Tianshu Wen; Yingling He; Chunye Jiao; Shuanggen Zhang; Xiangxian Wang; Fangfang Ge; Hongjie Liu; Guoquan Ni; Xiangdong Yang; Yuqiu Gu; Xianlun Wen; Weimin Zhou; Guangchang Wang

    2006-01-01

    @@ A deuterium cluster jet produced in the supersonic expansion into vacuum of deuterium gas at liquid nitrogen temperature and moderate backing pressures are studied by Rayleigh scattering techniques. The experimental results show that deuterium clusters can be created at moderate gas backing pressures ranging from 8 to 23 bar, and a maximum average cluster size of 350 atoms per cluster is estimated. The temporal evolution of the cluster jet generated at the backing pressure of 20 bar demonstrates a two-plateau structure. The possible mechanism responsible for this structure is discussed. The former plateau with higher average atom and cluster densities is more suitable for the general laser-cluster interaction experiments.

  6. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, F.B.; Hone, M.A.; Jarvis, O.N.; Loughlin, M.J.; Sadler, G. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S.; Watkins, N. [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.; Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    The effect of a sawtooth crash on the radial distribution of the slowing down fusion product tritons and on beams ions, is examined with measurements of the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line-integrals before and after sawtooth crashes. In deuterium discharges, the 14 MeV neutron production was wholly attributable to burnup of the 1 MeV fusion product tritons from d-d fusion. The local emissivity of 14 MeV neutrons, and hence of the profile of thermalizing tritons, is shown to be only weakly affected by crashes in the discharges studied. This is in contradiction with the apparent behaviour of injected beam ions as deduced from a study of the considerable changes in local emissivity of the 2.5 MeV neutrons. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the fusion product tritons is consistent with the scaling of the beam injected deuterium. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  7. Progress in theory and simulation of ion cyclotron emission from magnetic confinement fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendy, Richard; Chapman, Ben; Chapman, Sandra; Cook, James; Reman, Bernard; McClements, Ken; Carbajal, Leopoldo

    2016-10-01

    Suprathermal ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is detected from all large tokamak and stellarator plasmas. Its frequency spectrum has narrow peaks at sequential cyclotron harmonics of the energetic ion population (fusion-born or neutral beam-injected) at the outer edge of the plasma. ICE was the first collective radiative instability driven by confined fusion-born ions observed in deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET and TFTR, and the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability is the most likely emission mechanism. Contemporary ICE measurements are taken at very high sampling rates from the LHD stellarator and from the conventional aspect ratio KSTAR tokamak. A correspondingly advanced modelling capability for the ICE emission mechanism has been developed using 1D3V PIC and hybrid-PIC codes, supplemented by analytical theory. These kinetic codes simulate the self-consistent full orbit dynamics of energetic and thermal ions, together with the electric and magnetic fields and the electrons. We report recent progress in theory and simulation that addresses: the scaling of ICE intensity with energetic particle density; the transition between super-Alfvénic and sub-Alfvénic regimes for the collectively radiating particles; and the rapid time evolution that is seen for some ICE measurements. This work was supported in part by the RCUK Energy Programme [Grant Number EP/I501045] and by Euratom.

  8. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  9. Metal Liner Implosions for Cylindrical Convergent Isentropic Compression of Deuterium and its Application to MAGLIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinwurm, Marcus; Appelbe, Brian; Skidmore, Jonathan; Bland, Simon; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2012-10-01

    Isentropic Compression Experiments on pulsed power machines in the field of High Energy Density Physics have gained interest in recent years. We describe a method of isentropically compressing cryogenic Deuterium inside a metal liner. Pulse shaping was performed by solving Kidder's homogeneous isentropic compression for cylindrical geometry and extending it to an arbitrary Equation of State. The obtained pulse shape enables us to simulate a cylindrically convergent ramp wave, which quasi-isentropically compresses the Deuterium fill to densities much higher than achievable by using a standard pulse. The effect of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities upon the peak density achieved is evaluated using the resistive magneto-hydrodynamics code Gorgon for a maximum current of 25 MA. Therefore, isentropic liner implosions are a promising technique for recreating the conditions present in the interiors of gas giants. We applied this technique to the High-Gain Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MAGLIF) scheme [1]. There a metal liner is filled with DT gas surrounded by a layer of DT ice. We show how the current pulse can be shaped in order to isentropically compress the DT ice layer. By doing so, we keep the fuel at low temperature. This maximises the compression of the DT ice layer, and increases rho-r at stagnation. Burn wave propagation in the isentropically compressed fuel is compared to propagation in fuel compressed by a standard current pulse. [4pt] [1] S.A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)

  10. Interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium: radiation enhanced oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langley, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of implanted deuterium and helium with beryllium is of significant interest in the application of first wall coatings and other components of fusion reactors. Electropolished polycrystalline beryllium was first implanted with an Xe backscatter marker at 1.98 MeV followed by either implantation with 5 keV diatomic deuterium or helium. A 2.0 MeV He beam was used to analyze for impurity buildup; namely oxygen. The oxide layer thickness was found to increase linearly with increasing implant fluence. A 2.5 MeV H/sup +/ beam was used to depth profile the D and He by ion backscattering. In addition the retention of the implant was measured as a function of the implant fluence. The mean depth of the implant was found to agree with theoretical range calculations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe blister formation. No blisters were observed for implanted D but for implanted He blisters occurred at approx. 1.75 x 10/sup 17/ He cm/sup -2/. The blister diameter increased with increasing implant fluence from about 0.8 ..mu..m at 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/ to 5.5 ..mu..m at 3 x 10/sup 18/ He cm/sup -2/.

  11. Thermal and log-normal distributions of plasma in laser driven Coulomb explosions of deuterium clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarino, M.; Warrens, M.; Bonasera, A.; Lattuada, D.; Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Consoli, F.; de Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Kimura, S.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Schmidt, K.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Natowitz, J. B.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we explore the possibility that the motion of the deuterium ions emitted from Coulomb cluster explosions is highly disordered enough to resemble thermalization. We analyze the process of nuclear fusion reactions driven by laser-cluster interactions in experiments conducted at the Texas Petawatt laser facility using a mixture of D2+3He and CD4+3He cluster targets. When clusters explode by Coulomb repulsion, the emission of the energetic ions is “nearly” isotropic. In the framework of cluster Coulomb explosions, we analyze the energy distributions of the ions using a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution, a shifted MB distribution (sMB), and the energy distribution derived from a log-normal (LN) size distribution of clusters. We show that the first two distributions reproduce well the experimentally measured ion energy distributions and the number of fusions from d-d and d-3He reactions. The LN distribution is a good representation of the ion kinetic energy distribution well up to high momenta where the noise becomes dominant, but overestimates both the neutron and the proton yields. If the parameters of the LN distributions are chosen to reproduce the fusion yields correctly, the experimentally measured high energy ion spectrum is not well represented. We conclude that the ion kinetic energy distribution is highly disordered and practically not distinguishable from a thermalized one.

  12. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  13. Pion Induced Pion Production on Deuterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossi, Vesna

    This thesis describes measurements of the pion induced pion production reaction pi^+ d to pi^{+} pi^{-}p p performed with a 280 MeV incident pi^{+} beam at TRIUMF. The data are compared with an improved version of the Oset and Vicente-Vacas theoretical model (12). The goal of the experiment and of the analysis was to provide a larger body of data for the free reaction and to test the validity of theoretical models. In the process, the ability to determine the values of the coupling constants C, f_Delta, g _{N*Delta_tau} within such a model framework would be explored. The knowledge of the precise value of these coupling constants would constrain N^* decay branching ratios and other pion induced reaction mechanisms like Double Charge Exchange. A previous experiment (23) had indicated that the pion induced pion production on deuterium is essentially a quasifree process with the reaction occurring on the neutron leaving the proton merely a spectator. The main difference with respect to the free reaction is the effect of Fermi motion of the neutron. Although we were interested in studying the free reaction (pi^ {-}p to pi^ {+}pi^{-}n), we chose a deuterium target so that the experiment could be run with a pi^+beam, since the pi^- beam flux is about 6 times lower than the flux of the positive pion beam at 280 MeV, the energy at which our experiment was performed. Such a flux would have required a much longer running time for the experiment in order to achieve the same statistical accuracy. The quasifree nature of the process was also confirmed in our experiment. This experiment involved a coincidence measurement of the quasifree process and as such provided four-fold differential cross section spectra of the reaction thus allowing for a microscopic comparison between data and theoretical models. In the theoretical description we incorporated additional amplitudes for the N^* to N(pipi)_{p-wave} diagrams required to describe the reaction cross section at T_pi = 280 Me

  14. Selective Deuterium Ion Acceleration Using the Vulcan PW Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Krygier, AG; Kar, S; Ahmed, H; Alejo, A; Clarke, R; Fuchs, J; Green, A; Jung, D; Kleinschmidt, A; Najmudin, Z; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P; Notley, M; Oliver, M; Roth, M; Vassura, L; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M; Freeman, RR

    2015-01-01

    We report on the successful demonstration of selective acceleration of deuterium ions by target-normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) with a high-energy petawatt laser. TNSA typically produces a multi-species ion beam that originates from the intrinsic hydrocarbon and water vapor contaminants on the target surface. Using the method first developed by Morrison, et al., \\cite{Morrison:POP2012} an ion beam with $>$99$\\%$ deuterium ions and peak energy 28 MeV is produced with a 200 J, 700fs, $>10^{20} W/cm^{2}$ laser pulse by cryogenically freezing heavy water (D$_{2}$O) vapor onto the rear surface of the target prior to the shot. The estimated total yield of deuterium ions in an assumed 10$^{\\circ}$ half-angle cone was 3.0 $\\mu$C (1.9 $\\times 10^{13}$ ions) with 6.6$\\%$ laser-to-deuterium ion energy conversion efficiency.

  15. Influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium plasma containing inactive impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Sherman, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The degree of influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma has been theoretically studied as dependent on the content of inactive impurities in plasma. The analytic criterion of plasma ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is modified taking into account the absorption of intrinsic radiation from plasma in the ignition region. The influence of radiative processes on the DT plasma ignition has been analytically and numerically studied for plasma that contains a significant fraction of inactive impurities either as a result of DT fuel mixing with ICF target ablator material or as a result of using light metal DT-hydrides as solid noncryogenic fuel. It has been shown that the effect of the absorption of intrinsic radiation leads to lower impurity-induced increase in the ignition energy as compared to that calculated in the approximation of optically transparent ignition region.

  16. GAMMA-RAY DIAGNOSTICS OF ALPHA-SLOWING IN INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION-TARGETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENDOOVEN, PG; DRAKE, RP; CABLE, MD; Dendooven, Peter

    1993-01-01

    For large inertial confinement fusion deuterium-tritium targets, a way to diagnose alpha slowing might be via capture reaction gamma rays. Calculations are presented for two such methods: one uses the alpha+T direct capture gamma rays, the other is based on a series of resonant alpha-capture reactio

  17. Trophoblast fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The villous trophoblast of the human placenta is the epithelial cover of the fetal chorionic villi floating in maternal blood. This epithelial cover is organized in two distinct layers, the multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast directly facing maternal blood and a second layer of mononucleated cytotrophoblasts. During pregnancy single cytotrophoblasts continuously fuse with the overlying syncytiotrophoblast to preserve this end-differentiated layer until delivery. Syncytial fusion continuously supplies the syncytiotrophoblast with compounds of fusing cytotrophoblasts such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids as well as organelles. At the same time the input of cytotrophoblastic components is counterbalanced by a continuous release of apoptotic material from the syncytiotrophoblast into maternal blood. Fusion is an essential step in maintaining the syncytiotrophoblast. Trophoblast fusion was shown to be dependant on and regulated by multiple factors such as fusion proteins, proteases and cytoskeletal proteins as well as cytokines, hormones and transcription factors. In this chapter we focus on factors that may be involved in the fusion process of trophoblast directly or that may prepare the cytotrophoblast to fuse.

  18. Deuterium enrichment of the interstellar grain mantle

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K

    2015-01-01

    We carry out Monte-Carlo simulation to study deuterium enrichment of interstellar grain mantles under various physical conditions. Based on the physical properties, various types of clouds are considered. We find that in diffuse cloud regions, very strong radiation fields persists and hardly a few layers of surface species are formed. In translucent cloud regions with a moderate radiation field, significant number of layers would be produced and surface coverage is mainly dominated by photo-dissociation products such as, C,CH_3,CH_2D,OH and OD. In the intermediate dense cloud regions (having number density of total hydrogen nuclei in all forms ~ 2 x 10^4 cm^-3), water and methanol along with their deuterated derivatives are efficiently formed. For much higher density regions (~ 10^6 cm^-3), water and methanol productions are suppressed but surface coverage of CO,CO_2,O_2,O_3 are dramatically increased. We find a very high degree of fractionation of water and methanol. Observational results support a high frac...

  19. What controls deuterium excess in global precipitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pfahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The deuterium excess (d of precipitation is widely used in the reconstruction of past climatic changes from ice cores. However, its most common interpretation as moisture source temperature cannot directly be inferred from present-day water isotope observations. Here, we use a new empirical relation between d and near-surface relative humidity (RH together with reanalysis data to globally predict d of surface evaporation from the ocean. The very good quantitative agreement of the predicted hemispherically averaged seasonal cycle with observed d in precipitation indicates that moisture source relative humidity, and not sea surface temperature, is the main driver of d variability on seasonal timescales. Furthermore, we review arguments for an interpretation of long-term palaeoclimatic d changes in terms of moisture source temperature, and we conclude that there remains no sufficient evidence that would justify to neglect the influence of RH on such palaeoclimatic d variations. Hence, we suggest that either the interpretation of d variations in palaeorecords should be adapted to reflect climatic influences on RH during evaporation, in particular atmospheric circulation changes, or new arguments for an interpretation in terms of moisture source temperature will have to be provided based on future research.

  20. Fusion Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    the vesicular SNARE VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2 and the target (plasma membrane) SNAREs SNAP25 and syntaxin-1 results in fusion and release of neurotransmitter, synchronized to the electrical activity of the cell by calcium influx and binding to synaptotagmin. Formation of the SNARE complex is tightly regulated...... and appears to start with syntaxin-1 bound to an SM (Sec1/Munc18-like) protein. Proteins of the Munc13-family are responsible for opening up syntaxin and allowing sequential binding of SNAP-25 and VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2. N- to C-terminal “zippering” of the SNARE domains leads to membrane fusion...

  1. A direct fusion drive for rocket propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razin, Yosef S.; Pajer, Gary; Breton, Mary; Ham, Eric; Mueller, Joseph; Paluszek, Michael; Glasser, Alan H.; Cohen, Samuel A.

    2014-12-01

    The Direct Fusion Drive (DFD), a compact, anuetronic fusion engine, will enable more challenging exploration missions in the solar system. The engine proposed here uses a deuterium-helium-3 reaction to produce fusion energy by employing a novel field-reversed configuration (FRC) for magnetic confinement. The FRC has a simple linear solenoid coil geometry yet generates higher plasma pressure, hence higher fusion power density, for a given magnetic field strength than other magnetic-confinement plasma devices. Waste heat generated from the plasma's Bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation is recycled to maintain the fusion temperature. The charged reaction products, augmented by additional propellant, are exhausted through a magnetic nozzle. A 1 MW DFD is presented in the context of a mission to deploy the James Webb Space Telescope (6200 kg) from GPS orbit to a Sun-Earth L2 halo orbit in 37 days using just 353 kg of propellant and about half a kilogram of 3He. The engine is designed to produce 40 N of thrust with an exhaust velocity of 56.5 km/s and has a specific power of 0.18 kW/kg.

  2. Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion gamma ray physics (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N.; Wilson, D. C.; Stoeffl, W.; Dauffy, L.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Miller, E. K.; Ali, Z. A.

    2010-10-01

    The gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic is a multichannel, time-resolved, energy-thresholded γ-ray spectrometer that provides a high-bandwidth, direct-measurement of fusion reaction history in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments. 16.75 MeV deuterium+tritium (DT) fusion γ-rays, with a branching ratio of the order of 10-5γ/(14 MeV n), are detected to determine fundamental burn parameters, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, critical to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. During the tritium/hydrogen/deuterium ignition tuning campaign, an additional γ-ray line at 19.8 MeV, produced by hydrogen+tritium fusion with a branching ratio of unity, will increase the available γ-ray signal and may allow measurement of reacting fuel composition or ion temperature. Ablator areal density measurements with the GRH are also made possible by detection of 4.43 MeV γ-rays produced by inelastic scatter of DT fusion neutrons on C12 nuclei in the ablating plastic capsule material.

  3. Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion gamma ray physics (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N.; Wilson, D. C.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, M/S E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stoeffl, W.; Dauffy, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Miller, E. K. [Special Technologies Laboratory, NSTec, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Ali, Z. A. [Livermore Operations, NSTec, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic is a multichannel, time-resolved, energy-thresholded {gamma}-ray spectrometer that provides a high-bandwidth, direct-measurement of fusion reaction history in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments. 16.75 MeV deuterium+tritium (DT) fusion {gamma}-rays, with a branching ratio of the order of 10{sup -5}{gamma}/(14 MeV n), are detected to determine fundamental burn parameters, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, critical to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. During the tritium/hydrogen/deuterium ignition tuning campaign, an additional {gamma}-ray line at 19.8 MeV, produced by hydrogen+tritium fusion with a branching ratio of unity, will increase the available {gamma}-ray signal and may allow measurement of reacting fuel composition or ion temperature. Ablator areal density measurements with the GRH are also made possible by detection of 4.43 MeV {gamma}-rays produced by inelastic scatter of DT fusion neutrons on {sup 12}C nuclei in the ablating plastic capsule material.

  4. Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion gamma ray physics (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H W; Hoffman, N; Wilson, D C; Stoeffl, W; Dauffy, L; Kim, Y H; McEvoy, A; Young, C S; Mack, J M; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M; Miller, E K; Ali, Z A

    2010-10-01

    The gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic is a multichannel, time-resolved, energy-thresholded γ-ray spectrometer that provides a high-bandwidth, direct-measurement of fusion reaction history in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments. 16.75 MeV deuterium+tritium (DT) fusion γ-rays, with a branching ratio of the order of 10(-5)γ/(14 MeV n), are detected to determine fundamental burn parameters, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, critical to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. During the tritium/hydrogen/deuterium ignition tuning campaign, an additional γ-ray line at 19.8 MeV, produced by hydrogen+tritium fusion with a branching ratio of unity, will increase the available γ-ray signal and may allow measurement of reacting fuel composition or ion temperature. Ablator areal density measurements with the GRH are also made possible by detection of 4.43 MeV γ-rays produced by inelastic scatter of DT fusion neutrons on (12)C nuclei in the ablating plastic capsule material.

  5. The development of advanced robotics for the nuclear industry - The development of remote sensing robot vision system based on multi sensor fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Sung Il; Ryu, Kang Su; Choi, Il; Baek, Yung Mok; Koo, Bon Ki; Han, Yang Hwan; Kim, Byung Sun [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    The stereo vision algorithm based on newly developed fusion technique incorporating region information feature map to the traditional matching method has been developed here to provide more reliable depth information for= the acquired stereo image. Reliable segmentation results obtained from 3-D depth information were also presented here. The novel technique to generate automatic initial windows for image tracker from stereo images could be demonstrated quite successfully. 22 refs., 2 tabs., 43 figs. (author)

  6. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyev, S. S.; Spitsyn, A. V.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion-fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium-tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m3Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium-tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  7. New trends in fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The efforts of the international fusion community aim at demonstrating the scientific feasibility of thermonuclear fusion energy power plants. Understanding the behavior of burning plasmas, i.e. plasmas with strong self-heating, represents a primary scientific challenge for fusion research and a new science frontier. Although integrated studies will only be possible, in new, dedicated experimental facilities, such as the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER), present devices can address specific issues in regimes relevant to burning plasmas. Among these are an improvement of plasma performance via a reduction of the energy and particle transport, an optimization of the path to ignition or to sustained burn using additional heating and a control of plasma-wall interaction and energy and particle exhaust. These lectures address recent advances in plasma science and technology that are relevant to the development of fusion energy. Mention will be made of the inertial confinement line of research, but...

  8. Desensitized Optimal Filtering and Sensor Fusion Tool Kit Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Research on desensitized optimal filtering techniques and a navigation and sensor fusion tool kit using advanced filtering techniques is proposed. Research focuses...

  9. Influence of the Al wire placed in the anode axis on the transformation of the deuterium plasma column in the plasma focus discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubes, P.; Paduch, M.; Cikhardtova, B.; Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Rezac, K.; Zielinska, E.; Zaloga, D.; Sadowski, M. J.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the influence of an Al wire of 270 μm in diameter placed along the anode axis on the transformation of the deuterium pinch column in a megaampere (MA) plasma focus device. The evolution of the pinched column and of the wire corona was investigated by means of the multiframe interferometry, neutron and X-ray diagnostics. The wire corona did not influence considerably on the evolution of dense plasma structures and neutron production, but it increased the plasma density and consequently, the currents around its surface. The distribution of the closed internal currents (ranging hundreds of kA) and associated magnetic fields amounting to 5 T were also estimated in the dense plasma column and in plasmoidal structures at the near-equilibrium state. The description is based on the balance of the plasma pressure and the pressure of the internal poloidal and toroidal current components compressed by the external pinched column. The dominant number of fusion deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutrons is produced during the evolution of instabilities, when the uninterrupted wire corona (containing deuterium) connects the dense structures of the pinch, and it did not allow the formation of a constriction of the sub-millimeter diameter.

  10. High efficient ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks by PW-ps laser pulses for producing fusion flames in DT and HB11 of solid state density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustaizis, S.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks in the range of 1020 cm/s2 has been confirmed experimentally after this was long predicted as a non-thermal direct conversion of optical energy into plasma motion due to dominating nonlinear (ponderomotive) forces [1]. The use of laser pulses of more than PW power and ps or shorter duration can ignite a nuclear fusion flame in solid density deuterium tritium because the necessary energy flux of >108J/cm2 according to the theory of Chu [2] is available [3]. For the studies of the necessary velocities of the generated fusion flames above 1000 km/s the detailed processes can be analyzed by using the advanced genuine two-fluid hydrodynamic model [4] where it was surprising that the ignition of the fusion flame by the picosecond interaction needs a comparably long development in the nanosecond range before the thermal processes result in shock fronts similar to the Rakine-Hugoniot theory. For the evaluation of power generation the problem of lateral energy losses was studied by using very high pulsed magnetic fields. The recently produced 10 Kilotesla magnetic fields [5] are very promising for solutions.

  11. Ion cyclotron emission from fusion-born ions in large tokamak plasmas: a brief review from JET and TFTR to ITER

    CERN Document Server

    Dendy, R O

    2014-01-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) was the first collective radiative instability, driven by confined fusion-born ions, observed from deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET and TFTR. ICE comprises strongly suprathermal emission, which has spectral peaks at multiple ion cyclotron harmonic frequencies as evaluated at the outer mid-plane edge of tokamak plasmas. The measured intensity of ICE spectral peaks scaled linearly with measured fusion reactivity in JET. In other large tokamak plasmas, ICE is currently used as an indicator of fast ions physics. The excitation mechanism for ICE is the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI); in the case of JET and TFTR, the MCI is driven by a set of centrally born fusion products, lying just inside the trapped-passing boundary in velocity space, whose drift orbits make large radial excursions to the outer mid-plane edge. Diagnostic exploitation of ICE in future experiments therefore rests in part on deep understanding of the MCI, and recent advances in computational plasma physics...

  12. Magnetic fusion; La fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project.

  13. Study of deuterium retention on lithiated tungsten exposed to high-flux deuterium plasma using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cong; Wu, Xingwei; Zhang, Chenfei [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Ding, Hongbin, E-mail: hding@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); De Temmerman, G., E-mail: G.C.DeTemmerman@differ.nl [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Meiden, H.J. van der [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Deuterium retention effects on both pure tungsten and lithiated tungsten have been investigated in the linear plasma simulator Magnum-PSI by an in-situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. • The lithiation can inhibit the blistering on tungsten surface. • The re-deposition of lithium results in the formation of chemical state of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and tungsten oxides on a fresh surface of tungsten. - Abstract: Tungsten is under consideration for use as a plasma-facing material in the divertor region of ITER. Lithiation can significantly improve plasma performance in long-pulse tokamaks like EAST. The investigation of lithiated tungsten is important for understanding the lithium conditioning effects for EAST, where tungsten will be used as a plasma-facing material. In this paper, a few important issues of lithiated tungsten interacting with high-flux deuterium plasma have been studied, such as the effect of lithiation on deuterium retention, the profile of elemental distribution, and the chemical state of lithiated tungsten. Deuterium retention inside both pure and lithiated tungsten has been investigated for the first time in the linear plasma simulator Magnum-PSI by in-situ laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The results indicate that, after deuterium plasma exposure, deuterium retention could be saturated in the lithiation layer, and the lithium in the lithiated layer is chemically bound with deuterium. Moreover, the lithiation can inhibit the blistering on the tungsten surface. These results can be valuable for the application of LIBS as a diagnostic technique for plasma-facing components of tokamaks.

  14. Using secondary nuclear products for inferring the fuel areal density, convergence, and electron temperatures of deuterium filled implosions on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmann, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Kabadi, N. V.; Sutcliffe, G.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hartouni, E. P.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sayre, D. B.; Yeamans, C. B.; Khan, S. F.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lepape, S.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Meezan, N.; Bionta, R.; Ma, T.

    2016-10-01

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, 0.82 MeV 3He and 1.01 MeV T born from the primary DD reaction branches can undergo fusion reactions with the thermal deuterium plasma to create secondary D3He protons and DT neutrons respectively. In regimes of moderate fuel areal density (ρR 5 - 100 mg/cm2) the ratio of both of these secondary yields to the primary yield can be used to infer the fuel ρR, convergence, and an electron temperature (Te) simultaneously. This technique has been used on a myriad of deuterium filled implosion experiments on the NIF using the nuclear time of flight (NTOF) diagnostics to measure the secondary DT neutrons and CR-39 based wedge range filters (WRFs) to measure the secondary D3He protons. Additionally, a comparative study is conducted between the nuclear inferred convergence and x-ray inferred convergence obtained on these experiments. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  15. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations.

  16. 76 FR 49757 - Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Fusion... that the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee will be renewed for a two-year period beginning on...-range plans, priorities, and strategies for advancing plasma science, fusion science, and...

  17. Tame Fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.D. Scott

    2003-01-01

    The first section of this paper covers preliminaries. Essentially, the next four cover units. It is shown that a compatible nearring with DCCR is Nnilpotent if and only if every maximal right N-subgroup is a right ideal. The last five sections relate to fusion (I.e., N-groups minimal for being generated by Nsubgroups, where each is N-isomorphic to a given N-group). Right N-subgroups of a tame nearring N with DCCR, minimal for not annihilating a minimal ideal from the left, are self monogenic and N-isomorphic. That this holds for any collection of minimal ideals is significant. Here, the right N-subgroup involved is a 'fusion product' of the 'components'.

  18. Carpal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Carpal fusion may be seen in hereditary and nonhereditary conditions such as acrocallosal syndrome,acromegaly, Apert syndrome, arthrogryposis, Carpenter syndrome, chromosomal abnormalities, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC) syndrome, the F form of acropectorovertebral dysgenesis or the F syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Leopard syndrome, multiple synostosis syndrome, oligosyndactyly syndrome, Pfeiffer-like syndrome, scleroderma, split hand and foot malformatio...

  19. Fusion rules of equivariantizations of fusion categories

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We determine the fusion rules of the equivariantization of a fusion category $\\mathcal{C}$ under the action of a finite group $G$ in terms of the fusion rules of $\\mathcal{C}$ and group-theoretical data associated to the group action. As an application we obtain a formula for the fusion rules in an equivariantization of a pointed fusion category in terms of group-theoretical data. This entails a description of the fusion rules in any braided group-theoretical fusion category.

  20. Z-Pinch Magneto-Inertial Fusion Propulsion Engine Design Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miernik, Janie H.; Statham, Geoffrey; Adams, Robert B.; Polsgrove, Tara; Fincher, Sharon; Fabisinski, Leo; Maples, C. Dauphne; Percy, Thomas K.; Cortez, Ross J.; Cassibry, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human spaceflight missions. Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) is an approach which has been shown to potentially lead to a low cost, small fusion reactor/engine assembly (1). The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is an MIF concept in which a column of gas is compressed to thermonuclear conditions by an estimated axial current of approximately 100 MA. Recent advancements in experiments and the theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield as I(sup 4) (2). The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this is repeated over short timescales (10(exp -6) sec). This plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects (NWE) testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. There is a wealth of literature characterizing Z-Pinch physics and existing models (3-5). In order to be useful in engineering analysis, a simplified Z-Pinch fusion thermodynamic model was developed to determine the quantity of plasma, plasma temperature, rate of expansion, energy production, etc. to calculate the parameters that characterize a propulsion system. The amount of nuclear fuel per pulse, mixture ratio of the D-T and nozzle liner propellant, and assumptions about the efficiency of the engine, enabled the sizing of the propulsion system and resulted in an estimate of the thrust and Isp of a Z-Pinch fusion propulsion system for the concept vehicle. MIF requires a magnetic nozzle to contain and direct the nuclear pulses, as well as a robust structure and radiation shielding. The structure

  1. Subsurface deuterium bubble formation in W due to low-energy high flux deuterium plasma exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Qu, S. L.; Shi, L. Q.; Morgan, T. W.

    2017-03-01

    The deuterium (D) bubbles formed in W exposed to high flux D plasma were researched by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. After D plasma exposure at 500 K and 1000 K, a layer of nano-sized bubbles were homogenously distributed in W subsurface region. The D bubbles were homogenously nucleated due to the high D concentration, and the nucleation process is not related to the vacancy defects. At low temperature (500 K), D bubbles can grow by surface blistering, which caused different nano scale morphologies on different surfaces. At high temperature (1000 K), D bubbles mainly grow by vacancy clustering, which caused pinholes on the surface.

  2. Thermal and chaotic distributions of plasma in laser driven Coulomb explosions of deuterium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barbarino, M; Bonasera, A; Lattuada, D; Bang, W; Quevedo, H J; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Andreoli, P; Kimura, S; Dyer, G; Bernstein, A C; Hagel, K; Barbui, M; Schmidt, K; Gaul, E; Donovan, M E; Natowitz, J B; Ditmire, T

    2015-01-01

    In this work we explore the possibility that the motion of the deuterium ions emitted from Coulomb cluster explosions is chaotic enough to resemble thermalization. We analyze the process of nuclear fusion reactions driven by laser-cluster interactions in experiments conducted at the Texas Petawatt laser facility using a mixture of D2+3He and CD4+3He cluster targets. When clusters explode by Coulomb repulsion, the emission of the energetic ions is nearly isotropic. In the framework of cluster Coulomb explosions, we analyze the energy distributions of the ions using a Maxwell- Boltzmann (MB) distribution, a shifted MB distribution (sMB) and the energy distribution derived from a log-normal (LN) size distribution of clusters. We show that the first two distributions reproduce well the experimentally measured ion energy distributions and the number of fusions from d-d and d-3He reactions. The LN distribution is a good representation of the ion kinetic energy distribution well up to high momenta where the noise be...

  3. Gas swelling and deuterium distribution in beryllium implanted with deuterium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernikov, V.N.; Alimov, V.Kh.; Zakharov, A.P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    An extensive TEM study of the microstructure of Be TIP-30 irradiated with 3 and 10 keV D ions up to fluences, {Phi}, in the range from 3 x 10{sup 20} to 8 x 10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} at temperatures T{sub irr} = 300 K, 500 K and 700 K has been carried out. Depth distributions of deuterium in the form of separate D atoms and D{sub 2} molecules have been investigated by means of SIMS and RGA methods, correspondingly. D ion irradiation is accompanied by blistering and gives rise to different kind of destructions depending mainly on the irradiation temperature. Irradiation with D ions at 300 K leads to the formation of tiny highly pressurized D{sub 2} bubbles reminiscent of He bubbles in Be. Under 3 keV D ion irradiation D{sub 2} bubbles ({bar r}{sub b} {approx} 0.7 nm) appear at a fluence as low as 3x10{sup 20} D/m{sup 2}. Irradiation at 500 K results in the development, along with relatively small facetted bubbles, of larger oblate gas-filled cavities accumulating most of injected D atoms and providing for much higher gas swelling values as compared to irradiation at 300 K. The increase of D and/or T{sub irr}, to 700 K causes the further coarsening of large cavities which are transformed into sub-surface labyrinth structures. D and He ion implantation leads to the enhanced growth of porous microcrystalline layers of c.p.h.-BeO oxide with a microstructure which differs considerably from that of oxide layers on electropolished surfaces of Be. Based on the analysis of experimental data questions of deuterium reemission, thermal desorption and trapping in Be have been discussed in detail.

  4. DEPTH PROFILING OF DEUTERIUM IN Al2O3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈效华; 赵国庆; 等

    1995-01-01

    D2+ ions of 70 and 90keV were separately implanted into two thick samples of sintered alumina ceramic and the distribution of deuterium has been measured for three runs at an interval of 5 months using high energy proton backscattering and elastic recoil detection (ERD).The measured data show that there is little diffusion of dueterium in Al2O3 and the diffusion coefficient is deduced to be 1.1×10-17 cm2/s.The measured total concentration of implanted deuterium is 4.5×1018at.cm2.The profile of hydrogen adsorbed on the surface of Al2O3 samples was also observed by ERD and 1H(19E,αγ)16O analysis.The distribution range of 1H in Al2O3 after deuterium implantation is much larger than that before one.

  5. Hyperfine structure of P-states in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Faustov, R N; Martynenko, G A; Sorokin, V V

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of quasipotential approach to the bound state problem in quantum electrodynamics we calculate hyperfine structure intervals Delta E^{hfs}(2P_{1/2}) and Delta E^{hfs}(2P_{3/2}) for P-states in muonic deuterium. The tensor method of projection operators for the calculation of the hyperfine structure of P-states with definite quantum numbers of total atomic momentum F and total muon momentum j in muonic deuterium is formulated. We take into account vacuum polarization, relativistic, quadruple and structure corrections of orders alpha^4, alpha^5 and alpha^6. The obtained numerical values of hyperfine splittings are useful for the analysis of new experimental data of the CREMA collaboration regarding to muonic deuterium.

  6. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H]3- and [M - 5H]5- insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å2 and 808 ± 2 Å2. [M - 4H]4- ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å2) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å2) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H]4- and [M - 5H]5- ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  7. Nuclear Fusion Effects Induced in Intense Laser-Generated Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deutered polyethylene (CD2n thin and thick targets were irradiated in high vacuum by infrared laser pulses at 1015W/cm2 intensity. The high laser energy transferred to the polymer generates plasma, expanding in vacuum at supersonic velocity, accelerating hydrogen and carbon ions. Deuterium ions at kinetic energies above 4 MeV have been measured by using ion collectors and SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. At these energies the deuterium–deuterium collisions may induce over threshold fusion effects, in agreement with the high D-D cross-section valuesaround 3 MeV energy. At the first instants of the plasma generation, during which high temperature, density and ionacceleration occur, the D-D fusions occur as confirmed by the detection of mono-energetic protonsand neutrons with a kinetic energy of 3.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV, respectively, produced by the nuclear reaction. The number of fusion events depends strongly on the experimental set-up, i.e. on the laser parameters (intensity, wavelength, focal spot dimension, target conditions (thickness, chemical composition, absorption coefficient, presence of secondary targets and used geometry (incidence angle, laser spot, secondary target positions.A number of D-D fusion events of the order of 106÷7 per laser shot has been measured.

  8. An effective electrostatic-confinement based fusion approach

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, R K

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports a new electrostatic-confinement based fusion approach, where, a new non-equilibrium distribution function for an ion-beam, compressed by an external electric force, has been derived. This distribution function allows the system to possess appreciably low and insignificant thermal energy irrespective of the energy per particle. The spread in the energy among the particles is attributed to the collisions in presence of the external force, whereas; for equilibrium, the spreading in energy is due to the absence of the force. The reactivity for a deuterium-deuterium fusion, using the proposed distribution function, has been computed. It is shown that the fusion time is comparable to the energy confinement time, collision time and transit time of the ion for beam energy greater than 160 keV. The estimated energy gain Q (ratio of fusion power to the power consumed by the system) is around 10 for beam energy 160 keV and ion density 1018 cm-3. The energy loss due to particle scattering is estimated a...

  9. On the observation of charged particles in cold fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Bo U. R.; Håkansson, Per; Hedin, Allan; Bucur, Romulus V.; Johansson, Börje; Wäppling, Roger

    1989-09-01

    With the aim to confirm or reject the recent claim of observation of cold d-d fusion, an experimental effort has been made to try to observe MeV protons which should be emitted as a result of d-d fusion. Pd foils, thin enough to allow all protons produced to escape the foil, were electrolytically charged with deuterium. A Si(SB) detector was placed close to the Pd foil during charging in order to detect any protons emitted. The deuterium content was measured to be the expected 0.7 D per Pd. Monte Carlo simulations were made to estimate the detection efficiency of 3.02 MeV protons produced in the Pd foil. The background in the experiment was so low that fusion rates considerably lower than those reported on by Jones et al. could be detected. A number of experiments have been performed where the charging conditions were varied. In spite of that and the good sensitivity of the experiment no evidence for cold fusion has been found.

  10. On the observation of charged particles in cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundqvist, B.U.R.; Haakansson, P.; Hedin, A. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Ion Physics); Bucur, R.V. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry); Johansson, B.; Waeppling, R. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-09-01

    With the aim to confirm or reject the recent claim of observation of cold d-d fusion, an experimental effort has been made to try to observe MeV protons which should be emitted as a result of d-d fusion. Pd foils, thin enough to allow all protons produced to escape the foil, were electrolytically charged with deuterium. A Si(SB) detector was placed close to the Pd foil during charging in order to detect any protons emitted. The deuterium content was measured to be the expected 0.7 D per Pd. Monte Carlo simulations were made to estimate the detection efficiency of 3.02 MeV protons produced in the Pd foil. The background in the experiment was so low that fusion rates considerably lower than those reported on by Jones et al. could be detected. A number of experiments have been performed where the charging conditions were varied. In spite of that and the good sensitivity of the experiment no evidence for cold fusion has been found. (orig.).

  11. Simulation on advanced operation mode for the compact fusion-fission hybrid reactor%紧凑型聚变裂变混合堆先进运行模式的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈美霞; 刘成岳; 吴斌

    2012-01-01

    Reversed shear (RS) operation mode is simulated with Jsolver and TSC codes on some important issues, such as RS Plasma configuration, bootstrap current fraction and RS operation mode discharge simulation etc.. To some degree, the modeling results show that the RS operation mode is advanced and feasible for the compact Fusion-fission hybrid reactor.%使用Jsolver程序及托卡马克模拟程序TSC对紧凑型聚变裂变混合堆系统的反剪切平衡位形、自举电流份额及放电模拟进行数值模拟研究,以此探讨该混合堆的可行性和先进性.

  12. Advances in the development of interaction between the codes MCNPX and ANSYS Fluent and their fusion applications; Avances en el desarrollo de la interaccion entre los codigos MCNPX y ANSYS Fluente y sus aplicaciones para fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colomer, C.; Salellas, J.; Ahmed, R.; Fabbrio, M.; Aleman, A.

    2012-07-01

    The advances are presented in the project for the development of a code of interaction between MCNPX y el ANSYS Fluent. Following the flow of the work carried out during the development of the project will study of the most appropriate remeshing algorithms between both codes. In addition explain the selection and implementation of methods to verify internally the correct transmission of the variables involved between both nets. Finally the selection of cases for verification and validation of the interaction between both codes in each of the possible fields of application will be exposed.

  13. Production of secondary Deuterium in the atmosphere at various latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papini, P. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements)

    1995-09-01

    Secondary deuterium in the atmosphere are produced in interactions by primary cosmic rays. The shape of their energy spectrum depends on the primary cosmic ray spectrum incident at the top of the atmosphere. At high energies, the spectral shape depends on the primary spectrum of helium and heavy nuclei. However, at very low energies, specially below the geomagnetic cut-off, the spectral shape depends on the evaporation and recoil processes and hence almost independent of the spectral shape of the primary radiation. It is undertaken a calculation of the secondary deuterium spectrum at small atmospheric depths at various latitudes and the results will be presented.

  14. Experimental progress toward magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinars, Daniel; Herrmann, Mark; Cuneo, Michael; Lamppa, Derek; Lopez, Andrew; McBride, Ryan; Rovang, Dean; Hanson, David; Harding, Eric; Nakhleh, Charles; Slutz, Stephen; Vesey, Roger; Sefkow, Adam; Peterson, Kyle

    2011-10-01

    Yields exceeding 100 kJ may be possible on the 25 MA Z facility at Sandia using the implosion of cylindrical metal liners onto magnetized (>10 T) and preheated (100-500 eV) deuterium-tritium fuel [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The fusion fuel in such targets absorbs about 100 kJ, so a 100 kJ yield would be `scientific breakeven.' Suitable liner targets (Al and Be) have been fabricated and used in experiments on the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Magnetic field coil prototypes for >10 T axial fields are being tested. Preheat experiments using the multi-kJ Z-Beamlet laser are planned. Cryogenic deuterium fuel systems have been developed. Integrated magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) tests using deuterium fuel are expected in 2013. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Fusion Power Program biannual progress report, April-September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    This biannual report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed for the Office of Fusion Energy during the April-September 1979 quarter in the following research and development areas: materials; energy storage and transfer; tritium containment, recovery and control; advanced reactor design; atomic data; reactor safety; fusion-fission hybrid systems; alternate applications of fusion energy; and other work related to fusion power. Separate abstracts were prepared for three sections. (MOW)

  16. Fusion Based Safety Application for Pedestrian Detection with Danger Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    García, Fernando; Escalera, Arturo de la; Armingol, José M.; García, Jesús; Llinas, James

    2011-01-01

    Proceedings of: 14th International Conference on Information Fusion (FUSION 2011). Chicago, Illinois, USA 5-8 July 2011. Road safety applications require the most reliable data. In recent years data fusion is becoming one of the main technologies for Advance Driver Assistant Systems (ADAS) to overcome the limitations of isolated use of the available sensors and to fulfil demanding safety requirements. In this paper a real application of data fusion for road safety for pedestrian detection ...

  17. Fusion Power Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    This quarterly report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed for the Office of Fusion Energy during the October--December 1978 quarter in the following research and development areas: materials; energy storage and transfer; tritium containment, recovery and control; advanced reactor design; atomic data; reactor safety; fusion-fission hybrid systems; alternate applications of fusion energy; and other work related to fusion power. Three separate abstracts were prepared for the included sections. (MOW)

  18. Specific features of X-ray generation by plasma focus chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulatov, A. K.; Krapiva, P. S.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Moskalenko, I. N.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The process of hard X-ray (HXR) generation in plasma focus (PF) chambers was studied experimentally. The radiation was recorded using scintillation detectors with a high time resolution and thermoluminescent detectors in combination with the method of absorbing filters. Time-resolved analysis of the processes of neutron and X-ray generation in PFs is performed. The spectra of HXR emission from PF chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings are determined. In experiments with PF chambers filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture, in addition to the HXR pulse with photon energies of up to 200-300 keV, a γ-ray pulse with photon energies of up to 2.5-3.0 MeV is recorded, and a mechanism of its generation is proposed.

  19. FUSION WORLD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caroline; 黄颖(翻译)

    2009-01-01

    Fusion World”科技展示体验中心是英国设计公司MET Studio为新加坡科技研究局(A*Star)的科学工程委员会(SERC)所设计的,位于启汇城的办公地点,用于展示该委员会的精选技术作品,以吸引潜在的客户和启汇城内的学生购买群体。

  20. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by ...

  1. Fusion Plasma Physics and ITER - An Introduction (1/4)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In November 2006, ministers representing the world’s major fusion research communities signed the agreement formally establishing the international project ITER. Sited at Cadarache in France, the project involves China, the European Union (including Switzerland), India, Japan, the Russian Federation, South Korea and the United States. ITER is a critical step in the development of fusion energy: its role is to confirm the feasibility of exploiting magnetic confinement fusion for the production of energy for peaceful purposes by providing an integrated demonstration of the physics and technology required for a fusion power plant. The ITER tokamak is designed to study the “burning plasma” regime in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas by achieving a fusion amplification factor, Q (the ratio of fusion output power to plasma heating input power), of 10 for several hundreds of seconds with a nominal fusion power output of 500MW. It is also intended to allow the study of steady-state plasma operation at Q≥5 by me...

  2. Surface morphology and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Y. Z.; De Temmerman, G.; Luo, G. N.; Xu, H.Y.; Li, C.; Fu, B. Q.; Liu, W.

    2015-01-01

    Surface modifications and deuterium retention induced in tungsten by high fluxes (1024 m−2 s−1) low energy (38 eV) deuterium ions were studied as a function of surface temperature. Blister formation was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, while deuterium ret

  3. Determination of gluconeogenesis in man by the use of deuterium-NMR-spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rosian, E

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is the quantification of the deuterium--distribution in human glucose by the use of the deuterium NMR spectroscopy of deuteriated water. The glucose production in human organism is composed of gluconeogenesis and glycolysis. The quantification of the part of gluconeogenesis on the total glucose production was determined by the use of deuterium NMR spectroscopy. (boteke)

  4. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Nigel Oswald [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of ~17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, ~200 g/cm3 and ~20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases ~350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  5. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, N.O.

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of {approximately}17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, {approximately}200 g/cm{sup 3} and {approximately}20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases {approximately}350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  6. Carpal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Jalalshokouhi*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Carpal fusion may be seen in hereditary and nonhereditary conditions such as acrocallosal syndrome,acromegaly, Apert syndrome, arthrogryposis, Carpenter syndrome, chromosomal abnormalities, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC syndrome, the F form of acropectorovertebral dysgenesis or the F syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Leopard syndrome, multiple synostosis syndrome, oligosyndactyly syndrome, Pfeiffer-like syndrome, scleroderma, split hand and foot malformation, Stickler syndrome, thalidomide embryopathy, Turner syndrome and many other conditions as mentioned in Rubinstein-Taybi's book. Sometimes there is no known causative disease.Diagnosis is usually made by plain X-ray during studying a syndrome or congenital disease or could be an incidental finding like our patients. Hand bone anomalies are more common in syndromes or other congenital or non-hereditary conditions, but polydactyly, syndactyly or oligodactyly and carpal fusions are interesting. X-ray is the modality of choice, but MRI and X-ray CT with multiplanar reconstructions may be used for diagnosis.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Ternary Alloys for Fusion Breeding Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, B. William [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chiu, Ing L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Future fusion power plants based on the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel cycle will be required to breed the T fuel via neutron reactions with lithium, which will be incorporated in a breeding blanket that surrounds the fusion source. Recent work by LLNL proposed the used of liquid Li as the breeder in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Subsequently, an LDRD was initiated to develop alternatives ternary alloy liquid metal breeders that have reduced chemical reactivity with water and air compared to pure Li. Part of the work plan was to experimentally investigate the phase diagrams of ternary alloys. Of particular interest was measurement of the melt temperature, which must be low enough to be compatible with the temperature limits of the steel used in the construction of the chamber and heat transfer system.

  8. Diagnosing magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, S. B., E-mail: sbhanse@sandia.gov; Gomez, M. R.; Sefkow, A. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Harding, E. C.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Awe, T. J.; McBride, R. D.; Jennings, C. A.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Peterson, K. J.; Rovang, D. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Hess, M. H. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments performed at Sandia's Z facility have demonstrated significant thermonuclear fusion neutron yields (∼10{sup 12} DD neutrons) from multi-keV deuterium plasmas inertially confined by slow (∼10 cm/μs), stable, cylindrical implosions. Effective magnetic confinement of charged fusion reactants and products is signaled by high secondary DT neutron yields above 10{sup 10}. Analysis of extensive power, imaging, and spectroscopic x-ray measurements provides a detailed picture of ∼3 keV temperatures, 0.3 g/cm{sup 3} densities, gradients, and mix in the fuel and liner over the 1–2 ns stagnation duration.

  9. 78 FR 79021 - Request for a License To Export; Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... End use Recipient country application no., docket No. Matheson Tri Gas, Inc., October Deuterium (Heavy 14,000.0 kgs...... Non-nuclear end- Republic of Korea, 15,2013, November 12, 2013, Hydrogen). use for Taiwan. XMAT430, 11006125. semiconductor devices. Dated this 16th day of December 2013 in...

  10. Sputtering of Thick Deuterium Films by KeV Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Schou, Jørgen;

    1994-01-01

    Sputtering of thick films of solid deuterium up to several μm by keV electrons is reported for the first time. The sputtering yield increases within a narrow range of thicknesses around 1.6 μm by about 2 orders of magnitude for 1.5 keV electrons. A similar behavior has not been observed for ion...

  11. 78 FR 79018 - Request for a License To Export Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... COMMISSION Request for a License To Export Deuterium Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public Notice of Receipt... received the following request for an export license. Copies of the request are available electronically.... The information concerning this export license application follows. ] NRC Export License...

  12. Ordered ground states of metallic hydrogen and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    The physical attributes of some of the more physically distinct ordered states of metallic hydrogen and metallic deuterium at T = 0 and nearby are discussed. The likelihood of superconductivity in both is considered with respect to the usual coupling via the density fluctuations of the ions.

  13. Deuterium Fractionation and Ion-Molecule Reactions at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar; Hugo, Edouard; Gerlich, Dieter

    2005-08-01

    Understanding deuterium fractionation is currently one of the greatest challenges in astrochemistry. In this contribution deuteration experiments of the series CH_n^+, n=2-5, in a low temperature 22-pole ion trap are used to systematically test a simple chemical rule predicting which molecular ion undergoes deuterium exchange in collisions with HD. CH_4^+ turns out to be a problem case, where prediction fails. The method of laser induced reaction (LIR) is used to determine the population ratio of the lowest ortho-to-para states of H_2D^+ relaxed in collisions with H_2. Preliminary results indicate that the ortho-to-para ratio of H_2D^+ is substantially reduced in para-H_2. This points at the important role of nuclear spin in deuterium fractionation, in particular at the destruction of ortho-H_2D^+ in collisions with ortho-H_2. More systematic LIR experiments are needed for a chemical model of deuterium fractionation including state-to-state modifications of the species involved.

  14. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  15. THE GENERAL ATOMICS FUSION THEORY PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT FOR GRANT YEAR 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PROJECT STAFF

    2004-12-01

    The dual objective of the fusion theory program at General Atomics (GA) is to significantly advance our scientific understanding of the physics of fusion plasmas and to support the DIII-D and other tokamak experiments. The program plan is aimed at contributing significantly to the Fusion Energy Science and the Tokamak Concept Improvement goals of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES).

  16. Damage and deuterium retention in LiAlO 2 single crystals irradiated with deuterium ions using ion-beam techniques and optical absorption measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsui, H.; Nagata, S.; Tsuchiya, B.; Zhao, M.; Shikama, T.

    2011-10-01

    Ion beam analysis techniques and optical absorption measurements were employed to quantitatively examine the damage and deuterium retention in LiAlO 2 single crystals irradiated with 10 keV D2+. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry revealed that the lattice atoms were disordered by the incident deuterium ions in the ratio O/Al of 2.5. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that all the incident deuterium ions were retained near the end of their trajectories with a maximum concentration of 0.7 D/Al at room temperature. The depth profiles of the disordered atoms were nearly identical to those of the retained deuterium atoms. The release of the retained deuterium atoms and the annihilation of the ion-induced color centers, which contributed to an optical absorption band at 5.25 eV, were observed in the same temperature range. A correlation was established between the oxygen vacancies and the retained deuterium atoms.

  17. Effects of deuterium oxide on cell growth and vesicle speed in RBL-2H3 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshni S. Kalkur

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For the first time we show the effects of deuterium oxide on cell growth and vesicle transport in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3 cells. RBL-2H3 cells cultured with 15 moles/L deuterium showed decreased cell growth which was attributed to cells not doubling their DNA content. Experimental observations also showed an increase in vesicle speed for cells cultured in deuterium oxide. This increase in vesicle speed was not observed in deuterium oxide cultures treated with a microtubule-destabilizing drug, suggesting that deuterium oxide affects microtubule-dependent vesicle transport.

  18. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sinars, D. B.; Harding, E. C.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hess, M. H. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 10{sup 12} have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm{sup 3}. In these experiments, up to 5 × 10{sup 10} secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm{sup 2}, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 10{sup 10}. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  19. Heat resistant reduced activation 12% Cr steel of 16Cr12W2VTaB type-advanced structural material for fusion and fast breeder power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A. G.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M. V.; Solonin, M. I.; Chernov, V. M.; Golovanov, V. N.; Shamardin, V. K.; Bulanova, T. M.; Povstyanko, A. V.; Fedoseev, A. E.

    2002-12-01

    Heat resistant 12% Cr steels of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type (12Cr-2W-V-Ta-B-0.16C) provide a reduced activation material that can be used as a structural material for fusion and fast breeder reactors. The composition under study meets scientific and engineering requirements and has an optimal base element composition to provide a δ-ferrite content of no more than 20%. It also has a minimum quantity of low melting impurity elements and non-metallic inclusions. Short-term tensile properties for the steel tested to 700 °C are provided after the standard heat treatment (normalization, temper). Rupture strength and creep properties for the steel depending on the initial heat treatment conditions are also given. The microstructural stability of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type steel at temperatures up to 650 °C is predicted to be good, and the properties of the steel after irradiation in BOR-60 are demonstrated.

  20. Heat resistant reduced activation 12% Cr steel of 16Cr12W2VTaB type-advanced structural material for fusion and fast breeder power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A.G. E-mail: iral@bochvar.ru; Leonteva-Smirnova, M.V.; Solonin, M.I.; Chernov, V.M.; Golovanov, V.N.; Shamardin, V.K.; Bulanova, T.M.; Povstyanko, A.V.; Fedoseev, A.E

    2002-12-01

    Heat resistant 12% Cr steels of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type (12Cr-2W-V-Ta-B-0.16C) provide a reduced activation material that can be used as a structural material for fusion and fast breeder reactors. The composition under study meets scientific and engineering requirements and has an optimal base element composition to provide a {delta}-ferrite content of no more than 20%. It also has a minimum quantity of low melting impurity elements and non-metallic inclusions. Short-term tensile properties for the steel tested to 700 deg. C are provided after the standard heat treatment (normalization, temper). Rupture strength and creep properties for the steel depending on the initial heat treatment conditions are also given. The microstructural stability of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type steel at temperatures up to 650 deg. C is predicted to be good, and the properties of the steel after irradiation in BOR-60 are demonstrated.

  1. Catalysed fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, Francis

    2012-01-01

    A sizzling romance and a romp with subatomic particles at CERN. Love, discovery and adventure in the city where nations meet and beams collide. Life in a large laboratory. As always, the challenges are the same. Who leads? Who follows? Who succeeds? Who gets the credit? Who gets the women or the men? Young Jeremy arrives in CERN and joins the quest for green energy. Coping with baffling jargon and manifold dangers, he is distracted by radioactive rats, lovely ladies and an unscrupulous rival. Full of doubts and hesitations, he falls for a dazzling Danish girl, who leads him astray. His brilliant idea leads to a discovery and a new route to cold fusion. But his personal life is scrambled. Does it bring fame or failure? Tragedy or triumph?

  2. Ways towards pure deuterium inertial confinement fusion through the attainment of gigavolt potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-01-01

    The attainment of ultrahigh electric potentials by suppressing the stepped leader breakdown of a highly charged conductor levitated in a spiraling Taylor flow opens up the possibility of order of magnitude larger driver energies for the ignition of thermonuclear reactions by inertial confinement. In reaching gigavolt potentials, intense 1016 Watt, GeV ion beams become possible. Together with their large self-magnetic field, these beams should be powerful enough to launch a thermonuclear micro...

  3. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  4. Gorgon simulations of Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeltgen, Jonathan; Jennings, Christopher; Sefkow, Adam; Slutz, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Substantial fusion yields are predicted with pulsed power machines driving cylindrical liner implosions with preheated and magnetized deuterium-tritium [S.A. Slutz et al Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is the most likely mechanism that could degrade the fusion yield of this concept which we call Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF). Gorgon is a 3D magnetohydrodynamics code that is well suited to simulating the effects of 3D Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. It has successfully simulated wire array z-pinches in 3D. We plan to use Gorgon to simulate the MagLIF concept in 3D, but first we are performing 1D simulations to test the essential physics necessary to simulate the MagLIF concept, for example bremsstrahlung losses from the fuel and the inhibition of transport by the magnetic field. We will present 1D Gorgon results of optimized MagLIF yields as a function of drive current.

  5. HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM NMR OF SOLIDS BY MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckman, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large spectral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. For example, the homonuclear dipolar broadening, HD, for hydrogen is usually several tens of kilohertz. For deuterium, HD is relatively small; however, the quadrupole interaction causes a broadening which can be hundreds of kilohertz in polycrystalline or amorphous solids. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, {beta}{sub m} = Arccos(3{sup -1/2}), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. Two approaches have been developed for each nucleus. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of {beta}. A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H{sub D} was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal

  6. Research on an Agricultural Knowledge Fusion Method for Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengfu Xie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The object of our research is to develop an ontology-based agricultural knowledge fusion method that can be used as a comprehensive basis on which to solve agricultural information inconsistencies, analyze data, and discover new knowledge. A recent survey has provided a detailed comparison of various fusion methods used with Deep Web data (Li, 2013. In this paper, we propose an effective agricultural ontology-based knowledge fusion method by leveraging recent advances in data fusion, such as the semantic web and big data technologies, that will enhance the identification and fusion of new and existing data sets to make big data analytics more possible. We provide a detailed fusion method that includes agricultural ontology building, fusion rule construction, an evaluation module, etc. Empirical results show that this knowledge fusion method is useful for knowledge discovery.

  7. Nuclear fusion research in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheetham, A.D. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Plasma Research Lab

    1997-12-31

    In this paper the recently formed National Plasma Fusion Research Facility centred around the H-1NF Heliac, located at the Australian National University, the Institute of Advanced Studies is described in the context of the international Stellarator program and the national collaboration with the Australian Fusion Research Group. The objectives of the facility and the planned physics research program over the next five years are discussed and some recent results will be presented. The facility will support investigations in the following research areas: finite pressure equilibrium and stability, transport in high temperature plasmas, plasma heating and formation, instabilities and turbulence, edge plasma physics and advanced diagnostic development. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  8. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-27

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  9. Deuterium-Tritium Pulse Propulsion with Hydrogen as Propellant and the Entire Spacecraft as a Gigavolt Capacitor for Ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2012-01-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: 1. By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ~ 105 K. 2. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

  10. Rare pion double radiative capture reactions on hydrogen and deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasinoff, M.D. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Armstrong, D.S.; Clarke, J. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia (United States); Gorringe, T.P.; Kovash, M.; Tripathi, S. [Univ. of Kentucky, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Wright, D.H. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Zolnierczuk, P.A. [Univ. of Kentucky, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)

    2000-08-01

    The rare 2-photon radiative capture reaction has been observed for the first time on hydrogen and deuterium using the RMC high acceptance cylindrical pair spectrometer at TRIUMF. Our preliminary branching ratios are 3.8 x 10{sup -5} for hydrogen and 1.6 x 10{sup -5} for deuterium. Our {pi}{sup -}p data confirms the predicted dominance of the {pi}{pi}{yields} {gamma}{gamma}annihilation mechanism. Moreover, since crossing symmetry relates {pi}{pi}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} to {gamma}{pi}{yields}{gamma}{pi} this threshold ({pi}, 2{gamma}) reaction might also provide new information on the electric polarizability of the pion. Our {pi}{sup -}d data shows no evidence for the predicted d{sup *}{sub 1}(1920) dibaryon. (author)

  11. Effects of low-level deuterium enrichment on bacterial growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueshu Xie

    Full Text Available Using very precise (±0.05% measurements of the growth parameters for bacteria E. coli grown on minimal media, we aimed to determine the lowest deuterium concentration at which the adverse effects that are prominent at higher enrichments start to become noticeable. Such a threshold was found at 0.5% D, a surprisingly high value, while the ultralow deuterium concentrations (≤0.25% D showed signs of the opposite trend. Bacterial adaptation for 400 generations in isotopically different environment confirmed preference for ultralow (≤0.25% D enrichment. This effect appears to be similar to those described in sporadic but multiple earlier reports. Possible explanations include hormesis and isotopic resonance phenomena, with the latter explanation being favored.

  12. Biological Influence of Deuterium on Procariotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Mosin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Biologic influence of deuterium (D on cells of various taxonomic groups of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms realizing methylotrophic, chemoheterotrophic, photo-organotrophic, and photosynthetic ways of assimilation of carbon substrates are investigated at growth on media with heavy water (D2О. The method of step by step adaptation technique of cells to D2О was developed, consisting in plating of cells on 2 % agarose nutrient media containing increasing gradient of concentration of D2О (from 0 up to 98 % D2O and the subsequent selection of stable to D2O cells. In the result of that technique were obtained adapted to maximum concentration of D2O cells, biological material of which instead of hydrogen contained deuterium with levels of enrichment 92–97,5 at.% D.

  13. Simultaneous catalytic regime of tritium and helium-3 in D–D fusion without external breeding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Mahdavi; T Koohrokhi

    2010-03-01

    A catalytic regime of tritium and helium-3 in deuterium–deuterium fusion, including ion–electron collisions, mechanical expansion, bremsstrahlung radiation, inverse Compton scattering losses and reacting particles energy effect has been investigated. In this paper a new fuel configuration, DT 3He, is formed by adding 3He to DT fuel. According to our calculations this fuel (DT=0.0112 3He=0.0399) has greater energy gain than the fuel (DT=0.0112) used by Eliezer et al [Eliezer et al, Nucl. Fusion 40, 195 (2000)] and also it does not require external tritium and helium-3 breeding. Furthermore, neutron yields in D–D and D–T reactions are reduced due to the reduced quantity of initial amount of deuterium and tritium.

  14. Surface modification of tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloys exposed to high-flux deuterium plasma and its impact on deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Terentyev, D.; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2013-01-01

    Samples of tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloy (with 5 mass per cent of Ta) were exposed to high-flux deuterium plasma at different fluences. The surface modification was studied with scanning electron microscopy, and deuterium retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). In the

  15. Application of plasma focus installations for a study of the influence of deuterium cumulative flows on materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L I Ivanov; A I Dedyurin; I V Borovitskaya; O N Krokhin; V Ya Nikulin; S N Polukhin; A A Tikhomirov; A S Fedotov

    2003-12-01

    In this work, as an example of an application of the plasma focus (PF) device, we study the influence on alloys of vanadium of a cumulative flow producing in the PF device. The experiment was done in a 4-kJ PF device with various gas fillings and various anode shapes. It was found that the velocity of the axial cumulative flow depends on the type of gas and is about $5\\cdot 10^{7}$ cm/s for deuterium and $2\\cdot 10^{7}$ cm/s for argon fillings of plasma focus chamber; the shape of the flow is changed from a broad conical fly for deuterium to a quasi-one-directional stream for argon. The dynamics and structure of such flows are investigated by means of laser diagnostics and an image converter camera. The experiments show that cumulative flows produce various defects in tested samples. The appearance of a large number of cracks on the surface of vanadium under the impulse influence of deuterium plasma shows that pure vanadium cannot be used for the construction of thermonuclear fusion reactors. Such PF installations could also be used effectively for the study of other material and construction elements proposed for the use in thermonuclear machines.

  16. Kinetic isotope effects for fast deuterium and proton exchange rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, Estel; Mammoli, Daniele; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-04-21

    By monitoring the effect of deuterium decoupling on the decay of transverse (15)N magnetization in D-(15)N spin pairs during multiple-refocusing echo sequences, we have determined fast D-D exchange rates kD and compared them with fast H-H exchange rates kH in tryptophan to determine the kinetic isotope effect as a function of pH and temperature.

  17. Nuclear structure contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, Carl E; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We consider the two-photon exchange contribution to the $2P-2S$ Lamb shift in muonic deuterium in the framework of forward dispersion relations. The dispersion integrals are evaluated using experimental data on elastic deuteron form factors and inelastic electron-deuteron scattering, both in the quasielastic and hadronic range. The subtraction constant that is required to ensure convergence of the dispersion relation for the forward Compton amplitude $T_1(\

  18. Deuteron charge radius from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2016-01-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10.

  19. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  20. Counter-diffusion and -permeation of deuterium and hydrogen through metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kizu, Kaname; Tanabe; Tetsuo [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The first experiments for counter-diffusion and -permeation of deuterium and hydrogen through palladium were performed. Deuterium permeation rates against D{sub 2} pressure were measured under the condition where hydrogen permeated to opposite direction by supplying H{sub 2} gas at the permeated side of D{sub 2}. It was found that not a small amount of deuterium was clearly permeated even if the deuterium pressure was much smaller than the hydrogen pressure. Deuterium permeation rate was gradually reduced by increasing the counter H permeation. The deuterium permeation rate under the counter H permeation is well represented by a simple model in which the ratio of the deuterium permeation rates with and without the counter H permeation was proportional to the fractional concentration of deuterium in the bulk. As increasing the hydrogen counter flow, however, the deuterium permeation rate deviates from the model. This means that adsorption (absorption) of D{sub 2} from gas phase is inhibited and surface recombination of deuterium is blocked by hydrogen. (author)

  1. Modelling deuterium release from tungsten after high flux high temperature deuterium plasma exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorev, Petr; Matveev, Dmitry; Bakaeva, Anastasiia; Terentyev, Dmitry; Zhurkin, Evgeny E.; Van Oost, Guido; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten is a primary candidate for plasma facing materials for future fusion devices. An important safety concern in the design of plasma facing components is the retention of hydrogen isotopes. Available experimental data is vast and scattered, and a consistent physical model of retention of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten is still missing. In this work we propose a model of non-equilibrium hydrogen isotopes trapping under fusion relevant plasma exposure conditions. The model is coupled to a diffusion-trapping simulation tool and is used to interpret recent experiments involving high plasma flux exposures. From the computational analysis performed, it is concluded that high flux high temperature exposures (T = 1000 K, flux = 1024 D/m2/s and fluence of 1026 D/m2) result in generation of sub-surface damage and bulk diffusion, so that the retention is driven by both sub-surface plasma-induced defects (bubbles) and trapping at natural defects. On the basis of the non-equilibrium trapping model we have estimated the amount of H stored in the sub-surface region to be ∼10-5 at-1, while the bulk retention is about 4 × 10-7 at-1, calculated by assuming the sub-surface layer thickness of about 10 μm and adjusting the trap concentration to comply with the experimental results for the integral retention.

  2. Precision measures of the primordial abundance of deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Ryan; Jorgenson, Regina A; Murphy, Michael T; Steidel, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.87) damped Lyman-alpha system at z_abs = 3.06726 towards the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyman alpha transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias), and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H)_p = (2.53 +/- 0.04) x 10^-5, corresponding to a Universal baryon density 100 Omega_b h^2 = 2.202 +/- 0.045 for the standard model of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. By combining our measure of (D/H)_p with observations of the cosmic microwave backg...

  3. Selective deuterium ion acceleration using the Vulcan petawatt laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krygier, A. G. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palasiseau (France); Physics Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Morrison, J. T. [Propulsion Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Lab, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Jung, D. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Clarke, R.; Notley, M. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palasiseau (France); Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H. [The John Adams Institute, Blackett Laboratory, Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Norreys, P. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Oliver, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Zepf, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Helmholtz Institute Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Freeman, R. R. [Physics Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We report on the successful demonstration of selective acceleration of deuterium ions by target-normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) with a high-energy petawatt laser. TNSA typically produces a multi-species ion beam that originates from the intrinsic hydrocarbon and water vapor contaminants on the target surface. Using the method first developed by Morrison et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 030707 (2012)], an ion beam with >99% deuterium ions and peak energy 14 MeV/nucleon is produced with a 200 J, 700 fs, >10{sup 20}W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse by cryogenically freezing heavy water (D{sub 2}O) vapor onto the rear surface of the target prior to the shot. Within the range of our detectors (0°–8.5°), we find laser-to-deuterium-ion energy conversion efficiency of 4.3% above 0.7 MeV/nucleon while a conservative estimate of the total beam gives a conversion efficiency of 9.4%.

  4. Cryogenic distillation facility for isotopic purification of protium and deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Arkhipov, Ev.; Bondarenko, S.; Fedorchenko, O.; Ganzha, V.; Ivshin, K.; Kravtsov, P., E-mail: pkravt@gmail.com; Trofimov, V.; Vasilyev, A.; Vasyanina, T.; Vorobyov, A.; Vznuzdaev, M. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute” Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (NRC “Kurchatov Institute” PNPI), 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Kammel, P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Isotopic purification of the protium and deuterium is an important requirement of many physics experiments. A cryogenic facility for high-efficiency separation of hydrogen isotopes with a cryogenic distillation column as the main element is described. The instrument is portable, so that it can be used at the experimental site. It was designed and built at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia. Fundamental operating parameters have been measured including a liquid holdup in the column packing, the pressure drops across the column and the purity of the product at different operating modes. A mathematical model describes expected profiles of hydrogen isotope concentration along the distillation column. An analysis of ortho-parahydrogen isomeric composition by gas chromatography was used for evaluation of the column performance during the tuning operations. The protium content during deuterium purification (≤100 ppb) was measured using gas chromatography with accumulation of the protium in the distillation column. A high precision isotopic measurement at the Institute of Particle Physics, ETH-Zurich, Switzerland, provided an upper bound of the deuterium content in protium (≤6 ppb), which exceeds all commercially available products.

  5. Deuterium thermal desorption from vacancy clusters in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabtsev, S.; Gasparyan, Yu.; Zibrov, M.; Shubina, A.; Pisarev, A.

    2016-09-01

    Deuterium interaction with vacancy clusters in tungsten was studied by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). A recrystallized W foil was used as a sample, and the vacancy clusters were formed in the bulk by irradiation with 10 keV/D ions to the fluence of 3 × 1019 D/m2 and subsequent annealing at the temperature of 800 K. Then the sample was loaded with deuterium (0.67 keV/D ions with a fluence of 1 × 1019 D/m2), and TDS measurements with varying heating rates β in the range of 0.25-4 K/s were performed. The high temperature peak with the maximum at around 700 K was attributed to deuterium desorption from vacancy clusters and the detrapping energy for this type of defects was determined from the slope of the Arrhenius-like plot ln (β / Tm2) versus 1 /Tm , where Tm is the peak position. The detrapping energy calculated this way is 2.10 ± 0.02 eV.

  6. On kaonic deuterium. Quantum field theoretic and relativistic covariant approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, A N; Faber, M; Fuhrmann, H; Ivanova, V A; Marton, J; Troitskaya, N I; Zmeskal, J

    2004-01-01

    We study kaonic deuterium, the bound K^-d state A_{K d}. Within a quantum field theoretic and relativistic covariant approach we derive the energy level displacement of the ground state of kaonic deuterium in terms of the amplitude of K^-d scattering for arbitrary relative momenta. Near threshold our formula reduces to the well-known DGBT formula. The S-wave amplitude of K^-d scattering near threshold is defined by the resonances Lambda(1405), Sigma(1750) and a smooth elastic background, and the inelastic channels K^- d -> NY and K^- d -> NY pion, with Y = Sigma^{+/-}, Sigma^0 and Lambda^0, where the final-state interactions play an important role. The Ericson-Weise formula for the S-wave scattering length of K^-d scattering is derived. The total width of the energy level of the ground state of kaonic deuterium is estimated using the theoretical predictions of the partial widths of the two-body decays A_{Kd} -> NY and experimental data on the rates of the NY-pair production in the reactions K^-d -> NY. We obt...

  7. Electron Scattering From High-Momentum Neutrons in Deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Klimenko, A V; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolo, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Biselli, A S; Bltmann, S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Cummings, J P; Dashyan, N B; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dharmawardane, K V; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Fersch, R G; Feuerbach, R J; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gonenc, A; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Grioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kühn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Li, J; Livingston, K; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R C; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Mutchler, G S; Müller, J; Nadel-Turonski, P; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Stavinsky, A V; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S I; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B

    2006-01-01

    We report results from an experiment measuring the semi-inclusive reaction $d(e,e'p_s)$ where the proton $p_s$ is moving at a large angle relative to the momentum transfer. If we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred. This method, known as spectator tagging, can be used to study electron scattering from high-momentum (off-shell) neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. A reduced cross section was extracted for different values of final-state missing mass $W^{*}$, backward proton momentum $\\vec{p}_{s}$ and momentum transfer $Q^{2}$. The data are compared to a simple PWIA spectator model. A strong enhancement in the data observed at transverse kinematics is not reproduced by the PWIA model. This enhancement can likely be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that ...

  8. Calculation of doublet capture rate for muon capture in deuterium within chiral effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J.; Tater, M.; Truhlík, E.; Epelbaum, E.; Machleidt, R.; Ricci, P.

    2012-03-01

    The doublet capture rate Λ1 / 2 of the negative muon capture in deuterium is calculated employing the nuclear wave functions generated from accurate nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials constructed at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory and the weak meson exchange current operator derived within the same formalism. All but one of the low-energy constants that enter the calculation were fixed from pion-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon scattering data. The low-energy constant dˆR (cD), which cannot be determined from the purely two-nucleon data, was extracted recently from the triton β-decay and the binding energies of the three-nucleon systems. The calculated values of Λ1 / 2 show a rather large spread for the used values of the dˆR. Precise measurement of Λ1 / 2 in the future will not only help to constrain the value of dˆR, but also provide a highly nontrivial test of the nuclear chiral EFT framework. Besides, the precise knowledge of the constant dˆR will allow for consistent calculations of other two-nucleon weak processes, such as proton-proton fusion and solar neutrino scattering on deuterons, which are important for astrophysics.

  9. Deuterium recycling rate constants derived from plasma implantation/desorption shots in a martensitic steel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedano, L.A. [CIEMAT/DIAE, Madrid (Spain); European Commission/JRC, H-Materials Interaction Sector, Ispra (Italy); Esteban, G.A. [UPV-EHU/ETSIIT, D. Nuc. Eng. and Fluid Mec., Bilbao (Spain); Perujo, A. [European Commission/JRC, H-Materials Interaction Sector, Ispra (Italy)

    2001-12-04

    The recombination (K{sub 2}) and dissociation rate constants (K{sub 1}) are essential magnitudes for the tracking of tritium at the first wall (FW) of fusion reactors (FR). This paper presents our plasma implantation/recycling test, the modelling of the experiment and the results obtained for K{sub 2} and K{sub 1} in the case of a deuterium (D{sub 3}{sup +}/D{sub 2}{sup +}) plasma in the martensitic steel DIN 1.4914 (MANET). Once parasitic contributions were accounted, the D{sub 2} release from the target was seen to be surface limited. The values obtained for K{sub 1} and K{sub 2} show low dispersion on impinging flux and ion energies. For K{sub 1} a roughly constant value of 7 x 10{sup -6} mol Pa{sup -1} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} is derived. The obtained K{sub 2} is written as: K{sub 2} = 2.414 exp (-1571/RT) (m{sup 4} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}), with R = 8.314 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}. Our activation energies agree with those existing in the literature derived from permeation experiments. High reflection coefficients are derived, which are in good agreement with the classical theory of ion scattering at low energy. (orig.)

  10. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ˜16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ˜200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ˜40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  11. Deuterium trapping at defects created with neutron and ion irradiations in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Hatano; M. Shimada; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; V.Kh. Alimov; M. Hara; J. Shi; M. Kobayashi; T. Oda; G. Cao; K. Okuno; T. Tanaka; K. Sugiyama; J. Roth; B. Tyburska-Püschel; J. Dorner; N. Yoshida; N. Futagami; H. Watanabe; M. Hatakeyama; H. Kurishita; M. Sokolov; Y. Katoh

    2013-07-01

    The effects of neutron and ion irradiations on deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) were investigated. Specimens of pure W were irradiated with neutrons to 0.3 dpa at around 323 K and then exposed to high-flux D plasma at 473 and 773 K. The concentration of D significantly increased by neutron irradiation and reached 0.8 at% at 473 K and 0.4 at% at 773 K. Annealing tests for the specimens irradiated with 20 MeV W ions showed that the defects which play a dominant role in the trapping at high temperature were stable at least up to 973 K, while the density decreased at temperatures equal to or above 1123 K. These observations of the thermal stability of traps and the activation energy for D detrapping examined in a previous study (˜1.8 eV) indicated that the defects which contribute predominantly to trapping at 773 K were small voids. The higher concentration of trapped D at 473 K was explained by additional contributions of weaker traps. The release of trapped D was clearly enhanced by the exposure to atomic hydrogen at 473 K, though higher temperatures are more effective for using this effect for tritium removal in fusion reactors.

  12. Surface morphology influence on deuterium retention in beryllium films prepared by thermionic vacuum arc method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, A.; Porosnicu, C.; Badulescu, M.; Mustata, I.; Lungu, C. P.; Sugiyama, K.; Lindig, S.; Krieger, K.; Roth, J.; Nastuta, A.; Rusu, G.; Popa, G.

    2009-01-01

    In a plasma-confinement device, material eroded from plasma facing components will be transported and re-deposited at other locations inside the reaction chamber. Since beryllium from the first wall of the ITER fusion reactor will be eroded, ionized in the scrape-off layer plasma and finally re-deposited on divertor surfaces flowing along the magnetic field, it is important to study the properties of divertor armour materials (C, W) coated with beryllium. By applying different bias voltages (-200 V to +700 V) to the substrates during deposition, the morphology of the obtained films was modified. The films' morphology was characterized by means of AFM and SEM, and it was found that the coatings prepared using negative bias voltage at the substrate during deposition are more compact and have a smoother surface compared to the samples prepared with positive bias voltage. The thickness and composition of each film were measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). A study of deuterium implantation and retention into the prepared films was performed at IPP Garching in the high current ion source.

  13. Application of a Pyroprobe-Deuterium NMR System: Deuterium Tracing and Mechanistic Study of Upgrading Process for Lignin Model Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben, Haoxi; Jarvis, Mark W.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Gjersing, Erica L.; Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Foust, Thomas D.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Biddy, Mary J.

    2016-04-21

    In this study, a pyroprobe-deuterium (2H) NMR system has been used to identify isotopomer products formed during the deuteration and ring opening of lignin model compounds. Several common model compounds for lignin and its upgraded products, including guaiacol, syringol, toluene, p-xylene, phenol, catechol, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, and methylcyclopentane, have been examined for selective ring opening. Similar pathways for upgrading of toluene and p-xylene has been found, which will undergo hydrogenation, methyl group elimination, and ring opening process, and benzene, cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane have been found as major intermediates before ring opening. Very interestingly, the 2H NMR analysis for the deuterium-traced ring opening of catechol on Ir/..gamma..-Al2O3 is almost identical to the ring opening process for phenol. The ring opening processes for guaiacol and syringol appeared to be very complicated, as expected. Benzene, phenol, toluene, cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane have been determined to be the major products.

  14. Deuterium excess as a proxy for sea ice extent in the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, 1882-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, K. E.; Bertler, N.; Zwartz, D.; Trompetter, B.; Millet, M.; Davy, P.

    2011-12-01

    Deuterium excess in a high-resolution ice core extracted from the Whitehall Glacier (WHG) is highly sensitive to sea ice extent since observations began in 1979. Seasonal sea ice extent has increased significantly in the Ross Sea since 1995, creating a dipole between the Ross Sea and the Amundsen and Bellinghausen Sea Coasts, which have experienced significant sea ice loss. The reasons for the spatial differences in sea ice anomalies is thought to be primarily related to the phase of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM), the primary climate driver in this sector of Antarctica, and the complex interactions of SAM with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). A positive phase of SAM leads to deeper low pressure anomalies in the Amundsen Sea; cooler and stronger southerly winds in the western Ross Sea, and wind-driven sea ice advance, particularly when it is reinforced by La Nina conditions. In the WHG ice core, deuterium excess has mean values of 9.5 per mil from 1979 until 1994 and 5.2 per mil after 1995. This ~5 per mil shift is concurrent with a change from negative to positive sea ice extent anomalies in the Ross Sea and a concurrent decrease in marine trace elements (Na, Mg, V, Rb). We argue that increased southerly winds since 1995 (related to a more positive SAM) have increased the area of the Ross Sea and Terra Nova Bay polynas resulting in increased sea ice extent. Because sea surface temperatures (SST) are very low over these polynas, particularly in the austral autumn and winter, the deuterium excess signal at the Whitehall Glacier is highly sensitive to the amount of local moisture input and the seasonality of this moisture contribution. Increased local moisture, with low SST, results in low deuterium excess and therefore an inverse relationship with sea ice extent. In the context of the 125-year span of the WHG record, (1882-2006), deuterium excess is markedly high (and sea ice coverage is therefore expected to have been anomalously low) in the 1950s, '60s

  15. On the abundance of deuterium in celestial objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Rickard; Kero, Johan; Liszka, Ludwik

    2016-04-01

    The deuterium hydrogen ratio (D/H) is the subject of conflicting ideas about the origin of water on the Earth. The present D/H ratio in the Earth oceans (≈1.5x10-4) is substantially lower than most, if not all potential cosmic sources. Furthermore, other celestial bodies, including interstellar space, display a fairly wide range of D/H ratios superseding the terrestrial one. Escape processes may in part explain higher D/H ratios on Mars and Venus, but cannot explain the Earth's low ratio compared to that of the potential sources (e.g. comets and meteors), unless a deuterium "removal" process can be inferred that reduces the D/H ratio. Alternatively, the D/H ratio in the Earth's ocean represents a time capsule of a yet to be identified cosmic source. It is here hypothesized that the former is the cause, a "removal" of deuterium in matter (carbohydrates, water etc.) having high (pristine) D/H ratios. By "removal" is here meant an isotope transmutation, i.e. deuterium is transmuted to hydrogen plus a thermal neutron, a process requiring >2.25 MeV (≈3.6·10-13 J). However, once released a thermal neutron will eventually fuse with another heavier element by thermal neutron capture, a process that may lead to energy in excess of the spallation energy. The energy gain differs for different isotopes, but if exceeding unity it will induce more heat/power than the input power, maintaining power production over time. A gain less than unity will still result in deuterium removal, but also isotope transmutation, and/or element transmutation via β± decay. This report gives a theoretical background for the plasma forcing that can lead to thermal neutron spallation, a process that changes/decrease the D/H ratio in celestial objects. The applicability of the theory will be tested on celestial objects subjected to strong dynamic, and electromagnetic forcing, by the Sun or during the entry of high-speed objects into the Earth's atmosphere.

  16. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 1014 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2. The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I—the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 1017 D/cm2); II—the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 1017 to 8 × 1017 D/cm2); III—the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 1017 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The resulting structure shows stability against the action of

  17. Influence of tungsten microstructure and ion flux on deuterium plasma-induced surface modifications and deuterium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, L., E-mail: l.buzi@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie – und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Partner of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC), 52425 Jülich (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Netherlands); Gent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Netherlands); Unterberg, B.; Reinhart, M.; Dittmar, T.; Matveev, D.; Linsmeier, Ch. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie – und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Partner of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Breuer, U. [Central Institute of Engineering, Electronics and Analytics, ZEA-3 Analytics, Research Centre Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kreter, A. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie – und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Partner of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Van Oost, G. [Gent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2015-08-15

    The influence of surface temperature, particle flux density and material microstructure on the surface morphology and deuterium retention was studied by exposing tungsten targets (20 μm and 40 μm grain size) to deuterium plasma at the same particle fluence (10{sup 26} m{sup −2}) and incident ion energy (40 eV) to two different ion fluxes (low flux: 10{sup 22} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}, high flux: 10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). The maximum of deuterium retention was observed at ∼630 K for low flux density and at ∼870 K for high flux density, as indicated from the thermal desorption spectroscopy data (TDS). Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of blisters with a diameter of up to 1 μm which were formed at high flux density and high temperature (1170 K) contrasting with previously reported surface modification results at such exposure conditions.

  18. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, LPP-ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Bilato, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Dumont, R. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Mantsinen, M. [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  19. Comparison of the Recently proposed Super Marx Generator Approach to Thermonuclear Ignition with the DT Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid Concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed Super Marx generator pure deuterium micro-detonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser DT fusion-fission hybrid concept (LiFE) [1]. In a Super Marx generator a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultra-high voltage Marx generator, from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-explosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. A typical example of the LiFE concept is a fusion gain of 30, and a fission gain of 10, making up for a total gain of 300, with about 10 times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means a substantial release of fission products, as in fusion-less pure fission reactors. In the Super Marx approach for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-detonation a gain of the same magnitude can in theory be reached [2]. If feasible, the Super Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of ther...

  20. Thermonuclear reactivity of D-T fusion plasma with spin-polarized fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshiki [Department of Electronic Engineering, Gunma Univ., Kiryu, Gunma (Japan); Nakao, Yasuyuki

    1999-04-01

    The thermonuclear reactivity of deuterium(D) - tritium(T) fusion plasma with spin-polarized fuel has been studied. Two mechanisms of depolarization, collisions and waves, in the high temperature fusion plasma have been considered. The binary collisions have been found not to change the nuclear spin states. The waves with a frequency of a few GHz, however, changes the spin states appreciably, when {delta}B/B{sub 0} (the ratio of the amplitude of the fluctuating magnetic field to the external field) becomes larger than 10{sup -5}. (author)

  1. Path to Market for Compact Modular Fusion Power Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Simon; Baerny, Jennifer K.; Mattor, Nathan; Stoulil, Don; Miller, Ronald; Marston, Theodore

    2012-08-01

    The benefits of an energy source whose reactants are plentiful and whose products are benign is hard to measure, but at no time in history has this energy source been more needed. Nuclear fusion continues to promise to be this energy source. However, the path to market for fusion systems is still regularly a matter for long-term (20 + year) plans. This white paper is intended to stimulate discussion of faster commercialization paths, distilling guidance from investors, utilities, and the wider energy research community (including from ARPA-E). There is great interest in a small modular fusion system that can be developed quickly and inexpensively. A simple model shows how compact modular fusion can produce a low cost development path by optimizing traditional systems that burn deuterium and tritium, operating not only at high magnetic field strength, but also by omitting some components that allow for the core to become more compact and easier to maintain. The dominant hurdles to the development of low cost, practical fusion systems are discussed, primarily in terms of the constraints placed on the cost of development stages in the private sector. The main finding presented here is that the bridge from DOE Office of Science to the energy market can come at the Proof of Principle development stage, providing the concept is sufficiently compact and inexpensive that its development allows for a normal technology commercialization path.

  2. Production of polarized negative deuterium ion beam with dual optical pumping in KEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsho, M.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Mori, Y.

    1997-02-01

    To obtain highly nuclear-spin vector polarized negative deuterium ion beam, a dual optically pumped polarized negative deuterium ion source has been developed at KEK. It is possible to select a pure nuclear-spin state with this scheme, and negative deuterium ion beam with 100% nuclear-spin vector polarization can be produced in principle. We have obtained about 70% of nuclear-spin vector polarized negative deuterium ion beam so far. This result may open up a new possibilities for the optically pumped polarized ion source. (author)

  3. Neutron production with mixture of deuterium and krypton in Sahand Filippov type plasma focus facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, M.A., E-mail: mohammadidorbash@yahoo.com [Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sobhanian, S. [Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rawat, R.S. [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2011-08-01

    This Letter reports the order of magnitude enhancement in neutron yield from Sahand plasma focus device with krypton seeded deuterium operation. The highest average neutron yield of 2.2x10{sup 9} neutrons per shot was achieved at 1.00 Torr deuterium with 3% krypton which is higher than the best average neutron yield of 3.18x10{sup 8} neutrons per shot for pure deuterium operation. Estimation of average neutron energy showed that the maximum and minimum average energies are 2.98±0.6 MeV at 16 kV in 0.25 Torr deuterium with 3% Kr and 2.07±0.2 MeV at 18 kV operation in 0.5 Torr deuterium with 3% Kr, respectively. The anisotropy of neutron emission from Sahand DPF showed that the neutrons are produced mainly by beam-target mechanisms. -- Highlights: → The highest average neutron yield of 2.2x10{sup 9} neutrons per shot was achieved at mixture of deuterium and krypton. → In the krypton seeding of deuterium also anisotropy of neutron emission deuterium is found. → The krypton seeding of deuterium made the neutron emission more reliable over wider operating pressure ranges.

  4. Influence of Deuterium Treatments on the Polysilicon-Based Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Sung

    2016-06-01

    The electrical behavior of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) Schottky barrier photodetector structure, depending on deuterium treatment, is analyzed by means of the dark current and the photocurrent measurements. Al/Ti bilayer was used as Schottky metal. The deuterium incorporation into the absorption layer, undoped polysilicon, was achieved with annealing process and with ion implantation process, respectively. In the photocurrent-to-dark current ratio measurement, deuterium-ion-implanted photodetector shows over hundred higher than the control device. It means that the heightening of the Schottky barrier and the passivation of grain boundary trap were achieved effectively through the deuterium ion implantation process.

  5. An improved statistical model for predicting the deuterium ingress in zirconium alloy pressure tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, M.D., E-mail: mdpandey@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Xin, L. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2012-09-15

    In the CANDU pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), the nuclear fuel is contained in hundreds of Zr-2.5 Nb alloy pressure tubes. The corrosion of zirconium alloy produces deuterium that is absorbed by the body of the pressure tube. The presence of this deuterium causes hydrogen embrittlement of zirconium alloy with an adverse effect on the integrity of the pressure tube. An accurate prediction of deuterium accumulation over time is an important step for ensuring the fitness-for-service of pressure tubes. Deuterium ingress data collected from in-service inspection of pressure tubes exhibit heteroscedasticity, i.e., the variance of deuterium concentration is dependent on operating time (or exposure) and temperature. The currently used model by the nuclear industry involves a logarithmic regression of deuterium content over time and temperature. Since this approach does not deal with heteroscedasticity precisely, it results in a conservative prediction of the deuterium ingress. The paper presents a new approach for predicting deuterium ingress based on a weighted least-squares (WLS) regression that overcomes the limitations of the existing model, and it provides realistic prediction bounds of deuterium ingress.

  6. Identification of targetable FGFR gene fusions in diverse cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Mi; Su, Fengyun; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Khazanov, Nickolay; Ateeq, Bushra; Cao, Xuhong; Lonigro, Robert J; Vats, Pankaj; Wang, Rui; Lin, Su-Fang; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Kunju, Lakshmi P; Siddiqui, Javed; Tomlins, Scott A; Wyngaard, Peter; Sadis, Seth; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Hussain, Maha H; Feng, Felix Y; Zalupski, Mark M; Talpaz, Moshe; Pienta, Kenneth J; Rhodes, Daniel R; Robinson, Dan R; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2013-06-01

    Through a prospective clinical sequencing program for advanced cancers, four index cases were identified which harbor gene rearrangements of FGFR2, including patients with cholangiocarcinoma, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. After extending our assessment of FGFR rearrangements across multiple tumor cohorts, we identified additional FGFR fusions with intact kinase domains in lung squamous cell cancer, bladder cancer, thyroid cancer, oral cancer, glioblastoma, and head and neck squamous cell cancer. All FGFR fusion partners tested exhibit oligomerization capability, suggesting a shared mode of kinase activation. Overexpression of FGFR fusion proteins induced cell proliferation. Two bladder cancer cell lines that harbor FGFR3 fusion proteins exhibited enhanced susceptibility to pharmacologic inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Because of the combinatorial possibilities of FGFR family fusion to a variety of oligomerization partners, clinical sequencing efforts, which incorporate transcriptome analysis for gene fusions, are poised to identify rare, targetable FGFR fusions across diverse cancer types.

  7. Nonlinear laser-plasma interaction in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, T. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Campbell, M. E.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C.; Kimmel, M. W.; Knapp, P.; Lewis, S. M.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Scoglietti, D. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Smith, I. C.; Speas, C. S.; Vesey, R. A.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. While magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Key LPI processes are determined, and mitigation methods are discussed. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  8. Electrically insulating coatings for V-Li self-cooled blanket in a fusion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Reed, C. B.; Uz, M.; Park, J. H.; Smith, D. L.

    2000-05-17

    The blanket system is one of the most important components in a fusion reactor because it has a major impact on both the economics and safety of fusion energy. The primary functions of the blanket in a deuterium/tritium-fueled fusion reactor are to convert the fusion energy into sensible heat and to breed tritium for the fuel cycle. The liquid-metal blanket concept requires an electrically insulating coating on the first-wall structural material to minimize the magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop that occurs during the flow of liquid metal in a magnetic field. Based on the thermodynamics of interactions between the coating and the liquid lithium on one side and the structural V-base alloy on the other side, several coating candidates are being examined to perform the insulating function over a wide range of temperatures and lithium chemistries.

  9. Remote Handling and Plasma Conditions to Enable Fusion Nuclear Science R&D Using a US Component Testing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Carroll, Adam J [ORNL; Neumeyer, C. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Canik, John [ORNL; Cole, Michael J [ORNL; Dorland, W. D. [University of Maryland; Fogarty, P. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Kotschenreuther, M. [University of Texas, Austin; LaHaye, R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Mahajan, S. [University of Texas, Austin; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Nelson, Brad E [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Sontag, Aaron C [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Tsai, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Vanlanju, P. [University of Texas, Austin; Wagner, Jill C [ORNL; Yoder, III, Graydon L [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The use of a fusion component testing facility to study and establish, during the ITER era, the remaining scientific and technical knowledge needed by fusion Demo is considered and described in this paper. This use aims to lest components in an integrated fusion nuclear environment, for the first time, to discover and understand the underpinning physical properties, and to develop improved components for further testing, in a time-efficient manner. It requires a design with extensive modularization and remote handling of activated components, and flexible hot-cell laboratories. It further requires reliable plasma conditions to avoid disruptions and minimize their impact, and designs to reduce the divertor heat flux to the level of ITER design. As the plasma duration is extended through the planned ITER level (similar to 10(3) s) and beyond, physical properties with increasing time constants, progressively for similar to 10(4) s, similar to 10(5) s, and similar to 10(6) s, would become accessible for testing and R&D. The longest time constants of these are likely to be of the order of a week ( 106 S). Progressive stages of research operation are envisioned in deuterium, deuterium-tritium for the ITER duration, and deuterium-tritium with increasingly longer plasma durations. The fusion neutron fluence and operational duty factor anticipated for this "scientific exploration" phase of a component test facility are estimated to be up to 1 MW-yr/m(2) and up to 10%, respectively.

  10. Fusion research: the past is prologue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, R F

    1998-10-14

    At this juncture fusion research can be viewed as being at a turning point, a time to review its past and to imagine its future. Today, almost 50 years since the first serious attempts to address the daunting problem of achieving controlled fusion, we have both an opportunity and a challenge. Some predictions place fusion research today at a point midway between its first inception and its eventual maturation - in the middle of the 21st century - when fusion would become a major source of energy. Our opportunity therefore is to assess what we have learned from 50 years of hard work and use that knowledge as a starting point for new and better approaches to solving the fusion problem. Our challenge is to prove the "50 more years" prophesy wrong, by finding ways to shorten the time when fusion power becomes a reality. The thesis will be advanced that in the magnetic confinement approach to fusion open-ended magnetic confinement geometries offer much in responding to the challenge. A major advantage of open systems is that, owing to their theoretically and experimentally demonstrated ability to suppress plasma instabilities of both the MHD and the high-frequency wave-particle variety, the confinement becomes predictable from "classical," i.e., Fokker-Planck-type analysis. In a time of straitened budgetary circumstances for magnetic fusion research now being faced in the United States, the theoretical tractability of mirror-based systems is a substantial asset. In pursuing this avenue it is also necessary to keep an open mind as to the forms that mirror-based fusion power plants might take. For example, one can look to the high-energy physics community for a possible model: This community has shown the feasibility of constructing large and complex particle accelerators using superconducting magnets, vacuum chambers and complicated particle-handling technology, housed in underground tunnels that are 20 or more kilometers long. In the paper examples of mirror

  11. Electron Scattering From High-Momentum Neutrons in Deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.V. Klimenko; S.E. Kuhn

    2005-10-12

    We report results from an experiment measuring the semi-inclusive reaction D(e,e'p{sub s}) where the proton p{sub s} is moving at a large angle relative to the momentum transfer. If we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred. This method, known as spectator tagging, can be used to study electron scattering from high-momentum (off-shell) neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. A reduced cross section was extracted for different values of final-state missing mass W*, backward proton momentum {rvec p}{sub s} and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The data are compared to a simple PWIA spectator model. A strong enhancement in the data observed at transverse kinematics is not reproduced by the PWIA model. This enhancement can likely be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. A ''bound neutron structure function'' F{sub 2n}{sup eff} was extracted as a function of W* and the scaling variable x* at extreme backward kinematics, where effects of FSI appear to be smaller. For p{sub s} > 400 MeV/c, where the neutron is far off-shell, the model overestimates the value of F{sub 2n}{sup eff} in the region of x* between 0.25 and 0.6. A modification of the bound neutron structure function is one of possible effects that can cause the observed deviation.

  12. Cold fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  13. Multisensor image fusion guidelines in remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, C.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing delivers multimodal and -temporal data from the Earth's surface. In order to cope with these multidimensional data sources and to make the most of them, image fusion is a valuable tool. It has developed over the past few decades into a usable image processing technique for extracting information of higher quality and reliability. As more sensors and advanced image fusion techniques have become available, researchers have conducted a vast amount of successful studies using image fusion. However, the definition of an appropriate workflow prior to processing the imagery requires knowledge in all related fields - i.e. remote sensing, image fusion and the desired image exploitation processing. From the findings of this research it can be seen that the choice of the appropriate technique, as well as the fine-tuning of the individual parameters of this technique, is crucial. There is still a lack of strategic guidelines due to the complexity and variability of data selection, processing techniques and applications. This paper gives an overview on the state-of-the-art in remote sensing image fusion including sensors and applications. Putting research results in image fusion from the past 15 years into a context provides a new view on the subject and helps other researchers to build their innovation on these findings. Recommendations of experts help to understand further needs to achieve feasible strategies in remote sensing image fusion.

  14. Detection of deuterium Balmer lines in the Orion Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Hébrard, G; Vidal-Madjar, A; Walsh, J R; Ferlet, R

    2000-01-01

    The detection and first identification of the deuterium Balmer emissionlines, D-alpha and D-beta, in the core of the Orion Nebula is reported.Observations were conducted at the 3.6m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, usingthe Echelle spectrograph Gecko. These lines are very narrow and have identical11 km/s velocity shifts with respect to H-alpha and H-beta. They are probablyexcited by UV continuum fluorescence from the Lyman (DI) lines and arise fromthe interface between the HII region and the molecular cloud.

  15. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L. M.

    1992-09-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cyclotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm3. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH4 drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman α transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time.

  16. Relativistic description of the Fermi motion effects on deuterium targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusno, D.

    1979-12-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the inconsistencies of the conventional, non-relativistic approach, which has been used so far in the extraction of neutron data from deuterium targets, is given. A new approach dealing with the smearing effects, due to the nucleon's Fermi motion inside the deuteron, is developed as an alternative to the conventional one. This new approach is a spin-less, relativistic, simple and consistent approach. A new covariant model of the elastic electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron in the impulse approximation is also presented. The treatment includes spin and allows for a possibility of determining completely the two elastic structure functions.

  17. Diagnosing radiative shocks from deuterium and tritium implosions on NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, A; Divol, L; Weber, S; Döppner, T; Kyrala, G A; Kilne, J; Izumi, N; Glenn, S; Ma, T; Town, R P; Bradley, D K; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    During the recent ignition tuning campaign at the National Ignition Facility, layered cryogenic deuterium and tritium capsules were imploded via x-ray driven ablation. The hardened gated x-ray imager diagnostic temporally and spatially resolves the x-ray emission from the core of the capsule implosion at energies above ~8 keV. On multiple implosions, ~200-400 ps after peak compression a spherically expanding radiative shock has been observed. This paper describes the methods used to characterize the radial profile and rate of expansion of the shock induced x-ray emission.

  18. Lattice dynamics of solid deuterium by inelastic neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans

    1971-01-01

    . The effective force constants which are obtained show that the bond stretching forces between nearest-neighbor molecules are dominant and this bond stretching constant is 174 dyn cm-1. The elastic constants are deduced and the isothermal compressibility is calculated to be B-1=2.19×10-10 cm2 dyn-1. The density......The dispersion relations for phonons in solid ortho-deuterium have been measured at 5 °K by inelastic neutron scattering. The results are in good agreement with recent calculations in which quantum effects are taken into account. The data have been fitted to a third-neighbor general force model...

  19. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electron Scattering From a High-Momentum Neutron in Deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenko, Alexei [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The deuterium nucleus is a system of two nucleons (proton and neutron) bound together. The configuration of the system is described by a quantum-mechanical wave function and the state of the nucleons at a given time is not know a priori. However, by detecting a backward going proton of moderate momentum in coincidence with a reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred if we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction. This method, known as spectator tagging, was used to study the electron scattering from high-momentum neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV polarized electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. The accumulated data cover a wide kinematic range, reaching values of the invariant mass of the unobserved final state W* up to 3 GeV. A data sample of approximately 5 - 105 events, with protons detected at large scattering angles (as high as 136 degrees) in coincidence with the forward electrons, was selected. The product of the neutron structure function with the initial nucleon momentum distribution F2n. S was extracted for different values of W*, backward proton momenta ps and momentum transfer Q2. The data were compared to a calculation based on the spectator approximation and using the free nucleon form factors and structure functions. A strong enhancement in the data, not reproduced by the model, was observed at cos(thetapq) > -0.3 (where theta{sub pq} is the proton scattering angle relative to the direction of the momentum transfer) and can be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. The bound nucleon structure function F2n was studied in the region cos(thetapq) < -0.3 as a function of W* and scaling variable x*. At high spectator proton momenta the struck neutron is

  1. Dislocation mechanism of deuterium retention in tungsten under plasma implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinko, V I; Grigorev, P; Bakaev, A; Terentyev, D; van Oost, G; Gao, F; Van Neck, D; Zhurkin, E E

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a new theoretical model for deuterium (D) retention in tungsten-based alloys on the basis of its being trapped at dislocations and transported to the surface via the dislocation network with parameters determined by ab initio calculations. The model is used to explain experimentally observed trends of D retention under sub-threshold implantation, which does not produce stable lattice defects to act as traps for D in conventional models. Saturation of D retention with implantation dose and effects due to alloying of tungsten with, e.g. tantalum, are evaluated, and comparison of the model predictions with experimental observations under high-flux plasma implantation conditions is presented.

  2. Equation of state measurements in liquid deuterium to 100 GPa

    CERN Document Server

    Knudson, M D; Bailey, J E; Lemke, R W; Hall, C A; Deeney, C; Asay, J R

    2003-01-01

    Using intense magnetic pressure, a method was developed to launch flyer plates to velocities in excess of 20 km s sup - sup 1. This technique was used to perform plate-impact, shock wave experiments on cryogenic liquid deuterium (LD sub 2) to examine its high-pressure equation of state (EOS). Using an impedance matching method, Hugoniot measurements were obtained in the pressure range of 22-100 GPa. The results of these experiments disagree with the previously reported Hugoniot measurements of LD sub 2 in the pressure range above approx 40 GPa, but are in good agreement with first principles, ab initio models for hydrogen and its isotopes.

  3. Nuclear Fusion in the Deuterated cores of inflated hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyed, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    In Ouyed et al. (1998), Deuterium-Deuterium (DD) burning in the deep interior of giant planets (at the core-mantle interface) was proposed as a mechanism to explain their observed heat excess. An issue with such a mechanism is the extreme condition of high interior temperatures (~ 10^5 K) in a concentrated D layer needed to account for the excess heat. In this paper, we show that screened DD fusion in a deuterated core is a more plausible mechanism to explain the excess heat and observed inflated radii of some Jovian exoplanets ("hot Jupiters"). The screening alleviates the extreme temperature constraint and removes the requirement of a stratified D layer, so that DD-fusion is a significant internal energy source (~ 10^(25)-10^(27) erg/s) even within the expected range of core temperature (~ 10^4 K) and density of hot Jupiters. The mechanism is universal, long-lasting (Gigayears), and should be effective as long as the metallicity is not too high and the core has not been significantly eroded away already. Ap...

  4. FusionCharts Beginner's Guide The Official Guide for FusionCharts Suite

    CERN Document Server

    Nadhani, Sanket; Bhattacharya, Shamasis

    2012-01-01

    The book is written as a practical, step-by-step guide to using FusionCharts Suite. The book not only teaches you the fundamentals and implementation of FusionCharts Suite, but also makes you the data visualization guru among your friends and colleagues by teaching how to select the right chart type and usability tips. Filled with examples, code samples and practical tips in a no-nonsense way, the book is a breeze to read.This book is both for beginners and advanced web developers who need to create interactive charts for their web applications. No previous knowledge of FusionCharts Suite is a

  5. INTRODUCTION: Status report on fusion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Werner

    2005-10-01

    members' personal views on the latest achievements in fusion research, including magnetic and inertial confinement scenarios. The report describes fusion fundamentals and progress in fusion science and technology, with ITER as a possible partner in the realization of self-sustainable burning plasma. The importance of the socio-economic aspects of energy production using fusion power plants is also covered. Noting that applications of plasma science are of broad interest to the Member States, the report addresses the topic of plasma physics to assist in understanding the achievements of better coatings, cheaper light sources, improved heat-resistant materials and other high-technology materials. Nuclear fusion energy production is intrinsically safe, but for ITER the full range of hazards will need to be addressed, including minimising radiation exposure, to accomplish the goal of a sustainable and environmentally acceptable production of energy. We anticipate that the role of the Agency will in future evolve from supporting scientific projects and fostering information exchange to the preparation of safety principles and guidelines for the operation of burning fusion plasmas with a Q > 1. Technical progress in inertial and magnetic confinement, as well as in alternative concepts, will lead to a further increase in international cooperation. New means of communication will be needed, utilizing the best resources of modern information technology to advance interest in fusion. However, today the basis of scientific progress is still through journal publications and, with this in mind, we trust that this report will find an interested readership. We acknowledge with thanks the support of the members of the IFRC as an advisory body to the Agency. Seven chairmen have presided over the IFRC since its first meeting in 1971 in Madison, USA, ensuring that the IAEA fusion efforts were based on the best professional advice possible, and that information on fusion developments has

  6. Viral membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen C., E-mail: harrison@crystal.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  7. Evidence for hydrogen-deuterium exchange in viral particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jiangsen; LIU Ziyang; TANG Caihua; HE Yihui; ZHU Jiahong; WANG Chengyu; CHAI Shaoai; CHEN Yueqing; QIAN Wen

    2004-01-01

    Heavy water (D2O) could enhance thermostability of some viruses. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. Here we report the development of a matrix-aided gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry method that allows direct determination of deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio in D2O-treated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), hepatitis A virus (HAV) and RNA from D2O-treated HAV. The D/H ratio was expressed as δDSMOW. Our experiments showed that δDSMOW values increased significantly in D2O-treated viral samples compared to normal controls, and increment in δDSMOW of D2O, treated viral samples was in a fine linear relationship with increment in amount of samples loaded in BSA matrix. Our experiments also indicated that increased δDSMOW of D2O-treated virus correlated well with its enhanced thermostability. The results suggested that hydrogen-deuterium exchange occurred in viral particles and its RNA structure as a result of D2O-treatment. Furthermore, such exchange could cause changes in viral phenotype, such as enhanced thermostability.

  8. Chemical fractionation of deuterium in the protosolar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvāns, J.; Shmeld, I.; Kalnin, J. R.; Hocuk, S.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding gas-grain chemistry of deuterium in star-forming objects may help to explain their history and present state. We aim to clarify how processes in ices affect the deuterium fractionation. In this regard, we investigate a Solar-mass protostellar envelope using an astrochemical rate-equation model that considers bulk-ice chemistry. The results show a general agreement with the molecular D/H abundance ratios observed in low-mass protostars. The simultaneous processes of ice accumulation and rapid synthesis of HD on grain surfaces in the prestellar core hampers the deuteration of icy species. The observed very high D/H ratios exceeding 10 per cent, i.e., super-deuteration, are reproduced for formaldehyde and dimethyl ether, but not for other species in the protostellar envelope phase. Chemical transformations in bulk ice lower D/H ratios of icy species and do not help explaining the super-deuteration. In the protostellar phase, the D2O/HDO abundance ratio was calculated to be higher than the HDO/H2O ratio owing to gas-phase chemistry. Species that undergo evaporation from ices have high molecular D/H ratio and a high gas-phase abundance.

  9. Neoclassical flows in deuterium-helium plasma density pedestals

    CERN Document Server

    Buller, Stefan; Newton, Sarah; Omotani, John

    2016-01-01

    In tokamak transport barriers, the radial scale of profile variations can be comparable to a typical ion orbit width, which makes the coupling of the distribution function across flux surfaces important in the collisional dynamics. We use the radially global steady-state neoclassical {\\delta}f code Perfect to calculate poloidal and toroidal flows, and radial fluxes, in the pedestal. In particular, we have studied the changes in these quantities as the plasma composition is changed from a deuterium bulk species with a helium impurity to a helium bulk with a deuterium impurity, under specific profile similarity assumptions. The poloidally resolved radial fluxes are not divergence-free in isolation in the presence of sharp radial profile variations, which leads to the appearance of poloidal return-flows. These flows exhibit a complex radial-poloidal structure that extends several orbit widths into the core and is sensitive to abrupt radial changes in the ion temperature gradient. We find that a sizable neoclassi...

  10. Codeposition of deuterium ions with beryllium oxide at elevated temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Markin, A V; Gorodetsky, A E; Negodaev, M A; Rozhanskii, N V; Scaffidi-Argentina, F; Werle, H; Wu, C H; Zalavutdinov, R K; Zakharov, A P

    2000-01-01

    Deuterium-loaded BeO films were produced by sputtering the beryllium target with 10 keV Ne ions in D sub 2 gas at a pressure of approximately 1 Pa. The sputtered beryllium reacts - on the substrate surface - with the residual oxygen, thus forming a beryllium oxide layer. Biasing the substrate negatively with respect to the target provides the simultaneous bombardment of the growing film surface with D ions formed by Ne-D sub 2 collisions. Substrate potential governs the maximum energy of ions striking the growing film surface while its size governs the flux density. According to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) data, the beryllium is deposited in the form of polycrystalline hcp-BeO layers with negligible (about 1 at.%) carbon and neon retention. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) data shows a strong deuterium bonding, with a desorption peak at 950 K, in the films deposited at -50 and -400 V substrate potentia...

  11. Exploring the Origins of Deuterium Enrichments in Solar Nebular Organics

    CERN Document Server

    Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Alexander, Conel M O'D; Du, Fujun; Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I; Harries, Tim J

    2016-01-01

    Deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) enrichments in molecular species provide clues about their original formation environment. The organic materials in primitive solar system bodies have generally higher D/H ratios and show greater D/H variation when compared to D/H in solar system water. We propose this difference arises at least in part due to 1) the availability of additional chemical fractionation pathways for organics beyond that for water, and 2) the higher volatility of key carbon reservoirs compared to oxygen. We test this hypothesis using detailed disk models, including a sophisticated, new disk ionization treatment with a low cosmic ray ionization rate, and find that disk chemistry leads to higher deuterium enrichment in organics compared to water, helped especially by fractionation via the precursors CH$_2$D$^+$/CH$_3^+$. We also find that the D/H ratio in individual species varies significantly depending on their particular formation pathways. For example, from $\\sim20-40$ AU, CH$_4$ can reach $\\rm{D/H\\si...

  12. Blistering on tungsten surface exposed to high flux deuterium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H. Y.; Liu, W.; Luo, G. N.; Yuan, Y.; Jia, Y. Z.; Fu, B. Q.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-04-01

    The blistering behaviour of tungsten surfaces exposed to very high fluxes (1-2 × 1024/m2/s) of low energy (38 eV) deuterium plasmas was investigated as a function of ion fluence (0.2-7 × 1026 D/m2) and surface temperature (423-873 K). Blisters were observed under all conditions, especially up to temperatures of 873 K. The blister parameters are evaluated with blister size, blister density and surface coverage. The blister size always peaked at less than 0.5 μm and no blister larger than 10 μm is observed even at high fluence. The blister densities are found in high magnitude of 106 blisters/m2, with the surface coverages lower than 2%. The formation of cracks in the sub-surface region was observed by cross-section imaging. Changes in blister size and shape with fluence and temperature suggest processes of predominantly nucleation and subsequent growth of blisters. The smaller blister size is considered to be caused by a combination of flux-related effects such as enhanced defect formation in the near surface region, reduced deuterium diffusivity and relatively short exposure times.

  13. Understanding neutron production in the deuterium dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelbe, Brian, E-mail: b.appelbe07@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: j.chittenden@imperial.ac.uk; Chittenden, Jeremy, E-mail: b.appelbe07@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: j.chittenden@imperial.ac.uk [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    The deuterium Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) can produce copious amounts of MeV neutrons and can be used as an efficient neutron source. However, the mechanism by which neutrons are produced within the DPF is poorly understood and this limits our ability to optimize the device. In this paper we present results from a computational study aimed at understanding how neutron production occurs in DPFs with a current between 70 kA and 500 kA and which parameters can affect it. A combination of MHD and kinetic tools are used to model the different stages of the DPF implosion. It is shown that the anode shape can significantly affect the structure of the imploding plasma and that instabilities in the implosion lead to the generation of large electric fields at stagnation. These electric fields can accelerate deuterium ions within the stagnating plasma to large (>100 keV) energies leading to reactions with ions in the cold dense plasma. It is shown that the electromagnetic fields present can significantly affect the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the resulting neutron production.

  14. Hydrogen and deuterium retention in wall samples of JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrisch, R.; Ehrenberg, J.; Wielunski, M.; Martinelli, A.P.; Bergsaker, H.; Emmoth, B.; De Kock, L.; Coad, J.P.

    1987-02-01

    The amounts of H and D trapped in the surface layers of samples made out of C, Ni, Inconel and Si, installed at the vessel walls of JET and removed after the 1984 and 1985 periods of operation were measured. After the 1984 operation period the D concentration in carbon probes was of the order of 5x10/sup 19/m/sup 2/, while the hydrogen was about a factor of 40 higher. This can be attributed to a final glow discharge cleaning in hydrogen at the end of the operation period. After the 1984 period of operation the amounts of deuterium and hydrogen were nearly equal at about 5x10/sup 21/m/sup 2/. A comparison of the amounts of deuterium and hydrogen with the amount of carbon deposition on the Inconel wall samples shows a ratio of about 0.3 to 0.4 (H+D) per C-atom. The hydrogen concentrations trapped in the vessel wall correspond to more than 100 times the amount of hydrogen isotopes in the plasma during a discharge.

  15. Desorption process of deuterium from zircaloys and their oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamichi, Haruo; Kinoshita, Chiken; Hara, Masahiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    It is well known that hydrogen behavior plays an important role on the oxidation process of zircaloys. We have investigated the desorption process of deuterium from three kinds of zircaloys (Zry-2, Zry-4 and high-Fe and Ni-Zry-2) and their oxides using thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The purpose of the present paper is to get insight into the effect of alloying elements on the desorption behavior of deuterium from the zircaloys and their oxides. We have also performed in-situ observations through TEM for getting the relation between the desorption process and microstructural evolution. The desorption of D{sub 2} implanted by an ion accelerator occurs in two stages; the first and the second stages appear at around 350 K and around 700 K for the metallic zircaloys, respectively. For their oxide films, on the other hand, the desorption rate of D{sub 2} is much higher than that for the metallic zircaloys. It is found that the desorption rate depends strongly on the kind of zircaloys, especially on the concentration of Fe and Ni. From TEM result, it is found that the first desorption stage for the metallic specimens is correlated to the dissolution of the hydrides. (author)

  16. Preparation and characterization of deuterium-labeled glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naggi, A; Casu, B; Crippa, B; Magnaghi, S; Silvestro, L; Torri, G

    1994-01-01

    Heparin, NAcHep, DS, and CS were labeled with deuterium by N-reacetylating, with the deuterated acetic anhydride (CD3CO)2O, GAGs previously N-deacetylated (by hydrazinolysis) to the desired extent. Degrees of deuteration of the present preparations, as determined by 2H- and 1H-NMR were 15%, 51%, 49%, and 79% for heparin, NAcHep, DS, and CS, respectively. The NMR analysis (including the 13C spectra) of the labeled products indicated that deuterium labeling did not involve any substantial modification of the GAG structures. Also NMR signals associated with specific sequences of heparin for antithrombin and of DS for heparin cofactor II were essentially the same in the unlabeled and in the deuterated GAGs. The substantial retention of the original structure was confirmed by data on the degree of sulfation (by conductimetry) and on the electrophoretic mobility in acid buffer. On the other hand, HPLC/SEC data indicated some depolymerization of heparin and DS in the N-deacetylation step of the labeling reactions. HPLC/MS spectrometry permitted a clear identification of disaccharide and tetrasaccharide fragments obtained from deuterated GAGs by enzymic (heparinase, chondroitinase ABC) or chemical depolymerization (deaminative cleavage, Smith degradation), opening new prospects for studies of human pharmacokinetics, with differentiation of exogenous from endogenous GAGs.

  17. The Deuterium Fraction in Massive Starless Cores and Dynamical Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Shuo; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Pillai, Thushara; Butler, Michael J; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Sakai, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    We study deuterium fractionation in two massive starless cores C1-N and C1-S in Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) G028.37+00.07, first identified by Tan et al. (2013) with ALMA. Line emission from multiple transitions of $\\rm N_2H^+$ and $\\rm N_2D^+$ were observed with the ALMA, CARMA, SMA, JCMT, NRO 45m and IRAM 30m telescopes. By simultaneously fitting the spectra, we estimate the excitation conditions and deuterium fraction, $D_{\\rm frac}^{\\rm N_2H^+} \\equiv [\\rm N_2D^+]/[N_2H^+]$, with values of $D_{\\rm frac}^{\\rm N_2H^+} \\simeq 0.2$--$0.7$, several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. Additional observations of o-H$_2$D$^+$ are also presented that help constrain the ortho-to-para ratio of $\\rm H_2$, which is a key quantity affecting the degree of deuteration. We then present chemodynamical modeling of the two cores, exploring especially the implications for the collapse rate relative to free-fall, $\\alpha_{\\rm ff}$. In order to reach the high level of observed deuteration of $\\rm N_2H^+$, we find...

  18. Effect of neon plasma pre-irradiation on surface morphology and deuterium retention of tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; De Temmerman, G.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Ji, G.; Zhou, H. B.; Wang, B.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Neon and deuterium plasma irradiation of polycrystalline tungsten targets have been performed at high fluxes of ∼1024 ions m−2 s−1 to study the interaction of neon with tungsten and the influence of neon on deuterium retention. Tungsten exposure to neon plasma leads to the

  19. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ˜0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-2 Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10-6 Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  20. Thermal desorption of deuterium from modified carbon nanotubes and its correlation to the microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.; Keim, E.G.; Berg, van den A.H.J.; Smithers, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The process of deuterium desorption from single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) modified by atomic (D) and molecular (D2) deuterium treatment was investigated in an ultrahigh vacuum environment using thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). Microstructural and chemical analyses of SWNT material, m

  1. Saturation of deuterium retention in self-damaged tungsten exposed to high-flux plasmas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hoen, M. H. J.; Tyburska-Pueschel, B.; Ertl, K.; Mayer, M.; Rapp, J.; Kleijn, A.W.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Polycrystalline, annealed tungsten targets were bombarded with 12.3 MeV W4+ ions to various damage levels. Deuterium was implanted by high-flux plasmas in Pilot-PSI (>1024 m−2 s−1) at a surface temperature below 525 K. Deuterium retention has been studied by nuclear reaction analysis and by thermal

  2. Saturation of deuterium retention in self-damaged tungsten exposed to high-flux plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, M. H. J. 't; Tyburska-Puschel, B.; Ertl, K.; Mayer, M.; Rapp, J.; Kleyn, A. W.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma

    2012-01-01

    Polycrystalline, annealed tungsten targets were bombarded with 12.3MeV W4+ ions to various damage levels. Deuterium was implanted by high-flux plasmas in Pilot-PSI (>10(24) m(-2) s(-1)) at a surface temperature below 525 K. Deuterium retention has been studied by nuclear reaction analysis and by

  3. Atmospheric influence on the deuterium excess signal in polar firn - implications for ice core interpretation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlosser, Elisabeth; Oerter, H.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Reijmer, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal deuterium excess signal of fresh snow samples from Neumayer station, coastal Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, was studied to investigate the relationship between deuterium excess and precipitation origin. An isotope model was combined with a trajectory model to determine the relative inf

  4. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; M. Reinhart,; Litnovsky, A.; Philipps, V.; Van Oost, G.; Möller, S.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER - relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER - like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux

  5. Measurement of gluconeogenesis using glucose fragments and mass spectrometry after ingestion of deuterium oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chacko, Shaji K.; Sunehag, Agneta L.; Sharma, Susan; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Haymond, Morey W.

    2008-01-01

    We report a new method to measure the fraction of glucose derived from gluconeogenesis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and positive chemical ionization. After ingestion of deuterium oxide by subjects, glucose derived from gluconeogenesis is labeled with deuterium. Our calculations of gluc

  6. Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated graphite plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.N. Taylor; J. P. Allain; P. S. Krstic; J. Dadras; C. H. Skinner; K. E. Luitjohan

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fundamental interactions responsible for deuterium retention in lithiated graphite. Oxygen was found to be present and play a key role in experiments that simulated NSTX lithium conditioning, where the atomic surface concentration can increase to >40% when deuterium retention chemistry is observed. Quantum-classical molecular dynamic simulations elucidated this oxygen-deuterium effect and showed that oxygen retains significantly more deuterium than lithium in a simulated matrix with 20% lithium, 20% oxygen, and 60% carbon. Simulations further show that deuterium retention is even higher when lithium is removed from the matrix. Experiments artificially increased the oxygen content in graphite to approximately 16% and then bombarded with deuterium. XPS showed depletion of the oxygen and no enhanced deuterium retention, thus demonstrating that lithium is essential in retaining the oxygen that thereby retains deuterium.

  7. Flavivirus cell entry and membrane fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jolanda M.; Moesker, Bastiaan; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela; Wilschut, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Flaviviruses, such as dengue virus and West Nile virus, are enveloped viruses that infect cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and fusion from within acidic endosomes. The cell entry process of flaviviruses is mediated by the viral E glycoprotein. This short review will address recent advance

  8. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1990-02-01

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety.

  9. Comparison of the Recently proposed Super Marx Generator Approach to Thermonuclear Ignition with the DT Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid Concept (LIFE) by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2009-05-01

    The recently proposed Super Marx pure deuterium micro-detonation ignition concept [1] is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser DT fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE) [2]. A typical example of the LIFE concept is a fusion gain 30, and a fission gain of 10, making up for a total gain of 300, with about 10 times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means a substantial release of fission products, as in fusion-less pure fission reactors. In the Super Marx approach for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-detonation gains of the same magnitude can in theory be reached. If the theoretical prediction can be supported by more elaborate calculations, the Super Marx approach is likely to make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear micro-explosions. [1] ``Ignition of a Deuterium Micro-Detonation with a Gigavolt Super Marx Generator,'' Winterberg, F., Journal of Fusion Energy, Springer, 2008. http://www.springerlink.com/content/r2j046177j331241/fulltext.pdf. [2] ``LIFE: Clean Energy from Nuclear Waste,'' https://lasers.llnl.gov/missions/energy&_slash;for&_slash;the&_slash;future/life/

  10. Tritium concentrations in the active Pu'u O'o crater, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii: implications for cold fusion in the Earth's interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, J.E.; Hinkley, T.K.; Reimer, G.M.; Hedge, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    The assertion that deuterium-deuterium fusion may occur at low temperature suggests a potential new source of geothermal heat. If a cold-fusion-like process occurs within the Earth, then a test for its existence would be a search for anomalous tritium in volcanic emissions. The Pu'u O'o crater is the first point at which large amounts of water are degassed from the magma that feeds the Kilauea system. The magma is probably not contaminated by meteoric-source ground water prior to degassing at Pu'u O'o, although mixing of meteoric and magmatic H2O occurs within the crater. Tritium contents of samples from within the crater are lower than in samples taken simultaneously from the nearby upwind crater rim. These results provide no evidence in support of a cold-fusion-like process in the Earth's interior. ?? 1991.

  11. Fusion technologies for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE∗

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer K.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE engine design builds upon on going progress at the National Ignition Facility (NIF and offers a near-term pathway to commercial fusion. Fusion technologies that are critical to success are reflected in the design of the first wall, blanket and tritium separation subsystems. The present work describes the LIFE engine-related components and technologies. LIFE utilizes a thermally robust indirect-drive target and a chamber fill gas. Coolant selection and a large chamber solid-angle coverage provide ample tritium breeding margin and high blanket gain. Target material selection eliminates the need for aggressive chamber clearing, while enabling recycling. Demonstrated tritium separation and storage technologies limit the site tritium inventory to attractive levels. These key technologies, along with the maintenance and advanced materials qualification program have been integrated into the LIFE delivery plan. This describes the development of components and subsystems, through prototyping and integration into a First Of A Kind power plant.

  12. Economics of fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1977-10-15

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics.

  13. A critical compilation of experimental data on spectral lines and energy levels of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramida, A. E.

    2010-11-01

    For more than 50 years, Charlotte Moore's compilation of atomic energy levels and its subsequent revisions have been the standard source of reference data for the spectra of hydrogen and its isotopes. In those publications, theoretical data based on quantum-electrodynamic calculations have been given. This reflects the fact that the theory of the hydrogen spectrum has been perfected to an extent far exceeding the capabilities of the best measurements. However, rapid advances in the techniques of laser spectroscopy and optical frequency metrology have recently put experiments on a par with theory in terms of precision. This calls for construction of new comprehensive data sets for H, D, and T that summarize the latest experimental work and can be directly compared with the modern theoretical reference data. The present work compiles several tens of recent measurements of the hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium fine and hyperfine structure intervals and presents sets of energy levels and Ritz wavelengths derived from those measurements. Data exist for the fine structure of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium up to principal quantum number n = 12. For higher lying levels, there are many observed lines with unresolved fine structure. From those observations, level centers (centers of the fine structure) are derived by a least-squares optimization, and Ritz wavelengths of series with upper levels up to n = 40 are obtained. For tritium, the n = 2 and 3 energy level intervals are derived from experimental observations.

  14. Erosion of tungsten and its brazed joints with bronze irradiated by pulsed deuterium plasma flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakushin, V., E-mail: vlyakushin@mephi.ru; Polsky, V.; Kalin, B.; Dzhumaev, P.; Polyansky, A.; Sevryukov, O.; Suchkov, A.; Fedotov, V.

    2013-11-15

    This work presents results on erosion of mono- and polycrystalline tungsten and its brazed joints with bronze substrates under irradiation by high-temperature pulsed (τ{sub p} ∼ 20 μs) deuterium plasma flows, with a power density q = 19–66 GW/m{sup 2} and pulses numbering from 2 to 10, simulating the expected plasma disruptions and ELMs in fusion reactors. The surface erosion and heat resistance of tungsten and brazed joints were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and erosion coefficients were determined by target mass loss. It is found that for both types of tungsten the surface starts to significantly crack even under relatively weak irradiation regimes (q = 19 GW/m{sup 2}, N = 2), at which point surface melting is not observed. Local melting becomes visible with an increase of q up to 25 GW/m{sup 2}. In addition, there is formation of blisters with a typical size of 1–2 μm on the surface of monocrystalline samples and craters up to 2 μm in diameter on polycrystalline samples. In addition, craters ∼10–30 μm in diameter are formed on defects similar to those observed under unipolar arcs. At that point, the erosion coefficients change to within ranges of 0.2–0.7 × 10{sup −5} kg/J m{sup 2}. It is found that at q = 50 GW/m{sup 2}, the brazed joints of monocrystalline tungsten with bronze of Cu-0.6% Cr-0.08% Zr have the highest heat resistance.

  15. Inclusion and difusion studies of D in fusion breeding blanket candidate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.

    2015-07-01

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) reaction is the most practical fusion reaction on the way to harness fusion energy. As tritium presents trace quantities on Earth [1], tritium fuel is essential to be generated simultaneously with the D-T reaction in a commerical fusion power plant. Tritium can be obtained in the lithium contained breeding blanket as a transmutation product of nuclear reaction 6Li (n, a)T. Li2T iO3 is considered to be one promising candidate solid tritium breeder material, due to its high lithium density, low activation, compatiblity with structure materials and high chemical stability. The tritium generated in Li2T iO3 breeding blanket needs to be collected and recycled back to the fusion reaction. Therefore, the study of the diffusion characteristic of breeder material Li2T iO3 is necessary to determine tritium mobility and tritium extraction efficiency. In order to study tritium release mechanism of Li2T iO3 breeding material in a fusion power plant environment, a fusion like neutron spectrum is essential while it is now not availble in any laboratory. One alternative is using ion accelerator or implantor to get energetic hydrogenic (H,D,T) ions impacting on breeding material, to simulate the tritium distribution situation. Because of the radioactive property of tritium which will complicate processing procedure, another isotope of hydrogen Deuterium is actually used to be studied. The defect structure in Li2T iO3, due to reactor exposure to fusion generated particles and ? ray irradiation, is achieved by energetic Ti ions. SRIM program is implemented to simulate the D ion or Ti ion distributions after bombarding, as well as the defects. X-ray diffraction technique helps to identify phase compositions. Transmission electron microscopy technique is used to observe the microstructures (Author)

  16. Precision Measures of the Primordial Abundance of Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Pettini, Max; Jorgenson, Regina A.; Murphy, Michael T.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.88) damped Lyα system at z abs = 3.06726 toward the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyα transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias) and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H)p = (2.53 ± 0.04) × 10-5, corresponding to a universal baryon density 100 Ωb, 0 h 2 = 2.202 ± 0.046 for the standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). By combining our measure of (D/H)p with observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), we derive the effective number of light fermion species, N eff = 3.28 ± 0.28. We therefore rule out the existence of an additional (sterile) neutrino (i.e., N eff = 4.046) at 99.3% confidence (2.7σ), provided that the values of N eff and of the baryon-to-photon ratio (η10) did not change between BBN and recombination. We also place a strong bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, independent of the 4He primordial mass fraction, Y P: ξD = +0.05 ± 0.13 based only on the CMB+(D/H)p observations. Combining this value of ξD with the current best literature measure of Y P, we find a 2σ upper bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, |ξ| financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Keck telescope time was partially granted by NOAO, through the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP). TSIP is funded by NSF.

  17. Semi-analytic modeling and simulation of magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, R. D.; Slutz, S. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2013-10-01

    Presented is a semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). This model accounts for several key aspects of MagLIF, including: (1) pre-heat of the fuel; (2) pulsed-power-driven liner implosion; (3) liner compressibility with an analytic equation of state, artificial viscosity, and internal magnetic pressure and heating; (4) adiabatic compression and heating of the fuel; (5) radiative losses and fuel opacity; (6) magnetic flux compression with Nernst thermoelectric losses; (7) magnetized electron and ion thermal conduction losses; (8) deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium primary fusion reactions; and (9) magnetized alpha-particle heating. We will first show that this simplified model, with its transparent and accessible physics, can be used to reproduce the general 1D behavior presented throughout the original MagLIF paper. We will then use this model to illustrate the MagLIF parameter space, energetics, and efficiencies, and to show the experimental challenges that we will likely be facing as we begin testing MagLIF using the infrastructure presently available at the Z facility. Finally, we will demonstrate how this scenario could likely change as various facility upgrades are made over the next three to five years and beyond. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  19. Fusion research principles

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2013-01-01

    Fusion Research, Volume I: Principles provides a general description of the methods and problems of fusion research. The book contains three main parts: Principles, Experiments, and Technology. The Principles part describes the conditions necessary for a fusion reaction, as well as the fundamentals of plasma confinement, heating, and diagnostics. The Experiments part details about forty plasma confinement schemes and experiments. The last part explores various engineering problems associated with reactor design, vacuum and magnet systems, materials, plasma purity, fueling, blankets, neutronics

  20. Deuterium Retention by Implantation in Carbide-Doped Graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balden, M.; Oyarzabal, E.; Juan Pardo, E. de; Durocher, K.; Roth, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Garcia-Rosales, C. [Univ. de Navarra, San Sebastian (Spain). Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Tecnicas de Guipuzcoa and Escuela Superior de Ingenieros

    2003-04-01

    For fine-grain graphites with different final heat treatment, the influences of the porosity, degree of graphitization, and dopant (TiC, VC, WC, and ZrC) on the fluence dependence of the retention of 1 keV deuterium were investigated using thermal desorption spectroscopy. A strong decrease of the D retention for fluences higher than 10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} was observed for the undoped graphites graphitized at temperatures above 2000K compared to material only calcined at 1270K. Due to the identical manufacturing processes for the carbide-doped graphites used in this study, the structure is comparable for all of them. The choice of dopant as well as the ratio of open to closed porosity show no influence on the D retention. Therefore, these properties of the graphites can be neglected for hydrogen retention estimations.

  1. In-medium modification of pion-pairs on deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugert, Stefan

    2007-11-23

    In this thesis the quasi free photo production of pion pairs on bound nucleons {gamma}+A{yields} {pi}{pi}(A-1)+N is analyzed for liquid Deuterium. A pioneering experiment with a photon beam was performed by the TAPS collaboration at the accelerator facility MAMI-B in Mainz in 1999. This measurement observed an invariant mass shift of the isoscalar {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel with increasing atomic number as well. Due to the poor statistics, the significance of the data was however limited. The experiment described in this work reached a much higher statistical significance, allowing a review of the old data. In this experiment, the TAPS detector was used as a forward wall in combination with the Crystal Ball detector to achieve almost the complete 4{pi} solid angle coverage for particle detection at the MAMI accelerator facility. The installation of the experimental setup started at the end of 2003. The new readout electronics for the BaF{sub 2} crystals was used for the first time. Between June 2004 and April 2005 measurements on several targets were performed, including the lD{sub 2} data which has been analyzed in this work. The analysis of the Deuterium data is an essential contribution to understanding the ongoing processes for two reasons. Firstly, there is the possibility to compare the solid targets and Hydrogen to the lightest nucleus having Fermi motion included but the lowest possible nuclear volume, the Deuterium. For the second reason, there are no data for the mass differential cross section on the neutron available for the mentioned channels. Analyzing the Deuterium data and subtracting the published proton data, the cross section on the neutron gets accessible. An essential question for the theory is whether the cross section on neutron and proton are the same or how much they differ in the relevant energy regime. To determine the absolute cross section, the efficiency of the detector system is required. To provide this efficiency, I also

  2. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bluem, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik); Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Egger, J.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L.M. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Eades, J.; Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Gotta, D. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-05-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cylcotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm{sup 3}. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH{sub 4} drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman {alpha} transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time. (orig.).

  3. Pion Electroproduction form Helium 3, Deuterium, and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, Stephen Milton [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2002-05-01

    A series of measurements for pion electroproduction from helium-3, deuterium, and hydrogen were completed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility by the NucPi Collaboration. E91003 began taking data in February 1998 and was completed in April 1998. The longitudinal and transverse parts of the differential cross section were extracted, by means of a Rosenbluth type separation, in the direction parallel to the virtual photon, at Q 2 = 0.4 GeV 2 , for W = 1.15 and W = 1.6 GeV. The mass dependence of the longitudinal cross section should provide insight into the surprising apparent absence of any significant cross section enhancement due to excess pions in the nuclear medium.

  4. Pion Electroproduction form Helium 3, Deuterium, and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Avery

    2002-05-01

    A series of measurements for pion electroproduction from helium-3, deuterium, and hydrogen were completed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility by the NucPi Collaboration. E91003 began taking data in February 1998 and was completed in April 1998. The longitudinal and transverse parts of the differential cross section were extracted, by means of a Rosenbluth type separation, in the direction parallel to the virtual photon, at Q 2 = 0.4 GeV 2 , for W = 1.15 and W = 1.6 GeV. The mass dependence of the longitudinal cross section should provide insight into the surprising apparent absence of any significant cross section enhancement due to excess pions in the nuclear medium.

  5. Post-irradiation flashes and continuous emission from solid deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, J.A.; Brooks, R.L. [Guelph-Waterloo Program for Graduate Work in Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G2W1 (CANADA)

    1997-01-01

    Optical emission from proton-beam-irradiated solid deuterium near 800 nm has been studied after termination of the proton beam. The continuous red emission shows a residual intensity that persists over 30 min from termination of the beam. Optical flashes can also be thermally triggered over 10 min after termination of irradiation. Such triggered flashes are shown to quench the infrared absorption of Stark-shifted charge-induced features. Ultraviolet photons can stimulate this red emission after termination of irradiation with no measurable decrease in intensity for 40 min. The cause of this continuous emission and optical flashes is discussed in the light of these results. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Measurement of deuterium ion temperature profiles at TEXTOR-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, E.; Euringer, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Jaspers, R. [FOM Inst. voor Plasmafysica `Rijnhuizen`, Association EURATOM-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    1997-09-01

    Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) has been used to compare results on ion temperatures from several diagnostics at TEXTOR-94. The question of whether the typically measured width of impurity spectral lines is representative for the main ion temperature T{sub I}, is addressed by applying CXRS to the Balmer-alpha spectrum of deuterium. The importance of the halo effect is found not to be severe for the T{sub I} measurements. T{sub I} is lower than the impurity temperatures for low-density discharges with neutral beam heating. The time evolution of T{sub I} and the toroidal rotation were also measured during sawtooth oscillations. From this a lower bound for the ion heat diffusivity {chi}{sub I}{sup HP} of {approx} 2 m{sup 2} s{sup -1} has been deduced. (author).

  7. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

  8. Frontiers in fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Frontiers in Fusion Research provides a systematic overview of the latest physical principles of fusion and plasma confinement. It is primarily devoted to the principle of magnetic plasma confinement, that has been systematized through 50 years of fusion research. Frontiers in Fusion Research begins with an introduction to the study of plasma, discussing the astronomical birth of hydrogen energy and the beginnings of human attempts to harness the Sun's energy for use on Earth. It moves on to chapters that cover a variety of topics such as: * charged particle motion, * plasma kinetic theory, *

  9. Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The goal of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) is to relax the extreme pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion by magnetizing the fuel. Understanding the level of magnetization at stagnation is critical for charting the performance of any MIF concept. We show here that the secondary nuclear reactions in magnetized deuterium plasma can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product (BR), the critical confinement parameter for MIF. The secondary neutron yields and spectra are examined and shown to be extremely sensitive to BR. In particular, embedded magnetic fields are shown to affect profoundly the isotropy of the secondary neutron spectra. Detailed modeling of these spectra along with the ratio of overall secondary to primary neutron yields is used to form the basis of a diagnostic technique used to infer BR at stagnation. Effects of gradients in density, temperature and magnetic field strength are examined, as well as other possible non-uniform fuel configurations. Computational results employing a fully kinetic treatment of charged reaction product transport and Monte Carlo treatment of secondary reactions are compared to results from recent experiments at Sandia National Laboratories' Z machine testing the MAGnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept. The technique reveals that the charged reaction products were highly magnetized in these experiments. Implications for eventual ignition-relevant experiments with deuterium-tritium fuel are discussed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Plasma deuterium oxide accumulation following ingestion of different carbohydrate beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currell, Kevin; Urch, Joanna; Cerri, Erika; Jentjens, Roy L P; Blannin, Andy K; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2008-12-01

    Optimal fluid delivery from carbohydrate solutions such as oral rehydration solutions or sports drinks is essential. The aim of the study was to investigate whether a beverage containing glucose and fructose would result in greater fluid delivery than a beverage containing glucose alone. Six male subjects were recruited (average age (+/-SD): 22 +/- 2 y). Subjects entered the laboratory between 0700 h and 0900 h after an overnight fast. A 600 mL bolus of 1 of the 3 experimental beverages was then given. The experimental beverages were water (W), 75 g glucose (G), or 50 g glucose and 25 g fructose (GF); each beverage also contained 3.00 g of D2O. Following administration of the experimental beverage subjects remained in a seated position for 180 min. Blood and saliva samples were then taken every 5 min in the first hour and every 15 min thereafter. Plasma and saliva samples were analyzed for deuterium enrichment by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Deuterium oxide enrichments were compared using a 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance. The water trial (33 +/- 3 min) showed a significantly shorter time to peak than either G (82 +/- 40 min) or GF (59 +/- 25 min), but the difference between G and GF did not reach statistical significance. There was a significantly greater AUC for GF (55 673 +/- 10 020 delta per thousand vs. Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW).180 min) and W (60 497 +/- 9864 delta per thousand vs. VSMOW.180 min) compared with G (46 290 +/- 9622 delta per thousand vs. VSMOW.180 min); W and GF were not significantly different from each other. These data suggest that a 12.5% carbohydrate beverage containing glucose and fructose results in more rapid fluid delivery in the first 75 min than a beverage containing glucose alone.

  11. Plasma Heating and Current Drive for Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    ITER (in Latin ``the way'') is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen - deuterium and tritium - fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q >= 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). In a Tokamak the definition of the functionalities and requirements for the Plasma Heating and Current Drive are relevant in the determination of the overall plant efficiency, the operation cost of the plant and the plant availability. This paper summarise these functionalities and requirements in perspective of the systems under construction in ITER. It discusses the further steps necessary to meet those requirements. Approximately one half of the total heating will be provided by two Neutral Beam injection systems at with energy of 1 MeV and a beam power of 16 MW into the plasma. For ITER specific test facility is being build in order to develop and test the Neutral Beam injectors. Remote handling maintenance scheme for the NB systems, critical during the nuclear phase of the project, will be developed. In addition the paper will give an overview over the general status of ITER. )

  12. Deuterium retention and surface modifications of nanocrystalline tungsten films exposed to high-flux plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoen, M.H.J. ' t [FOM Institute DIFFER (Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research), Association EURATOM-FOM, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Dellasega, D.; Pezzoli, A.; Passoni, M. [Politecnico di Milano, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Kleyn, A.W., E-mail: A.W.Kleijn@uva.nl [FOM Institute DIFFER (Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research), Association EURATOM-FOM, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, NL-1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, CDCST, CAEP, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. [FOM Institute DIFFER (Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research), Association EURATOM-FOM, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The films withstand the intense plasma exposure maintaining overall integrity. • An increase of deuterium retention was observed with decreasing tungsten density. • Formation of micrometer-sized blisters as well as structures on the nanometer scale depending on the layer type. - Abstract: Deuterium retention studies are presented for nanostructured tungsten films exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas. Thin tungsten films of ∼1 μm thickness were deposited with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on bulk tungsten. Surface modifications were studied with scanning electron microscopy and deuterium retention with thermal desorption spectroscopy. Three types of PLD films with different densities and crystallinity were studied after exposure to deuterium plasmas. The surface temperature ranged from about 460 K at the periphery to about 520 K in the centre of the targets. The films withstand the intense plasma exposure well and maintain their overall integrity. An increase of deuterium retention is observed with decreasing tungsten density and crystallite size. We found that the filling of these thin films with deuterium is significantly faster than for pre-damaged polycrystalline tungsten. We observed formation of micrometer-sized blisters as well as structures on the nanometer scale, both depending on the layer type.

  13. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta, E-mail: l.buzi@fz-juelich.de [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Temmerman, Greg De [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oost, Guido Van [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Möller, Sören [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10{sup 23} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s and low: 9 · 10{sup 21} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10{sup 26} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion.

  14. Deuterium ordering in Laves phase deuteride YFe2D4.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proffen, Thomas Ernst [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ropka, Joanna [UNIV OF GENEVA; Cerny, Radovan [UNIV OF GENEVA; Paul - Boncour, V [CNRS

    2009-01-01

    The structure of Laves phase deuteride YFe{sub 2}D{sub 4.2} has been investigated by synchrotron and neutron (ToF) powder diffraction experiments between 60 K and 370 K. YFe{sub 2}D{sub 4.2} crystallizes below 323K in fully ordered monoclinic structure (s.g. Pc, Z = 8, a = 5.50663(4), b = 11.4823(1), c = 9.42919(6) {angstrom}, {beta} = 122.3314(5){sup o}, V = 503.765(3) {angstrom}{sup 3} at 290K) containing 4 yttrium, 8 iron and 18 deuterium atoms. Most of D-D distances are within the precision of the diffraction experiment longer than 2.1 {angstrom}, the shortest ones are of 1.96 {angstrom}. Seven iron atoms from eight are coordinated by deuterium in a trigonal bipyramid, similar to that in TiFeD{sub 1.95-2}. The eights iron atom is coordinated by deuterium in a tetrahedral configuration. The iron coordination by deuterium, and iron-deuterium distances points to the importance of the directional bonding between iron and deuterium atoms. The lowering of crystal symmetry due to deuterium ordering occurs at much higher temperature than magnetic order, and is therefore one of the parameters which are at the origin of magnetic transition at lower temperatures.

  15. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  16. Inertially confined fusion plasmas dominated by alpha-particle self-heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J. A.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G.; Kozioziemski, B.; Grim, G.; Field, J. E.; Frenje, J.; Izumi, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Landen, O.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moore, A.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Rygg, R. R.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Shaughnessy, D.; Strozzi, D.; Town, R. P. J.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-particle self-heating, the process of deuterium-tritium fusion reaction products depositing their kinetic energy locally within a fusion reaction region and thus increasing the temperature in the reacting region, is essential for achieving ignition in a fusion system. Here, we report new inertial confinement fusion experiments where the alpha-particle heating of the plasma is dominant with the fusion yield produced exceeding the fusion yield from the work done on the fuel (pressure times volume change) by a factor of two or more. These experiments have achieved the highest yield (26 +/- 0.5 kJ) and stagnation pressures (≍220 +/- 40 Gbar) of any facility-based inertial confinement fusion experiments, although they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the National Ignition Facility (~300-400 Gbar). These experiments put us in a new part of parameter space that has not been extensively studied so far because it lies between the no-alpha-particle-deposition regime and ignition.

  17. Developing diagnostic systems for ITER – the next step fusion energy experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Leipold, Frank; Gutierrez Espinoza, Heidi Estibaliz

    to be a viable energy source. Fusion energy power plants will be safe and can be operated to supply the baseload of an energy system. The fuel resources are inexhaustible, and can be derived from sea water. Fusion energy is based on the nuclear reaction fusing hydrogen isotopes into helium – like in the Sun......Fusion energy research is moving to the next stage with the well progressed construction of one of the largest research infrastructures ever – ITER. The goal of ITER is to produce 500 MW of fusion power while heating the fuel –deuterium/tritium plasma – by 50 MW. This will confirm fusion energy...... is the ultimate goal of fusion energy, the path towards this is challenging. A fusion plasma has a temperature of 200 mio. degrees (15 times that of the core of the Sun), and this is confined by a magnetic field generated by powerful superconducting magnets in a vacuum chamber of 1000 m3. Operating diagnostic...

  18. Tritium Breeding Blanket for a Commercial Fusion Power Plant - A System Engineering Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Wayne R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-04-14

    The goal of developing a new source of electric power based on fusion has been pursued for decades. If successful, future fusion power plants will help meet growing world-wide demand for electric power. A key feature and selling point for fusion is that its fuel supply is widely distributed globally and virtually inexhaustible. Current world-wide research on fusion energy is focused on the deuterium-tritium (DT for short) fusion reaction since it will be the easiest to achieve in terms of the conditions (e.g., temperature, density and confinement time of the DT fuel) required to produce net energy. Over the past decades countless studies have examined various concepts for TBBs for both magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). At this time, the key organizations involved are government sponsored research organizations world-wide. The near-term focus of the MFE community is on the development of TBB mock-ups to be tested on the ITER tokamak currently under construction in Caderache France. TBB concepts for IFE tend to be different from MFE primarily due to significantly different operating conditions and constraints. This report focuses on longer-term commercial power plants where the key stakeholders include: electric utilities, plant owner and operator, manufacturer, regulators, utility customers, and in-plant subsystems including the heat transfer and conversion systems, fuel processing system, plant safety systems, and the monitoring control systems.

  19. Thermal desorption of deuterium from Be, and Be with helium bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, A.V.; Van Veen, A.; Busker, G.J. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.

    1998-01-01

    Deuterium desorption measurements carried out on a single-crystalline beryllium sample are presented. Deuterium ions were implanted at room temperature at the energy of 0.7 and 1.2 keV up to doses ranging from 10{sup 19} to 3.6 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -2}. In order to eliminate the influence of the beryllium-oxide surface layer, before the implantation the surface of the sample was cleaned by argon sputtering. After the implantation the sample was annealed up to 1200 K at a constant rate of 10 K/s. Deuterium released from the sample was monitored by a calibrated quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The desorption spectra revealed two different contributions. One is a well defined and very narrow peak centered around 450 K. This peak is observed only at high implantation doses > 7.8 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -2}, which is close to the deuterium saturation limit of 0.3 D/Be and is related to deuterium release from blisters or interconnected bubbles. The activation energy of 1.1 eV and the threshold implantation dose are consistent with the values reported in literature. The second contribution in the release spectra is found in the temperature range from 600 to 900 K and is present throughout the whole range of the implantation doses. The activation energies corresponding to this release lie in the range between 1.8 and 2.5 eV and are ascribed to the release from deuterium-vacancy type of defects. In a number of experiments the deuterium implantation was preceded by helium implantation followed by partial annealing to create helium bubbles. The resulting deuterium desorption spectra indicate that deuterium detrapping from helium bubbles is characterized by an activation energy of 2.7 eV. (author)

  20. Cell fusion and nuclear fusion in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Ohtsu, Mina; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells are surrounded by a plasma membrane and have a large nucleus containing the genomic DNA, which is enclosed by a nuclear envelope consisting of the outer and inner nuclear membranes. Although these membranes maintain the identity of cells, they sometimes fuse to each other, such as to produce a zygote during sexual reproduction or to give rise to other characteristically polyploid tissues. Recent studies have demonstrated that the mechanisms of plasma membrane or nuclear membrane fusion in plants are shared to some extent with those of yeasts and animals, despite the unique features of plant cells including thick cell walls and intercellular connections. Here, we summarize the key factors in the fusion of these membranes during plant reproduction, and also focus on "non-gametic cell fusion," which was thought to be rare in plant tissue, in which each cell is separated by a cell wall.

  1. Thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium and tantalum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.F.

    1981-10-01

    Heats of transport have been determined for thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in pure vanadium, niobium and tantalum; in vanadium alloyed with either niobium, titanium or chromium; and in niobium-tantalum alloys. In all cases, thermotransport was toward colder regions and was significantly greater for deuterium than for hydrogen. A mass spectrometric technique was used to simultaneously measure heats of transport for hydrogen and deuterium in a single specimen containing both isotopes. This technique greatly increased the precision with which isotope effects in the heat of transport could be measured. The predominant effect of alloying was to dramatically increase thermotransport; however, thermotransport decreased as niobium was added to tantalum.

  2. Diagnosing laser-preheated magnetized plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Nagayama, T. N.; Wei, M. S.; Campbell, E. M.; Fiksel, G.; Chang, P.-Y.; Davies, J. R.; Barnak, D. H.; Glebov, V. Y.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Fooks, J.; Blue, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    We present a platform on the OMEGA EP Laser Facility that creates and diagnoses the conditions present during the preheat stage of the MAGnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept. Experiments were conducted using 9 kJ of 3ω (355 nm) light to heat an underdense deuterium gas (electron density: 2.5 ×1020 cm-3=0.025 of critical density) magnetized with a 10 T axial field. Results show that the deuterium plasma reached a peak electron temperature of 670 ± 140 eV, diagnosed using streaked spectroscopy of an argon dopant. The results demonstrate that plasmas relevant to the preheat stage of MagLIF can be produced at multiple laser facilities, thereby enabling more rapid progress in understanding magnetized preheat. Results are compared with magneto-radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, and plans for future experiments are described.

  3. Development of aerogel-lined targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Tom [Technical Univ. Munchen (Germany)

    2013-03-28

    This thesis explores the formation of ICF compatible foam layers inside of an ablator shell used for inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In particular, the capability of p- DCPD polymer aerogels to serve as a scaffold for the deuterium-tritium mix was analyzed. Four different factors were evaluated: the dependency of different factors such as thickness or composition of a precursor solution on the uniformity of the aerogel layer, how to bring the optimal composition inside of the ablator shell, the mechanical stability of ultra-low density p-DCPD aerogel bulk pieces during wetting and freezing with hydrogen, and the wetting behavior of thin polymer foam layers in HDC carbon ablator shells with liquid deuterium. The research for thesis was done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in cooperation with the Technical University Munich.

  4. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Nevzat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT filled cryogenic plastic (CH capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13–15 MeV and downscattered (10–12 MeV neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  5. Species separation and modification of neutron diagnostics in inertial-confinement fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Inglebert, Aurelie; Larroche, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The different behaviours of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) in the hot spot of marginally-igniting cryogenic DT inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) targets are investigated with an ion Fokker-Planck model. With respect to an equivalent single-species model, a higher density and a higher temperature are found for T in the stagnation phase of the target implosion. In addition, the stagnating hot spot is found to be less dense but hotter than in the single-species case. As a result, the fusion reaction yield in the hot spot is significantly increased. Fusion neutron diagnostics of the implosion find a larger ion temperature as deduced from DT reactions than from DD reactions, in good agreement with NIF experimental results. ICF target designs should thus definitely take ion-kinetic effects into account.

  6. Fokker Planck kinetic modeling of suprathermal alpha-particles in a fusion plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Peigney, Benjamin-Edouard; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We present an ion kinetic model describing the ignition and burn of the deuterium-tritium fuel of inertial fusion targets. The analysis of the underlying physical model enables us to develop efficient numerical methods to simulate the creation, transport and collisional relaxation of fusion reaction products (alpha-particles) at a kinetic level. A two-energy-scale approach leads to a self-consistent modeling of the coupling between suprathermal alpha-particles and the thermal bulk of the imploding plasma. This method provides an accurate numerical treatment of energy deposition and transport processes involving suprathermal particles. The numerical tools presented here are validated against known analytical results. This enables us to investigate the potential role of ion kinetic effects on the physics of ignition and thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion schemes.

  7. Nuclear fusion inside condense matters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jing-tang

    2007-01-01

    This article describes in detail the nuclear fusion inside condense matters--the Fleischmann-Pons effect, the reproducibility of cold fusions, self-consistentcy of cold fusions and the possible applications.

  8. Preliminary results from the first integrated Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Awe, T. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Herrmann, M.; Jennings, C.; Lamppa, D.; Martin, M.; McBride, R. D.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D.; Smith, I. C.

    2013-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' Z Machine provides a drive current of up to 27 MA with 100 ns risetime to a magnetically-driven load. Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) is the main focus of the inertial confinement fusion program on Z. The MagLIF concept uses an imploding metallic cylindrical liner to compress magnetized, pre-heated fusion fuel. Simulations indicate that fusion yields on the order of 100 kJ (5e16 DT neutrons) are achievable with a drive current of 27 MA in 100 ns, a laser preheat of 8 kJ in 8 ns, an applied axial B-field of 30 T, and deuterium-tritium fusion fuel. The first fully integrated MagLIF experiments are scheduled to be conducted on Z late summer 2013. These tests will utilize a drive current of 16 MA, a laser preheat of 2 kJ in 2 ns, an applied B-field of 10 T, and deuterium fuel. With these reduced parameters, simulations predict yields greater than 1e10 DD neutrons. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  10. Fusion helps diversification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Liang; Z. Ren; M. de Rijke

    2014-01-01

    A popular strategy for search result diversification is to first retrieve a set of documents utilizing a standard retrieval method and then rerank the results. We adopt a different perspective on the problem, based on data fusion. Starting from the hypothesis that data fusion can improve performance

  11. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Katsov; M Müller; M Schick

    2005-06-01

    The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simulation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in mechanism lead to several predictions, in particular that fusion is accompanied by transient leakage. This prediction has recently been verified. Self-consistent field theory is applied to examine the free energy barriers in the different scenarios.

  12. Controlled thermonuclear fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Bobin, Jean Louis

    2014-01-01

    The book is a presentation of the basic principles and main achievements in the field of nuclear fusion. It encompasses both magnetic and inertial confinements plus a few exotic mechanisms for nuclear fusion. The state-of-the-art regarding thermonuclear reactions, hot plasmas, tokamaks, laser-driven compression and future reactors is given.

  13. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  14. Scaphoid excision with four-corner fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enna, Matthew; Hoepfner, Peter; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2005-11-01

    The scaphoid plays a critical role in maintain-ing normal carpal kinematics. SLAC and SNAC wrist arthritis demonstrate the ramifications ofscaphoid pathology on wrist biomechanics. In the past, symptomatic SLAC or SNAC pathology spelled total wrist arthrodesis. Over the past 20 years there has been a movement toward limited wrist arthrodesis in the treatment of SLAC/SNAC wrists. In the long-term follow-up of four-corner fusions, patient satisfaction is high, patients are able to return to their previous vocation, and wrist function averages 60%-70% of the contralateral wrist. The Spider plate is a recent advancement in the four-corner fusion armamentarium that has thus far shown great promise in respect to fusion rates (100% in the first documented series [36]),functional range of motion, intercarpal stability[37], and patient satisfaction.

  15. Thermal desorption from self-damaged tungsten exposed to deuterium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparyan, Yu.M., E-mail: gasparyan.yury@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe sh.31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ogorodnikova, O.V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe sh.31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Efimov, V.S.; Mednikov, A.; Marenkov, E.D.; Pisarev, A.A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe sh.31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Markelj, S.; Čadež, I. [Jožef Stefan Institute and Association EURATOM-MHEST, Jamova Cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-08-15

    Deuterium retention in tungsten damaged by 2–20 MeV W ions and then exposed to D atoms was investigated by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy. Experimental data demonstrate a significant increase of deuterium retention in the presence of radiation defects. A remarkable amount of deuterium is trapped even at the temperature of 800 K. TDS spectra were simulated using the computer code DIFTRAP based on kinetic rate equations to derive parameters of deuterium interaction with radiation defects. It was shown that irradiation by MeV W ions forms in W a high concentration of strong traps with the detrapping energy of 1.7–2 eV. These traps play major role in the D retention at elevated temperatures. The experimental spectra have peculiarities that are not described by the standard modeling; and the reasons for that are discussed.

  16. Mid-infrared vibrational study of deuterium-containing PAH variants

    CERN Document Server

    Buragohain, Mridusmita; Sarre, Peter; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have been long proposed to be a major carrier of 'Unidentified Infrared' (UIR) emission bands that have been observed ubiquitously in various astrophysical environments. These molecules can potentially be an efficient reservoir of deuterium. Once the infrared properties of the deuterium- containing PAHs are well understood both experimentally and theoretically, the interstellar UIR bands can be used as a valuable tool to infer the cause of the deuterium depletion in the ISM. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out on deuterium-containing ovalene variants to study the infrared properties of these molecules. These include deuterated ovalene, cationic deuterated ovalene, deuteronated ovalene and deuterated-deuteronated ovalene. We present a D/H ratio calculated from our theoretical study to compare with the observationally proposed D/H ratio.

  17. Effect of neon plasma pre-irradiation on surface morphology and deuterium retention of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, L., E-mail: L.Cheng@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics & Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); De Temmerman, G.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregion Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Ji, G. [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, UMR CNRS 8207, Université Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Zhou, H.B. [School of Physics & Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, B. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Yuan, Y., E-mail: yueyuan@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics & Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Y. [School of Physics & Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu, G.H., E-mail: LGH@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics & Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Neon and deuterium plasma irradiation of polycrystalline tungsten targets have been performed at high fluxes of ∼10{sup 24} ions m{sup −2} s{sup −1} to study the interaction of neon with tungsten and the influence of neon on deuterium retention. Tungsten exposure to neon plasma leads to the formation of wavy nanostructures on the surface. Subsequent exposure to high-flux deuterium plasma leads to blister formation of micrometer size on top of the wavy structures. The total deuterium retention is decreased by neon pre-irradiation for all surface temperatures used in the present experiments. It is suggested that a barrier of trapped Ne is formed that interrupts the D transport and reduces D retention.

  18. Mid-infrared vibrational study of deuterium-containing PAH variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buragohain, Mridusmita; Pathak, Amit; Sarre, Peter; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki

    2016-11-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have been long proposed to be a major carrier of 'Unidentified Infrared' (UIR) emission bands that have been observed ubiquitously in various astrophysical environments. These molecules can potentially be an efficient reservoir of deuterium. Once the infrared properties of the deuterium-containing PAHs are well understood both experimentally and theoretically, the interstellar UIR bands can be used as a valuable tool to infer the cause of the deuterium depletion in the ISM. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out on deuterium-containing ovalene variants to study the infrared properties of these molecules. These include deuterated ovalene, cationic deuterated ovalene, deuteronated ovalene and deuterated-deuteronated ovalene. We present a D/H ratio calculated from our theoretical study to compare with the observationally proposed D/H ratio.

  19. Commissioning experiment of the polarized internal gas target with deuterium at ANKE/COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Boxing [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Collaboration: ANKE-Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    In order to conduct the production experiments with polarized deuterium target and (un)polarized proton beam at ANKE/COSY, a commissioning experiment of the polarized internal target with deuterium is imperative. The commissioning experiment includes the measurements of both the vector (Q{sub y}) and tensor (Q{sub yy}) polarization of the deuterium gas target through the nuclear reactions with large and well known analyzing powers, which can be detected in ANKE. The dependence of the polarizations along the storage cell is also determined. The poster presents the physics case for the experiments with deuterium polarized internal target and the apparatus needed for the commissioning experiment, as well as the procedure of extraction for spin observables.

  20. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Davis, A. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R.; Karasik, M.; Keck, R. L.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Woo, K. M.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs=56 ±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ˜60 % of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, LM15119ER (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  1. Deuterium-tritium pulse propulsion with hydrogen as propellant and the entire space-craft as a gigavolt capacitor for ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    2013-08-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ∼105 K. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

  2. Parity-violating neutron spin rotation in hydrogen and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grießhammer, H. W.; Schindler, M. R.; Springer, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the (parity-violating) spin-rotation angle of a polarized neutron beam through hydrogen and deuterium targets, using pionless effective field theory up to next-to-leading order. Our result is part of a program to obtain the five leading independent low-energy parameters that characterize hadronic parity violation from few-body observables in one systematic and consistent framework. The two spin-rotation angles provide independent constraints on these parameters. Our result for np spin rotation is frac{1} {ρ }frac{{d\\varphi _{PV}^{np} }} {{dl}} = left[ {4.5 ± 0.5} right] rad MeV^{ - frac{1} {2}} left( {2g^{left( {^3 S_1 - ^3 P_1 } right)} + g^{left( {^3 S_1 - ^3 P_1 } right)} } right) - left[ {18.5 ± 1.9} right] rad MeV^{ - frac{1} {2}} left( {g_{left( {Δ I = 0} right)}^{left( {^1 S_0 - ^3 P_0 } right)} - 2g_{left( {Δ I = 2} right)}^{left( {^1 S_0 - ^3 P_0 } right)} } right), while for nd spin rotation we obtain frac{1} {ρ }frac{{d\\varphi _{PV}^{nd} }} {{dl}} = left[ {8.0 ± 0.8} right] rad MeV^{ - frac{1} {2}} g^{left( {^3 S_1 - ^1 P_1 } right)} + left[ {17.0 ± 1.7} right] rad MeV^{ - frac{1} {2}} g^{left( {^3 S_1 - ^3 P_1 } right)} + left[ {2.3 ± 0.5} right] rad MeV^{ - frac{1} {2}} left( {3g_{left( {Δ I = 0} right)}^{left( {^1 S_0 - ^3 P_0 } right)} - 2g_{left( {Δ I = 1} right)}^{left( {^1 S_0 - ^3 P_0 } right)} } right), where the g (X-Y), in units of MeV^{ - frac{3} {2}}, are the presently unknown parameters in the leading-order parity-violating Lagrangian. Using naıve dimensional analysis to estimate the typical size of the couplings, we expect the signal for standard target densities to be left| {frac{{d\\varphi _{PV} }} {{dl}}} right| ≈ left[ {10^{ - 7} ldots 10^{ - 6} } right]frac{{rad}} {m} for both hydrogen and deuterium targets. We find no indication that the nd observable is enhanced compared to the np one. All results are properly renormalized. An estimate of the numerical and systematic uncertainties of our calculations

  3. 以 gp41为靶点的 HIV-1肽类融合抑制剂研究进展%Advancement on the study of peptides fusion inhibitors anti HIV-1 targeting gp41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许燕珍; 吴文言

    2016-01-01

    gp41是 HIV-1表面的一种包膜糖蛋白,介导病毒粒子与宿主细胞的细胞膜发生膜融合从而使病毒进入靶细胞,在 HIV-1感染和传播的过程中起关键作用。以 gp41为靶点的融合抑制剂不失为一种新型的抗 HIV-1药物之选,其中2003年多肽类融合抑制剂 T-20的上市,使得多肽融合抑制剂成为备受关注的研究热点。本文就 gp41的结构、融合机制以及肽类融合抑制剂的研究进展进行了综述。%The transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 of HIV-1 plays a key role in HIV-1 infection and transmission,mediating the fusion of virus and target cell membranes. Developing various peptides and peptidomimetics used as fusion inhibitors have be-came an attractive research area since the first peptide fusion inhibitor(T-20)targeting HIV-1 gp41 approved by FDA in 2003. This review summarizes the structure and fusion mechanism of gp41 and the recent progresses in the design and development of novel peptides and peptidominetics used as HIV-1 fusion inhibitors.

  4. Search for d* dibaryon by double-radiative capture on pionic deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolnierczuk, P.A.; Gorringe, T.P.; Hasinoff, M.D.; Kovash, M.A.; Tripathi, S.; Wright, D.H

    2002-12-05

    We report a search for d* dibaryon production by double-radiative capture on pionic deuterium. The experiment was conducted at the TRIUMF cyclotron using the RMC cylindrical pair spectrometer, and detected {gamma}-ray coincidences following pion stops in liquid deuterium. We found no evidence for narrow dibaryons, and obtained a branching ratio upper limit, BR<6.7x10{sup -6} (90% C.L.), for narrow d* production in the mass range from 1920 to 1980 MeV.

  5. Search for d^* Dibaryon by Double-radiative Capture on Pionic Deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Zolnierczuk, P A; Hasinoff, M D; Kovash, M A; Tripathi, S; Wright, D H

    2002-01-01

    We report a search for d^* dibaryon production by double-radiative capture on pionic deuterium. The experiment was conducted at the TRIUMF cyclotron using the RMC cylindrical pair spectrometer, and detected gamma-ray coincidences following pion stops in liquid deuterium. We found no evidence for narrow dibaryons, and obtained a branching ratio upper limit, BR < 1.5 times 10^{-6} (90% C.L.), for narrow d^* production in the mass range from 1920 to 1980 MeV.

  6. Overview of recent tritium target filling, layering, and material testing at Los Alamos national laboratory in support of inertial fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebey, P. S.; Dole, J. M.; Geller, D. A.; Hoffer, J. K.; Morris, J.; Nobile, A.; Schoonover, J. R.; Wilson, D. [MS-C927, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Bonino, M.; Harding, D.; Sangster, C.; Shmayda, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE, Univ. of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Nikroo, A.; Sheliak, J. D. [General Atomics GA (United States); Burmann, J.; Cook, B.; Letts, S.; Sanchez, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The Tritium Science and Engineering (AET-3) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performs a variety of activities to support Inertial Fusion (IF) research - both to further fundamental fusion science and to develop technologies in support of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power generation. Inertial fusion ignition target designs have a smooth spherical shell of cryogenic Deuterium-Tritium (DT) solid contained within a metal or plastic shell that is a few mm in diameter. Fusion is attained by imploding these shells under the symmetric application of energy beams. For IFE targets the DT solid must also survive the process of injecting it into the power plant reactor. Non-ignition IF targets often require a non-cryogenic DT gas fill of a glass or polymeric shell. In this paper an overview will be given of recent LANL activities to study cryogenic DT layering, observe tritium exposure effects on IF relevant materials, and fill targets in support of IF implosion experiments. (authors)

  7. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  8. On the path to fusion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, M.

    2016-10-01

    There is a need to develop alternate energy sources in the coming century because fossil fuels will become depleted and their use may lead to global climate change. Inertial fusion can become such an energy source, but significant progress must be made before its promise is realized. The high-density approach to inertial fusion suggested by Nuckolls et al. leads reaction chambers compatible with civilian power production. Methods to achieve the good control of hydrodynamic stability and implosion symmetry required to achieve these high fuel densities will be discussed. Fast Ignition, a technique that achieves fusion ignition by igniting fusion fuel after it is assembled, will be described along with its gain curves. Fusion costs of energy for conventional hotspot ignition will be compared with those of Fast Ignition and their capital costs compared with advanced fission plants. Finally, techniques that may improve possible Fast Ignition gains by an order of magnitude and reduce driver scales by an order of magnitude below conventional ignition requirements are described.

  9. Comparison of Spatiotemporal Fusion Models: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneously capturing spatial and temporal dynamics is always a challenge for the remote sensing community. Spatiotemporal fusion has gained wide interest in various applications for its superiority in integrating both fine spatial resolution and frequent temporal coverage. Though many advances have been made in spatiotemporal fusion model development and applications in the past decade, a unified comparison among existing fusion models is still limited. In this research, we classify the models into three categories: transformation-based, reconstruction-based, and learning-based models. The objective of this study is to (i compare four fusion models (STARFM, ESTARFM, ISTAFM, and SPSTFM under a one Landsat-MODIS (L-M pair prediction mode and two L-M pair prediction mode using time-series datasets from the Coleambally irrigation area and Poyang Lake wetland; (ii quantitatively assess prediction accuracy considering spatiotemporal comparability, landscape heterogeneity, and model parameter selection; and (iii discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the three categories of spatiotemporal fusion models.

  10. Decision Fusion System for Bolted Joint Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bolted joint is widely used in mechanical and architectural structures, such as machine tools, industrial robots, transport machines, power plants, aviation stiffened plate, bridges, and steel towers. The bolt loosening induced by flight load and environment factor can cause joint failure leading to a disastrous accident. Hence, structural health monitoring is critical for the bolted joint detection. In order to realize a real-time and convenient monitoring and satisfy the requirement of advanced maintenance of the structure, this paper proposes an intelligent bolted joint failure monitoring approach using a developed decision fusion system integrated with Lamb wave propagation based actuator-sensor monitoring method. Firstly, the basic knowledge of decision fusion and classifier selection techniques is briefly introduced. Then, a developed decision fusion system is presented. Finally, three fusion algorithms, which consist of majority voting, Bayesian belief, and multiagent method, are adopted for comparison in a real-world monitoring experiment for the large aviation aluminum plate. Based on the results shown in the experiment, a big potential in real-time application is presented that the method can accurately and rapidly identify the bolt loosening by analyzing the acquired strain signal using proposed decision fusion system.

  11. Dust Combustion Safety Issues for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety research task to identify the safety issues and phenomenology of metallic dust fires and explosions that are postulated for fusion experiments. There are a variety of metal dusts that are created by plasma erosion and disruptions within the plasma chamber, as well as normal industrial dusts generated in the more conventional equipment in the balance of plant. For fusion, in-vessel dusts are generally mixtures of several elements; that is, the constituent elements in alloys and the variety of elements used for in-vessel materials. For example, in-vessel dust could be composed of beryllium from a first wall coating, tungsten from a divertor plate, copper from a plasma heating antenna or diagnostic, and perhaps some iron and chromium from the steel vessel wall or titanium and vanadium from the vessel wall. Each of these elements has its own unique combustion characteristics, and mixtures of elements must be evaluated for the mixture’s combustion properties. Issues of particle size, dust temperature, and presence of other combustible materials (i.e., deuterium and tritium) also affect combustion in air. Combustion in other gases has also been investigated to determine if there are safety concerns with “inert” atmospheres, such as nitrogen. Several coolants have also been reviewed to determine if coolant breach into the plasma chamber would enhance the combustion threat; for example, in-vessel steam from a water coolant breach will react with metal dust. The results of this review are presented here.

  12. Advanced Alarm Systems: Revision of Guidance and Its Technical Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Pressurized Water Reactor (Westinghouse) APWR Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (Mitsubishi) ARP alarm response procedure CAMLS CANDU Annunciation Message...List System CANDU Canadian Deuterium Uranium CE Combustion Engineering CPIAS Critical Parameter Indication and Alarm System CRT cathode ray tube ...bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC

  13. Effect of plastic deformation on deuterium retention and release in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terentyev, D., E-mail: dterenty@sckcen.be; Lambrinou, K.; Minov, B. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); De Temmerman, G. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon - CS 90 046 - 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Morgan, T. W. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Zayachuk, Y.; Bystrov, K. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Dubinko, A. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Oost, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-02-28

    The effect of severe plastic deformation on the deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high-flux low-energy plasma (flux ∼ 10{sup 24 }D/m{sup 2}/s, energy ∼ 50 eV, and fluence up to 3 × 10{sup 26 }D/m{sup 2}) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The desorption spectra in both reference and plastically deformed samples were deconvolved into three contributions attributed to the detrapping from dislocations, deuterium-vacancy clusters, and pores, respectively. The plastically induced deformation, resulting in high dislocation density, does not change the positions of the three peaks, but alters their amplitudes as compared to the reference material. The appearance of blisters detected by scanning electron microscopy and the desorption peak attributed to the release from pores (i.e., deuterium bubbles) were suppressed in the plastically deformed samples but only up to a certain fluence. Beyond 5 × 10{sup 25 }D/m{sup 2}, the release from the bubbles in the deformed material is essentially higher than in the reference material. Based on the presented results, we suggest that a dense dislocation network increases the incubation dose needed for the appearance of blisters, associated with deuterium bubbles, by offering numerous nucleation sites for deuterium clusters eventually transforming into deuterium-vacancy clusters by punching out jogs on dislocation lines.

  14. Control of Fusion and Solubility in Fusion Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Craven, David A

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we consider the control of fusion in fusion systems, proving three previously known, non-trivial results in a new, largely elementary way. We then reprove a result of Aschbacher, that the product of two strongly closed subgroups is strongly closed; to do this, we consolidate the theory of quotients of fusion systems into a consistent theory. We move on considering p-soluble fusion systems, and prove that they are constrained, allowing us to effectively characterize fusion systems of p-soluble groups. This leads us to recast Thompson Factorization for Qd(p)-free fusion systems, and consider Thompson Factorization for more general fusion systems.

  15. RF heating for fusion product studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellsten, T., E-mail: thel@kth.se; Johnson, T. [Dept. of Fusion Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Sharapov, S. E.; Kiptily, V.; Rimini, F. [CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre Abingdon (United Kingdom); Eriksson, J. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University (Sweden); Mantsinen, M. [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Barcelona (Spain); Schneider, M. [IRFM-CEA, Saint-Paul-Lez Durance (France); Tsalas, M. [FOM Inst. DIFFER, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-12-10

    Third harmonic cyclotron heating is an effective tool for accelerating deuterium (D) beams to the MeV energy range, suitable for studying ITER relevant fast particle physics in plasmas without significant tritium content. Such experiments were recently conducted in JET with an ITER like wall in D plasmas with {sup 3}He concentrations up to 30% in order to boost the fusion reactivity by D-{sup 3}He reactions. The harmonic cyclotron heating produces high-energy tails in the MeV range of D ions by on-axis heating and of {sup 3}He ions by tangential off-axis heating. The discharges are characterized by long sawtooth free periods and a rich spectrum of MHD modes excited by the fast D and {sup 3}He ions. The partitions of the power, which depend on the distribution function of D, vary strongly over several slowing down times. Self-consistent modelling of the distribution function with the SELFO-light code are presented and compared with experimental data from fast particle diagnostics.

  16. Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Edward I.

    2016-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear bum in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm3-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIP's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY20l0 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

  17. Review on Recent Developments in Laser Driven Inertial Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghoranneviss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of the laser in 1960 hopes were based on using its very high energy concentration within very short pulses of time and very small volumes for energy generation from nuclear fusion as “Inertial Fusion Energy” (IFE, parallel to the efforts to produce energy from “Magnetic Confinement Fusion” (MCF, by burning deuterium-tritium (DT in high temperature plasmas to helium. Over the years the fusion gain was increased by a number of magnitudes and has reached nearly break-even after numerous difficulties in physics and technology had been solved. After briefly summarizing laser driven IFE, we report how the recently developed lasers with pulses of petawatt power and picosecond duration may open new alternatives for IFE with the goal to possibly ignite solid or low compressed DT fuel thereby creating a simplified reactor scheme. Ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks after irradiation of picosecond (PS laser pulses of around terawatt (TW power in the range of 1020 cm/s2 was discovered by Sauerbrey (1996 as measured by Doppler effect where the laser intensity was up to about 1018 W/cm2. This is several orders of magnitude higher than acceleration by irradiation based on thermal interaction of lasers has produced.

  18. ULTRASOUND INDUCED AND LASER ENHANCED COLD FUSION CHEMISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.V.Prevenslik

    1995-01-01

    The standard model of sonoluminescence suggests that the coulomb barrer to deuterium fusion may be overcome by high bubble gas temperatures caused by compression heating if the bubble diameter remains spherical during bubble collapse.However,in the more likely collapse geometry of a pancake shape,the temperature rise in the bubbles is negligible.But the collapsing pancake bubble is fund to significantly increase the frequency of the infrared energy available in the vibrational state of the water molecules at ambient temperature.For a collapse to liquied density,ultraviolet radiation at about 10eV is fund.Although the ultraviolet radiation is of a low intensity,higher intensities may be possible if the bubble collapse is enhanced by visible and infrared lases.Neither hot nor cold fusion is predicted in bubble collapse but the ultraviolet energy at about 10eV developed in the bubble is sufficient to provide the basis for a new field of chemistry called ultrasound induced and laser enhanced cold fusion chemistry.

  19. Research on stellarator-mirror fission-fusion hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Kotenko, V. G.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Nemov, V. V.; Ågren, O.; Noack, K.; Kalyuzhnyi, V. N.; Hagnestål, A.; Källne, J.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Garkusha, I. E.

    2014-09-01

    The development of a stellarator-mirror fission-fusion hybrid concept is reviewed. The hybrid comprises of a fusion neutron source and a powerful sub-critical fast fission reactor core. The aim is the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel and safe fission energy production. In its fusion part, neutrons are generated in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma, confined magnetically in a stellarator-type system with an embedded magnetic mirror. Based on kinetic calculations, the energy balance for such a system is analyzed. Neutron calculations have been performed with the MCNPX code, and the principal design of the reactor part is developed. Neutron outflux at different outer parts of the reactor is calculated. Numerical simulations have been performed on the structure of a magnetic field in a model of the stellarator-mirror device, and that is achieved by switching off one or two coils of toroidal field in the Uragan-2M torsatron. The calculations predict the existence of closed magnetic surfaces under certain conditions. The confinement of fast particles in such a magnetic trap is analyzed.

  20. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  1. Flux dependence of deuterium retention in single crystal tungsten

    CERN Document Server

    Poon, M; Davis, J W; Haasz, A A

    2002-01-01

    The retention of deuterium in single crystal tungsten has been measured as a function of the incident ion flux in the range of 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 -5x10 sup 1 sup 9 D sup + /m sup 2 s at 300 K. Incident D sub 3 sup + ions were implanted to fluences of 10 sup 2 sup 1 , 10 sup 2 sup 2 , and 10 sup 2 sup 3 D sup + /m sup 2 with ion energies (500 eV/D sup +) below the threshold energy for elastic collision damage. Above 3x10 sup 1 sup 8 D sup + /m sup 2 s, little or no flux dependence is seen. However, a rapid decrease in retention is seen for incident fluxes below 10 sup 1 sup 8 D sup + /m sup 2 s at the 10 sup 2 sup 1 D sup + /m sup 2 fluence, suggesting a threshold value below which retention is strongly reduced. Flux dependence at the higher fluences show a smaller decrease in retention with decreasing flux. The observed results are consistent with trapping and trap evolution by cluster and cavity formation. The effect of specimen surface preparation has proved to be very significant, especially for the lower fl...

  2. Deuterium fractionation in formaldehyde photolysis: chamber experiments and RRKM theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. K. Nilsson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available While isotope effects in formaldehyde photolysis are the key link between the δD of methane emissions with the δD of atmospheric in situ hydrogen production, the mechanism and the extent of their pressure dependencies is not adequately described. The pressure dependence of the photolysis rates of the mono- and di-deuterated formaldehyde isotopologues HDCO and D2CO relative to the parent isotopologue H2CO was investigated using RRKM theory and experiment. D2CO and H2CO were photolysed in a static reaction chamber at bath gas pressures of 50, 200, 400, 600 and 1000 mbar; these experiments compliment and extend our earlier work with HDCO vs. H2CO. The UV lamps used for photolysis emit light at wavelengths that mainly dissociate formaldehyde into molecular products, CO and H2 or D2. A model was constructed using RRKM theory to calculate the lifetime of excited formaldehyde on the S0 surface to describe the observed pressure dependent photolytic fractionation of deuterium. The effect of deuteration on the RRKM lifetime of the S0 state is not the main cause of the experimentally observed isotope effect. We propose that there is an additional previously unrecognised isotopic fractionation in the rate of transfer of population from the initially excited S1 state onto the S0 surface.

  3. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off unpolarised deuterium at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Gordon D.

    2008-10-15

    The HERMES experiment was a forward angle spectrometer on the HERA storage ring at DESY, Hamburg, Germany. HERMES successfully increased understanding of the ''spin puzzle'', the spin structure of the nucleon, by providing high precision measurements of {delta}{sigma} in the Quark Parton Model, the fraction of the spin carried by the current quarks. Following the link of another piece of the puzzle, the orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluons, to the Generalised Parton Distribution (GPD) theoretical framework, HERMES focused on measurements of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process. These measurements are sensitive to GPDs, allowing further experimental constraints to be made on the components of nucleon spin. In the Winter shutdown period 2005-2006 HERMES was upgraded with a Recoil Detector in the target region. This allowed the experiment to make exclusive measurements of the DVCS process for the rst time, reducing background and increasing the resolution of various kinematic variables. The method for reconstructing particle tracks in the inhomogeneous magnetic eld is investigated here. DVCS o a deuterium target is measured with all available data prior to the installation of the Recoil Detector. A comparison is made to currently available models of spin-(1)/(2) GPDs. This analysis has been approved for publication by the HERMES collaboration. The data is further employed in an investigation of a model dependent constraint of the total angular momentum of up and down quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  4. Synthesis of deuterium labelled metabolites of warfarin and phenprocoumon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimark, L.D.; Toon, S.; Low, L.K.; Swinney, D.C.; Trager, W.F.

    1986-02-01

    The synthesis of deuterium labelled 4'-,6-,7- and 8-hydroxy metabolites of warfarin and phenprocoumon is described. The pentadeuterio labelled 6-,7- and 8-hydroxyphenprocoumons were prepared via alkylation of the respective 6-, 7- and 8-methoxy-4-hydroxycoumarins with 1-(phenyl-d/sub 5/)-1-bromopropane and subsequent cleavage of the methyl protecting group with boron tribromide. The synthesis of 1-(pentadeuteriophenyl)-1-bromopropane and the 6-, 7-and 8-methoxy-4-hydroxycoumarins are also presented. The pentadeuterio labelled 6-, 7- and 8-hydroxywarfarins were obtained by reaction of 4-(phenyl-d/sub 5/)-3-buten-2-one with the respective 6-, 7- and 8-hydroxy-4-hydroxycoumarins in methanol followed by hydrolysis of the intermediate cyclic methyl ketals in aqueous acid. 4-Hydroxycoumarin-5,6,7,8-d/sub 4/, prepared from phenyl-d/sub 6/ and tetradeuteriomalonic acid, was reacted with 1-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol and 4-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-3-buten-2-one to yield labelled 4'-hydroxyphenprocoumon and 4'-hydroxywarfarin respectively.

  5. Annealing effects on deuterium retention behavior in damaged tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sakurada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Effects of annealing after/under iron (Fe ion irradiation on deuterium (D retention behavior in tungsten (W were studied. The D2 TDS spectra as a function of heating temperature for 0.1dpa damaged W showed that the D retention was clearly decreased as the annealing temperature was increased. In particular, the desorption of D trapped by voids was largely reduced by annealing at 1173K. The TEM observation indicated that the size of dislocation loops was clearly grown, and its density was decreased by the annealing above 573K. After annealing at 1173K, almost all the dislocation loops were recovered. The results of positron annihilation spectroscopy suggested that the density of vacancy-type defects such as voids, was decreased as the annealing temperature was increased, while its size was increased, indicating that the D retention was reduced by the recovery of the voids. Furthermore, it was found that the desorption temperature of D trapped by the voids for damaged W above 0.3dpa was shifted toward higher temperature side. These results lead to a conclusion that the D retention behavior is controlled by defect density. The D retention in the samples annealed during irradiation was less than that annealed after irradiation. This result shows that defects would be quickly annihilated before stabilization by annealing during irradiation.

  6. Erosion products of plasma facing materials formed under ITER-like transient load and deuterium retention in them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putrik, A. B., E-mail: putrik@triniti.ru; Klimov, N. S. [State Research Center of the Russian Federation Troitsk Institute for Innovation & Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Gasparyan, Yu. M., E-mail: yura@plasma.mephi.ru; Efimov, V. S. [National Research Nuclear University Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Barsuk, V. A.; Podkovyrov, V. L., E-mail: podk@triniti.ru; Zhitlukhin, A. M., E-mail: zhitlukh@triniti.ru; Yarochevskaya, A. D.; Kovalenko, D. V., E-mail: kovalenko@triniti.ru [State Research Center of the Russian Federation Troitsk Institute for Innovation & Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Erosion of the plasma-facing materials in particular evaporation of the materials in a fusion reactor under intense transient events is one of the problems of the ITER. The current experimental data are insufficient to predict the properties of the erosion products, a significant part of which will be formed during transient events (edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions). The paper concerns the experimental investigation of the graphite and tungsten erosion products deposited under pulsed plasma load at the QSPA-T: heat load on the target was 2.6 MJ/m{sup 2} with 0.5 ms pulse duration. The designed diagnostics for measuring the deposition rate made it possible to determine that the deposition of eroded material occurs during discharge, and the deposition rate is in the range (0.1–100) × 10{sup 19} at/(cm{sup 2} s), which is much higher than that for stationary processes. It is found that the relative atomic concentrations D/C and D/(W + C) in the erosion products deposited during the pulse process are on the same level as for the stationary processes. An exposure of erosion products to photonic energy densities typical of those expected at mitigated disruptions in the ITER (pulse duration of 0.5–1 ms, integral energy density of radiation of 0.1–0.5 MJ/m2) significantly decreases the concentration of trapped deuterium.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of strong shock waves propagating in dense deuterium, taking into consideration effects of excited electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Huiling; He, X. T.

    2017-02-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of shock waves propagating in dense deuterium with the electron force field method [J. T. Su and W. A. Goddard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 185003 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.185003], which explicitly takes the excitation of electrons into consideration. Nonequilibrium features associated with the excitation of electrons are systematically investigated. We show that chemical bonds in D2 molecules lead to a more complicated shock wave structure near the shock front, compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulation. Charge separation can bring about accumulation of net charges on large scales, instead of the formation of a localized dipole layer, which might cause extra energy for the shock wave to propagate. In addition, the simulations also display that molecular dissociation at the shock front is the major factor that accounts for the "bump" structure in the principal Hugoniot. These results could help to build a more realistic picture of shock wave propagation in fuel materials commonly used in the inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Neutron production in deuterium gas-puff z-pinch with outer plasma shell at current of 3 MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Rezac, K.; Cikhardtova, B.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A. V.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Frusov, F. I.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Dudkin, G. N.; Garapatsky, A. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Varlachev, V. A.; Turek, K.; Krasa, J.

    2015-11-01

    Z-pinch experiments at the current of about 3 MA were carried out on the GIT-12 generator. The outer plasma shell of deuterium gas-puff was generated by the system of 48 plasma guns. This configuration exhibits a high efficiency of the production of DD fusion neutrons with the yield of above 1012 neutrons produced in a single shot with the duration of about 20 ns. The maximum energy of the neutrons produced in this pulse exceeded 30 MeV. The neutron radiation was measured using scintillation TOF detectors, CR-39 nuclear track detectors, bubble detectors BD-PND and BDS-10000 and by several types of nuclear activation detectors. These diagnostic tools were used to measure the anisotropy of neutron fluence and neutron energy spectra. It allows us to estimate the total number of DD neutrons, the contribution of other nuclear reactions, the amount of scattered neutrons, and other parameters of neutron production. This work was supported by the MSMT grants LH13283, LD14089.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of strong shock waves propagating in dense deuterium, taking into consideration effects of excited electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Huiling; He, X T

    2017-02-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of shock waves propagating in dense deuterium with the electron force field method [J. T. Su and W. A. Goddard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 185003 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.99.185003], which explicitly takes the excitation of electrons into consideration. Nonequilibrium features associated with the excitation of electrons are systematically investigated. We show that chemical bonds in D_{2} molecules lead to a more complicated shock wave structure near the shock front, compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulation. Charge separation can bring about accumulation of net charges on large scales, instead of the formation of a localized dipole layer, which might cause extra energy for the shock wave to propagate. In addition, the simulations also display that molecular dissociation at the shock front is the major factor that accounts for the "bump" structure in the principal Hugoniot. These results could help to build a more realistic picture of shock wave propagation in fuel materials commonly used in the inertial confinement fusion.

  10. 8th International School of Fusion Reactor Technology "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Leotta, G G; Muon-catalyzed fusion and fusion with polarized nuclei

    1988-01-01

    The International School of Fusion Reactor Technology started its courses 15 years ago and since then has mantained a biennial pace. Generally, each course has developed the subject which was announced in advance at the closing of the previous course. The subject to which the present proceedings refer was chosen in violation of that rule so as to satisfy the recent and diffuse interest in cold fusion among the main European laboratories involved in controlled thermonuclear research (CTR). In the second half of 1986 we started to prepare a workshop aimed at assessing the state of the art and possibly of the perspectives of muon- catalyzed fusion. Research in this field has recently produced exciting experimental results open to important practical applications. We thought it worthwhile to consider also the beneficial effects and problems of the polarization ofthe nuclei in both cold and thermonuclear fusion. In preparing the 8th Course on Fusion Reactor Technology, it was necessary to abandon the tradi...

  11. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak fusion power plant study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    STARFIRE is a 1200 MWe central station fusion electric power plant that utilizes a deuterium-tritium fueled tokamak reactor as a heat source. Emphasis has been placed on developing design features which will provide for simpler assembly and maintenance, and improved safety and environmental characteristics. The major features of STARFIRE include a steady-state operating mode based on continuous rf lower-hybrid current drive and auxiliary heating, solid tritium breeder material, pressurized water cooling, limiter/vacuum system for impurity control and exhaust, high tritium burnup and low vulnerable tritium inventories, superconducting EF coils outside the superconducting TF coils, fully remote maintenance, and a low-activation shield. A comprehensive conceptual design has been developed including reactor features, support facilities and a complete balance of plant. A construction schedule and cost estimate are presented, as well as study conclusions and recommendations.

  12. Direct LiT Electrolysis in a Metallic Fusion Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Luke [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-30

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium-based breeding blankets was developed. The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fusion/fission reactors is critical in order to maintain low concentrations. This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Extraction is complicated due to required low tritium concentration limits and because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering hydrogen and deuterium through an electrolysis step at high temperatures.

  13. Direct Lit Electrolysis In A Metallic Lithium Fusion Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Babineau, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Teprovich, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Vaquer, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-13

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium based breeding blankets was developed.  The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fission/fusion reactors is critical in order to maintained low concentrations.  This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket, extraction is complicated at the required low levels. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering the hydrogen and deuterium thru an electrolysis step at high temperatures. 

  14. Direct LiT Electrolysis in a Metallic Fusion Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Luke [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-30

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium based breeding blankets was developed. The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fusion/fission reactors is critical in order to maintain low concentrations. This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Extraction is complicated due to required low tritium concentration limits and because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering hydrogen and deuterium through an electrolysis step at high temperatures.

  15. Optimal Liner Material for Near Term Magnetized Liner Fusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutz, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Substantial fusion yields are predicted with existing pulsed power machines driving cylindrical liner implosions with preheated and magnetized deuterium-tritium [S.A. Slutz et al Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. Experiments are planned using the Z accelerator to drive these implosions. However, the peak current, the laser heating energy, and the applied magnetic field will be less than optimal. We present simulations which show, that under these conditions, the yield can be improved significantly by decreasing the density of the liner material, e.g. Lithium substituted for Beryllium. Furthermore, the simulations show that decreasing the liner density allows the use of very low aspect ratio (R/δR) liners, while still obtaining interesting yields. Low aspect ratio liners should be more robust to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  16. Cell fusions in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Bjerregaard, Bolette; Talts, Jan Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Cell fusions are important to fertilization, placentation, development of skeletal muscle and bone, calcium homeostasis and the immune defense system. Additionally, cell fusions participate in tissue repair and may be important to cancer development and progression. A large number of factors appear...... to regulate cell fusions, including receptors and ligands, membrane domain organizing proteins, proteases, signaling molecules and fusogenic proteins forming alpha-helical bundles that bring membranes close together. The syncytin family of proteins represent true fusogens and the founding member, syncytin-1......, has been documented to be involved in fusions between placental trophoblasts, between cancer cells and between cancer cells and host ells. We review the literature with emphasis on the syncytin family and propose that syncytins may represent universal fusogens in primates and rodents, which work...

  17. Fusion Revisits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    It's going to be a hot summer at CERN. At least in the Main Building, where from 13 July to 20 August an exhibition is being hosted on nuclear fusion, the energy of the Stars. Nuclear fusion is the engine driving the stars but also a potential source of energy for mankind. The exhibition shows the different nuclear fusion techniques and research carried out on the subject in Europe. Inaugurated at CERN in 1993, following collaboration between Lausanne's CRPP-EPFL and CERN, with input from Alessandro Pascolini of Italy's INFN, this exhibition has travelled round Europe before being revamped and returning to CERN. 'Fusion, Energy of the Stars', from 13 July onwards, Main Building

  18. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  19. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  20. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  1. Sampling Based Average Classifier Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hou

    2014-01-01

    fusion algorithms have been proposed in literature, average fusion is almost always selected as the baseline for comparison. Little is done on exploring the potential of average fusion and proposing a better baseline. In this paper we empirically investigate the behavior of soft labels and classifiers in average fusion. As a result, we find that; by proper sampling of soft labels and classifiers, the average fusion performance can be evidently improved. This result presents sampling based average fusion as a better baseline; that is, a newly proposed classifier fusion algorithm should at least perform better than this baseline in order to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  2. The promises and challenges of fusion constructs in protein biochemistry and enzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiquan; Liu, Long; Xu, Fei

    2016-10-01

    Fusion constructs are used to improve the properties of or impart novel functionality to proteins for biotechnological applications. The biochemical characteristics of enzymes or functional proteins optimized by fusion include catalytic efficiency, stability, activity, expression, secretion, and solubility. In this review, we summarize the parameters of enzymes or functional proteins that can be modified by fusion constructs. For each parameter, fusion strategies and molecular partners are examined using examples from recent studies. Future prospects in this field are also discussed. This review is expected to increase interest in and advance fusion strategies for optimization of enzymes and other functional proteins.

  3. Application of the JDL data fusion process model for cyber security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobe, Nicklaus A.

    2010-04-01

    A number of cyber security technologies have proposed the use of data fusion to enhance the defensive capabilities of the network and aid in the development of situational awareness for the security analyst. While there have been advances in fusion technologies and the application of fusion in intrusion detection systems (IDSs), in particular, additional progress can be made by gaining a better understanding of a variety of data fusion processes and applying them to the cyber security application domain. This research explores the underlying processes identified in the Joint Directors of Laboratories (JDL) data fusion process model and further describes them in a cyber security context.

  4. Application of next generation sequencing to human gene fusion detection: computational tools, features and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingguo; Xia, Junfeng; Jia, Peilin; Pao, William; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-07-01

    Gene fusions are important genomic events in human cancer because their fusion gene products can drive the development of cancer and thus are potential prognostic tools or therapeutic targets in anti-cancer treatment. Major advancements have been made in computational approaches for fusion gene discovery over the past 3 years due to improvements and widespread applications of high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. To identify fusions from NGS data, existing methods typically leverage the strengths of both sequencing technologies and computational strategies. In this article, we review the NGS and computational features of existing methods for fusion gene detection and suggest directions for future development.

  5. Economically competitive fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Ward

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Not since the oil crisis of the 1970s has the perception that energy is a crucial and precious resource been as strong as it is today. The need for a new approach to world energy supply, driven by concerns over resources, pollution, and security, is leading to a reappraisal of fusion. Fusion has enormous potential and major safety and environmental advantages, and hence could make a large difference to energy supplies.

  6. Fusion, cold fusion, and space policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotegard, D. (CST Ltd. (United States))

    1991-01-01

    This paper critiques Americal science policy through a consideration of two examples-cold fusion and asteroid mining. It points out that the failure of central planning in science and technology policy is just as marked as in more mundane activities. It highlights the current low level of debate and points out some technical issues that need to be addressed. It concludes with evidence that the alliance of flawed policy options is further lowering the level of debate. (author).

  7. MHD Simulations for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin, S.C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear fusion holds forth the promise of being a clean and safe solution to meet the world's energy demand in the foreseeable future without producing long-lived radioactive waste or weapons-grade material. The most mature configuration for magnetically confining a fusion plasma is the tokamak; a current carrying toroidal plasma characterized by strong externally produced magnetic fields. The temperatures, densities, and current will diffuse across the magnetic field lines at some rate, determining the confinement properties of the tokamak. The tokamak can also develop global instabilities if the current and/or pressure exceed certain instability thresholds. This set of lectures is aimed at describing analytical formulations and associated numerical methods for quantitatively describing both the slow (diffusive) motion associated with transport and the faster (wave-like) motion associated with instabilities. The former uses slow time scale ordering to remove the wave-like motion, and a time dependent field-aligned coordinate transformation to isolate the cross-field transport from the faster transport along the magnetic field lines. The latter uses a combination of high-order finite elements, a particular representation of the magnetic and velocity vector fields, and an implicit time advance algorithm with desirable properties. This paper is followed by the slides of the lectures. (author)

  8. Fusion an introduction to the physics and technology of magnetic confinement fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    This second edition of a popular textbook is thoroughly revised with around 25% new and updated content.It provides an introduction to both plasma physics and fusion technology at a level that can be understood by advanced undergraduates and graduate students in the physical sciences and related engineering disciplines.As such, the contents cover various plasma confinement concepts, the support technologies needed to confine the plasma, and the designs of ITER as well as future fusion reactors.With end of chapter problems for use in courses.

  9. The Deuterator: software for the determination of backbone amide deuterium levels from H/D exchange MS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsinoremas NF

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The combination of mass spectrometry and solution phase amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange experiments is an effective method for characterizing protein dynamics, and protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions. Despite methodological advancements and improvements in instrumentation and automation, data analysis and display remains a tedious process. The factors that contribute to this bottleneck are the large number of data points produced in a typical experiment, each requiring manual curation and validation, and then calculation of the level of backbone amide exchange. Tools have become available that address some of these issues, but lack sufficient integration, functionality, and accessibility required to address the needs of the H/D exchange community. To date there is no software for the analysis of H/D exchange data that comprehensively addresses these issues. Results We have developed an integrated software system for the automated analysis and representation of H/D exchange data that has been titled "The Deuterator". Novel approaches have been implemented that enable high throughput analysis, automated determination of deuterium incorporation, and deconvolution of overlapping peptides. This has been achieved by using methods involving iterative theoretical envelope fitting, and consideration of peak data within expected m/z ranges. Existing common file formats have been leveraged to allow compatibility with the output from the myriad of MS instrument platforms and peptide sequence database search engines. A web-based interface is used to integrate the components of The Deuterator that are able to analyze and present mass spectral data from instruments with varying resolving powers. The results, if necessary, can then be confirmed, adjusted, re-calculated and saved. Additional tools synchronize the curated calculation parameters with replicate time points, increasing throughput. Saved results can then

  10. Deuterium retention and morphological modifications of the surface in five grades of tungsten after deuterium plasma exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balden, M., E-mail: Martin.Balden@ipp.mpg.de; Manhard, A.; Elgeti, S.

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • D retention for used W grades varies by more than one order of magnitude. • Hydrogen loading-induced damaging manifests in surface modifications and retention. • Effects of plasma flux on retention and surface modifications are discussed. • Higher fluxes produce more severe hydrogen loading-induced damaging. - Abstract: Five tungsten (W) grades were simultaneously exposed to deuterium (D) plasma with 10{sup 20} D/(m{sup 2} s) of 38 eV/D up to 10{sup 26} D/m{sup 2} at 500 K specimen temperature. The D inventories and their depth profiles within the topmost 12 μm were determined by nuclear reaction analysis (D({sup 3}He, p)α). Morphological modifications at and below the surface were analysed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy assisted by focused ion beam cross-sectioning. The observed variation of the D inventory by more than one order of magnitude (0.5–15 × 10{sup 20} D/m{sup 2}) is attributed only to the different properties of each W grade. Spherical blisters and stepped flat-topped extrusions are observed depending on the W grade. These modifications are interpreted as an indication for hydrogen loading-induced damaging. The exposure conditions and W grades were chosen to allow a comparison between published data sets.

  11. Multi-sensor image fusion and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Rick S

    2005-01-01

    Taking another lesson from nature, the latest advances in image processing technology seek to combine image data from several diverse types of sensors in order to obtain a more accurate view of the scene: very much the same as we rely on our five senses. Multi-Sensor Image Fusion and Its Applications is the first text dedicated to the theory and practice of the registration and fusion of image data, covering such approaches as statistical methods, color-related techniques, model-based methods, and visual information display strategies.After a review of state-of-the-art image fusion techniques,

  12. Influence of traps on the deuterium behaviour in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, E.; Perujo, A.; Benamati, G.

    1997-06-01

    A time dependent permeation method is used to measure the permeability, diffusivity and solubility of deuterium in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman. The measurements cover the temperature range from 373 to 743 K which includes the onset of deuterium trapping effects on diffusivity and solubility. The results are interpreted using a trapping model. The number of trap sites and their average energies for deuterium in F82H and Batman steels are determined.

  13. Influence of traps on the deuterium behaviour in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, E. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Perujo, A. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Benamati, G. [Associazione ENEA-EURATOM sulla FUSIONE, CR Brasimone, 40032 Camungnano Bologna (Italy)

    1997-06-01

    A time dependent permeation method is used to measure the permeability, diffusivity and solubility of deuterium in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman. The measurements cover the temperature range from 373 to 743 K which includes the onset of deuterium trapping effects on diffusivity and solubility. The results are interpreted using a trapping model. The number of trap sites and their average energies for deuterium in F82H and Batman steels are determined. (orig.).

  14. MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATION AND DEUTERIUM PERMEATION TESTING OF ADVANCED COATINGS FOR TRITIUM SERVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korinko, P.

    2004-01-24

    A plant directed research and development task to develop and study new, improved, and low cost tritium permeation barriers was initiated in FY02. The project was intended to determine the permeation rate and permeation reduction factor of substrate materials and coated materials. The samples were characterized for microstructural and microchemical consistency. Permeation tests were also run. The sample geometry and sample sealing method selected for the coatings posed significant schedule and technical challenges. Diffusivity were consistent with published values but permeation data exhibited an unexpected sample to sample variation. The effort has lead to an improved sample design that will be used to support a Process Development task.

  15. Auto-fusion and the shaping of neurons and tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulavie, Fabien; Sundaram, Meera V

    2016-12-01

    Cells adopt specific shapes that are necessary for specific functions. For example, some neurons extend elaborate arborized dendrites that can contact multiple targets. Epithelial and endothelial cells can form tiny seamless unicellular tubes with an intracellular lumen. Recent advances showed that cells can auto-fuse to acquire those specific shapes. During auto-fusion, a cell merges two parts of its own plasma membrane. In contrast to cell-cell fusion or macropinocytic fission, which result in the merging or formation of two separate membrane bound compartments, auto-fusion preserves one compartment, but changes its shape. The discovery of auto-fusion in C. elegans was enabled by identification of specific protein fusogens, EFF-1 and AFF-1, that mediate cell-cell fusion. Phenotypic characterization of eff-1 and aff-1 mutants revealed that fusogen-mediated fusion of two parts of the same cell can be used to sculpt dendritic arbors, reconnect two parts of an axon after injury, or form a hollow unicellular tube. Similar auto-fusion events recently were detected in vertebrate cells, suggesting that auto-fusion could be a widely used mechanism for shaping neurons and tubes.

  16. Inner Sphere and Outer Sphere Electron Transfer to Methyl Iodide. Deuterium and 13C Kinetic Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Crossland, Ingolf

    1996-01-01

    Deuterium and 13C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) have been determined for the conversion of methyl iodide into methyl radical via inner sphere ET (electron transfer) and via outer sphere ET. The alfa-deuterium KIE was found to be very high for in......Deuterium and 13C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) have been determined for the conversion of methyl iodide into methyl radical via inner sphere ET (electron transfer) and via outer sphere ET. The alfa-deuterium KIE was found to be very high for in...

  17. Three-corner wrist fusion using memory staples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riet, Roger P; Bain, Gregory I

    2006-12-01

    Scapholunate dissociation with advanced collapse (SLAC), scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC), and lunotriquetral advanced collapse (LTAC) of the carpus are challenging problems. Various treatment options have been described. We describe a technique of 3-corner wrist fusion, using memory staples. The scaphoid and triquetrum are resected, and the capitate is fused to the lunate. Articular cartilage is removed from the capitolunate joint, and the bones are shaped to conforming surfaces. Bone graft from the resected triquetrum and scaphoid is used to increase fusion rate and a dynamic compressive fixation force is applied due to the unique properties of the memory staples. The main advantages of this procedure include the following: retained anatomical articulation between the lunate and the lunate fossa on the radius, improved ulnar deviation due to the resection of the triquetrum, and an excellent fusion rate between the lunate and capitate due to the dynamic fixation, the conforming surfaces, and the use of autologous bone graft.

  18. Image processing for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Miller-Kamm, Victoria; Orth, Charles; Roberts, Randy; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2016-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short-pulse kilo-Joule laser pulses with controllable delays that generate X-rays to provide backlighting for high-density internal confinement fusion (ICF) capsule targets. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. ARC is designed to employ up to eight backlighters with tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution, to record the dynamics and produce an X-ray "motion picture" of the compression and ignition of cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets. ARC will generate tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of ICF shots. Additionally, ARC supports a variety of other high energy density experiments including fast ignition studies on NIF. The automated alignment image analysis algorithms use digital camera sensor images to direct ARC beams onto the tens-of-microns scale metal wires. This paper describes the ARC automatic alignment sequence throughout the laser chain from pulse initiation to target with an emphasis on the image processing algorithms that generate the crucial alignment positions for ARC. The image processing descriptions and flow diagrams detail the alignment control loops throughout the ARC laser chain beginning in the ARC high-contrast front end (HCAFE), on into the ARC main laser area, and ending in the ARC target area.

  19. Fusion Technology for ITER, the ITER Project. Further Development Towards a DEMO Fusion Power Plant (3/4)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    This is the second half of a lecture series on fusion and will concentrate on fusion technology. The early phase of fusion development was concentrated on physics. However, during the 1980s it was realized that if one wanted to enter the area of fusion reactor plasmas, even in an experimental machine, a significant advance in fusion technologies would be needed. After several conceptual studies of reactor class fusion devices in the 1980s the engineering design phase of ITER started in earnest during the 1990s. The design team was in the beginning confronted with many challenges in the fusion technology area as well as in physics for which no readily available solution existed and in a few cases it was thought that solutions may be impossible to find. However, after the initial 3 years of intensive design and R&D work in an international framework utilizing basic fusion technology R&D from the previous decade it became clear that for all problems a conceptual solution could be found and further devel...

  20. Fusion methodologies in crisis management higher level fusion and decision making

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This book emphasizes a contemporary view on the role of higher level fusion in designing crisis management systems. It provides the formal foundations, architecture, and implementation strategies required for building dynamic current and future situational pictures. It goes on to discuss the state-of-the-art computational approaches to designing such processes and their inherent challenges. This book integrates recent advances in decision theory with those in fusion methodology to define an end-to-end framework for decision support in crisis management. The text discusses modern fusion and decision support methods for dealing with heterogeneous and often unreliable, low fidelity, contradictory, and redundant data and information, as well as rare, unknown, unconventional or even unimaginable critical situations. The book also examines the role of context in situation management, cognitive aspects of decision making and situation management, approaches to domain representation, visualization, as well as the rol...