WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced crew escape

  1. Water Vapor Permeability of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Kuzneth, Larry; Gillis, David; Jones, Jeffery; Daniel, Brian; Gernhardt, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) crewmembers are expected to return to earth wearing a suit similar to the current Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). To ensure optimum cognitive performance, suited crewmembers must maintain their core body temperature within acceptable limits. There are currently several options for thermal maintenance in the post-landing phase. These include the current baseline, which uses an ammonia boiler, purge flow using oxygen in the suit, accessing sea water for liquid cooling garment (LCG) cooling and/or relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit. These options vary significantly in mass, power, engineering and safety factors, with relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit being the least difficult to implement. Data from previous studies indicates that the evaporative cooling capacity of the ACES was much higher than previously expected, but subsequent tests were performed for longer duration and higher metabolic rates to better define the water vapor permeability of the ACES. In these tests five subjects completed a series of tests performing low to moderate level exercise in order to control for a target metabolic rate while wearing the ACES in an environmentally controlled thermal chamber. Four different metabolic profiles at a constant temperature of 95 F and relative humidity of 50% were evaluated. These tests showed subjects were able to reject about twice as much heat in the permeable ACES as they were in an impermeable suit that had less thermal insulation. All of the heat rejection differential is attributed to the increased evaporation capability through the Gortex bladder of the suit.

  2. Cooling Properties of the Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit: Results of an Environmental Chamber Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Gillis, David; Bue, Grant; Son, Chan; Norcross, Jason; Kuznetz, Larry; Chapman, Kirt; Chhipwadia, Ketan; McBride, Tim

    2008-01-01

    The shuttle crew wears the Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit (ACES) to protect themselves from cabin decompression and to support bail out during landing. ACES is cooled by a liquid-cooled garment (LCG) that interfaces to a heat exchanger that dumps heat into the cabin. The ACES outer layer is made of Gore-Tex(Registered TradeMark), permitting water vapor to escape while containing oxygen. The crew can only lose heat via insensible water losses and the LCG. Under nominal landing operations, the average cabin temperature rarely exceeds 75 F, which is adequate for the ACES to function. Problem A rescue shuttle will need to return 11 crew members if the previous mission suffers a thermal protection system failure, preventing it from returning safely to Earth. Initial analysis revealed that 11 crew members in the shuttle will increase cabin temperature at wheel stop above 80 F, which decreases the ACES ability to keep crew members cool. Air flow in the middeck of the shuttle is inhomogeneous and some ACES may experience much higher temperatures that could cause excessive thermal stress to crew members. Methods A ground study was conducted to measure the cooling efficiency of the ACES at 75 F, 85 F, and 95 F at 50% relative humidity. Test subjects representing 5, 50, and 95 percentile body habitus of the astronaut corps performed hand ergometry keeping their metabolic rate at 400, 600, and 800 BTU/hr for one hour. Core temperature was measured by rectal probe and skin, while inside and outside the suit. Environmental chamber wall and cooling unit inlet and outlet temperatures were measured using high-resolution thermistors ( 0.2 C). Conclusions Under these test conditions, the ACES was able to protect the core temperature of all test subjects, however thermal stress due to high insensible losses and skin temperature and skin heat flow may impact crew performance. Further research should be performed to understand the impact on cognitive performance.

  3. Physiological responses to wearing the space shuttle launch and entry suit and the prototype advanced crew escape suit compared to the unsuited condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Linda H.; Mcbrine, John J.; Hayes, Judith C.; Stricklin, Marcella D.; Greenisen, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The launch and entry suit (LES) is a life support suit worn during Orbiter ascent and descent. The impact of suit weight and restricted mobility on egress from the Orbiter during an emergency is unknown. An alternate suit - the advanced crew escape suite (ACES) - is being evaluated. The physiological responses to ambulatory exercise of six subjects wearing the LES and ACES were measured and compared to those measurements taken while unsuited. Dependent variables included heart rate and metabolic response to treadmill walking at 5.6 km/h (3.5 mph), and also bilateral concentric muscle strength about the knee, shoulder, and elbow. No significant (p greater than 0.06) differences in heart rate or metabolic variables were measured in either suit while walking at 5.6 km/h. Significant (p less than 0.05) decreases in all metabolic variables were remarked when both suits were compared to the unsuited condition. There were no significant (p greater than 0.05) differences among the three suit conditions at 30 or 180 deg/s for muscles about the elbow and knee; however, about the shoulder, a significant (p = 0.0215) difference between the ACES and the unsuited condition was noted. Therefore, wearing a life support suit while performing Orbiter egress imposes a significant metabolic demand on crewmembers. Selective upper body strength movements may be compromised.

  4. STS-100 crew members pose on the FSS after emergency escape training on the pad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - The STS-100 crew poses for a photo on the 195-foot level of Launch Pad 39A'''s Fixed Service Structure. Standing, from left, are Mission Specialists Scott Umberto Guidoni, Scott E. Parazynski, Chris A. Hadfield, Yuri V. Lonchakov, and John L. Phillips; Commander Kent V. Rominger; and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby. Hadfield is with the Canadian Space Agency, Guidoni with the European Space Agency and Lonchakov with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. Behind them can be seen the tip of one white solid rocket booster and the orange external tank. The STS-100 mission is carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello and the SSRMS, to the International Space Station. Raffaello carries six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. The SSRMS is crucial to the continued assembly of the orbiting complex. Launch of mission STS-100 is scheduled for April 19 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  5. Interim results of the study of control room crew staffing for advanced passive reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, B.P.; Sebok, A.; Haugset, K. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    1996-03-01

    Differences in the ways in which vendors expect the operations staff to interact with advanced passive plants by vendors have led to a need for reconsideration of the minimum shift staffing requirements of licensed Reactor Operators and Senior Reactor Operators contained in current federal regulations (i.e., 10 CFR 50.54(m)). A research project is being carried out to evaluate the impact(s) of advanced passive plant design and staffing of control room crews on operator and team performance. The purpose of the project is to contribute to the understanding of potential safety issues and provide data to support the development of design review guidance. Two factors are being evaluated across a range of plant operating conditions: control room crew staffing; and characteristics of the operating facility itself, whether it employs conventional or advanced, passive features. This paper presents the results of the first phase of the study conducted at the Loviisa nuclear power station earlier this year. Loviisa served as the conventional plant in this study. Data collection from four crews were collected from a series of design basis scenarios, each crew serving in either a normal or minimum staffing configuration. Results of data analyses show that crews participating in the minimum shift staffing configuration experienced significantly higher workload, had lower situation awareness, demonstrated significantly less effective team performance, and performed more poorly as a crew than the crews participating in the normal shift staffing configuration. The baseline data on crew configurations from the conventional plant setting will be compared with similar data to be collected from the advanced plant setting, and a report prepared providing the results of the entire study.

  6. Effects of crew resource management training on the team performance of operators in an advanced nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the study are twofold: the development of a CRM training program appropriate to Korean NPPs and the evaluation of CRM training effectiveness. Firstly, the CRM program was developed with a focus on nontechnical skills - such as leadership, situational awareness, teamwork, and communication - which have been widely known to be critical for improving operational performance. Secondly, the effectiveness tests were conducted for two different crews of operators, performing six different emergency operation scenarios during a four-week period. All the crews (crews A and B) participated in the training program for the technical knowledge and skills, which were required to operate the simulator of the MCR during the first week. However, for the verification of the effectiveness of the CRM training program, only crew A was randomly selected to attend the CRM training after the technical knowledge and skills training. The results of the experiments showed that the CRM training program improved the individual attitudes of crew A with a statistical significance. The team skills of crew A were found to be significantly more advanced than those of crew B. However, the CRM training did not have a positive effect on enhancing the individual performance of crew A, as compared with that of crew B. (author)

  7. Evaluation of speech recognizers for use in advanced combat helicopter crew station research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Army Crew Station Research and Development Facility uses vintage 1984 speech recognizers. An evaluation was performed of newer off-the-shelf speech recognition devices to determine whether newer technology performance and capabilities are substantially better than that of the Army's current speech recognizers. The Phonetic Discrimination (PD-100) Test was used to compare recognizer performance in two ambient noise conditions: quiet office and helicopter noise. Test tokens were spoken by males and females and in isolated-word and connected-work mode. Better overall recognition accuracy was obtained from the newer recognizers. Recognizer capabilities needed to support the development of human factors design requirements for speech command systems in advanced combat helicopters are listed.

  8. Escape Velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Nikola Vlacic

    2010-01-01

    In this project, we investigated if it is feasible for a single staged rocket with constant thrust to attain escape velocity. We derived an equation for the velocity and position of a single staged rocket that launches vertically. From this equation, we determined if an ideal model of a rocket is able to reach escape velocity.

  9. Blowout win : advances in BOP technology cut waste and make work safer for drilling crews

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, G.

    2008-03-15

    With the advent of programmable logic controllers (PLCs), there has been significant improvement in the way that blowout prevention (BOP) equipment can be controlled and operated. The accumulator, which provides the energy to operate the BOP, usually includes compressed gas bottles, regulator valves, pumps, a hydraulic reservoir, a manifold, and control valves. PLCs have made the accumulator easier to operate since they have eliminated much of the cable that spans from the control panel to the rig control shack. The control unit currently consists of some computer chips and a printed circuit instead of miles of wires and cables. In addition to providing efficient BOP control, PLCs have enabled rig managers to readily identify and fix problems. Some manufacturers have included remote troubleshooting capability for the accumulator. Advances in BOP technology and controls have been driven by the challenges of drilling in harsh offshore environments. However, some operators in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin continue to use BOP systems that have been around for decades because of their reputation for reliability and low-maintenance requirements. 1 fig.

  10. Putting Integrated Systems Health Management Capabilities to Work: Development of an Advanced Caution and Warning System for Next-Generation Crewed Spacecraft Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccann, Robert S.; Spirkovska, Lilly; Smith, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) technologies have advanced to the point where they can provide significant automated assistance with real-time fault detection, diagnosis, guided troubleshooting, and failure consequence assessment. To exploit these capabilities in actual operational environments, however, ISHM information must be integrated into operational concepts and associated information displays in ways that enable human operators to process and understand the ISHM system information rapidly and effectively. In this paper, we explore these design issues in the context of an advanced caution and warning system (ACAWS) for next-generation crewed spacecraft missions. User interface concepts for depicting failure diagnoses, failure effects, redundancy loss, "what-if" failure analysis scenarios, and resolution of ambiguity groups are discussed and illustrated.

  11. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models. PMID:25109085

  12. Methodology and algorithms for railway crew management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, R.; Gomide, F. [State Univ. of Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Lagrimante, R. [MRS Logistica S.A, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    Crew management problems are highly important for many transportation systems such as airlines, railways and public bus transportation. Despite recent advances, scheduling methodologies and decision support systems still need improvement, especially their computational efficiency, practical feasibility and use. This paper briefly overview classic crew management approaches. It discusses various practical issues concerning classic methods and suggests a new approach and algorithms. Computational results and experience with actual data and real world situations are also reported. (orig.)

  13. Flight Crew Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Graves, Glenn W.; Richard D. McBride; Ira Gershkoff; Diane Anderson; Deepa Mahidhara

    1993-01-01

    A new crew scheduling optimization system has been developed for United Airlines. The system was developed to permit quick response to schedule changes and to reduce crew scheduling costs. It was designed to work efficiently for both the medium sized problems (300 flights daily) and the very large problems (1,700 flights daily) that United must solve. The system has two main components, a generator and an optimizer. The generator creates pairings (candidate crew trips) which are fed as variab...

  14. Exploring flight crew behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    A programme of research into the determinants of flight crew performance in commercial and military aviation is described, along with limitations and advantages associated with the conduct of research in such settings. Preliminary results indicate significant relationships among personality factors, attitudes regarding flight operations, and crew performance. The potential theoretical and applied utility of the research and directions for further research are discussed.

  15. Commercial Crew Medical Ops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinbaugh, Randall; Cole, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Provide commercial partners with: center insight into NASA spaceflight medical experience center; information relative to both nominal and emergency care of the astronaut crew at landing site center; a basis for developing and sharing expertise in space medical factors associated with returning crew.

  16. 肝细胞癌免疫逃逸机制的研究进展%The advance research of hepatocellular carcinoma immune escape'mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王拱辰

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma in the process which are in the formation , development, invade , metastasis present autoantigen abnormal expression and to express some new antigens , that als can unusually secrete many biological active cytokine and many metabolic products in the meantime as well , these changes can avoid body immune systems attacks and impair body' cellular and humoral immune function , and also change carcinoma cellular immunomicroenvir-onment , many factors and many mechanismses escape body' immune recognitions and immune attacks, namely: hepatocellular carcinoma immune escapes, this text overview recent years a related mechanism at home and abroad of hepatocellular carcinoma immune escape%肝细胞癌在形成、发展及外侵和转移过程中出现自身抗原异常表达和新表达一些抗原,同时也可以异常分泌许多具有生物活性因子和许多代谢物质,这些改变可以避免机体免疫系统打击同时也可以使机体细胞和体液免疫功能下降,而且也可以使肿瘤细胞所处的免疫微环境发生变化,多因素、多机制逃避机体免疫系统识别和被免疫系统打击,即:肝细胞癌的免疫逃逸.本文就近年国内外原发性肝细胞癌与免疫逃逸相关机制作一综述.

  17. Crew Transportation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, Pamela S. (Compiler); Mango, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Commercial Crew Program (CCP) has been chartered to facilitate the development of a United States (U.S.) commercial crew space transportation capability with the goal of achieving safe, reliable, and cost effective access to and from low Earth orbit (LEO) and the International Space Station (ISS) as soon as possible. Once the capability is matured and is available to the Government and other customers, NASA expects to purchase commercial services to meet its ISS crew rotation and emergency return objectives.

  18. Escaping from MOND

    OpenAIRE

    Famaey, Benoit; Bruneton, Jean-Philippe; Zhao, HongSheng

    2007-01-01

    We present a new test of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) on galactic scales, based on the escape speed in the solar neighbourhood. This test is independent from other empirical successes of MOND at reproducing the phenomenology of galactic rotation curves. The galactic escape speed in MOND is entirely determined by the baryonic content of the Galaxy and the external field in which it is embedded. We estimate that the external field in which the Milky Way must be embedded to produce the obs...

  19. Crew Transportation Operations Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Edward J.; Pearson, Don J. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Crew Transportation Operations Standards contains descriptions of ground and flight operations processes and specifications and the criteria which will be used to evaluate the acceptability of Commercial Providers' proposed processes and specifications.

  20. GASA Hybird Algorithm Applied in Airline Crew Rostering System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yinghui; RAO Yunbo; ZHOU Mingtian

    2007-01-01

    Crew postering system is a daily grind in the management of both corporation and enterprise. A fair and reasonable rostering method plays a very important role in the arousing worker's enthusiasm and improving the work efficiency. This paper presents a method of building models for automatic crew rostering mode with computer and advancing the multi-objective optimum scheme. The method to build models for crew rostering system is also discussed. The question to crew rostering system model is solved by genetic algorithms and simulated annealing algorithms. Simulation results show the correctness of algorithms. The actual data of the airways have justified its reasonability and efficiency.

  1. STS-54 Crew Portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Astronauts pictured in the STS-54 crew portrait from left to right are: Mario Runco, Jr., mission specialist; John H. Casper, commander; Donald R. McMonagle, pilot; and mission specialists Susan J. Helms, and Gregory J. Harbaugh. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on January 13, 1993 at 8:59:30 am (EST), the crew deployed the fifth Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-6).

  2. Coordination strategies of crew management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Sharon; Cano, Yvonne; Bryant, Don

    1991-01-01

    An exploratory study that describes and contrasts two three-person flight crews performing in a B-727 simulator is presented. This study specifically attempts to delineate crew communication patterns accounting for measured differences in performance across routine and nonroutine flight patterns. The communication patterns in the two crews evaluated indicated different modes of coordination, i.e., standardization in the less effective crew and planning/mutual adjustment in the more effective crew.

  3. Crew Activity Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James; Kirillov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The crew activity analyzer (CAA) is a system of electronic hardware and software for automatically identifying patterns of group activity among crew members working together in an office, cockpit, workshop, laboratory, or other enclosed space. The CAA synchronously records multiple streams of data from digital video cameras, wireless microphones, and position sensors, then plays back and processes the data to identify activity patterns specified by human analysts. The processing greatly reduces the amount of time that the analysts must spend in examining large amounts of data, enabling the analysts to concentrate on subsets of data that represent activities of interest. The CAA has potential for use in a variety of governmental and commercial applications, including planning for crews for future long space flights, designing facilities wherein humans must work in proximity for long times, improving crew training and measuring crew performance in military settings, human-factors and safety assessment, development of team procedures, and behavioral and ethnographic research. The data-acquisition hardware of the CAA (see figure) includes two video cameras: an overhead one aimed upward at a paraboloidal mirror on the ceiling and one mounted on a wall aimed in a downward slant toward the crew area. As many as four wireless microphones can be worn by crew members. The audio signals received from the microphones are digitized, then compressed in preparation for storage. Approximate locations of as many as four crew members are measured by use of a Cricket indoor location system. [The Cricket indoor location system includes ultrasonic/radio beacon and listener units. A Cricket beacon (in this case, worn by a crew member) simultaneously transmits a pulse of ultrasound and a radio signal that contains identifying information. Each Cricket listener unit measures the difference between the times of reception of the ultrasound and radio signals from an identified beacon

  4. Formulation of consumables management models: Consumables analysis/crew simulator interface requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    Consumables analysis/crew training simulator interface requirements were defined. Two aspects were investigated: consumables analysis support techniques to crew training simulator for advanced spacecraft programs, and the applicability of the above techniques to the crew training simulator for the space shuttle program in particular.

  5. Advances of PD-1/PD-L1 Signaling Pathway in Immune Escape and Treatment for 
Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng LIN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Despiting the great progress on target agents, majority of people who do not harbor a mutation could not get benefit from them. Immunotherapy, through stimulating the body's immune system to improve the antitumor immunity effect, has been a new therapeutic method for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Study had been reported that immune checkpoint molecules, including programmed death-1 (PD-1/PD-ligand (L 1 axis, are closedly related with cancer generation and development, and play a key role on clinical significance of NSCLC. Activation of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway contributes to tumor immune escape, and block PD-1/PD-L1 pathway can enhance endogenous antimuor immunity. Currently increasing clinical trials suggested that immune checkpoint inhibitors, including anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies turned out to be beneficial and safe in NSCLC. Here, we provide a review on the progress of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway and immune checkpoint inhibitors in NSCLC.

  6. Advanced Materials and Fabrication Techniques for the Orion Attitude Control Motor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Launch Abort System (LAS) for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) will provide a safe escape for the crew in the event of an emergency during launch. A key...

  7. Flight Crew Health Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullett, C. C.

    1970-01-01

    The health maintenance program for commercial flight crew personnel includes diet, weight control, and exercise to prevent heart disease development and disability grounding. The very high correlation between hypertension and overweight in cardiovascular diseases significantly influences the prognosis for a coronary prone individual and results in a high rejection rate of active military pilots applying for civilian jobs. In addition to physical fitness the major items stressed in pilot selection are: emotional maturity, glucose tolerance, and family health history.

  8. A Lucky Escape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王道庚

    2009-01-01

    @@ This story concerns(有关)a spider(蜘蛛)and a certain general of ancient times who had lost a battle and,in the company of(在……陪同下)a faithful(忠诚的)servant,was trying to escape(逃脱)from the enemy.Both were extremely(极度,非常)tired,and both were hungry and thirsty,but they did not dare to go into any town for fear of (担心,害怕)being discovered and captured(捉)by the enemy.Toward evening they arrived at a mountain where there was a small cave.

  9. Crew Systems Laboratory/Building 7. Historical Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovinac, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Building 7 is managed by the Crew and Thermal Systems Division of the JSC Engineering Directorate. Originally named the Life Systems Laboratory, it contained five major test facilities: two advanced environmental control laboratories and three human-rated vacuum chambers (8 , 11 , and the 20 ). These facilities supported flight crew familiarization and the testing and evaluation of hardware used in the early manned spaceflight programs, including Gemini, Apollo, and the ASTP.

  10. Escape from the Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Dinu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper sets out to elaborate on Romania’s specific agenda regarding the approach to the integration process in the EU as a project of modernization. The focus is on the functional aspects, the type of strategic solutions destined to consolidate the specific transformations belonging to post-communist transition seen as an internal transition, on the one hand and on the other hand to push convergence as the essence of integration, marked by the vision of EU integration as a continuation of change, which is the stage of external transition. Identifying the prominent factors and the pragmatic priorities of the escape from the peripheries of development by engaging in evolution by way of the second modernization constitutes as well a target for analysis. One particularity of the method of analysis is the review if the value-set of the bobsled effect of path dependency – the path of the peripheries – as well as of the set of values of the escape from the peripheries.

  11. Mars - an escaping planet?

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, R

    2005-01-01

    The chaotic behaviour of the motion of the planets in our Solar System is well established. Numerical experiments with a modified Solar System consisting of a more massive Earth have shown, that for special values of an enlargement factor K around 5 the dynamical state of a truncated planetary system (excluding Mercury and the outer planets Uranus and Neptune) is highly chaotic. On the contrary for values of the mass of the Earth up to the mass of Saturn no irregular dynamical behaviour was observed. We extended our investigations to the complete planetary system and showed, that this chaotic window found before still exists. Tests in different 'Solar Systems' showed that only including Jupiter and Saturn with their actual masses together with a 'massive' Earth (between 4 and 6 times more massive) destabilize the orbit of Mars so that even escapes from the system are possible.

  12. Reconstructing the Alcatraz escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, F.; Hoes, O.; Hut, R.; Donchyts, G.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the night of June 12, 1962 three inmates used a raft made of raincoatsto escaped the ultimate maximum security prison island Alcatraz in SanFrancisco, United States. History is unclear about what happened tothe escapees. At what time did they step into the water, did theysurvive, if so, where did they reach land? The fate of the escapees has been the subject of much debate: did theymake landfall on Angel Island, or did the current sweep them out ofthe bay and into the cold pacific ocean? In this presentation, we try to shed light on this historic case using avisualization of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the San Francisco Bay, combined with historical tidal records. By reconstructing the hydrodynamic conditions and using a particle based simulation of the escapees we show possible scenarios. The interactive model is visualized using both a 3D photorealistic and web based visualization. The "Escape from Alcatraz" scenario demonstrates the capabilities of the 3Di platform. This platform is normally used for overland flooding (1D/2D). The model engine uses a quad tree structure, resulting in an order of magnitude speedup. The subgrid approach takes detailed bathymetry information into account. The inter-model variability is tested by comparing the results with the DFlow Flexible Mesh (DFlowFM) San Francisco Bay model. Interactivity is implemented by converting the models from static programs to interactive libraries, adhering to the Basic ModelInterface (BMI). Interactive models are more suitable for answeringexploratory research questions such as this reconstruction effort. Although these hydrodynamic simulations only provide circumstantialevidence for solving the mystery of what happened during the foggy darknight of June 12, 1962, it can be used as a guidance and provides aninteresting testcase to apply interactive modelling.

  13. Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Smith L.

    2010-01-01

    This document establishes the policy and procedures for the HSP and is authorized through the Director, Johnson Space Center (JSC). This document delineates the medical operations requirements for the HSP. The HSP goals are accomplished through an awareness campaign and procedures such as limiting access to flight crewmembers, medical screening, and controlling flight crewmember activities. NASA's Human Space Flight Program uses strategic risk mitigation to achieve mission success while protecting crew health and safety. Infectious diseases can compromise crew health and mission success, especially in the immediate preflight period. The primary purpose of the Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program (HSP) is to mitigate the risk of occurrence of infectious disease among astronaut flight crews in the immediate preflight period. Infectious diseases are contracted through direct person-to-person contact, and through contact with infectious material in the environment. The HSP establishes several controls to minimize crew exposure to infectious agents. The HSP provides a quarantine environment for the crew that minimizes contact with potentially infectious material. The HSP also limits the number of individuals who come in close contact with the crew. The infection-carrying potential of these primary contacts (PCs) is minimized by educating them in ways to avoid infections and avoiding contact with the crew if they are or may be sick. The transmission of some infectious diseases can be greatly curtailed by vaccinations. PCs are strongly encouraged to maintain updated vaccinations.

  14. Crew Transportation Technical Management Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinnie, John M. (Compiler); Lueders, Kathryn L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    Under the guidance of processes provided by Crew Transportation Plan (CCT-PLN-1100), this document, with its sister documents, International Space Station (ISS) Crew Transportation and Services Requirements Document (CCT-REQ-1130), Crew Transportation Technical Standards and Design Evaluation Criteria (CCT-STD-1140), Crew Transportation Operations Standards (CCT STD-1150), and ISS to Commercial Orbital Transportation Services Interface Requirements Document (SSP 50808), provides the basis for a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) certification for services to the ISS for the Commercial Provider. When NASA Crew Transportation System (CTS) certification is achieved for ISS transportation, the Commercial Provider will be eligible to provide services to and from the ISS during the services phase.

  15. An escape from crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jeremy; Pelli, Denis G

    2007-10-26

    Crowding occurs when nearby flankers jumble the appearance of a target object, making it hard to identify. Crowding is feature integration over an inappropriately large region. What determines the size of that region? According to bottom-up proposals, the size is that of an anatomically determined isolation field. According to top-down proposals, the size is that of the spotlight of attention. Intriligator and Cavanagh (2001) proposed the latter, but we show that their conclusion rests on an implausible assumption. Here we investigate the role of attention in crowding using the change blindness paradigm. We measure capacity for widely and narrowly spaced letters during a change detection task, both with and without an interstimulus cue. We find that standard crowding manipulations-reducing spacing and adding flankers-severely impair uncued change detection but have no effect on cued change detection. Because crowded letters look less familiar, we must use longer internal descriptions (less compact representations) to remember them. Thus, fewer fit into working memory. The memory limit does not apply to the cued condition because the observer need remember only the cued letter. Cued performance escapes the effects of crowding, as predicted by a top-down account. However, our most parsimonious account of the results is bottom-up: Cued change detection is so easy that the observer can tolerate feature degradation and letter distortion, making the observer immune to crowding. The change detection task enhances the classic partial report paradigm by making the test easier (same/different instead of identifying one of many possible targets), which increases its sensitivity, so it can reveal degraded memory traces.

  16. Flight Crew Integration (FCI) ISS Crew Comments Database & Products Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This Crew Debrief Data provides support for design and development of vehicles, hardware, requirements, procedures, processes, issue resolution, lessons learned, consolidation and trending for current Programs; and much of the data is also used to support development of future Programs.

  17. Crew Cerebral Oxygen Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR proposal is aimed at developing a non-invasive, optical method for monitoring crew member state of awareness in operational environments. All...

  18. Crew Cerebral Oxygen Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR proposal is aimed at developing a non-invasive, optical method for monitoring the state of consciousness of crew members in operational...

  19. Space Shuttle Wireless Crew Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R. W.; Doe, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The design, development, and performance characteristics of the Space Shuttle's Wireless Crew Communications System are discussed. This system allows Space Shuttle crews to interface with the onboard audio distribution system without the need for communications umbilicals, and has been designed through the adaptation of commercially available hardware in order to minimize development time. Testing aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia has revealed no failures or design deficiencies.

  20. In-Space Crew-Collaborative Task Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaap, John; Meyer, Patrick; Davis, Elizabeth; Richardson, Lea

    2007-01-01

    For all past and current human space missions, the final scheduling of tasks to be done in space has been devoid of crew control, flexibility, and insight. Ground controllers, with minimal input from the crew, schedule the tasks and uplink the timeline to the crew or uplink the command sequences to the hardware. Prior to the International Space Station (ISS), the crew could make requests about tomorrow s timeline, they could omit a task, or they could request that something in the timeline be delayed. This lack of control over one's own schedule has had negative consequences. There is anecdotal consensus among astronauts that control over their own schedules will mitigate the stresses of long duration missions. On ISS, a modicum of crew control is provided by the job jar. Ground controllers prepare a task list (a.k.a. "job jar") of non-conflicting tasks from which jobs can be chosen by the in space crew. Because there is little free time and few interesting non-conflicting activities, the task-list approach provides little relief from the tedium of being micro-managed by the timeline. Scheduling for space missions is a complex and laborious undertaking which usually requires a large cadre of trained specialists and suites of complex software tools. It is a giant leap from today s ground prepared timeline (with a job jar) to full crew control of the timeline. However, technological advances, currently in-work or proposed, make it reasonable to consider scheduling a collaborative effort by the ground-based teams and the in-space crew. Collaboration would allow the crew to make minor adjustments, add tasks according to their preferences, understand the reasons for the placement of tasks on the timeline, and provide them a sense of control. In foreseeable but extraordinary situations, such as a quick response to anomalies and extended or unexpected loss of signal, the crew should have the autonomous ability to make appropriate modifications to the timeline, extend the

  1. 76 FR 64960 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Flight Crew Self-Defense...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 27656). Upon registering for a voluntary advanced self-defense training class provided by... number, and Social Security number (last four digits) from flight and cabin crew members of air carriers... voluntary advanced self-defense training program for flight and cabin crew members of air carriers...

  2. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, MS Springer on JSC crew compartment trainer middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, wearing navy blue launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), participates in JSC crew compartment trainer (CCT) exercises. MS Springer is seated in mission specialist seat on CCT middeck, the position he will occupy during the entry phase of flight. Behind Springer is the closed airlock hatch and stowed treadmill. The crew escape system (CES) pole extends overhead from starboard wall to side hatch. On Springer's left is the galley. CCT is located in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A. Photo was taken by Bill Bowers of JSC.

  3. Energy-limited escape revised

    OpenAIRE

    Salz, M.; Schneider, P. C.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) < 13.11~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ because in these planets th...

  4. 46 CFR 185.420 - Crew training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crew training. 185.420 Section 185.420 Shipping COAST...) OPERATIONS Crew Requirements § 185.420 Crew training. (a) The owner, charterer, master or managing operator... duties listed in the station bill required by § 185.514 of this part. (b) Training conducted on a...

  5. The Escape Fraction of Ionizing Radiation from Primordial Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, Andrew; Shull, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    The escape of ionizing radiation from galaxies plays a critical role in the evolution of gas in galaxies, and the heating and ionization history of the intergalactic medium. Here, we present semi-analytic calculations of the escape fraction of ionizing radiation for both hydrogen and helium from primordial galaxies, as well as analytic derivations of these quantities. We consider variations in the galaxy density profile, source type, location, and spectrum, and gas clumping/distribution factors. For sufficiently hard first-light sources, the helium ionization fronts closely track or even advance beyond that of hydrogen. Key new results in this work include calculations of the escape fractions for He I and He II ionizing radiation, and the impact of partial ionization from X-rays from early AGN or stellar clusters on the escape fractions from primordial halos. When factoring in frequency-dependent effects, we find that X-rays play an important role in boosting the escape fractions for both hydrogen and helium,...

  6. Escaping carbon lock-in

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, G.C. [Instituto de Empresa, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    This article explores the climate policy implications of the arguments made in ''Understanding carbon lock-in'' (Unruh, 2000), which posited that industrial countries have become locked-into fossil fuel-based energy systems through path dependent processes driven by increasing returns to scale. Carbon lock-in arises through technological, organizational, social and institutional co-evolution, ''culminating'' in what was termed as techno-institutional complex (TIC). In order to resolve the climate problem, an escape from the lock-in condition is required. However, due to the self-referential nature of TIC, escape conditions are unlikely to be generated internally and it is argued here that erogenous forces are probably required. (author)

  7. STS-88 crew goes through Crew Equipment Interface Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, and Jerry L. Ross check out equipment on the Unity connecting module, primary payload on the mission. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Scheduled for launch on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for the International Space Station. The Unity connecting module will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, already on orbit after a November launch. Unity will have two Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) attached and 1 stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 will connect U.S. and Russian elements; PMA-2 will provide a Shuttle docking location. Eventually, Unity's six ports will provide connecting points for the Z1 truss exterior framework, U.S. lab, airlock, cupola, Node 3, and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, as well as the control module. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power through the early assembly stages. It provides fuel storage capability and a rendezvous and docking capability to the Service Module.

  8. STS-114: Discovery Crew Arrival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    George Diller of NASA Public Affairs narrates the STS-114 Crew arrival at Kennedy Space Center aboard a Gulf Stream aircraft. They were greeted by Center Director Jim Kennedy. Commander Eileen Collins introduced each of her crew members and gave a brief description of their roles in the mission. Mission Specialist 3, Andrew Thomas will be the lead crew member on the inspection on flight day 2; he is the intravehicular (IV) crew member that will help and guide Mission Specialists Souichi Noguchi and Stephen Robinson during their spacewalks. Pilot James Kelly will be operating the shuttle systems in flying the Shuttle; he will be flying the space station robotic arm during the second extravehicular activity and he will be assisting Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence during the other two extravehicular activities; he will be assisting on the rendezvous on flight day three, and landing of the shuttle. Commander Collins also mentioned Pilot Kelly's recent promotion to Colonel by the United States Air Force. Mission Specialist 1, Souichi Noguchi from JAXA (The Japanese Space Agency) will be flying on the flight deck for ascent; he will be doing three spacewalks on day 5, 7, and 9; He will be the photo/TV lead for the different types of cameras on board to document the flight and to send back the information to the ground for both technical and public affairs reasons. Mission Specialist 5, Charles Camada will be doing the inspection on flight day 2 with Mission Specialist Thomas and Pilot Kelly; he will be transferring the logistics off the shuttle and onto the space station and from the space station back to the shuttle; He will help set up eleven lap tops on board. Mission Specialist 4, Wendy Lawrence will lead the transfer of logistics to the space station; she is the space station arm operator during extravehicular activities 1 and 3; she will be carrying the 6,000 pounds of external storage platform from the shuttle payload bay over to the space station; she is also

  9. The formation process of flight crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginnett, Robert C.

    1987-01-01

    A study which uses Hackman's Normative Model (1986) for group effectiveness to see if there are any differences between the behaviors of effective and less effective captains at building and maintaining their crews is presented. Captains were selected using crew evaluations, creating a final pool of six effective crew managers and four captains less proficient as crew leaders. Data collection began at crew briefings, and continued through two trips, with intense data gathering during critical incidents for both task and process events. It was found that a predetermined set of interactions that can occur between crew members exists for the forming crew. It is concluded that effective captains expand the set of interactions, decreasing the limitations on how the group will work together.

  10. 76 FR 27656 - Intent To Request Renewal From OMB of One Current Public Collection of Information: Flight Crew...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... advanced self-defense training program for flight and cabin crew members of air carriers providing... information, airline employee number, and Social Security number (last four digits) from flight and cabin crew members of air carriers to verify employment status to confirm eligibility to participate in...

  11. ESCAPE AS REINFORCEMENT AND ESCAPE EXTINCTION IN THE TREATMENT OF FEEDING PROBLEMS

    OpenAIRE

    LaRue, Robert H; Stewart, Victoria; Piazza, Cathleen C; Volkert, Valerie M; Patel, Meeta R; Zeleny, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Given the effectiveness of putative escape extinction as treatment for feeding problems, it is surprising that little is known about the effects of escape as reinforcement for appropriate eating during treatment. In the current investigation, we examined the effectiveness of escape as reinforcement for mouth clean (a product measure of swallowing), escape as reinforcement for mouth clean plus escape extinction (EE), and EE alone as treatment for the food refusal of 5 children. Results were si...

  12. Photochemical Escape of Oxygen from Early Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical escape is an important process for oxygen escape from present Mars. In this work, a 1-D Monte-Carlo Model is developed to calculate escape rates of energetic oxygen atoms produced from O2+ dissociative recombination reactions (DR) under 1, 3, 10, and 20 times present solar XUV fluxes. We found that although the overall DR rates increase with solar XUV flux almost linearly, oxygen escape rate increases from 1 to 10 times present solar XUV conditions but decreases when increasing solar XUV flux further. Analysis shows that atomic species in the upper thermosphere of early Mars increases more rapidly than O2+ when increasing XUV fluxes. While the latter is the source of energetic O atoms, the former increases the collision probability and thus decreases the escape probability of energetic O. Our results suggest that photochemical escape be a less important escape mechanism than previously thought for the loss of water and/or CO2 from early Mars.

  13. Energy-limited escape revised

    CERN Document Server

    Salz, M; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

    2016-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) < 13.11~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ because in these planets the radiative energy input is efficiently used to drive the planetary wind. Massive and compact planets with $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) \\gtrsim 13.6~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ exhibit more tightly bound atmospheres in which the complete radiative energy input is re-emitted through hydrogen Ly$\\alpha$ and free-free emission. These planets therefore host hydrodynamically stable thermospheres. Between these two extremes the strength of the planetary winds rapidly declines as a result of a decreasing heating eff...

  14. Wind-Induced Atmospheric Escape: Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Richard; Johnson, Robert; Sittler, Edward, Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Simpson, David

    2012-01-01

    Rapid thermospheric flows can significantly enhance the estimates of the atmospheric loss rate and the structure of the atmospheric corona of a planetary body. In particular, rapid horizontal flow at the exobase can increase the corresponding constituent escape rate. Here we show that such corrections, for both thermal and non-thermal escape, cannot be ignored when calculating the escape of methane from Titan, for which drastically different rates have been proposed. Such enhancements are also relevant to Pluto and exoplanets.

  15. Reduced Volume Prototype Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; A Next-Generation Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinen, Janice V.; Anchondo, Ian; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Colunga, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the reduced volume prototype (RVP) spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME). The RVP SWME is the third generation of hollow fiber SWME hardware. Like its predecessors, RVP SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Major design improvements, including a 36% reduction in volume, reduced weight, and a more flight-like backpressure valve, facilitate the packaging of RVP SWME in the AEMU PLSS envelope. The development of these evaporative cooling systems will contribute to a more robust and comprehensive AEMU PLSS.

  16. Escape as Reinforcement and Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Feeding Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, Robert H.; Stewart, Victoria; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Volkert, Valerie M.; Patel, Meeta R.; Zeleny, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Given the effectiveness of putative escape extinction as treatment for feeding problems, it is surprising that little is known about the effects of escape as reinforcement for appropriate eating during treatment. In the current investigation, we examined the effectiveness of escape as reinforcement for mouth clean (a product measure of…

  17. STS-54 Crew Arrival for TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Footage shows the crew of STS-54, Commander John H. Casper, Pilot Donald R. McMonagle, and Mission Specialists Mario Runco, Jr., Gregory J. Harbaugh, and Susan J. Helms landing and emerging from several T-38 aircraft during the Terminal Countdown and Demonstration Test (TCDT). Commander Casper introduces the crew and they each make a brief statement about the mission.

  18. Submarine 'safe to escape' studies in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurd, K M; Seddon, F M; Thacker, J C; Blogg, S L; Stansfield, M R D; White, M G; Loveman, G A M

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Navy requires reliable advice on the safe limits of escape from a distressed submarine (DISSUB). Flooding in a DISSUB may cause a rise in ambient pressure, increasing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and decreasing the maximum depth from which it is safe to escape. The aim of this study was to investigate the pressure/depth limits to escape following saturation at raised ambient pressure. Exposure to saturation pressures up to 1.6 bar (a) (160 kPa) (n = 38); escapes from depths down to 120 meters of sea water (msw) (n = 254) and a combination of saturation followed by escape (n = 90) was carried out in the QinetiQ Submarine Escape Simulator, Alverstoke, United Kingdom. Doppler ultrasound monitoring was used to judge the severity of decompression stress. The trials confirmed the previously untested advice, in the Guardbook, that if a DISSUB was lying at a depth of 90 msw, then it was safe to escape when the pressure in the DISSUB was 1.5 bar (a), but also indicated that this advice may be overly conservative. This study demonstrated that the upper DISSUB saturation pressure limit to safe escape from 90 msw was 1.6 bar (a), resulting in two cases of DCS. PMID:25109084

  19. Escaping Homelessness: Anticipated and Perceived Facilitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Allisha; Tweed, Roger

    2009-01-01

    One study with two distinct sections was conducted to identify factors facilitating escape from homelessness. In Section 1, 58 homeless individuals rated possible facilitators of escape (factors they believed would help them become more independent and self-sufficient). In Section 2, 80 participants who had already exited homelessness rated the…

  20. Escape of atmospheric gases from the Moon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Da Dao-an; Yang Ya-tian

    2005-12-01

    The escape rate of atmospheric molecules on the Moon is calculated.Based on the assumption that the rates of emission and escape of gases attain equilibrium, the ratio of molecular number densities during day and night, 0/0, can be explained. The plausible emission rate of helium and radioactive elements present in the Moon has also been calculated.

  1. Communication analyses of plant operator crews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elucidation of crew communication aspects is required to improve the man-man interface which supports operators' diagnoses and decisions. Experiments to clarify operator performance under abnormal condition were evaluated by protocol analyses, interviews, etc. using a training simulator. We had the working hypothesis, based on experimental observations, that operator performance can be evaluated by analysis of crew communications. The following four approaches were tried to evaluate operator performance. (1) Crew performance was quantitatively evaluated by the number of tasks undertaken by an operator crew. (2) The group thinking process was clarified by cognition-communication flow. (3) The group response process was clarified by movement flow. (4) Quantitative indexes for evaluating crew performance were considered to be represented by the amount of information effectively exchanged among operators. (author)

  2. The Apollo 11 Prime Crew

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Portrait of the prime crew of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. From left to right they are: Commander, Neil A. Armstrong, Command Module Pilot, Michael Collins, and Lunar Module Pilot, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. On July 20th 1969 at 4:18 PM, EDT the Lunar Module 'Eagle' landed in a region of the Moon called the Mare Tranquillitatis, also known as the Sea of Tranquillity. After securing his spacecraft, Armstrong radioed back to earth: 'Houston, Tranquility Base here, the Eagle has landed'. At 10:56 p.m. that same evening and witnessed by a worldwide television audience, Neil Armstrong stepped off the 'Eagle's landing pad onto the lunar surface and said: 'That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.' He became the first human to set foot upon the Moon.

  3. Cultural Variability in Crew Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ute

    1999-01-01

    Four studies were conducted to determine features of effective crew communication in response to errors during flight. Study One examined whether US captains and first officers use different communication strategies to correct errors and problems on the flight deck, and whether their communications are affected by the two situation variables, level of risk and degree of face-threat involved in challenging an error. Study Two was the cross-cultural extension of Study One and involved pilots from three European countries. Study Three compared communication strategies of female and male air carrier pilots who were matched in terms of years and type of aircraft experience. The final study assessed the effectiveness of the communication strategies observed in Study One.

  4. Biomedical Wireless Ambulatory Crew Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Alan; Humphreys, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A compact, ambulatory biometric data acquisition system has been developed for space and commercial terrestrial use. BioWATCH (Bio medical Wireless and Ambulatory Telemetry for Crew Health) acquires signals from biomedical sensors using acquisition modules attached to a common data and power bus. Several slots allow the user to configure the unit by inserting sensor-specific modules. The data are then sent real-time from the unit over any commercially implemented wireless network including 802.11b/g, WCDMA, 3G. This system has a distributed computing hierarchy and has a common data controller on each sensor module. This allows for the modularity of the device along with the tailored ability to control the cards using a relatively small master processor. The distributed nature of this system affords the modularity, size, and power consumption that betters the current state of the art in medical ambulatory data acquisition. A new company was created to market this technology.

  5. Escaping the resource curse in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shixiong; Li, Shurong; Ma, Hua; Sun, Yutong

    2015-02-01

    Many societies face an income gap between rich regions with access to advanced technology and regions that are rich in natural resources but poorer in technology. This "resource curse" can lead to a Kuznets trap, in which economic inequalities between the rich and the poor increase during the process of socioeconomic development. This can also lead to depletion of natural resources, environmental degradation, social instability, and declining socioeconomic development. These problems will jeopardize China's achievements if the current path continues to be pursued without intervention by the government to solve the problems. To mitigate the socioeconomic development gap between western and eastern China, the government implemented its Western Development Program in 2000. However, recent data suggest that this program has instead worsened the resource curse. Because each region has its own unique strengths and weaknesses, China must escape the resource curse by accounting for this difference; in western China, this can be done by improving education, promoting high-tech industry, adjusting its economic strategy to balance regional development, and seeking more sustainable approaches to socioeconomic development.

  6. Kuiper Prize Lecture - Escape of atmospheres, ancient and modern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunten, D.M. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A development history is presented for theories concerning planetary atmosphere gas-escape phenomena, which although firmly grounded in the kinetics of gases achieved truly productive results only after spacecraft remote sensing data for both the earth atmosphere and the planets became widely available. The most significant initial advances, encompassing diffusion-limited flow, nonthermal escape mechanisms, bound nonthermal coronas, and mass fractionation during early blowoff, followed from sounding rocket studies of the earth upper atmosphere, Mariner 5 results on hydrogen near Venus, and the nitrogen isotopic composition discovered by Viking in Mars. Attention has more recently been given to the xenon isotopic patterns in various atmospheres, as well as to the puzzling behavior of the Io atmosphere and plasma torus. 126 refs.

  7. Kuiper Prize Lecture - Escape of atmospheres, ancient and modern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A development history is presented for theories concerning planetary atmosphere gas-escape phenomena, which although firmly grounded in the kinetics of gases achieved truly productive results only after spacecraft remote sensing data for both the earth atmosphere and the planets became widely available. The most significant initial advances, encompassing diffusion-limited flow, nonthermal escape mechanisms, bound nonthermal coronas, and mass fractionation during early blowoff, followed from sounding rocket studies of the earth upper atmosphere, Mariner 5 results on hydrogen near Venus, and the nitrogen isotopic composition discovered by Viking in Mars. Attention has more recently been given to the xenon isotopic patterns in various atmospheres, as well as to the puzzling behavior of the Io atmosphere and plasma torus. 126 refs

  8. Shared Problem Models and Crew Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orasanu, Judith; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The importance of crew decision making to aviation safety has been well established through NTSB accident analyses: Crew judgment and decision making have been cited as causes or contributing factors in over half of all accidents in commercial air transport, general aviation, and military aviation. Yet the bulk of research on decision making has not proven helpful in improving the quality of decisions in the cockpit. One reason is that traditional analytic decision models are inappropriate to the dynamic complex nature of cockpit decision making and do not accurately describe what expert human decision makers do when they make decisions. A new model of dynamic naturalistic decision making is offered that may prove more useful for training or aiding cockpit decision making. Based on analyses of crew performance in full-mission simulation and National Transportation Safety Board accident reports, features that define effective decision strategies in abnormal or emergency situations have been identified. These include accurate situation assessment (including time and risk assessment), appreciation of the complexity of the problem, sensitivity to constraints on the decision, timeliness of the response, and use of adequate information. More effective crews also manage their workload to provide themselves with time and resources to make good decisions. In brief, good decisions are appropriate to the demands of the situation and reflect the crew's metacognitive skill. Effective crew decision making and overall performance are mediated by crew communication. Communication contributes to performance because it assures that all crew members have essential information, but it also regulates and coordinates crew actions and is the medium of collective thinking in response to a problem. This presentation will examine the relation between communication that serves to build performance. Implications of these findings for crew training will be discussed.

  9. Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Launch Abort System Guidance and Control Analysis Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, John B.; Kim, Sungwan; Raney, David L.; Aubuchon, Vanessa V.; Sparks, Dean W.; Busan, Ronald C.; Proud, Ryan W.; Merritt, Deborah S.

    2008-01-01

    Aborts during the critical ascent flight phase require the design and operation of Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) systems to escape from the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and return the crew safely to the Earth. To accomplish this requirement of continuous abort coverage, CEV ascent abort modes are being designed and analyzed to accommodate the velocity, altitude, atmospheric, and vehicle configuration changes that occur during ascent. Aborts from the launch pad to early in the flight of the CLV second stage are performed using the Launch Abort System (LAS). During this type of abort, the LAS Abort Motor is used to pull the Crew Module (CM) safely away from the CLV and Service Module (SM). LAS abort guidance and control studies and design trades are being conducted so that more informed decisions can be made regarding the vehicle abort requirements, design, and operation. This paper presents an overview of the Orion CEV, an overview of the LAS ascent abort mode, and a summary of key LAS abort analysis methods and results.

  10. Optimal escape theory predicts escape behaviors beyond flight initiation distance: risk assessment and escape by striped plateau lizards Sceloporus virgatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William E.COOPER Jr

    2009-01-01

    Escape theory predicts that flight initiation distance (FID=distance between predator and prey when escape begins) is longer when risk is greater and shorter when escape is more costly. A few tests suggest that escape theory applies to distance fled. Escape models have not addressed stochastic variables, such as probability of fleeing and of entering refuge, but their economic logic might be applicable. Experiments on several risk factors in the lizard Sceloporus virgatus confirmed all predictions for the above escape variables. FID was greater when approach was faster and more direct, for lizards on ground than on trees, for lizards rarely exposed to humans, for the second of two approaches, and when the predator turned toward lizards rather than away. Lizards fled further during rapid and second consecutive approaches. They were more likely to flee when approached directly, when a predator turned toward them, and during second approaches. They were more likely to enter refuge when approached rapidly. A novel finding is that perch height in trees was unrelated to FID because lizards escaped by moving out of sight, then moving up or down unpredictably. These findings add to a growing body of evidence supporting predictions of escape theory for FID and distance fled. They show that two probabilistic aspects of escape are predictable based on relative predation risk levels. Because individuals differ in boldness, the assessed optimal FID and threshold risks for fleeing and entering refuge are exceeded for an increasing proportion of individuals as risk increases[Current Zoology 55(2):123-131,2009].

  11. Quantifying Distributions of Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Cen, Renyue

    2015-01-01

    Simulations have indicated that most of the escaped Lyman continuum photons escape through a minority of solid angles with near complete transparency, with the remaining majority of the solid angles largely opaque, resulting in a very broad and skewed probability distribution function (PDF) of the escape fraction when viewed at different angles. Thus, the escape fraction of Lyman continuum photons of a galaxy observed along a line of sight merely represents the properties of the interstellar medium along that line of sight, which may be an ill-representation of true escape fraction of the galaxy averaged over its full sky. Here we study how Lyman continuum photons escape from galaxies at $z=4-6$, utilizing high-resolution large-scale cosmological radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. We compute the PDF of the mean escape fraction ($\\left$) averaged over mock observational samples, as a function of the sample size, compared to the true mean (had you an infinite sample size). We find that, when the sample size is...

  12. Crew system dynamics - Combining humans and automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Mary

    1989-01-01

    Some of the human factor issues involved in effectively combining human and automated systems are examined with particular reference to spaceflights. The concepts of the crew system and crew systems dynamics are defined, and the present status of crew systems is summarized. The possibilities and potential problems aasociated with the use of automated systems are discussed, as are unique capabilities and possible errors introduced by human participants. It is emphasized that the true integration of human and automated systems must allow for the characteristics of both.

  13. Net escapement of Antartic krill in trawls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krafft, B.A.; Krag, Ludvig Ahm; Herrmann, Bent;

    This document describes the aims and methodology of a three year project (commenced in 2012) entitled Net Escapement of Antarctic krill in Trawls (NEAT). The study will include a morphology based mathematical modeling (FISHSELECT) of different sex and maturity groups of Antarctic krill (Euphausia...... superba) to predict basic selective characteristics of different trawl gear and net designs. Results will be used to quantify the theoretic catch efficiency and escape mortality in different net designs and also to construct design guides, to minimize escape mortality, with descriptions of basis selective...

  14. Escapes in Hamiltonian systems with multiple exit channels: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the escape dynamics in open Hamiltonian systems with multiple channels of escape continuing the work initiated in Part I. A thorough numerical investigation is conducted distinguishing between trapped (ordered and chaotic) and escaping orbits. The determination of the location of the basins of escape towards the different escape channels and their correlations with the corresponding escape periods of the orbits is undoubtedly an issue of paramount importance. We consider four diffe...

  15. Flight Crew State Monitoring Metrics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — eSky will develop specific crew state metrics based on the timeliness, tempo and accuracy of pilot inputs required by the H-mode Flight Control System (HFCS)....

  16. Crew Autonomy Measures and Models (CAMM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SA Technologies will employ a two-part solution including measures and models for evaluating crew autonomy in exploratory space missions. An integrated measurement...

  17. The escape velocity and Schwarzschild metric

    CERN Document Server

    Murzagalieva, A G; Murzagaliev, G Z

    2002-01-01

    The escape velocity value in the terms of general relativity by means Schwarzschild metric is provided to make of the motion equation with Friedman cosmological model behavior build in the terms of Robertson-Worker metric. (author)

  18. Biogeochemistry: Nocturnal escape route for marsh gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Katey Walter; MacIntyre, Sally

    2016-07-01

    A field study of methane emissions from wetlands reveals that more of the gas escapes through diffusive processes than was thought, mostly at night. Because methane is a greenhouse gas, the findings have implications for global warming.

  19. Karachi Commander Escapes Attack, 10 Dead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘志强

    2004-01-01

    KARACHI: The army commander in the Pakistani city of Karachi narrowly① escaped assassination② yesterday when gunmen attacked his convoy③ with gunfire and a bomb, killing at least 10 and wounding his driver, officials said.

  20. International Space Station Crew Return Vehicle: X-38. Educational Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The International Space Station (ISS) will provide the world with an orbiting laboratory that will have long-duration micro-gravity experimentation capability. The crew size for this facility will depend upon the crew return capability. The first crews will consist of three astronauts from Russia and the United States. The crew is limited to three…

  1. 20 CFR 404.1010 - Farm crew leader as employer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Farm crew leader as employer. 404.1010....1010 Farm crew leader as employer. A farm crew leader furnishes workers to do agricultural labor for another person, usually a farm operator. If the crew leader pays the workers (the money can be the...

  2. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mökkönen, Harri, E-mail: harri.mokkonen@aalto.fi [Department of Applied Physics and COMP CoE, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11100, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Faculty of Physical Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík (Iceland); Ikonen, Timo [Department of Applied Physics and COMP CoE, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11100, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Jónsson, Hannes [Department of Applied Physics and COMP CoE, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11100, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Faculty of Physical Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík (Iceland); Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1843 (United States); Ala-Nissila, Tapio [Department of Applied Physics and COMP CoE, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11100, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1843 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  3. On the escape of CH4 from Pluto's atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinen, T. T.; Erwin, J. T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    We adapted a multi-species escape model, developed for close-in extrasolar planets, to calculate the escape rates of CH4 and N2 from Pluto. In the absence of escape, CH4 should overtake N2 as the dominant species below the exobase. The CH4 profile depends strongly on the escape rate, however, and the typical escape rates predicted for Pluto lead to a nearly constant mixing ratio of less than 1 % below the exobase. In this case the CH4 escape rate is only 5-10 % of the N2 escape rate. Observat...

  4. Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Bond, Cody R.

    2013-09-01

    To benchmark the current U.S. wind turbine fleet reliability performance and identify the major contributors to component-level failures and other downtime events, the Department of Energy funded the development of the Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database by Sandia National Laboratories. This report is the third annual Wind Plant Reliability Benchmark, to publically report on CREW findings for the wind industry. The CREW database uses both high resolution Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) data from operating plants and Strategic Power Systems ORAPWindª (Operational Reliability Analysis Program for Wind) data, which consist of downtime and reserve event records and daily summaries of various time categories for each turbine. Together, these data are used as inputs into CREWs reliability modeling. The results presented here include: the primary CREW Benchmark statistics (operational availability, utilization, capacity factor, mean time between events, and mean downtime); time accounting from an availability perspective; time accounting in terms of the combination of wind speed and generation levels; power curve analysis; and top system and component contributors to unavailability.

  5. Escape statistics for parameter sweeps through bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nicholas J; Shaw, Steven W

    2012-04-01

    We consider the dynamics of systems undergoing parameter sweeps through bifurcation points in the presence of noise. Of interest here are local codimension-one bifurcations that result in large excursions away from an operating point that is transitioning from stable to unstable during the sweep, since information about these "escape events" can be used for system identification, sensing, and other applications. The analysis is based on stochastic normal forms for the dynamic saddle-node and subcritical pitchfork bifurcations with a time-varying bifurcation parameter and additive noise. The results include formulation and numerical solution for the distribution of escape events in the general case and analytical approximations for delayed bifurcations for which escape occurs well beyond the corresponding quasistatic bifurcation points. These bifurcations result in amplitude jumps encountered during parameter sweeps and are particularly relevant to nano- and microelectromechanical systems, for which noise can play a significant role.

  6. Cultural Variability in Crew Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ute

    1997-01-01

    In this study we examined what linguistic strategies pilots use when they have to challenge the actions of a colleague, and how their communications balance the need for informativeness with the need for assuring the other's cooperation. Two strategies emerged for captains. They either gave commands or they made suggestions that referred to actions of the crew. Both strategies explicitly state what action should be taken but they differ in their social implications. Commands are direct insofar as they entail a strong obligation for the listener to comply with the speaker' s request. Suggestions are less direct in this respect. However, by using the collegial "Let's do," speakers appeal to the solidarity between themselves and their listeners and seek compliance in this way. Commands, in contrast, are inherently authoritative and imply an asymmetry in status. Speakers by giving a command, express their belief that they are socially more powerful than their listeners and that they are thus licensed to command. That is, speakers seek listener compliance by appeal to their status. Status-based commands were more frequent among male captains than among female captains. Female captains instead were likely to shift the motivation for their commands away from their status to some objective necessity by referring to some problem or goal It remains to be seen, however, how captains' strategies were affected by the severity of a problem situation. Results in a preliminary study involving only male participants, suggests that pilots increased the directness of their utterances in situations that they perceived to be risky. Thus the observation that male captains used complex communications half of the time while female captains did so 75% of the time, could indicate that male captains were more likely than female captains to change their strategies with the severity of situations. Both male and female first officers in this study were less direct than captains. The most common

  7. Space shuttle crew training at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Paola Catapano

    From 13 to 16 October, the crew of NASA Space Shuttle mission STS-134 came to CERN for a special physics training programme. Invited here by Samuel Ting, they will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) detector to the International Space Station (ISS).   The STS134 crew in the Lodge at the Aiguille du Midi wearing CERN fleeces. From left to right: Captain Mark Kelly, US Navy; Pilot Gregory Johnson, USAF ret.; Mission Specialist Andrew Feustel; Mission Specialist Mike Fincke, USAF, Mission Specialist Gregory Chamitoff and Mission Specialist Roberto Vittori, ESA and Italian Air Force. Headed by Commander Mark Kelly, a US Navy captain, the crew included pilot Gregory Johnson, a US Air Force (USAF) colonel, and mission specialists Mike Fincke (also a USAF Colonel), Andrew Feustel, and Gregory Chamitoff of NASA, as well as Colonel Roberto Vittori of the European Space Agency (ESA). Two flight directors, Gary Horlache and Derek Hassmann of NASA, and the engineer responsible for the Ext...

  8. Composite Crew Module (CCM) Permeability Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to form an Agency team to design and build a composite crew module in 18 months in order to gain hands-on experience in anticipation that future exploration systems may be made of composite materials. One of the conclusions from this Composite Crew Module Primary Structure assessment was that there was a lack of understanding regarding the ability for composite pressure shells to contain consumable gases, which posed a technical risk relative to the use of a metallic design. After the completion of the Composite Crew Module test program, the test article was used in a new program to assess the overall leakage/permeability and identify specific features associated with high leak rates. This document contains the outcome of the leakage assessment.

  9. Unexpected variability of Martian hydrogen escape

    OpenAIRE

    Chaffin, Michael S.; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Stewart, Ian; Montmessin, Franck; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    International audience Mars today is much drier than the Earth, though they likely began with similar relative amounts of water. One potential cause for this discrepancy is hydrogen loss to space, which may have removed a large fraction of Mars' initial water. Here we demonstrate an order-of-magnitude change in the Martian hydrogen escape rate in 2007, inconsistent with established models for the source of escaping hydrogen. We analyze 121.6 nm (hydrogen Lyman-α) airglow observations made ...

  10. Martian Atmospheric and Ionospheric plasma Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Rickard

    2016-04-01

    Solar forcing is responsible for the heating, ionization, photochemistry, and erosion processes in the upper atmosphere throughout the lifetime of the terrestrial planets. Of the four terrestrial planets, the Earth is the only one with a fully developed biosphere, while our kin Venus and Mars have evolved into arid inhabitable planets. As for Mars, there are ample evidences for an early Noachian, water rich period on Mars. The question is, what made Mars evolve so differently compared to the Earth? Various hydrosphere and atmospheric evolution scenarios for Mars have been forwarded based on surface morphology, chemical composition, simulations, semi-empiric (in-situ data) models, and the long-term evolution of the Sun. Progress has been made, but the case is still open regarding the changes that led to the present arid surface and tenuous atmosphere at Mars. This presentation addresses the long-term variability of the Sun, the solar forcing impact on the Martian atmosphere, and its interaction with the space environment - an electromagnetic wave and particle interaction with the upper atmosphere that has implications for its photochemistry, composition, and energization that governs thermal and non-thermal escape. Non-thermal escape implies an electromagnetic upward energization of planetary ions and molecules to velocities above escape velocity, a process governed by a combination of solar EUV radiation (ionization), and energy and momentum transfer by the solar wind. The ion escape issue dates back to the early Soviet and US-missions to Mars, but the first more accurate estimates of escape rates came with the Phobos-2 mission in 1989. Better-quality ion composition measurement results of atmospheric/ionospheric ion escape from Mars, obtained from ESA Mars Express (MEX) instruments, have improved our understanding of the ion escape mechanism. With the NASA MAVEN spacecraft orbiting Mars since Sept. 2014, dual in-situ measurement with plasma instruments are now

  11. On the escape of CH4 from Pluto's atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Koskinen, T T; Yelle, R V

    2015-01-01

    We adapted a multi-species escape model, developed for close-in extrasolar planets, to calculate the escape rates of CH4 and N2 from Pluto. In the absence of escape, CH4 should overtake N2 as the dominant species below the exobase. The CH4 profile depends strongly on the escape rate, however, and the typical escape rates predicted for Pluto lead to a nearly constant mixing ratio of less than 1 % below the exobase. In this case the CH4 escape rate is only 5-10 % of the N2 escape rate. Observations of the CH4 profile by the New Horizons/ALICE spectrograph can constrain the CH4 escape rate and provide a unique test for escape models.

  12. Centrifugally Stimulated Exospheric Ion Escape at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the transport of ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere magnetosphere of Mercury. We show that, because of small spatial scales, the centrifugal effect due to curvature of the E B drift paths can lead to significant particle energization in the parallel direction. We demonstrate that because of this effect, ions with initial speed smaller than the escape speed such as those produced via thermal desorption can overcome gravity and escape into the magnetosphere. The escape route of this low-energy exosphere originating material is largely controlled by the magnetospheric convection rate. This escape route spreads over a narrower range of altitudes when the convection rate increases. Bulk transport of low-energy planetary material thus occurs within a limited region of space once moderate magnetospheric convection is established. These results suggest that, via release of material otherwise gravitationally trapped, the E B related centrifugal acceleration is an important mechanism for the net supply of plasma to the magnetosphere of Mercury.

  13. COMMUNICATION PROBLEMS IN A MIXED CREW ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN ASTRATINEI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shipping has become a highly international and multicultural industry due to a globalised labour market of seafarers. About two thirds of the world`s merchant fleets, are manned by a mixed crew, which may include two to three different nationalities. The common language used on board ship is English. So the crewmembers must have a good command of this language. 80% of all maritime accidents are, according to incident reports, caused by human error i.e. negligence, fatigue, incompetence or communication breakdown. Another factor that may affect the safety of crew and cargo is the cultural differences within the mixed nationality crews which, if not appeased in time, may lead to very serious conflicts. This paper proposes to analyse some characteristics of the Asian culture and traditions and suggest some ways of improving the professional relationship among multinational crew members by making them aware of their shipmates identities. A questionnaire, which we intend to use as a research tool, will be provided and explained.

  14. 19 CFR 122.45 - Crew list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crew list. 122.45 Section 122.45 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for...

  15. Multifunctional Coating for Crew Cabin Surfaces and Fabrics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's crewed spacecrafts require routine cleaning of particulate, moisture, organic, and salt contaminants on the crew cabin surfaces and fabrics. Self-cleaning...

  16. 14 CFR 121.385 - Composition of flight crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Composition of flight crew. 121.385 Section... Composition of flight crew. (a) No certificate holder may operate an airplane with less than the minimum flight crew in the airworthiness certificate or the airplane Flight Manual approved for that...

  17. Latino High School Students' Perceptions of Gangs and Crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Edward M.; Wishard, Alison; Gallimore, Ronald; Rivera, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Controversies around definitions and perceptions of gangs are heightened by the scarcity of research on crews. In an open-ended interview, 77 Latino 10th graders from a random longitudinal sample provided information about gangs and crews. Although less than 10% reported having been in gangs or crews, 84% reported having personal contact with…

  18. 26 CFR 31.3121(o)-1 - Crew leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crew leader. 31.3121(o)-1 Section 31.3121(o)-1... Contributions Act (Chapter 21, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(o)-1 Crew leader. The term “crew leader” means an individual who furnishes individuals to perform agricultural labor...

  19. Solving the Airline Crew Pairing Problem using Subsequence Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel; Ryan, David; Lusby, Richard Martin;

    2009-01-01

    Good and fast solutions to the airline crew pairing problem are highly interesting for the airline industry, as crew costs are the biggest expenditure after fuel for an airline. The crew pairing problem is typically modelled as a set partitioning problem and solved by column generation. However...

  20. Subsequence Generation for the Airline Crew Pairing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel; Lusby, Richard Martin; Ryan, David;

    Good and fast solutions to the airline crew pairing problem are highly interesting for the airline industry, as crew costs are the biggest expenditure after fuel for an airline. The crew pairing problem is typically modelled as a set partitioning problem and solved by column generation. However...

  1. Solving the Airline Crew Pairing Problem using Subsequence Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel; Ryan, David M.; Lusby, Richard Martin;

    2010-01-01

    Good and fast solutions to the airline crew pairing problem are highly interesting for the airline industry, as crew costs are the biggest expenditure after fuel for an airline. The crew pairing problem is typically modelled as a set partitioning problem and solved by column generation. However...

  2. Solving the Airline Crew Pairing Problem using Subsequence Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel; Lusby, Richard Martin; Ryan, David M.;

    Good and fast solutions to the airline crew pairing problem are highly interesting for the airline industry, as crew costs are the biggest expenditure after fuel for an airline. The crew pairing problem is typically modelled as a set partitioning problem and solved by column generation. However...

  3. Temporal and ontogenetic variation in the escape response of Ameiva festiva (Squamata, Teiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lattanzio

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several factors have been shown to affect lizard escape behavior (flight initiation distance or FID, the distance between predator and prey when the prey initiates escape. Patterns of daily activity, such as foraging or movement behavior, vary with respect to time of day, supporting that escape responses may vary temporally as well. However, there remains scant information regarding the effects of time of day on FID. During peak activity, FID may decrease due to increased cost of giving up resources (e.g., prey or potential mates. An alternative hypothesis is that FID may increase because lizard activity in general may serve to alert a predator in advance of its approach. A lizard in this scenario may be favored to flee sooner rather than later. Moreover, juvenile and adult lizards of multiple species may differ in behavioral, ecological, and morphological traits that could influence escape decisions. I tested the effects of time of day (in 30-min intervals and age (juvenile or adult on the FID of a tropical whiptail lizard, Ameiva festiva in Costa Rica. I found that A. festiva escape responses varied with time of day such that in general, their FID decreased throughout the day. In addition, I observed a peak in FID from mid to late-morning that matches published estimates of peak activity times for A. festiva. Overall, juvenile A. festiva initiated an escape response sooner than adults, which may be related to differences in perceived risk associated with differences in size and predator experience between the two age groups. I conclude that escape responses may be contingent on both the activity level of the animal at the time of approach and its age.

  4. 19 CFR 122.75b - Electronic manifest requirement for crew members and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... issued by the TSA to an air carrier subject to the provisions of 49 CFR part 1544, 1546, or 1550. The... and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft departing from the United States. 122.75b Section 122...; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard...

  5. Extension of service life of rigid transfer lines /SMDC/. [explosive components for aircraft escape systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, L. J.; Kayser, E. G.; Schimmel, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a life evaluation program on rigid explosive transfer lines, which are used to initiate aircraft emergency crew escape functions, are presented in order to provide quantitative information on rigid explosive transfer lines which can contribute to responsible, conservative, service life determinations. The program involved the development of a test methodology, testing of the three types of transfer lines in use in the U.S., testing of these lines following a repeat of the thermal test conducted in the original qualification, and conducting a degradation investigation. Results from the testing of more than 800 components showed that rigid explosive transfer lines were not affected by age, service, or a repeat of the thermal qualification tests on full-service lines. The explosive degradation limits were approximated and the mechanisms examined. It is concluded that the service lives of rigid explosive transfer lines should be considered for extension in order to provide cost savings and increased system reliability.

  6. [Escape mutants of hepatitis B virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Carlos Mario; Navas, María-Cristina

    2015-04-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a public health problem worldwide. Considering HBV morbidity and mortality and the economic consequences .of this infection, policies and strategies to control it have been implemented, especially in regions where HBV infection is endemic, with high rates of vertical and horizontal infection. One of these strategies is the development of the recombinant vaccine. A 92% of the countries in the world have implemented the vaccine with a global coverage of 69%. The escape variants of HBV correspond to isolates with mutations in the sequence coding for the "a" determinant; these mutations result in changes in the amino acid sequence of the surface antigen (HBsAg) that prevent neutralization of viral particles by antibodies generated in response to vaccination or infection. The escape variants can infect vaccinated individuals and have been identified in the population of countries with different epidemiological patterns. PMID:26065452

  7. Escape and Stand of the Pluto Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong-Yi

    2002-01-01

    Molar mass μmin of the lightest gas, which will exist "forever" in the atmosphere at the planet surface,can be evaluated by Jeans rule. The μmin of Pluto is 17.3 g@ mol-1. It is evident that both N2 and CO can be major atmospheric composition at the Pluto surface, and will exist "forever". CH4 can only be escaping slowly from Pluto atmosphere, and still holds quite a proportion in current Pluto atmosphere. However, it will not escape from Titan (or Jupiter, Saturn) atmosphere largely, and will exist "forever". Given the quantitylevelof partial pressure of CH4 in Pluto and Titan (or Jupiter, Saturn) original atmosphere is the same, it will be clear that the current partial pressure of CH4 in Pluto surface atmosphere is 10-3 Pa.

  8. Designing an escape room with the Experience Pyramid model

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, Outi; Shumeyko, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The concept of real life room escape, although relatively new, has been constantly gaining popularity and spreading across countries and continents. Despite the ever-growing appeal and widespread appreciation, the phenomenon is highly underresearched. The authors of this paper, employed at InsideOut Escape Games – the first room escape company of Finland – decided to explore the question of applicability of available experience design tools in the context of room escape. The Experience Py...

  9. Escape from a Riddled-Like Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO Xiao-Gang; DAI Jun; WANG Wen-Xiu; HE Da-Ren

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate a system described by a conservative and a dissipative map concatenation. A fat fractal forbidden net, induced by interaction between discontinuous and noninvertible properties, introduces rippled-like attraction basins of two periodic attractors. Small areas, which serve as escaping holes of a new type of crisis, are dominated by conventional strong dissipation and are bounded by the forbidden region, but only in the vicinity of each periodic point.

  10. How inflation hawks escape expectations traps

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvain Leduc

    2003-01-01

    Why did inflation increase so dramatically from the 1960s to the 1970s? One possible theory is that once people started believing inflation would rise, the Fed was forced to validate those expectations by increasing the money supply. In "How Inflation Hawks Escape Expectations Traps," Sylvain Leduc discusses this "expectations trap" hypothesis and uses a direct measure of expectations to see if the theory is consistent with the data.

  11. A NASA Perspective on Maintenance Activities and Maintenance Crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth Tim

    2007-01-01

    Proactive consideration of ground crew factors enhances the designs of space vehicles and vehicle safety by: (1) Reducing the risk of undetected ground crew errors and collateral damage that compromise vehicle reliability and flight safety (2) Ensuring compatibility of specific vehicle to ground system interfaces (3) Optimizing ground systems. During ground processing and launch operations, public safety, flight crew safety, ground crew safety, and the safety of high-value spacecraft are inter-related. For extended Exploration missions, surface crews perform functions that merge traditional flight and ground operations.

  12. STS-108 backup crew member Padalka in an M-113

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Joining the STS-108 crew and Expedition 4 crew, cosmonaut Gennadi Padalka is ready to practice driving an M-113 armored personnel carrier. Padalka completed training in 2000 for a space flight on Soyuz-TM transport vehicle as a commander of an ISS contingency crew and is part of a backup crew for the Expedition 4. STS-108 is a Utilization Flight that will carry the replacement Expedition 4 crew to the International Space Station, as well as the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, filled with supplies and equipment. The l1-day mission is scheduled for launch Nov. 29 on Space Shuttle Endeavour.

  13. Effects of submarine escape training on the pulmonary function and carbon dioxide retention in the escape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rui-yong; WANG Wen-bo; FANG Yi-qun; XU Ji; XU Lin-jun

    2011-01-01

    Objective Fast buoyancy ascent escape used in submarine escape is the most probable choice of survival in case of a submarine accident.Rate of success for escape depends very much on the extent of training,in spite of the fact that rapid compression and decompression pose great challenges to the human body in terms of enormous stresses.To minimize stresses experienced during sub escape training has always been a research subject for us.Lungs are susceptible to rapid change in pressure during escape.Dynamic pulmonary function and the end-tidal PCO2 ( PETCO2 ) might be the best indicator for its effect on the pulmonary function of the submarine escapee.Methods Five male navy divers received submarine escape trainings,at different depths from 3-60 m.They were compressed at different rates (with pressure doubled every 20 s or 30 s),in the simulated submarine escape tower located in the Naval Medical Research Institute.The gas of end-expiration was collected immediately after escape,respiratory rate (RR) and dynamic pulmonary function were closely monitored,and PETCO2 was determined with the mass spectrometer.Results Experimental results showed that forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1.0) tended to increase with increasing depth,and that it increased significantly at 50 m and 60 m,when compared with the basic data (P < 0.05 ),and it was coupled with a decrease in forced expiratory flow at 25 % ( FEF25% ),indicating that it had certain effect on the function of small airways.PETCO2 and RR all elevated markedly following escapes.No significant differences could be seen in RR following escapes at various depths.PETCO2 and depth ( r =0.387,P < 0.01 ) were positively correlated with compression rate ( r =0.459,P < 0.01 ) and RR ( r =0.467,P < 0.01 ).CO2 retention might be attributed to pulmonary ventilation disorder induced by rapid changes in pressure.PETCO2 was within normal range,following escapes at various depths,suggesting that increased RR might be

  14. Cold ion escape from the Martian ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Nilsson, H.; Fedorov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We here report on new measurements of the escape flux of oxygen ions from Mars by combining the observations of the ASPERA-3 and MARSIS experiments on board the European Mars Express spacecraft. We show that in previous estimates of the total heavy ion escape flow the contribution of the cold ionospheric outflow with energies below 10 eV has been underestimated. Both case studies and the derived flow pattern indicate that the cold plasma observed by MARSIS and the superthermal plasma observed by ASPERA-3 move with the same bulk speed in most regions of the Martian tail. We determine maps of the tailside heavy ion flux distribution derived from mean ion velocity distributions sampled over 7 years. If we assume that the superthermal bulk speed derived from these long time averages of the ion distribution function represent the total plasma bulk speed we derive the total tailside plasma flux. Assuming cylindrical symmetry we determine the mean total escape rate for the years 2007-2014 at 2.8 ± 0.4 ×1025 atoms / s which is in good agreement with model estimates. A possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside.

  15. Xenon Fractionation and Archean Hydrogen Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Xenon is the heaviest gas found in significant quantities in natural planetary atmospheres. It would seem the least likely to escape. Yet there is more evidence for xenon escape from Earth than for any element other than helium and perhaps neon. The most straightforward evidence is that most of the radiogenic Xe from the decay of (129)I (half-life 15.7 Myr) and (244)Pu (half-life 81 Myr) that is Earth's birthright is missing. The missing xenon is often attributed to the impact erosion of early atmospheres of Earth and its ancestors. It is obvious that if most of the radiogenic xenon were driven off by impacts, most of the rest of the atmophiles fared the same fate. The other line of evidence is in the nonradiogenic isotopes of xenon and its silent partner, krypton. Atmospheric xenon is strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) compared to any known solar system source (Figure 1). This is in stark contrast to krypton, which may not be fractionated at all: atmospheric Kr is slightly heavier than solar Kr (at about 0.5% per amu), but it is the same as in carbonaceous chondrites. Nonradiogenic xenon is also under abundant relative to krypton (the so-called "missing xenon" problem). Together these observations imply that xenon has been subject to fractionating escape and krypton not.

  16. The escape of natural satellites from Mercury and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar's (1977) suggestion that the slow rotations of Mercury and Venus are in part due to natural satellites that subsequently escaped is discussed. A more useful criterion for the escape of such satellites than the previously proposed is derived, and it is shown that this distance is sufficiently small for Mercury and Venus to make the escape of satellites a likely possibility. (Auth.)

  17. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.382 Mechanical escape facilities. (a) Mechanical escape facilities shall be provided with overspeed, overwind, and automatic stop... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mechanical escape facilities. 75.382 Section...

  18. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Means of escape. 177.500 Section 177.500 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Escape Requirements § 177.500 Means of escape. (a) Except as otherwise provided...

  19. Integrated vehicle and crew scheduling: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno de Athayde Prata

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a bibliographical review about vehicle and crew scheduling problem which is applicable in the optimization of public transportation systems. The traditional sequential approaches are presented. The most relevant mathematical models for the integrated approach are exposed. Finally, resolution approaches for the integrated problem,based on heuristics, branch-and-bound, lagrangean relaxation, columns generation and meta-heuristics are presented.

  20. Crew goal setting for security control

    OpenAIRE

    Wetter, Olive Emil; Hofer, Franziska; Jonas, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness, efficiency, and robustness of simple goal setting in airport security control. As outcome, crew performance in terms of productivity (Experiment 1, field setting) was studied. Furthermore, the moderating role of negative and positive priming due to a previous task on the impact of goals (Experiment 2, laboratory setting) was analyzed. This research builds a bridge from goal setting theory to practice and prepares the grounds for its application in se...

  1. The Home Care Crew Scheduling Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel; Justesen, Tor

    In the Home Care Crew Scheduling Problem (HCCSP) a staff of caretakers has to be assigned a number of visits, such that the total number of assigned visits is maximised. The visits have different locations and positions in time, and travelling time and time windows must be respected. The challenge...... clustering of the visits based on the problem structure. The algorithm is tested on real-life problem instances and we obtain solutions that are better than current practice in all cases....

  2. Risks incurred by hydrogen escaping from containers and conduits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.R.; Grilliot, E.S. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States); Swain, M.N. [Analytical Technologies, Inc., Miami, FL (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This paper is a discussion of a method for hydrogen leak classification. Leaks are classified as; gas escapes into enclosed spaces, gas escapes into partially enclosed spaces (vented), and gas escapes into unenclosed spaces. Each of the three enclosure classifications is further divided into two subclasses; total volume of hydrogen escaped and flow rate of escaping hydrogen. A method to aid in risk assessment determination in partially enclosed spaces is proposed and verified for several enclosure geometries. Examples are discussed for additional enclosure geometries.

  3. The cost of the sword: escape performance in male swordtails.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Baumgartner

    Full Text Available The handicap theory of sexual selection posits that male display traits that are favored in mate choice come at a significant cost to performance. We tested one facet of this hypothesis in the green swordtail (Xiphophorus helleri. In this species, the lower ray of male caudal fin is extended into a 'sword', which serves to attract potential mates. However, bearing a long sword may increase drag and thus compromise a male's ability to swim effectively. We tested escape performance in this species by eliciting C-start escape responses, an instinctive escape behavior, in males with various sword lengths. We then removed males' swords and retested escape performance. We found no relationship between escape performance and sword length and no effect of sword removal on escape performance. While having a large sword may attract a predator's attention, our results suggest that sword size does not compromise a male's escape performance.

  4. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc;

    2013-01-01

    is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed......, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans...

  5. The Fastest Saccadic Responses Escape Visual Masking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M. Crouzet, Sébastien; Overgaard, Morten; Busch, Niko A.

    2014-01-01

    visual processing while the initial feedforward processing is thought to be left intact. We tested a prediction derived from this hypothesis: the fastest responses, being triggered before the beginning of reentrant processing, should escape the OSM interference. In a saccadic choice reaction time task......, which gives access to very early stages of visual processing, target visibility was reduced either by OSM, conventional backward masking, or low stimulus contrast. A general reduction of performance was observed in all three conditions. However, the fastest saccades did not show any sign of interference...

  6. Escape distribution for an inclined billiard

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Alan

    2014-01-01

    H${\\acute{e}}$non [8] used an inclined billiard to investigate aspects of chaotic scattering which occur in satellite encounters and in other situations. His model consisted of a piecewise mapping which described the motion of a point particle bouncing elastically on two disks. A one parameter family of orbits, named h-orbits, was obtained by starting the particle at rest from a given height. We obtain an analytical expression for the escape distribution of the h-orbits, which is also compared with results from numerical simulations. Finally, some discussion is made about possible applications of the h-orbits in connection with Hill's problem.

  7. Escape distribution for an inclined billiard

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Alan; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    H${\\acute{e}}$non [8] used an inclined billiard to investigate aspects of chaotic scattering which occur in satellite encounters and in other situations. His model consisted of a piecewise mapping which described the motion of a point particle bouncing elastically on two disks. A one parameter family of orbits, named h-orbits, was obtained by starting the particle at rest from a given height. We obtain an analytical expression for the escape distribution of the h-orbits, which is also compare...

  8. Suicide as escape from psychotic panic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Mark J; Ronningstam, Elsa; Schechter, Mark; Herbstman, Benjamin; Maltsberger, John T

    2016-01-01

    Suicides of patients in states of acute persecutory panic may be provoked by a subjective experience of helpless terror threatening imminent annihilation or dismemberment. These patients are literally scared to death and try to run away. They imagine suicide is survivable and desperately attempt to escape from imaginary enemies. These states of terror occur in a wide range of psychotic illnesses and are often associated with command hallucinations and delusions. In this article, the authors consider the subjective experience of persecutory panic and the suicide response as an attempt to flee from danger. PMID:27294586

  9. Tectonically controlled methane escape in Lake Baikal

    OpenAIRE

    Klerkx, J.; De Batist, M.; J. Poort; Hus, R.; Van Rensbergen, P.; Khlystov, O.; Granin, N.

    2006-01-01

    Methane, which is at least partly stored in the bottom sediments of Lake Baikal as gas hydrates, is released on the lake floor in the deeper parts of the basin along major faults, forming venting structures similar to small mud volcanoes. The CH4 venting structures are considered to be the surface expression of escape pathways for excess CH4 generated by the dissociation of pre-existing hydrates. The existence of a local heat flow anomaly associated with the seep area is most likely due to a ...

  10. Arduino adventures escape from Gemini station

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, James Floyd

    2013-01-01

    Arduino Adventures: Escape from Gemini Station provides a fun introduction to the Arduino microcontroller by putting you (the reader) into the action of a science fiction adventure story.  You'll find yourself following along as Cade and Elle explore Gemini Station-an orbiting museum dedicated to preserving and sharing technology throughout the centuries. Trouble ensues. The station is evacuated, including Cade and Elle's class that was visiting the station on a field trip. Cade and Elle don't make it aboard their shuttle and are trapped on the station along with a friendly artificial intellig

  11. The effects of steady swimming on fish escape performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Sanam B; Cathcart, Kelsey; Darakananda, Karin; Gaing, Ashley N; Shin, Seo Yim; Vronay, Xena; Wright, Dania N; Ellerby, David J

    2016-06-01

    Escape maneuvers are essential to the survival and fitness of many animals. Escapes are frequently initiated when an animal is already in motion. This may introduce constraints that alter the escape performance. In fish, escape maneuvers and steady, body caudal fin (BCF) swimming are driven by distinct patterns of curvature of the body axis. Pre-existing muscle activity may therefore delay or diminish a response. To quantify the performance consequences of escaping in flow, escape behavior was examined in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) in both still-water and during steady swimming. Escapes executed during swimming were kinematically less variable than those made in still-water. Swimming escapes also had increased response latencies and lower peak velocities and accelerations than those made in still-water. Performance was also lower for escapes made up rather than down-stream, and a preference for down-stream escapes may be associated with maximizing performance. The constraints imposed by pre-existing motion and flow, therefore, have the potential to shape predator-prey interactions under field conditions by shifting the optimal strategies for both predators and prey. PMID:27161016

  12. How some T cells escape tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, G; Sercarz, E

    1989-11-01

    A feature common to many animal models of autoimmune disease, for example, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis and collagen-induced arthritis, is the presence of self-reactive T cells in healthy animals, which are activated to produce disease by immunization with exogenous antigen. It is unclear why these T cells are not deleted during ontogeny in the thymus and, having escaped tolerance induction, why they are not spontaneously activated by self-antigen. To investigate these questions, we have examined an experimental model in which mice are tolerant to an antigen despite the presence of antigen-reactive T cells. We find that the T cells that escape tolerance induction are specific for minor determinants on the antigen. We propose that these T cells evade tolerance induction because some minor determinants are only available in relatively low amounts after in vivo processing of the whole antigen. For the same reason, these T cells are not normally activated but can be stimulated under special circumstances to circumvent tolerance. PMID:2478888

  13. Molecular Dications in Planetary Atmospheric Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Falcinelli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental properties of multiply charged molecular ions, such as energetics, structure, stability, lifetime and fragmentation dynamics, are relevant to understand and model the behavior of gaseous plasmas as well as ionosphere and astrophysical environments. Experimental determinations of the Kinetic Energy Released (KER for ions originating from dissociations reactions, induced by Coulomb explosion of doubly charged molecular ions (molecular dications produced by double photoionization of CO2, N2O and C2H2 molecules of interest in planetary atmospheres, are reported. The KER measurement as a function of the ultraviolet (UV photon energy in the range of 28–65 eV was extracted from the electron-ion-ion coincidence spectra obtained by using tunable synchrotron radiation coupled with ion imaging techniques at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory Trieste, Italy. These experiments, coupled with a computational analysis based on a Monte Carlo trajectory simulation, allow assessing the probability of escape for simple ionic species in the upper atmosphere of Mars, Venus and Titan. The measured KER in the case of H+, C+, CH+, CH2+, N+, O+, CO+, N2+ and NO+ fragment ions range between 1.0 and 5.5 eV, being large enough to allow these ionic species to participate in the atmospheric escape from such planets into space. In the case of Mars, we suggest a possible explanation for the observed behavior of the O+ and CO22+ ion density profiles.

  14. Uremic escape of renal allograft rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Schilfgaarde, R. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); van Breda Vriesman, P.J.C. (Rijksuniversiteit Limburg Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Immunopathology)

    1981-10-01

    It is demonstrated in rats that, in the presence of early postoperative severe but transient uremia, the survival of first set Brown-Norway (BN) renal allografts in Lewis (LEW) recipients is at least three times prolonged when compared to non-uremic controls. This phenomenon is called 'uremic escape of renal allograft rejection'. By means of lethal X-irradiation of donors of BN kidneys transplanted into transiently uremic and non-uremic LEW recipients, the presence of passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence is demonstrated to be obilgatory for this phenomenon to occur. As a result of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence, a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction is elicited in the spleens of LEW recipients of BN kidneys which amplifies the host response. The splenomegaly observed in LEW recipients of BN kidneys is caused not only by this GVH reaction, which is shown to be exquisitely sensitive to even mild uremia. It is also contributed to by a proliferative response of the host against the graft (which latter response is equated with an in vivo equivalent of a unilateral mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR)), since the reduction in spleen weights caused by abrogation of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence brought about by lethal donor X-irradiation is increased significantly by early postoperative severe but transient uremia. It is concluded that in uremic escape of renal allograft rejection both reactions are suppressed by uremia during the early post-operative period.

  15. Cancer incidence among Nordic airline cabin crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkala, Eero; Helminen, Mika; Haldorsen, Tor; Hammar, Niklas; Kojo, Katja; Linnersjö, Anette; Rafnsson, Vilhjálmur; Tulinius, Hrafn; Tveten, Ulf; Auvinen, Anssi

    2012-12-15

    Airline cabin crew are occupationally exposed to cosmic radiation and jet lag with potential disruption of circadian rhythms. This study assesses the influence of work-related factors in cancer incidence of cabin crew members. A cohort of 8,507 female and 1,559 male airline cabin attendants from Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden was followed for cancer incidence for a mean follow-up time of 23.6 years through the national cancer registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were defined as ratios of observed and expected numbers of cases. A case-control study nested in the cohort (excluding Norway) was conducted to assess the relation between the estimated cumulative cosmic radiation dose and cumulative number of flights crossing six time zones (indicator of circadian disruption) and cancer risk. Analysis of breast cancer was adjusted for parity and age at first live birth. Among female cabin crew, a significantly increased incidence was observed for breast cancer [SIR 1.50, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.32-1.69], leukemia (1.89, 95% CI 1.03-3.17) and skin melanoma (1.85, 95% CI 1.41-2.38). Among men, significant excesses in skin melanoma (3.00, 95% CI 1.78-4.74), nonmelanoma skin cancer (2.47, 95% CI 1.18-4.53), Kaposi sarcoma (86.0, 95% CI 41.2-158) and alcohol-related cancers (combined SIR 3.12, 95% CI 1.95-4.72) were found. This large study with complete follow-up and comprehensive cancer incidence data shows an increased incidence of several cancers, but according to the case-control analysis, excesses appear not to be related to the cosmic radiation or circadian disruptions from crossing multiple time zones.

  16. Escape from X inactivation varies in mouse tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel B Berletch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI silences most genes on one X chromosome in female mammals, but some genes escape XCI. To identify escape genes in vivo and to explore molecular mechanisms that regulate this process we analyzed the allele-specific expression and chromatin structure of X-linked genes in mouse tissues and cells with skewed XCI and distinguishable alleles based on single nucleotide polymorphisms. Using a binomial model to assess allelic expression, we demonstrate a continuum between complete silencing and expression from the inactive X (Xi. The validity of the RNA-seq approach was verified using RT-PCR with species-specific primers or Sanger sequencing. Both common escape genes and genes with significant differences in XCI status between tissues were identified. Such genes may be candidates for tissue-specific sex differences. Overall, few genes (3-7% escape XCI in any of the mouse tissues examined, suggesting stringent silencing and escape controls. In contrast, an in vitro system represented by the embryonic-kidney-derived Patski cell line showed a higher density of escape genes (21%, representing both kidney-specific escape genes and cell-line specific escape genes. Allele-specific RNA polymerase II occupancy and DNase I hypersensitivity at the promoter of genes on the Xi correlated well with levels of escape, consistent with an open chromatin structure at escape genes. Allele-specific CTCF binding on the Xi clustered at escape genes and was denser in brain compared to the Patski cell line, possibly contributing to a more compartmentalized structure of the Xi and fewer escape genes in brain compared to the cell line where larger domains of escape were observed.

  17. Crew coordination concepts: Continental Airlines CRM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Darryl; Morgan, Alice

    1987-01-01

    The outline of the crew coordination concepts at Continental airlines is: (1) Present relevant theory: Contained in a pre-work package and in lecture/discussion form during the work course, (2) Discuss case examples: Contained in the pre-work for study and use during the course; and (3) Simulate practice problems: Introduced during the course as the beginning of an ongoing process. These concepts which are designed to address the problem pilots have in understanding the interaction between situations and their own theories of practice are briefly discussed.

  18. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  19. The Home Care Crew Scheduling Problem:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel; Justesen, Tor; Dohn, Anders;

    In the Home Care Crew Scheduling Problem a staff of caretakers has to be assigned a number of visits to patients' homes, such that the overall service level is maximised. The problem is a generalisation of the vehicle routing problem with time windows. Required travel time between visits and time...... preference constraints. The algorithm is tested both on real-life problem instances and on generated test instances inspired by realistic settings. The use of the specialised branching scheme on real-life problems is novel. The visit clustering decreases run times significantly, and only gives a loss...

  20. Hurricane Ivan Photographed by Expedition 9 Crew

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Except for a small portion of the International Space Station (ISS) in the foreground, Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, fills this image over the northern Gulf of Mexico. As the downgraded category 4 storm approached landfall on the Alabama coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the ISS at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  1. The Advanced Re-Entry Vehicle (ARV) a Development Step from ATV Toward Manned Transportation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottacini, M.; Berthe, P.; Vo, X.; Pietsch, K.

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) programme has been undertaken by Europe with the objective to contribute to the preparation of a future European crew transportation system, while providing a valuable logistic support to the ISS through an operational cargo return system. This development would allow: - the early acquisition of critical technologies; - the design, development and testing of elements suitable for the follow up human rated transportation system. These vehicles should also serve future LEO infrastructures and exploration missions. With the aim to satisfy the above objectives a team composed by major European industries and led by EADS Astrium Space Transportation is currently conducting the phase A of the programme under contract with the European Space Agency (ESA). Two vehicle versions are being investigated: a Cargo version, transporting cargo only to/from the ISS, and a Crew version, which will allow the transfer of both crew and cargo to/from the ISS. The ARV Cargo version, in its present configuration, is composed of three modules. The Versatile Service Module (VSM) provides to the system the propulsion/GNC for orbital manoeuvres and attitude control and the orbital power generation. Its propulsion system and GNC shall be robust enough to allow its use for different launch stacks and different LEO missions in the future. The Un-pressurised Cargo Module (UCM) provides the accommodation for about 3000 kg of un-pressurised cargo and is to be sufficiently flexible to ensure the transportation of: - orbital infrastructure components (ORU's); - scientific / technological experiments; - propellant for re-fuelling, re-boost (and deorbiting) of the ISS. The Re-entry Module (RM) provides a pressurized volume to accommodate active/passive cargo (2000 kg upload/1500 kg download). It is conceived as an expendable conical capsule with spherical heat- hield, interfacing with the new docking standard of the ISS, i.e. it carries the IBDM docking system, on a

  2. Crew Health And Recreation Gear Exercise Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A magneto-Rheological (MR) fluid based exoskeleton leg demonstrator was developed to help long duration exploration mission crews obtain exercise with...

  3. Crew productivity issues in long-duration space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, John M.; Foushee, H. Clayton; Ulschak, Francis L.

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests the importance of teamwork, coordination, and conflict resolution to the performance and survival of isolated, confined groups in high-technology environments. With the advent of long-duration space flight, group-related issues of crew functioning will take on added significance. This paper discusses the influence of crew roles, status, leadership, and norms on the performance of small, confined groups, and offers guidelines and suggestions regarding organizational design, crew selection, training, and team building for crew productivity and social well-being in long-duration spaceflight.

  4. The atmospheric escape at Mars: complementing the scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, Jean; Simon, Cyril; Barthélémy, Mathieu; Thissen, Roland; Ehrenreich, David; Gronoff, Guillaume; Witasse, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    In the recent years, the presence of dications in the atmospheres of Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan has been modeled and assessed. These studies also suggested that these ions could participate to the escape of the planetary atmospheres because a large fraction of them is unstable and highly ener- getic. When they dissociate, their internal energy is transformed into kinetic energy which may be larger than the escape energy. This study assesses the impact of the doubly-charged ions in the escape of CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres and to compare it to the escape of thermal photo-ions.We solve a Boltzmann transport equation at daytime taking into account the dissociative states of CO++ for a simplified single constituent atmosphere of a 2 case-study planet. We compute the escape of fast ions using a Beer-Lambert approach. We study three test-cases. On a Mars-analog planet in today's conditions, we retrieve the measured electron escape flux. When comparing the two mechanisms (i.e. excluding solar wind effects, sputtering ...), the escape due to the fast ions issuing from the dissociation of dications may account for up to 6% of the total and the escape of thermal ions for the remaining. We show that these two mechanisms cannot explain the escape of the atmosphere since the magnetic field vanished but complement the other processes and allow writing the scenario of the Mars escape. We show that the atmosphere of a Mars analog planet would empty in another giga years and a half. At Venus orbit, the contribution of the dications in the escape rate is negligible.When simulating the hot Jupiter HD209458b, the two processes cannot explain the measured escape flux of C+.

  5. The humanitarians' tragedy: escapable and inescapable cruelties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Paradoxically, elements of cruelty are intrinsic to the humanitarian enterprise.(1) This paper focuses on some of these. Escapable cruelties arise from technical failings, but the gradual professionalisation of the field and improvements in relief technologies mean that they have been significantly reduced in comparison to earlier eras. Other cruelties arise from clashes among rights, and the tensions inherent in trying to promote humanity amid the horrors of war. These are inescapable and constitute the 'humanitarians' tragedy'. Among them is the individual cruelty of failing to do good at the margin: a clash between the individual's impulses and ideals and the constraints of operating in constrained circumstances. This is a version of triage. In addition, there is the cruelty of compromising dearly-held principles when faced with other competing or overriding demands. There is also the cruelty whereby humanitarians feed victims' dreams that there is an alternative reality, which in fact cannot be attained.

  6. Risk factors for skin cancer among Finnish airline cabin crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojo, Katja; Helminen, Mika; Pukkala, Eero; Auvinen, Anssi

    2013-07-01

    Increased incidence of skin cancers among airline cabin crew has been reported in several studies. We evaluated whether the difference in risk factor prevalence between Finnish airline cabin crew and the general population could explain the increased incidence of skin cancers among cabin crew, and the possible contribution of estimated occupational cosmic radiation exposure. A self-administered questionnaire survey on occupational, host, and ultraviolet radiation exposure factors was conducted among female cabin crew members and females presenting the general population. The impact of occupational cosmic radiation dose was estimated in a separate nested case-control analysis among the participating cabin crew (with 9 melanoma and 35 basal cell carcinoma cases). No considerable difference in the prevalence of risk factors of skin cancer was found between the cabin crew (N = 702) and the general population subjects (N = 1007) participating the study. The mean risk score based on all the conventional skin cancer risk factors was 1.43 for cabin crew and 1.44 for general population (P = 0.24). Among the cabin crew, the estimated cumulative cosmic radiation dose was not related to the increased skin cancer risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57-1.00]. The highest plausible risk of skin cancer for estimated cosmic radiation dose was estimated as 9% per 10 mSv. The skin cancer cases had higher host characteristics scores than the non-cases among cabin crew (adjusted OR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.01-2.04). Our results indicate no difference between the female cabin crew and the general female population in the prevalence of factors generally associated with incidence of skin cancer. Exposure to cosmic radiation did not explain the excess of skin cancer among the studied cabin crew in this study.

  7. Crew coordination issues of EVS approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Bernd; Korn, Bernd R.

    2004-08-01

    Enhanced Vision Systems (EVS) are currently developed with the goal to alleviate restrictions in airspace and airport capacity in low visibility conditions. Existing EVS-systems are based on IR-sensors although the penetration of bad weather (dense fog and light rain) by MMW-radar is remarkably better than in the infrared spectrum. But the quality of MMW radar is rather poor compared to IR images. However, the analysis of radar images can be simplified dramatically when simple passive radar retro-reflectors are used to mark the runway. This presentation is the third in a series of studies investigating the use of such simple landing aids. In the first study the feasibility of the radar PAPI concept was determined; the second one provided first promising human performance results in a low-fidelity simulation. The present study examined pilot performance, workload, situation awareness, and crew coordination issues in a high-fidelity simulation of 'Radar-PAPI' visual aids supporting a precision straight-in landing in low visibility (CAT-II). Simulation scenarios were completed in a fixed-base cockpit simulator involving six two-pilot flight-deck crews. Pilots could derive visual cues to correct lateral glide-path deviations from 13 pairs of runway-marking corner reflectors. Vertical deviations were indicated by a set of six diplane reflectors using intensity-coding to provide the PAPI categories needed for the correction of vertical deviations. The study compared three display formats and associated crew coordination issues: (1) PF views a head-down B-scope display and switches to visual landing upon PNF's call-out that runway is in sight; (2) PF views a head-down C-scope display and switches to visual landing upon PNF's call-out that runway is in sight; (3) PF views through a head-up display (HUD) that displays primary flight guidance information and receives vertical and lateral guidance from PNF who views a head-down B-scope. PNF guidance is terminated upon PF

  8. 19 CFR 122.49c - Master crew member list and master non-crew member list requirement for commercial aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... subject to the provisions of 49 CFR part 1544, 1546, or 1550. The amendments will have superseding effect... Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard... applicable; (12) Status onboard the aircraft. (d) Exception. The master crew member and non-crew member...

  9. How Effective Is Communication Training For Aircraft Crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Charlotte; Goguen, Joseph; Devenish, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Report surveys communication training for aircraft crews. Intended to alleviate problems caused or worsened by poor communication and coordination among crewmembers. Focuses on two training methods: assertiveness training and grid-management training. Examines theoretical background of methods and attempts made to validate their effectiveness. Presents criteria for evaluating applicability to aviation environment. Concludes communication training appropriate for aircraft crews.

  10. 14 CFR 91.1061 - Augmented flight crews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Augmented flight crews. 91.1061 Section 91...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1061 Augmented flight crews. (a) No program manager may assign any...

  11. 14 CFR 135.99 - Composition of flight crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Composition of flight crew. 135.99 Section... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 135.99 Composition of flight crew. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft with...

  12. 33 CFR 157.168 - Crew member: Main deck watch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.168 Crew member: Main deck watch. During COW operations, the master shall ensure that at least one member of the crew with...

  13. Rowing Crew Coordination Dynamics at Increasing Stroke Rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, Laura S.; Zaal, Frank T. J. M.; de Poel, Harjo J.

    2015-01-01

    In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, couple

  14. An Analysis of Shuttle Crew Scheduling Violations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    From the early years of the Space Shuttle program, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle crews have had a timeline of activities to guide them through their time on-orbit. Planners used scheduling constraints to build timelines that ensured the health and safety of the crews. If a constraint could not be met it resulted in a violation. Other agencies of the federal government also have scheduling constraints to ensure the safety of personnel and the public. This project examined the history of Space Shuttle scheduling constraints, constraints from Federal agencies and branches of the military and how these constraints may be used as a guide for future NASA and private spacecraft. This was conducted by reviewing rules and violations with regard to human aerospace scheduling constraints, environmental, political, social and technological factors, operating environment and relevant human factors. This study includes a statistical analysis of Shuttle Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) related violations to determine if these were a significant producer of constraint violations. It was hypothesized that the number of SCSC violations caused by EVA activities were a significant contributor to the total number of violations for Shuttle/ISS missions. Data was taken from NASA data archives at the Johnson Space Center from Space Shuttle/ISS missions prior to the STS-107 accident. The results of the analysis rejected the null hypothesis and found that EVA violations were a significant contributor to the total number of violations. This analysis could help NASA and commercial space companies understand the main source of constraint violations and allow them to create constraint rules that ensure the safe operation of future human private and exploration missions. Additional studies could be performed to evaluate other variables that could have influenced the scheduling violations that were analyzed.

  15. Theory underlying CRM training: Psychological issues in flight crew performance and crew coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    What psychological theory and research can reveal about training in Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is summarized. A framework is provided for the critical analysis of current approaches to CRM training. Background factors and definitions critical to evaluating CRM are reviewed, followed by a discussion of issues directly related to CRM training effectiveness. Some of the things not known about the optimization of crew performance and the research needed to make these efforts as effective as possible are described.

  16. How many ions have escaped the Martian atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, David; McFadden, James; Halekas, Jasper; Connerney, J. E. P.; Eparvier, Frank; Mitchell, David; Bougher, Stephen W.; Bowers, Charlie; Curry, Shannon; Dong, Chuanfei; Dong, Yaxue; Egan, Hilary; Fang, Xiaohua; Harada, Yuki; Jakosky, Bruce; Lillis, Robert; Luhmann, Janet; Ma, Yingjuan; Modolo, Ronan; Weber, Tristan

    2016-10-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission has been making science measurements of the Martian upper atmosphere and its escape to space since November 2014. A key part of this effort is the measurement of the escape rates of charged particles (ions) at present and over solar system history. The lack of a global dynamo magnetic field at Mars leaves its upper atmosphere more directly exposed to the impinging solar wind than magnetized planets such as Earth. For this reason it is thought that ion escape at Mars may have played a significant role in long term climate change. MAVEN measures escaping planetary ions directly, with high energy, mass, and time resolution.With nearly two years of observations in hand, we will report the average ion escape rate and the spatial distribution of escaping ions as measured by MAVEN and place them in context with previous measurements of ion loss by other spacecraft (e.g. Phobos 2 and Mars Express). We will then report on the measured variability in ion escape rates with different drivers (e.g. solar EUV, solar wind pressure, etc.). Finally, we will use these results to provide an initial estimate of the total ion escape from Mars over billions of years.

  17. Green Pea Galaxies Reveal Secrets of Lyα Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Gronke, Max; Rhoads, James E.; Dijkstra, Mark; Jaskot, Anne; Zheng, Zhenya; Wang, Junxian

    2016-04-01

    We analyze archival Lyα spectra of 12 “Green Pea” galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, model their Lyα profiles with radiative transfer models, and explore the dependence of the Lyα escape fraction on various properties. Green Pea galaxies are nearby compact starburst galaxies with [O iii] λ5007 equivalent widths (EWs) of hundreds of Å. All 12 Green Pea galaxies in our sample show Lyα lines in emission, with an Lyα EW distribution similar to high-redshift Lyα emitters. Combining the optical and UV spectra of Green Pea galaxies, we estimate their Lyα escape fractions and find correlations between Lyα escape fraction and kinematic features of Lyα profiles. The escape fraction of Lyα in these galaxies ranges from 1.4% to 67%. We also find that the Lyα escape fraction depends strongly on metallicity and moderately on dust extinction. We compare their high-quality Lyα profiles with single H i shell radiative transfer models and find that the Lyα escape fraction anticorrelates with the derived H i column densities. Single-shell models fit most Lyα profiles well, but not the ones with the highest escape fractions of Lyα. Our results suggest that low H i column density and low metallicity are essential for Lyα escape and make a galaxy an Lyα emitter.

  18. Teachers Offering Healthy Escape Options for Teenagers in Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaywell, Joan F.

    2005-01-01

    "[T]wenty-five percent of today's teenagers have inordinate emotional baggage beyond the normal angst of adolescence." This burden can lead to unhealthy escapes, including substance abuse, sexual activity, violence, eating disorders, and suicide. One healthy escape, however, lies in books, where students can read about teenagers living in painful…

  19. Flight Crew Training: Multi-Crew Pilot License Training versus Traditional Training and Its Relationship with Job Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, the International Civil Aviation Organization promulgated requirements for a Multi-Crew Pilot License for First Officers, in which the candidate attends approximately two years of ground school and trains as part of a two-person crew in a simulator of a Boeing 737 or an Airbus 320 airliner. In the traditional method, a candidate qualifies…

  20. 19 CFR 122.49b - Electronic manifest requirement for crew members and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 49 CFR part 1544, 1546, or 1550 of the Transportation Security Administration regulations. Crew... an air carrier subject to 49 CFR part 1544, 1546, or 1550. The provisions or amendments will have... and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft arriving in, continuing within, and overflying...

  1. Stochastic narrow escape in molecular and cellular biology analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Holcman, David

    2015-01-01

    This book covers recent developments in the non-standard asymptotics of the mathematical narrow escape problem in stochastic theory, as well as applications of the narrow escape problem in cell biology. The first part of the book concentrates on mathematical methods, including advanced asymptotic methods in partial equations, and is aimed primarily at applied mathematicians and theoretical physicists who are interested in biological applications. The second part of the book is intended for computational biologists, theoretical chemists, biochemists, biophysicists, and physiologists. It includes a summary of output formulas from the mathematical portion of the book and concentrates on their applications in modeling specific problems in theoretical molecular and cellular biology. Critical biological processes, such as synaptic plasticity and transmission, activation of genes by transcription factors, or double-strained DNA break repair, are controlled by diffusion in structures that have both large and small sp...

  2. Escaping in couples facilitates evacuation: Experimental study and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ning; Hu, Mao-Bin; Ding, Jian-Xun; Ding, Zhong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of escaping in couples on the evacuation dynamics has been investigated via experiments and modeling. Two sets of experiments have been implemented, in which pedestrians are asked to escape either in individual or in couples. The experiments show that escaping in couples can decrease the average evacuation time. Moreover, it is found that the average evacuation time gap is essentially constant, which means that the evacuation speed essentially does not depend on the number of pedestrians that have not yet escaped. To model the evacuation dynamics, an improved social force model has been proposed, in which it is assumed that the driving force of a pedestrian cannot be fulfilled when the composition of physical forces exceeds a threshold because the pedestrian cannot keep his/her body balance under this circumstance. To model the effect of escaping in couples, attraction force has been introduced between the partners. Simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental ones.

  3. Split-second escape decisions in blue tits (Parus caeruleus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Johan; Kaby, Ulrika; Jakobsson, Sven

    2002-07-01

    Bird mortality is heavily affected by birds of prey. Under attack, take-off is crucial for survival and even minor mistakes in initial escape response can have devastating consequences. Birds may respond differently depending on the character of the predator's attack and these split-second decisions were studied using a model merlin (Falco columbarius) that attacked feeding blue tits (Parus caeruleus) from two different attack angles in two different speeds. When attacked from a low attack angle they took off more steeply than when attacked from a high angle. This is the first study to show that escape behaviour also depends on predator attack speed. The blue tits responded to a high-speed attack by dodging sideways more often than when attacked at a low speed. Escape speed was not significantly affected by the different treatments. Although they have only a split-second before escaping an attack, blue tits do adjust their escape strategy to the prevailing attack conditions.

  4. Immune Escape Strategies of Malaria Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Pollyanna S.; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Freire-De-Lima, Celio G.; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most life-threatening infectious diseases worldwide. Immunity to malaria is slow and short-lived despite the repeated parasite exposure in endemic areas. Malaria parasites have evolved refined machinery to evade the immune system based on a range of genetic changes that include allelic variation, biomolecular exposure of proteins, and intracellular replication. All of these features increase the probability of survival in both mosquitoes and the vertebrate host. Plasmodium species escape from the first immunological trap in its invertebrate vector host, the Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites have to pass through various immunological barriers within the mosquito such as anti-microbial molecules and the mosquito microbiota in order to achieve successful transmission to the vertebrate host. Within these hosts, Plasmodium species employ various immune evasion strategies during different life cycle stages. Parasite persistence against the vertebrate immune response depends on the balance among virulence factors, pathology, metabolic cost of the host immune response, and the parasites ability to evade the immune response. In this review we discuss the strategies that Plasmodium parasites use to avoid the vertebrate host immune system and how they promote successful infection and transmission. PMID:27799922

  5. [Interferon : antiviral mechanisms and viral escape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espert, Lucile; Gongora, Céline; Mechti, Nadir

    2003-02-01

    15 % of human cancers have virus origin, meaning that viruses are the second cause of cancers after tabagism. The knowledge of antiviral mechanisms is essential for treatment and prevention of infection evolution towards cancers. Interferons (IFNs) are a large family of multifunctional cytokines. They are involved in regulation of cell growth and modulation of immune response. But, all these functions seem to converge toward the most important of them : the antiviral activity. IFN secretion is the first event induced by viral infection, and will act on specific receptors on neighbour cells and prevent their infection by inducing numbers of antiviral genes. Although few of them are well known like the PKR, the 2-5OAS/RNase L pathway and the Mx proteins, many others need extensive studies to understand the wide range of IFN effect. Viruses have evolved to circumvent the IFN antiviral activity, and are able not only to divert the cellular machinery but also to lure the antiviral mechanisms of the host cell. The purpose of this review is to describe the many antiviral pathways and proteins induced by IFNs and to summarize the strategies of viral escape. PMID:12660132

  6. Ion Escape from the Ionosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, R.; Sittler, E.; Lipatov, A.

    2008-01-01

    Ions have been observed to flow away from Titan along its induced magnetic tail by the Plasma Science Instrument (PLS) on Voyager 1 and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) on Cassini. In both cases, the ions have been inferred to be of ionospheric origin. Recent plasma measurements made at another unmagnetized body, Venus, have also observed similar flow in its magnetic tail. Much earlier, the possibility of such flow was inferred when ionospheric measurements made from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) were used to derive upward flow and acceleration of H(+), D(+) and O(+) within the nightside ionosphere of Venus. The measurements revealed that the polarization electric field in the ionosphere produced the principal upward force on these light ions. The resulting vertical flow of H(+) and D(+) was found to be the dominant escape mechanism of hydrogen and deuterium, corresponding to loss rates consistent with large oceans in early Venus. Other electrodynamic forces were unimportant because the plasma beta in the nightside ionosphere of Venus is much greater than one. Although the plasma beta is also greater than one on Titan, ion acceleration is expected to be more complex, especially because the subsolar point and the subflow points can be 180 degrees apart. Following what we learned at Venus, upward acceleration of light ions by the polarization electric field opposing gravity in the ionosphere of Titan will be described. Additional electrodynamic forces resulting from the interaction of Saturn's magnetosphere with Titan's ionosphere will be examined using a recent hybrid model.

  7. Observations of Crew Dynamics during Mars Analog Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Stacy L.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the crew dynamics during two simulations of Mars Missions. Using an analog of a Mars habitat in two locations, Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station (FMARS) which is located on Devon Island at 75 deg North in the Canadian Arctic, and the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) which is located in the south of Utah, the presentation examines the crew dynamics in relation to the leadership style of the commander of the mission. The difference in the interaction of the two crews were shown to be related to the leadership style and the age group in the crew. As much as possible the habitats and environment was to resemble a Mars outpost. The difference between the International Space Station and a Mars missions is reviewed. The leadership styles are reviewed and the contrast between the FMARS and the MDRS leadership styles were related to crew productivity, and the personal interactions between the crew members. It became evident that leadership styles and interpersonal skill had more affect on mission success and crew dynamics than other characteristics.

  8. Dications and thermal ions in planetary atmospheric escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, J.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Barthélémy, M.; Thissen, R.; Ehrenreich, D.; Gronoff, G.; Witasse, O.

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, the presence of dications in the atmospheres of Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan has been modeled and assessed. These studies also suggested that these ions could participate to the escape of the planetary atmospheres because a large fraction of them is unstable and highly energetic. When they dissociate, their internal energy is transformed into kinetic energy which may be larger than the escape energy. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of the doubly-charged ions in the escape of CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres and to compare it to the escape of thermal photo-ions. We solve a Boltzmann transport equation at daytime taking into account the dissociative states of CO2++ for a simplified single constituent atmosphere of a case-study planet. We compute the escape of fast ions using a Beer-Lambert approach. We study three test-cases. On a Mars-analog planet in today's conditions, we retrieve the measured electron escape flux. When comparing the two mechanisms (i.e. excluding solar wind effects, sputtering, etc.), the escape due to the fast ions issuing from the dissociation of dications may account for up to 6% of the total and the escape of thermal ions for the remaining. We show that these two mechanisms cannot explain the escape of the atmosphere since the magnetic field vanished and even contribute only marginally to this loss. We show that with these two mechanisms, the atmosphere of a Mars analog planet would empty in another giga years and a half. At Venus orbit, the contribution of the dications in the escape rate is negligible. When simulating the hot Jupiter HD 209458 b, the two processes cannot explain the measured escape flux of C+. This study shows that the dications may constitute a source of the escape of planetary atmospheres which had not been taken into account until now. This source, although marginal, is not negligible. The influence of the photoionization is of course large, but cannot explain alone the loss of Mars

  9. Plant operator performance evaluation from the viewpoint of crew communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elucidation of a plant operator's cognitive processes is required to improve the man-machine interface that supports operators' diagnoses and decisions. Experiments to clarify operators' cognitive processes have been performed in which operator performance under abnormal conditions was evaluated by protocol analyses and interviews using a plant dynamics simulator. The cognitive processes had been previously analyzed by using the information-processing model developed based on Rasmussen's idea. The authors have had the working hypothesis, based on the experimental observations, that crew communications can be divided into various types, and operator performance can be evaluated by analysis of crew communications. Differences in operator crew performance were evaluated in the present study

  10. Escape of Particles from an Open Square-Shaped Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Hua; LIU Sheng; WANG Bing

    2013-01-01

    The escape of particles in an open square-shaped cavity has been examined.We consider a family of trajectories launched from the left bottom lead of the square cavity and escaped from the right boundary.For each escaping trajectories,we record the propagation time and the detector position.We find that the escape time graph exhibits a regular sawtooth structure.For a set of detector points,we search for the classical trajectories from the source point to the detector points.Then we use semiclassical theory to construct the wave function at different given points.The calculation results suggest that the escape probability density depends on the detector position and the momentum of the particle sensitively.The Fourier transform of the semiclassical wave function gives the path length spectrum.Each peak in the path length spectrum corresponds to the length of one escape trajectory of the particle.We hope that our results will be useful in understanding the escape and transport process of particles inside a microcavity.

  11. Evolutionary escape on complex genotype-phenotype networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Marcelo, Esther; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    We study the problem of evolutionary escape that is the process whereby a population under sudden changes in the selective pressures acting upon it try to evade extinction by evolving from previously well-adapted phenotypes to those that are favoured by the new selective pressure. We perform a comparative analysis between results obtained by modelling genotype space as a regular hypercube (H-graphs), which is the scenario considered in previous work on the subject, to those corresponding to a complex genotype-phenotype network (B-graphs). In order to analyse the properties of the escape process on both these graphs, we apply a general theory based on multi-type branching processes to compute the evolutionary dynamics and probability of escape. We show that the distribution of distances between phenotypes in B-graphs exhibits a much larger degree of heterogeneity than in H-graphs. This property, one of the main structural differences between both types of graphs, causes heterogeneous behaviour in all results associated to the escape problem. We further show that, due to the heterogeneity characterising escape on B-graphs, escape probability can be underestimated by assuming a regular hypercube genotype network, even if we compare phenotypes at the same distance in H-graphs. Similarly, it appears that the complex structure of B-graphs slows down the rate of escape.

  12. Xenon Fractionation, Hydrogen Escape, and the Oxidation of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Catling, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Xenon in Earth's atmosphere is severely mass fractionated and depleted compared to any plausible solar system source material, yet Kr is unfractionated. These observations seem to imply that Xe has escaped from Earth. Vigorous hydrodynamic hydrogen escape can produce mass fractionation in heavy gases. The required hydrogen flux is very high but within the range permitted by solar EUV heating when Earth was 100 Myrs old or younger. However this model cannot explain why Xe escapes but Kr does not. Recently, what appears to be ancient atmospheric xenon has been recovered from several very ancient (3-3.5 Ga) terrestrial hydrothermal barites and cherts (Pujol 2011, 2013). What is eye-catching about this ancient Xe is that it is less fractionated that Xe in modern air. In other words, it appears that a process was active on Earth some 3 to 3.5 billion years ago that caused xenon to fractionate. By this time the Sun was no longer the EUV source that it used to be. If xenon was being fractionated by escape — currently the only viable hypothesis — it had to be in Earth's Archean atmosphere and under rather modest levels of EUV forcing. It should be possible for Xe, but not Kr, to escape from Earth as an ion. In a hydrodynamically escaping hydrogen wind the hydrogen is partially ionized. The key concepts are that ions are much more strongly coupled to the escaping flow than are neutrals (so that a relatively modest flow of H and H+ to space could carry Xe+ along with it, the flux can be small enough to be consistent with diffusion-limited flux), and that Xe alone among the noble gases is more easily ionized than hydrogen. This sort of escape is possible along the polar field lines, although a weak or absent magnetic field would likely work as well. The extended history of hydrogen escape implicit in Xe escape in the Archean is consistent with other suggestions that hydrogen escape in the Archean was considerable. Hydrogen escape plausibly played the key role in creating

  13. Escape angles in bulk chi((2)) soliton interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steffen Kjær; Bang, Ole; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2002-01-01

    We develop a theory for nonplanar interaction between two identical type I spatial solitons propagating at opposite, but arbitrary transverse angles in quadratic nonlinear (or so-called chi((2))) bulk, media. We predict quantitatively the outwards escape angle, below which the solitons turn around...... and collide, and above which they continue to move-away from each other. For in-plane interaction, the theory allows prediction of the Outcome of a collision through the inwards escape angle, i.e., whether the solitons fuse or cross. We find an analytical expression determining the inwards escape angle using...... Gaussian approximations for the solitons. The theory is verified numerically....

  14. Probabilistic Analysis of a Composite Crew Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Brian H.; Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan

    2011-01-01

    An approach for conducting reliability-based analysis (RBA) of a Composite Crew Module (CCM) is presented. The goal is to identify and quantify the benefits of probabilistic design methods for the CCM and future space vehicles. The coarse finite element model from a previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) project is used as the baseline deterministic analysis model to evaluate the performance of the CCM using a strength-based failure index. The first step in the probabilistic analysis process is the determination of the uncertainty distributions for key parameters in the model. Analytical data from water landing simulations are used to develop an uncertainty distribution, but such data were unavailable for other load cases. The uncertainty distributions for the other load scale factors and the strength allowables are generated based on assumed coefficients of variation. Probability of first-ply failure is estimated using three methods: the first order reliability method (FORM), Monte Carlo simulation, and conditional sampling. Results for the three methods were consistent. The reliability is shown to be driven by first ply failure in one region of the CCM at the high altitude abort load set. The final predicted probability of failure is on the order of 10-11 due to the conservative nature of the factors of safety on the deterministic loads.

  15. Crew activities, science, and hazards of manned missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Benton C.

    1988-01-01

    The crew scientific and nonscientific activities that will occur at each stage of a mission to Mars are examined. Crew activities during the interplanetary flight phase will include simulations, maintenance and monitoring, communications, upgrading procedures and operations, solar activity monitoring, cross-training and sharpening of skills, physical conditioning, and free-time activities. Scientific activities will address human physiology, human psychology, sociology, astronomy, space environment effects, manufacturing, and space agriculture. Crew activities on the Martian surface will include exploration, construction, manufacturing, food production, maintenance and training, and free time. Studies of Martian geology and atmosphere, of the life forms that may exist there, and of the Martian moons will occur on the planet's surface. Crew activities and scientific studies that will occur in Mars orbit, and the hazards relevant to each stage of the mission, are also addressed.

  16. Avatar Robot for Crew Performance and Behavioral Health Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project investigates the effectiveness of using an avatar robotic platform as a crew assistant and a family member substitute. This type of avatar robot is...

  17. Cosmic rays score direct hits with Apollo crew

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 14 astronauts conduted experiments during the spaceflight to help scientists to understand why previous crews have seen flashes of light during missions, believed to be caused by cosmic rays (1 page).

  18. Rowing Crew Coordination Dynamics at Increasing Stroke Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Cuijpers, Laura S.; Zaal, Frank T.J.M.; De Poel, Harjo J.

    2015-01-01

    In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, coupled oscillator dynamics predict the stability of the coordination to decrease with increasing stroke rate, which in case of antiphase may eventually yield breakdowns to in-phase. Therefore, this stud...

  19. Theoretical Study on Ion Escape in Martian Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jian-Kui; LIU Zhen-Xing; Klaus TORKAR; Tielong ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    @@ Based on the observation that Martian magnetic moment is gradually reducing from the ancient to the present,we investigate the O+ ion flux distribution along magnetic field lines and the ion escaping flux in Martian tail with different assumed Martian magnetic moments. The results show that the O+ ion flux along magnetic field lines decreases with distance from Mars; the ion flux along the field line decreases more quickly if the magnetic moment is larger; the larger the magnetic moment, the smaller the ion escaping flux in the Martian tail. The ion escaping flux depends on Z-coordinate in the Martian tail. With decrease of the magnetic moment, the ion escaping flux in the Martian tail increases. The results are significant for studying the water loss from Mars surface.

  20. Amplitude modulation control of escape from a potential well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacón, R. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Escuela de Ingenierías Industriales, Universidad de Extremadura, Apartado Postal 382, E-06006 Badajoz (Spain); Martínez García-Hoz, A. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-13400 Almadén (Ciudad Real) (Spain); Miralles, J.J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-02071 Albacete (Spain); Martínez, P.J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, E.I.N.A., Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of periodic amplitude modulations in controlling (suppressing and enhancing) escape from a potential well through the universal model of a damped Helmholtz oscillator subjected to an external periodic excitation (the escape-inducing excitation) whose amplitude is periodically modulated (the escape-controlling excitation). Analytical and numerical results show that this multiplicative control works reliably for different subharmonic resonances between the two periodic excitations involved, and that its effectiveness is comparable to those of different methods of additive control. Additionally, we demonstrate the robustness of the multiplicative control against the presence of low-intensity Gaussian noise. -- Highlights: •Multiplicative control of escape from a potential well has been demonstrated. •Theoretical predictions are obtained from a Melnikov analysis. •It has been shown the robustness of the multiplicative control against noise.

  1. AMO EXPRESS: A Command and Control Experiment for Crew Autonomy Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetson, Howard K.; Haddock, Angie T.; Frank, Jeremy; Cornelius, Randy; Wang, Lui; Garner, Larry

    2015-01-01

    NASA is investigating a range of future human spaceflight missions, including both Mars-distance and Near Earth Object (NEO) targets. Of significant importance for these missions is the balance between crew autonomy and vehicle automation. As distance from Earth results in increasing communication delays, future crews need both the capability and authority to independently make decisions. However, small crews cannot take on all functions performed by ground today, and so vehicles must be more automated to reduce the crew workload for such missions. NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program funded Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) project conducted an autonomous command and control experiment on-board the International Space Station that demonstrated single action intelligent procedures for crew command and control. The target problem was to enable crew initialization of a facility class rack with power and thermal interfaces, and involving core and payload command and telemetry processing, without support from ground controllers. This autonomous operations capability is enabling in scenarios such as initialization of a medical facility to respond to a crew medical emergency, and representative of other spacecraft autonomy challenges. The experiment was conducted using the Expedite the Processing of Experiments for Space Station (EXPRESS) rack 7, which was located in the Port 2 location within the U.S Laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Activation and deactivation of this facility is time consuming and operationally intensive, requiring coordination of three flight control positions, 47 nominal steps, 57 commands, 276 telemetry checks, and coordination of multiple ISS systems (both core and payload). Utilization of Draper Laboratory's Timeliner software, deployed on-board the ISS within the Command and Control (C&C) computers and the Payload computers, allowed development of the automated procedures specific to ISS without having to certify

  2. Adaptive coordination and heedfulness make better cockpit crews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, G; Kolbe, M; Zala-Mezö, E; Bienefeld-Seall, N; Künzle, B

    2010-02-01

    Team coordination during a simulated clean approach performed by 42 civil aviation cockpit crews was analysed. Several hypotheses regarding the adaptive use of implicit and explicit coordination, leadership and heedful interrelating were tested. The results indicate the adaptiveness of coordination to different levels of standardisation and task load and the general importance of explicit coordination for good performance. Leadership seems to be required mainly for work phases with little standardisation. In exploratory lag sequential analyses, heedful behaviour in the seven best and six worst performing crews was examined. The coordination sequences in high performance crews were found to be more succinct and well balanced, indicating that a shared sense of heedfulness is crucial for effectiveness. Theoretical implications for the conceptualisation of adaptive coordination and heedfulness and practical implications for improving crew training are discussed. Statement of Relevance: Analyses of team coordination during a simulated clean approach performed by civil aviation cockpit crews demonstrated the occurrence and effectiveness of adaptive coordination in response to different levels of task load and standardisation. Results also indicated the importance of heedful interrelating, both as a form of coordination and as a way of regulating the adaptiveness of coordination efforts. These findings have important implications for improving crew training, leadership practices and possibly also standard operating procedures.

  3. Intercultural crew issues in long-duration spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Norbert O.; Lyons, Terence J.; Binder, Heidi

    2003-01-01

    Before long-duration flights with international crews can be safely undertaken, potential interpersonal difficulties will need to be addressed. Crew performance breakdown has been recognized by the American Institute of Medicine, in scientific literature, and in popular culture. However, few studies of human interaction and performance in confined, isolated environments exist, and the data pertaining to those studies are mostly anecdotal. Many incidents involving crew interpersonal dynamics, those among flight crews, as well as between flight crews and ground controllers, are reported only in non-peer reviewed books and newspapers. Consequently, due to this lack of concrete knowledge, the selection of astronauts and cosmonauts has focused on individual rather than group selection. Additional selection criteria such as interpersonal and communication competence, along with intercultural training, will have a decisive impact on future mission success. Furthermore, industrial psychological research has demonstrated the ability to select a group based on compatibility. With all this in mind, it is essential to conduct further research on heterogeneous, multi-national crews including selection and training for long-duration space missions.

  4. Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) Ionosphere Evidence for Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoegy, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    An early estimate of escape of H2O from Venus [McElroy et al., 1982] using observed hot oxygen densities inferred by Nagy et al. [1981] from PVO OUVS 1304 Å dayglow and using ionization rates from photoionization and electron impact. This resulted in an estimated oxygen ionization rate planet-wide above the plasmapause of 3x1025 atoms/s. Based on the energetic O+ being swept up and removed by solar wind, McElroy et al. [1982] gave an estimate of a loss rate for O of 6x106 atoms/cm2/s. Using a different method of estimating escape based data in the ionotail of Venus, Brace et al. [1987] estimated a total planetary O+ escape rate of 5x1025 ions/s. Their estimate was based on PVO measurements of superthermal O+ (energy range 9-16 eV) in the tail ray plasma between 2000 and 3000 km. Their estimated global mean flux was 107 atoms/cm2/s. The two escape rates are remarkably close considering all the errors involved in such estimates of escape. A study of escape by Luhmann et al. [2008] using VEX observations at low solar activity finds modest escape rates, prompting the authors to reconsider the evidence from both PVO and VEX of the possibility of enhanced escape during extreme interplanetary conditions. We reexamine the variation of escape under different solar wind conditions using ion densities and plasma content in the dayside and nightside of Venus using PVO ionosphere density during times of high solar activity. Citations: Brace, L.H., W. T. Kasprzak, H.A. Taylor, R. F. Theis, C. T. Russess, A. Barnes, J. D. Mihalov, and D. M. Hunten, "The Ionotail of Venus: Its Configuration and Evidence for Ion Escape", J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15-26, 1987. Luhmann, J.G., A. Fedorov, S. Barabash, E. Carlsson, Y. Futaana, T.L. Zhang, C.T. Russell, J.G. Lyon, S.A. Ledvina, and D.A. Brain, “Venus Express observations of atmospheric oxygen escape during the passage of several coronal mass ejections”, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008. McElroy, M. B., M. J. Prather, J. M. Rodiquez, " Loss

  5. Speed kills: ineffective avian escape responses to oncoming vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Travis L DeVault; Blackwell, Bradley F.; Seamans, Thomas W.; Lima, Steven L.; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Animal–vehicle collisions cause high levels of vertebrate mortality worldwide, and what goes wrong when animals fail to escape and ultimately collide with vehicles is not well understood. We investigated alert and escape behaviours of captive brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in response to virtual vehicle approaches of different sizes and at speeds ranging from 60 to 360 km h−1. Alert and flight initiation distances remained similar across vehicle speeds, and accordingly, alert and flig...

  6. GREEN PEA GALAXIES REVEAL SECRETS OF Lyα ESCAPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Huan; Wang, Junxian [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China (China); Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E. [Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration (United States); Gronke, Max; Dijkstra, Mark [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo (Norway); Jaskot, Anne [Smith College, Northampton, MA (United States); Zheng, Zhenya, E-mail: yanghuan@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: huan.y@asu.edu, E-mail: Sangeeta.Malhotra@asu.edu, E-mail: James.Rhoads@asu.edu [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-04-01

    We analyze archival Lyα spectra of 12 “Green Pea” galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, model their Lyα profiles with radiative transfer models, and explore the dependence of the Lyα escape fraction on various properties. Green Pea galaxies are nearby compact starburst galaxies with [O iii] λ5007 equivalent widths (EWs) of hundreds of Å. All 12 Green Pea galaxies in our sample show Lyα lines in emission, with an Lyα EW distribution similar to high-redshift Lyα emitters. Combining the optical and UV spectra of Green Pea galaxies, we estimate their Lyα escape fractions and find correlations between Lyα escape fraction and kinematic features of Lyα profiles. The escape fraction of Lyα in these galaxies ranges from 1.4% to 67%. We also find that the Lyα escape fraction depends strongly on metallicity and moderately on dust extinction. We compare their high-quality Lyα profiles with single H i shell radiative transfer models and find that the Lyα escape fraction anticorrelates with the derived H i column densities. Single-shell models fit most Lyα profiles well, but not the ones with the highest escape fractions of Lyα. Our results suggest that low H i column density and low metallicity are essential for Lyα escape and make a galaxy an Lyα emitter.

  7. Folding and escape of nascent proteins at ribosomal exit tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Thuy, Bui Phuong; Hoang, Trinh Xuan

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the interplay between post-translational folding and escape of two small single-domain proteins at the ribosomal exit tunnel by using Langevin dynamics with coarse-grained models. It is shown that at temperatures lower or near the temperature of the fastest folding, folding proceeds concomitantly with the escape process, resulting in vectorial folding and enhancement of foldability of nascent proteins. The concomitance between the two processes, however, deteriorates as tempera...

  8. Dynamics of immune escape during HIV/SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L Althaus

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs play an important role in controlling HIV/SIV infection. Notably, the observation of escape mutants suggests a selective pressure induced by the CTL response. However, it remains difficult to assess the definite role of the cellular immune response. We devise a computational model of HIV/SIV infection having a broad cellular immune response targeting different viral epitopes. The CTL clones are stimulated by viral antigen and interact with the virus population through cytotoxic killing of infected cells. Consequently, the virus population reacts through the acquisition of CTL escape mutations. Our model provides realistic virus dynamics and describes several experimental observations. We postulate that inter-clonal competition and immunodominance may be critical factors determining the sequential emergence of escapes. We show that even though the total killing induced by the CTL response can be high, escape rates against a single CTL clone are often slow and difficult to estimate from infrequent sequence measurements. Finally, our simulations show that a higher degree of immunodominance leads to more frequent escape with a reduced control of viral replication but a substantially impaired replicative capacity of the virus. This result suggests two strategies for vaccine design: Vaccines inducing a broad CTL response should decrease the viral load, whereas vaccines stimulating a narrow but dominant CTL response are likely to induce escape but may dramatically reduce the replicative capacity of the virus.

  9. Green Pea Galaxies Reveal Secrets of Ly$\\alpha$ Escape

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Gronke, Max; Rhoads, James E; Jaskot, Anne; Zheng, Zhenya; Dijkstra, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Star-formation in galaxies generates a lot of Ly$\\alpha$ photons. Understanding the escape of Ly$\\alpha$ photons from galaxies is a key issue in studying high redshift galaxies and probing cosmic reionization with Ly$\\alpha$. To understand Ly$\\alpha$ escape, it is valuable to study analogs of high redshift Ly$\\alpha$ emitters in nearby universe. However, most nearby analogs have too small a Ly$\\alpha$ equivalent width and escape fraction compared to high redshift Ly$\\alpha$ emitters. One different group of nearby analogs are "Green Pea" galaxies, selected by their high equivalent width optical emission lines. Here we show that Green Pea galaxies have strong Ly$\\alpha$ emission lines and high Ly$\\alpha$ escape fraction (see also Henry et al. 2015), providing an opportunity to solve Ly$\\alpha$ escape problem. Green Peas have a Ly$\\alpha$ equivalent width distribution similar to high redshift Ly$\\alpha$ emitters. The Ly$\\alpha$ escape fraction correlates with many quantities of Ly$\\alpha$ profile, especially the...

  10. Escape dynamics and fractal basin boundaries in Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The escape dynamics in a simple analytical gravitational model which describes the motion of stars in a Seyfert galaxy is investigated in detail. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. In order to distinguish safely and with certainty between ordered and chaotic motion, we apply the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins through the openings around the collinear Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$ and relate them with the corresponding spatial distribution of the escape times of the orbits. Our exploration takes place both in the physical $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the galactic system. Our numerical analysis reveals the strong dependence of the properties of the considered escape basins with the...

  11. Development of capacity for measuring ionizing radiation in aircraft crew; Desenvolvimento da capacitacao para efetuar medicoes de radiacao ionizante em tripulacoes de aeronaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federico, C.A.; Goncalez, O.L., E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: odairl@ieav.cta.b [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA/ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica; Caldas, L.V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper describes the activities performed in a research program of the Institute of Advanced Studies, Brazil, belonging to the Brazilian Air Force, joining to researches from Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, in order to bring to Brazil the capacity and acknowledge necessary to the evaluation of dose from ionizing radiation originated in the cosmic radiation and its by products which fall on aircraft crews

  12. Initial transcribed sequence mutations specifically affect promoter escape properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Lilian M; Cobb, Ingrid M; Ozmore, Jillian R; Khoo, Maureen; Nahm, Grace; Xia, Lulin; Bao, Yeran; Ahn, Colette

    2006-07-25

    Promoter escape efficiency of E. coli RNA polymerase is guided by both the core promoter and the initial transcribed sequence (ITS). Here, we quantitatively examined the escape properties of 43 random initial sequence variants of the phage T5 N25 promoter. The position for promoter escape on all N25-ITS variants occurred at the +15/+16 juncture, unlike the +11/+12 juncture for the wild type N25. These variants further exhibited a 25-fold difference in escape efficiency. ITS changes favoring promoter escape showed a compositional bias that is unrelated to nucleotide substrate binding affinity for the initial positions. Comparing all variants, the natural N25 promoter emerges as having evolved an ITS optimal for promoter escape, giving a high level of productive synthesis after undergoing the shortest abortive program. We supplemented GreB to transcription reactions to better understand abortive initiation and promoter escape in vivo. GreB supplementation elevated productive RNA synthesis 2-5-fold by altering the abortive RNA pattern, decreasing the abundance of the medium (6-10 nt) to long (11-15 nt) abortive RNAs without changing the levels of short (2-5 nt) and very long abortive RNAs (16-20 nt). The GreB-refractive nature of short abortive RNA production may reflect a minimum length requirement of 4-5 bp of the RNA-DNA hybrid for maintaining the stability of initial or backtracked complexes. That the very long abortive RNAs are unaffected by GreB suggests that they are unlikely to be products of polymerase backtracking. How the ITS might influence the course of early transcription is discussed within the structural context of an initial transcribing complex. PMID:16846227

  13. Rømt regnbueørret blir i fjorden : Behaviour of escaped rainbow trout

    OpenAIRE

    Skilbrei, Ove

    2009-01-01

    Rainbow trout are mainly farmed in fjords. They are thought to be more sedentary after escaping than escaped salmon, however this has not previously been well documented. The behaviour of escaped rainbow trout is now being studied in the fjords around the island of Osterøy in Hordaland in order to increase our understanding of escaped fish and to develop recapture strategies.

  14. Crew Roles and Interactions in Scientific Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Stanley G.; Bleacher, Jacob E.

    2013-01-01

    Future piloted space exploration missions will focus more on science than engineering, a change which will challenge existing concepts for flight crew tasking and demand that participants with contrasting skills, values, and backgrounds learn to cooperate as equals. In terrestrial space flight analogs such as Desert Research And Technology Studies, engineers, pilots, and scientists can practice working together, taking advantage of the full breadth of all team members training to produce harmonious, effective missions that maximize the time and attention the crew can devote to science. This paper presents, in a format usable as a reference by participants in the field, a successfully tested crew interaction model for such missions. The model builds upon the basic framework of a scientific field expedition by adding proven concepts from aviation and human spaceflight, including expeditionary behavior and cockpit resource management, cooperative crew tasking and adaptive leadership and followership, formal techniques for radio communication, and increased attention to operational considerations. The crews of future spaceflight analogs can use this model to demonstrate effective techniques, learn from each other, develop positive working relationships, and make their expeditions more successful, even if they have limited time to train together beforehand. This model can also inform the preparation and execution of actual future spaceflights.

  15. Crew roles and interactions in scientific space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Stanley G.; Bleacher, Jacob E.

    2013-10-01

    Future piloted space exploration missions will focus more on science than engineering, a change which will challenge existing concepts for flight crew tasking and demand that participants with contrasting skills, values, and backgrounds learn to cooperate as equals. In terrestrial space flight analogs such as Desert Research And Technology Studies, engineers, pilots, and scientists can practice working together, taking advantage of the full breadth of all team members' training to produce harmonious, effective missions that maximize the time and attention the crew can devote to science. This paper presents, in a format usable as a reference by participants in the field, a successfully tested crew interaction model for such missions. The model builds upon the basic framework of a scientific field expedition by adding proven concepts from aviation and human space flight, including expeditionary behavior and cockpit resource management, cooperative crew tasking and adaptive leadership and followership, formal techniques for radio communication, and increased attention to operational considerations. The crews of future space flight analogs can use this model to demonstrate effective techniques, learn from each other, develop positive working relationships, and make their expeditions more successful, even if they have limited time to train together beforehand. This model can also inform the preparation and execution of actual future space flights.

  16. History of oxygen and carbon escape from the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Zhang, M. H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Bougher, S. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    A fraction of the oxygen in the Martian atmosphere continually escapes to space because dissociative recombination of the O2(+) ions in the ionosphere can impart sufficient energy to the product O atoms. In addition, ionization of the extended atomic oxygen corona resulting from the above process adds to escape since the solar wind can carry away O(+) ions born above a few hundred km altitude. A further by-product of this ion-pickup by the solar wind is an additional population of escaping oxygen atoms that are sputtered from the atmosphere near the exobase by pickup ions that are on reentry rather than escaping trajectories. This sputtering process can also remove carbon in the form of intact or dissociated CO2 since all atoms and molecules in the 'target' gas are subject to the collisional energy transfer that characterizes sputtering. We have estimated the present rates of escape of oxygen and carbon due to these mechanisms, as well as the rates at several epochs in the history of the solar system.

  17. Escape dynamics in a binary system of interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    The escape dynamics in an analytical gravitational model which describes the motion of stars in a binary system of interacting dwarf spheroidal galaxies is investigated in detail. We conduct a numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. In order to distinguish safely and with certainty between ordered and chaotic motion, we apply the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins through the openings around the collinear Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$ and relate them with the corresponding spatial distribution of the escape times of the orbits. Our exploration takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the galactic system. Our numerical analysis reveals the strong dependence of the properties of the con...

  18. Single-File Escape of Colloidal Particles from Microfluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Pierno, Matteo; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Tan, Yizhou; Pagliara, Stefano

    2016-07-15

    Single-file diffusion is a ubiquitous physical process exploited by living and synthetic systems to exchange molecules with their environment. It is paramount to quantify the escape time needed for single files of particles to exit from constraining synthetic channels and biological pores. This quantity depends on complex cooperative effects, whose predominance can only be established through a strict comparison between theory and experiments. By using colloidal particles, optical manipulation, microfluidics, digital microscopy, and theoretical analysis we uncover the self-similar character of the escape process and provide closed-formula evaluations of the escape time. We find that the escape time scales inversely with the diffusion coefficient of the last particle to leave the channel. Importantly, we find that at the investigated microscale, bias forces as tiny as 10^{-15}  N determine the magnitude of the escape time by drastically reducing interparticle collisions. Our findings provide crucial guidelines to optimize the design of micro- and nanodevices for a variety of applications including drug delivery, particle filtering, and transport in geometrical constrictions. PMID:27472142

  19. Single-File Escape of Colloidal Particles from Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Pierno, Matteo; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Tan, Yizhou; Pagliara, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Single-file diffusion is a ubiquitous physical process exploited by living and synthetic systems to exchange molecules with their environment. It is paramount to quantify the escape time needed for single files of particles to exit from constraining synthetic channels and biological pores. This quantity depends on complex cooperative effects, whose predominance can only be established through a strict comparison between theory and experiments. By using colloidal particles, optical manipulation, microfluidics, digital microscopy, and theoretical analysis we uncover the self-similar character of the escape process and provide closed-formula evaluations of the escape time. We find that the escape time scales inversely with the diffusion coefficient of the last particle to leave the channel. Importantly, we find that at the investigated microscale, bias forces as tiny as 10-15 N determine the magnitude of the escape time by drastically reducing interparticle collisions. Our findings provide crucial guidelines to optimize the design of micro- and nanodevices for a variety of applications including drug delivery, particle filtering, and transport in geometrical constrictions.

  20. Extreme hydrodynamic atmospheric loss near the critical thermal escape regime

    CERN Document Server

    Erkaev, N V; Odert, P; Kulikov, Yu N; Kislyakova, K G

    2015-01-01

    By considering martian-like planetary embryos inside the habitable zone of solar-like stars we study the behavior of the hydrodynamic atmospheric escape of hydrogen for small values of the Jeans escape parameter $\\beta < 3$, near the base of the thermosphere, that is defined as a ratio of the gravitational and thermal energy. Our study is based on a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model that calculates the volume heating rate in a hydrogen dominated thermosphere due to the absorption of the stellar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) flux. We find that when the $\\beta$ value near the mesopause/homopause level exceeds a critical value of $\\sim$2.5, there exists a steady hydrodynamic solution with a smooth transition from subsonic to supersonic flow. For a fixed XUV flux, the escape rate of the upper atmosphere is an increasing function of the temperature at the lower boundary. Our model results indicate a crucial enhancement of the atmospheric escape rate, when the Jeans escape parameter $\\beta$ decr...

  1. MAVEN measurements of photochemical escape of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, R. J.; Deighan, J.; Fox, J. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T. E.; Lee, Y.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Elrod, M. K.; Andersson, L.; McFadden, J.

    2015-10-01

    One of the primary goals of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers [1]. One of the major escape processes is known as photochemical escape, which is broadly defined as a process by which a) an exothermic reaction in the atmosphere/ionosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through any subsequent collisions[2].At Mars, photochemical escape of oxygen is expected to be a significant channel for atmospheric escape, particularly in the early solar system when extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluxes were much higher[3]. Thus characterizing this escape process is central to understanding the role escape to space has played in Mars' climate evolution.

  2. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer in airline cabin crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic radiation dose rates are considerably higher at cruising altitudes of airplanes than at ground level. Previous studies have found increased risk of certain cancers among aircraft cabin crew, but the results are not consistent across different studies. Despite individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment is important for evaluating the relation between cosmic radiation exposure and cancer risk, only few previous studies have tried to develop an exposure assessment method. The evidence for adverse health effects in aircrews due to ionizing radiation is inconclusive because quantitative dose estimates have not been used. No information on possible confounders has been collected. For an occupational group with an increased risk of certain cancers it is very important to assess if the risk is related to occupational exposure. The goal of this thesis was to develop two separate retrospective exposure assessment methods for occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. The methods included the assessment based on survey on flight histories and based on company flight timetables. Another goal was to describe the cancer incidence among aircraft cabin crew with a large cohort in four Nordic countries, i.e., Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Also the contribution of occupational as well as non-occupational factors to breast and skin cancer risk among the cabin crew was studied with case-control studies. Using the survey method of cosmic radiation exposure assessment, the median annual radiation dose of Finnish airline cabin crew was 0.6 milliSievert (mSv) in the 1960s, 3.3 mSv in the 1970s, and 3.6 mSv in the 1980s. With the flight timetable method, the annual radiation dose increased with time being 0.7 mSv in the 1960 and 2.1 mSv in the 1995. With the survey method, the median career dose was 27.9 mSv and with the timetable method 20.8 mSv. These methods provide improved means for individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment compared to studies where cruder

  3. Evaluating nuclear power plant crew performance during emergency response drills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is responsible for the regulation of the health, safety and environmental consequences of nuclear activities in Canada. Recently, the Human Factors Specialists of the AECB have become involved in the assessment of emergency preparedness and emergency response at nuclear facilities. One key contribution to existing AECB methodology is the introduction of Behaviourally Anchored Rating Scales (BARS) to measure crew interaction skills during emergency response drills. This report presents results of an on-going pilot study to determine if the BARS provide a reliable and valid means of rating the key dimensions of communications, openness, task coordination and adaptability under simulated emergency circumstances. To date, the objectivity of the BARS is supported by good inter-rater reliability while the validity of the BARS is supported by the agreement between ratings of crew interaction and qualitative and quantitative observations of crew performance. (author)

  4. STS-113 crew members take part in CEIT activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - As part of Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, STS-113 Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria (left) and John Herrington (center) look over equipment that will be carried on the mission. The primary payloads on mission STS-113 are the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the International Space Station, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B that can be used by spacewalkers to move along the truss with equipment. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. The mission will also deliver the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return Expedition 5 to Earth. Space Shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to launch Nov. 10 on the 11-day mission.

  5. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer in airline cabin crew.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, K.

    2013-03-15

    Cosmic radiation dose rates are considerably higher at cruising altitudes of airplanes than at ground level. Previous studies have found increased risk of certain cancers among aircraft cabin crew, but the results are not consistent across different studies. Despite individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment is important for evaluating the relation between cosmic radiation exposure and cancer risk, only few previous studies have tried to develop an exposure assessment method. The evidence for adverse health effects in aircrews due to ionizing radiation is inconclusive because quantitative dose estimates have not been used. No information on possible confounders has been collected. For an occupational group with an increased risk of certain cancers it is very important to assess if the risk is related to occupational exposure. The goal of this thesis was to develop two separate retrospective exposure assessment methods for occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. The methods included the assessment based on survey on flight histories and based on company flight timetables. Another goal was to describe the cancer incidence among aircraft cabin crew with a large cohort in four Nordic countries, i.e., Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Also the contribution of occupational as well as non-occupational factors to breast and skin cancer risk among the cabin crew was studied with case-control studies. Using the survey method of cosmic radiation exposure assessment, the median annual radiation dose of Finnish airline cabin crew was 0.6 milliSievert (mSv) in the 1960s, 3.3 mSv in the 1970s, and 3.6 mSv in the 1980s. With the flight timetable method, the annual radiation dose increased with time being 0.7 mSv in the 1960 and 2.1 mSv in the 1995. With the survey method, the median career dose was 27.9 mSv and with the timetable method 20.8 mSv. These methods provide improved means for individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment compared to studies where cruder

  6. Ballistics Analysis of Orion Crew Module Separation Bolt Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Samuel A.; Konno, Kevin E.; Carney, Kelly S.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    NASA is currently developing a new crew module to replace capabilities of the retired Space Shuttles and to provide a crewed vehicle for exploring beyond low earth orbit. The crew module is a capsule-type design, which is designed to separate from the launch vehicle during launch ascent once the launch vehicle fuel is expended. The separation is achieved using pyrotechnic separation bolts, wherein a section of the bolt is propelled clear of the joint at high velocity by an explosive charge. The resulting projectile must be contained within the fairing structure by a containment plate. This paper describes an analytical effort completed to augment testing of various containment plate materials and thicknesses. The results help guide the design and have potential benefit for future similar applications.

  7. Escape probability of the super-Penrose process

    CERN Document Server

    Ogasawara, Kota; Miyamoto, Umpei; Igata, Takahisa; Patil, Mandar

    2016-01-01

    We consider a head-on collision of two massive particles that move in the equatorial plane of an extremal Kerr black hole, which results in the production of two massless particles. Focusing a typical case, where both of the colliding particles have zero angular momenta, we show that a massless particle produced in such a collision can escape to infinity with arbitrarily large energy in the near-horizon limit of the collision point. Furthermore, if we assume that the emission of the produced massless particles is isotropic in the center-of-mass frame but confined to the equatorial plane, the escape probability of the produced massless particle approaches $5/12$ and almost all escaping massless particles have arbitrarily large energy at infinity and an impact parameter approaching $2M$.

  8. Characterization of escape times of Josephson Junctions for signal detection

    CERN Document Server

    Addesso, Paolo; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the escape time of a Josephson junction might be used to detect the presence of a sinusoidal signal embedded in noise when standard signal processing tools can be prohibitive. We show that the prescriptions for the experimental set-up and some physical behaviors depend on the detection strategy. More specifically, by exploiting the sample mean of escape times to perform detection, two resonant regions are identified. At low frequencies there is a stochastic resonance/activation phenomenon, while near the plasma frequency a geometric resonance appears. The naive sample mean detector is outperformed, in terms of error probability, by the optimal likelihood ratio test. The latter exhibits only geometric resonance, showing monotonically increasing performance as the bias current approaches the junction critical current. In this regime the escape times are vanishingly small and therefore performance are essentially limited by measurement electronics. The behavior of the likelihood ratio and samp...

  9. Can transgenic rice cause ecological risks through transgene escape?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Alien transgene escape from genetically engineered rice to non-transgenic varieties or close wild relatives (including weedy rice) may lead to unpredictable ecological risks. However, for transgene escape to occur three conditions need to be met: (i) spatially, transgenic rice and its non-transgenic counterparts or wild relatives should have sympatric distributions; (ii) temporally, the flowering time of transgenic rice and the non-transgenic varieties or wild relatives should overlap; and (iii) biologically, transgenic rice and its wild relative species should have such a sufficiently close relationship that their interspecific hybrids can have normal generative reproduction. This paper presents research data on the geographic distribution, flowering habits, interspecific hybridization, and gene flow of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) and its closely related wild relatives containing the AA genome. The objective is to estimate the possibility of transgene escape to non-transgenic rice varieties and wild relatives of rice, which may result in unpredictable ecological risks.

  10. NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    By incorporating rigorous engineering practices, innovative manufacturing processes and test techniques, a unique multi-center government/contractor partnership, and a clean-sheet design developed around the primary requirements for the International Space Station (ISS) and Lunar missions, the Upper Stage Element of NASA's Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), the "Ares I," is a vital part of the Constellation Program's transportation system. Constellation's exploration missions will include Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles required to place crew and cargo in low-Earth orbit (LEO), crew and cargo transportation systems required for human space travel, and transportation systems and scientific equipment required for human exploration of the Moon and Mars. Early Ares I configurations will support ISS re-supply missions. A self-supporting cylindrical structure, the Ares I Upper Stage will be approximately 84' long and 18' in diameter. The Upper Stage Element is being designed for increased supportability and increased reliability to meet human-rating requirements imposed by NASA standards. The design also incorporates state-of-the-art materials, hardware, design, and integrated logistics planning, thus facilitating a supportable, reliable, and operable system. With NASA retiring the Space Shuttle fleet in 2010, the success of the Ares I Project is essential to America's continued leadership in space. The first Ares I test flight, called Ares 1-X, is scheduled for 2009. Subsequent test flights will continue thereafter, with the first crewed flight of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), "Orion," planned for no later than 2015. Crew transportation to the ISS will follow within the same decade, and the first Lunar excursion is scheduled for the 2020 timeframe.

  11. Space biology initiative program definition review. Trade study 1: Automation costs versus crew utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L. Neal; Crenshaw, John, Sr.; Hambright, R. N.; Nedungadi, A.; Mcfayden, G. M.; Tsuchida, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    A significant emphasis upon automation within the Space Biology Initiative hardware appears justified in order to conserve crew labor and crew training effort. Two generic forms of automation were identified: automation of data and information handling and decision making, and the automation of material handling, transfer, and processing. The use of automatic data acquisition, expert systems, robots, and machine vision will increase the volume of experiments and quality of results. The automation described may also influence efforts to miniaturize and modularize the large array of SBI hardware identified to date. The cost and benefit model developed appears to be a useful guideline for SBI equipment specifiers and designers. Additional refinements would enhance the validity of the model. Two NASA automation pilot programs, 'The Principal Investigator in a Box' and 'Rack Mounted Robots' were investigated and found to be quite appropriate for adaptation to the SBI program. There are other in-house NASA efforts that provide technology that may be appropriate for the SBI program. Important data is believed to exist in advanced medical labs throughout the U.S., Japan, and Europe. The information and data processing in medical analysis equipment is highly automated and future trends reveal continued progress in this area. However, automation of material handling and processing has progressed in a limited manner because the medical labs are not affected by the power and space constraints that Space Station medical equipment is faced with. Therefore, NASA's major emphasis in automation will require a lead effort in the automation of material handling to achieve optimal crew utilization.

  12. STS-114: Discovery Crew Post Landing Press Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The crew of the STS-114 Discovery is shown during a post landing press briefing. Commander Collins introduces the crew members who consist of Pilot Jim Kelley, Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi from JAXA, Steve Robinson, Mission Specialist and Charlie Camarda, Mission Specialist. Steve Robinson answers a question from the news media about the repair that he performed in orbit, and his feelings about being back in his hometown of California. Commander Collins talks about the most significant accomplishment of the mission. The briefing ends as each crewmember reflects on the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy and expresses their personal thoughts and feelings as they re-entered the Earth's atmosphere.

  13. Adaptive Attitude Control of the Crew Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muse, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    An H(sub infinity)-NMA architecture for the Crew Launch Vehicle was developed in a state feedback setting. The minimal complexity adaptive law was shown to improve base line performance relative to a performance metric based on Crew Launch Vehicle design requirements for all most all of the Worst-on-Worst dispersion cases. The adaptive law was able to maintain stability for some dispersions that are unstable with the nominal control law. Due to the nature of the H(sub infinity)-NMA architecture, the augmented adaptive control signal has low bandwidth which is a great benefit for a manned launch vehicle.

  14. Passive Thrust Oscillation Mitigation for the CEV Crew Pallet System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Matthew; Powell, Cory; Pellicciotti, Joseph; Buehrle, Ralph; Johnson, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) was intended to be the next-generation human spacecraft for the Constellation Program. The CEV Isolator Strut mechanism was designed to mitigate loads imparted to the CEV crew caused by the Thrust Oscillation (TO) phenomenon of the proposed Ares I Launch Vehicle (LV). The Isolator Strut was also designed to be compatible with Launch Abort (LA) contingencies and landing scenarios. Prototype struts were designed, built, and tested in component, sub-system, and system-level testing. The design of the strut, the results of the tests, and the conclusions and lessons learned from the program will be explored in this paper.

  15. Program documentation crew system vidar data reduction (CSVIDR) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwie, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    The Crew System Vidar Data Reduction (CSVIDR) program was written to process selected portions of data acquired from long term tests of space shuttle crew equipment. Data are recorded on a seven track computer compatible tape using the Vidar autodata eight processing system. The input tape is in a six bit binary coded decimal format. The 1110 hardware conversion option is used to convert all data from a BCD format to Fieldata since the majority of the data is output without further conversion. Data is retrieved from a character string, calibrated, tabulated, printed, and output on a fixed sample rate tape for use as input to a general purpose plot program.

  16. Experimental Evaluation of the Hydrodynamic Response of Crew Boat Hulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    This report presents the results of an experimental study on 3 different hulls of crew boats intended for service to offshore wind turbines. Their hydrodynamic behaviour has been tested in various sea states representing general wave conditions that could be expected at offshore wind farms. Two...... different directions. • The connection forces between the hulls and the wind turbine pile. • The natural frequency of oscillation. For the study, realistic scale models of the hulls of the crew boats were supplied by the client, Hauschildt Marine. The laboratory tests were performed by Arthur Pecher under...

  17. Water-escape velocities in jumping blacktip sharks

    OpenAIRE

    Juerg M. Brunnschweiler

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the first determination of water-escape velocities in free-ranging sharks. Two approximations are used to estimate the final swimming speed at the moment of penetrating the water surface. Blacktip sharks were videotaped from below the surface and parameters were estimated by analysing the sequences frame by frame. Water-escape velocities averaged 6.3 m s−1. These velocities for blacktip sharks seem accurate and are similar to estimates obtained for other shark species of ...

  18. Water-escape velocities in jumping blacktip sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnschweiler, Juerg M

    2005-09-22

    This paper describes the first determination of water-escape velocities in free-ranging sharks. Two approximations are used to estimate the final swimming speed at the moment of penetrating the water surface. Blacktip sharks were videotaped from below the surface and parameters were estimated by analysing the sequences frame by frame. Water-escape velocities averaged 6.3 ms(-1). These velocities for blacktip sharks seem accurate and are similar to estimates obtained for other shark species of similar size. PMID:16849197

  19. Structured noise induced non-recross barrier escaping

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Chun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent barrier passage of a particle driven by the structured noise is studied in the field of a metastable potential. Quantities such as the probability of passing over the saddle point and transmission coefficient of the escaping rate are calculated for a thimbleful of insight into the diffusion dynamical properties. Results show that the barrier recrossing behavior is greatly reduced by the structured noisy environment. Particles diffusion in such an dissipative environment tends to successfully escape from the potential well without any embarrassments.

  20. Rapid endosomal escape of prickly nanodiamonds: implications for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhiqin; Miu, Kaikei; Lung, Pingsai; Zhang, Silu; Zhao, Saisai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Lin, Ge; Li, Quan

    2015-06-01

    The prickly nanodiamonds easily entered cells via endocytosis followed by unique intracellular translocation characteristics—quick endosomal escape followed by stable residence in cytoplasm. Endosomal membrane rupturing is identified as the major route of nanodiamonds’ escaping the vesicle confinement and to the cytoplasm. Little cytotoxicity is observed to associate with the nanodiamonds’ cytosolic release. Such features enable its application for gene delivery, which requires both effective cellular uptake and cytosolic release of the gene. Taking green fluorescent protein gene as an example, we demonstrate the successful cytosolic delivery and expression of such a gene using the prickly nanodiamonds as carrier.

  1. Escape probability based routing for ad hoc networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xuanping; Qin Zheng; Li Xin

    2006-01-01

    Routes in an ad hoc network may fail frequently because of node mobility. Stability therefore can be an important element in the design of routing protocols. The node escape probability is introduced to estimate the lifetime and stability of link between neighboring nodes and the escape probability based routing (EPBR) scheme to discover stable routes is proposed. Simulation results show that the EPBR can discover stable routes to reduce the number of route rediscovery, and is applicable for the situation that has highly dynamic network topology with broad area of communication.

  2. Assessing the Risk of Crew Injury Due to Dynamic Loads During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, J. T.; Gernhardt, M.; Newby, N.

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight requires tremendous amounts of energy to achieve Earth orbit and to attain escape velocity for interplanetary missions. Although the majority of the energy is managed in such a way as to limit the accelerations on the crew, several mission phases may result in crew exposure to dynamic loads. In the automotive industry, risk of serious injury can be tolerated because the probability of a crash is remote each time a person enters a vehicle, resulting in a low total risk of injury. For spaceflight, the level of acceptable injury risk must be lower to achieve a low total risk of injury because the dynamic loads are expected on each flight. To mitigate the risk of injury due to dynamic loads, the NASA Human Research Program has developed a research plan to inform the knowledge gaps and develop relevant tools for assessing injury risk. The risk of injury due to dynamic loads can be further subdivided into extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors. Extrinsic risk factors include the vehicle dynamic profile, seat and restraint design, and spacesuit design. Human tolerance to loads varies considerably depending on the direction, amplitude, and rise-time of acceleration therefore the orientation of the body to the dynamic vector is critical to determining crew risk of injury. Although a particular vehicle dynamic profile may be safe for a particular design, the seat, restraint, and suit designs can affect the risk of injury due to localized effects. In addition, characteristics intrinsic to the crewmember may also contribute to the risk of injury, such as crewmember sex, age, anthropometry, and deconditioning due to spaceflight, and each astronaut may have a different risk profile because of these factors. The purpose of the research plan is to address any knowledge gaps in the risk factors to mitigate injury risk. Methods for assessing injury risk have been well documented in other analogous industries and include human volunteer testing, human exposure to dynamic

  3. Escaping Embarrassment: Face-Work in the Rap Cipher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jooyoung

    2009-01-01

    How do individuals escape embarrassing moments in interaction? Drawing from ethnographic fieldwork, in-depth interviews, and video recordings of weekly street corner ciphers (impromptu rap sessions), this paper expands Goffman's theory of defensive and protective face-work. The findings reveal formulaic and indirect dimensions of face-work. First,…

  4. Comparing the escape dynamics in tidally limited star cluster models

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the orbital dynamics in three different models describing the properties of a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. In particular, we use the isochrone and the Hernquist potentials to model the spherically symmetric star cluster and we compare our results with the corresponding ones of a previous work in which the Plummer model was applied for the same purpose. Our analysis takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the tidally limited star cluster. We restrict our investigation into two dimensions and we conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between ordered and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels above the critical escape energy. It is of particular interest to determine the escape basins towards the two exit channels (n...

  5. The spectrum of Cosmic Rays escaping from relativistic shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2010-01-01

    We derive expressions for the time integrated spectrum of Cosmic Rays (CRs) that are accelerated in a decelerating relativistic shock wave and escape ahead of the shock. It is assumed that at any given time the CRs have a power law form, carry a constant fraction of the energy E_tot of the shocked plasma, and escape continuously at the maximal energy attainable. The spectrum of escaping particles is highly sensitive to the instantaneous spectral index due to the fact that the minimal energy, E_min ~ \\Gamma^2 m_pc^2 where \\Gamma is the shock Lorentz factor, changes with time. In particular, the escaping spectrum may be considerably harder than the canonical N(E)\\propto E^-2 spectrum. For a shock expanding into a plasma of density n, a spectral break is expected at the maximal energy attainable at the transition to non relativistic velocities, E ~ 10^19 (\\epsilon_B/0.1)(n/1 cm^-3)^(1/6)(E_tot/10^51 erg)^(1/3) eV where \\epsilon_B is the fraction of the energy flux carried by the magnetic field. If ultra-high ene...

  6. Spatial and Nonspatial Escape Strategies in the Barnes Maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona E.; Reiserer, Randall S.; Tomarken, Andrew J.; McDonald, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    The Barnes maze is a spatial memory task that requires subjects to learn the position of a hole that can be used to escape the brightly lit, open surface of the maze. Two experiments assessed the relative importance of spatial (extra-maze) versus proximal visible cues in solving the maze. In Experiment 1, four groups of mice were trained either…

  7. 46 CFR 169.313 - Means of escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Means of escape. 169.313 Section 169.313 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction... apart, uniform for the length of the ladder; (3) At least 3 inches from the nearest permanent object...

  8. The Dutch approach to the escape from large compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, E.W.; Leur, P.H.E. van de

    1999-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the building regulations have no design mies for large fire compartments (over 1000 m2). With respect to the ability of people to escape from a fire in such large spaces, the Centre for Fire Research of TNO Building and Construction Research has developed a guideline that integra

  9. A Structural Soundness Proof for Shivers's Escape Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Jan; Adams, Michael D.; Matthew, Might

    2012-01-01

    Shivers’s escape technique enables one to analyse the control flow of higher-order program fragments. It is widely used, but its soundness has never been proven. In this paper, we present the first soundness proof for the technique. Our proof is structured as a composition of Galois connections and...

  10. MAVEN in situ measurements of photochemical escape of oxygen from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Robert; Deighan, Justin; Fox, Jane; Bougher, Stephen; Lee, Yuni; Cravens, Thomas; Rahmati, Ali; Mahaffy, Paul; Benna, Mehdi; Groller, Hannes; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    One of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape from Mars at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers. One of the known escape processes is photochemical escape, where a) an exothermic chemical reaction in the atmosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through subsequent collisions. At Mars, photochemical escape of oxygen is expected to be a significant channel for atmospheric escape, particularly in the early solar system when extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluxes were much higher. Thus characterizing this escape process and its variability with solar drivers is central to understanding the role escape to space has played in Mars' climate evolution. We use near-periapsis (Mars history is not very useful to calculate from such escape fluxes derived over a limited area and under limited conditions. A thicker atmosphere and much higher solar EUV in the past may change the dynamics of escape dramatically. In the future, we intend to use 3-D Monte Carlo models of global atmospheric escape, in concert with our in situ and remote measurements, to fully characterize photochemical escape under current conditions and carefully extrapolate back in time using further simulations with new boundary conditions.

  11. 46 CFR 282.21 - Wages of officers and crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OPERATORS OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY FOR LINER VESSELS ENGAGED IN ESSENTIAL SERVICES IN THE FOREIGN COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES Calculation of Subsidy Rates § 282.21 Wages of officers and crew. (a... the predominant ship type (most voyages) on the service. The purpose of the per month calculation...

  12. SCOPE : an intelligent maintenance system for supporting crew operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.; Breebaart, L.; Neerincx, M.A.; Wolff, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an intelligent maintenance system for Supporting Crew OPErations (SCOPE). SCOPE supports the astronauts onboard the ISS and helps them to maximize the availability of complex payload systems. SCOPE detects system failures, guides the isolation of the root causes of failure, and

  13. 19 CFR 122.44 - Crew baggage declaration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crew baggage declaration. 122.44 Section 122.44 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements...

  14. 19 CFR 122.46 - Crew purchase list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crew purchase list. 122.46 Section 122.46 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements...

  15. Ergonomic and anthropometric issues of the forward Apache crew station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhuijzen, A.J.K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the anthropometric accommodation in the Apache crew systems. These activities are part of a comprehensive project, in a cooperative effort from the Armstrong Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, Ohio, USA) and TNO Human Factors Research Institute (TNO HFRI) in

  16. Radiation exposure of the crew in commercial air traffic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The routine radiation exposure of the crews in Yugoslav Airlines (JAT) has been studied and some previous results are presented. The flights of four selected groups of pilots (four aircraft types) have been studied during one year. Annual exposures and dose equivalents are presented. Some additional results and discussions are given. (1 fig., 4 tabs.)

  17. Paresev 1-A and Tow Plane with Crew and Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    With the Paresev 1-A and the 450-hp Stearman Sport Biplane as a backdrop the pilot and crew pose for this picture in 1962. Starting at left: On the motorcycle is Walter Whiteside, in the Paresev 1-A is test pilot Milton Thompson, Frank Fedor, Richard Klein, Victor Horton, Tom Kelly, Jr., Fred Harris, owner of the Stearman, John Orahood, and Gary Layton.

  18. Integrating Timetabling and Crew Scheduling at a Freight Railway Operator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Bach (Lucas); T.A.B. Dollevoet (Twan); D. Huisman (Dennis)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We investigate to what degree we can integrate a Train Timetabling / Engine Scheduling Problem with a Crew Scheduling Problem. In the Timetabling Problem we design a timetable for the desired lines by fixing the departure and arrival times. Also, we allocate time-slots

  19. 14 CFR 23.853 - Passenger and crew compartment interiors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... cable insulation, and for small parts (such as knobs, handles, rollers, fasteners, clips, grommets, rub... and cable insulation and small parts that the Administrator finds would not contribute significantly... compartment to be used by the crew or passengers: (a) The materials must be at least flame-resistant; (b)...

  20. Sharp Technologies as Applied to a Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Kinney, David; Reuther, James; Saunders, David

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the efforts of Ames Research Center to develop Slender Hypersonic Aerothermodynamic Research Probes (SHARP) technologies as applied to the new Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV). Amongst these technologies are ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC). The results of Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations on prospective designs of the CTV are shown as well as wind tunnel test results.

  1. Bullying 101: The Club Crew's Guide to Bullying Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Bullying 101" is the Club Crew's Guide to Bullying Prevention. A visually-friendly, age-appropriate, 16-page colorful guide for students to read or for parents to use when talking with children, this guide describes and explains what bullying is and is not, the roles of other students, and tips on what each student can do to prevent…

  2. STS-109 Crew Interviews: Michael J. Massimino

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 Mission Specialist Michael J. Massimino is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his most memorable experiences. He gives details on the mission's goals and objectives, which focus on the refurbishing of the Hubble Space Telescope, and his role in the mission. He explains the plans for the rendezvous of the Columbia Orbiter with the Hubble Space Telescope. He provides details and timelines for each of the planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), which include replacing the solar arrays, changing the Power Control Unit, installing the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and installing a new Cryocooler for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). He also describes the break-out plan in place for these spacewalks. The interview ends with Massimino explaining the details of a late addition to the mission's tasks, which is to replace a reaction wheel on the Hubble Space Telescope.

  3. Plasma-induced Escape and Alterations of Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.; Ewrin, J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Leblanc, F.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheres of planets and planetary satellites are typically imbedded in space plasmas. Depending on the interaction with the induced or intrinsic fields energetic ions can have access to the thermosphere and the corona affecting their composition and thermal structure and causing loss to space. These processes are often lumped together as ‘atmospheric sputtering’ (Johnson 1994). In this talk I will review the results of simulations of the plasma bombardment at a number of solar system bodies and use those data to describe the effect on the upper atmosphere and on escape. Of considerable recent interest is the modeling of escape from Titan. Prior to Cassini’s tour of the Saturnian system, plasma-induced escape was suggested to be the dominant loss process, but recent models of enhanced thermal escape, often referred to as ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape, have been suggested to lead to much larger Titan atmospheric loss rates (Strobel 2008; Cui et al. 2008). Such a process has been suggested to be active at some point in time on a number of solar system bodies. I will present hybrid fluid/ kinetic models of the upper atmosphere of certain bodies in order to test both the plasma-induced and thermal escape processes. Preliminary results suggest that the loss rates estimated using the ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape process can be orders of magnitude too large. The implications for Mars, Titan and Pluto will be discussed. Background for this talk is contained in the following papers (Johnson 2004; 2009; Chaufray et al. 2007; Johnson et al. 2008; 2009; Tucker and Johnson 2009). References: Chaufray, J.Y., R. Modolo, F. Leblanc, G. Chanteur, R.E. Johnson, and J.G. Luhmann, Mars Solar Wind interaction: formation of the Martian corona and atmosphric loss to space, JGR 112, E09009, doi:10.1029/2007JE002915 (2007) Cui, J., Yelle, R. V., Volk, K. Distribution and escape of molecular hydrogen in Titan's thermosphere and exosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 113, doi:10

  4. Crew Survivability After a Rapid Cabin Depressurization Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence acquired through historic failure investigations involving rapid cabin decompression (e.g. Challenger, Columbia and Soyuz 11) show that full evacuation of the cabin atmosphere may occur within seconds. During such an event, the delta-pressure between the sealed suit ventilation system and the cabin will rise at the rate of the cabin depressurization; potentially at a rate exceeding the capability of the suit relief valve. It is possible that permanent damage to the suit pressure enclosure and ventilation loop components may occur as the integrated system may be subjected to delta pressures in excess of the design-to pressures. Additionally, as the total pressure of the suit ventilation system decreases, so does the oxygen available to the crew. The crew may be subjected to a temporarily incapacitating, but non-lethal, hypoxic environment. It is expected that the suit will maintain a survivable atmosphere on the crew until the vehicle pressure control system recovers or the cabin has otherwise attained a habitable environment. A common finding from the aforementioned reports indicates that the crew would have had a better chance at surviving the event had they been in a protective configuration, that is, in a survival suit. Making use of these lessons learned, the Constellation Program implemented a suit loop in the spacecraft design and required that the crew be in a protective configuration, that is suited with gloves on and visors down, during dynamic phases of flight that pose the greatest risk for a rapid and uncontrolled cabin depressurization event: ascent, entry, and docking. This paper details the evaluation performed to derive suit pressure garment and ventilation system performance parameters that would lead to the highest probability of crew survivability after an uncontrolled crew cabin depressurization event while remaining in the realm of practicality for suit design. This evaluation involved: (1) assessment of stakeholder

  5. Assessing and Promoting Functional Resilience in Flight Crews During Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelhamer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    NASA plans to send humans to Mars in about 20 years. The NASA Human Research Program supports research to mitigate the major risks to human health and performance on extended missions. However, there will undoubtedly be unforeseen events on any mission of this nature - thus mitigation of known risks alone is not sufficient to ensure optimal crew health and performance. Research should be directed not only to mitigating known risks, but also to providing crews with the tools to assess and enhance resilience, as a group and individually. We can draw on ideas from complexity theory and network theory to assess crew and individual resilience. The entire crew or the individual crewmember can be viewed as a complex system that is composed of subsystems (individual crewmembers or physiological subsystems), and the interactions between subsystems are of crucial importance for overall health and performance. An understanding of the structure of the interactions can provide important information even in the absence of complete information on the component subsystems. This is critical in human spaceflight, since insufficient flight opportunities exist to elucidate the details of each subsystem. Enabled by recent advances in noninvasive measurement of physiological and behavioral parameters, subsystem monitoring can be implemented within a mission and also during preflight training to establish baseline values and ranges. Coupled with appropriate mathematical modeling, this can provide real-time assessment of health and function, and detect early indications of imminent breakdown. Since the interconnected web of physiological systems (and crewmembers) can be interpreted as a network in mathematical terms, we can draw on recent work that relates the structure of such networks to their resilience (ability to self-organize in the face of perturbation). There are many parameters and interactions to choose from. Normal variability is an established characteristic of a healthy

  6. A decision support system for crew planning in passenger transportation using a flexible branch-and-price algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Freling, Richard; Lentink, Ramon; Wagelmans, Albert

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThis paper discusses a decision support system for airline and railway crew planning. The system is a state-of-the-art branch-and-price solver that is used for crew scheduling and crew rostering. We briefly discuss the mathematical background of the solver, of which most part is covered in the Operations Research literature. Crew scheduling is crew planning for one or a few days that results in crew duties or pairings, and crew rostering is crew planning for at least one week for ...

  7. Formulation of a Cooperative-Confinement-Escape problem of multiple cooperative defenders against an evader escaping from a circular region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose and formulate the Cooperative-Confinement-Escape (CCE) problem of multiple cooperative defenders against an evader escaping from a circular region, in which the defenders are moving on the circle with attempt to prevent possible escape of a single evader who is initially located inside the circle. The main contributions are summarized as follows: (1) we first provide an effective formulation of the CCE problem, which is an emphasis of this paper, with design of two nonlinear control strategies for the cooperative defenders and the adversarial evader, respectively. Particularly, we consider to include a proper interaction between each pair of the nearest-neighbor defenders, and an adaptive trajectory prediction mechanism in the strategies of the defenders to increase the chance of successful confinement. (2) For the first attempt on analyzing the CCE dynamics which is unavoidably strongly nonlinear, we analyze the minimum energy of the evader for possible escape. (3) For understanding of the behaviors of the system under different parameters, (i) we illustrate the effectiveness of the confinement strategy using the adaptive trajectory prediction mechanism, and (ii) the physical roles of the system parameters with respect to the system dynamics, some of which may be unexpected or not straightforward. A separate paper will be presented for systematic analysis of the agents' behaviors with respect to the large intervals of the parameter settings.

  8. An Empirical Investigation of Time-Out with and without Escape Extinction to Treat Escape-Maintained Noncompliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Gregory E.; Olmi, D. Joe; Edwards, Ron P.; Tingstrom, Daniel H.; Sterling-Turner, Heather E.; Christ, Theodore J.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of two time-out (TO) procedures in reducing escape-maintained noncompliance of 4 children. Noncompliant behavioral function was established via a functional assessment (FA), including indirect and direct descriptive procedures and brief confirmatory experimental analyses. Following FA, parents were…

  9. Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling;

    Introduction: Neck pain is frequent among helicopter pilots and crew (1). The aim of this study was to investigate if an exercise intervention could reduce the prevalence of neck-pain among helicopter pilots and crew. Methods: Thirty-one pilots and thirty-eight crew members were randomized...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1074 - Farm crew leader who is self-employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Farm crew leader who is self-employed. 404.1074 Section 404.1074 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... § 404.1074 Farm crew leader who is self-employed. If you are a farm crew leader and are deemed...

  11. Improving crew support methods in human-machine teams for long-durations missions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, N.J.J.M.; Cohen, I.; Neerincx, M.A.; Brinkman, W.P.; Diggelen, J.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated Mission Execution Crew Assistant's (MECA) crew support methods during the MARS-500 experiment (520 days). MARS-500 provided a unique test platform, because of its setting, where a small crew is isolated for a long duration simulating a manned Mars mission. Thus more prolonged or repeate

  12. Advances of PD-1/PD-L1 Signaling Pathway in Immune Escape and Treatment for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer%PD-1/PD-L1信号通路在非小细胞肺癌免疫逃逸及其治疗中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林城; 陈雄; 刘静南; 黄于芳(综述); 欧阳学农(审校)

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Despiting the great progress on target agents, majority of people who do not harbor a mutation could not get beneift from them. Immunotherapy, through stimulating the body's immune system to improve the antitumor immunity effect, has been a new therapeutic method for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Study had been reported that immune checkpoint molecules, including programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand (L) 1 axis, are closedly related with cancer generation and development, and play a key role on clinical signiifcance of NSCLC. Activation of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway contributes to tumor immune escape, and block PD-1/PD-L1 pathway can enhance endogenous antimuor immunity. Currently increasing clinical trials suggested that immune checkpoint inhibitors, including anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies turned out to be beneifcial and safe in NSCLC. Here, we provide a review on the progress of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway and immune checkpoint inhibitors in NSCLC.%非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC)是肿瘤相关性死亡率第一的恶性肿瘤。虽然近年来靶向治疗进展迅速,但很多基因未突变的患者不能从中受益。目前免疫治疗已成为肿瘤治疗的新方向,它能通过刺激机体免疫系统提高抗肿瘤免疫效应。研究显示免疫检查点分子:程序性死亡分子1(programmed death 1, PD-1)、程序性死亡分子1配体(PD-1 ligand, PD-L1),与肿瘤发生、发展密切相关,在NSCLC中有重要的临床意义。PD-1/PD-L1信号通路的激活有助于肿瘤免疫逃逸,而阻断该通路可以增强机体内源性抗肿瘤免疫效应。目前越来越多的临床试验显示免疫检查点阻滞剂抗PD-1、抗PD-L1抗体在治疗NSCLC中的良好疗效性和安全性。本综述旨在回顾及总结近年来PD-1/PD-L1信号通路及其阻滞剂在NSCLC中的研究进展。

  13. STS-109 Crew Interviews: James H. Newman

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 Mission Specialist James H. Newman is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his most memorable experiences. He gives details on the mission's goals and objectives, which focus on the refurbishing of the Hubble Space Telescope, and his role in the mission. He provides a brief background on the Hubble Space Telescope, and explains the plans for the rendezvous of the Columbia Orbiter with the Hubble Space Telescope. He provides details and timelines for each of the planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), which include replacing the solar arrays, changing the Power Control Unit, installing the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and installing a new Cryocooler for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). He gives further explanation of each of these pieces of equipment. He also describes the break-out plan in place for these spacewalks. The interview ends with Newman explaining the details of a late addition to the mission's tasks, which is to replace a reaction wheel on the Hubble Space Telescope.

  14. The Apollo Medical Operations Project: Recommendations to improve crew health and performance for future exploration missions and lunar surface operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Novak, Joseph D.; Polk, James D.; Gillis, David B.; Schmid, Josef; Duncan, James M.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    Introduction: Medical requirements for the future crew exploration vehicle (CEV), lunar surface access module (LSAM), advanced extravehicular activity (EVA) suits, and Lunar habitat are currently being developed within the exploration architecture. While much is known about the vehicle and lunar surface activities during Apollo, relatively little is known about whether the hardware, systems, or environment impacted crew health or performance during these missions. Also, inherent to the proposed aggressive surface activities is the potential risk of injury to crewmembers. The Space Medicine Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested a study in December 2005 to identify Apollo mission issues relevant to medical operations impacting crew health and/or performance during a lunar mission. The goals of this project were to develop or modify medical requirements for new vehicles and habitats, create a centralized database for future access, and share relevant Apollo information with various working groups participating in the exploration effort. Methods: A review of medical operations during Apollo missions 7-17 was conducted. Ten categories of hardware, systems, or crew factors were identified during preliminary data review generating 655 data records which were captured in an Access® database. The preliminary review resulted in 285 questions. The questions were posed to surviving Apollo crewmembers using mail, face-to-face meetings, phone communications, or online interactions. Results: Fourteen of 22 surviving Apollo astronauts (64%) participated in the project. This effort yielded 107 recommendations for future vehicles, habitats, EVA suits, and lunar surface operations. Conclusions: To date, the Apollo Medical Operations recommendations are being incorporated into the exploration mission architecture at various levels and a centralized database has been developed. The Apollo crewmember's input has proved to be an invaluable resource. We will continue

  15. The Biomolecule Sequencer Project: Nanopore Sequencing as a Dual-Use Tool for Crew Health and Astrobiology Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, K. K.; Botkin, D. S.; Burton, A. S.; Castro-Wallace, S. L.; Chaput, J. D.; Dworkin, J. P.; Lehman, N.; Lupisella, M. L.; Mason, C. E.; Smith, D. J.; Stahl, S; Switzer, C.

    2016-01-01

    Human missions to Mars will fundamentally transform how the planet is explored, enabling new scientific discoveries through more sophisticated sample acquisition and processing than can currently be implemented in robotic exploration. The presence of humans also poses new challenges, including ensuring astronaut safety and health and monitoring contamination. Because the capability to transfer materials to Earth will be extremely limited, there is a strong need for in situ diagnostic capabilities. Nucleotide sequencing is a particularly powerful tool because it can be used to: (1) mitigate microbial risks to crew by allowing identification of microbes in water, in air, and on surfaces; (2) identify optimal treatment strategies for infections that arise in crew members; and (3) track how crew members, microbes, and mission-relevant organisms (e.g., farmed plants) respond to conditions on Mars through transcriptomic and genomic changes. Sequencing would also offer benefits for science investigations occurring on the surface of Mars by permitting identification of Earth-derived contamination in samples. If Mars contains indigenous life, and that life is based on nucleic acids or other closely related molecules, sequencing would serve as a critical tool for the characterization of those molecules. Therefore, spaceflight-compatible nucleic acid sequencing would be an important capability for both crew health and astrobiology exploration. Advances in sequencing technology on Earth have been driven largely by needs for higher throughput and read accuracy. Although some reduction in size has been achieved, nearly all commercially available sequencers are not compatible with spaceflight due to size, power, and operational requirements. Exceptions are nanopore-based sequencers that measure changes in current caused by DNA passing through pores; these devices are inherently much smaller and require significantly less power than sequencers using other detection methods

  16. Stream life of spawning pink salmon and the method of escapement enumeration by aerial survey: Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys are currently used as the method tor escapement enumeration of pink salmon throughout Alaska. Other escapement enumeration methods cannot be...

  17. Parameter Optimization on Experimental Study to Reduce Ammonia Escape in CO2 Absorption by Ammonia Scrubbing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Leng; Jianmin Gao; Mingyue He; Min Xie; Qian Du; Rui Sun; Shaohua Wu

    2016-01-01

    In order to research ammonia escape in CO2 absorption by ammonia scrubbing, ammonia escape was studied in CO2 absorption process using the bubbling reactor in different conditions as gas flow rate, CO2 ratio, absorbent temperature and ammonia concentration and quantity of escaped ammonia was measured by chemical titration. The results indicated that, the amount of ammonia escape can be around 20% of original amount in 90 min and the escaped amount will increase with the rise of gas flow rate, absorbent temperature, concentration of ammonia while decrease as CO2 ratio goes up. Through the analysis of the law of ammonia escape, at the same time, combined with ammonia escape and the influence of the relationship between the CO2 absorption efficiency, reducing ammonia escape working condition parameter optimization is given.

  18. Bacillus anthracis Factors for Phagosomal Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Zornetta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of phagosome escape by intracellular pathogens is an important step in the infectious cycle. During the establishment of anthrax, Bacillus anthracis undergoes a transient intracellular phase in which spores are engulfed by local phagocytes. Spores germinate inside phagosomes and grow to vegetative bacilli, which emerge from their resident intracellular compartments, replicate and eventually exit from the plasma membrane. During germination, B. anthracis secretes multiple factors that can help its resistance to the phagocytes. Here the possible role of B. anthracis toxins, phospholipases, antioxidant enzymes and capsules in the phagosomal escape and survival, is analyzed and compared with that of factors of other microbial pathogens involved in the same type of process.

  19. Quantum and thermal phase escape in extended Josephson systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work I examine phase escape in long annular Josephson tunnel junctions. The sine-Gordon equation governs the dynamics of the phase variable along the junction. This equation supports topological soliton solutions, which correspond to quanta of magnetic flux trapped in the junction barrier. For such Josephson vortices an effective potential is formed by an external magnetic field, while a bias current acts as a driving force. Both together form a metastable potential well, which the vortex is trapped in. When the driving force exceeds the pinning force of the potential, the vortex escapes and the junction switches to the voltage state. At a finite temperature the driving force fluctuates. If the junction's energy scale is small, the phase variable can undergo a macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) process at temperatures below the crossover temperature. Without a vortex trapped, the metastable state is not a potential minimum in space, but a potential minimum at zero phase difference. (orig.)

  20. Quantum and thermal phase escape in extended Josephson systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, A.

    2006-07-12

    In this work I examine phase escape in long annular Josephson tunnel junctions. The sine-Gordon equation governs the dynamics of the phase variable along the junction. This equation supports topological soliton solutions, which correspond to quanta of magnetic flux trapped in the junction barrier. For such Josephson vortices an effective potential is formed by an external magnetic field, while a bias current acts as a driving force. Both together form a metastable potential well, which the vortex is trapped in. When the driving force exceeds the pinning force of the potential, the vortex escapes and the junction switches to the voltage state. At a finite temperature the driving force fluctuates. If the junction's energy scale is small, the phase variable can undergo a macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) process at temperatures below the crossover temperature. Without a vortex trapped, the metastable state is not a potential minimum in space, but a potential minimum at zero phase difference. (orig.)

  1. Escape Time of Josephson Junctions for Signal Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Addesso, P; Pierro, V

    2014-01-01

    In this Chapter we investigate with the methods of signal detection the response of a Josephson junction to a perturbation to decide if the perturbation contains a coherent oscillation embedded in the background noise. When a Josephson Junction is irradiated by an external noisy source, it eventually leaves the static state and reaches a steady voltage state. The appearance of a voltage step allows to measure the time spent in the metastable state before the transition to the running state, thus defining an escape time. The distribution of the escape times depends upon the characteristics of the noise and the Josephson junction. Moreover, the properties of the distribution depends on the features of the signal (amplitude, frequency and phase), which can be therefore inferred through the appropriate signal processing methods. Signal detection with JJ is interesting for practical purposes, inasmuch as the superconductive elements can be (in principle) cooled to the absolute zero and therefore can add (in practi...

  2. Behavioral analysis of the escape response in larval zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ruopei; Girdhar, Kiran; Chemla, Yann; Gruebele, Martin

    The behavior of larval zebrafish is of great interest because the limited number of locomotor neurons in larval zebrafish couples with its rich repertoire of movements as a vertebrate animal. Current research uses a priori-selected parameters to describe their swimming behavior while our lab has built a parameter-free model based on singular value decomposition analysis to characterize it. Our previous work has analyzed the free swimming of larval zebrafish and presented a different picture from the current classification of larval zebrafish locomotion. Now we are extending this work to the studies of their escape response to acoustic stimulus. Analysis has shown intrinsic difference in the locomotion between escape response and free swimming.

  3. Fractionation of noble gases by thermal escape from accreting planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, T. M.

    1986-01-01

    Assuming solar initial elemental and isotopic ratios and a determination of the degree of fractionation occurring by competition between gravitational binding and escape, a model is developed for selective noble gas loss through escape during the growth of planetesimals to form the terrestrial planets. Of the two classes of planetesimals that can form on a time scale that is consistent with modern accretion models, one is depleted in neon while the other is neon-rich. The mechanism is noted to be capable of accounting for all known properties of the noble gas volatiles on the terrestrial planets, with only one exception, namely the Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios for Mars and the earth, which are much lower than observed.

  4. Escape of Mars atmospheric carbon through time by photochemical means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Kim, J.; Nagy, A. F.

    Luhmann et al. recently suggested that sputtering of the Martian atmosphere by re-entering O(+) pickup ions could have provided a significant route of escape for CO2 and its products throughout Mars' history. They estimated that the equivalent of C in an approximately 140-mbar CO2 atmosphere should have been lost this way if the Sun and solar wind evolved according to available models. Another source of escaping C (and O) that is potentially important is the dissociative recombination of ionospheric CO(+) near the exobase. We have evaluated the loss rates due to this process for 'ancient' solar EUV radiation fluxes of 1, 3, and 6 times the present flux in order to calculate the possible cumulative loss over the last 3.5 Gyr.

  5. Designing institutions for global democracy: flexibility through escape clauses and sunset provisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan W. Kuyper

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available How can advocates of global democracy grapple with the empirical conditions that constitute world politics? I argue that flexibility mechanisms—;commonly used to advance international cooperation—should be employed to make the institutional design project of global democracy more tractable. I highlight three specific reasons underpinning this claim. First, flexibility provisions make bargaining over different institutional designs more manageable. Second, heightened flexibility takes seriously potential concerns about path-dependent institutional development. Finally, deliberately shortening the time horizons of agents by employing flexibility provisions has cognitive benefits as it forces designers to focus specifically on issues of feasibility as well as desirability. I discuss a range of flexibility mechanisms and highlight the utility of sunset provisions and escape clauses. From this analysis, I build an argument for the usage of small-scale democratic experiments through which citizens (or their representatives have a say in global policy making.

  6. Escape rates for rotor walk in Z^d

    OpenAIRE

    Florescu, Laura; Ganguly, Shirshendu; Levine, Lionel; Peres, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Rotor walk is a deterministic analogue of random walk. We study its recurrence and transience properties on Z^d for the initial configuration of all rotors aligned. If n particles in turn perform rotor walks starting from the origin, we show that the number that escape (i.e., never return to the origin) is of order n in dimensions d>=3, and of order n/log(n) in dimension 2.

  7. The escape of natural satellites from Mercury and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is suggested that the slow rotations of Mercury and Venus may be connected with the absence of natural satellites around them. If Mercury or Venus possessed a satellite at the time of formation, the tidal evolution would have caused the satellite to recede. At a sufficiently large distance from the planet, the Sun's gravitational influence makes the satellite orbit unstable. The natural satellites of Mercury and Venus might have escaped as a consequence of this instability. (Auth.)

  8. Brain size as a driver of avian escape strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Samia, Diogo S. M.; Pape Møller, Anders; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    After detecting an approaching predator, animals make a decision when to flee. Prey will initiate flight soon after detecting a predator so as to minimize attentional costs related to on-going monitoring of the whereabouts of the predator. Such costs may compete with foraging and other maintenance activities and hence be larger than the costs of immediate flight. The drivers of interspecific variation in escape strategy are poorly known. Here we investigated the morphological, life history an...

  9. Transcriptional control of behavior: Engrailed knockout changes cockroach escape trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, David; Marie, Bruno; Domenici, Paolo; Blagburn, Jonathan M.; Bacon, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    The cerci of the cockroach are covered with identified sensory hairs, which detect air movements. The sensory neurons which innervate these hairs synapse with giant interneurons (GIs) in the terminal ganglion which in turn synapse with interneurons and leg motorneurons in thoracic ganglia. This neural circuit mediates the animal's escape behavior. The transcription factor Engrailed (En) is expressed only in the medially born sensory neurons, which suggested it could work as a positional deter...

  10. Amygdala involvement in human avoidance, escape and approach behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Schlund, Michael W.; Cataldo, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    Many forms of psychopathology and substance abuse problems are characterized by chronic ritualized forms of avoidance and escape behavior that are designed to control or modify external or internal (i.e, thoughts, emotions, bodily sensations) threats. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation, we examined amygdala reactivity to threatening cues when avoidance responding consistently prevented contact with an upcoming aversive event (money loss). In addition, we examined esca...

  11. Preflight and postflight microbiological results from 25 space shuttle crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Bassinger, Virginia J.; Molina, Thomas C.; Gunter, Emelie G.; Groves, Theron O.; Cioletti, Louis J.; Mishra, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Clinical-microbiological investigations are an important aspect of the crew health stabilization program. To ensure that space crews have neither active nor latent infections, clinical specimens, including throat and nasal swabs and urine samples, are collected at 10 days (L-10) and 2days (L-2) before launch, and immediately after landing (L+0). All samples are examined for the presence of bacteria and fungi. In addition, fecal samples are collected at L-10 and examined for bacteria, fungi and parasites. This paper describes clinical-microbiological findings from 144 astronauts participating in 25 Space Shuttle missions spanning Space Transportation System (STS)-26 to STS-50. The spectrum of microbiological findings from the specimens included 25 bacterial and 11 fungal species. Among the bacteria isolated most frequently were Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis and Streptococcus agalactiae. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated fungal pathogen.

  12. STS-104 crew pose for photo in Atlantis's payload bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- During payload walkdown at Launch Pad 39B, the STS-104 crew pause for a photo. At left are Commander Steven W. Lindsey (front), Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (center) and Mission Specialist James F. Reilly (back). At right are Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt and Pilot Charles O. Hobaugh. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency exit training from the orbiter, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiters payload bay and simulated countdown exercises. The launch of Atlantis on mission STS-104 is scheduled July 12 from Launch Pad 39B. The mission is the 10th flight to the International Space Station and carries the Joint Airlock Module.

  13. STS-100 and Expedition Two Crews Pose For Onboard Portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 and Expedition Two crew members pose for an onboard portrait in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS). Bottom, from left, are Chris A. Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency, Umberto Guidoni of the European Space Agency, Kent V. Rominger, and Susan J. Helms (Expedition Two). Middle row, James S. Voss (Expedition Two), and cosmonauts Yury V. Usachev (Expedition Two) and Yuri V. Lonchakov. Top, Scott E. Parazynski, John L. Phillips, and Jeffrey S. Ashby. The crews accomplished the following objectives: The delivery of the Canadian-built Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), Canadarm2, which is needed to perform assembly operations on later flights; The delivery and installation of a UHF anterna that provides space-to-space communications capability for U.S. based space walks; and carried the Italian-built multipurpose Logistics Module Raffaello containing six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab, Destiny.

  14. STS-110 and Expedition Four Crews Pose for Onboard Portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Posed inside the Destiny Laboratory aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are the STS-110 and Expedition Four crews for a traditional onboard portrait From the left, bottom row, are astronauts Ellen Ochoa, STS mission specialist, Michael J. Bloomfield, STS mission commander, and Yury I Onufrienko, Expedition Four mission commander. From the left, middle row, are astronauts Daniel W. Bursch, Expedition Four flight engineer, Rex J. Walheim, STS mission specialist, and Carl E. Walz, Expedition Four flight engineer. From the left, top row, are astronauts Stephen N. Frick, STS pilot; Jerry L. Ross, Lee M.E. Morin, and Steven L. Smith, all mission specialists. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis on April 8, 2002, the STS-110 mission crew prepared the ISS for future space walks by installing and outfitting the 43-foot-long Starboard side S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The mission served as the 8th ISS assembly flight.

  15. Escape of Ionizing Radiation from High-Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, K; Wood, Kenneth; Loeb, Abraham

    1999-01-01

    We use a three-dimensional radiation transfer code to calculate the steady-state escape fraction of ionizing photons from disk galaxies as a function of redshift and galaxy mass. The gaseous disks are assumed to be isothermal (with a sound speed of 10 km/s) and radially exponential. Their scale-radius is related to the characteristic spin parameter and virial radius of their host halos, and their vertical structure is dictated by their self-gravity. The sources of radiation are taken to be either stars embedded in the disk, or a central quasar. The predicted increase in the disk density with redshift results in an overall decline of the escape fraction with increasing redshift. For typical parameters we find that the escape fraction at z=10 is less than 1% for stars, but greater than 30% for mini-quasars. Unless the smooth gas content of high-redshift disks was depleted by more than an order of magnitude due to supernove-driven outflows or fragmentation, the reionization of the universe was most likely domina...

  16. The RAVE Survey: Constraining the Local Galactic Escape Speed

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M C; Helmi, A; Wyse, R F G; Fulbright, J P; Freeman, K C; Navarro, J F; Seabroke, G M; Steinmetz, M; Williams, M; Bienaymé, O; Binney, J; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Dehnen, W; Gibson, B K; Gilmore, G; Grebel, E K; Munari, U; Parker, Q A; Scholz, R D; Siebert, A; Watson, F G; Zwitter, T

    2006-01-01

    We report new constraints on the local escape speed of our Galaxy. Our analysis is based on a sample of high velocity stars from the RAVE survey and two previously published datasets. We use cosmological simulations of disk galaxy formation to motivate our assumptions on the shape of the velocity distribution, allowing for a significantly more precise measurement of the escape velocity compared to previous studies. We find that the escape velocity lies within the range $498\\kms < \\ve < 608 \\kms$ (90 per cent confidence), with a median likelihood of $544\\kms$. The fact that $\\ve^2$ is significantly greater than $2\\vc^2$ (where $\\vc=220\\kms$ is the local circular velocity) implies that there must be a significant amount of mass exterior to the Solar circle, i.e. this convincingly demonstrates the presence of a dark halo in the Galaxy. For a simple isothermal halo, one can calculate that the minimum radial extent is $\\sim58$ kpc. We use our constraints on $\\ve$ to determine the mass of the Milky Way halo f...

  17. Fleeing to refuge: Escape decisions in the race for life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, William E

    2016-10-01

    Economic escape theory that predicts that flight initiation distance (FID=predator-prey distance when a prey begins to flee from an approaching predator) increases as predation risk increases has been overwhelmingly supported. However, the vast majority of empirical tests have focused on effects of single predation risk factors. Even studies that have included multiple risk factors have not predicted how they jointly affect FID. I present a model that predicts joint effects of several predation risk factors that affect the outcome of a race between predator and prey to the prey's refuge. As a prey's distance to refuge and predator attack speed increase, and as the prey's location forces it to flee more toward a predator to reach refuge, FID increases. A published model proposed and experiment showed that FID is longer when prey flee directly toward than directly away from a predator to a refuge. We present a new geometric model that predicts FID for all angles between the prey's and predator's paths to refuge, distance of the prey from refuge when escape begins, predator and prey speeds, and a margin of safety allowing the prey to reach refuge before the predator. The model provides many new, testable predictions about relationships among its variables and FID. Most notably, it predicts that FID increases sigmoidally as the angle between predator and prey paths to refuge increases. Although the model is not economic (cost-benefit), we discuss its relationship to economic escape theory. PMID:27343624

  18. 46 CFR 108.155 - Restrictions on means of escape utilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on means of escape utilized. 108.155 Section 108.155 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE... means of escape utilized. A required means of escape may not be a vertical ladder or deck...

  19. Escape Performance Following Exposure to Inescapable Shock: Deficits in Motor Response Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisman, Hymie; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A series of 13 experiments employing mice systematically investigated shock-elicited activity in a circular field and escape performance in a shuttle box following exposure to either escapable or inescapable shock. Results show that escape interference induced by inescapable shock may be comfortably interpreted in terms of a decreased tendency for…

  20. On the Relative Contributions of Noncontingent Reinforcement and Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Food Refusal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Gregory K.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Patel, Meeta R.; Layer, Stacy A.; Bachmeyer, Melanie H.; Bethke, Stephanie D.; Gutshall, Katharine A.

    2004-01-01

    In the current investigation, we evaluated the relative effects of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR), escape extinction, and a combination of NCR and escape extinction as treatment for the feeding problems exhibited by 4 children. For each participant, consumption increased only when escape extinction was implemented, independent of whether NCR…

  1. 46 CFR 56.50-25 - Safety and relief valve escape piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety and relief valve escape piping. 56.50-25 Section 56.50-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-25 Safety and relief valve escape piping. (a) Escape piping...

  2. Reentry Thermal Analysis of a Generic Crew Exploration Vehicle Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Gong, Leslie; Quinn, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on the heat-shielding characteristics of honeycomb-core sandwich panels fabricated with different materials for possible use as wall panels for the proposed crew exploration vehicle. Graphite/epoxy sandwich panel was found to outperform aluminum sandwich panel under the same geometry due to superior heat-shielding qualities and lower material density. Also, representative reentry heat-transfer analysis was performed on the windward wall structures of a generic crew exploration vehicle. The Apollo low Earth orbit reentry trajectory was used to calculate the reentry heating rates. The generic crew exploration vehicle has a graphite/epoxy composite honeycomb sandwich exterior wall and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich interior wall, and is protected with the Apollo thermal protection system ablative material. In the thermal analysis computer program used, the TPS ablation effect was not yet included; however, the results from the nonablation heat-transfer analyses were used to develop a "virtual ablation" method to estimate the ablation heat loads and the thermal protection system recession thicknesses. Depending on the severity of the heating-rate time history, the virtual ablation period was found to last for 87 to 107 seconds and the ablation heat load was estimated to be in the range of 86 to 88 percent of the total heat load for the ablation time period. The thermal protection system recession thickness was estimated to be in the range of 0.08 to 0.11 inches. For the crew exploration vehicle zero-tilt and 18-degree-tilt stagnation points, thermal protection system thicknesses of h = {0.717, 0.733} inches were found to be adequate to keep the substructural composite sandwich temperature below the limit of 300 F.

  3. Space crew productivity: A driving factor in space station design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbers, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The criteria of performance, cost, and mission success probability (program confidence) are the principal factors that program or project managers and system engineers use in selecting the optimum design approach for meeting mission objectives. A frame of reference is discussed in which the interrelationships of these pertinent parameters can be made visible, and from which rational or informed decisions can be derived regarding the potential impact of adjustments in crew productivity on total Space Station System effectiveness.

  4. Crew resource management training--clinicians' reactions and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Daniel J; Stiles, Renee; Gaffney, E Andrew; Seddon, Margaret R; Grogan, Eric L; Nixon, William R; Speroff, Theodore

    2005-08-01

    Many health care organizations are adopting crew resource management (CRM) training from the aviation industry as a patient safety practice. Although CRM has high face validity, its effects have not been thoroughly evaluated in aviation or health care. Its potential to improve team communication, coordination, and patient safety, however, makes efforts to study CRM necessary and worthwhile. This article evaluates clinicians' attitudes about and reactions to CRM after they participated in an eight-hour, commercially developed training program.

  5. STS-97 and Expedition One Crews Pose for Onboard Photo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    In this image, the five STS-97 crew members pose with the 3 members of the Expedition One crew onboard the International Space Station (ISS) for the first ever traditional onboard portrait taken in the Zvezda Service Module. On the front row, left to right, are astronauts Brent W. Jett, Jr., STS-97 commander; William M. Shepherd, Expedition One mission commander; and Joseph R. Tarner, STS-97 mission specialist. On the second row, from the left are Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer; astronaut Carlos I. Noriega, STS-97 mission specialist; cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Expedition One Soyuz commander; and Michael J. Bloomfield, STS-97 pilot. Behind them is astronaut Marc Garneau, STS-97 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The primary objective of the STS-97 mission was the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the station aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment. The STS-97 crew of five launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000 for an 11 day mission.

  6. STS-103 crew pose in front of Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    During Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TDCT) activities at Launch Pad 39B, the STS-103 crew pose in front of the flame trench, which is situated underneath the Mobile Launcher Platform holding Space Shuttle Discovery. Standing left to right are Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., and Mission Specialists Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, also with ESA, and Steven L. Smith. One of the solid rocket boosters and the external tank that are attached to Discovery can be seen in the photo. The flame trench is made of concrete and refractory brick, and contains an orbiter flame deflector on one side and solid rocket booster flame deflector on the other. The deflectors protect the flame trench floor and pad surface from the intense heat of launch. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  7. Medical operations: Crew surgeon's report. [in Skylab simulation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    To assure the safety and well being of the Skylab environment simulation crewmembers it was necessary to develop a medical safety plan with emergency procedures. All medical and nonmedical test and operations personnel, except those specifically exempted, were required to meet the medical standards and proficiency levels as established. Implemented programs included health care of the test crew and their families, occupational medical services for chamber operating personnel, clinical laboratory support and hypobaric and other emergency support.

  8. Communications Between Crews on Mars and Scientists on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Patricia W.; Budden, Nancy Ann; McKay, David S.; Spudis, Paul D.; Frassanito, Jack; Keaton, Paul

    1998-01-01

    For the purpose of the following discussion, we assume that of the six crew members sent to Mars, at least three will be scientists. We further assume that geological and biological investigations will proceed together (although investigative techniques may vary), both for vestiges of ancient life, and for evidence of living organisms. Finally, unexpected discoveries may cause sudden changes in exploration strategies, and mission planning should be flexible enough to accommodate such shifts.

  9. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Wilkes, Robert; Kuehnel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the Generation 4 Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (Gen4 SWME). The SWME offers several advantages when compared with prior crewmember cooling technologies, including the ability to reject heat at increased atmospheric pressures, reduced loop infrastructure, and higher tolerance to fouling. Like its predecessors, Gen4 SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Test results from the backup cooling system which is based on a similar design and the subject of a companion paper, suggested that further volume reductions could be achieved through fiber density optimization. Testing was performed with four fiber bundle configurations ranging from 35,850 fibers to 41,180 fibers. The optimal configuration reduced the Gen4 SWME envelope volume by 15% from that of Gen3 while dramatically increasing the performance margin of the system. A rectangular block design was chosen over the Gen3 cylindrical design, for packaging configurations within the AEMU PLSS envelope. Several important innovations were made in the redesign of the backpressure valve which is used to control evaporation. A twin-port pivot concept was selected from among three low profile valve designs for superior robustness, control and packaging. The backpressure valve motor, the thermal control valve, delta pressure sensors and temperature sensors were incorporated into the manifold endcaps, also for packaging considerations. Flight-like materials including a titanium housing were used for all components. Performance testing

  10. Nutrititional Status Assessment of International Space Station Crew Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Zwart, S. R.; Block, G.; Rice, B. I.; Davis-Street, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Defining optimal nutrient requirements is imperative to ensure crew health on long-duration space exploration missions. To date, nutrient requirement data have been extremely limited because of small sample sizes and difficulties associated with collecting biological samples. In this study, we examined changes in body composition, bone metabolism, hematology, general blood chemistry, and blood levels of selected vitamins and minerals after long-duration (128-195 d) space flight aboard the International Space Station. Crew members consumed an average of 80% of the recommended energy intakes, and on landing day their body weight had decreased (P=0.051). After flight, hematocrit was less, and serum femtin was greater than before flight (PSerum iron, ferritin saturation, and transferrin had decreased after flight. The finding that other acute-phase proteins, including ceruloplasmin, retinol binding protein, transthyretin, and albumin were not changed after flight suggests that the changes in iron metabolism may not be strictly due to an inflammatory response. Urinary 8- hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration was greater and superoxide dismutase was less after flight, indicating that oxidative damage had increased (Pserum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly decreased after flight (Pserum concentration of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, was elevated only in crew members who landed in Russia, probably because of the longer time lapse between landing and sample collection. These data provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin D status, and oxidative damage remain critical concerns for long-duration space flight.

  11. The STS-104 crew takes part in CEIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the Space Station Processing Facility, the STS-104 crew look over equipment as part of Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. From left are Commander Steven Lindsey, Mission Specialist James F. Reilly II and Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt at far right. Not shown is Pilot Charles O. Hobaugh. The STS-104 mission will carry the Joint Airlock Module to the International Space Station. The U.S.-made module will allow astronauts and cosmonauts in residence on the Station to perform future spacewalks without the presence of a Space Shuttle. The module, which comprises a crew lock and an equipment lock, will be connected to the starboard (right) side of Node 1 Unity. Atlantis will also carry oxygen and nitrogen storage tanks, vital to operation of the Joint Airlock, on a Spacelab Logistics Double Pallet in the payload bay. The tanks, to be installed on the perimeter of the Joint Module during the mission'''s spacewalks, will support future spacewalk operations and experiments plus agument the resupply system for the Station'''s Service Module.

  12. Mars Hybrid Propulsion System Trajectory Analysis. Part I; Crew Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Patrick R.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Qu, Min

    2015-01-01

    NASAs Human spaceflight Architecture team is developing a reusable hybrid transportation architecture in which both chemical and electric propulsion systems are used to send crew and cargo to Mars destinations such as Phobos, Deimos, the surface of Mars, and other orbits around Mars. By combining chemical and electrical propulsion into a single space- ship and applying each where it is more effective, the hybrid architecture enables a series of Mars trajectories that are more fuel-efficient than an all chemical architecture without significant increases in flight times. This paper provides the analysis of the interplanetary segments of the three Evolvable Mars Campaign crew missions to Mars using the hybrid transportation architecture. The trajectory analysis provides departure and arrival dates and propellant needs for the three crew missions that are used by the campaign analysis team for campaign build-up and logistics aggregation analysis. Sensitivity analyses were performed to investigate the impact of mass growth, departure window, and propulsion system performance on the hybrid transportation architecture. The results and system analysis from this paper contribute to analyses of the other human spaceflight architecture team tasks and feed into the definition of the Evolvable Mars Campaign.

  13. Autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies: emergence of neutralization-resistant escape virus and subsequent development of escape virus neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E;

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development...... of neutralizing antibodies to the primary virus isolates was detected 13-45 weeks after seroconversion. Emergence of escape virus with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by autologous sera was demonstrated. The patients subsequently developed neutralizing antibodies against the escape virus but after a delay....... Titers of neutralizing antibodies against late virus isolates were generally low compared to initial neutralizing titers against primary virus isolates. The delay in appearance of neutralizing antibodies to the dominant viral strain at any time in the patient and the emergence of neutralization resistant...

  14. In-flight dose estimates for aircraft crew and pregnant female crew members in military transport missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, J G; Mairos, J C

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft fighter pilots may experience risks other than the exposure to cosmic radiation due to the characteristics of a typical fighter flight. The combined risks for fighter pilots due to the G-forces, hypobaric hypoxia, cosmic radiation exposure, etc. have determined that pregnant female pilots should remain on ground. However, several military transport missions can be considered an ordinary civil aircraft flight and the question arises whether a pregnant female crew member could still be part of the aircraft crew. The cosmic radiation dose received was estimated for transport missions carried out on the Hercules C-130 type of aircraft by a single air squad in 1 month. The flights departed from Lisboa to areas such as: the Azores, several countries in central and southern Africa, the eastern coast of the USA and the Balkans, and an estimate of the cosmic radiation dose received on each flight was carried out. A monthly average cosmic radiation dose to the aircraft crew was determined and the dose values obtained were discussed in relation to the limits established by the European Union Council Directive 96/29/Euratom. The cosmic radiation dose estimates were performed using the EPCARD v3.2 and the CARI-6 computing codes. EPCARD v3.2 was kindly made available by GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection (Neuherberg, Germany). CARI-6 (version July 7, 2004) was downloaded from the web site of the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute, Federal Aviation Administration (USA). In this study an estimate of the cosmic radiation dose received by military aircraft crew on typical transport missions is made.

  15. Kramers escape rate in overdamped systems with the power-law distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yanjun; Du, Jiulin

    2014-01-01

    Kramers escape rate in the overdamped systems with the power-law distribution is studied. By using the mean first passage time, we derive the escape rate for the power-law distribution and obtain the Kramers' infinite barrier escape rate in this case. It is shown that the escape rate for the power-law distribution extends the Kramers' overdamped result to the relatively low barrier. Furthermore, we apply the escape rate for the power-law distribution to the unfolding of titin and show a bette...

  16. Desert Rats 2010 Operations Tests: Insights from the Geology Crew Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Hurtado, J. M., Jr.; Young, K. E.; Rice, J.; Garry, W. B.; Eppler, D.

    2011-01-01

    Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series of tests of NASA hardware and operations deployed in the high desert of Arizona. Conducted annually since 1997, these activities exercise planetary surface hardware and operations in relatively harsh conditions where long-distance, multi-day roving is achievable. Such activities not only test vehicle subsystems, they also stress communications and operations systems and enable testing of science operations approaches that advance human and robotic surface exploration capabilities. Desert RATS 2010 tested two crewed rovers designed as first-generation prototypes of small pressurized vehicles, consistent with exploration architecture designs. Each rover provided the internal volume necessary for crewmembers to live and work for periods up to 14 days, as well as allowing for extravehicular activities (EVAs) through the use of rear-mounted suit ports. The 2010 test was designed to simulate geologic science traverses over a 14-day period through a volcanic field that is analogous to volcanic terrains observed throughout the Solar System. The test was conducted between 31 August and 13 September 2010. Two crewmembers lived in and operated each rover for a week with a "shift change" on day 7, resulting in a total of eight test subjects for the two-week period. Each crew consisted of an engineer/commander and an experienced field geologist. Three of the engineer/commanders were experienced astronauts with at least one Space Shuttle flight. The field geologists were drawn from the scientific community, based on funded and published field expertise.

  17. Escaping stars from young low-N clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Weidner, Carsten; Bonnell, Ian A.; Moeckel, Nickolas

    2010-01-01

    With the use of N-body calculations the amount and properties of escaping stars from low-N (N = 100 and 1000) young embedded star clusters prior to gas expulsion are studied over the first 5 Myr of their existence. Besides the number of stars also different initial radii and binary populations are examined as well as virialised and collapsing clusters. It is found that these clusters can loose substantial amounts (up to 20%) of stars within 5 Myr with considerable velocities up to more than 1...

  18. Experimental study of subsonic microjet escaping from a rectangular nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniskin, V. M.; Maslov, A. A.; Mukhin, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    The first experiments on the subsonic laminar microjets escaping from the nozzles of rectangular shape are carried out. The nozzle size is 83.3x3823 microns. Reynolds number calculated by the nozzle height and the average flow velocity at the nozzle exit ranged from 58 to 154. The working gas was air at room temperature. The velocity decay and velocity fluctuations along the center line of the jet are determined. The fundamental difference between the laminar microjets characteristics and subsonic turbulent jets of macro size is shown. Based on measurements of velocity fluctuations it is shown the presence of laminar-turbulent transition in microjets and its location is determined.

  19. Test of time: what if little Albert had escaped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Andy P; Nightingale, Zoë C

    2009-04-01

    Watson and Rayner's (1920) ;Little Albert' experiment has become one of the most famous studies in psychology. It is a staple of many general psychology textbooks and is part of the very fabric of the discipline's folklore. Despite this fame, the study has been widely criticized in the nearly 90 years since it was published for its lack of methodological rigour. This article attempts to evaluate the contribution of the ;little Albert' study to modern clinical psychology by speculating on what theories and treatments of child anxiety would look like in a parallel universe in which the study never took place because ;little Albert' escaped from the hospital in which Watson tested him.

  20. Chases and escapes the mathematics of pursuit and evasion

    CERN Document Server

    Nahin, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    We all played tag when we were kids. What most of us don't realize is that this simple chase game is in fact an application of pursuit theory, and that the same principles of games like tag, dodgeball, and hide-and-seek are also at play in military strategy, high-seas chases by the Coast Guard, and even romantic pursuits. In Chases and Escapes, Paul Nahin gives us the first complete history of this fascinating area of mathematics, from its classical analytical beginnings to the present day. Drawing on game theory, geometry, linear algebra, target-tracking algorithms, and much

  1. NASA's Commercial Crew Program, The Next Step in U.S. Space Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Edward J.; Thomas, Rayelle E.

    2013-01-01

    The Commercial Crew Program (CCP) is leading NASA's efforts to develop the next U.S. capability for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station (ISS) by the mid-decade timeframe. The outcome of this capability is expected to stimulate and expand the U.S. space transportation industry. NASA is relying on its decades of human space flight experience to certify U.S. crewed vehicles to the ISS and is doing so in a two phase certification approach. NASA Certification will cover all aspects of a crew transportation system, including development, test, evaluation, and verification; program management and control; flight readiness certification; launch, landing, recovery, and mission operations; sustaining engineering and maintenance/upgrades. To ensure NASA crew safety, NASA Certification will validate technical and performance requirements, verify compliance with NASA requirements, validate the crew transportation system operates in appropriate environments, and quantify residual risks.

  2. Nutrititional Status Assessment of International Space Station Crew Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Zwart, S. R.; Block, G.; Rice, B. I.; Davis-Street, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Defining optimal nutrient requirements is imperative to ensure crew health on long-duration space exploration missions. To date, nutrient requirement data have been extremely limited because of small sample sizes and difficulties associated with collecting biological samples. In this study, we examined changes in body composition, bone metabolism, hematology, general blood chemistry, and blood levels of selected vitamins and minerals after long-duration (128-195 d) space flight aboard the International Space Station. Crew members consumed an average of 80% of the recommended energy intakes, and on landing day their body weight had decreased (P=0.051). After flight, hematocrit was less, and serum femtin was greater than before flight (Pacute-phase proteins, including ceruloplasmin, retinol binding protein, transthyretin, and albumin were not changed after flight suggests that the changes in iron metabolism may not be strictly due to an inflammatory response. Urinary 8- hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration was greater and superoxide dismutase was less after flight, indicating that oxidative damage had increased (P<0.05). Despite the reported use of vitamin D supplements during flight, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly decreased after flight (P<0.01). Bone resorption was increased after flight, as indicated by several urinary markers of bone resorption. Bone formation, assessed by serum concentration of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, was elevated only in crew members who landed in Russia, probably because of the longer time lapse between landing and sample collection. These data provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin D status, and oxidative damage remain critical concerns for long-duration space flight.

  3. Microbiology and Crew Medical Events on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oubre, Cherie; Charvat, Jacqueline M.; Kadwa, Biniafer; Taiym, Wafa; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane; Baalen, Mary Van

    2014-01-01

    The closed environment of the International Space Station (ISS) creates an ideal environment for microbial growth. Previous studies have identified the ubiquitous nature of microorganisms throughout the space station environment. To ensure safety of the crew, microbial monitoring of air and surface within ISS began in December 2000 and continues to be monitored on a quarterly basis. Water monitoring began in 2009 when the potable water dispenser was installed on ISS. However, it is unknown if high microbial counts are associated with inflight medical events. The microbial counts are determined for the air, surface, and water samples collected during flight operations and samples are returned to the Microbiology laboratory at the Johnson Space Center for identification. Instances of microbial counts above the established microbial limit requirements were noted and compared inflight medical events (any non-injury event such as illness, rashes, etc.) that were reported during the same calendar-quarter. Data were analyzed using repeated measures logistic regression for the forty-one US astronauts flew on ISS between 2000 and 2012. In that time frame, instances of microbial counts being above established limits were found for 10 times for air samples, 22 times for surface samples and twice for water. Seventy-eight inflight medical events were reported among the astronauts. A three times greater risk of a medical event was found when microbial samples were found to be high (OR = 3.01; p =.007). Engineering controls, crew training, and strict microbial limits have been established to mitigate the crew medical events and environmental risks. Due to the timing issues of sampling and the samples return to earth, identification of particular microorganisms causing a particular inflight medical event is difficult. Further analyses are underway.

  4. 45130-Drilling Crew First Enter into the International Drilling Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Zhixian; Drilling

    1995-01-01

    @@ 45130-Drilling Crew subordinate to the Fourth Drilling Company of Zhongyuan Petroleum Exploration Bureau, won the two bids of risk exploration drilling projects, respectively for China Ltd. Co. of New Zealand Petroleum Exploration Company worked in the Dongtinghu Basin in 1992 and Amoco Orient Oil Co.worked in the Fuyang area, Anhui Province in November of 1993.According to the two contracts that have been signed, the two drilling wells were successfully completed,all drilling parameters are in accordance with the requirements of both contracts.

  5. First direct exposure to lunar material for Crew Reception personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    The first direct exposure to lunar material for Crew Reception personnel probably happened late Friday, July 25, 1969. Terry Slezak (displaying moon dust on his left hand fingers), Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) photographic technician, was removing film magazines from the first of two containers when the incident occurred. As he removed the plastic seal from Magazine S, one of the 70mm magazines taken during Apollo 11 Extravehicular Activity (EVA), it was apparent that the exterior of the cassette displayed traces of a black powdery substance. Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong reported during the mission that he had retrieved a 70mm cassette which had dropped to the lunar surface.

  6. STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Official crew portrait

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, crewmembers, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), pose for their Official crew portrait on the flight deck of JSC's motion based (MB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). Left to right are Mission Specialist 1 (MS1) Mario Runco, Jr, Commander John H. Casper, Pilot Donald R. McMonagle, MS3 Susan J. Helms, and MS2 Gregory J. Harbaugh. MB-SMS is located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Portrait made by NASA JSC contract photographer Scott A. Wickes.

  7. STS-107 crew looks at flight equipment during CEIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, STS-107 Mission Specialist David Brown checks equipment in the payload bay of Columbia while a technician looks on. Behind Brown is Payload Commander Michael Anderson. STS-107 is a research mission, with the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), also known as SPACEHAB, as the primary payload, plus the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) that incorporates eight high priority secondary attached shuttle experiments. STS-107 is scheduled to launch July 19, 2002

  8. Eye of Hurricane Ivan Photographed by Expedition 9 Crew

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image hosts a look into the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm approached landfall on the central Gulf coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph as the downgraded category 4 storm approached the Alabama coast. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  9. Crew training and the reliability of a battalion fire support system

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Rae Yoon

    1991-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A method for incorporating crew training level into an analysis of the system reliability of a field artillery battalion fire support system is developed. The crew of an equipment can be regarded as a component acting in series with the equipment, which itself has a hardware reliability. By using a transformation of the training level, as measured by a score on a qualification test, into a crew component reliability, overall fire sup...

  10. Environmental Monitoring as Part of Life Support for the Crew Habitat for Lunar and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Darrell L.

    2010-01-01

    Like other crewed space missions, future missions to the moon and Mars will have requirements for monitoring the chemical and microbial status of the crew habitat. Monitoring the crew habitat becomes more critical in such long term missions. This paper will describe the state of technology development for environmental monitoring of lunar lander and lunar outpost missions, and the state of plans for future missions.

  11. Ultra-fast Escape of a Octopus-inspired Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The octopus, squid, and other cephalopods inflate with water and then release a jet to accelerate in the opposite direction. This escape mechanism is particularly interesting in the octopus because they become initially quite bluff, yet this does not hinder them in achieving impressive bursts of speed. We examine this somewhat paradoxical maneuver using a simple deflating spheroid model in both potential and viscous flow. We demonstrate that the dynamic reduction of the width of the body completely changes the flow and forces acting on the escaping rocket in three ways. First, a body which reduces in size can generate an added mass thrust which counteracts the added mass inertia. Second, the motion of the shrinking wall acts similar to suction on a static wall, reducing separation and drag forces in a viscous fluid, but that this effects depends on the rate of size change. Third, using a combination of these two features it is possible to initially load the fluid with kinetic energy when heavy and bluff and then recover that energy when streamlined and light, enabling ultra-fast accelerations. As a notable example, these mechanisms allow a shrinking spheroid rocket in a heavy inviscid fluid to achieve speeds greater than an identical rocket in the vacuum of space. Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute.

  12. FEM analysis of escape capsule suffered to gas explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-lu; Mei, Rui-bin; Li, Chang-sheng; Cai, Ban; Liu, Xiang-hua

    2013-05-01

    Escape capsules are new devices for underground coal mines that provide air, water, food and supplies in the event of an emergency in where miners are unable to escape. It is difficult to carry out the experiments of explosion and safety because the danger and nonrepeatability of explosion. The structure deformation and distribution of equivalent stress has been investigated under different impact pressure conditions including unimodal and bimodal loads based on the FEM and software LS-DYNA. The results show that the distribution of deformation and equivalent stress has the same trend on the same surface with the increment of explosion pressure. The deformation and stress are larger with side impact pressure compared with that of the same front impact pressure. Furthermore, the maximum equivalent stress is 246MPa and 260MPa on the front and sides of capsule with five times for national standard impact pressure 1.5MPa. Under these conditions, the deformation is less than about 9.97mm and 10.47mm, respectively. When the front impact pressure is 2.0MPa, the deformation of capsule still belongs to elasticity but the less plastic deformation occurs on the Ushape stiffening channels with the same side impact pressure. However, it is safe for capsule structure because the equivalent stress 283MPa is much less than the tensile strength. It is noted that bimodal load accelerates the capsule deformation so that it is more dangerous compared with unimodal load.

  13. Metastatic Tumor Dormancy in Cutaneous Melanoma: Does Surgery Induce Escape?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Tseng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the concept of tumor dormancy, tumor cells may exist as single cells or microscopic clusters of cells that are clinically undetectable, but remain viable and have the potential for malignant outgrowth. At metastatic sites, escape from tumor dormancy under more favorable local microenvironmental conditions or through other, yet undefined stimuli, may account for distant recurrence after supposed “cure” following surgical treatment of the primary tumor. The vast majority of evidence to date in support of the concept of tumor dormancy originates from animal studies; however, extensive epidemiologic data from breast cancer strongly suggests that this process does occur in human disease. In this review, we aim to demonstrate that metastatic tumor dormancy does exist in cutaneous melanoma based on evidence from mouse models and clinical observations of late recurrence and occult transmission by organ transplantation. Experimental data underscores the critical role of impaired angiogenesis and immune regulation as major mechanisms for maintenance of tumor dormancy. Finally, we examine evidence for the role of surgery in promoting escape from tumor dormancy at metastatic sites in cutaneous melanoma.

  14. Pair interaction of catalytically active colloids: from assembly to escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Mozaffari, Ali; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics and pair trajectory of two self-propelled colloids are reported. The autonomous motions of the colloids are due to a catalytic chemical reaction taking place asymmetrically on their surfaces that generates a concentration gradient of interactive solutes around the particles and actuate particle propulsion. We consider two spherical particles with symmetric catalytic caps extending over the local polar angles $\\theta^1_{cap}$ and $\\theta^2_{cap}$ from the centers of active sectors in an otherwise quiescent fluid. A combined analytical-numerical technique was developed to solve the coupled mass transfer equation and the hydrodynamics in the Stokes flow regime. The ensuing pair trajectory of the colloids is controlled by the reacting coverages $\\theta^j_{cap}$ and their initial relative orientation with respect to each other. Our analysis indicates two possible scenarios for pair trajectories of catalytic self-propelled particles: either the particles approach, come into contact and assemble or they interact and move away from each other (escape). For arbitrary motions of the colloids, it is found that the direction of particle rotations is the key factor in determining the escape or assembly scenario. Based on the analysis, a phase diagram is sketched for the pair trajectory of the catalytically active particles as a function of active coverages and their initial relative orientations. We believe this study has important implications in elucidation of collective behaviors of auotophoretically self-propelled colloids.

  15. Metastatic Tumor Dormancy in Cutaneous Melanoma: Does Surgery Induce Escape?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, William W. [Department of Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, Room S-321, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Fadaki, Niloofar; Leong, Stanley P., E-mail: leongsx@cpmcri.org [Department of Surgery and Center for Melanoma Research and Treatment, California Pacific Medical Center and Research Institute, 2340 Clay Street, 2nd floor, San Francisco, CA 94115 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    According to the concept of tumor dormancy, tumor cells may exist as single cells or microscopic clusters of cells that are clinically undetectable, but remain viable and have the potential for malignant outgrowth. At metastatic sites, escape from tumor dormancy under more favorable local microenvironmental conditions or through other, yet undefined stimuli, may account for distant recurrence after supposed “cure” following surgical treatment of the primary tumor. The vast majority of evidence to date in support of the concept of tumor dormancy originates from animal studies; however, extensive epidemiologic data from breast cancer strongly suggests that this process does occur in human disease. In this review, we aim to demonstrate that metastatic tumor dormancy does exist in cutaneous melanoma based on evidence from mouse models and clinical observations of late recurrence and occult transmission by organ transplantation. Experimental data underscores the critical role of impaired angiogenesis and immune regulation as major mechanisms for maintenance of tumor dormancy. Finally, we examine evidence for the role of surgery in promoting escape from tumor dormancy at metastatic sites in cutaneous melanoma.

  16. Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project. Phase 2; Human Factors and Crew Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Hurlbert, K. M.; Kirby, G.; Lewis, J. F.; ORear, P.

    1997-01-01

    Phase 2 of the Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project was conducted in June and July of 1996 at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The primary objective of Phase 2 was to demonstrate and evaluate an integrated physicochemical air revitalization and regenerative water recovery system capable of sustaining a human crew of four for 30 days inside a closed chamber. The crew (3 males and 1 female) was continuously present inside a chamber throughout the 30-day test. The objective of this paper was to describe crew interactions and human factors for the test. Crew preparations for the test included training and familiarization of chamber systems and accommodations, and medical and psychological evaluations. During the test, crew members provided metabolic loads for the life support systems, performed maintenance on chamber systems, and evaluated human factors inside the chamber. Overall, the four crew members found the chamber to be comfortable for the 30-day test. The crew performed well together and this was attributed in part to team dynamics, skill mix (one commander, two system experts, and one logistics lead), and a complementary mix of personalities. Communication with and support by family, friends, and colleagues were identified as important contributors to the high morale of the crew during the test. Lessons learned and recommendations for future testing are presented by the crew in this paper.

  17. Commercial Crew Program and the Safety Technical Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Macy

    2016-01-01

    The Commercial Crew Program (CCP) is unique to any other program office at NASA. After the agency suffered devastating budget cuts and the Shuttle Program retired, the U.S. gave up its human spaceflight capabilities. Since 2011 the U.S. has been dependent on Russia to transport American astronauts and cargo to the International Space Station (ISS) and back. NASA adapted and formed CCP, which gives private, domestic, aerospace companies unprecedented reign over America's next ride to space. The program began back in 2010 with 5 companies and is now in the final phase of certification with 2 commercial partners. The Commercial Crew Program is made up of 7 divisions, each working rigorously with the commercial providers to complete the certification phase. One of these 7 divisions is Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) which is partly comprised of the Safety Technical Review Board (STRB). The STRB is primarily concerned with mitigating improbable, but catastrophic hazards. It does this by identifying, managing, and tracking these hazards in reports. With the STRB being in SE&I, it significantly contributes to the overall certification of the partners' vehicles. After the partners receive agency certification approval, they will have the capability to provide the U.S. with a reliable, safe, and cost-effective means of human spaceflight and cargo transport to the ISS and back.

  18. STS-114: Crew Interviews 1. Andy Thomas 2. Steve Robinson

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    STS-114 Mission Specialists, Andy Thomas and Steve Robinson, are seen in this pre-flight interview. Andy Thomas begins by talking about his interest in spaceflight as a young boy growing up in Australia. He expresses that the chances of an Australian boy studying to eventually become an astronaut was very remote. His Mechanical Engineering Degree in Australia and a Doctorate enabled him to acquire unique skills to come to the United States to work for Lockheed Martin. On the topic of return to flight, he reflects on experiences that he had working with the Michael Anderson and Kalpana Chawla of the ill-fated Space Shuttle Columbia. He also talks about the safety of the Space Shuttle Discovery and repairs to its Thermal Protection system. He explains in detail the Logistics Flight (LF) 1, spacewalks, Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform (ESP)-2. Steve Robinson expresses that he had many interests as a child and becoming an astronaut was one of them. He was fascinated with things that fly and wanted to find out how they flew. He also designed hang gliders as a teenager. He expresses how his family feels about the risky business of spaceflight. He talks about how the space shuttle discovery crew will remember the Columbia crew by including seven stars on their patch so that they can bring them into orbit and then back home. Robinson also talks about his primary job, and the spacewalks that he and Soichi Noguchi will be performing.

  19. Holographic weapons sight as a crew optical alignment sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merancy, Nujoud; Dehmlow, Brian; Brazzel, Jack P.

    2011-06-01

    Crew Optical Alignment Sights (COAS) are used by spacecraft pilots to provide a visual reference to a target spacecraft for lateral relative position during rendezvous and docking operations. NASA's Orion vehicle, which is currently under development, has not included a COAS in favor of automated sensors, but the crew office has requested such a device be added for situational awareness and contingency support. The current Space Shuttle COAS was adopted from Apollo heritage, weighs several pounds, and is no longer available for procurement which would make re-use difficult. In response, a study was conducted to examine the possibility of converting a commercially available weapons sight to a COAS for the Orion spacecraft. The device used in this study was the XPS series Holographic Weapon Sight (HWS) procured from L-3 EOTech. This device was selected because the targeting reticule can subtend several degrees, and display a graphic pattern tailored to rendezvous and docking operations. Evaluations of the COAS were performed in both the Orion low-fidelity mockup and rendezvous simulations in the Reconfigurable Operational Cockpit (ROC) by crewmembers, rendezvous engineering experts, and flight controllers at Johnson Space Center. These evaluations determined that this unit's size and mounting options can support proper operation and that the reticule visual qualities are as good as or better than the current Space Shuttle COAS. The results positively indicate that the device could be used as a functional COAS and supports a low-cost technology conversion solution.

  20. Holographic Weapons Sight as Crew Optical Alignment Sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merancy, Nujoud; Dehmlow, Brian; Brazzel, Jack P.

    2011-01-01

    Crew Optical Alignment Sights (COAS) are used by spacecraft pilots to provide a visual reference to a target spacecraft for lateral relative position during rendezvous and docking operations. NASA s Orion vehicle, which is currently under development, has not included a COAS in favor of automated sensors, but the crew office has requested such a device be added for situational awareness and contingency support. The current Space Shuttle COAS was adopted from Apollo heritage, weighs several pounds, and is no longer available for procurement which would make re-use difficult. In response, a study was conducted to examine the possibility of converting a commercially available weapons sight to a COAS for the Orion spacecraft. The device used in this study was the XPS series Holographic Weapon Sight (HWS) procured from L-3 EOTech. This device was selected because the targeting reticule can subtend several degrees, and display a graphic pattern tailored to rendezvous and docking operations. Evaluations of the COAS were performed in both the Orion low-fidelity mockup and rendezvous simulations in the Reconfigurable Operational Cockpit (ROC) by crewmembers, rendezvous engineering experts, and flight controllers at Johnson Space Center. These evaluations determined that this unit s size and mounting options can support proper operation and that the reticule visual qualities are as good as or better than the current Space Shuttle COAS. The results positively indicate that the device could be used as a functional COAS and supports a low-cost technology conversion solution.

  1. The NASA Commercial Crew Program (CCP) Mission Assurance Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, NASA established the Commercial Crew Program in order to provide human access to the International Space Station and low earth orbit via the commercial (non-governmental) sector. A particular challenge to NASA has been how to determine the commercial providers transportation system complies with Programmatic safety requirements. The process used in this determination is the Safety Technical Review Board which reviews and approves provider submitted Hazard Reports. One significant product of the review is a set of hazard control verifications. In past NASA programs, 100 percent of these safety critical verifications were typically confirmed by NASA. The traditional Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) model does not support the nature of the Commercial Crew Program. To that end, NASA SMA is implementing a Risk Based Assurance (RBA) process to determine which hazard control verifications require NASA authentication. Additionally, a Shared Assurance Model is also being developed to efficiently use the available resources to execute the verifications. This paper will describe the evolution of the CCP Mission Assurance process from the beginning of the Program to its current incarnation. Topics to be covered include a short history of the CCP; the development of the Programmatic mission assurance requirements; the current safety review process; a description of the RBA process and its products and ending with a description of the Shared Assurance Model.

  2. Integrating Human Factors into Crew Exploration Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Baggerman, Susan; Campbell, paul

    2007-01-01

    With NASA's new Vision for Exploration to send humans beyond Earth orbit, it is critical to consider the human as a system that demands early and continuous user involvement, and an iterative prototype/test/redesign process. Addressing human-system interface issues early on can be very cost effective even cost reducing when performed early in the design and development cycle. To achieve this goal within Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Project Office, human engineering (HE) team is formed. Key tasks are to apply HE requirements and guidelines to hardware/software, and provide HE design, analysis and evaluation of crew interfaces. Initial activities included many practice-orientated evaluations using low-fidelity CEV mock-ups. What follows is a description of such evaluations that focused on a HE requirement regarding Net Habitable Volume (NHV). NHV is defined as the total remaining pressurized volume available to on-orbit crew after accounting for the loss of volume due to deployed hardware and structural inefficiencies which decrease functional volume. The goal of the NHV evaluations was to develop requirements providing sufficient CEV NHV for crewmembers to live and perform tasks in support of mission goals. Efforts included development of a standard NHV calculation method using computer models and physical mockups, and crew/ stakeholder evaluations. Nine stakeholders and ten crewmembers participated in the unsuited evaluations. Six crewmembers also participated in a suited evaluation. The mock-up was outfitted with volumetric representation of sub-systems such as seats, and stowage bags. Thirteen scenarios were developed to represent mission/crew tasks and considered to be primary volume drivers (e.g., suit donning) for the CEV. Unsuited evaluations included a structured walkthrough of these tasks. Suited evaluations included timed donning of the existing launch and entry suit to simulate a contingency scenario followed by doffing/ stowing of the suits. All mockup

  3. Advanced Hybrid Spacesuit Concept Featuring Integrated Open Loop and Closed Loop Ventilation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Brian A.; Fitzpatrick, Garret R.; Gohmert, Dustin M.; Ybarra, Rick M.; Dub, Mark O.

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses the design and prototype of an advanced spacesuit concept that integrates the capability to function seamlessly with multiple ventilation system approaches. Traditionally, spacesuits are designed to operate both dependently and independently of a host vehicle environment control and life support system (ECLSS). Spacesuits that operate independent of vehicle-provided ECLSS services must do so with equipment selfcontained within or on the spacesuit. Suits that are dependent on vehicle-provided consumables must remain physically connected to and integrated with the vehicle to operate properly. This innovation is the design and prototype of a hybrid spacesuit approach that configures the spacesuit to seamlessly interface and integrate with either type of vehicular systems, while still maintaining the ability to function completely independent of the vehicle. An existing Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) was utilized as the platform from which to develop the innovation. The ACES was retrofitted with selected components and one-off items to achieve the objective. The ventilation system concept was developed and prototyped/retrofitted to an existing ACES. Components were selected to provide suit connectors, hoses/umbilicals, internal breathing system ducting/ conduits, etc. The concept utilizes a lowpressure- drop, high-flow ventilation system that serves as a conduit from the vehicle supply into the suit, up through a neck seal, into the breathing helmet cavity, back down through the neck seal, out of the suit, and returned to the vehicle. The concept also utilizes a modified demand-based breathing system configured to function seamlessly with the low-pressure-drop closed-loop ventilation system.

  4. Characterization of escape times of Josephson junctions for signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addesso, Paolo; Filatrella, Giovanni; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the escape time of a Josephson junction might be used to detect the presence of a sinusoidal signal embedded in noise when use of standard signal processing tools can be prohibitive due to the extreme weakness of the source or to the huge amount of data. In this paper we show that the prescriptions for the experimental setup and some physical behaviors depend on the detection strategy. More specifically, by exploitation of the sample mean of escape times to perform detection, two resonant regions are identified. At low frequencies there is a stochastic resonance or activation phenomenon, while near the plasma frequency a geometric resonance appears. Furthermore, detection performance in the geometric resonance region is maximized at the prescribed value of the bias current. The naive sample mean detector is outperformed, in terms of error probability, by the optimal likelihood ratio test. The latter exhibits only geometric resonance, showing monotonically increasing performance as the bias current approaches the junction critical current. In this regime the escape times are vanishingly small and therefore performance is essentially limited by measurement electronics. The behavior of the likelihood ratio and sample mean detector for different values of incoming signal to noise ratio is discussed, and a relationship with the error probability is found. Detectors based on the likelihood ratio test could be employed also to estimate unknown parameters in the applied input signal. As a prototypical example we study the phase estimation problem of a sinusoidal current, which is accomplished by using the filter bank approach. Finally we show that for a physically feasible detector the performances are found to be very close to the Cramer-Rao theoretical bound. Applications might be found, for example, in some astronomical detection problems (where the all-sky gravitational and/or radio wave search for pulsars requires the analysis of nearly sinusoidal

  5. Characterization of escape times of Josephson junctions for signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addesso, Paolo; Filatrella, Giovanni; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the escape time of a Josephson junction might be used to detect the presence of a sinusoidal signal embedded in noise when use of standard signal processing tools can be prohibitive due to the extreme weakness of the source or to the huge amount of data. In this paper we show that the prescriptions for the experimental setup and some physical behaviors depend on the detection strategy. More specifically, by exploitation of the sample mean of escape times to perform detection, two resonant regions are identified. At low frequencies there is a stochastic resonance or activation phenomenon, while near the plasma frequency a geometric resonance appears. Furthermore, detection performance in the geometric resonance region is maximized at the prescribed value of the bias current. The naive sample mean detector is outperformed, in terms of error probability, by the optimal likelihood ratio test. The latter exhibits only geometric resonance, showing monotonically increasing performance as the bias current approaches the junction critical current. In this regime the escape times are vanishingly small and therefore performance is essentially limited by measurement electronics. The behavior of the likelihood ratio and sample mean detector for different values of incoming signal to noise ratio is discussed, and a relationship with the error probability is found. Detectors based on the likelihood ratio test could be employed also to estimate unknown parameters in the applied input signal. As a prototypical example we study the phase estimation problem of a sinusoidal current, which is accomplished by using the filter bank approach. Finally we show that for a physically feasible detector the performances are found to be very close to the Cramer-Rao theoretical bound. Applications might be found, for example, in some astronomical detection problems (where the all-sky gravitational and/or radio wave search for pulsars requires the analysis of nearly sinusoidal

  6. A piloted simulator investigation of stability and control, display and crew-loading requirements for helicopter instrument approach. Part 1: Technical discussion and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebacqz, J. V.; Forrest, R. D.; Gerdes, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    A ground-simulation experiment was conducted to investigate the influence and interaction of flight-control system, fight-director display, and crew-loading situation on helicopter flying qualities during terminal area operations in instrument conditions. The experiment was conducted on the Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft at Ames Research Center. Six levels of control complexity, ranging from angular rate damping to velocity augmented longitudinal and vertical axes, were implemented on a representative helicopter model. The six levels of augmentation were examined with display variations consisting of raw elevation and azimuth data only, and of raw data plus one-, two-, and three-cue flight directors. Crew-loading situations simulated for the control-display combinations were dual-pilot operation (representative auxiliary tasks of navigation, communications, and decision-making). Four pilots performed a total of 150 evaluations of combinations of these parameters for a representative microwave landing system (MLS) approach task.

  7. Developing a Crew Time Model for Human Exploration Missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battfeld, Bryan; Stromgren, Chel; Shyface, Hilary; Cirillo, William; Goodliff, Kandyce

    2015-01-01

    Candidate human missions to Mars require mission lengths that could extend beyond those that have previously been demonstrated during crewed Lunar (Apollo) and International Space Station (ISS) missions. The nature of the architectures required for deep space human exploration will likely necessitate major changes in how crews operate and maintain the spacecraft. The uncertainties associated with these shifts in mission constructs - including changes to habitation systems, transit durations, and system operations - raise concerns as to the ability of the crew to complete required overhead activities while still having time to conduct a set of robust exploration activities. This paper will present an initial assessment of crew operational requirements for human missions to the Mars surface. The presented results integrate assessments of crew habitation, system maintenance, and utilization to present a comprehensive analysis of potential crew time usage. Destination operations were assessed for a short (approx. 50 day) and long duration (approx. 500 day) surface habitation case. Crew time allocations are broken out by mission segment, and the availability of utilization opportunities was evaluated throughout the entire mission progression. To support this assessment, the integrated crew operations model (ICOM) was developed. ICOM was used to parse overhead, maintenance and system repair, and destination operations requirements within each mission segment - outbound transit, Mars surface duration, and return transit - to develop a comprehensive estimation of exploration crew time allocations. Overhead operational requirements included daily crew operations, health maintenance activities, and down time. Maintenance and repair operational allocations are derived using the Exploration Maintainability and Analysis Tool (EMAT) to develop a probabilistic estimation of crew repair time necessary to maintain systems functionality throughout the mission.

  8. Vaccination and timing influence SIV immune escape viral dynamics in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyen Loh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL can be effective at controlling HIV-1 in humans and SIV in macaques, but their utility is partly offset by mutational escape. The kinetics of CTL escape and reversion of escape mutant viruses upon transmission to MHC-mismatched hosts can help us understand CTL-mediated viral control and the fitness cost extracted by immune escape mutation. Traditional methods for following CTL escape and reversion are, however, insensitive to minor viral quasispecies. We developed sensitive quantitative real-time PCR assays to track the viral load of SIV Gag164-172 KP9 wild-type (WT and escape mutant (EM variants in pigtail macaques. Rapid outgrowth of EM virus occurs during the first few weeks of infection. However, the rate of escape plateaued soon after, revealing a prolonged persistence of WT viremia not detectable by standard cloning and sequencing methods. The rate of escape of KP9 correlated with levels of vaccine-primed KP9-specific CD8+ T cells present at that time. Similarly, when non-KP9 responder (lacking the restricting Mane-A*10 allele macaques were infected with SHIVmn229 stock containing a mixture of EM and WT virus, rapid reversion to WT was observed over the first 2 weeks following infection. However, the rate of reversion to WT slowed dramatically over the first month of infection. The serial quantitation of escape mutant viruses evolving during SIV infection shows that rapid dynamics of immune escape and reversion can be observed in early infection, particularly when CD8 T cells are primed by vaccination. However, these early rapid rates of escape and reversion are transient and followed by a significant slowing in these rates later during infection, highlighting that the rate of escape is significantly influenced by the timing of its occurrence.

  9. On the relative contributions of positive reinforcement and escape extinction in the treatment of food refusal.

    OpenAIRE

    Piazza, Cathleen C; Patel, Meeta R; Gulotta, Charles S; Sevin, Bari M; Layer, Stacy A

    2003-01-01

    We compared the effects of positive reinforcement alone, escape extinction alone, and positive reinforcement with escape extinction in the treatment of the food and fluid refusal of 4 children who had been diagnosed with a pediatric feeding disorder. Consumption did not increase when positive reinforcement was implemented alone. By contrast, consumption increased for all participants when escape extinction was implemented, independent of the presence or absence of positive reinforcement. Howe...

  10. When a Fish is a Fish: The Economic Impacts of Escaped Farmed Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Yajie Liu; Jon Olaf Olaussen; Anders Skonhoft

    2011-01-01

    The escape of cultured fish from a marine aquaculture facility is a type of biological invasion that may lead to a variety of potential ecological and economic effects on native fish. This paper develops a general invasive species impact model to capture explicitly both the ecological and economic effects of invasive species, especially escaped farmed fish, on native stocks and harvests. First, the possible effects of escaped farmed fish on the growth and stock size of a native fish are exami...

  11. Sharks modulate their escape behavior in response to predator size, speed and approach orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamone, Scott; Blaine, Tristan; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Escape responses are often critical for surviving predator-prey interactions. Nevertheless, little is known about how predator size, speed and approach orientation impact escape performance, especially in larger prey that are primarily viewed as predators. We used realistic shark models to examine how altering predatory behavior and morphology (size, speed and approach orientation) influences escape behavior and performance in Squalus acanthias, a shark that is preyed upon by apex marine predators. Predator models induced C-start escape responses, and increasing the size and speed of the models triggered a more intense response (increased escape turning rate and acceleration). In addition, increased predator size resulted in greater responsiveness from the sharks. Among the responses, predator approach orientation had the most significant impact on escapes, such that the head-on approach, as compared to the tail-on approach, induced greater reaction distances and increased escape turning rate, speed and acceleration. Thus, the anterior binocular vision in sharks renders them less effective at detecting predators approaching from behind. However, it appears that sharks compensate by performing high-intensity escapes, likely induced by the lateral line system, or by a sudden visual flash of the predator entering their field of view. Our study reveals key aspects of escape behavior in sharks, highlighting the modulation of performance in response to predator approach. PMID:25041843

  12. On the relative contributions of positive reinforcement and escape extinction in the treatment of food refusal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Cathleen C; Patel, Meeta R; Gulotta, Charles S; Sevin, Bari M; Layer, Stacy A

    2003-01-01

    We compared the effects of positive reinforcement alone, escape extinction alone, and positive reinforcement with escape extinction in the treatment of the food and fluid refusal of 4 children who had been diagnosed with a pediatric feeding disorder. Consumption did not increase when positive reinforcement was implemented alone. By contrast, consumption increased for all participants when escape extinction was implemented, independent of the presence or absence of positive reinforcement. However, the addition of positive reinforcement to escape extinction was associated with beneficial effects (e.g., greater decreases in negative vocalizations and inappropriate behavior) for some participants.

  13. On the hydrodynamic model of thermal escape from planetary atmospheres and its comparison with kinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Parkers' model of thermal escape implies the search of solutions of one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations for an inviscid but thermally conducting gas with a critical point and vanishing temperature far from the source. The properties of solutions of this model are studied for neutral mon- and diatomic gases with the viscosity index varying from 1/2 to 1. The domains of existence and uniqueness of solutions in terms of the source Jeans escape parameter and Knudsen number are established. The solutions are found to exist only in a narrow range of the critical point Jeans parameter. The lower and upper limits of this range correspond to solutions that are dominated by either heat conduction or adiabatic expansion. Thermal escape described by Parker's model occurs in two asymptotic regimes: the low-density (LD) regime, when escape is dominated by heat conduction, and the high-density (HD) regime, when escape is dominated by adiabatic expansion. Expressions for the mass and energy escape rates in these regimes are found theoretically. The comparison of results of hydrodynamic and kinetic simulations performed in identical conditions shows that Parker's model is capable of describing thermal escape only in the HD regime, providing decent agreement with the kinetic model in terms of the atmospheric structure below the exobase and the mass and energy escape rates. In the LD regime, Parker's model predicts a much faster drop in atmospheric temperature and less extended atmospheres, and can both over- and underestimate the escape rates in orders of magnitude.

  14. Test of time: what if little Albert had escaped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Andy P; Nightingale, Zoë C

    2009-04-01

    Watson and Rayner's (1920) ;Little Albert' experiment has become one of the most famous studies in psychology. It is a staple of many general psychology textbooks and is part of the very fabric of the discipline's folklore. Despite this fame, the study has been widely criticized in the nearly 90 years since it was published for its lack of methodological rigour. This article attempts to evaluate the contribution of the ;little Albert' study to modern clinical psychology by speculating on what theories and treatments of child anxiety would look like in a parallel universe in which the study never took place because ;little Albert' escaped from the hospital in which Watson tested him. PMID:19293325

  15. Energetic particle recurrence and escape during solar cycle 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Roelof, E. C.

    1980-10-01

    Low-energy solar particle data have been combined from a multi-spacecraft near-earth data set covering most of solar cycle 20 (1966-1976). Particle intensity profiles have been ordered in the natural heliographic coordinate system of the estimated high coronal connection longitude of the foot point of the interplanetary field line. The recurrence trends of approximately 1-MeV solar particles become more apparent in this coordinate system than when plotted versus time, and thereby extend the evidence for regions of continual injection and escape from the corona. Intercomparison of solar particles and solar wind streams in heliographic longitude suggests that the origin of stream-associated spatial particle events seen at 1 AU is solar rather than interplanetary.

  16. Escape and avoidance learning in the earthworm Eisenia hortensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jeffrey Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in instrumental learning in earthworms dates back to 1912 when Yerkes concluded that they can learn a spatial discrimination in a T-maze. Rosenkoetter and Boice determined in the 1970s that the “learning” that Yerkes observed was probably chemotaxis and not learning at all. We examined a different form of instrumental learning: the ability to learn both to escape and to avoid an aversive stimulus. Freely moving “master” worms could turn off an aversive white light by increasing their movement; the behavior of yoked controls had no effect on the light. We demonstrate that in as few as 12 trials the behavior of the master worms comes under the control of this contingency.

  17. The resonance escape probability during the neutron slowing down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different methods were used to calculate the neutron resonance escape probability during neutron slowing down in homogeneous media : two Monte Carlo simulations and a determinist method. The first simulation is based on a natural process intervening in neutron transport, the second is a nonanalog simulation while the determinist method is based on an iterative solution of the neutron slowing down equation. The results are in a good agreement for the three methods . The second simulation was found to be more efficient than the first one for high dilutions . In fact we have attained a better figure of merite ( FOM = 1/ (sigma sup 2 ) T) by the second simulation than by the first one . 2 figs. ; 2 refs ( author )

  18. Nosema Tolerant Honeybees (Apis mellifera) Escape Parasitic Manipulation of Apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurze, Christoph; Le Conte, Yves; Dussaubat, Claudia;

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is not only pivotal for development, but also for pathogen defence in multicellular organisms. Although numerous intracellular pathogens are known to interfere with the host’s apoptotic machinery to overcome this defence, its importance for host-parasite coevolution has been neglected. We...... apoptotic processes in the gut epithelium, we visualised apoptotic cells using TUNEL assays and measured the relative expression levels of subset of candidate genes involved in the apoptotic machinery using qPCR. Our results suggest that N. ceranae reduces apoptosis in sensitive honeybees by enhancing...... inhibitor of apoptosis protein-(iap)-2 gene transcription. Interestingly, this seems not be the case in Nosema tolerant honeybees. We propose that these tolerant honeybees are able to escape the manipulation of apoptosis by N. ceranae, which may have evolved a mechanism to regulate an anti-apoptotic gene...

  19. Will 3552 Don Quixote escape from the Solar System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryadi Siregar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Asteroid 1983 SA, well known as 3552 Don Quixote, is one of Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs which is the most probable candidate for the cometary origin, or otherwise as Jupiter-Family-Comets (JFCs. The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of 3552 Don Quixote to be ejected from the Solar System. This paper presents an orbital evolution of 100 hypothetical asteroids generated by cloning 3552 Don Quixote. Investigation of its orbital evolution is conducted by using the SWIFT subroutine package, where the gravitational perturbations of eight major planets in the Solar System are considered. Over very short time scales (220 kyr relative to the Solar System life time (10 Gyr, the asteroid 3552 Don Quixote gave an example of chaotic motion that can cause asteroid to move outward and may be followed by escaping from the Solar System. Probability of ejection within the 220 kyr time scale is 50%.

  20. Escaping Antiangiogenic Therapy: Strategies Employed by Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio P. Pinto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor angiogenesis is widely recognized as one of the “hallmarks of cancer”. Consequently, during the last decades the development and testing of commercial angiogenic inhibitors has been a central focus for both basic and clinical cancer research. While antiangiogenic drugs are now incorporated into standard clinical practice, as with all cancer therapies, tumors can eventually become resistant by employing a variety of strategies to receive nutrients and oxygen in the event of therapeutic assault. Herein, we concentrate and review in detail three of the principal mechanisms of antiangiogenic therapy escape: (1 upregulation of compensatory/alternative pathways for angiogenesis; (2 vasculogenic mimicry; and (3 vessel co-option. We suggest that an understanding of how a cancer cell adapts to antiangiogenic therapy may also parallel the mechanisms employed in the bourgeoning tumor and isolated metastatic cells delivering responsible for residual disease. Finally, we speculate on strategies to adapt antiangiogenic therapy for future clinical uses.

  1. Phenotypic mismatches reveal escape from arms-race coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T Hanifin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were "ahead" of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race.

  2. Initiating a watch list for Ebola virus antibody escape mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erin L.; Burke, Aran Z.; Martin, Kyle P.; Miura, Tanya A.; Wichman, Holly A.; Brown, Celeste J.

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa is the largest in recorded history and resulted in over 11,000 deaths. It is essential that strategies for treatment and containment be developed to avoid future epidemics of this magnitude. With the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapies using the envelope glycoprotein (GP) of the 1976 Mayinga strain, one important strategy is to anticipate how the evolution of EBOV might compromise these efforts. In this study we have initiated a watch list of potential antibody escape mutations of EBOV by modeling interactions between GP and the antibody KZ52. The watch list was generated using molecular modeling to estimate stability changes due to mutation. Every possible mutation of GP was considered and the list was generated from those that are predicted to disrupt GP-KZ52 binding but not to disrupt the ability of GP to fold and to form trimers. The resulting watch list contains 34 mutations (one of which has already been seen in humans) at six sites in the GP2 subunit. Should mutations from the watch list appear and spread during an epidemic, it warrants attention as these mutations may reflect an evolutionary response from the virus that could reduce the effectiveness of interventions such as vaccination. However, this watch list is incomplete and emphasizes the need for more experimental structures of EBOV interacting with antibodies in order to expand the watch list to other epitopes. We hope that this work provokes experimental research on evolutionary escape in both Ebola and other viral pathogens. PMID:26925318

  3. Initiating a watch list for Ebola virus antibody escape mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig R; Johnson, Erin L; Burke, Aran Z; Martin, Kyle P; Miura, Tanya A; Wichman, Holly A; Brown, Celeste J; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa is the largest in recorded history and resulted in over 11,000 deaths. It is essential that strategies for treatment and containment be developed to avoid future epidemics of this magnitude. With the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapies using the envelope glycoprotein (GP) of the 1976 Mayinga strain, one important strategy is to anticipate how the evolution of EBOV might compromise these efforts. In this study we have initiated a watch list of potential antibody escape mutations of EBOV by modeling interactions between GP and the antibody KZ52. The watch list was generated using molecular modeling to estimate stability changes due to mutation. Every possible mutation of GP was considered and the list was generated from those that are predicted to disrupt GP-KZ52 binding but not to disrupt the ability of GP to fold and to form trimers. The resulting watch list contains 34 mutations (one of which has already been seen in humans) at six sites in the GP2 subunit. Should mutations from the watch list appear and spread during an epidemic, it warrants attention as these mutations may reflect an evolutionary response from the virus that could reduce the effectiveness of interventions such as vaccination. However, this watch list is incomplete and emphasizes the need for more experimental structures of EBOV interacting with antibodies in order to expand the watch list to other epitopes. We hope that this work provokes experimental research on evolutionary escape in both Ebola and other viral pathogens. PMID:26925318

  4. ESCAP holds expert group meeting on population issues facing adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes the activities at the ESCAP Population Division Expert Group Meeting on Adolescents that was held during September-October 1997 in Bangkok, Thailand. The meeting was a follow-up to the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). The meeting considered 1) the ICPD recommendations; 2) the recommendations contained in the Jakarta Plan of Action on Human Resource Development; and 3) the Proposals for Action on Human Resources Development for Youth in Asia and the Pacific. Participants included about 25 people from Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The conference relied on 8 invited experts, two resource persons, advisors from the UNFPA Country Support Team for East and Southeast Asia, and representatives of UNFPA, the Population Council, and the East-West Center. A concern was the declining age of menarche of girls in the ESCAP region and the increasing age of marriage. During the time of menarche and marriage, girls are migrating and moving away from their family and community in rural areas. Family structure and relationships are changing. Increases are observed in adolescent premarital sexual activity, the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, teenage pregnancy, and abortion. The mass media and information technologies have both a positive and a negative influence on adolescents. Parent-child communication exchanges and teacher-student exchanges are "less than ideal." Old traditions and practices change slower than people change. Boys and girls are affected differently by the sociocultural and economic environment. The societal norms set expectations for behavior that may conflict with individual beliefs and practices. Changes brought by globalization and rapid economic growth provide greater opportunity for young girls and women to obtain employment and autonomy.

  5. RpoS controls the Vibrio cholerae mucosal escape response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Toftgaard Nielsen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae causes a severe diarrhoeal disease by secreting a toxin during colonization of the epithelium in the small intestine. Whereas the initial steps of the infectious process have been intensively studied, the last phases have received little attention. Confocal microscopy of V. cholerae O1-infected rabbit ileal loops captured a distinctive stage in the infectious process: 12 h post-inoculation, bacteria detach from the epithelial surface and move into the fluid-filled lumen. Designated the "mucosal escape response," this phenomenon requires RpoS, the stationary phase alternative sigma factor. Quantitative in vivo localization assays corroborated the rpoS phenotype and showed that it also requires HapR. Expression profiling of bacteria isolated from ileal loop fluid and mucus demonstrated a significant RpoS-dependent upregulation of many chemotaxis and motility genes coincident with the emigration of bacteria from the epithelial surface. In stationary phase cultures, RpoS was also required for upregulation of chemotaxis and motility genes, for production of flagella, and for movement of bacteria across low nutrient swarm plates. The hapR mutant produced near-normal numbers of flagellated cells, but was significantly less motile than the wild-type parent. During in vitro growth under virulence-inducing conditions, the rpoS mutant produced 10- to 100-fold more cholera toxin than the wild-type parent. Although the rpoS mutant caused only a small over-expression of the genes encoding cholera toxin in the ileal loop, it resulted in a 30% increase in fluid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Together, these results show that the mucosal escape response is orchestrated by an RpoS-dependent genetic program that activates chemotaxis and motility functions. This may furthermore coincide with reduced virulence gene expression, thus preparing the organism for the next stage in its life cycle.

  6. Views of the STS 41-D mission crew training on the SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Views of the STS 41-D mission crew training on the Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). Views include crew commander Henry Hartsfield, Jr., and mission specialist Richard Mullane discussing proposed training. Mission specialist Judith Resnik is in the background (35806); Resnik about to climb up stairs from middeck to flight deck (35807).

  7. 46 CFR 72.15-20 - Ventilation for crew quarters and passenger spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the tropics shall, in general, be fitted with a mechanical ventilation system. ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for crew quarters and passenger spaces. 72... VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-20 Ventilation for crew quarters and...

  8. More explicit communication after classroom-based crew resource management training: results of a pragmatic trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Twisk, J.W.R.; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives: Aviation-based crew resource management trainings to optimize non-technical skills among professionals are often suggested for health care as a way to increase patient safety. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of a 2-day classroom-based crew resource management (CRM)

  9. Don't Rock the Boat : How Antiphase Crew Coordination Affects Rowing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Brouwer, Anouk J.; de Poel, Harjo J.; Hofmijster, Mathijs J.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that crew rowing requires perfect synchronization between the movements of the rowers. However, a long-standing and somewhat counterintuitive idea is that out-of-phase crew rowing might have benefits over in-phase (i.e., synchronous) rowing. In synchronous rowing, 5 to 6% of

  10. 75 FR 18825 - Advantage Electronic Product Development Incorporated/Utility Crew Safety LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Advantage Electronic Product Development Incorporated/Utility Crew Safety LLC AGENCY: Department of Energy... intent to grant to: Advantage Electronic Product Development Incorporated/Utility Crew Safety LLC, of... whether the interests of the Federal Government or the United States industry in foreign commerce will...

  11. 49 CFR 230.65 - Steam blocking view of engine crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.65 Steam blocking view of engine crew. The steam locomotive owner and/or... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam blocking view of engine crew. 230.65...

  12. Comparing Communication Contents with the Associated Crew Performance in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the case of human operators working in a large process control system, the consequence of inappropriate communications would be significant because they have to carry out many kinds of crucial activities based on communications. This means that one of the practical methods would be the investigation of communication contents, through which we are able to identify useful insights pertaining to the prevention of inappropriate communications. For this reason, communications of main control room (MCR) operating crews are analyzed to characterize communication contents. After that, communication contents and the associated crew performance data are compared. As a result, it seems that the performance of operating crews is proportional to the amount of 3-way communications. However, it is also revealed that a theoretical framework that is able to characterize the communication of MCR operating crews is needed because it is insufficient to retrieve insightful information from simple comparisons based on the empirical observation of crew communications

  13. Psychosocial issues affecting crews during long-duration international space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanas, N.

    1998-01-01

    Psychosocial issues can negatively impact on crew performance and morale during long-duration international space missions. Major psychosocial factors that have been described in anecdotal reports from space and in studies from analog situations on Earth include: 1) crew heterogeneity due to gender differences, cultural issues, and work experiences and motivations; 2) language and dialect variations; and 3) task versus supportive leadership roles. All of these factors can lead to negative sequelae, such as intra-crew tension and cohesion disruptions. Specific sequelae that can result from single factors include subgrouping and scapegoating due to crew heterogeneity; miscommunication due to major or subtle language differences; and role confusion, competition, and status leveling due to inappropriate leadership role definition. It is time to conduct research exploring the impact of these psychosocial factors and their sequelae on space crews during actual long-duration international space missions.

  14. STS-112 crew arrives at KSC's SLF for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-112 Mission Specialist Fyodor Yurchikhin, who is with the Russian Space Agency, shows his happiness at returning to KSC to prepare for launch. He will be making his first Shuttle flight. STS-112, aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis, is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks. Launch is scheduled for Oct. 2 betw een 2 and 6 p.m.

  15. Cross-cultural attitudes of flight crew regarding CRM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Ashleigh

    1993-01-01

    This study asks if the Cockpit Management Attitude Questionnaire (CMAQ) can detect differences across countries, and/or across occupations. And if so, can those differences be interpreted? Research has shown that the CMAQ is sensitive to attitude differences between and within organizations, thereby demonstrating its effectiveness with American populations. But the CMAQ was originally designed by American researchers and psychometrically refined for American pilots. The items in the questionnaire, though general in nature, still reflect the ubiquitous Western bias, because the items were written by researchers from and for the one culture. Recognizing this constraint, this study is nonetheless interested in attitudes toward crew behavior, and how those attitudes may vary across country and occupation.

  16. STS-95 crew members participate in a SPACEHAB familiarization exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Inside the SPACEHAB training module, STS-95 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski, M.D., helps with connections on the mesh cap worn by Payload Specialist John Glenn, who is a senator from Ohio. Glenn is also wearing the Respiratory Inductance Plethysmograph (RIP) suit he will wear on the mission to monitor respiration. The cap and suit are part of the equipment that will be used to seek to improve the quality of sleep for future astronauts. The STS-95 crew are participating in SPACEHAB familiarization at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility, Cape Canaveral. The mission, scheduled to launch Oct. 29, includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  17. Orion Crew Injury Prediction: Landing Conditions and Vehicle Interface Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelson, Kerry; Gernhardt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This presentation reviews the work being done to research the possibility of injuries from landing the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle in either water or land contingencies This was done using the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) finite element model. The purpose of the simulations was to compare variations of a Vehicle Interface Element (VIE) and to evaluate the potential for injury. The presentation is accompanied by several animations from the model runs, showing the projected motion, with and without the various suggested types of VIEs. There are charts showing the injury metrics with the various types of VIEs. The ultimate use of this analysis was to assist in a selection of possible VIE designs

  18. Real-Time Simulation of Ship Impact for Crew Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2003-01-01

    Real-time simulation of marine accidents and representation in a realistic, virtual environment may be an efficient way to train emergency procedures for ship?s crews and thus improve safety at sea. However, although various fast, simplified methods have been presented over the past decades......, the real-time simulation of ship grounding and collision events poses a number of challenges. This paper presents a set of theoretical models and methods by which it is relatively easy to implement collision and grounding modeling capabilities in existing, real-time marine simulators. Most notably......, the paper co.... methods for fast prediction of collision and grounding motion and a method that transforms any motion into a set of forces. The latter method allows that the grounding and collision impact modules interact with the simulation software only through specification of external forces...

  19. Flight Crew Responses to the Interval Management Alternative Clearances (IMAC) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Wilson, Sara R.; Swieringa, Kurt A.; Roper, Roy D.

    2016-01-01

    Interval Management Alternative Clearances (IMAC) was a human-in-the-loop simulation experiment conducted to explore the efficacy and acceptability of three IM operations: CAPTURE, CROSS, and MAINTAIN. Two weeks of data collection were conducted, with each week using twelve subject pilots and four subject controllers flying ten high-density arrival scenarios into the Denver International Airport. Overall, both the IM operations and procedures were rated very favorably by the flight crew in terms of acceptability, workload, and pilot head down time. However, several critical issues were identified requiring resolution prior to real-world implementation, including the high frequency of IM speed commands, IM speed commands requiring changes to aircraft configuration, and ambiguous IM cockpit displays that did not trigger the intended pilot reaction. The results from this experiment will be used to prepare for a flight test in 2017, and to support the development of an advanced IM concept of operations by the FAA (Federal Aviation Agency) and aviation industry.

  20. Requirements for Designing Life Support System Architectures for Crewed Exploration Missions Beyond Low-Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David; Perry,Jay; Sargusingh, Miriam; Toomarian, Nikzad

    2016-01-01

    NASA's technology development roadmaps provide guidance to focus technological development on areas that enable crewed exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Specifically, the technology area roadmap on human health, life support and habitation systems describes the need for life support system (LSS) technologies that can improve reliability and in-situ maintainability within a minimally-sized package while enabling a high degree of mission autonomy. To address the needs outlined by the guiding technology area roadmap, NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program has commissioned the Life Support Systems (LSS) Project to lead technology development in the areas of water recovery and management, atmosphere revitalization, and environmental monitoring. A notional exploration LSS architecture derived from the International Space has been developed and serves as the developmental basis for these efforts. Functional requirements and key performance parameters that guide the exploration LSS technology development efforts are presented and discussed. Areas where LSS flight operations aboard the ISS afford lessons learned that are relevant to exploration missions are highlighted.

  1. Treatment of Escape-Maintained Behavior with Positive Reinforcement: The Role of Reinforcement Contingency and Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingvarsson, Einar T.; Hanley, Gregory P.; Welter, Katherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional analyses suggested that the disruptive behavior of three preschool children was maintained by escape from demands. While keeping the escape contingency intact, we conducted (a) a density analysis in which the children earned preferred items for task completion according to two schedules that varied in reinforcement density, and (b) a…

  2. Anticipating and blocking HIV-1 escape by second generation antiviral shRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout Ben

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is an evolutionary conserved gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific breakdown of target mRNAs. RNAi can be used to inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting the viral RNA genome. However, the error-prone replication machinery of HIV-1 can generate RNAi-resistant variants with specific mutations in the target sequence. For durable inhibition of HIV-1 replication the emergence of such escape viruses must be controlled. Here we present a strategy that anticipates HIV-1 escape by designing 2nd generation short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs that form a complete match with the viral escape sequences. Results To block the two favorite viral escape routes observed when the HIV-1 integrase gene sequence is targeted, the original shRNA inhibitor was combined with two 2nd generation shRNAs in a single lentiviral expression vector. We demonstrate in long-term viral challenge experiments that the two dominant viral escape routes were effectively blocked. Eventually, virus breakthrough did however occur, but HIV-1 evolution was skewed and forced to use new escape routes. Conclusion These results demonstrate the power of the 2nd generation RNAi concept. Popular viral escape routes are blocked by the 2nd generation RNAi strategy. As a consequence viral evolution was skewed leading to new escape routes. These results are of importance for a deeper understanding of HIV-1 evolution under RNAi pressure.

  3. Computer Self-Efficacy, Competitive Anxiety and Flow State: Escaping from Firing Online Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Pei-Yu, Chiu; Shih, Hsiao-Feng; Lin, Pei-Shin; Hong, Jon-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Flow state in game playing affected by computer self-efficacy and game competitive anxiety was studied. In order to examine the effect of those constructs with high competition, this study select "Escaping from firing online game" which require college students to escape from fire and rescue people and eliminate the fire damage along the way of…

  4. Competing Contingencies for Escape Behavior: Effects of Negative Reinforcement Magnitude and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has shown that problem behavior maintained by social-negative reinforcement can be treated without escape extinction by enhancing the quality of positive reinforcement for an appropriate alternative response such as compliance. By contrast, negative reinforcement (escape) for compliance generally has been ineffective in the…

  5. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 223 - Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening 13 Figure 13 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND.... 223, Fig. 13 Figure 13 to Part 223—Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening EC01JY91.060...

  6. 77 FR 28601 - Announcement of an Opportunity for Manufacturers and Designers of Closed Circuit Escape...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ...://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-08/pdf/2012-4691.pdf ), Approval Tests and Standards for Closed-Circuit Escape Respirators (CCERs) on March 8th 2012. This final rule revised and updated the requirements... Manufacturers and Designers of Closed Circuit Escape Respirators To Participate in Performance Testing Within...

  7. The use of an escape contingency and a token economy to increase food acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, SungWoo; Boscoe, James H; Byrne, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    Escape (termination of a meal) and token-based differential reinforcement of alternative behavior were used as reinforcement to increase acceptance of food. Using a changing criterion design, the number of bites accepted and consumed was gradually increased to 15 bites per meal. These data suggest that, in some cases, escape may be a potent reinforcer for food acceptance. PMID:14596575

  8. The use of an escape contingency and a token economy to increase food acceptance.

    OpenAIRE

    Kahng, SungWoo; Boscoe, James H; Byrne, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    Escape (termination of a meal) and token-based differential reinforcement of alternative behavior were used as reinforcement to increase acceptance of food. Using a changing criterion design, the number of bites accepted and consumed was gradually increased to 15 bites per meal. These data suggest that, in some cases, escape may be a potent reinforcer for food acceptance.

  9. Crew Factors in Flight Operations XII: A Survey of Sleep Quantity and Quality in On-Board Crew Rest Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Co, Elizabeth L.; Miller, Donna L.; Dinges, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Many aircraft operated on long-haul commercial airline flights are equipped with on-board crew rest facilities, or bunks, to allow crewmembers to rest during the flight. The primary objectives of this study were to gather data on how the bunks were used, the quantity and quality of sleep obtained by flight crewmembers in the facilities, and the factors that affected their sleep. A retrospective survey comprising 54 questions of varied format addressed demographics, home sleep habits, and bunk sleep habits. Crewmembers from three airlines with long-haul fleets carrying augmented crews consisting of B747-100/200, B747-400, and MD-11 aircraft equipped with bunks returned a total of 1404 completed surveys (a 37% response rate). Crewmembers from the three carriers were comparable demographically, although one carrier had older, more experienced flight crewmembers. Each group, on average, rated themselves as "good" or "very good" sleepers at home, and all groups obtained about the same average amount of sleep each night. Most were able to sleep in the bunks, and about two thirds indicated that these rest opportunities benefited their subsequent flight deck alertness and performance. Comfort, environment, and physiology (e.g., being ready for sleep) were identified as factors that most promoted sleep. Factors cited as interfering with sleep included random noise, thoughts, heat, and the need to use the bathroom. These factors, in turn, suggest potential improvements to bunk facilities and their use. Ratings of the three aircraft types suggested differences among facilities. Bunks in the MD-11 were rated significantly better than either of the B747 types, and the B747-400 bunks received better ratings than did the older, B747-100/200 facilities.

  10. Task engagement and escape maintained challenging behavior: differential effects of general and explicit cues when implementing a signaled delay in the delivery of reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Joe; Johnson, LeAnne; Monn, Emily; Harris, Michael

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of explicit and general delay cues when implementing a tolerance for a delay in the delivery of a reinforcement procedure to increase task engagement and decrease escape maintained challenging behavior. Two preschool children with autism participated in an alternating treatments design with changing criterions for task engagement. For both children, descriptive and experimental analyses verified that the challenging behavior functioned to escape instructional task demands. Subsequently, two types of tasks were identified for each participant with assignment to either the explicit or general cue procedures. Both participants demonstrated increased task engagement with concurrent decreases in challenging behavior with both types of delay cues, though rate of successful work unit completion advanced more quickly with explicit delay cues.

  11. A decision support system for crew planning in passenger transportation using a flexible branch-and-price algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Freling (Richard); R.M. Lentink (Ramon); A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThis paper discusses a decision support system for airline and railway crew planning. The system is a state-of-the-art branch-and-price solver that is used for crew scheduling and crew rostering. We briefly discuss the mathematical background of the solver, of which most part is covered

  12. 8 CFR 231.2 - Electronic manifest and I-94 requirement for passengers and crew onboard departing vessels and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... section 231 of the Act are set forth in 19 CFR 4.64 (passengers and crew members onboard vessels) and in 19 CFR 122.75a (passengers onboard aircraft) and 122.75b (crew members onboard aircraft). (b... for passengers and crew onboard departing vessels and aircraft. 231.2 Section 231.2 Aliens...

  13. 8 CFR 231.1 - Electronic manifest and I-94 requirement for passengers and crew onboard arriving vessels and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... section 231 of the Act are set forth in 19 CFR 4.7b (passengers and crew members onboard vessels) and in 19 CFR 122.49a (passengers onboard aircraft) and 122.49b (crew members onboard aircraft). (b... for passengers and crew onboard arriving vessels and aircraft. 231.1 Section 231.1 Aliens...

  14. 46 CFR 2.01-50 - Persons other than crew on towing, oyster, or fishing steam vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Persons other than crew on towing, oyster, or fishing... than crew on towing, oyster, or fishing steam vessels. (a) A steam vessel engaged in towing, oyster dredging and planting, and fishing may be permitted to carry persons in addition to its crew. (b)...

  15. Plasma clouds and snowplows: Bulk plasma escape from Mars observed by MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Harada, Y.; Hara, T.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present initial Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) observations and preliminary interpretation of bulk plasma loss from Mars. MAVEN particle and field measurements show that planetary heavy ions derived from the Martian atmosphere can escape in the form of discrete coherent structures or "clouds." The ions in these clouds are unmagnetized or weakly magnetized, have velocities well above the escape speed, and lie directly downstream from magnetic field amplifications, suggesting a "snowplow" effect. This postulated escape process, similar to that successfully used to explain the dynamics of active gas releases in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath, relies on momentum transfer from the shocked solar wind protons to the planetary heavy ions, with the electrons and magnetic field acting as intermediaries. Fluxes of planetary ions on the order of 107 cm-2 s-1 can escape by this process, and if it operates regularly, it could contribute 10-20% of the current ion escape from Mars.

  16. Photochemical escape of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere: new insights from MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, R. J.; Deighan, J.; Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T.; Fox, J. L.; Lee, Y.; Rahmati, A.; McFadden, J. P.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Elrod, M. K.; Andersson, L.; Fowler, C. M.; Curry, S.; Gröller, H.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape from Mars at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers. One of the known escape processes is photochemical escape, where a) an exothermic chemical reaction in the atmosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through any subsequent collisions. Because escaping hot atoms are not directly measured, models of production and transport (through the atmosphere) of such atoms must be used to constrain photochemical escape rates. These models require altitude profiles of neutral densities and electron and ion densities and temperatures, as well as compositional information, all of which are measured by MAVEN instruments at the relevant altitudes (150-300 km). For every altitude profile: Profiles of O2+ dissociative recombination (DR) rates will be calculated from electron temperature, electron density and O2+ density. Profiles of energy distributions of hot O atoms will be calculated from profiles of electron and ion temperatures. Profiles of all neutral densities will be input into models of hot O transport in order to calculate photochemical escape fluxes from DR of O2+. We will present photochemical escape fluxes as a function of several factors, in particular solar zenith angle and EUV flux. This, combined with further simulations with progressively higher EUV fluxes, will eventually enable a total integrated loss estimate over the course of Martian history and hence a determination of the impact of this loss process on the evolution of the Martian climate.

  17. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Rachel E; Mediratta, Rishi P; Xie, James; Kambhampati, Swetha; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Montacute, Tamara; Zhang, Michael; Zaw, Catherine; He, Jimmy; Sanchez, Magali; Pischel, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful servicelearning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program's outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians. PMID:26170731

  18. Modified guidance laws to escape microbursts with turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogan Atilla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces Modified Altitude- and Dive-Guidance laws for escaping a microburst with turbulence. The goal is to develop a procedure to estimate the highest altitude at which an aircraft can fly through a microburst without running into stall. First, a new metric is constructed that quantifies the aircraft upward force capability in a microburst encounter. In the absence of turbulence, the metric is shown to be a decreasing function of altitude. This suggests that descending to a low altitude may improve safety in the sense that the aircraft will have more upward force capability to maintain its altitude. In the presence of stochastic turbulence, the metric is treated as a random variable and its probability distribution function is analytically approximated as a function of altitude. This approximation allows us to determine the highest safe altitude at which the aircraft may descend, hence avoiding to descend too low. This highest safe altitude is used as the commanded altitude in Modified Altitude- and Dive-Guidance. Monte Carlo simulations show that these Modified Altitude- and Dive-Guidance strategies can decrease the probability of minimum altitude being lower than a given value without significantly increasing the probability of crash.

  19. Nosema Tolerant Honeybees (Apis mellifera Escape Parasitic Manipulation of Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kurze

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is not only pivotal for development, but also for pathogen defence in multicellular organisms. Although numerous intracellular pathogens are known to interfere with the host's apoptotic machinery to overcome this defence, its importance for host-parasite coevolution has been neglected. We conducted three inoculation experiments to investigate in the apoptotic respond during infection with the intracellular gut pathogen Nosema ceranae, which is considered as potential global threat to the honeybee (Apis mellifera and other bee pollinators, in sensitive and tolerant honeybees. To explore apoptotic processes in the gut epithelium, we visualised apoptotic cells using TUNEL assays and measured the relative expression levels of subset of candidate genes involved in the apoptotic machinery using qPCR. Our results suggest that N. ceranae reduces apoptosis in sensitive honeybees by enhancing inhibitor of apoptosis protein-(iap-2 gene transcription. Interestingly, this seems not be the case in Nosema tolerant honeybees. We propose that these tolerant honeybees are able to escape the manipulation of apoptosis by N. ceranae, which may have evolved a mechanism to regulate an anti-apoptotic gene as key adaptation for improved host invasion.

  20. ESCAPE. Energy Security and ClimAte Policy Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change and energy supply security policy are currently not integrated in most countries, despite possible synergies. The ESCAPE approach suggests that linking climate change policy with security of energy supply could improve climate change policy at both a national and international level. The report explores the interaction between policies of energy security and climate change and the options of inclusion of energy security issues into national and international post-2012 climate negotiations. It emphasises the importance of the US in this regard and takes a close look at US energy policy documents. It appears that current US energy policy is not directed towards reducing its reliance on imported fossil fuel, even though the government has a strong preference for this. This study shows that measures to reduce import dependency are mostly synergetic with climate policy and gives some options that can be implemented. On an international level, linkages of energy security into post-2012 climate policy may be possible in sectoral bottom-up approaches or technology frameworks. As well, inclusion of a security of supply criterion in international emission trading instruments may provide potential benefits

  1. Dynamical correlations in the escape strategy of Influenza A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggi, L.; Colaiori, F.; Loreto, V.; Tria, F.

    2013-03-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of human Influenza A virus presents a challenging theoretical problem. An extremely high mutation rate allows the virus to escape, at each epidemic season, the host immune protection elicited by previous infections. At the same time, at each given epidemic season a single quasi-species, that is a set of closely related strains, is observed. A non-trivial relation between the genetic (i.e., at the sequence level) and the antigenic (i.e., related to the host immune response) distances can shed light into this puzzle. In this paper we introduce a model in which, in accordance with experimental observations, a simple interaction rule based on spatial correlations among point mutations dynamically defines an immunity space in the space of sequences. We investigate the static and dynamic structure of this space and we discuss how it affects the dynamics of the virus-host interaction. Interestingly we observe a staggered time structure in the virus evolution as in the real Influenza evolutionary dynamics.

  2. Escape of the martian protoatmosphere and initial water inventory

    CERN Document Server

    Erkaev, N V; Elkins-Tanton, L; Stökl, A; Odert, P; Marcq, E; Dorfi, E A; Kislyakova, K G; Kulikov, Yu N; Leitzinger, M; Güdel, M

    2013-01-01

    Latest research in planet formation indicate that Mars formed within a few million years (Myr) and remained a planetary embryo that never grew to a more massive planet. It can also be expected from dynamical models, that most of Mars' building blocks consisted of material that formed in orbital locations just beyond the ice line which could have contained ~0.1-0.2 wt. % of H2O. By using these constraints, we estimate the nebula-captured and catastrophically outgassed volatile contents during the solidification of Mars' magma ocean and apply a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model for the study of the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) driven thermal escape of the martian protoatmosphere during the early active epoch of the young Sun. The amount of gas that has been captured from the protoplanetary disk into the planetary atmosphere is calculated by solving the hydrostatic structure equations in the protoplanetary nebula. Depending on nebular properties such as the dust grain depletion factor, planetesimal...

  3. Heart rate and core temperature responses of elite pit crews during automobile races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, David P; Bowen, Robert S; Lightfoot, J Timothy

    2011-08-01

    There is limited information regarding the physiological and psychological demands of the racing environment, and the subsequent effect on the performance of pit crew athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate heart rates (HRs) and core body temperatures (CTs) of pit crew athletes in the race environment. The HR and CT of pit crew athletes (n = 7) and control subjects were measured during 6 National Association for Stock Car Automobile Racing Sprint Cup races using ingestible sensors (HQ Inc, Palmetto, FL, USA). The HR and CT were measured before each race, at 15-minute intervals during the race, and upon completion of each pit stop. Compared to the control subject at each race, the pit crew athletes had significantly (p = 0.014) lower core temperatures (CTs). The pit crew athletes displayed higher HRs on the asphalt tracks than on concrete tracks (p = 0.011), and HR responses of the crew members were significantly (p = 0.012) different between pit crew positions, with the tire changers and jackman exhibiting higher HRs than the tire carriers. Unexpectedly, the CTs of the pit crew athletes were not elevated in the race environment, despite high ambient temperatures and the extensive fire-protection equipment (e.g., helmet, suit, gloves) each pit crew athlete wore. The lack of CT change is possibly the result of the increased HR more efficiently shunting blood to the skin and dissipating heat as a consequence of the athletes' extensive training regimen and ensuing heat acclimation. Additionally, it is possible that psychological stress unique to several of the tracks provided an additive effect resulting in increased heart rates.

  4. A specific case: Cosmic radiation exposures of flight crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ) provides educational materials to increase awareness among flight crew, supports research and provides a tool (computer model) for estimating doses received on individual flights so that individuals or companies may assess total doses. Additionally, the US FAA has recommended that commercial airline companies provide education and training to aircrew, which some companies already do. Within the European Union, the Council Directive 96/29 Euratom (Articles 10 and 42) specifies that each Member State shall make arrangements for undertakings operating aircraft to take account of exposure to more than 1 mSv/a. The undertakings shall take appropriate measures, in particular: (a) To assess the exposure of the crew concerned, (b) To take into account the assessed exposure when organizing working schedules with a view to reducing the doses of highly exposed aircrew, (c) To inform the workers concerned of the health risks their work involves, (d) To ensure that the dose received by the foetus is kept as low as reasonably achievable and be unlikely to exceed 1 mSv following declaration of pregnancy. Both artificial radiation and naturally occurring occupational radiation exposures and risks require regulatory control, although the mechanisms for routine monitoring to achieve compliance will differ. For aircrew exposures to cosmic radiation, dose estimation rather than measurement is sufficient in most cases owing to the availability of reasonable, accurate models. Although exposure data are available and guidance has been developed for controlling aircrew exposures, there has been slow acceptance of this guidance outside Europe. There will be economic barriers to implementing some methods of exposure control, such as reducing flight altitude or re-routing, which incur fuel cost penalties, or flight postponement during significant solar particle events. In some cases, there may be resistance from affected flight crew, since seniority permits selection of schedules and higher dose

  5. Analytical Approach for Estimating Preliminary Mass of ARES I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Structural Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Pravin

    2007-01-01

    In January 2004, President Bush gave the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) a vision for Space Exploration by setting our sight on a bold new path to go back to the Moon, then to Mars and beyond. In response to this vision, NASA started the Constellation Program, which is a new exploration launch vehicle program. The primary mission for the Constellation Program is to carry out a series of human expeditions ranging from Low Earth Orbit to the surface of Mars and beyond for the purposes of conducting human exploration of space, as specified by the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE). The intent is that the information and technology developed by this program will provide the foundation for broader exploration activities as our operational experience grows. The ARES I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) has been designated as the launch vehicle that will be developed as a "first step" to facilitate the aforementioned human expeditions. The CLV Project is broken into four major elements: First Stage, Upper Stage Engine, Upper Stage (US), and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for the design of the CLV and has the prime responsibility to design the upper stage of the vehicle. The US is the second propulsive stage of the CLV and provides CEV insertion into low Earth orbit (LEO) after separation from the First Stage of the Crew Launch Vehicle. The fully integrated Upper Stage is a mix of modified existing heritage hardware (J-2X Engine) and new development (primary structure, subsystems, and avionics). The Upper Stage assembly is a structurally stabilized cylindrical structure, which is powered by a single J-2X engine which is developed as a separate Element of the CLV. The primary structure includes the load bearing liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) propellant tanks, a Forward Skirt, the Intertank structure, the Aft Skirt and the Thrust Structure. A Systems Tunnel, which carries fluid and

  6. Bol d'Or success for all-women crew from CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The boat 'Mic Mac' and its CERN's all-woman crew (left to right), Christine Theurillat, Ursula Haenger , Paola Catapano, Petra Riedler, and skipper Cristina Morone. Spectacular highlight of the Lake Leman sailing calendar is the annual Bol d'Or race. Held this year on 16 and 17 June, the event attracted nearly 500 teams who competed under extreme weather conditions for the honours. Among the competitors was an all-woman crew from the CERN Yachting Club, sailing their Surprise boat, Mic Mac. The team was not only among the 397 boats to finish, but also the first all-woman crewed single hull boat to cross the line.

  7. A Study of a Lifting Body as a Space Station Crew Exigency Return Vehicle (CERV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacConochie, Ian O.

    2000-01-01

    A lifting body is described for use as a return vehicle for crews from a space station. Reentry trajectories, subsystem weights and performance, and costs are included. The baseline vehicle is sized for a crew of eight. An alternate configuration is shown in which only four crew are carried with the extra volume reserved for logistics cargo. A water parachute recovery system is shown as an emergency alternative to a runway landing. Primary reaction control thrusters from the Shuttle program are used for orbital maneuvering while the Shuttle verniers are used for all attitude control maneuvers.

  8. Don’t Rock the Boat: How Antiphase Crew Coordination Affects Rowing

    OpenAIRE

    de Brouwer, Anouk J.; De Poel, Harjo J.; Mathijs J Hofmijster

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that crew rowing requires perfect synchronization between the movements of the rowers. However, a long-standing and somewhat counterintuitive idea is that out-of-phase crew rowing might have benefits over in-phase (i.e., synchronous) rowing. In synchronous rowing, 5 to 6% of the power produced by the rower(s) is lost to velocity fluctuations of the shell within each rowing cycle. Theoretically, a possible way for crews to increase average boat velocity is to reduce th...

  9. Advanced construction management for lunar base construction - Surface operations planner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    The study proposes a conceptual solution and lays the framework for developing a new, sophisticated and intelligent tool for a lunar base construction crew to use. This concept integrates expert systems for critical decision making, virtual reality for training, logistics and laydown optimization, automated productivity measurements, and an advanced scheduling tool to form a unique new planning tool. The concept features extensive use of computers and expert systems software to support the actual work, while allowing the crew to control the project from the lunar surface. Consideration is given to a logistics data base, laydown area management, flexible critical progress scheduler, video simulation of assembly tasks, and assembly information and tracking documentation.

  10. Advanced Solid State Lighting for AES Deep Space Hab Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbert, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    The advanced Solid State Lighting (SSL) assemblies augmented 2nd generation modules under development for the Advanced Exploration Systems Deep Space Habitat in using color therapy to synchronize crew circadian rhythms. Current RGB LED technology does not produce sufficient brightness to adequately address general lighting in addition to color therapy. The intent is to address both through a mix of white and RGB LEDs designing for fully addressable alertness/relaxation levels as well as more dramatic circadian shifts.

  11. H Escape Rates Inferred from MAVEN/IUVS Observations of the Mars Hydrogen Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Michael S.; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Deighan, Justin; Schneider, Nicholas M.; McClintock, William; Stewart, A. Ian F.; Thiemann, E. M.; Clarke, John T.; Holsclaw, Gregory; Jain, Sonal Kumar; Crismani, Matteo; Stiepen, Arnaud; Montmessin, Franck; Eparvier, Francis; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    H escape oxidizes and dessicates the Mars atmosphere and surface, providing a key control on the present-day chemistry and long-term evolution of the planet. Recently, large variations in the escape rate of H as a function of season have been reported by several studies, making continued observation of the variation a high priority. We present escape rates derived from Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) observations of the extended atmosphere of Mars at H Lyman alpha (121.6 nm), which must be interpreted with a coupled density/radiative transfer model owing to the optically thick nature of the emission and the small fraction of H present in the corona on escaping trajectories. We recover densities, temperatures, and escape rates under the assumption of spherical symmetry for multiple periods across MAVEN's mission so far, beginning in December 2014 (escape rates ~4e8/cm2/s). We describe the observed variation and compare it with previously observed seasonal variation in retrieved H escape rates, providing a necessary input for future photochemical modeling studies and estimates of water loss from Mars over its history.

  12. Reporter Assay for Endo/Lysosomal Escape of Toxin-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Gilabert-Oriol

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters—horseradish peroxidase (HRP, Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa and ricin A-chain (RTA—were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates—saporin-HRP, Alexasaporin and saporin-KQ-RTA—were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of Alexasaporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10–1000 nM.

  13. Centaur Application to Robotic and Crewed Lunar Lander Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birckenstaedt, Bonnie; Kutter, Bernard F.; Zegler, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Human space exploration, while a clear imperative for the progression of human civilization, can be severely impeded by excessively high operational costs and perceived high risk. A cost effective method of accomplishing every phase of exploration transport is mandatory to avoid this trap. Centaur, the upper stage on the current Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket, is an excellent candidate for modification as a robotic and possible human transport vehicle to our nearest neighbor. The Centaur is produced in Denver, Colorado. Centaur has proven to be extremely robust and reliable, with 77 consecutive successful flights. Modifications to the current design would allow the Centaur to function as an in-space propulsion system. With its present capability Centaur can directly support robotic probe landings on the moon and is directly extensible to larger landing tasks including high-mass crewed missions. Lunar descent would be accomplished in two phases: primary descent using the RL10 engine and a final horizontal terminal phase powered by pressure fed thrusters mounted along the Centaur tank. Utilizing the Centaur for human exploration would greatly reduce cost by leveraging an already designed and manufactured stage. It would increase safety by its robustness and redundancy that the Centaur has proven in many successful launches. With the Centaur concept for human exploration, NASA can have the safety and cost effectiveness needed to explore the Moon, Mars, and beyond.

  14. Evaluation of the seating of Qantas flight deck crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusted, M; Healey, S; Mandryk, J A

    1994-10-01

    In 1985 Qantas Airways (Australia) requested an ergonomics assessment of three pilots' seats so that one could be selected for fitting in all new aircraft as well replacement in existing aircraft. The Ipeco seat was chosen. In 1991, after all aircraft were fitted with the Ipeco seats, the company then requested a further evaluation of the seat to see if it was acceptable to the pilots and if there were any outstanding problems. A seat feature checklist plus a body chart discomfort rating scale was given to the total crew of 1030 pilots. The results from the 202 respondents indicated that although the pilots found the Ipeco seat an improvement on the Weber seat there were some modifications required. The main problems included insufficient adjustment range of the lumbar support area and the thigh supports, and infrequent replacement of the seat cushion. The body charts supported the checklist results in that the main areas of discomfort indicated were the buttocks and low back. Recommendations for improvements in design of the Ipeco seat, training in use and maintenance are presented. The method used in this study has application for field assessment of seating in a wide range of occupations, particularly bus drivers, truck drivers and train drivers, who spend long hours seated without being able to take breaks. PMID:15676978

  15. Materials and Process Activities for NASA's Composite Crew Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polis, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to design, build, and test a full-scale Composite Crew Module (CCM). The overall goal of the CCM project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project s baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. The materials and process activities were prioritized based on a rapid prototype approach. This approach focused developmental activities on design details with greater risk and uncertainty, such as out-of-autoclave joining, over some of the more traditional lamina and laminate building block levels. While process development and associated building block testing were performed, several anomalies were still observed at the full-scale level due to interactions between process robustness and manufacturing scale-up. This paper describes the process anomalies that were encountered during the CCM development and the subsequent root cause investigations that led to the final design solutions. These investigations highlight the importance of full-scale developmental work early in the schedule of a complex composite design/build project.

  16. Simulation Development and Analysis of Crew Vehicle Ascent Abort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program is an integral step in its journey to Mars as it would expedite development of space technologies and open up partnership with U.S. commercial companies. NASA reviews and independent assessment of Commercial Crew Program is fundamental to its success, and being able to model a commercial crew vehicle in a simulation rather than conduct a live test would be a safer, faster, and less expensive way to assess and certify the capabilities of the vehicle. To this end, my project was to determine the feasibility of using a simulation tool named SOMBAT version 2.0 to model a multiple parachute system for Commercial Crew Program simulation. The main tasks assigned to me were to debug and test the main parachute system model, (capable of simulating one to four main parachute bodies), and to utilize a graphical program to animate the simulation results. To begin tackling the first task, I learned how to use SOMBAT by familiarizing myself with its mechanics and by understanding the methods used to tweak its various parameters and outputs. I then used this new knowledge to set up, run, and analyze many different situations within SOMBAT in order to explore the limitations of the parachute model. Some examples of parameters that I varied include the initial velocity and orientation of the falling capsule, the number of main parachutes, and the location where the parachutes were attached to the capsule. Each parameter changed would give a different output, and in some cases, would expose a bug or limitation in the model. A major bug that I discovered was the inability of the model to handle any number of parachutes other than three. I spent quite some time trying to debug the code logically, but was unable to figure it out until my mentor taught me that digital simulation limitations can occur when some approximations are mistakenly assumed for certain in a physical system. This led me to the realization that unlike in all of the programming classes

  17. The STS-103 crew pose for photographers following Terminal Countdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-103 crew pose for photographers following Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) emergency egress training on the small armored personnel carrier behind them. Standing left to right are Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, their trainer on the carrier Capt. George Hoggard of the KSC/CCAS Fire Department, Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Jean-Francois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  18. The STS-93 crew pose in front of Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-93 crew pose in front of the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia following their landing on runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:20:35 p.m. EDT on July 27. From left to right, they are Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Commander Eileen Collins, and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The mission's primary objective was to deploy the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. This was the 95th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 26th for Columbia. The landing was the 19th consecutive Shuttle landing in Florida and the 12th night landing in Shuttle program history. On this mission, Collins became the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander.

  19. Structural Configuration Analysis of Crew Exploration Vehicle Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, V.

    2006-01-01

    Structural configuration modeling and finite element analysis of crew exploration vehicle (CEV) concepts are presented. In the structural configuration design approach, parametric solid models of the pressurized shell and tanks are developed. The CEV internal cabin pressure is same as in the International Space Station (ISS) to enable docking with the ISS without an intermediate airlock. Effects of this internal pressure load on the stress distribution, factor of safety, mass and deflections are investigated. Uniform 7 mm thick skin shell, 5 mm thick shell with ribs and frames, and isogrid skin construction options are investigated. From this limited study, the isogrid construction appears to provide most strength/mass ratio. Initial finite element analysis results on the service module tanks are also presented. These rapid finite element analyses, stress and factor of safety distribution results are presented as a part of lessons learned and to build up a structural mass estimation and sizing database for future technology support. This rapid structural analysis process may also facilitate better definition of the vehicles and components for rapid prototyping. However, these structural analysis results are highly conceptual and exploratory in nature and do not reflect current configuration designs being conducted at the program level by NASA and industry.

  20. Quantifying the impact of human immunodeficiency virus-1 escape from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich D Kadolsky

    Full Text Available HIV-1 escape from the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL response leads to a weakening of viral control and is likely to be detrimental to the patient. To date, the impact of escape on viral load and CD4(+ T cell count has not been quantified, primarily because of sparse longitudinal data and the difficulty of separating cause and effect in cross-sectional studies. We use two independent methods to quantify the impact of HIV-1 escape from CTLs in chronic infection: mathematical modelling of escape and statistical analysis of a cross-sectional cohort. Mathematical modelling revealed a modest increase in log viral load of 0.051 copies ml(-1 per escape event. Analysis of the cross-sectional cohort revealed a significant positive association between viral load and the number of "escape events", after correcting for length of infection and rate of replication. We estimate that a single CTL escape event leads to a viral load increase of 0.11 log copies ml(-1 (95% confidence interval: 0.040-0.18, consistent with the predictions from the mathematical modelling. Overall, the number of escape events could only account for approximately 6% of the viral load variation in the cohort. Our findings indicate that although the loss of the CTL response for a single epitope results in a highly statistically significant increase in viral load, the biological impact is modest. We suggest that this small increase in viral load is explained by the small growth advantage of the variant relative to the wildtype virus. Escape from CTLs had a measurable, but unexpectedly low, impact on viral load in chronic infection.

  1. The impact of escaped farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. on catch statistics in Scotland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren M Green

    Full Text Available In Scotland and elsewhere, there are concerns that escaped farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. may impact on wild salmon stocks. Potential detrimental effects could arise through disease spread, competition, or inter-breeding. We investigated whether there is evidence of a direct effect of recorded salmon escape events on wild stocks in Scotland using anglers' counts of caught salmon (classified as wild or farmed and sea trout (Salmo trutta L.. This tests specifically whether documented escape events can be associated with reduced or elevated escapes detected in the catch over a five-year time window, after accounting for overall variation between areas and years. Alternate model frameworks were somewhat inconsistent, however no robust association was found between documented escape events and higher proportion of farm-origin salmon in anglers' catch, nor with overall catch size. A weak positive correlation was found between local escapes and subsequent sea trout catch. This is in the opposite direction to what would be expected if salmon escapes negatively affected wild fish numbers. Our approach specifically investigated documented escape events, contrasting with earlier studies examining potentially wider effects of salmon farming on wild catch size. This approach is more conservative, but alleviates some potential sources of confounding, which are always of concern in observational studies. Successful analysis of anglers' reports of escaped farmed salmon requires high data quality, particularly since reports of farmed salmon are a relatively rare event in the Scottish data. Therefore, as part of our analysis, we reviewed studies of potential sensitivity and specificity of determination of farmed origin. Specificity estimates are generally high in the literature, making an analysis of the form we have performed feasible.

  2. Fractional extension of Kramers rate and barrier escaping from metastable potential well

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Chun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The reactive process of barrier escaping from the metastable potential well is studied together with the extension of Kramers' rate formula to the fractional case. Characteristic quantities are computed for an thimbleful of insight into the near barrier escaping and recrossing dynamics. Where the stationary transmission coefficient is revealed to be larger than the usual cases which implies less barrier recrossing. And the non-monotonic varying of it reveals a close dependence to the fractional exponent $\\alpha$. In most cases, the near barrier behavior of the escaping dynamics is equivalent to the diffusion in the two-dimensional non-Ohmic damping system.

  3. The calculation of the resonance escape factor of helium for Lorentzian and Voigt profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jian [School of Science, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China)]. E-mail: hejian405@163.com; Zhang Qingguo [School of Science, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China)

    2006-11-27

    The resonance escape factors of helium 10830.34 A, 10830.25 A and 10829.08 A that making up the 10830 A emission lines are calculated, for both Lorentzian profile and Voigt profile. The total number of absorbing atoms in the ground state is calculated. The dependence of the escape factors on the optical depth in the line center is considered. The resonance escape factors of helium 3889 and 3118 emission lines are discussed also. This calculation is useful in the research on the helium in the sun and remote stars from the helium emission lines.

  4. Mean Exit Time and Escape Probability for a Tumor Growth System under Non-Gaussian Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Jian; Gao, Ting; Kan, Xingye; Duan, Jinqiao

    2011-01-01

    Effects of non-Gaussian $\\alpha-$stable L\\'evy noise on the Gompertz tumor growth model are quantified by considering the mean exit time and escape probability of the cancer cell density from inside a safe or benign domain. The mean exit time and escape probability problems are formulated in a differential-integral equation with a fractional Laplacian operator. Numerical simulations are conducted to evaluate how the mean exit time and escape probability vary or bifurcates when $\\alpha$ changes. Some bifurcation phenomena are observed and their impacts are discussed.

  5. 78 FR 20388 - Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision that Nonconforming 2007 Ford Escape Multi-Purpose...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... Nonconforming 2007 Ford Escape Multi-Purpose Passenger Vehicles are Eligible for Importation AGENCY: National... nonconforming 2007 Ford Escape Multi-Purpose Passenger Vehicles that were not originally manufactured to comply... safety standards (the U.S.-certified version of the same 2007 Ford Escape Multi-Purpose...

  6. rHEALTH X with Non-Invasive Capabilities for Science and Crew Health Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is an extraordinary need for a universal biomedical analyzer that has broadly flexible capabilities for cell studies, small animal experiments, and crew...

  7. Nonflammable Crew Clothing Utilizing Phosphorus-Based Fire-Retardant Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For maintaining U.S. leadership in space exploration, there is an urgent need to develop nonflammable crew clothing with the requirements of comfort, ease of...

  8. A Model for Bus Crew Scheduling Problem with Multiple Duty Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach for solving the bus crew scheduling problem which considers early, day, and late duty modes with time shift and work intensity constraints. Furthermore, the constraint with the least crew number of a certain duty (e.g., day duty has also been considered. An optimization model is formulated as a 0-1 integer programming problem to improve the efficiency of crew scheduling at the minimum expense of total idle time of crew for a circle bus line. Correspondingly, a heuristic algorithm utilizing the tabu search algorithm has been proposed to solve the model. Finally, the proposed model and algorithm are successfully tested by a case study.

  9. STS-105 and Expedition Three crews pose together for photo on Fixed Service Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-105 crew poses on the Fixed Service Structure at Launch Pad 39A. From left are Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester, Commander Scott Horowitz, Pilot Rick Sturckow and Mission Specialist Dan Barry. The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews are at Kennedy Space Center participating in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, a dress rehearsal for launch. The activities include emergency egress training, a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The Expedition Two crew members currently on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. The mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  10. STS-105 and Expedition Three crews pose for photo at Launch Pad 39A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews pose at Launch Pad 39A after training exercises. Pictured (left to right) are STS-105 Mission Specialists Patrick Forrester and Daniel Barry and Commander Scott Horowitz; Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonauts Mikhail Tyurin and Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov; and STS-105 Pilot Rick Sturckow. Both crews are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. The training includes emergency egress, a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, which is seen in the background. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  11. Socio-economic Survey of Commercial Fishing Crew in the Northeast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Northeast Fisheries Science Center's Social Sciences Branch (SSB) completed a survey of crew, including hired captains, participating in commercial fisheries in...

  12. Crew interface analysis: Selected articles on space human factors research, 1987 - 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagian, Tandi (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    As part of the Flight Crew Support Division at NASA, the Crew Interface Analysis Section is dedicated to the study of human factors in the manned space program. It assumes a specialized role that focuses on answering operational questions pertaining to NASA's Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom Programs. One of the section's key contributions is to provide knowledge and information about human capabilities and limitations that promote optimal spacecraft and habitat design and use to enhance crew safety and productivity. The section provides human factors engineering for the ongoing missions as well as proposed missions that aim to put human settlements on the Moon and Mars. Research providing solutions to operational issues is the primary objective of the Crew Interface Analysis Section. The studies represent such subdisciplines as ergonomics, space habitability, man-computer interaction, and remote operator interaction.

  13. Whither CRM? Future directions in Crew Resource Management training in the cockpit and elsewhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    The past decade has shown worldwide adoption of human factors training in civil aviation, now known as Crew Resource Management (CRM). The shift in name from cockpit to crew reflects a growing trend to extend the training to other components of the aviation system including flight attendants, dispatchers, maintenance personnel, and Air Traffic Controllers. The paper reports findings and new directions in research into human factors.

  14. Effectiveness improvement of psycho-physiological support of professional activity of navy ship crews

    OpenAIRE

    K.A. Bervitsky; I.A. Shevtchuk; A.N. Onishchenko

    2010-01-01

    The results of study of body functional status of members of Navy ship crews during sea campaigns and in the process of military professional adaptation have been analyzed. Psycho-physiological specificity of professional activity and regularity in changes of psycho-physiological parameters of military seamen have been estimated. Organization-staff and assessment-corrective measures of effectiveness improvement of psycho-physiological support of Navy ship crews' professional activity hav...

  15. STS-93: Columbia, Flight Crew Training with M-113 for Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage shows the crewmembers, Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman, and Michel Tognini, standing in front of an M-113 armored personnel carrier vehicle, and posing for photographs. Footage also includes the crew inside the vehicle getting quick instructions on how to operate the vehicle. They are also seen taking turns in driving the vehicle, and taking photographs and recording each other as one member of the crew drives the vehicle.

  16. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Space Environments Engineering and Crew Auroral Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph; Pettit, Donald R.; Hartman, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Today s presentation describes how real time space weather data is used by the International Space Station (ISS) space environments team to obtain data on auroral charging of the ISS vehicle and support ISS crew efforts to obtain auroral images from orbit. Topics covered include: Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), . Auroral charging of ISS, . Real ]time space weather monitoring resources, . Examples of ISS auroral charging captured from space weather events, . ISS crew observations of aurora.

  17. Location Tracking of Moving Crew Members for Effective Damage Control in an Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jin Kang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In an emergency, the commanding officer may have limited information, and crew members may behave differently compared to how they behaved during training. In an emergency situation, if the commanding officer is aware of each crew member's location and role in that situation, he can disseminate orders expeditiously and precisely. To realise a faster and more precise dissemination of orders through better awareness of each crew member's location and role, real-time crew member tracking is needed. The technical feasibility of a real time crew-tracking system based on a wireless sensor network has been studied, with the intent to improve effective commanding in an emergency. Herein, location tracking was achieved using instrumentation consisting of ZigBee tags, routers, and gateways, which were used to record the location and role data of moving crew members on a full-scale ship.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(1, pp.57-61, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.503

  18. Ceramide formation mediated by acid sphingomyelinase facilitates endosomal escape of caliciviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivanna, Vinay; Kim, Yunjeong; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2015-09-01

    Our recent results demonstrated that bile acids facilitate virus escape from the endosomes into the cytoplasm for successful replication of porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC). We report a novel finding that bile acids can be substituted by cold treatment for endosomal escape and virus replication. This endosomal escape by cold treatment or bile acids is associated with ceramide formation by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). ASM catalyzes hydrolysis of sphingomyelin into ceramide, which is known to destabilize lipid bilayer. Treatment of LLC-PK cells with bile acids or cold led to ceramide formation, and small molecule antagonists or siRNA of ASM blocked ceramide formation in the endosomes and significantly reduced PEC replication. Inhibition of ASM resulted in the retention of PEC, feline calicivirus or murine norovirus in the endosomes in correlation with reduced viral replication. These results suggest the importance of viral escape from the endosomes for the replication of various caliciviruses. PMID:25985440

  19. Sensitivity to initial conditions, entropy production, and escape rate at the onset of chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, Miguel Angel, E-mail: fuentesm@santafe.edu [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro and CONICET, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Center for Advanced Studies in Ecology and Biodiversity, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 114-D, Santiago CP 6513677 (Chile); Sato, Yuzuru [Kita 12 Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Tsallis, Constantino, E-mail: tsallis@cbpf.br [Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas and National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)

    2011-08-01

    We analytically link three properties of nonlinear dynamical systems, namely sensitivity to initial conditions, entropy production, and escape rate, in z-logistic maps for both positive and zero Lyapunov exponents. We unify these relations at chaos, where the Lyapunov exponent is positive, and at its onset, where it vanishes. Our result unifies, in particular, two already known cases, namely (i) the standard entropy rate in the presence of escape, valid for exponential functionality rates with strong chaos, and (ii) the Pesin-like identity with no escape, valid for the power-law behavior present at points such as the Feigenbaum one. -- Highlights: → We study sensitivity, entropy production and escape rate. → We focus on one-dimensional simple nonlinear maps. → We discuss both strong and weak chaos. → Our results unify two cases that are already known in the literature. → The results are consistent with nonextensive statistics.

  20. Escaping the poverty trap: modeling the interplay between economic growth and the ecology of infectious disease

    CERN Document Server

    Goerg, Georg M; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Althouse, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of economies and infectious disease are inexorably linked: economic well-being influences health (sanitation, nutrition, treatment capacity, etc.) and health influences economic well-being (labor productivity lost to sickness and disease). Often societies are locked into ``poverty traps'' of poor health and poor economy. Here, using a simplified coupled disease-economic model with endogenous capital growth we demonstrate the formation of poverty traps, as well as ways to escape them. We suggest two possible mechanisms of escape both motivated by empirical data: one, through an influx of capital (development aid), and another through changing the percentage of GDP spent on healthcare. We find that a large influx of capital is successful in escaping the poverty trap, but increasing health spending alone is not. Our results demonstrate that escape from a poverty trap may be possible, and carry important policy implications in the world-wide distribution of aid and within-country healthcare spending.

  1. Escape of photons from two fixed extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Daniel; Sánchez-Hernández, Manuel; 10.1103/PhysRevD.78.104024

    2008-01-01

    We study the scattering of light (null geodesics) by two fixed extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes, in which the gravitational attraction of their masses is exactly balanced with the electrostatic repulsion of their charges, allowing a static spacetime. We identify the set of unstable periodic orbits that constitute the fractal repeller that completely describes the chaotic escape dynamics of photons. In the framework of periodic orbit theory, the analysis of the linear stability of the unstable periodic orbits is used to obtain the main quantities of chaos that characterize the escape dynamics of the photons scattered by the black holes. In particular, the escape rate which is compared with the result obtained from numerical simulations that consider statistical ensembles of photons. We also analyze the dynamics of photons in the proximity of a perturbed black hole and give an analytical estimation for the escape rate in this system.

  2. Pizza or Pancake? Formation Models of Gas Escape Biosignatures in Terrestrial and Martian Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Fairen, A. G.; Baker, L.; McKay, C. P.; Willson, D.

    2016-05-01

    Fine-grained sedimentary hollowed structures were imaged in Gale Crater, but no biomarkers identified to support biology. Our observation-based (gas escape) terrestrial model could inform on possible martian paleoenvironments at time of formation.

  3. Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Seals for NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Miller, Sharon K. R.; Smith, Ian M.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M

    2008-01-01

    Silicone rubber seals are being considered for a number of interfaces on NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Some of these joints include the docking system, hatches, and heat shield-to-back shell interface. A large diameter molded silicone seal is being developed for the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) that forms an effective seal between the CEV and International Space Station (ISS) and other future Constellation Program spacecraft. Seals between the heat shield and back shell prevent high temperature reentry gases from leaking into the interface. Silicone rubber seals being considered for these locations have inherent adhesive tendencies that would result in excessive forces required to separate the joints if left unchecked. This paper summarizes adhesion assessments for both as-received and adhesion-mitigated seals for the docking system and the heat shield interface location. Three silicone elastomers were examined: Parker Hannifin S0899-50 and S0383-70 compounds, and Esterline ELA-SA-401 compound. For the docking system application various levels of exposure to atomic oxygen (AO) were evaluated. Moderate AO treatments did not lower the adhesive properties of S0899-50 sufficiently. However, AO pretreatments of approximately 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm did lower the adhesion of S0383-70 and ELA-SA-401 to acceptable levels. For the heat shield-to-back shell interface application, a fabric covering was also considered. Molding Nomex fabric into the heat shield pressure seal appreciably reduced seal adhesion for the heat shield-to-back shell interface application.

  4. Required Area for a Crew Person in a Space Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Frances E.

    1998-01-01

    This 176 page report was written in circa 1966 to examine the effects of confmement during space flight. One of the topics covered was the required size of a space vehicle for extended missions. Analysis was done using size of crew and length of time in a confmed space. The report was based on all information available at that time. The data collected and analyzed included both NASA and (when possible) Russian missions flown to date, analogs (such as submarines), and ground studies. Both psychological and physiological responses to confmement were examined. Factors evaluated in estimating the degree of impairment included the level of performance of intellectual, perceptual, manual and co-ordinated tasks, response to psychological testing, subjective comments of the participants, nature and extent of physiological change, and the nature and extent of behavioral change and the nature and extent of somatic complaints. Information was not included from studies where elements of perceptual isolation were more than mildly incidental - water immersion studies, studies in darkened and acoustically insulated rooms, studies with distorted environmental inputs - unpattemed light and white noise. Using the graph from the document, the upper line provides a threshold of minimum acceptable volumeall points above the line may be considered acceptable. The lower line provides a threshold of unacceptable volume - all points below the line are unacceptable. The area in between the two lines is the area of doubtful acceptability where impairment tends to increase with reduction in volume and increased duration of exposure. Reference is made of the Gemini VII, 14-day duration mission which had detectable impairment with a combination of 40 cubic feet per man for 14 days. In line with all other data this point should be in the 'marked impairment' zone. It is assumed that the state of fitness, dedication and experience influenced this outcome.

  5. Radiation exposure to astronaut crew during space walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The cosmic ray environment in low-earth orbit is mainly composed of high-energy charged particles originating from galactic sources, solar energetic events and radiation confined within the dipolar geomagnetic field. These radiations are characterized by a high linear energy transfer and potentially inflict greater biological damage than that resulting from typical terrestrial radiation hazards. Reliable assessment of health risks to astronaut crew, particularly cancer induction, is pivotal in the design of future expeditions into interplanetary space and related to the estimation of radiation doses at the level of critical radiosensitive organs and tissues. The European Space Agency's Matroshka experiment was aimed at simulating an astronaut's body during extravehicular activities. The Matroshka facility basically consists of an Alderson-type human phantom torso attached to a base platform and covered by a protective carbon-fibre container, acting as a space suit model. The phantom is divided into 33 nearly tissue equivalent, polyurethane-based slices of specific density for tissue and organs, aligned along a central rod. Natural bones are embedded. Channels and cut-outs enable accommodation of 7 active and more than 6000 passive radiation sensors of which the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities provided more than 1100 thermoluminescence detectors for spatially resolved dosimetry and estimation of the radiobiological effectiveness. Matroshka was launched to the International Space Station on January 29 2004 with Progress-11 and mounted at the outside hull of the Russian Segment on February 26 2004. After retrieval of Matroshka into the Station on August 18 2005 and disintegration, the passive detectors were downloaded to earth with Soyuz on October 11 2005 for readout and analysis. Dose distributions are presented for slices 3 (eye), 15 (lung) and 27 (intestine), varying between 75 and 180 mGy. (author)

  6. The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldon, R

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region including southeast and south Asian countries and the Pacific island of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Samoa, and the Solomon Islands is discussed in terms of mobility transition and origin and destination factors. The changing patterns of mobility in Asia are further delineated in the discussion of internal movements and international movement. Emigration in the smaller countries of the Pacific are treated separately. Future predictions are that the Asia Pacific region will experience continued fertility decline and stabilization of low rates over the next 20 years. The declines will result in slow labor force growth, and increased demand for labor in traditional core and neocore countries as defined and presented in table form by Friedman will be heightened. International movements are likely to increase in large urban areas within destination countries. Tokyo and Singapore are the principal cities in Asia. Tokyo by restrictive government policy has limited immigration, but future labor shortages of unskilled labor from southeast Asia and China are expected. Singapore is already dependent on foreign labor by 10%. Current labor shortages have led to the creation of a growth triangle between Singapore, Indonesia, and Malaysia. Other cities expected to emerge as primary cities in international regional complexes with spillover into the hinterlands include the Hong Kong, Guangzhou, and Macau triangle in the Pearl River delta, Taipei and Seoul, and possibly Kuala Lumpur. Internal migration is expected to increase in the capital cities of Bangkok, Manila,j and centers such as Shanghai, Beijing, and other large cities of southeast Asia. These cities will be linked through the flows of skilled international migrants, which began in the 1960s and is expected to become a future major flow. Recreational and resource niches will be left in much of the Pacific, the Himalayan Kingdoms, and

  7. The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldon, R

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region including southeast and south Asian countries and the Pacific island of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Samoa, and the Solomon Islands is discussed in terms of mobility transition and origin and destination factors. The changing patterns of mobility in Asia are further delineated in the discussion of internal movements and international movement. Emigration in the smaller countries of the Pacific are treated separately. Future predictions are that the Asia Pacific region will experience continued fertility decline and stabilization of low rates over the next 20 years. The declines will result in slow labor force growth, and increased demand for labor in traditional core and neocore countries as defined and presented in table form by Friedman will be heightened. International movements are likely to increase in large urban areas within destination countries. Tokyo and Singapore are the principal cities in Asia. Tokyo by restrictive government policy has limited immigration, but future labor shortages of unskilled labor from southeast Asia and China are expected. Singapore is already dependent on foreign labor by 10%. Current labor shortages have led to the creation of a growth triangle between Singapore, Indonesia, and Malaysia. Other cities expected to emerge as primary cities in international regional complexes with spillover into the hinterlands include the Hong Kong, Guangzhou, and Macau triangle in the Pearl River delta, Taipei and Seoul, and possibly Kuala Lumpur. Internal migration is expected to increase in the capital cities of Bangkok, Manila,j and centers such as Shanghai, Beijing, and other large cities of southeast Asia. These cities will be linked through the flows of skilled international migrants, which began in the 1960s and is expected to become a future major flow. Recreational and resource niches will be left in much of the Pacific, the Himalayan Kingdoms, and

  8. Parameterizing Convective Organization to Escape the Entrainment Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Neale, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Lateral mixing parameters in buoyancy-driven deep convection schemes are among the most sensitive and important unknowns in atmosphere models. Unfortunately, there is not a true optimum value for plume mixing rate, but rather a dilemma or tradeoff: Excessive dilution of updrafts leads to unstable stratification bias in the mean state, while inadequate dilution allows deep convection to occur too easily, causing poor space and time distributions and variability. In this too-small parameter space, compromises are made based on competing metrics of model performance. We attempt to escape this “entrainment dilemma” by making bulk plume parameters (chiefly entrainment rate) depend on a new prognostic variable (“organization,” org) meant to reflect the rectified effects of subgrid-scale structure in meteorological fields. We test an org scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with a new unified shallow-deep convection scheme (UW-ens, a 2-plume version of the University of Washington scheme). Since buoyant ascent involves natural selection, subgrid structure makes convection systematically deeper and stronger than the pure unorganized case: plumes of average (or randomly sampled) air rising in the average environment. To reflect this, org is nonnegative, but we leave it dimensionless. A time scale characterizes its behavior (here ˜3 h for a 2o model). Currently its source is rain evaporation, but other sources can be added easily. We also let org be horizontally transported by advection, as a mass-weighted mean over the convecting layer. Linear coefficients link org to a plume ensemble, which it assists via: 1) plume base warmth above the mean temperature 2) plume radius enhancement (reduced mixing), and 3) increased probability of overlap in a multi-plume scheme, where interactions benefit later generations (this part has only been implemented in an offline toy column model). Since rain evaporation is a source for org, it functions as a time-lagged but

  9. Access to enterntainment and information programming for the crew as part of the communication system of future Mars mission or Lunar Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, H.

    other problem. The opportunity of escaping from interpersonal problems can sometimes help, but have to handle with care since it can also keep the crew members from disuss and solve their problems in personal interaction. REFERENCES [1] Budden N. A., ed. (1999) Mars Field Geology, Biology, and Paleontology Workshop LPI No. 968 [2] Kanas, N. Psychological issues during long duration space missions. In 12th MIS Symposium, June 8 13, 1997, Washington,- 1997. [3] R. KASS and J. KASS: Psycho -social Training for man in space. Acta Astronautica Vol. 45, No. 2, pp. 115-118, 1999.

  10. Progesterone After Estradiol Modulates Shuttle-Cage Escape by Facilitating Volition

    OpenAIRE

    Mayeaux, Darryl J.; Tandle, Sarah M.; Cilano, Sean M.; Fitzharris, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    In animal models of depression, depression is defined as performance on a learning task. That task is typically escaping a mild electric shock in a shuttle cage by moving from one side of the cage to the other. Ovarian hormones influence learning in other kinds of tasks, and these hormones are associated with depressive symptoms in humans. The role of these hormones in shuttle-cage escape learning, however, is less clear. This study manipulated estradiol and progesterone in ovariectomized fem...

  11. Inhibition of chaotic escape from a potential well using small parametric modulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown theoretically for the first time that, depending on its period, amplitude, and initial phase, a periodic parametric modulation can suppress a chaotic escape from a potential well. The instance of the Helmholtz oscillator is used to demonstrate, by means of Melnikov close-quote s method, that parametric modulations of the linear or quadratic potential terms inhibit chaotic escape when certain resonance conditions are met. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  12. CRISPR-Cas9 Can Inhibit HIV-1 Replication but NHEJ Repair Facilitates Virus Escape

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 can be used for guide RNA (gRNA)-directed, sequence-specific cleavage of HIV proviral DNA in infected cells. We here demonstrate profound inhibition of HIV-1 replication by harnessing T cells with Cas9 and antiviral gRNAs. However, the virus rapidly and consistently escaped from this inhibition. Sequencing of the HIV-1 escape variants revealed nucleotide...

  13. Swimming and escape behavior of copepod nauplii: implications for predator-prey interactions among copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titelman, Josefin

    2001-01-01

    This study focuses on how prey behavior may affect predation risk through encounter rates and the escape success of the prey given an encounter. Temora longicornis nauplii require stronger hydrodynamic signals to elicit escape than Acartia tonsa nauplii (critical fluid deformation rates, Delta* o...... behavior of A. tonsa acts predominantly at the post-encounter stage where its sensitivity to hydrodynamic signals (i,e., low Delta*) effectively compensates for the high predator encounter rate generated by its motility....

  14. Choices between positive and negative reinforcement during treatment for escape-maintained behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    DeLeon, I G; Neidert, P L; Anders, B M; Rodriguez-Catter, V

    2001-01-01

    Positive reinforcement was more effective than negative reinforcement in promoting compliance and reducing escape-maintained problem behavior for a child with autism. Escape extinction was then added while the child was given a choice between positive or negative reinforcement for compliance and the reinforcement schedule was thinned. When the reinforcement requirement reached 10 consecutive tasks, the treatment effects became inconsistent and reinforcer selection shifted from a strong prefer...

  15. A One-year, Short-Stay Crewed Mars Mission Using Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Electric Propulsion (BNTEP) - A Preliminary Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Laura M.; Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    A crewed mission to Mars poses a significant challenge in dealing with the physiological issues that arise with the crew being exposed to a near zero-gravity environment as well as significant solar and galactic radiation for such a long duration. While long surface stay missions exceeding 500 days are the ultimate goal for human Mars exploration, short round trip, short surface stay missions could be an important intermediate step that would allow NASA to demonstrate technology as well as study the physiological effects on the crew. However, for a 1-year round trip mission, the outbound and inbound hyperbolic velocity at Earth and Mars can be very large resulting in a significant propellant requirement for a high thrust system like Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). Similarly, a low thrust Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system requires high electrical power levels (10 megawatts electric (MWe) or more), plus advanced power conversion technology to achieve the lower specific mass values needed for such a mission. A Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Electric Propulsion (BNTEP) system is examined here that uses three high thrust Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) engines allowing short departure and capture maneuvers. The engines also generate electrical power that drives a low thrust Electric Propulsion (EP) system used for efficient interplanetary transit. This combined system can help reduce the total launch mass, system and operational requirements that would otherwise be required for equivalent NEP or Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) mission. The BNTEP system is a hybrid propulsion concept where the BNTR reactors operate in two separate modes. During high-thrust mode operation, each BNTR provides 10's of kilo-Newtons of thrust at reasonably high specific impulse (Isp) of 900 seconds for impulsive transplanetary injection and orbital insertion maneuvers. When in power generation/EP mode, the BNTR reactors are coupled to a Brayton power conversion system allowing each

  16. A One-year, Short-Stay Crewed Mars Mission Using Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Electric Propulsion (BNTEP) - A Preliminary Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Laura A.; Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    A crewed mission to Mars poses a signi cant challenge in dealing with the physiolog- ical issues that arise with the crew being exposed to a near zero-gravity environment as well as signi cant solar and galactic radiation for such a long duration. While long sur- face stay missions exceeding 500 days are the ultimate goal for human Mars exploration, short round trip, short surface stay missions could be an important intermediate step that would allow NASA to demonstrate technology as well as study the physiological e ects on the crew. However, for a 1-year round trip mission, the outbound and inbound hy- perbolic velocity at Earth and Mars can be very large resulting in a signi cant propellant requirement for a high thrust system like Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). Similarly, a low thrust Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system requires high electrical power lev- els (10 megawatts electric (MWe) or more), plus advanced power conversion technology to achieve the lower speci c mass values needed for such a mission. A Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Electric Propulsion (BNTEP) system is examined here that uses three high thrust Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) engines allowing short departure and capture maneuvers. The engines also generate electrical power that drives a low thrust Electric Propulsion (EP) system used for ecient interplanetary transit. This combined system can help reduce the total launch mass, system and operational requirements that would otherwise be required for equivalent NEP or Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) mission. The BNTEP system is a hybrid propulsion concept where the BNTR reactors operate in two separate modes. During high-thrust mode operation, each BNTR provides 10's of kilo- Newtons of thrust at reasonably high speci c impulse (Isp) of 900 seconds for impulsive trans-planetary injection and orbital insertion maneuvers. When in power generation / EP mode, the BNTR reactors are coupled to a Brayton power conversion system allowing each

  17. Escape-Route Planning of Underground Coal Mine Based on Improved Ant Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwei Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When a mine disaster occurs, to lessen disaster losses and improve survival chances of the trapped miners, good escape routes need to be found and used. Based on the improved ant algorithm, we proposed a new escape-route planning method of underground mines. At first, six factors which influence escape difficulty are evaluated and a weight calculation model is built to form a weighted graph of the underground tunnels. Then an improved ant algorithm is designed and used to find good escape routes. We proposed a tunnel network zoning method to improve the searching efficiency of the ant algorithm. We use max-min ant system method to optimize the meeting strategy of ants and improve the performance of the ant algorithm. In addition, when a small part of the mine tunnel network changes, the system may fix the optimal routes and avoid starting a new processing procedure. Experiments show that the proposed method can find good escape routes efficiently and can be used in the escape-route planning of large and medium underground coal mines.

  18. Quantifying the Escape Mortality of Trawl Caught Antarctic Krill (Euphausia superba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Bjørn A.; Krag, Ludvig A.; Engås, Arill; Nordrum, Sigve; Bruheim, Inge; Herrmann, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is an abundant fishery resource, the harvest levels of which are expected to increase. However, many of the length classes of krill can escape through commonly used commercial trawl mesh sizes. A vital component of the overall management of a fishery is to estimate the total fishing mortality and quantify the mortality rate of individuals that escape from fishing gear. The methods for determining fishing mortality in krill are still poorly developed. We used a covered codend sampling technique followed by onboard observations made in holding tanks to monitor mortality rates of escaped krill. Haul duration, hydrological conditions, maximum fishing depth and catch composition all had no significant effect on mortality of krill escaping 16 mm mesh size nets, nor was any further mortality associated with the holding tank conditions. A non- parametric Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to model the relationship between mortality rates of escapees and time. There was a weak tendency, though not significant, for smaller individuals to suffer higher mortality than larger individuals. The mortality of krill escaping the trawl nets in our study was 4.4 ± 4.4%, suggesting that krill are fairly tolerant of the capture-and-escape process in trawls. PMID:27622510

  19. Effects of Serotonergic and Opioidergic Drugs on Escape Behaviors and Social Status of Male Crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonova, V. E.; Schürmann, F.-W.; Sakharov, D. A.

    We examined the effects of selective serotonin depletion and opioid ligands on social rank and related escape behavior of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Establishment of social rank in a pair of males affected their escape reactions. Losers showed a lower and dominants a higher percentage of jumps in response to tactile cercal stimulation than before a fight. The serotonin-depleting drug α-methyltryptophan (AMTP) caused an activation of the escape reactivity in socially naive crickets. AMTP-treated animals also showed a lower ability to become dominants. With an initial 51.6+/-3.6% of wins in the AMTP group, the percentage decreased to 26+/-1.6% on day 5 after injection. The opiate receptor antagonist naloxone affected fight and escape similarly as AMTP. In contrast to naloxone, the opioid agonist [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin decreased escape responsiveness to cercal stimulation in naive and subordinate crickets. We suggest that serotonergic and opioid systems are involved in the dominance induced depression of escape behavior.

  20. Quantifying the Escape Mortality of Trawl Caught Antarctic Krill (Euphausia superba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Bjørn A; Krag, Ludvig A; Engås, Arill; Nordrum, Sigve; Bruheim, Inge; Herrmann, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is an abundant fishery resource, the harvest levels of which are expected to increase. However, many of the length classes of krill can escape through commonly used commercial trawl mesh sizes. A vital component of the overall management of a fishery is to estimate the total fishing mortality and quantify the mortality rate of individuals that escape from fishing gear. The methods for determining fishing mortality in krill are still poorly developed. We used a covered codend sampling technique followed by onboard observations made in holding tanks to monitor mortality rates of escaped krill. Haul duration, hydrological conditions, maximum fishing depth and catch composition all had no significant effect on mortality of krill escaping 16 mm mesh size nets, nor was any further mortality associated with the holding tank conditions. A non- parametric Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to model the relationship between mortality rates of escapees and time. There was a weak tendency, though not significant, for smaller individuals to suffer higher mortality than larger individuals. The mortality of krill escaping the trawl nets in our study was 4.4 ± 4.4%, suggesting that krill are fairly tolerant of the capture-and-escape process in trawls. PMID:27622510

  1. Lobelia siphilitica plants that escape herbivory in time also have reduced latex production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Parachnowitsch

    Full Text Available Flowering phenology is an important determinant of a plant's reproductive success. Both assortative mating and niche construction can result in the evolution of correlations between phenology and other reproductive, functional, and life history traits. Correlations between phenology and herbivore defence traits are particularly likely because the timing of flowering can allow a plant to escape herbivory. To test whether herbivore escape and defence are correlated, we estimated phenotypic and genetic correlations between flowering phenology and latex production in greenhouse-grown Lobelia siphilitica L. (Lobeliaceae. Lobelia siphilitica plants that flower later escape herbivory by a specialist pre-dispersal seed predator, and thus should invest fewer resources in defence. Consistent with this prediction, we found that later flowering was phenotypically and genetically correlated with reduced latex production. To test whether herbivore escape and latex production were costly, we also measured four fitness correlates. Flowering phenology was negatively genetically correlated with three out of four fitness estimates, suggesting that herbivore escape can be costly. In contrast, we did not find evidence for costs of latex production. Generally, our results suggest that herbivore escape and defence traits will not evolve independently in L. siphilitica.

  2. Orbital and escape dynamics in barred galaxies - I. The 2D system

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Christof

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use the two-dimensional (2D) version of a new analytical gravitational model in order to explore the orbital as well as the escape dynamics of the stars in a barred galaxy composed of a spherically symmetric central nucleus, a bar, a flat disk and a dark matter halo component. A thorough numerical investigation is conducted for distinguishing between bounded and escaping motion. Furthermore bounded orbits are further classified into non-escaping regular and trapped chaotic using the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. Our aim is to determine the basins of escape through the two symmetrical escape channels around the Lagrange points $L_2$ and $L_3$ and also to relate them with the corresponding distribution of the escape rates of the orbits. We integrate initial conditions of orbits in several types of planes so as to obtain a more complete view of the overall orbital properties of the dynamical system. We also present evidence that the unstable manifolds which guide the orbits in and out t...

  3. Chaotic escape from an open vase-shaped cavity. I. Numerical and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Jaison; Keeler, Matthew L.; Giefer, Joshua; Delos, John B.

    2012-01-01

    We present part I in a two-part study of an open chaotic cavity shaped as a vase. The vase possesses an unstable periodic orbit in its neck. Trajectories passing through this orbit escape without return. For our analysis, we consider a family of trajectories launched from a point on the vase boundary. We imagine a vertical array of detectors past the unstable periodic orbit and, for each escaping trajectory, record the propagation time and the vertical detector position. We find that the escape time exhibits a complicated recursive structure. This recursive structure is explored in part I of our study. We present an approximation to the Helmholtz equation for waves escaping the vase. By choosing a set of detector points, we interpolate trajectories connecting the source to the different detector points. We use these interpolated classical trajectories to construct the solution to the wave equation at a detector point. Finally, we construct a plot of the detector position versus the escape time and compare this graph to the results of an experiment using classical ultrasound waves. We find that generally the classical trajectories organize the escaping ultrasound waves.

  4. Harmonious Co-Existence between Green and Black——Story about GW106 Drilling Crew "The Best Environment-Friendly Crew"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stepping into the well site of Rig Crew GW106 from GreatWall Drilling Company Venezuela) in Venezuela, you will be amazed by what you see. No splashing sludge or muddy roads, instead, what before you are spotless drilling equipment. All the workers in clean and glaring uniforms work busily yet in an orderly way.

  5. Characterization of Crew Refuse Returned from Shuttle Missions with Permanent Gas, Volatile Organic Compound, and Microbial Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, B.; Hummerick, M.; Roberts, M.; Krummins, V.; Kish, A.; Garland, J.; Maxwell, S.; Mills, A.

    In addition to the mass and energy costs associated with bioregenerative systems for advanced life support, the storage and processing of waste on spacecraft requires both atmospheric and biological management. Risks to crew health may arise from the presence of potential human pathogens in waste or from decay processes during waste storage and/or processing. This study reports on the permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses of crew refuse returned from shuttle missions STS-105, 109 and 110. The research objective is to characterize the biological stability of the waste stream, to assess the risks associated with its storage, and to provide baseline measures for the evaluation of waste processing technologies. Microbiological samples were collected from packaging material, food waste, bathroom waste, and bulk liquid collected from the volume F waste container. The number of culturable bacteria and total bacteria were determined by plating on R2A media and by Acridine Orange direct count, respectively. Samples of the trash were analyzed for the presence of fecal and total coliforms and other human-associated bacteria. Dry and ash weights were determined to estimate both water and organic content of the materials. The aerobic and anaerobic bio-stability of stored waste was determined by on-line monitoring of CO2 and by laboratory analysis of off-gas samples for hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA method TO15 with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors . This study establishes a baseline measure of waste composition, labile organics, and microbial load for this material.

  6. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal RE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rachel E Rizal,1,* Rishi P Mediratta,1,* James Xie,1 Swetha Kambhampati,1 Kelsey Hills-Evans,1 Tamara Montacute,1 Michael Zhang,1 Catherine Zaw,2 Jimmy He,2 Magali Sanchez,2 Lauren Pischel1 1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful service-learning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program’s outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians. Keywords: immunizations, vaccine delivery, vaccinations 

  7. Use of Data Comm by Flight Crew to Conduct Interval Management Operations to Parallel Dependent Runways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Hubbs, Clay; Shay, Rick; Karanian, James

    2011-01-01

    The Interval Management (IM) concept is being developed as a method to maintain or increase high traffic density airport arrival throughput while allowing aircraft to conduct near idle thrust descents. The Interval Management with Spacing to Parallel Dependent Runways (IMSPiDR1) experiment at NASA Langley Research Center used 24 commercial pilots to examine IM procedures to conduct parallel dependent runway arrival operations while maintaining safe but efficient intervals behind the preceding aircraft. The use of IM procedures during these operations requires a lengthy and complex clearance from Air Traffic Control (ATC) to the participating aircraft, thereby making the use of Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) highly desirable as the communication method. The use of CPDLC reduces the need for voice transmissions between controllers and flight crew, and enables automated transfer of IM clearance elements into flight management systems or other aircraft avionics. The result is reduced crew workload and an increase in the efficiency of crew procedures. This paper focuses on the subset of data collected related to the use of CPDLC for IM operations into a busy airport. Overall, the experiment and results were very successful, with the mean time under 43 seconds for the flight crew to load the clearance into the IM spacing tool, review the calculated speed, and respond to ATC. An overall mean rating of Moderately Agree was given when the crews were asked if the use of CPDLC was operationally acceptable as simulated in this experiment. Approximately half of the flight crew reported the use of CPDLC below 10,000 for IM operations was unacceptable, with 83% reporting below 5000 was unacceptable. Also described are proposed modifications to the IM operations that may reduce CPDLC Respond time to less than 30 seconds and should significantly reduce the complexity of crew procedures, as well as follow-on research issues for operational use of CPDLC during IM

  8. Testing a Simple Recipe for Estimating Thermal Hydrodynamic Escape Rates in Primitive Terrestrial Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedson, A. J.; Yung, Y. L.; Chen, P.

    2014-12-01

    During the first billion years of the Sun's history, the emission of ultraviolet and X-ray radiation varied from ~100 to ~6 times greater than its present level. The absorption of this intense radiation in the upper atmospheres of the terrestrial planets is believed to have driven rapid hydrodynamic escape, either in the form of energy-limited escape or transonic blow-off. The calculation of escape rates under these circumstances, and in particular the nature of the correct condition to apply at the upper boundary, depends on whether or not the flow remains subsonic below the exobase. If the flow remains subsonic, the kinetic Jeans equations may be applied at the exobase; otherwise, the radius of the sonic point must be located and then appropriate boundary conditions applied at this radius. This seems to suggest that the full hydrodynamic escape problem needs to be solved iteratively to determine where the sonic radius falls and the type of boundary conditions that should be applied. Such an arduous undertaking is generally impractical for standard application in chemical evolution models or related studies. Fortunately, a much easier but still accurate approach to determining whether the flow remains subsonic below the exobase for a given amount of energy deposition has been provided by Johnson et al. (2013, Ap. J. Lett. 768:L4), who base their results on rigorous Discrete Simulation Monte Carlo models. Their model provides the ratio of the escape rate to the energy-limited value as a function of the total XUV heating. The XUV heating, however, is itself coupled to the escape rate through the radial structure of the upper atmosphere, which can become greatly distended for large heating rates. Here we present a simple recipe for estimating the hydrodynamic escape rate that includes the coupling between the escape rate, the radial structure, and the XUV heating while avoiding the use of demanding numerical calculations. The approach involves an iterative semi

  9. Providing Oxygen for the Crew of a Lunar Outpost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Michael K.; Jeng, Frank; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly S.

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) is obviously essential for human space missions, but it is important to examine all the different ways it will be used and the potential sources that it may come from. This effort will lead to storage and delivery requirements and help to determine the optimum architecture from an overall systems engineering point of view. Accounting for all the oxygen in a Lunar Outpost mission includes meeting the metabolic needs of the crew while in the surface Habitat, leakage through the Habitat or Pressurized Rover walls, recharge of the space suit backpack and emergency situations. Current plans indicate that both primary and secondary O2 bottles for the space suit will be filled to a pressure of 20.7 MPa (3000 psia). Other uses of O2 require much lower pressure. Sources of O2 at a Lunar Outpost include compressed or liquefied O2 brought along specifically for life support, scavenged O2 from the Lander propulsion system, recovered O2 from waste water or exhaled carbon dioxide and O2 mined from the moon itself. Previously, eight technology options were investigated to provide the high pressure space suit O2. High pressure O2 storage was treated as the baseline technology and compared to the other seven. The other seven were cryogenic storage followed by high pressure vaporization, scavenging liquid oxygen (LOX) from Lander followed by vaporization, LOX delivery followed by sorption compression, low pressure water electrolysis followed by mechanical compression, high pressure water electrolysis, sharing a high pressure electrolyzer with a regenerative fuel cell power system, and making use of In- Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). This system-level analysis was conducted by comparing equivalent system mass of the eight technologies in open and closed loop life support architectures. The most promising high pressure O2 generation technologies were recommended for development. Updates and an expansion of the earlier study have been made and the results are reported in

  10. Exosomes as a tumor immune escape mechanism: possible therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Harold H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in cancer therapy have been substantial in terms of molecular understanding of disease mechanisms, however these advances have not translated into increased survival in the majority of cancer types. One unsolved problem in current cancer therapeutics is the substantial immune suppression seen in patients. Conventionally, investigations in this area have focused on antigen-nonspecific immune suppressive molecules such as cytokines and T cell apoptosis inducing molecules such as Fas ligand. More recently, studies have demonstrated nanovesicle particles termed exosomes are involved not only in stimulation but also inhibition of immunity in physiological conditions. Interestingly, exosomes secreted by cancer cells have been demonstrated to express tumor antigens, as well as immune suppressive molecules such as PD-1L and FasL. Concentrations of exosomes from plasma of cancer patients have been associated with spontaneous T cell apoptosis, which is associated in some situations with shortened survival. In this paper we place the "exosome-immune suppression" concept in perspective of other tumor immune evasion mechanisms. We conclude by discussing a novel therapeutic approach to cancer immune suppression by extracorporeal removal of exosomes using hollow fiber filtration technology

  11. MAVEN Imaging UV Spectrograph Results on the Mars Atmosphere and Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Michael; Schneider, Nick; McClintock, Bill; Stewart, Ian; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal; Clarke, John; Holsclaw, Greg; Montmessin, Franck; Lefevre, Franck; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Stiepen, Arnaud; Crismani, Matteo; Mayyasi, Majd; Evans, Scott; Stevens, Mike; Yelle, Roger; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) is one of nine science instruments aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft, whose payload is dedicated to exploring the upper atmosphere of Mars and understanding the magnitude and drivers of Mars' atmospheric escape rate. IUVS uses ultraviolet light to investigate the lower and upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. The instrument is among the most powerful spectrographs sent to another planet, with several key capabilities: (1) separate Far-UV & Mid-UV channels for stray light control, (2) a high resolution echelle mode to resolve deuterium and hydrogen emission, (3) internal instrument pointing and scanning capabilities to allow complete mapping and nearly continuous operation, and (4) optimization for airglow studies. IUVS, along with other MAVEN instruments, obtains a comprehensive picture of the current state of the Mars upper atmosphere and ionosphere and the processes that control atmospheric escape. We present an overview of selected IUVS results, including (1) the discovery of diffuse aurora at Mars, and its contrast with previously detected discrete aurora localized near crustal magnetic fields; (2) widespread detection of mesospheric clouds; (3) Significant seasonal and short-timescale variability in thermospheric composition; (4) Global ozone maps spanning six months of seasonal evolution; and (5) mapping of the Mars H and O coronas, deriving the escape rates of H and O and their variability. This last is of particular importance for understanding the long term evolution of Mars and its atmosphere, with the observed preset escape of H potentially capable of removing a large fraction of Mars' initial water inventory, and the differential escape of O relative to H potentially providing a net source of oxidizing power to the atmosphere and planet at present, in contrast with a photochemical theory that predicts stoichiometrically balanced escape. The atmospheric and escape

  12. Two cases of atmospheric escape in the Solar System: Titan and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandouras, I.

    2012-01-01

    Escape into space of the constituents of a planetary upper atmosphere can occur either in the form of neutral gas (thermal escape or non-thermal escape), or in the form of plasma. The long-term stability of an atmosphere results from the balance between source and escape rates. Two cases will be examined: Titan and Earth. Titan is the second largest planetary satellite in the Solar System and is the only one that has an atmosphere as substantial as that of the Earth. Titan's nitrogen rich atmosphere is embedded within Saturn's magnetosphere, and is directly bombarded by energetic ions due to Titan's lack of a significant intrinsic magnetic field. In addition to thermal escape, energy input from Saturn's magnetosphere and from Solar UV radiation can drive several non-thermal escape mechanisms in Titan's upper atmosphere: sputtering, dissociation and dissociative ionization of molecular nitrogen producing pick-up ions, photochemical production of fast neutrals etc. Earth also constantly loses matter, mostly in the form of H+ and O+ ions, through various outflow processes from the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. Most of the ions are low-energy (plasma reservoir is the plasmasphere, which is a toroidal region encircling the Earth and containing cold and dense plasma. Plasma plumes, forming in the outer plasmasphere and released outwards, constitute a well-established mode for plasmaspheric material release to the magnetosphere. They are associated to geomagnetically active periods and the related electric field change. In 1992 Lemaire and Shunk proposed the existence of an additional mode for plasmaspheric material release and escape: a plasmaspheric wind, steadily transporting cold plasmaspheric plasma outwards across the geomagnetic field lines. This has been proposed on a theoretical basis. Direct detection of this wind has, however, eluded observation in the past. Analysis of ion measurements, acquired in the outer plasmasphere by the CIS experiment onboard the

  13. Influence of the helicopter environment on patient care capabilities: flight crew perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, K. J.; Rodenberg, H.; Woodard, D.

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Flight crew perceptions of the effect of the rotary-wing environment on patient-care capabilities have not been subject to statistical analysis. We hypothesized that flight crew members perceived significant difficulties in performing patient-care tasks during air medical transport. METHODS: A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of flight crew members from 20 flight programs. Respondents were asked to compare the difficulty of performing patient-care tasks in rotary-wing and standard (emergency department or intensive care unit) settings. Demographic data collected on respondents included years of flight experience, flights per month, crew duty position and primary aircraft in which the respondent worked. Statistical analysis was performed as appropriate using Student's t-test, type III sum of squares, and analysis of variance. Alpha was defined as p responded. All tasks were significantly rated more difficult in the rotary-wing environment. Ratings were not significantly correlated with flight experience, duty position, flights per month or aircraft used. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the performance of patient-care tasks are perceived by air medical flight crew to be significantly more difficult during rotary-wing air medical transport than in hospital settings.

  14. Personal values and crew compatibility: Results from a 105 days simulated space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandal, Gro M.; Bye, Hege H.; van de Vijver, Fons J. R.

    2011-08-01

    On a mission to Mars the crew will experience high autonomy and inter-dependence. "Groupthink", known as a tendency to strive for consensus at the cost of considering alternative courses of action, represents a potential safety hazard. This paper addresses two aspects of "groupthink": the extent to which confined crewmembers perceive increasing convergence in personal values, and whether they attribute less tension to individual differences over time. It further examines the impact of personal values for interpersonal compatibility. These questions were investigated in a 105-day confinement study in which a multinational crew ( N=6) simulated a Mars mission. The Portrait of Crew Values Questionnaire was administered regularly to assess personal values, perceived value homogeneity, and tension attributed to value disparities. Interviews were conducted before and after the confinement. Multiple regression analysis revealed no significant changes in value homogeneity over time; rather the opposite tendency was indicated. More tension was attributed to differences in hedonism, benevolence and tradition in the last 35 days when the crew was allowed greater autonomy. Three subgroups, distinct in terms of personal values, were identified. No evidence for "groupthink" was found. The results suggest that personal values should be considered in composition of crews for long duration missions.

  15. Study of the psychological adaptation of the crew during a 135 days space simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisabeth, Rosnet; Geneviève, Cazes; Alla, Venokhodova

    The purpose of this study is to examine human Actaptation of a three members' crew during a 135 days MIR flight simulation and to compare and validate psychological methods for monitoring and support in flight. The main findings showed that isolation was not a key factor for the subjects who were more concerned by recreational activities, family, and work. The individual reactions to stress of the crew members were to project their problems on the others. These reactions had some consequences upon the group: Although the three subjects developed a weak tendency to ≪ group think ≫, one of the crew members was considered as less integrated to the group by me other two subjects, who, however, acted to protect (successfully) the general cohesion and mood of the crew. From a methodological point of view, baseline data predicted the difficulties that occurred for one of the crew member. Bom quantitative and qualitative tools were adequate, although qualitative tests gave a closer approach to the actual situation that developed during the simulation.

  16. Modeling the endosomal escape of cell-penetrating peptides: transmembrane pH gradient driven translocation across phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzoub, Mazin; Pramanik, Aladdin; Gräslund, Astrid

    2005-11-15

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to mediate the efficient cellular uptake of a wide range of cargoes. Internalization of a number of CPPs requires uptake by endocytosis, initiated by binding to anionic cell surface heparan sulfate (HS), followed by escape from endosomes. To elucidate the endosomal escape mechanism, we have modeled the process for two CPPs: penetratin (pAntp) and the N-terminal signal peptide of the unprocessed bovine prion protein (bPrPp). Large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) were produced encapsulating either peptide, and an ionophore, nigericin, was used to create a transmembrane pH gradient (DeltapH(mem), inside acidic) similar to the one arising in endosomes in vivo. In the absence of DeltapH(mem), no pAntp escape from the LUVs is observed, while a fraction of bPrPp escapes. In the presence of DeltapH(mem), a significant amount of pAntp escapes and an even higher degree of bPrPp escape takes place. These results, together with the differences in kinetics of escape, indicate different escape mechanisms for the two peptides. A minimum threshold peptide concentration exists for the escape of both peptides. Coupling of the peptides to a cargo reduces the fraction escaping, while complexation with HS significantly hinders the escape. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy results show that during the escape process the LUVs are intact. Taken together, these results suggest a model for endosomal escape of CPPs: DeltapH(mem)-mediated mechanism, following dissociation from HS of the peptides, above a minimum threshold peptide concentration, in a process that does not involve lysis of the vesicles.

  17. IMF-induced escape of molecular ions from the Martian ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kubota

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Mars does not possess a significant global intrinsic magnetic field, the solar wind interacts directly with the Martian ionosphere and can induce ion escapes from it. Phobos-2 and recent Mars Express (MEX observations have shown that the escaping ions are O+ as well as molecular O2+ and CO2+. While O+ escape can be understood by the ion pick-up of non-thermal O corona extended around the planet, regarding the heavy molecular O2+ and CO2+, which are buried in the lower ionosphere, a novel escape mechanism needs to considered. Here we attack this problem by global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD simulations. First, we clarify the global structure of the streamlines that result from the interaction with the solar wind. Then, by focusing on the streamlines that dip into the low-altitude part of the dayside ionosphere, we investigate the escape path of the molecular ions. The effects of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF on the molecular ion escape process are investigated by comparing the results with and without IMF. IMF has little effect on O+ escape via ion pick-up mediated by solar wind electron impact ionization of the O corona. O2+ and CO2+ are shoveled from the low-altitude regions of the dayside ionosphere by magnetic tension in the presence of IMF. These ions are pulled by the U-shaped field lines to the north and south poles, and at the terminator, they are concentrated in the noon–midnight meridian plane. These ions remain confined to the noon–midnight plane as they are transported to the nightside to form the tail ray. Then they escape along the streamlines open to the interplanetary space. Under a typical solar wind and IMF condition expected at Mars, O+, O2+ and CO2+ escape fluxes are 8.0 × 1023, 3.5 × 1023 and 5.0 × 1022 ion s−1, respectively, which are in good agreement with the MEX observations.

  18. Making the clean available: Escaping India’s Chulha Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid cookfuel pollution is the largest energy-related health risk globally and most important cause of ill-health for Indian women and girls. At 700 million cooking with open biomass chulhas, the Indian population exposed has not changed in several decades, in spite of hundreds of programs to make the “available clean”, i.e. to burn biomass cleanly in advanced stoves. While such efforts continue, there is need to open up another front to attack this health hazard. Gas and electric cooking, which are clean at the household, are already the choice for one-third of Indians. Needed is a new agenda to make the “clean available”, i.e., to vigorously extend these clean fuels into populations that are caught in the Chulha Trap. This will require engaging new actors including the power and petroleum ministries as well as the ministry of health, which have not to date been directly engaged in addressing this problem. It will have implications for LPG imports, distribution networks, and electric and gas user technologies, as well as setting new priorities for electrification and biofuels, but at heart needs to be addressed as a health problem, not one of energy access, if it is to be solved effectively. - Highlights: • Pollution from cooking with solid fuels is largest health hazard for Indian women and girls. • 700 million Indians are caught in a trap using solid fuels with little change in number exposed for decades. • Efforts to make the biomass fuel clean through advanced stoves have made only modest progress in decades. • A major new effort is needed to make the clean available, in the form of gas and electricity. • This will require forging new partnerships and rethinking how these fuels are currently promoted

  19. Advanced Life Support Project Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Life support systems are an enabling technology and have become integral to the success of living and working in space. As NASA embarks on human exploration and development of space to open the space frontier by exploring, using and enabling the development of space and to expand the human experience into the far reaches of space, it becomes imperative, for considerations of safety, cost, and crew health, to minimize consumables and increase the autonomy of the life support system. Utilizing advanced life support technologies increases this autonomy by reducing mass, power, and volume necessary for human support, thus permitting larger payload allocations for science and exploration. Two basic classes of life support systems must be developed, those directed toward applications on transportation/habitation vehicles (e.g., Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), next generation launch vehicles, crew-tended stations/observatories, planetary transit spacecraft, etc.) and those directed toward applications on the planetary surfaces (e.g., lunar or Martian landing spacecraft, planetary habitats and facilities, etc.). In general, it can be viewed as those systems compatible with microgravity and those compatible with hypogravity environments. Part B of the Appendix defines the technology development 'Roadmap' to be followed in providing the necessary systems for these missions. The purpose of this Project Plan is to define the Project objectives, Project-level requirements, the management organizations responsible for the Project throughout its life cycle, and Project-level resources, schedules and controls.

  20. Escape Distance in Ground-Nesting Birds Differs with Individual Level of Camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Aggarwal, Jared K; Troscianko, Jolyon T; Stevens, Martin; Spottiswoode, Claire N

    2016-08-01

    Camouflage is one of the most widespread antipredator strategies in the animal kingdom, yet no animal can match its background perfectly in a complex environment. Therefore, selection should favor individuals that use information on how effective their camouflage is in their immediate habitat when responding to an approaching threat. In a field study of African ground-nesting birds (plovers, coursers, and nightjars), we tested the hypothesis that individuals adaptively modulate their escape behavior in relation to their degree of background matching. We used digital imaging and models of predator vision to quantify differences in color, luminance, and pattern between eggs and their background, as well as the plumage of incubating adult nightjars. We found that plovers and coursers showed greater escape distances when their eggs were a poorer pattern match to the background. Nightjars sit on their eggs until a potential threat is nearby, and, correspondingly, they showed greater escape distances when the pattern and color match of the incubating adult's plumage-rather than its eggs-was a poorer match to the background. Finally, escape distances were shorter in the middle of the day, suggesting that escape behavior is mediated by both camouflage and thermoregulation. PMID:27420787

  1. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priyanka L; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-08-23

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc-dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  2. Fluctuating bottleneck model studies on kinetics of DNA escape from α-hemolysin nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yukun; Wang, Zilin; Chen, Anpu; Zhao, Nanrong

    2015-11-14

    We have proposed a fluctuation bottleneck (FB) model to investigate the non-exponential kinetics of DNA escape from nanometer-scale pores. The basic idea is that the escape rate is proportional to the fluctuating cross-sectional area of DNA escape channel, the radius r of which undergoes a subdiffusion dynamics subjected to fractional Gaussian noise with power-law memory kernel. Such a FB model facilitates us to obtain the analytical result of the averaged survival probability as a function of time, which can be directly compared to experimental results. Particularly, we have applied our theory to address the escape kinetics of DNA through α-hemolysin nanopores. We find that our theoretical framework can reproduce the experimental results very well in the whole time range with quite reasonable estimation for the intrinsic parameters of the kinetics processes. We believe that FB model has caught some key features regarding the long time kinetics of DNA escape through a nanopore and it might provide a sound starting point to study much wider problems involving anomalous dynamics in confined fluctuating channels. PMID:26567685

  3. Sputtering at Mars: MAVEN observations of precipitating and escaping oxygen during nominal and extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Shannon; Luhmann, Janet; Dong, Chuanfei; Ma, Yingjuan; Leblanc, Francois; Modolo, Ronan; Brain, David; Gruesbeck, Jacob; Hara, Takuya; Halekas, Jasper; Dong, Yaxue; Williamson, Hayley N.; Johnson, Robert E.; McFadden, James; Espley, Jared R.; Mitchell, David; Connerney, Jack; Eparvier, Frank; Lillis, Robert J.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Sputtering is believed to be one of the dominant escape mechanisms during the early epochs of our solar system when the solar activity and EUV intensities were much higher than the present day. Mars lacks a global dynamo magnetic field, which creates a scenario where the solar wind directly interacts with the upper atmosphere and newly created ions can be picked up and swept away by the background convection electric field. These pick-up ions can directly escape or precipitate back into the atmosphere and induce atmospheric sputtering of neutrals.The MAVEN spacecraft has observed the Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, magnetic topology and interactions with the Sun and solar wind during numerous Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) impacts spanning from March 2015 to June 2016. ICMEs are associated with enhanced solar wind velocities, densities and magnetic field strength, and often drive heavy ion precipitation at much higher rates than during nominal conditions. Thus, ICMEs provide a unique environment for observing sputtering. We will compare MAVEN observations of heavy ion precipitation during nominal conditions as well as during ICMEs. Additionally, we will present global MHD and test particle simulations of the ICMEs in order to calculate sputtering escape rates for oxygen. Finally, we will use the observed and modeled sputtering escape rates to provide an initial estimate of the total sputtered atmospheric escape from Mars over billions of years.

  4. Specific exercise training for reducing neck and shoulder pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Flight-related neck/shoulder pain is frequent among military helicopter pilots and crew members. With a lifetime prevalence of 81 % for pilots and 84 % for crew members, the prevalence of neck pain is considered high compared to the general population. The aim of this study...... was to investigate whether a specifically tailored exercise intervention would reduce the prevalence and incidence rate of neck/shoulder pain among helicopter pilots and crew members. METHOD: This study used a prospective, parallel group, single blinded, randomized controlled design. Participants were military...... status at enrollment, and 3) operational flying within the previous 6 months. Primary outcome was change in neck and shoulder pain assessed by 1) a modified version of the "Standardized Nordic questionnaire for the analysis of musculoskeletal symptoms" and by 2) pressure pain threshold measurements...

  5. The STS-95 crew addresses KSC employees in the Training Auditorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Training Auditorium, STS-95 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (at podium) addresses KSC employees who were invited to hear the STS-95 crew describe their experiences during their successful mission dedicated to microgravity research and to view a videotape of the highlights of the mission. The other STS-95 crew members are (seated, from left to right) Pilot Steven W. Lindsey; Mission Specialist and Payload Commander Stephen K. Robinson; Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski and Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA); and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), and John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio and one of the original seven Project Mercury astronauts. Later in the afternoon, the crew will participate in a parade down State Road A1A in nearby Cocoa Beach, reminiscent of those held after missions during the Mercury Program.

  6. STS-101 crew returns from Launch Pad 39A after launch was scrubbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The STS-101 crew returns to the Operations and Checkout Building after the launch was scrubbed due to cross winds at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility gusting above 20 knots. Flight rules require cross winds at the SLF to be no greater than 15 knots in case of a contingency Shuttle landing. Shown leaving the Astrovan are (left to right) Mission Specialists James S. Voss and Yuri Usachev of Russia; Pilot Scott J. Horowitz; and Commander James D. Halsell Jr. in the doorway. Weather conditions will be reevaluated for another launch try on April 25. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. The mission is expected to last about 10 days.

  7. NASA Crew Personal Active Dosimeters (CPADs): Leveraging Novel Terrestrial Personal Radiation Monitoring Capabilities for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgab, Martin; Semones, Edward; Lee, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) is developing novel Crew Personal Active Dosimeters (CAPDs) for upcoming crewed space exploration missions and beyond. To reduce the resource footprint of the project a COTS dosimeter base is used for the development of CPADs. This base was identified from evaluations of existing COTS personal dosimeters against the concept of operations of future crewed missions and tests against detection requirements for radiation characteristic of the space environment. CPADs exploit operations efficiencies from novel features for space flight personal dosimeters such as real-time dose feedback, and autonomous measuring and data transmission capabilities. Preliminary CPAD design, results of radiation testing and aspects of operational integration will be presented.

  8. The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews pose in front of the M-113 during TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews pose in front of the M-113 armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training at the pad. From left to right, they are STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz, Mission Specialist Daniel Barry, Pilot Rick Sturckow, and Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester; Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonauts Mikhail Tyurin and Vladimir Nikolaevich Dezhurov. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The current Expedition Two crew members on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. Launch of Discovery is scheduled no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001.

  9. Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Active Thermal Control and Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Boehm, Paul; Cross, Cynthia D.; Rains, George Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in September of 2014. The development of the Orion Active Thermal Control (ATCS) and Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the integrating the components into the EFT1 vehicle and preparing them for launch. Work also has started on preliminary design reviews for the manned vehicle. Additional development work is underway to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation on the flight tests of EM1 in 2017 and of EM2 in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2013 to April 2014

  10. STS-107 crew looks at SHI Research Double Module during CEIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - While a technician holds a light wand, STS-107 Mission Specialists David Brown and Kalpana Chawla look over equipment in the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), part of the payload on the mission. The crew is taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, which include equipment and payload familiarization. A research mission, STS-107 also will carry the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) that incorporates eight high priority secondary attached shuttle experiments. STS-107 is scheduled to launch July 19, 2002

  11. Smoking behaviour among female airline cabin crew from ten Asian countries

    OpenAIRE

    Li, C; Fielding, R.; Marcoolyn, G; Wong, C M; Hedley, A.

    1994-01-01

    Objective - To identify factors related to the high prevalence of smoking behaviour among a sample of female airline cabin crew of Asian origin. Design - A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey of 585 Asian women, aged 20-41 years working as experienced cabin crew for a major international airline. Main outcome measures - Subjects answered questions on their knowledge of the consequences of smoking, the per¬ceived effects of smoking, their per¬ceptions of the social images of smoking ...

  12. The Use of Water During the Crew 144, Mars Desert Research Station, Utah Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Well. from November 29th to December 14th, 2014, the author conducted astrobiological and geological surveys, as analog astronaut member of the international Crew 144, at the site of the Mars Society's Mars Desert Research Station, located at a remote location in the Utah desert, United States. The use of water for drinking, bathing, cleaning, etc., in the crew was a major issue for consideration for a human expedition to the planet Mars in the future. The author would like to tell about the factors of the rationalized use of water.

  13. Escape and collision dynamics in the planar equilateral restricted four-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    We consider the planar circular equilateral restricted four body-problem where a test particle of infinitesimal mass is moving under the gravitational attraction of three primary bodies which move on circular orbits around their common center of gravity, such that their configuration is always an equilateral triangle. The case where all three primaries have equal masses is numerically investigated. A thorough numerical analysis takes place in the configuration $(x,y)$ as well as in the $(x,C)$ space in which we classify initial conditions of orbits into four main categories: (i) bounded regular orbits, (ii) trapped chaotic orbits, (iii) escaping orbits and (iv) collision orbits. Interpreting the collision motion as leaking in the phase space we related our results to both chaotic scattering and the theory of leaking Hamiltonian systems. We successfully located the escape and the collision basins and we managed to correlate them with the corresponding escape and collision times of orbits. We hope our contribut...

  14. Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Induced Non-Thermal Escape Fluxes from the Martian Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Lewkow, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), produced through charge exchange (CX) collisions between solar wind (SW) ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated. Subsequent induced non-thermal escape fluxes have been carried out for the Martian atmosphere. Detailed modeling of the ENA energy input and determination of connections between parameters of precipitating ENAs and resulting escape fluxes, reflection coefficients of fast atoms from the Mars atmosphere, and altitude dependent ENA energy distributions are established using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the precipitation process with accurate quantum mechanical (QM) cross sections. Detailed descriptions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules induced by ENAs have been obtained for a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for atmospheric escape and evolution. The effects of using isotropic hard sphere (HS) cross sections as compared to realistic, anisotropic quantum cross sections are examined for energy-deposition profil...

  15. Mass fractionation of noble gases in diffusion-limited hydrodynamic hydrogen escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The theory of mass fractionation by hydrogen is presently extended to atmospheres in which hydrogen is not the major constituent. This theoretical framework is applied to three different cases. In the first, it is shown that the fractionation of terrestrial atmospheric neon with respect to mantle neon is explainable as a consequence of diffusion-limited hydrogen escape from a steam atmosphere toward the end of the accretion process. In the second, the anomalously high Ar-38/Ar-36 ratio of Mars is shown to be due to hydrodynamic fractionation by a vigorously escaping and very pure hydrogen wind. In the last case, it is speculated that the currently high Martian D/H ratio emerged during the hydrodynamic escape phase which fractionated Ar.

  16. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells.

  17. Intermittent cold water swim stress increases immobility and interferes with escape performance in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, John P; Drugan, Robert C

    2005-11-30

    The behavioral consequences of intermittent, 5 s cold-water swims (15 degrees C) or confinement were assessed 24 h after stress in a 5 min forced swim test or an instrumental swim escape test (SET). The SET was conducted with temporal and instrumental parameters similar to the shock-motivated shuttle escape test. The tests detected significantly increased immobility in the forced swim test and increased latency to escape in the SET. These results extend previous findings with intermittent swim stress and provide evidence that intermittent swim stress produces behavioral deficits similar to other stress models. This new model may be a useful tool for exploring the physiological mechanisms underlying the stress response.

  18. Ambipolar escape from Venus, Mars and Titan, and negative ions at Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric photoelectrons are a natural product of the photo-ionisation of planetary atmospheres. Their energy spectrum is distinctive and depends on the solar spectrum in the EUV and X-ray region. On production, the energetic electrons move along the magnetic field (open or draped), setting up an ambipolar electric field which can extract ions. This provides an escape mechanism similar to Earth's 'polar wind'. As these objects are unmagnetised, this produces an extended escape mechanism over the whole sunlit ionosphere. Here, we review recent measurements of photoelectrons far from the parent objects at Venus, Mars and Titan, from Venus Express, Mars Express, Maven and Cassini, and discuss similarities and related escape rates. We also review the pioneering observations of the remarkably heavy negative ions discovered in Titan's ionosphere.

  19. The great escape: the role of self-esteem and self-related cognition in terror management

    OpenAIRE

    Wisman, Arnaud; Heflick, Nathan A; Goldenberg, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating terror management theory and objective self-awareness theory, we propose the existential escape hypothesis, which states that people with low self-esteem should be especially prone to escaping self-awareness as a distal response to thoughts of death. This is because they lack the means to bolster the self as a defense, and the propensity to bolster the self reduces the motivation to escape from self-awareness. Five studies supported this hypothesis. Individuals low,...

  20. Immunoproteasomes edit tumors, which then escapes immune recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    In 1985, John Monaco--the discoverer of LMP-2 and -7, the inducible components of the immunoproteasome--asked his advanced immunology class as to why the MHC region contained not only structural genes, but several others as well, whose functions were then unknown. As we drew a blank, he quipped: perchance because many of the MHC genes are induced by IFN-γ! The ensuing three decades have witnessed the unveiling of the profound fundamental and clinical implications of that classroom tête-à-tête. Amongst its multitudinous effects, IFN-γ induces genes enhancing antigen processing and presentation to T cells; such as those encoding cellular proteases and activators of proteases. In this issue, Keller et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 3257-3268] demonstrate that the limited success of MART-1/Melan-A-targeted immunotherapy in melanoma patients could be due to inefficient MART-1(26-35) presentation, owing to the proteolytic activities of IFN-γ-inducible β2i/MECL-1, proteasome activator 28 (PA28), and endoplasmic reticulum-associated aminopeptidase-associated with antigen processing (ERAP). Specifically, whilst β2i and PA28 impede MART-1(26-35) liberation from its precursor protein, ERAP-1 degrades this epitope. Hence, critical to effective cancer immunotherapy is deep knowledge of T-cell-targeted tumor antigens and how cellular proteases generate protective epitope(s) from them, or destroy them. PMID:26527367

  1. Generalized Jeans' Escape of Pick-Up Ions in Quasi-Linear Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. E.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    Jeans escape is a well-validated formulation of upper atmospheric escape that we have generalized to estimate plasma escape from ionospheres. It involves the computation of the parts of particle velocity space that are unbound by the gravitational potential at the exobase, followed by a calculation of the flux carried by such unbound particles as they escape from the potential well. To generalize this approach for ions, we superposed an electrostatic ambipolar potential and a centrifugal potential, for motions across and along a divergent magnetic field. We then considered how the presence of superthermal electrons, produced by precipitating auroral primary electrons, controls the ambipolar potential. We also showed that the centrifugal potential plays a small role in controlling the mass escape flux from the terrestrial ionosphere. We then applied the transverse ion velocity distribution produced when ions, picked up by supersonic (i.e., auroral) ionospheric convection, relax via quasi-linear diffusion, as estimated for cometary comas [1]. The results provide a theoretical basis for observed ion escape response to electromagnetic and kinetic energy sources. They also suggest that super-sonic but sub-Alfvenic flow, with ion pick-up, is a unique and important regime of ion-neutral coupling, in which plasma wave-particle interactions are driven by ion-neutral collisions at densities for which the collision frequency falls near or below the gyro-frequency. As another possible illustration of this process, the heliopause ribbon discovered by the IBEX mission involves interactions between the solar wind ions and the interstellar neutral gas, in a regime that may be analogous [2].

  2. Early low-titer neutralizing antibodies impede HIV-1 replication and select for virus escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine J Bar

    Full Text Available Single genome sequencing of early HIV-1 genomes provides a sensitive, dynamic assessment of virus evolution and insight into the earliest anti-viral immune responses in vivo. By using this approach, together with deep sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, antibody adsorptions and virus-entry assays, we found evidence in three subjects of neutralizing antibody (Nab responses as early as 2 weeks post-seroconversion, with Nab titers as low as 1∶20 to 1∶50 (IC(50 selecting for virus escape. In each of the subjects, Nabs targeted different regions of the HIV-1 envelope (Env in a strain-specific, conformationally sensitive manner. In subject CH40, virus escape was first mediated by mutations in the V1 region of the Env, followed by V3. HIV-1 specific monoclonal antibodies from this subject mapped to an immunodominant region at the base of V3 and exhibited neutralizing patterns indistinguishable from polyclonal antibody responses, indicating V1-V3 interactions within the Env trimer. In subject CH77, escape mutations mapped to the V2 region of Env, several of which selected for alterations of glycosylation. And in subject CH58, escape mutations mapped to the Env outer domain. In all three subjects, initial Nab recognition was followed by sequential rounds of virus escape and Nab elicitation, with Nab escape variants exhibiting variable costs to replication fitness. Although delayed in comparison with autologous CD8 T-cell responses, our findings show that Nabs appear earlier in HIV-1 infection than previously recognized, target diverse sites on HIV-1 Env, and impede virus replication at surprisingly low titers. The unexpected in vivo sensitivity of early transmitted/founder virus to Nabs raises the possibility that similarly low concentrations of vaccine-induced Nabs could impair virus acquisition in natural HIV-1 transmission, where the risk of infection is low and the number of viruses responsible for transmission and productive clinical

  3. Large-scale microarray profiling reveals four stages of immune escape in non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosolini, Marie; Algans, Christelle; Pont, Frédéric; Ycart, Bernard; Fournié, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL) are aggressive lymphoid malignancies that develop in patients due to oncogenic activation, chemo-resistance, and immune evasion. Tumor biopsies show that B-NHL frequently uses several immune escape strategies, which has hindered the development of checkpoint blockade immunotherapies in these diseases. To gain a better understanding of B-NHL immune editing, we hypothesized that the transcriptional hallmarks of immune escape associated with these diseases could be identified from the meta-analysis of large series of microarrays from B-NHL biopsies. Thus, 1446 transcriptome microarrays from seven types of B-NHL were downloaded and assembled from 33 public Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets, and a method for scoring the transcriptional hallmarks in single samples was developed. This approach was validated by matching scores to phenotypic hallmarks of B-NHL such as proliferation, signaling, metabolic activity, and leucocyte infiltration. Through this method, we observed a significant enrichment of 33 immune escape genes in most diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) samples, with fewer in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) samples. Comparing these gene expression patterns with overall survival data evidenced four stages of cancer immune editing in B-NHL: non-immunogenic tumors (stage 1), immunogenic tumors without immune escape (stage 2), immunogenic tumors with immune escape (stage 3), and fully immuno-edited tumors (stage 4). This model complements the standard international prognostic indices for B-NHL and proposes that immune escape stages 3 and 4 (76% of the FL and DLBCL samples in this data set) identify patients relevant for checkpoint blockade immunotherapies. PMID:27622044

  4. Synchronous activity lowers the energetic cost of nest escape for sea turtle hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, Mohd Uzair; Booth, David T; Joseph, Juanita

    2016-05-15

    A potential advantage of group movement in animals is increased locomotion efficiency. This implies a reduced energetic cost for individuals that occur in larger groups such as herds, flocks and schools. When chelonian hatchlings hatch in the underground nest with finite energy for their post-hatching dispersal phase, they face the challenge of minimizing energetic expenditure while escaping the nest. The term 'social facilitation' has been used to describe the combined digging effort of sea turtle hatchlings during nest escape. Given that in a normal clutch, a substantial part of the energy reserve within the residual yolk is used by hatchlings in the digging out process, a decreased cohort size may reduce the energy reserve available to cross the beach and sustain the initial swimming frenzy. This hypothesis was experimentally tested by varying cohort size in hatchling green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and measuring energy expenditure during the nest escape process using open-flow respirometry. The energetic cost of escaping through 40 cm of sand was calculated to vary between 4.4 and 28.3 kJ per individual, the cost decreasing as the number of individuals in the cohort increased. This represents 11-68% of the energy contained in a hatchling's residual yolk at hatching. The reduced energetic cost associated with large cohorts resulted from both a lower metabolic rate per individual and a shortened nest escape time. We conclude that synchronous digging activity of many hatchlings during nest escape evolved not only to facilitate rapid nest emergence but also to reduce the energetic cost to individuals. PMID:27207954

  5. Unsteady motion: escape jumps in planktonic copepods, their kinematics and energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Andersen, Anders Peter; Langlois, Vincent J.;

    2010-01-01

    estimate the force and power output needed to accelerate and overcome drag. Both are very high compared with those of other organisms, as are the escape velocities in comparison to startle velocities of other aquatic animals. Thus, the maximum weight-specific force, which for muscle motors of other animals...... arrangement of the latter probably adapted for high force production during short-lasting bursts. The resulting escape velocities scale with body length to power 0.65, different from the size-scaling of both similar sized and larger animals moving at constant velocity, but similar to that found for startle...

  6. Escape rate of an active Brownian particle over a potential barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burada, P S; Lindner, B

    2012-03-01

    We study the dynamics of an active Brownian particle with a nonlinear friction function located in a spatial cubic potential. For strong but finite damping, the escape rate of the particle over the spatial potential barrier shows a nonmonotonic dependence on the noise intensity. We relate this behavior to the fact that the active particle escapes from a limit cycle rather than from a fixed point and that a certain amount of noise can stabilize the sojourn of the particle on this limit cycle. PMID:22587135

  7. "We are free, you are slaves. Come on, let's run away": Escape from Constantia, 1712.

    OpenAIRE

    Paulse, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Slaves were imported to the Cape from 1658 to 1808. The majority of the captives lived in Cape Town and many other slaves lived on farms. Added to this captive population were political exiles. In 1712, 23 slaves and exiles gathered at Constantia, a renowned wine farm, to run away. Since the holding was an important homestead, one would expect that this escape would have been reconstructed in the histories of the farm and slavery at the Cape. At the time, the escape raised s...

  8. Escape of a driven particle from a metastable state: A semiclassical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pradipta; Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2010-06-28

    In this article we explore the dynamics of escape of a particle in the semiclassical regime by driving the particle externally. We demonstrate that under suitable approximations the semiclassical escape rate essentially assumes the structure of classical Kramers rate. Both internal (due to thermal bath) as well as external noises (due to driving) are being considered. The noises are stationary, Gaussian, and are characterized by arbitrary decaying memory kernel. Finally, we subject our formulation to rigorous numerical test under variedly changing conditions of the parameters. PMID:20590205

  9. Escape from intermittent repellers: periodic orbit theory for crossover from exponential to algebraic decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, P

    1999-12-01

    We apply periodic orbit theory to study the asymptotic distribution of escape times from an intermittent map. The dynamical zeta function exhibits a branch point which is associated with an asymptotic power law escape. By an analytic continuation technique we compute a pair of complex conjugate zeroes beyond the branch point, associated with a preasymptotic exponential decay. The crossover time from an exponential to a power law is also predicted. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by numerical simulation. Applications to conductance fluctuations in quantum dots are discussed.

  10. Increased transcapillary escape rate of albumin in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1986-01-01

    The transcapillary escape rate, intravascular mass and outflux of albumin were measured in 75 Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. The groups were defined as: group 1: normal urinary albumin excretion, less than 30 mg/24 h (n = 21); group 2: microalbuminuria, 30-300 mg/24 h (n = 36); group...... 3: diabetic nephropathy, less than 300 mg/24 h (n = 18). Fifteen sex- and age-matched non-diabetic persons served as control subjects. The diabetes duration was: group 1: 20 +/- 9 years, group 2: 17 +/- 5 years, group 3: 19 +/- 7 years. The transcapillary escape rate of albumin was similar...

  11. Rate of escape of random walks on wreath products and related groups

    OpenAIRE

    Revelle, David

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the rate of escape for a random walk on $G\\wr \\Z$ and proves laws of the iterated logarithm for both the inner and outer radius of escape. The class of G for which these results hold includes finite, G as well as groups of the form $H\\wr \\Z$, so the construction can be iterated. Laws of the iterated logarithm are also found for random walk on Baumslag--Solitar groups and a discrete version of the Sol geometry.

  12. Scaling analysis for the European heavy liquid metal scaled pool facility escape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tichelen, K.; Vanderhaegen, M. [SCK CEN, Mol (Belgium); Jajarayu, S. [NRG, Petten (Netherlands); Keijers, S. [SCK CEN, Mol (Belgium); Roelofs, F. [NRG, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    The understanding of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor pool is a critical issue in the design of the MYRRHA system, the European Technology Pilot Plant for the Lead Fast Reactor. The E-SCAPE facility is a thermal-hydraulic scale model of the MYRRHA reactor using lead-bismuth as coolant. Non-dimensional analysis and CFD simulations are used to determine the scaling factors and transposition of the experimental results to the real scale situation. The joint efforts of SCK·CEN and NRG within the European project THINS in applying CFD to fix the design parameters of E-SCAPE is reported. (author)

  13. Quantifying the escape mortality of trawl caught Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krafft, Bjørn A; Krag, Ludvig Ahm; Engås, Arill;

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is an abundant fishery resource, the harvest levels of which are expected to increase. However, many of the length classes of krill can escape through commonly used commercial trawl mesh sizes. A vital component of the overall management of a fishery is to esti......Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is an abundant fishery resource, the harvest levels of which are expected to increase. However, many of the length classes of krill can escape through commonly used commercial trawl mesh sizes. A vital component of the overall management of a fishery...

  14. The combined application of biological therapy and methotrexate in case of escape phenomenon progressing

    OpenAIRE

    Ponich E.S.; Kruglova L.S.; Babushkin A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: the study of the efficacy of methotrexate in patients with the "escape effect" during the ustekinumab therapy. Materials and Methods. The results of methotrexate at a dose of 15-20mg/week in treatment of 4 patients receiving biologic and developed "escape effect". Ustekinumab is used as a hypodermic injection at a dose of 45 mg for a body weight of a patient no more than 100 kg, and 90 mg of body weight over 100 kg, at the zero week, the 4th week and then every 12 weeks. Patients control...

  15. Antarctic krill; assessment of mesh size selectivity and escape mortality from trawls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krafft, Bjørn A.; Krag, Ludvig Ahm; Herrmann, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    This working paper presents the aims and methodology for a three-year-project (commenced in 2015) assessing size selectivity and escape mortality of Antarctic krill from trawl nets. The project is widely based on acquired experiences from a completed study Net Escapement of Antarctic krill...... in Trawls (NEAT), presented in WG-EMM 2012/24, WGEMM 2013/34, WG-EMM 2014/14 and WG-EMM 2014/16. Funding is provided by the Norwegian Research Council and ship-time for executing the field-experiments is offered free-of-charge by two Norwegian commercial fishing companies; Olympic Seafood AS and Aker Bio...

  16. 76 FR 49834 - Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2009 Dodge RAM 1500 Laramie Crew...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). How to read comments submitted... Nonconforming 2009 Dodge RAM 1500 Laramie Crew Cab Trucks Manufactured for the Mexican Market Are Eligible for... a petition for a decision that 2009 Dodge RAM 1500 Laramie Crew Cab trucks manufactured for...

  17. Microbial detection and monitoring in advanced life support systems like the International Space Station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tongeren, Sandra P.; Krooneman, Janneke; Raangs, Gerwin C.; Welling, Gjalt W.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Potentially pathogenic microbes and so-called technophiles may form a serious threat in advanced life support systems, such as the International Space Station (ISS). They not only pose a threat to the health of the crew, but also to the technical equipment and materials of the space station. The dev

  18. Microbial detection and monitoring in advanced life support systems like the international space station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tongeren, Sandra P.; Krooneman, Janneke; Raangs, Gerwin C.; Welling, Gjalt W.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Potentially pathogenic microbes and so-called technophiles may form a serious threat in advanced life support systems, such as the International Space Station (ISS). They not only pose a threat to the health of the crew, but also to the technical equipment and materials of the space station. The dev

  19. 14 CFR 417.311 - Flight safety crew roles and qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... procedures. (2) An individual who monitors vehicle performance and performs flight termination must have... must include: (1) Mission specific training programs to ensure team readiness. (2) Launch simulation exercises of system failure modes, including nominal and failure modes, that test crew performance,...

  20. Crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: a multisite controlled before-after study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; Bruijne, M. de; Dyck, C. van; So, R.L.; Tangkau, P.; Wagner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a growing awareness today that adverse events in the intensive care unit (ICU) are more often caused by problems related to non-technical skills than by a lack of technical, or clinical, expertise. Team training, such as crew resource management (CRM), aims to improve these non