WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced computer architectures

  1. ATCA for Machines-- Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture is a new industry open standard for electronics instrument modules and shelves being evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is the first industrial standard designed for High Availability (HA). ILC availability simulations have shown clearly that the capabilities of ATCA are needed in order to achieve acceptable integrated luminosity. The ATCA architecture looks attractive for beam instruments and detector applications as well. This paper provides an overview of ongoing R&D including application of HA principles to power electronics systems.

  2. ATCA for Machines-- Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture is a new industry open standard for electronics instrument modules and shelves being evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is the first industrial standard designed for High Availability (HA). ILC availability simulations have shown clearly that the capabilities of ATCA are needed in order to achieve acceptable integrated luminosity. The ATCA architecture looks attractive for beam instruments and detector applications as well. This paper provides an overview of ongoing R and D including application of HA principles to power electronics systems

  3. Power-efficient computer architectures recent advances

    CERN Document Server

    Själander, Magnus; Kaxiras, Stefanos

    2014-01-01

    As Moore's Law and Dennard scaling trends have slowed, the challenges of building high-performance computer architectures while maintaining acceptable power efficiency levels have heightened. Over the past ten years, architecture techniques for power efficiency have shifted from primarily focusing on module-level efficiencies, toward more holistic design styles based on parallelism and heterogeneity. This work highlights and synthesizes recent techniques and trends in power-efficient computer architecture.Table of Contents: Introduction / Voltage and Frequency Management / Heterogeneity and Sp

  4. Performance evaluation of scientific programs on advanced architecture computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.W.; Messina, P.; Baille, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Recently a number of advanced architecture machines have become commercially available. These new machines promise better cost-performance then traditional computers, and some of them have the potential of competing with current supercomputers, such as the Cray X/MP, in terms of maximum performance. This paper describes an on-going project to evaluate a broad range of advanced architecture computers using a number of complete scientific application programs. The computers to be evaluated include distributed- memory machines such as the NCUBE, INTEL and Caltech/JPL hypercubes, and the MEIKO computing surface, shared-memory, bus architecture machines such as the Sequent Balance and the Alliant, very long instruction word machines such as the Multiflow Trace 7/200 computer, traditional supercomputers such as the Cray X.MP and Cray-2, and SIMD machines such as the Connection Machine. Currently 11 application codes from a number of scientific disciplines have been selected, although it is not intended to run all codes on all machines. Results are presented for two of the codes (QCD and missile tracking), and future work is proposed

  5. Building highly available control system applications with Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture and open standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakov, Artem; Furukawa, Kazuro

    2010-01-01

    Requirements for modern and future control systems for large projects like International Linear Collider demand high availability for control system components. Recently telecom industry came up with a great open hardware specification - Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA). This specification is aimed for better reliability, availability and serviceability. Since its first market appearance in 2004, ATCA platform has shown tremendous growth and proved to be stable and well represented by a number of vendors. ATCA is an industry standard for highly available systems. On the other hand Service Availability Forum, a consortium of leading communications and computing companies, describes interaction between hardware and software. SAF defines a set of specifications such as Hardware Platform Interface, Application Interface Specification. SAF specifications provide extensive description of highly available systems, services and their interfaces. Originally aimed for telecom applications, these specifications can be used for accelerator controls software as well. This study describes benefits of using these specifications and their possible adoption to accelerator control systems. It is demonstrated how EPICS Redundant IOC was extended using Hardware Platform Interface specification, which made it possible to utilize benefits of the ATCA platform.

  6. Computer architecture for efficient algorithmic executions in real-time systems: New technology for avionics systems and advanced space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Chester C.; Youngblood, John N.; Saha, Aindam

    1987-01-01

    Improvements and advances in the development of computer architecture now provide innovative technology for the recasting of traditional sequential solutions into high-performance, low-cost, parallel system to increase system performance. Research conducted in development of specialized computer architecture for the algorithmic execution of an avionics system, guidance and control problem in real time is described. A comprehensive treatment of both the hardware and software structures of a customized computer which performs real-time computation of guidance commands with updated estimates of target motion and time-to-go is presented. An optimal, real-time allocation algorithm was developed which maps the algorithmic tasks onto the processing elements. This allocation is based on the critical path analysis. The final stage is the design and development of the hardware structures suitable for the efficient execution of the allocated task graph. The processing element is designed for rapid execution of the allocated tasks. Fault tolerance is a key feature of the overall architecture. Parallel numerical integration techniques, tasks definitions, and allocation algorithms are discussed. The parallel implementation is analytically verified and the experimental results are presented. The design of the data-driven computer architecture, customized for the execution of the particular algorithm, is discussed.

  7. Advanced Architectures for Astrophysical Supercomputing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsdell, B. R.; Barnes, D. G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Astronomers have come to rely on the increasing performance of computers to reduce, analyze, simulate and visualize their data. In this environment, faster computation can mean more science outcomes or the opening up of new parameter spaces for investigation. If we are to avoid major issues when implementing codes on advanced architectures, it is important that we have a solid understanding of our algorithms. A recent addition to the high-performance computing scene that highlights this point is the graphics processing unit (GPU). The hardware originally designed for speeding-up graphics rendering in video games is now achieving speed-ups of O(100×) in general-purpose computation - performance that cannot be ignored. We are using a generalized approach, based on the analysis of astronomy algorithms, to identify the optimal problem-types and techniques for taking advantage of both current GPU hardware and future developments in computing architectures.

  8. Computer architecture technology trends

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This year's edition of Computer Architecture Technology Trends analyses the trends which are taking place in the architecture of computing systems today. Due to the sheer number of different applications to which computers are being applied, there seems no end to the different adoptions which proliferate. There are, however, some underlying trends which appear. Decision makers should be aware of these trends when specifying architectures, particularly for future applications. This report is fully revised and updated and provides insight in

  9. Advanced router architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Kloth, Axel K

    2005-01-01

    Routers, switches, and transmission equipment form the backbone of the Internet, yet many users and service technicians do not understand how these nodes really work.Advanced Router Architectures addresses how components of advanced routers work together and how they are integrated with each other. This book provides the background behind why these building blocks perform certain functions, and how the function is implemented in general use. It offers an introduction to the subject matter that is intended to trigger deeper interest from the reader. The book explains, for example, why traffic m

  10. The Spin Torque Lego - from spin torque nano-devices to advanced computing architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grollier, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Spin transfer torque (STT), predicted in 1996, and first observed around 2000, brought spintronic devices to the realm of active elements. A whole class of new devices, based on the combined effects of STT for writing and Giant Magneto-Resistance or Tunnel Magneto-Resistance for reading has emerged. The second generation of MRAMs, based on spin torque writing : the STT-RAM, is under industrial development and should be out on the market in three years. But spin torque devices are not limited to binary memories. We will rapidly present how the spin torque effect also allows to implement non-linear nano-oscillators, spin-wave emitters, controlled stochastic devices and microwave nano-detectors. What is extremely interesting is that all these functionalities can be obtained using the same materials, the exact same stack, simply by changing the device geometry and its bias conditions. So these different devices can be seen as Lego bricks, each brick with its own functionality. During this talk, I will show how spin torque can be engineered to build new bricks, such as the Spintronic Memristor, an artificial magnetic nano-synapse. I will then give hints on how to assemble these bricks in order to build novel types of computing architectures, with a special focus on neuromorphic circuits. Financial support by the European Research Council Starting Grant NanoBrain (ERC 2010 Stg 259068) is acknowledged.

  11. Computers in Academic Architecture Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Alfred; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Computers are widely used in architectural research and teaching in U.S. schools of architecture. A survey of libraries serving these schools sought information on the emphasis placed on computers by the architectural curriculum, accessibility of computers to library staff, and accessibility of computers to library patrons. Survey results and…

  12. Polymorphous Computing Architecture (PCA) Application Benchmark 1: Three-Dimensional Radar Data Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lebak, J

    2001-01-01

    The DARPA Polymorphous Computing Architecture (PCA) program is building advanced computer architectures that can reorganize their computation and communication structures to achieve better overall application performance...

  13. The coupling of fluids, dynamics, and controls on advanced architecture computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    This grant provided for the demonstration of coupled controls, body dynamics, and fluids computations in a workstation cluster environment; and an investigation of the impact of peer-peer communication on flow solver performance and robustness. The findings of these investigations were documented in the conference articles.The attached publication, 'Towards Distributed Fluids/Controls Simulations', documents the solution and scaling of the coupled Navier-Stokes, Euler rigid-body dynamics, and state feedback control equations for a two-dimensional canard-wing. The poor scaling shown was due to serialized grid connectivity computation and Ethernet bandwidth limits. The scaling of a peer-to-peer communication flow code on an IBM SP-2 was also shown. The scaling of the code on the switched fabric-linked nodes was good, with a 2.4 percent loss due to communication of intergrid boundary point information. The code performance on 30 worker nodes was 1.7 (mu)s/point/iteration, or a factor of three over a Cray C-90 head. The attached paper, 'Nonlinear Fluid Computations in a Distributed Environment', documents the effect of several computational rate enhancing methods on convergence. For the cases shown, the highest throughput was achieved using boundary updates at each step, with the manager process performing communication tasks only. Constrained domain decomposition of the implicit fluid equations did not degrade the convergence rate or final solution. The scaling of a coupled body/fluid dynamics problem on an Ethernet-linked cluster was also shown.

  14. Lowering the threshold for computers in early design : some advances in architectural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achten, H.H.

    2004-01-01

    The design drawing is an important medium for establishing design support by means of computers. Architects intensively use graphic representations to communicate their design ideas personally, between professionals, and others. In this study, we consider line drawings such as sketches or drawings.

  15. Spatial computing in interactive architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.O. Dulman (Stefan); M. Krezer; L. Hovestad

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractDistributed computing is the theoretical foundation for applications and technologies like interactive architecture, wearable computing, and smart materials. It evolves continuously, following needs rising from scientific developments, novel uses of technology, or simply the curiosity to

  16. CITAstudio: Computation in Architecture 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul; Ayres, Phil

    2016-01-01

    CITAstudio yearbook. CITAstudio: Computation in Architecture is a two year International Master's Programme at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture. With a focus on digital design and material fabrication the programme questions how computation is changing our spatial...

  17. Layered architecture for quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, N. Cody; Van Meter, Rodney; Fowler, Austin G.; McMahon, Peter L.; Kim, Jungsang; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    We develop a layered quantum-computer architecture, which is a systematic framework for tackling the individual challenges of developing a quantum computer while constructing a cohesive device design. We discuss many of the prominent techniques for implementing circuit-model quantum computing and introduce several new methods, with an emphasis on employing surface-code quantum error correction. In doing so, we propose a new quantum-computer architecture based on optical control of quantum dot...

  18. Computer architecture a quantitative approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hennessy, John L

    2019-01-01

    Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, Sixth Edition has been considered essential reading by instructors, students and practitioners of computer design for over 20 years. The sixth edition of this classic textbook is fully revised with the latest developments in processor and system architecture. It now features examples from the RISC-V (RISC Five) instruction set architecture, a modern RISC instruction set developed and designed to be a free and openly adoptable standard. It also includes a new chapter on domain-specific architectures and an updated chapter on warehouse-scale computing that features the first public information on Google's newest WSC. True to its original mission of demystifying computer architecture, this edition continues the longstanding tradition of focusing on areas where the most exciting computing innovation is happening, while always keeping an emphasis on good engineering design.

  19. Digital design and computer architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, David

    2010-01-01

    Digital Design and Computer Architecture is designed for courses that combine digital logic design with computer organization/architecture or that teach these subjects as a two-course sequence. Digital Design and Computer Architecture begins with a modern approach by rigorously covering the fundamentals of digital logic design and then introducing Hardware Description Languages (HDLs). Featuring examples of the two most widely-used HDLs, VHDL and Verilog, the first half of the text prepares the reader for what follows in the second: the design of a MIPS Processor. By the end of D

  20. Layered Architecture for Quantum Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cody Jones

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We develop a layered quantum-computer architecture, which is a systematic framework for tackling the individual challenges of developing a quantum computer while constructing a cohesive device design. We discuss many of the prominent techniques for implementing circuit-model quantum computing and introduce several new methods, with an emphasis on employing surface-code quantum error correction. In doing so, we propose a new quantum-computer architecture based on optical control of quantum dots. The time scales of physical-hardware operations and logical, error-corrected quantum gates differ by several orders of magnitude. By dividing functionality into layers, we can design and analyze subsystems independently, demonstrating the value of our layered architectural approach. Using this concrete hardware platform, we provide resource analysis for executing fault-tolerant quantum algorithms for integer factoring and quantum simulation, finding that the quantum-dot architecture we study could solve such problems on the time scale of days.

  1. Geometric Computing for Freeform Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Wallner, J.; Pottmann, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Geometric computing has recently found a new field of applications, namely the various geometric problems which lie at the heart of rationalization and construction-aware design processes of freeform architecture. We report on our work in this area

  2. Computing architecture for autonomous microgrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-09-29

    A computing architecture that facilitates autonomously controlling operations of a microgrid is described herein. A microgrid network includes numerous computing devices that execute intelligent agents, each of which is assigned to a particular entity (load, source, storage device, or switch) in the microgrid. The intelligent agents can execute in accordance with predefined protocols to collectively perform computations that facilitate uninterrupted control of the .

  3. A Heterogeneous Quantum Computer Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, X.; Riesebos, L.; Lao, L.; Garcia Almudever, C.; Sebastiano, F.; Versluis, R.; Charbon, E.; Bertels, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a high level view of the heterogeneous quantum computer architecture as any future quantum computer will consist of both a classical and quantum computing part. The classical part is needed for error correction as well as for the execution of algorithms that contain both

  4. The new landscape of parallel computer architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalf, John [NERSC Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley California, 94720 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The past few years has seen a sea change in computer architecture that will impact every facet of our society as every electronic device from cell phone to supercomputer will need to confront parallelism of unprecedented scale. Whereas the conventional multicore approach (2, 4, and even 8 cores) adopted by the computing industry will eventually hit a performance plateau, the highest performance per watt and per chip area is achieved using manycore technology (hundreds or even thousands of cores). However, fully unleashing the potential of the manycore approach to ensure future advances in sustained computational performance will require fundamental advances in computer architecture and programming models that are nothing short of reinventing computing. In this paper we examine the reasons behind the movement to exponentially increasing parallelism, and its ramifications for system design, applications and programming models.

  5. The new landscape of parallel computer architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalf, John

    2007-01-01

    The past few years has seen a sea change in computer architecture that will impact every facet of our society as every electronic device from cell phone to supercomputer will need to confront parallelism of unprecedented scale. Whereas the conventional multicore approach (2, 4, and even 8 cores) adopted by the computing industry will eventually hit a performance plateau, the highest performance per watt and per chip area is achieved using manycore technology (hundreds or even thousands of cores). However, fully unleashing the potential of the manycore approach to ensure future advances in sustained computational performance will require fundamental advances in computer architecture and programming models that are nothing short of reinventing computing. In this paper we examine the reasons behind the movement to exponentially increasing parallelism, and its ramifications for system design, applications and programming models

  6. Computer aided architectural design : futures 2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de B.; Leeuwen, van J.P.; Achten, H.H.

    2001-01-01

    CAAD Futures is a bi-annual conference that aims to promote the advancement of computer-aided architectural design in the service of those concerned with the quality of the built environment. The conferences are organized under the auspices of the CAAD Futures Foundation, which has its secretariat

  7. Programmable architecture for quantum computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.; Wang, L.; Charbon, E.; Wang, B.

    2013-01-01

    A programmable architecture called “quantum FPGA (field-programmable gate array)” (QFPGA) is presented for quantum computing, which is a hybrid model combining the advantages of the qubus system and the measurement-based quantum computation. There are two kinds of buses in QFPGA, the local bus and

  8. Advanced parallel processing with supercomputer architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper investigates advanced parallel processing techniques and innovative hardware/software architectures that can be applied to boost the performance of supercomputers. Critical issues on architectural choices, parallel languages, compiling techniques, resource management, concurrency control, programming environment, parallel algorithms, and performance enhancement methods are examined and the best answers are presented. The authors cover advanced processing techniques suitable for supercomputers, high-end mainframes, minisupers, and array processors. The coverage emphasizes vectorization, multitasking, multiprocessing, and distributed computing. In order to achieve these operation modes, parallel languages, smart compilers, synchronization mechanisms, load balancing methods, mapping parallel algorithms, operating system functions, application library, and multidiscipline interactions are investigated to ensure high performance. At the end, they assess the potentials of optical and neural technologies for developing future supercomputers

  9. Advanced Topology Optimization Methods for Conceptual Architectural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Niels; Amir, Oded; Clausen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a series of new, advanced topology optimization methods, developed specifically for conceptual architectural design of structures. The proposed computational procedures are implemented as components in the framework of a Grasshopper plugin, providing novel capacities...

  10. Advanced Topology Optimization Methods for Conceptual Architectural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Niels; Amir, Oded; Clausen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a series of new, advanced topology optimization methods, developed specifically for conceptual architectural design of structures. The proposed computational procedures are implemented as components in the framework of a Grasshopper plugin, providing novel capacities...

  11. Savannah River Site computing architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-03-29

    A computing architecture is a framework for making decisions about the implementation of computer technology and the supporting infrastructure. Because of the size, diversity, and amount of resources dedicated to computing at the Savannah River Site (SRS), there must be an overall strategic plan that can be followed by the thousands of site personnel who make decisions daily that directly affect the SRS computing environment and impact the site's production and business systems. This plan must address the following requirements: There must be SRS-wide standards for procurement or development of computing systems (hardware and software). The site computing organizations must develop systems that end users find easy to use. Systems must be put in place to support the primary function of site information workers. The developers of computer systems must be given tools that automate and speed up the development of information systems and applications based on computer technology. This document describes a proposal for a site-wide computing architecture that addresses the above requirements. In summary, this architecture is standards-based data-driven, and workstation-oriented with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.

  12. Savannah River Site computing architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-03-29

    A computing architecture is a framework for making decisions about the implementation of computer technology and the supporting infrastructure. Because of the size, diversity, and amount of resources dedicated to computing at the Savannah River Site (SRS), there must be an overall strategic plan that can be followed by the thousands of site personnel who make decisions daily that directly affect the SRS computing environment and impact the site`s production and business systems. This plan must address the following requirements: There must be SRS-wide standards for procurement or development of computing systems (hardware and software). The site computing organizations must develop systems that end users find easy to use. Systems must be put in place to support the primary function of site information workers. The developers of computer systems must be given tools that automate and speed up the development of information systems and applications based on computer technology. This document describes a proposal for a site-wide computing architecture that addresses the above requirements. In summary, this architecture is standards-based data-driven, and workstation-oriented with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.

  13. Computer Architecture A Quantitative Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hennessy, John L

    2011-01-01

    The computing world today is in the middle of a revolution: mobile clients and cloud computing have emerged as the dominant paradigms driving programming and hardware innovation today. The Fifth Edition of Computer Architecture focuses on this dramatic shift, exploring the ways in which software and technology in the cloud are accessed by cell phones, tablets, laptops, and other mobile computing devices. Each chapter includes two real-world examples, one mobile and one datacenter, to illustrate this revolutionary change.Updated to cover the mobile computing revolutionEmphasizes the two most im

  14. Super-computer architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Hockney, R W

    1977-01-01

    This paper examines the design of the top-of-the-range, scientific, number-crunching computers. The market for such computers is not as large as that for smaller machines, but on the other hand it is by no means negligible. The present work-horse machines in this category are the CDC 7600 and IBM 360/195, and over fifty of the former machines have been sold. The types of installation that form the market for such machines are not only the major scientific research laboratories in the major countries-such as Los Alamos, CERN, Rutherford laboratory-but also major universities or university networks. It is also true that, as with sports cars, innovations made to satisfy the top of the market today often become the standard for the medium-scale computer of tomorrow. Hence there is considerable interest in examining present developments in this area. (0 refs).

  15. Specialized computer architectures for computational aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    In recent years, computational fluid dynamics has made significant progress in modelling aerodynamic phenomena. Currently, one of the major barriers to future development lies in the compute-intensive nature of the numerical formulations and the relative high cost of performing these computations on commercially available general purpose computers, a cost high with respect to dollar expenditure and/or elapsed time. Today's computing technology will support a program designed to create specialized computing facilities to be dedicated to the important problems of computational aerodynamics. One of the still unresolved questions is the organization of the computing components in such a facility. The characteristics of fluid dynamic problems which will have significant impact on the choice of computer architecture for a specialized facility are reviewed.

  16. Fault Tolerant Computer Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Sorin, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    For many years, most computer architects have pursued one primary goal: performance. Architects have translated the ever-increasing abundance of ever-faster transistors provided by Moore's law into remarkable increases in performance. Recently, however, the bounty provided by Moore's law has been accompanied by several challenges that have arisen as devices have become smaller, including a decrease in dependability due to physical faults. In this book, we focus on the dependability challenge and the fault tolerance solutions that architects are developing to overcome it. The two main purposes

  17. VLSI Architectures for Computing DFT's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, T. K.; Chang, J. J.; Hsu, I. S.; Reed, I. S.; Pei, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Simplifications result from use of residue Fermat number systems. System of finite arithmetic over residue Fermat number systems enables calculation of discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of series of complex numbers with reduced number of multiplications. Computer architectures based on approach suitable for design of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits for computing DFT's. General approach not limited to DFT's; Applicable to decoding of error-correcting codes and other transform calculations. System readily implemented in VLSI.

  18. Advanced information processing system for advanced launch system: Avionics architecture synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a fault-tolerant distributed computer system architecture that was developed to meet the real time computational needs of advanced aerospace vehicles. One such vehicle is the Advanced Launch System (ALS) being developed jointly by NASA and the Department of Defense to launch heavy payloads into low earth orbit at one tenth the cost (per pound of payload) of the current launch vehicles. An avionics architecture that utilizes the AIPS hardware and software building blocks was synthesized for ALS. The AIPS for ALS architecture synthesis process starting with the ALS mission requirements and ending with an analysis of the candidate ALS avionics architecture is described.

  19. Advances in unconventional computing

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The unconventional computing is a niche for interdisciplinary science, cross-bred of computer science, physics, mathematics, chemistry, electronic engineering, biology, material science and nanotechnology. The aims of this book are to uncover and exploit principles and mechanisms of information processing in and functional properties of physical, chemical and living systems to develop efficient algorithms, design optimal architectures and manufacture working prototypes of future and emergent computing devices. This first volume presents theoretical foundations of the future and emergent computing paradigms and architectures. The topics covered are computability, (non-)universality and complexity of computation; physics of computation, analog and quantum computing; reversible and asynchronous devices; cellular automata and other mathematical machines; P-systems and cellular computing; infinity and spatial computation; chemical and reservoir computing. The book is the encyclopedia, the first ever complete autho...

  20. Computer Architecture A Quantitative Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hennessy, John L

    2007-01-01

    The era of seemingly unlimited growth in processor performance is over: single chip architectures can no longer overcome the performance limitations imposed by the power they consume and the heat they generate. Today, Intel and other semiconductor firms are abandoning the single fast processor model in favor of multi-core microprocessors--chips that combine two or more processors in a single package. In the fourth edition of Computer Architecture, the authors focus on this historic shift, increasing their coverage of multiprocessors and exploring the most effective ways of achieving parallelis

  1. High-level language computer architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Yaohan

    1975-01-01

    High-Level Language Computer Architecture offers a tutorial on high-level language computer architecture, including von Neumann architecture and syntax-oriented architecture as well as direct and indirect execution architecture. Design concepts of Japanese-language data processing systems are discussed, along with the architecture of stack machines and the SYMBOL computer system. The conceptual design of a direct high-level language processor is also described.Comprised of seven chapters, this book first presents a classification of high-level language computer architecture according to the pr

  2. Time-Predictable Computer Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoeberl Martin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Today's general-purpose processors are optimized for maximum throughput. Real-time systems need a processor with both a reasonable and a known worst-case execution time (WCET. Features such as pipelines with instruction dependencies, caches, branch prediction, and out-of-order execution complicate WCET analysis and lead to very conservative estimates. In this paper, we evaluate the issues of current architectures with respect to WCET analysis. Then, we propose solutions for a time-predictable computer architecture. The proposed architecture is evaluated with implementation of some features in a Java processor. The resulting processor is a good target for WCET analysis and still performs well in the average case.

  3. Computer architecture fundamentals and principles of computer design

    CERN Document Server

    Dumas II, Joseph D

    2005-01-01

    Introduction to Computer ArchitectureWhat is Computer Architecture?Architecture vs. ImplementationBrief History of Computer SystemsThe First GenerationThe Second GenerationThe Third GenerationThe Fourth GenerationModern Computers - The Fifth GenerationTypes of Computer SystemsSingle Processor SystemsParallel Processing SystemsSpecial ArchitecturesQuality of Computer SystemsGenerality and ApplicabilityEase of UseExpandabilityCompatibilityReliabilitySuccess and Failure of Computer Architectures and ImplementationsQuality and the Perception of QualityCost IssuesArchitectural Openness, Market Timi

  4. Advanced and secure architectural EHR approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blobel, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    Electronic Health Records (EHRs) provided as a lifelong patient record advance towards core applications of distributed and co-operating health information systems and health networks. For meeting the challenge of scalable, flexible, portable, secure EHR systems, the underlying EHR architecture must be based on the component paradigm and model driven, separating platform-independent and platform-specific models. Allowing manageable models, real systems must be decomposed and simplified. The resulting modelling approach has to follow the ISO Reference Model - Open Distributing Processing (RM-ODP). The ISO RM-ODP describes any system component from different perspectives. Platform-independent perspectives contain the enterprise view (business process, policies, scenarios, use cases), the information view (classes and associations) and the computational view (composition and decomposition), whereas platform-specific perspectives concern the engineering view (physical distribution and realisation) and the technology view (implementation details from protocols up to education and training) on system components. Those views have to be established for components reflecting aspects of all domains involved in healthcare environments including administrative, legal, medical, technical, etc. Thus, security-related component models reflecting all view mentioned have to be established for enabling both application and communication security services as integral part of the system's architecture. Beside decomposition and simplification of system regarding the different viewpoint on their components, different levels of systems' granularity can be defined hiding internals or focusing on properties of basic components to form a more complex structure. The resulting models describe both structure and behaviour of component-based systems. The described approach has been deployed in different projects defining EHR systems and their underlying architectural principles. In that context

  5. Geometric Computing for Freeform Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Wallner, J.

    2011-06-03

    Geometric computing has recently found a new field of applications, namely the various geometric problems which lie at the heart of rationalization and construction-aware design processes of freeform architecture. We report on our work in this area, dealing with meshes with planar faces and meshes which allow multilayer constructions (which is related to discrete surfaces and their curvatures), triangles meshes with circle-packing properties (which is related to conformal uniformization), and with the paneling problem. We emphasize the combination of numerical optimization and geometric knowledge.

  6. Computer aid in solar architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl, E W

    1982-02-01

    Among architects the question is being discussed in how far new buildings can be designed in a way to make more economical use of energy by architectural means. Solar houses in the USA are often taken as a model. As yet it is unclear how such measures will affect heat demand in the central European climate and with domestic building materials being used. A computer simulation program is introduced by which these questions can be answered as early as in the stage of planning. The program can be run on a common microcomputersystem.

  7. 4th Conference on Advances in architectural geometry 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Knippers, Jan; Mitra, Niloy; Wang, Wenping

    2015-01-01

    This book contains 24 technical papers presented at the fourth edition of the Advances in Architectural Geometry conference, AAG 2014, held in London, England, September 2014. It offers engineers, mathematicians, designers, and contractors insight into the efficient design, analysis, and manufacture of complex shapes, which will help open up new horizons for architecture. The book examines geometric aspects involved in architectural design, ranging from initial conception to final fabrication. It focuses on four key topics: applied geometry, architecture, computational design, and also practice in the form of case studies. In addition, the book also features algorithms, proposed implementation, experimental results, and illustrations. Overall, the book presents both theoretical and practical work linked to new geometrical developments in architecture. It gathers the diverse components of the contemporary architectural tendencies that push the building envelope towards free form in order to respond to multiple...

  8. Advanced customization in architectural design and construction

    CERN Document Server

    Naboni, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art in advanced customization within the sector of architectural design and construction, explaining important new technologies that are boosting design, product and process innovation and identifying the challenges to be confronted as we move toward a mass customization construction industry. Advanced machinery and software integration are discussed, as well as an overview of the manufacturing techniques offered through digital methods that are acquiring particular significance within the field of digital architecture. CNC machining, Robotic Fabrication, and Additive Manufacturing processes are all clearly explained, highlighting their ability to produce personalized architectural forms and unique construction components. Cutting-edge case studies in digitally fabricated architectural realizations are described and, looking towards the future, a new model of 100% customized architecture for design and construction is presented. The book is an excellent guide to the profoun...

  9. Application of advanced electronics to a future spacecraft computer design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Advancements in hardware and software technology are summarized with specific emphasis on spacecraft computer capabilities. Available state of the art technology is reviewed and candidate architectures are defined.

  10. Advances in Computer Entertainment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Romão, T.; Reidsma, Dennis; Unknown, [Unknown

    2012-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment ACE 2012). ACE has become the leading scientific forum for dissemination of cutting-edge research results in the area of entertainment computing. Interactive entertainment is one of the most vibrant

  11. Brain architecture: a design for natural computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Marcus

    2007-12-15

    Fifty years ago, John von Neumann compared the architecture of the brain with that of the computers he invented and which are still in use today. In those days, the organization of computers was based on concepts of brain organization. Here, we give an update on current results on the global organization of neural systems. For neural systems, we outline how the spatial and topological architecture of neuronal and cortical networks facilitates robustness against failures, fast processing and balanced network activation. Finally, we discuss mechanisms of self-organization for such architectures. After all, the organization of the brain might again inspire computer architecture.

  12. Computer programming and architecture the VAX

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Takes a unique systems approach to programming and architecture of the VAXUsing the VAX as a detailed example, the first half of this book offers a complete course in assembly language programming. The second describes higher-level systems issues in computer architecture. Highlights include the VAX assembler and debugger, other modern architectures such as RISCs, multiprocessing and parallel computing, microprogramming, caches and translation buffers, and an appendix on the Berkeley UNIX assembler.

  13. Memristor-based nanoelectronic computing circuits and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Vourkas, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    This book considers the design and development of nanoelectronic computing circuits, systems and architectures focusing particularly on memristors, which represent one of today’s latest technology breakthroughs in nanoelectronics. The book studies, explores, and addresses the related challenges and proposes solutions for the smooth transition from conventional circuit technologies to emerging computing memristive nanotechnologies. Its content spans from fundamental device modeling to emerging storage system architectures and novel circuit design methodologies, targeting advanced non-conventional analog/digital massively parallel computational structures. Several new results on memristor modeling, memristive interconnections, logic circuit design, memory circuit architectures, computer arithmetic systems, simulation software tools, and applications of memristors in computing are presented. High-density memristive data storage combined with memristive circuit-design paradigms and computational tools applied t...

  14. Advances in Computer Entertainment.

    OpenAIRE

    Nijholt, Antinus; Romão, T.; Reidsma, Dennis; Unknown, [Unknown

    2012-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment ACE 2012). ACE has become the leading scientific forum for dissemination of cutting-edge research results in the area of entertainment computing. Interactive entertainment is one of the most vibrant areas of interest in modern society and is amongst the fastest growing industries in the world. ACE 2012 will bring together leading researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to prese...

  15. Architectures for single-chip image computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gove, Robert J.

    1992-04-01

    This paper will focus on the architectures of VLSI programmable processing components for image computing applications. TI, the maker of industry-leading RISC, DSP, and graphics components, has developed an architecture for a new-generation of image processors capable of implementing a plurality of image, graphics, video, and audio computing functions. We will show that the use of a single-chip heterogeneous MIMD parallel architecture best suits this class of processors--those which will dominate the desktop multimedia, document imaging, computer graphics, and visualization systems of this decade.

  16. Advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Markus; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1997-06-01

    An advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles is presented. The hierarchical architecture consists of four levels: a vehicle level, a control level, a rule-based level and a knowledge-based level. A special focus is on forms of internal representation, which have to be chosen adequately for each level. The control scheme is applied to VaMP, a Mercedes passenger car which autonomously performs missions on German freeways. VaMP perceives the environment with its sense of vision and conventional sensors. It controls its actuators for locomotion and attention focusing. Modules for perception, cognition and action are discussed.

  17. Advanced computers and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerator physicists today have access to computers that are far more powerful than those available just 10 years ago. In the early 1980's, desktop workstations performed less one million floating point operations per second (Mflops), and the realized performance of vector supercomputers was at best a few hundred Mflops. Today vector processing is available on the desktop, providing researchers with performance approaching 100 Mflops at a price that is measured in thousands of dollars. Furthermore, advances in Massively Parallel Processors (MPP) have made performance of over 10 gigaflops a reality, and around mid-decade MPPs are expected to be capable of teraflops performance. Along with advances in MPP hardware, researchers have also made significant progress in developing algorithms and software for MPPS. These changes have had, and will continue to have, a significant impact on the work of computational accelerator physicists. Now, instead of running particle simulations with just a few thousand particles, we can perform desktop simulations with tens of thousands of simulation particles, and calculations with well over 1 million particles are being performed on MPPs. In the area of computational electromagnetics, simulations that used to be performed only on vector supercomputers now run in several hours on desktop workstations, and researchers are hoping to perform simulations with over one billion mesh points on future MPPs. In this paper we will discuss the latest advances, and what can be expected in the near future, in hardware, software and applications codes for advanced simulation of particle accelerators

  18. Brain architecture: A design for natural computation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Marcus

    2008-01-01

    Fifty years ago, John von Neumann compared the architecture of the brain with that of computers that he invented and which is still in use today. In those days, the organisation of computers was based on concepts of brain organisation. Here, we give an update on current results on the global organisation of neural systems. For neural systems, we outline how the spatial and topological architecture of neuronal and cortical networks facilitates robustness against failures, fast processing, and ...

  19. Advanced connection systems for architectural glazing

    CERN Document Server

    Afghani Khoraskani, Roham

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the findings of a detailed study to explore the behavior of architectural glazing systems during and after an earthquake and to develop design proposals that will mitigate or even eliminate the damage inflicted on these systems. The seismic behavior of common types of architectural glazing systems are investigated and causes of damage to each system, identified. Furthermore, depending on the geometrical and structural characteristics, the ultimate horizontal load capacity of glass curtain wall systems is defined based on the stability of the glass components. Detailed attention is devoted to the incorporation of advanced connection devices between the structure of the building and the building envelope system in order to minimize the damage to glazed components. An innovative new connection device is introduced that results in a delicate and functional system easily incorporated into different architectural glazing systems, including those demanding maximum transparency.

  20. Advanced pixel architectures for scientific image sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Coath, R; Godbeer, A; Wilson, M; Turchetta, R

    2009-01-01

    We present recent developments from two projects targeting advanced pixel architectures for scientific applications. Results are reported from FORTIS, a sensor demonstrating variants on a 4T pixel architecture. The variants include differences in pixel and diode size, the in-pixel source follower transistor size and the capacitance of the readout node to optimise for low noise and sensitivity to small amounts of charge. Results are also reported from TPAC, a complex pixel architecture with ~160 transistors per pixel. Both sensors were manufactured in the 0.18μm INMAPS process, which includes a special deep p-well layer and fabrication on a high resistivity epitaxial layer for improved charge collection efficiency.

  1. A computer architecture for intelligent machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, D. R.; Saridis, G. N.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of intelligent machines proposes a hierarchical organization for the functions of an autonomous robot based on the principle of increasing precision with decreasing intelligence. An analytic formulation of this theory using information-theoretic measures of uncertainty for each level of the intelligent machine has been developed. The authors present a computer architecture that implements the lower two levels of the intelligent machine. The architecture supports an event-driven programming paradigm that is independent of the underlying computer architecture and operating system. Execution-level controllers for motion and vision systems are briefly addressed, as well as the Petri net transducer software used to implement coordination-level functions. A case study illustrates how this computer architecture integrates real-time and higher-level control of manipulator and vision systems.

  2. A memory-array architecture for computer vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsara, P.T.

    1989-01-01

    With the fast advances in the area of computer vision and robotics there is a growing need for machines that can understand images at a very high speed. A conventional von Neumann computer is not suited for this purpose because it takes a tremendous amount of time to solve most typical image processing problems. Exploiting the inherent parallelism present in various vision tasks can significantly reduce the processing time. Fortunately, parallelism is increasingly affordable as hardware gets cheaper. Thus it is now imperative to study computer vision in a parallel processing framework. The author should first design a computational structure which is well suited for a wide range of vision tasks and then develop parallel algorithms which can run efficiently on this structure. Recent advances in VLSI technology have led to several proposals for parallel architectures for computer vision. In this thesis he demonstrates that a memory array architecture with efficient local and global communication capabilities can be used for high speed execution of a wide range of computer vision tasks. This architecture, called the Access Constrained Memory Array Architecture (ACMAA), is efficient for VLSI implementation because of its modular structure, simple interconnect and limited global control. Several parallel vision algorithms have been designed for this architecture. The choice of vision problems demonstrates the versatility of ACMAA for a wide range of vision tasks. These algorithms were simulated on a high level ACMAA simulator running on the Intel iPSC/2 hypercube, a parallel architecture. The results of this simulation are compared with those of sequential algorithms running on a single hypercube node. Details of the ACMAA processor architecture are also presented.

  3. Security Architecture of Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    V.KRISHNA REDDY; Dr. L.S.S.REDDY

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud Computing offers service over internet with dynamically scalable resources. Cloud Computing services provides benefits to the users in terms of cost and ease of use. Cloud Computing services need to address the security during the transmission of sensitive data and critical applications to shared and public cloud environments. The cloud environments are scaling large for data processing and storage needs. Cloud computing environment have various advantages as well as disadvantages o...

  4. Field-programmable custom computing technology architectures, tools, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Luk, Wayne; Pocek, Ken

    2000-01-01

    Field-Programmable Custom Computing Technology: Architectures, Tools, and Applications brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this fast-moving area. In seven selected chapters, the book describes the latest advances in architectures, design methods, and applications of field-programmable devices for high-performance reconfigurable systems. The contributors to this work were selected from the leading researchers and practitioners in the field. It will be valuable to anyone working or researching in the field of custom computing technology. It serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most challenging issues being examined today.

  5. Fundamentals of computer architecture and design

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides semester-length coverage of computer architecture and design, providing a strong foundation for students to understand modern computer system architecture and to apply these insights and principles to future computer designs.  It is based on the author’s decades of industrial experience with computer architecture and design, as well as with teaching students focused on pursuing careers in computer engineering.  Unlike a number of existing textbooks for this course, this one focuses not only on CPU architecture, but also covers in great detail in system buses, peripherals and memories.This book teaches every element in a computing system in two steps.  First, it introduces the functionality of each topic (and subtopics) and then goes into “from-scratch design” of a particular digital block from its architectural specifications using timing diagrams.  The author describes how the data-path of a certain digital block is generated using timin g diagrams, a method which most textbo...

  6. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Mølmer, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits...... quantum computing....

  7. Cloud Computing: Architecture and Services

    OpenAIRE

    Ms. Ravneet Kaur

    2018-01-01

    Cloud computing is Internet-based computing, whereby shared resources, software, and information are provided to computers and other devices on demand, like the electricity grid. It is a method for delivering information technology (IT) services where resources are retrieved from the Internet through web-based tools and applications, as opposed to a direct connection to a server. Rather than keeping files on a proprietary hard drive or local storage device, cloud-based storage makes it possib...

  8. Monte Carlo simulations on SIMD computer architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmester, C.P.; Gronsky, R.; Wille, L.T.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper algorithmic considerations regarding the implementation of various materials science applications of the Monte Carlo technique to single instruction multiple data (SIMD) computer architectures are presented. In particular, implementation of the Ising model with nearest, next nearest, and long range screened Coulomb interactions on the SIMD architecture MasPar MP-1 (DEC mpp-12000) series of massively parallel computers is demonstrated. Methods of code development which optimize processor array use and minimize inter-processor communication are presented including lattice partitioning and the use of processor array spanning tree structures for data reduction. Both geometric and algorithmic parallel approaches are utilized. Benchmarks in terms of Monte Carl updates per second for the MasPar architecture are presented and compared to values reported in the literature from comparable studies on other architectures

  9. Digital architecture, wearable computers and providing affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guglielmi, Michel; Johannesen, Hanne Louise

    2005-01-01

    as the setting for the events of experience. Contemporary architecture is a meta-space residing almost any thinkable field, striving to blur boundaries between art, architecture, design and urbanity and break down the distinction between the material and the user or inhabitant. The presentation for this paper...... will, through research, a workshop and participation in a cumulus competition, focus on the exploration of boundaries between digital architecture, performative space and wearable computers. Our design method in general focuses on the interplay between the performing body and the environment – between...

  10. Architectural design for a topological cluster state quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devitt, Simon J; Munro, William J; Nemoto, Kae; Fowler, Austin G; Stephens, Ashley M; Greentree, Andrew D; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2009-01-01

    The development of a large scale quantum computer is a highly sought after goal of fundamental research and consequently a highly non-trivial problem. Scalability in quantum information processing is not just a problem of qubit manufacturing and control but it crucially depends on the ability to adapt advanced techniques in quantum information theory, such as error correction, to the experimental restrictions of assembling qubit arrays into the millions. In this paper, we introduce a feasible architectural design for large scale quantum computation in optical systems. We combine the recent developments in topological cluster state computation with the photonic module, a simple chip-based device that can be used as a fundamental building block for a large-scale computer. The integration of the topological cluster model with this comparatively simple operational element addresses many significant issues in scalable computing and leads to a promising modular architecture with complete integration of active error correction, exhibiting high fault-tolerant thresholds.

  11. Architecture, systems research and computational sciences

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The Winter 2012 (vol. 14 no. 1) issue of the Nexus Network Journal is dedicated to the theme “Architecture, Systems Research and Computational Sciences”. This is an outgrowth of the session by the same name which took place during the eighth international, interdisciplinary conference “Nexus 2010: Relationships between Architecture and Mathematics, held in Porto, Portugal, in June 2010. Today computer science is an integral part of even strictly historical investigations, such as those concerning the construction of vaults, where the computer is used to survey the existing building, analyse the data and draw the ideal solution. What the papers in this issue make especially evident is that information technology has had an impact at a much deeper level as well: architecture itself can now be considered as a manifestation of information and as a complex system. The issue is completed with other research papers, conference reports and book reviews.

  12. Switching from computer to microcomputer architecture education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolanakis, Dimosthenis E.; Kotsis, Konstantinos T.; Laopoulos, Theodore

    2010-03-01

    In the last decades, the technological and scientific evolution of the computing discipline has been widely affecting research in software engineering education, which nowadays advocates more enlightened and liberal ideas. This article reviews cross-disciplinary research on a computer architecture class in consideration of its switching to microcomputer architecture. The authors present their strategies towards a successful crossing of boundaries between engineering disciplines. This communication aims at providing a different aspect on professional courses that are, nowadays, addressed at the expense of traditional courses.

  13. Electromagnetic Physics Models for Parallel Computing Architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amadio, G; Bianchini, C; Iope, R; Ananya, A; Apostolakis, J; Aurora, A; Bandieramonte, M; Brun, R; Carminati, F; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Goulas, I; Nikitina, T; Bhattacharyya, A; Mohanty, A; Canal, P; Elvira, D; Jun, S Y; Lima, G; Duhem, L

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part of the GeantV project. Results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well. (paper)

  14. Electromagnetic Physics Models for Parallel Computing Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, G.; Ananya, A.; Apostolakis, J.; Aurora, A.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bianchini, C.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Goulas, I.; Iope, R.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Mohanty, A.; Nikitina, T.; Novak, M.; Pokorski, W.; Ribon, A.; Seghal, R.; Shadura, O.; Vallecorsa, S.; Wenzel, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. GeantV, a next generation detector simulation, has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth and type of parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance. In this paper we describe implementation of electromagnetic physics models developed for parallel computing architectures as a part of the GeantV project. Results of preliminary performance evaluation and physics validation are presented as well.

  15. CAAD as Computer-Activated Architectural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Per

    1998-01-01

    In a brief sketch, drawing on a general philosophical conception of human interaction with the world, the architectural design process is analysed in terms of two kinds of human action: interpretation and production. Both of these are seen as establishing a link between mental and material entities....... On this background two alternative roles of computers in computer-aided architectural design (CAAD) are distinguished: a passive and a more active role, where in the latter case, the computer’s capacity for symbol manipulation is utilized to influence design thinking actively. The analysis offered in this paper may...... serve at least two purposes: to provide a conceptual machinery for research and reflection on CAAD, and to clarify the notion of ‘artificial intelligence’ in the light of architectural design....

  16. The Fermilab central computing facility architectural model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of the current Central Computing Upgrade at Fermilab is to create a computing environment that maximizes total productivity, particularly for high energy physics analysis. The Computing Department and the Next Computer Acquisition Committee decided upon a model which includes five components: an interactive front-end, a Large-Scale Scientific Computer (LSSC, a mainframe computing engine), a microprocessor farm system, a file server, and workstations. With the exception of the file server, all segments of this model are currently in production: a VAX/VMS cluster interactive front-end, an Amdahl VM Computing engine, ACP farms, and (primarily) VMS workstations. This paper will discuss the implementation of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Architectural Model. Implications for Code Management in such a heterogeneous environment, including issues such as modularity and centrality, will be considered. Special emphasis will be placed on connectivity and communications between the front-end, LSSC, and workstations, as practiced at Fermilab. (orig.)

  17. The Fermilab Central Computing Facility architectural model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1989-05-01

    The goal of the current Central Computing Upgrade at Fermilab is to create a computing environment that maximizes total productivity, particularly for high energy physics analysis. The Computing Department and the Next Computer Acquisition Committee decided upon a model which includes five components: an interactive front end, a Large-Scale Scientific Computer (LSSC, a mainframe computing engine), a microprocessor farm system, a file server, and workstations. With the exception of the file server, all segments of this model are currently in production: a VAX/VMS Cluster interactive front end, an Amdahl VM computing engine, ACP farms, and (primarily) VMS workstations. This presentation will discuss the implementation of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Architectural Model. Implications for Code Management in such a heterogeneous environment, including issues such as modularity and centrality, will be considered. Special emphasis will be placed on connectivity and communications between the front-end, LSSC, and workstations, as practiced at Fermilab. 2 figs

  18. Computing on Knights and Kepler Architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolotti, G; Caberletti, M; Ferraro, A; Giacomini, F; Manzali, M; Maron, G; Salomoni, D; Crimi, G; Zanella, M

    2014-01-01

    A recent trend in scientific computing is the increasingly important role of co-processors, originally built to accelerate graphics rendering, and now used for general high-performance computing. The INFN Computing On Knights and Kepler Architectures (COKA) project focuses on assessing the suitability of co-processor boards for scientific computing in a wide range of physics applications, and on studying the best programming methodologies for these systems. Here we present in a comparative way our results in porting a Lattice Boltzmann code on two state-of-the-art accelerators: the NVIDIA K20X, and the Intel Xeon-Phi. We describe our implementations, analyze results and compare with a baseline architecture adopting Intel Sandy Bridge CPUs.

  19. Large computer systems and new architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, T.

    1978-01-01

    The super-computers of today are becoming quite specialized and one can no longer expect to get all the state-of-the-art software and hardware facilities in one package. In order to achieve faster and faster computing it is necessary to experiment with new architectures, and the cost of developing each experimental architecture into a general-purpose computer system is too high when one considers the relatively small market for these computers. The result is that such computers are becoming 'back-ends' either to special systems (BSP, DAP) or to anything (CRAY-1). Architecturally the CRAY-1 is the most attractive today since it guarantees a speed gain of a factor of two over a CDC 7600 thus allowing us to regard any speed up resulting from vectorization as a bonus. It looks, however, as if it will be very difficult to make substantially faster computers using only pipe-lining techniques and that it will be necessary to explore multiple processors working on the same problem. The experience which will be gained with the BSP and the DAP over the next few years will certainly be most valuable in this respect. (Auth.)

  20. A High Performance VLSI Computer Architecture For Computer Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Wen-Tai

    1988-10-01

    A VLSI computer architecture, consisting of multiple processors, is presented in this paper to satisfy the modern computer graphics demands, e.g. high resolution, realistic animation, real-time display etc.. All processors share a global memory which are partitioned into multiple banks. Through a crossbar network, data from one memory bank can be broadcasted to many processors. Processors are physically interconnected through a hyper-crossbar network (a crossbar-like network). By programming the network, the topology of communication links among processors can be reconfigurated to satisfy specific dataflows of different applications. Each processor consists of a controller, arithmetic operators, local memory, a local crossbar network, and I/O ports to communicate with other processors, memory banks, and a system controller. Operations in each processor are characterized into two modes, i.e. object domain and space domain, to fully utilize the data-independency characteristics of graphics processing. Special graphics features such as 3D-to-2D conversion, shadow generation, texturing, and reflection, can be easily handled. With the current high density interconnection (MI) technology, it is feasible to implement a 64-processor system to achieve 2.5 billion operations per second, a performance needed in most advanced graphics applications.

  1. Optimization and mathematical modeling in computer architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Sankaralingam, Karu; Nowatzki, Tony

    2013-01-01

    In this book we give an overview of modeling techniques used to describe computer systems to mathematical optimization tools. We give a brief introduction to various classes of mathematical optimization frameworks with special focus on mixed integer linear programming which provides a good balance between solver time and expressiveness. We present four detailed case studies -- instruction set customization, data center resource management, spatial architecture scheduling, and resource allocation in tiled architectures -- showing how MILP can be used and quantifying by how much it outperforms t

  2. Smart SOA platforms in cloud computing architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Exposito , Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    This book is intended to introduce the principles of the Event-Driven and Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA 2.0) and its role in the new interconnected world based on the cloud computing architecture paradigm. In this new context, the concept of "service" is widely applied to the hardware and software resources available in the new generation of the Internet. The authors focus on how current and future SOA technologies provide the basis for the smart management of the service model provided by the Platform as a Service (PaaS) layer.

  3. Addressing Cloud Computing in Enterprise Architecture: Issues and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Khaled; Gangavarapu, Narendra

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how the characteristics of cloud computing affect the enterprise architecture in four domains: business, data, application and technology. The ownership and control of architectural components are shifted from organisational perimeters to cloud providers. It argues that although cloud computing promises numerous benefits to enterprises, the shifting control from enterprises to cloud providers on architectural components introduces several architectural challenges. The d...

  4. An introduction to NASA's advanced computing program: Integrated computing systems in advanced multichip modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Alkalai, Leon

    1996-01-01

    Recent changes within NASA's space exploration program favor the design, implementation, and operation of low cost, lightweight, small and micro spacecraft with multiple launches per year. In order to meet the future needs of these missions with regard to the use of spacecraft microelectronics, NASA's advanced flight computing (AFC) program is currently considering industrial cooperation and advanced packaging architectures. In relation to this, the AFC program is reviewed, considering the design and implementation of NASA's AFC multichip module.

  5. Computational electromagnetics recent advances and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Emerging Topics in Computational Electromagnetics in Computational Electromagnetics presents advances in Computational Electromagnetics. This book is designed to fill the existing gap in current CEM literature that only cover the conventional numerical techniques for solving traditional EM problems. The book examines new algorithms, and applications of these algorithms for solving problems of current interest that are not readily amenable to efficient treatment by using the existing techniques. The authors discuss solution techniques for problems arising in nanotechnology, bioEM, metamaterials, as well as multiscale problems. They present techniques that utilize recent advances in computer technology, such as parallel architectures, and the increasing need to solve large and complex problems in a time efficient manner by using highly scalable algorithms.

  6. Roadmap to the SRS computing architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.

    1994-07-05

    This document outlines the major steps that must be taken by the Savannah River Site (SRS) to migrate the SRS information technology (IT) environment to the new architecture described in the Savannah River Site Computing Architecture. This document proposes an IT environment that is {open_quotes}...standards-based, data-driven, and workstation-oriented, with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.{close_quotes} Achieving this vision will require many substantial changes in the computing applications, systems, and supporting infrastructure at the site. This document consists of a set of roadmaps which provide explanations of the necessary changes for IT at the site and describes the milestones that must be completed to finish the migration.

  7. Computer Architecture for Energy Efficient SFQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-27

    IBM Corporation (T.J. Watson Research Laboratory) 1101 Kitchawan Road Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 -0000 2 ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer...accomplished during this ARO-sponsored project at IBM Research to identify and model an energy efficient SFQ-based computer architecture. The... IBM Windsor Blue (WB), illustrated schematically in Figure 2. The basic building block of WB is a "tile" comprised of a 64-bit arithmetic logic unit

  8. Advances in physiological computing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairclough, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    This edited collection will provide an overview of the field of physiological computing, i.e. the use of physiological signals as input for computer control. It will cover a breadth of current research, from brain-computer interfaces to telemedicine.

  9. Advanced Concept Architecture Design and Integrated Analysis (ACADIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-03

    1 Advanced Concept Architecture Design and Integrated Analysis (ACADIA) Submitted to the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA) on...Research Report 20161001 - 20161030 Advanced Concept Architecture Design and Integrated Analysis (ACADIA) W911NF-16-2-0229 8504Cedric Justin, Youngjun

  10. Compact, open-architecture computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.K.; Lim, A.; Kangarloo, H.; Eldredge, S.; Loloyan, M.; Chuang, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) was introduced in 1982, and its basic system design has not changed. Current CR systems have certain limitations: spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratios are lower than those of screen-film systems, they are complicated and expensive to build, and they have a closed architecture. The authors of this paper designed and implemented a simpler, lower-cost, compact, open-architecture CR system to overcome some of these limitations. The open-architecture system is a manual-load-single-plate reader that can fit on a desk top. Phosphor images are stored in a local disk and can be sent to any other computer through standard interfaces. Any manufacturer's plate can be read with a scanning time of 90 second for a 35 x 43-cm plate. The standard pixel size is 174 μm and can be adjusted for higher spatial resolution. The data resolution is 12 bits/pixel over an x-ray exposure range of 0.01-100 mR

  11. Fast semivariogram computation using FPGA architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadapati, Yamuna; Shirvaikar, Mukul; Dong, Xuanliang

    2015-02-01

    The semivariogram is a statistical measure of the spatial distribution of data and is based on Markov Random Fields (MRFs). Semivariogram analysis is a computationally intensive algorithm that has typically seen applications in the geosciences and remote sensing areas. Recently, applications in the area of medical imaging have been investigated, resulting in the need for efficient real time implementation of the algorithm. The semivariogram is a plot of semivariances for different lag distances between pixels. A semi-variance, γ(h), is defined as the half of the expected squared differences of pixel values between any two data locations with a lag distance of h. Due to the need to examine each pair of pixels in the image or sub-image being processed, the base algorithm complexity for an image window with n pixels is O(n2). Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are an attractive solution for such demanding applications due to their parallel processing capability. FPGAs also tend to operate at relatively modest clock rates measured in a few hundreds of megahertz, but they can perform tens of thousands of calculations per clock cycle while operating in the low range of power. This paper presents a technique for the fast computation of the semivariogram using two custom FPGA architectures. The design consists of several modules dedicated to the constituent computational tasks. A modular architecture approach is chosen to allow for replication of processing units. This allows for high throughput due to concurrent processing of pixel pairs. The current implementation is focused on isotropic semivariogram computations only. Anisotropic semivariogram implementation is anticipated to be an extension of the current architecture, ostensibly based on refinements to the current modules. The algorithm is benchmarked using VHDL on a Xilinx XUPV5-LX110T development Kit, which utilizes the Virtex5 FPGA. Medical image data from MRI scans are utilized for the experiments

  12. Developing a Distributed Computing Architecture at Arizona State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armann, Neil; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of Arizona State University's computing architecture, designed to ensure that all new distributed computing pieces will work together, is described. Aspects discussed include the business rationale, the general architectural approach, characteristics and objectives of the architecture, specific services, and impact on the university…

  13. A Computational Architecture for Programmable Automation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Russell H.; Korein, James U.; Maier, Georg E.; Durfee, Lawrence F.

    1987-03-01

    This short paper describes recent work at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center directed at developing a highly flexible computational architecture for research on sensor-based programmable automation. The system described here has been designed with a focus on dynamic configurability, layered user inter-faces and incorporation of sensor-based real time operations into new commands. It is these features which distinguish it from earlier work. The system is cur-rently being implemented at IBM for research purposes and internal use and is an outgrowth of programmable automation research which has been ongoing since 1972 [e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] .

  14. ELASTIC CLOUD COMPUTING ARCHITECTURE AND SYSTEM FOR HETEROGENEOUS SPATIOTEMPORAL COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Shi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spatiotemporal computation implements a variety of different algorithms. When big data are involved, desktop computer or standalone application may not be able to complete the computation task due to limited memory and computing power. Now that a variety of hardware accelerators and computing platforms are available to improve the performance of geocomputation, different algorithms may have different behavior on different computing infrastructure and platforms. Some are perfect for implementation on a cluster of graphics processing units (GPUs, while GPUs may not be useful on certain kind of spatiotemporal computation. This is the same situation in utilizing a cluster of Intel's many-integrated-core (MIC or Xeon Phi, as well as Hadoop or Spark platforms, to handle big spatiotemporal data. Furthermore, considering the energy efficiency requirement in general computation, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA may be a better solution for better energy efficiency when the performance of computation could be similar or better than GPUs and MICs. It is expected that an elastic cloud computing architecture and system that integrates all of GPUs, MICs, and FPGAs could be developed and deployed to support spatiotemporal computing over heterogeneous data types and computational problems.

  15. Elastic Cloud Computing Architecture and System for Heterogeneous Spatiotemporal Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X.

    2017-10-01

    Spatiotemporal computation implements a variety of different algorithms. When big data are involved, desktop computer or standalone application may not be able to complete the computation task due to limited memory and computing power. Now that a variety of hardware accelerators and computing platforms are available to improve the performance of geocomputation, different algorithms may have different behavior on different computing infrastructure and platforms. Some are perfect for implementation on a cluster of graphics processing units (GPUs), while GPUs may not be useful on certain kind of spatiotemporal computation. This is the same situation in utilizing a cluster of Intel's many-integrated-core (MIC) or Xeon Phi, as well as Hadoop or Spark platforms, to handle big spatiotemporal data. Furthermore, considering the energy efficiency requirement in general computation, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) may be a better solution for better energy efficiency when the performance of computation could be similar or better than GPUs and MICs. It is expected that an elastic cloud computing architecture and system that integrates all of GPUs, MICs, and FPGAs could be developed and deployed to support spatiotemporal computing over heterogeneous data types and computational problems.

  16. Advanced Computer Typography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    side it necessary and IdentOf, bp block number) Cartography Typography C uter Graphics 20.VSsT RACT (Continueaon reverse aide It necessary -d Identif...material with graphic arts quality. There are several systems’ ’a which operate through the computer. The CTI system was designed especially for...cartography and typography is the HERA system. It was designed especially for the printing of difficult material such as chemical structures, electronic

  17. Computer architecture evaluation for structural dynamics computations: Project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Hilda M.

    1989-01-01

    The intent of the proposed effort is the examination of the impact of the elements of parallel architectures on the performance realized in a parallel computation. To this end, three major projects are developed: a language for the expression of high level parallelism, a statistical technique for the synthesis of multicomputer interconnection networks based upon performance prediction, and a queueing model for the analysis of shared memory hierarchies.

  18. Experimental high energy physics and modern computer architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoek, J.

    1988-06-01

    The paper examines how experimental High Energy Physics can use modern computer architectures efficiently. In this connection parallel and vector architectures are investigated, and the types available at the moment for general use are discussed. A separate section briefly describes some architectures that are either a combination of both, or exemplify other architectures. In an appendix some directions in which computing seems to be developing in the USA are mentioned. (author)

  19. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Enterprise Architecture Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The project implements an architecture for delivery of integrated health management capabilities for the 21st Century launch complex. The delivered capabilities include anomaly detection, fault isolation, prognostics and physics based diagnostics.

  20. Power and Energy Architecture for Army Advanced Energy Initiative

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaffer, Edward C; Massie, Darrell D; Cross, James B

    2006-01-01

    ... technologies for the Army. The current P&E architecture is an amalgam of independent programs, which traditionally have been developed in stovepipe organizations, and often as an afterthought to the development of other advanced technologies...

  1. A new data architecture for advancing life cycle assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    IntroductionLife cycle assessment (LCA) has a technical architecture that limits data interoperability, transparency, and automated integration of external data. More advanced information technologies offer promise for increasing the ease with which information can be synthesized...

  2. Outline of a novel architecture for cortical computation

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, Kaushik

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a novel architecture for cortical computation has been proposed. This architecture is composed of computing paths consisting of neurons and synapses only. These paths have been decomposed into lateral, longitudinal and vertical components. Cortical computation has then been decomposed into lateral computation (LaC), longitudinal computation (LoC) and vertical computation (VeC). It has been shown that various loop structures in the cortical circuit play important roles in cortica...

  3. A High Performance COTS Based Computer Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patte, Mathieu; Grimoldi, Raoul; Trautner, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Using Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) electronic components for space applications is a long standing idea. Indeed the difference in processing performance and energy efficiency between radiation hardened components and COTS components is so important that COTS components are very attractive for use in mass and power constrained systems. However using COTS components in space is not straightforward as one must account with the effects of the space environment on the COTS components behavior. In the frame of the ESA funded activity called High Performance COTS Based Computer, Airbus Defense and Space and its subcontractor OHB CGS have developed and prototyped a versatile COTS based architecture for high performance processing. The rest of the paper is organized as follows: in a first section we will start by recapitulating the interests and constraints of using COTS components for space applications; then we will briefly describe existing fault mitigation architectures and present our solution for fault mitigation based on a component called the SmartIO; in the last part of the paper we will describe the prototyping activities executed during the HiP CBC project.

  4. Advanced Physical Models and Numerical Algorithms to Enable High-Fidelity Aerothermodynamic Simulations of Planetary Entry Vehicles on Emerging Distributed Heterogeneous Computing Architectures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The design and qualification of entry systems for planetary exploration largely rely on computational simulations. However, state-of-the-art modeling capabilities...

  5. Applications of parallel computer architectures to the real-time simulation of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doster, J.M.; Sills, E.D.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the authors report on efforts to utilize parallel computer architectures for the thermal-hydraulic simulation of nuclear power systems and current research efforts toward the development of advanced reactor operator aids and control systems based on this new technology. Many aspects of reactor thermal-hydraulic calculations are inherently parallel, and the computationally intensive portions of these calculations can be effectively implemented on modern computers. Timing studies indicate faster-than-real-time, high-fidelity physics models can be developed when the computational algorithms are designed to take advantage of the computer's architecture. These capabilities allow for the development of novel control systems and advanced reactor operator aids. Coupled with an integral real-time data acquisition system, evolving parallel computer architectures can provide operators and control room designers improved control and protection capabilities. Current research efforts are currently under way in this area

  6. Teaching Computer Organization and Architecture Using Simulation and FPGA Applications

    OpenAIRE

    D. K.M. Al-Aubidy

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the design concepts and realization of incorporating micro-operation simulation and FPGA implementation into a teaching tool for computer organization and architecture. This teaching tool helps computer engineering and computer science students to be familiarized practically with computer organization and architecture through the development of their own instruction set, computer programming and interfacing experiments. A two-pass assembler has been designed and implemente...

  7. Computation, architectural design and fabrication logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Martin

    2016-01-01

    Digital fabrication and digital form generation can change the way different professions interact in relation to the development and construction of architecture. The technologies can provide a more integrated design process and expand the architectural vocabulary. At Aarhus School of Architectur...

  8. DC Characterization of Different Advanced MOSFET Architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jomaah, J.; Fadlallah, M.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2011-01-01

    A review of recent results concerning the DC characterization of FD- and Double Gate SOI MOSFET's and FinFETs in modern CMOS technologies is given. By proper extraction techniques, distinction between the different interaction mechanisms is done. Parameter extraction conducted at room and low temperature clearly indicates that the mobility is directly impacted by shrinking the gate length in sub 100nm architectures. (author)

  9. Advanced computations in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    2002-01-01

    Scientific simulation in tandem with theory and experiment is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. In this paper we review recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations in magnetically confined plasmas with illustrative examples chosen from magnetic confinement research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetic reconnection, and others. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales together with access to powerful new computational resources. In particular, the fusion energy science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPP's to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. It should be emphasized that these calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In general, results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. The associated scientific excitement should serve to

  10. Computational simulation in architectural and environmental acoustics methods and applications of wave-based computation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Shinichi; Otsuru, Toru

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews a variety of methods for wave-based acoustic simulation and recent applications to architectural and environmental acoustic problems. Following an introduction providing an overview of computational simulation of sound environment, the book is in two parts: four chapters on methods and four chapters on applications. The first part explains the fundamentals and advanced techniques for three popular methods, namely, the finite-difference time-domain method, the finite element method, and the boundary element method, as well as alternative time-domain methods. The second part demonstrates various applications to room acoustics simulation, noise propagation simulation, acoustic property simulation for building components, and auralization. This book is a valuable reference that covers the state of the art in computational simulation for architectural and environmental acoustics.  

  11. Outline of a novel architecture for cortical computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Kaushik

    2008-03-01

    In this paper a novel architecture for cortical computation has been proposed. This architecture is composed of computing paths consisting of neurons and synapses. These paths have been decomposed into lateral, longitudinal and vertical components. Cortical computation has then been decomposed into lateral computation (LaC), longitudinal computation (LoC) and vertical computation (VeC). It has been shown that various loop structures in the cortical circuit play important roles in cortical computation as well as in memory storage and retrieval, keeping in conformity with the molecular basis of short and long term memory. A new learning scheme for the brain has also been proposed and how it is implemented within the proposed architecture has been explained. A few mathematical results about the architecture have been proposed, some of which are without proof.

  12. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  13. Recent advances in computational optimization

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Optimization is part of our everyday life. We try to organize our work in a better way and optimization occurs in minimizing time and cost or the maximization of the profit, quality and efficiency. Also many real world problems arising in engineering, economics, medicine and other domains can be formulated as optimization tasks. This volume is a comprehensive collection of extended contributions from the Workshop on Computational Optimization. This book presents recent advances in computational optimization. The volume includes important real world problems like parameter settings for con- trolling processes in bioreactor, robot skin wiring, strip packing, project scheduling, tuning of PID controller and so on. Some of them can be solved by applying traditional numerical methods, but others need a huge amount of computational resources. For them it is shown that is appropriate to develop algorithms based on metaheuristic methods like evolutionary computation, ant colony optimization, constrain programming etc...

  14. International Conference on Advanced Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Patnaik, Srikanta

    2014-01-01

    This book is composed of the Proceedings of the International Conference on Advanced Computing, Networking, and Informatics (ICACNI 2013), held at Central Institute of Technology, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India during June 14–16, 2013. The book records current research articles in the domain of computing, networking, and informatics. The book presents original research articles, case-studies, as well as review articles in the said field of study with emphasis on their implementation and practical application. Researchers, academicians, practitioners, and industry policy makers around the globe have contributed towards formation of this book with their valuable research submissions.

  15. Silicon CMOS architecture for a spin-based quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhorst, M; Eenink, H G J; Yang, C H; Dzurak, A S

    2017-12-15

    Recent advances in quantum error correction codes for fault-tolerant quantum computing and physical realizations of high-fidelity qubits in multiple platforms give promise for the construction of a quantum computer based on millions of interacting qubits. However, the classical-quantum interface remains a nascent field of exploration. Here, we propose an architecture for a silicon-based quantum computer processor based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We show how a transistor-based control circuit together with charge-storage electrodes can be used to operate a dense and scalable two-dimensional qubit system. The qubits are defined by the spin state of a single electron confined in quantum dots, coupled via exchange interactions, controlled using a microwave cavity, and measured via gate-based dispersive readout. We implement a spin qubit surface code, showing the prospects for universal quantum computation. We discuss the challenges and focus areas that need to be addressed, providing a path for large-scale quantum computing.

  16. Performance Analysis of Cloud Computing Architectures Using Discrete Event Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, John C.; Golomb, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing offers the economic benefit of on-demand resource allocation to meet changing enterprise computing needs. However, the flexibility of cloud computing is disadvantaged when compared to traditional hosting in providing predictable application and service performance. Cloud computing relies on resource scheduling in a virtualized network-centric server environment, which makes static performance analysis infeasible. We developed a discrete event simulation model to evaluate the overall effectiveness of organizations in executing their workflow in traditional and cloud computing architectures. The two part model framework characterizes both the demand using a probability distribution for each type of service request as well as enterprise computing resource constraints. Our simulations provide quantitative analysis to design and provision computing architectures that maximize overall mission effectiveness. We share our analysis of key resource constraints in cloud computing architectures and findings on the appropriateness of cloud computing in various applications.

  17. Toward a Fault Tolerant Architecture for Vital Medical-Based Wearable Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdali-Mohammadi, Fardin; Bajalan, Vahid; Fathi, Abdolhossein

    2015-12-01

    Advancements in computers and electronic technologies have led to the emergence of a new generation of efficient small intelligent systems. The products of such technologies might include Smartphones and wearable devices, which have attracted the attention of medical applications. These products are used less in critical medical applications because of their resource constraint and failure sensitivity. This is due to the fact that without safety considerations, small-integrated hardware will endanger patients' lives. Therefore, proposing some principals is required to construct wearable systems in healthcare so that the existing concerns are dealt with. Accordingly, this paper proposes an architecture for constructing wearable systems in critical medical applications. The proposed architecture is a three-tier one, supporting data flow from body sensors to cloud. The tiers of this architecture include wearable computers, mobile computing, and mobile cloud computing. One of the features of this architecture is its high possible fault tolerance due to the nature of its components. Moreover, the required protocols are presented to coordinate the components of this architecture. Finally, the reliability of this architecture is assessed by simulating the architecture and its components, and other aspects of the proposed architecture are discussed.

  18. Architectural development of an advanced EVA Electronic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    An advanced electronic system for future EVA missions (including zero gravity, the lunar surface, and the surface of Mars) is under research and development within the Advanced Life Support Division at NASA Ames Research Center. As a first step in the development, an optimum system architecture has been derived from an analysis of the projected requirements for these missions. The open, modular architecture centers around a distributed multiprocessing concept where the major subsystems independently process their own I/O functions and communicate over a common bus. Supervision and coordination of the subsystems is handled by an embedded real-time operating system kernel employing multitasking software techniques. A discussion of how the architecture most efficiently meets the electronic system functional requirements, maximizes flexibility for future development and mission applications, and enhances the reliability and serviceability of the system in these remote, hostile environments is included.

  19. On Architectural Acoustics Design using Computer Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2004-01-01

    The acoustical quality of a given building, or space within the building, is highly dependent on the architectural design. Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in the architectural acoustic and the emergence of potent...... room acoustic simulation programs it is now possible to subjectively analyze and evaluate acoustic properties prior to the actual construction of a facility. With the right tools applied, the acoustic design can become an integrated part of the architectural design process. The aim of the present paper...... this information is discussed. The conclusion of the paper is that the application of acoustical simulation programs is most beneficial in the last of three phases but that an application of the program to the two first phases would be preferable and possible with an improvement of the interface of the program....

  20. Exploring Heterogeneous Multicore Architectures for Advanced Embedded Uncertainty Quantification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phipps, Eric T.; Edwards, Harold C.; Hu, Jonathan J.

    2014-09-01

    We explore rearrangements of classical uncertainty quantification methods with the aim of achieving higher aggregate performance for uncertainty quantification calculations on emerging multicore and manycore architectures. We show a rearrangement of the stochastic Galerkin method leads to improved performance and scalability on several computational architectures whereby un- certainty information is propagated at the lowest levels of the simulation code improving memory access patterns, exposing new dimensions of fine grained parallelism, and reducing communica- tion. We also develop a general framework for implementing such rearrangements for a diverse set of uncertainty quantification algorithms as well as computational simulation codes to which they are applied.

  1. A flexible architecture for advanced process control solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faron, Kamyar; Iourovitski, Ilia

    2005-05-01

    Advanced Process Control (APC) is now mainstream practice in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Over the past decade and a half APC has evolved from a "good idea", and "wouldn"t it be great" concept to mandatory manufacturing practice. APC developments have primarily dealt with two major thrusts, algorithms and infrastructure, and often the line between them has been blurred. The algorithms have evolved from very simple single variable solutions to sophisticated and cutting edge adaptive multivariable (input and output) solutions. Spending patterns in recent times have demanded that the economics of a comprehensive APC infrastructure be completely justified for any and all cost conscious manufacturers. There are studies suggesting integration costs as high as 60% of the total APC solution costs. Such cost prohibitive figures clearly diminish the return on APC investments. This has limited the acceptance and development of pure APC infrastructure solutions for many fabs. Modern APC solution architectures must satisfy the wide array of requirements from very manual R&D environments to very advanced and automated "lights out" manufacturing facilities. A majority of commercially available control solutions and most in house developed solutions lack important attributes of scalability, flexibility, and adaptability and hence require significant resources for integration, deployment, and maintenance. Many APC improvement efforts have been abandoned and delayed due to legacy systems and inadequate architectural design. Recent advancements (Service Oriented Architectures) in the software industry have delivered ideal technologies for delivering scalable, flexible, and reliable solutions that can seamlessly integrate into any fabs" existing system and business practices. In this publication we shall evaluate the various attributes of the architectures required by fabs and illustrate the benefits of a Service Oriented Architecture to satisfy these requirements. Blue

  2. Biomimetic design processes in architecture: morphogenetic and evolutionary computational design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menges, Achim

    2012-01-01

    Design computation has profound impact on architectural design methods. This paper explains how computational design enables the development of biomimetic design processes specific to architecture, and how they need to be significantly different from established biomimetic processes in engineering disciplines. The paper first explains the fundamental difference between computer-aided and computational design in architecture, as the understanding of this distinction is of critical importance for the research presented. Thereafter, the conceptual relation and possible transfer of principles from natural morphogenesis to design computation are introduced and the related developments of generative, feature-based, constraint-based, process-based and feedback-based computational design methods are presented. This morphogenetic design research is then related to exploratory evolutionary computation, followed by the presentation of two case studies focusing on the exemplary development of spatial envelope morphologies and urban block morphologies. (paper)

  3. Design for scalability in 3D computer graphics architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Lund, Hans Erik

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes useful methods and techniques for designing scalable hybrid parallel rendering architectures for 3D computer graphics. Various techniques for utilizing parallelism in a pipelines system are analyzed. During the Ph.D study a prototype 3D graphics architecture named Hybris has...

  4. First 3 years of operation of RIACS (Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science) (1983-1985)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) is to explore matches between advanced computing architectures and the processes of scientific research. An architecture evaluation of the MIT static dataflow machine, specification of a graphical language for expressing distributed computations, and specification of an expert system for aiding in grid generation for two-dimensional flow problems was initiated. Research projects for 1984 and 1985 are summarized.

  5. Advances in embedded computer vision

    CERN Document Server

    Kisacanin, Branislav

    2014-01-01

    This illuminating collection offers a fresh look at the very latest advances in the field of embedded computer vision. Emerging areas covered by this comprehensive text/reference include the embedded realization of 3D vision technologies for a variety of applications, such as stereo cameras on mobile devices. Recent trends towards the development of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with embedded image and video processing algorithms are also examined. The authoritative insights range from historical perspectives to future developments, reviewing embedded implementation, tools, technolog

  6. A heterogeneous hierarchical architecture for real-time computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skroch, D.A.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The need for high-speed data acquisition and control algorithms has prompted continued research in the area of multiprocessor systems and related programming techniques. The result presented here is a unique hardware and software architecture for high-speed real-time computer systems. The implementation of a prototype of this architecture has required the integration of architecture, operating systems and programming languages into a cohesive unit. This report describes a Heterogeneous Hierarchial Architecture for Real-Time (H{sup 2} ART) and system software for program loading and interprocessor communication.

  7. Supervisory Control System Architecture for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Cole, Daniel L [University of Pittsburgh; Fugate, David L [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Rao, Nageswara S [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    This technical report was generated as a product of the Supervisory Control for Multi-Modular SMR Plants project within the Instrumentation, Control and Human-Machine Interface technology area under the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report documents the definition of strategies, functional elements, and the structural architecture of a supervisory control system for multi-modular advanced SMR (AdvSMR) plants. This research activity advances the state-of-the art by incorporating decision making into the supervisory control system architectural layers through the introduction of a tiered-plant system approach. The report provides a brief history of hierarchical functional architectures and the current state-of-the-art, describes a reference AdvSMR to show the dependencies between systems, presents a hierarchical structure for supervisory control, indicates the importance of understanding trip setpoints, applies a new theoretic approach for comparing architectures, identifies cyber security controls that should be addressed early in system design, and describes ongoing work to develop system requirements and hardware/software configurations.

  8. Usage of Thin-Client/Server Architecture in Computer Aided Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimen, Caghan; Kavurucu, Yusuf; Aydin, Halit

    2014-01-01

    With the advances of technology, thin-client/server architecture has become popular in multi-user/single network environments. Thin-client is a user terminal in which the user can login to a domain and run programs by connecting to a remote server. Recent developments in network and hardware technologies (cloud computing, virtualization, etc.)…

  9. Advances in medical image computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolxdorff, T; Deserno, T M; Handels, H; Meinzer, H-P

    2009-01-01

    Medical image computing has become a key technology in high-tech applications in medicine and an ubiquitous part of modern imaging systems and the related processes of clinical diagnosis and intervention. Over the past years significant progress has been made in the field, both on methodological and on application level. Despite this progress there are still big challenges to meet in order to establish image processing routinely in health care. In this issue, selected contributions of the German Conference on Medical Image Processing (BVM) are assembled to present latest advances in the field of medical image computing. The winners of scientific awards of the German Conference on Medical Image Processing (BVM) 2008 were invited to submit a manuscript on their latest developments and results for possible publication in Methods of Information in Medicine. Finally, seven excellent papers were selected to describe important aspects of recent advances in the field of medical image processing. The selected papers give an impression of the breadth and heterogeneity of new developments. New methods for improved image segmentation, non-linear image registration and modeling of organs are presented together with applications of image analysis methods in different medical disciplines. Furthermore, state-of-the-art tools and techniques to support the development and evaluation of medical image processing systems in practice are described. The selected articles describe different aspects of the intense development in medical image computing. The image processing methods presented enable new insights into the patient's image data and have the future potential to improve medical diagnostics and patient treatment.

  10. Computer system architecture for laboratory automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penney, B.K.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the various approaches that may be taken to provide computing resources for laboratory automation. Three distinct approaches are identified, the single dedicated small computer, shared use of a larger computer, and a distributed approach in which resources are provided by a number of computers, linked together, and working in some cooperative way. The significance of the microprocessor in laboratory automation is discussed, and it is shown that it is not simply a cheap replacement of the minicomputer. (Auth.)

  11. A computational architecture for social agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, A.H. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This article describes a new class of information-processing models for social agents. They axe derived from primate brain architecture, the processing in brain regions, the interactions among brain regions, and the social behavior of primates. In another paper, we have reviewed the neuroanatomical connections and functional involvements of cortical regions. We reviewed the evidence for a hierarchical architecture in the primate brain. By examining neuroanatomical evidence for connections among neural areas, we were able to establish anatomical regions and connections. We then examined evidence for specific functional involvements of the different neural axeas and found some support for hierarchical functioning, not only for the perception hierarchies but also for the planning and action hierarchy in the frontal lobes.

  12. On architectural acoustic design using computer simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2004-01-01

    properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...... acoustic design process. The emphasis is put on the first three out of five phases in the working process of the architect and a case study is carried out in which each phase is represented by typical results ? as exemplified with reference to the design of Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon. The paper...... discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the programme in each phase compared to the works of architects not using acoustic simulation programmes. The conclusion of the paper is that the application of acoustic simulation programs is most beneficial in the last of three phases but an application...

  13. A Communication Architecture for an Advanced Extravehicular Mobile Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the communication architecture for the Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 1.0 subsystem for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU). The following systems are described in detail: Caution Warning and Control System, Informatics, Storage, Video, Audio, Communication, and Monitoring Test and Validation. This document also provides some background as well as the purpose and goals of the PAS subsystem being developed at Glenn Research Center (GRC).

  14. A Scalable Communication Architecture for Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Ngo Hoang , Giang; Liquori , Luigi; Nguyen Chan , Hung

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), seen as foundation for overall grid modernization, is an integration of many technologies that provides an intelligent connection between consumers and system operators [ami 2008]. One of the biggest challenge that AMI faces is to scalable collect and manage a huge amount of data from a large number of customers. In our paper, we address this challenge by introducing a mixed peer-to-peer (P2P) and client-server communication architecture for AMI in whic...

  15. The visual simulators for architecture and computer organization learning

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić Boško; Grbanović Nenad; Đorđević Jovan

    2009-01-01

    The paper proposes a method of an effective distance learning of architecture and computer organization. The proposed method is based on a software system that is possible to be applied in any course in this field. Within this system students are enabled to observe simulation of already created computer systems. The system provides creation and simulation of switch systems, too.

  16. Optoelectronic Computer Architecture Development for Image Reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forber, Richard

    1996-01-01

    .... Specifically, we collaborated with UCSD and ERIM on the development of an optically augmented electronic computer for high speed inverse transform calculations to enable real time image reconstruction...

  17. Architecture independent environment for developing engineering software on MIMD computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valimohamed, Karim A.; Lopez, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Engineers are constantly faced with solving problems of increasing complexity and detail. Multiple Instruction stream Multiple Data stream (MIMD) computers have been developed to overcome the performance limitations of serial computers. The hardware architectures of MIMD computers vary considerably and are much more sophisticated than serial computers. Developing large scale software for a variety of MIMD computers is difficult and expensive. There is a need to provide tools that facilitate programming these machines. First, the issues that must be considered to develop those tools are examined. The two main areas of concern were architecture independence and data management. Architecture independent software facilitates software portability and improves the longevity and utility of the software product. It provides some form of insurance for the investment of time and effort that goes into developing the software. The management of data is a crucial aspect of solving large engineering problems. It must be considered in light of the new hardware organizations that are available. Second, the functional design and implementation of a software environment that facilitates developing architecture independent software for large engineering applications are described. The topics of discussion include: a description of the model that supports the development of architecture independent software; identifying and exploiting concurrency within the application program; data coherence; engineering data base and memory management.

  18. Heavy Lift Vehicle (HLV) Avionics Flight Computing Architecture Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Robert F.; Chen, Yuan; Morgan, Dwayne R.; Butler, A. Marc; Sdhuh, Joseph M.; Petelle, Jennifer K.; Gwaltney, David A.; Coe, Lisa D.; Koelbl, Terry G.; Nguyen, Hai D.

    2011-01-01

    A NASA multi-Center study team was assembled from LaRC, MSFC, KSC, JSC and WFF to examine potential flight computing architectures for a Heavy Lift Vehicle (HLV) to better understand avionics drivers. The study examined Design Reference Missions (DRMs) and vehicle requirements that could impact the vehicles avionics. The study considered multiple self-checking and voting architectural variants and examined reliability, fault-tolerance, mass, power, and redundancy management impacts. Furthermore, a goal of the study was to develop the skills and tools needed to rapidly assess additional architectures should requirements or assumptions change.

  19. Design of Carborane Molecular Architectures via Electronic Structure Computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, J.M.; Serrano-Andres, L.; Klein, D.J.; Schleyer, P.V.R.; Mich, J.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical electronic structure computations were employed to explore initial steps towards a comprehensive design of poly carborane architectures through assembly of molecular units. Aspects considered were (i) the striking modification of geometrical parameters through substitution, (ii) endohedral carboranes and proposed ejection mechanisms for energy/ion/atom/energy storage/transport, (iii) the excited state character in single and dimeric molecular units, and (iv) higher architectural constructs. A goal of this work is to find optimal architectures where atom/ion/energy/spin transport within carborane superclusters is feasible in order to modernize and improve future photo energy processes.

  20. Architectural analysis for wirelessly powered computing platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapoor, A.; Pineda de Gyvez, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a design framework for wirelessly powered generic computing platforms that takes into account various system parameters in response to a time-varying energy source. These parameters are the charging profile of the energy source, computing speed (fclk), digital supply voltage (VDD), energy

  1. MOMCC: Market-Oriented Architecture for Mobile Cloud Computing Based on Service Oriented Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfazli, Saeid; Sanaei, Zohreh; Gani, Abdullah; Shiraz, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    The vision of augmenting computing capabilities of mobile devices, especially smartphones with least cost is likely transforming to reality leveraging cloud computing. Cloud exploitation by mobile devices breeds a new research domain called Mobile Cloud Computing (MCC). However, issues like portability and interoperability should be addressed for mobile augmentation which is a non-trivial task using component-based approaches. Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is a promising design philosop...

  2. Cloud Computing Security in Openstack Architecture: General Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Igorevich Shakulo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The subject of article is cloud computing security. Article begins with author analyzing cloud computing advantages and disadvantages, factors of growth, both positive and negative. Among latter, security is deemed one of the most prominent. Furthermore, author takes architecture of OpenStack project as an example for study: describes its essential components and their interconnection. As conclusion, author raises series of questions as possible areas of further research to resolve security concerns, thus making cloud computing more secure technology.

  3. Advances in Computer Science and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Second International Conference on Advances in Computer Science and Engineering (CES 2012)

    2012-01-01

    This book includes the proceedings of the second International Conference on Advances in Computer Science and Engineering (CES 2012), which was held during January 13-14, 2012 in Sanya, China. The papers in these proceedings of CES 2012 focus on the researchers’ advanced works in their fields of Computer Science and Engineering mainly organized in four topics, (1) Software Engineering, (2) Intelligent Computing, (3) Computer Networks, and (4) Artificial Intelligence Software.

  4. Layered Architectures for Quantum Computers and Quantum Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nathan C.

    This chapter examines how to organize quantum computers and repeaters using a systematic framework known as layered architecture, where machine control is organized in layers associated with specialized tasks. The framework is flexible and could be used for analysis and comparison of quantum information systems. To demonstrate the design principles in practice, we develop architectures for quantum computers and quantum repeaters based on optically controlled quantum dots, showing how a myriad of technologies must operate synchronously to achieve fault-tolerance. Optical control makes information processing in this system very fast, scalable to large problem sizes, and extendable to quantum communication.

  5. Computer Architecture Techniques for Power-Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Kaxiras, Stefanos

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years, power dissipation has become an important design constraint, on par with performance, in the design of new computer systems. Whereas in the past, the primary job of the computer architect was to translate improvements in operating frequency and transistor count into performance, now power efficiency must be taken into account at every step of the design process. While for some time, architects have been successful in delivering 40% to 50% annual improvement in processor performance, costs that were previously brushed aside eventually caught up. The most critical of these

  6. Centaure: an heterogeneous parallel architecture for computer vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peythieux, Marc

    1997-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the architecture of parallel computers dedicated to computer vision. In the first chapter, the problem to be solved is presented, as well as the architecture of the Sympati and Symphonie computers, on which this work is based. The second chapter is about the state of the art of computers and integrated processors that can execute computer vision and image processing codes. The third chapter contains a description of the architecture of Centaure. It has an heterogeneous structure: it is composed of a multiprocessor system based on Analog Devices ADSP21060 Sharc digital signal processor, and of a set of Symphonie computers working in a multi-SIMD fashion. Centaure also has a modular structure. Its basic node is composed of one Symphonie computer, tightly coupled to a Sharc thanks to a dual ported memory. The nodes of Centaure are linked together by the Sharc communication links. The last chapter deals with a performance validation of Centaure. The execution times on Symphonie and on Centaure of a benchmark which is typical of industrial vision, are presented and compared. In the first place, these results show that the basic node of Centaure allows a faster execution than Symphonie, and that increasing the size of the tested computer leads to a better speed-up with Centaure than with Symphonie. In the second place, these results validate the choice of running the low level structure of Centaure in a multi- SIMD fashion. (author) [fr

  7. Neuromorphic Computing – From Materials Research to Systems Architecture Roundtable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, Ivan K. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Stevens, Rick [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Pino, Robinson [Dept. of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, Washington, DC (United States); Pechan, Michael [Dept. of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-10-29

    Computation in its many forms is the engine that fuels our modern civilization. Modern computation—based on the von Neumann architecture—has allowed, until now, the development of continuous improvements, as predicted by Moore’s law. However, computation using current architectures and materials will inevitably—within the next 10 years—reach a limit because of fundamental scientific reasons. DOE convened a roundtable of experts in neuromorphic computing systems, materials science, and computer science in Washington on October 29-30, 2015 to address the following basic questions: Can brain-like (“neuromorphic”) computing devices based on new material concepts and systems be developed to dramatically outperform conventional CMOS based technology? If so, what are the basic research challenges for materials sicence and computing? The overarching answer that emerged was: The development of novel functional materials and devices incorporated into unique architectures will allow a revolutionary technological leap toward the implementation of a fully “neuromorphic” computer. To address this challenge, the following issues were considered: The main differences between neuromorphic and conventional computing as related to: signaling models, timing/clock, non-volatile memory, architecture, fault tolerance, integrated memory and compute, noise tolerance, analog vs. digital, and in situ learning New neuromorphic architectures needed to: produce lower energy consumption, potential novel nanostructured materials, and enhanced computation Device and materials properties needed to implement functions such as: hysteresis, stability, and fault tolerance Comparisons of different implementations: spin torque, memristors, resistive switching, phase change, and optical schemes for enhanced breakthroughs in performance, cost, fault tolerance, and/or manufacturability.

  8. Hybrid VLSI/QCA Architecture for Computing FFTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarres, Katayoon; Spotnitz, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    A data-processor architecture that would incorporate elements of both conventional very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry and quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) has been proposed to enable the highly parallel and systolic computation of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). The proposed circuit would complement the QCA-based circuits described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, namely Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots (NPO-20801), Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42; Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots (NPO-20855) Vol. 27, No. 1 (January 2003), page 32; and Bit-Serial Adder Based on Quantum Dots (NPO-20869), Vol. 27, No. 1 (January 2003), page 35. The cited prior articles described the limitations of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry and the major potential advantage afforded by QCA. To recapitulate: In a VLSI circuit, signal paths that are required not to interact with each other must not cross in the same plane. In contrast, for reasons too complex to describe in the limited space available for this article, suitably designed and operated QCAbased signal paths that are required not to interact with each other can nevertheless be allowed to cross each other in the same plane without adverse effect. In principle, this characteristic could be exploited to design compact, coplanar, simple (relative to VLSI) QCA-based networks to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes.

  9. Experimental comparison of two quantum computing architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Norbert M; Maslov, Dmitri; Roetteler, Martin; Debnath, Shantanu; Figgatt, Caroline; Landsman, Kevin A; Wright, Kenneth; Monroe, Christopher

    2017-03-28

    We run a selection of algorithms on two state-of-the-art 5-qubit quantum computers that are based on different technology platforms. One is a publicly accessible superconducting transmon device (www. ibm.com/ibm-q) with limited connectivity, and the other is a fully connected trapped-ion system. Even though the two systems have different native quantum interactions, both can be programed in a way that is blind to the underlying hardware, thus allowing a comparison of identical quantum algorithms between different physical systems. We show that quantum algorithms and circuits that use more connectivity clearly benefit from a better-connected system of qubits. Although the quantum systems here are not yet large enough to eclipse classical computers, this experiment exposes critical factors of scaling quantum computers, such as qubit connectivity and gate expressivity. In addition, the results suggest that codesigning particular quantum applications with the hardware itself will be paramount in successfully using quantum computers in the future.

  10. Investigating Architectural Issues in Neuromorphic Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    An example of this is Diffusion Tensor Imaging ( DTI ), a variant of fMRI, which detects water diffusion. DTI is routinely applied at medical...model computed for a subfield positioned over a section of the silhouette dog’s hind leg . The illustrated angles roughly correspond to orientation

  11. Advanced Exploration Systems Water Architecture Study Interim Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the Advanced Exploration System (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) is to develop advanced water recovery systems that enable NASA human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The primary objective of the AES WRP is to develop water recovery technologies critical to near-term missions beyond LEO. The secondary objective is to continue to advance mid-readiness-level technologies to support future NASA missions. An effort is being undertaken to establish the architecture for the AES Water Recovery System (WRS) that meets both near- and long-term objectives. The resultant architecture will be used to guide future technical planning, establish a baseline development roadmap for technology infusion, and establish baseline assumptions for integrated ground and on-orbit Environmental Control and Life Support Systems definition. This study is being performed in three phases. Phase I established the scope of the study through definition of the mission requirements and constraints, as well as identifying all possible WRS configurations that meet the mission requirements. Phase II focused on the near-term space exploration objectives by establishing an International Space Station-derived reference schematic for long-duration (>180 day) in-space habitation. Phase III will focus on the long-term space exploration objectives, trading the viable WRS configurations identified in Phase I to identify the ideal exploration WRS. The results of Phases I and II are discussed in this paper.

  12. SpaceWire- Based Control System Architecture for the Lightweight Advanced Robotic Arm Demonstrator [LARAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, Marek; Coates, Adam; Montano, Giuseppe; Allouis, Elie; Jameux, David

    2015-09-01

    The Lightweight Advanced Robotic Arm Demonstrator (LARAD) is a state-of-the-art, two-meter long robotic arm for planetary surface exploration currently being developed by a UK consortium led by Airbus Defence and Space Ltd under contract to the UK Space Agency (CREST-2 programme). LARAD has a modular design, which allows for experimentation with different electronics and control software. The control system architecture includes the on-board computer, control software and firmware, and the communication infrastructure (e.g. data links, switches) connecting on-board computer(s), sensors, actuators and the end-effector. The purpose of the control system is to operate the arm according to pre-defined performance requirements, monitoring its behaviour in real-time and performing safing/recovery actions in case of faults. This paper reports on the results of a recent study about the feasibility of the development and integration of a novel control system architecture for LARAD fully based on the SpaceWire protocol. The current control system architecture is based on the combination of two communication protocols, Ethernet and CAN. The new SpaceWire-based control system will allow for improved monitoring and telecommanding performance thanks to higher communication data rate, allowing for the adoption of advanced control schemes, potentially based on multiple vision sensors, and for the handling of sophisticated end-effectors that require fine control, such as science payloads or robotic hands.

  13. Experimental Comparison of Two Quantum Computing Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-28

    trap experiment on an independent quantum computer of identical size and comparable capability but with a different physical implementation at its core... locked laser. These optical controllers con- sist of an array of individual addressing beams and a coun- terpropagating global beam that illuminates...generally programmable. This allows identical quantum tasks or algorithms to be imple- mented on radically different technologies to inform further

  14. On Computational Fluid Dynamics Tools in Architectural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Hougaard, Mads; Stærdahl, Jesper Winther

    engineering computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation program ANSYS CFX and a CFD based representative program RealFlow are investigated. These two programs represent two types of CFD based tools available for use during phases of an architectural design process. However, as outlined in two case studies...

  15. The Design of a System Architecture for Mobile Multimedia Computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2000-01-01

    This chapter discusses the system architecture of a portable computer, called Mobile Digital Companion, which provides support for handling multimedia applications energy efficiently. Because battery life is limited and battery weight is an important factor for the size and the weight of the Mobile

  16. Cloud Computing Security in Openstack Architecture: General Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Gleb Igorevich Shakulo

    2015-01-01

    The subject of article is cloud computing security. Article begins with author analyzing cloud computing advantages and disadvantages, factors of growth, both positive and negative. Among latter, security is deemed one of the most prominent. Furthermore, author takes architecture of OpenStack project as an example for study: describes its essential components and their interconnection. As conclusion, author raises series of questions as possible areas of further research to resolve security c...

  17. CMS on the GRID: Toward a fully distributed computing architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocente, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    The computing systems required to collect, analyse and store the physics data at LHC would need to be distributed and global in scope. CMS is actively involved in several grid-related projects to develop and deploy a fully distributed computing architecture. We present here recent developments of tools for automating job submission and for serving data to remote analysis stations. Plans for further test and deployment of a production grid are also described

  18. Advanced computers and Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    High-performance parallelism that is currently available is synchronous in nature. It is manifested in such architectures as Burroughs ILLIAC-IV, CDC STAR-100, TI ASC, CRI CRAY-1, ICL DAP, and many special-purpose array processors designed for signal processing. This form of parallelism has apparently not been of significant value to many important Monte Carlo calculations. Nevertheless, there is much asynchronous parallelism in many of these calculations. A model of a production code that requires up to 20 hours per problem on a CDC 7600 is studied for suitability on some asynchronous architectures that are on the drawing board. The code is described and some of its properties and resource requirements ae identified to compare with corresponding properties and resource requirements are identified to compare with corresponding properties and resource requirements are identified to compare with corresponding properties and resources of some asynchronous multiprocessor architectures. Arguments are made for programer aids and special syntax to identify and support important asynchronous parallelism. 2 figures, 5 tables

  19. Considering Intermittent Dormancy in an Advanced Life Support Systems Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.; Perry, Jay L.

    2017-01-01

    Many advanced human space exploration missions being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) include concepts in which in-space systems cycle between inhabited and uninhabited states. Managing the life support system (LSS) may be particularly challenged during these periods of intermittent dormancy. A study to identify LSS management challenges and considerations relating to dormancy is described. The study seeks to define concepts suitable for addressing intermittent dormancy states and to evaluate whether the reference LSS architectures being considered by the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support Systems Project (LSSP) are sufficient to support this operational state. The primary focus of the study is the mission concept considered to be the most challenging-a crewed Mars mission with an extensive surface stay. Results from this study are presented and discussed.

  20. Advanced computer-based training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H D; Martin, H D

    1987-05-01

    The paper presents new techniques of computer-based training for personnel of nuclear power plants. Training on full-scope simulators is further increased by use of dedicated computer-based equipment. An interactive communication system runs on a personal computer linked to a video disc; a part-task simulator runs on 32 bit process computers and shows two versions: as functional trainer or as on-line predictor with an interactive learning system (OPAL), which may be well-tailored to a specific nuclear power plant. The common goal of both develoments is the optimization of the cost-benefit ratio for training and equipment.

  1. Advanced computer-based training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H.D.; Martin, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents new techniques of computer-based training for personnel of nuclear power plants. Training on full-scope simulators is further increased by use of dedicated computer-based equipment. An interactive communication system runs on a personal computer linked to a video disc; a part-task simulator runs on 32 bit process computers and shows two versions: as functional trainer or as on-line predictor with an interactive learning system (OPAL), which may be well-tailored to a specific nuclear power plant. The common goal of both develoments is the optimization of the cost-benefit ratio for training and equipment. (orig.) [de

  2. Architectural design of an advanced naturally ventilated building form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomas, K.J. [De Montfort University, Leicester (United Kingdom). Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development

    2007-02-15

    Advanced stack-ventilated buildings have the potential to consume much less energy for space conditioning than typical mechanically ventilated or air-conditioned buildings. This paper describes how environmental design considerations in general, and ventilation considerations in particular, shape the architecture of advanced naturally ventilated (ANV) buildings. The attributes of simple and advanced naturally ventilated buildings are described and a taxonomy of ANV buildings presented. Simple equations for use at the preliminary design stage are presented. These produce target structural cross section areas for the key components of ANV systems. The equations have been developed through practice-based research to design three large educational buildings: the Frederick Lanchester Library, Coventry, UK; the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, London, UK; the Harm A. Weber Library, Elgin, near Chicago, USA. These buildings are briefly described and the sizes of the as-built ANV features compared with the target values for use in preliminary design. The three buildings represent successive evolutionary stages: from advanced natural ventilation, to ANV with passive downdraught cooling, and finally ANV with HVAC support. Hopefully the guidance, simple calculation tools and case study examples will give architects and environmental design consultants confidence to embark on the design of ANV buildings. (author)

  3. Advances in photonic reservoir computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van der Sande Guy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We review a novel paradigm that has emerged in analogue neuromorphic optical computing. The goal is to implement a reservoir computer in optics, where information is encoded in the intensity and phase of the optical field. Reservoir computing is a bio-inspired approach especially suited for processing time-dependent information. The reservoir’s complex and high-dimensional transient response to the input signal is capable of universal computation. The reservoir does not need to be trained, which makes it very well suited for optics. As such, much of the promise of photonic reservoirs lies in their minimal hardware requirements, a tremendous advantage over other hardware-intensive neural network models. We review the two main approaches to optical reservoir computing: networks implemented with multiple discrete optical nodes and the continuous system of a single nonlinear device coupled to delayed feedback.

  4. Advances in photonic reservoir computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Sande, Guy; Brunner, Daniel; Soriano, Miguel C.

    2017-05-01

    We review a novel paradigm that has emerged in analogue neuromorphic optical computing. The goal is to implement a reservoir computer in optics, where information is encoded in the intensity and phase of the optical field. Reservoir computing is a bio-inspired approach especially suited for processing time-dependent information. The reservoir's complex and high-dimensional transient response to the input signal is capable of universal computation. The reservoir does not need to be trained, which makes it very well suited for optics. As such, much of the promise of photonic reservoirs lies in their minimal hardware requirements, a tremendous advantage over other hardware-intensive neural network models. We review the two main approaches to optical reservoir computing: networks implemented with multiple discrete optical nodes and the continuous system of a single nonlinear device coupled to delayed feedback.

  5. The Architectural Designs of a Nanoscale Computing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M. Eshaghian-Wilner

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A generic nanoscale computing model is presented in this paper. The model consists of a collection of fully interconnected nanoscale computing modules, where each module is a cube of cells made out of quantum dots, spins, or molecules. The cells dynamically switch between two states by quantum interactions among their neighbors in all three dimensions. This paper includes a brief introduction to the field of nanotechnology from a computing point of view and presents a set of preliminary architectural designs for fabricating the nanoscale model studied.

  6. Advances in computational complexity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Jin-Yi

    1993-01-01

    This collection of recent papers on computational complexity theory grew out of activities during a special year at DIMACS. With contributions by some of the leading experts in the field, this book is of lasting value in this fast-moving field, providing expositions not found elsewhere. Although aimed primarily at researchers in complexity theory and graduate students in mathematics or computer science, the book is accessible to anyone with an undergraduate education in mathematics or computer science. By touching on some of the major topics in complexity theory, this book sheds light on this burgeoning area of research.

  7. Advanced in Computer Science and its Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, Neil; Park, James; CSA 2013

    2014-01-01

    The theme of CSA is focused on the various aspects of computer science and its applications for advances in computer science and its applications and provides an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss the latest issues and progress in the area of computer science and its applications. Therefore this book will be include the various theories and practical applications in computer science and its applications.

  8. Quantum chromodynamics with advanced computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronfeld, A S

    2008-01-01

    We survey results in lattice quantum chromodynamics from groups in the USQCD Collaboration. The main focus is on physics, but many aspects of the discussion are aimed at an audience of computational physicists

  9. A computer architecture for the implementation of SDL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutcher, L A

    1989-01-01

    Finite State Machines (FSMs) are a part of well-established automata theory. The FSM model is useful in all stages of system design, from abstract specification to implementation in hardware. The FSM model has been studied as a technique in software design, and the implementation of this type of software considered. The Specification and Description Language (SDL) has been considered in detail as an example of this approach. The complexity of systems designed using SDL warrants their implementation through a programmed computer. A benchmark for the implementation of SDL has been established and the performance of SDL on three particular computer architectures investigated. Performance is judged according to this benchmark and also the ease of implementation, which is related to the confidence of a correct implementation. The implementation on 68000s and transputers is considered as representative of established and state-of-the-art microprocessors respectively. A third architecture that uses a processor that has been proposed specifically for the implementation of SDL is considered as a high-level custom architecture. Analysis and measurements of the benchmark on each architecture indicates that the execution time of SDL decreases by an order of magnitude from the 68000 to the transputer to the custom architecture. The ease of implementation is also greater when the execution time is reduced. A study of some real applications of SDL indicates that the benchmark figures are reflected in user-oriented measures of performance such as data throughput and response time. A high-level architecture such as the one proposed here for SDL can provide benefits in terms of execution time and correctness.

  10. Hybrid parallel computing architecture for multiview phase shifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kai; Li, Zhongwei; Zhou, Xiaohui; Shi, Yusheng; Wang, Congjun

    2014-11-01

    The multiview phase-shifting method shows its powerful capability in achieving high resolution three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement. Unfortunately, this ability results in very high computation costs and 3-D computations have to be processed offline. To realize real-time 3-D shape measurement, a hybrid parallel computing architecture is proposed for multiview phase shifting. In this architecture, the central processing unit can co-operate with the graphic processing unit (GPU) to achieve hybrid parallel computing. The high computation cost procedures, including lens distortion rectification, phase computation, correspondence, and 3-D reconstruction, are implemented in GPU, and a three-layer kernel function model is designed to simultaneously realize coarse-grained and fine-grained paralleling computing. Experimental results verify that the developed system can perform 50 fps (frame per second) real-time 3-D measurement with 260 K 3-D points per frame. A speedup of up to 180 times is obtained for the performance of the proposed technique using a NVIDIA GT560Ti graphics card rather than a sequential C in a 3.4 GHZ Inter Core i7 3770.

  11. Using EDUCache Simulator for the Computer Architecture and Organization Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasko Ristov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The computer architecture and organization course is essential in all computer science and engineering programs, and the most selected and liked elective course for related engineering disciplines. However, the attractiveness brings a new challenge, it requires a lot of effort by the instructor, to explain rather complicated concepts to beginners or to those who study related disciplines. The usage of visual simulators can improve both the teaching and learning processes. The overall goal is twofold: 1~to enable a visual environment to explain the basic concepts and 2~to increase the student's willingness and ability to learn the material.A lot of visual simulators have been used for the computer architecture and organization course. However, due to the lack of visual simulators for simulation of the cache memory concepts, we have developed a new visual simulator EDUCache simulator. In this paper we present that it can be effectively and efficiently used as a supporting tool in the learning process of modern multi-layer, multi-cache and multi-core multi-processors.EDUCache's features enable an environment for performance evaluation and engineering of software systems, i.e. the students will also understand the importance of computer architecture building parts and hopefully, will increase their curiosity for hardware courses in general.

  12. Lightgrid-an agile distributed computing architecture for Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Jason; Perry, John O.; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2010-01-01

    A light weight grid based computing architecture has been developed to accelerate Geant4 computations on a variety of network architectures. This new software is called LightGrid. LightGrid has a variety of features designed to overcome current limitations on other grid based computing platforms, more specifically, smaller network architectures. By focusing on smaller, local grids, LightGrid is able to simplify the grid computing process with minimal changes to existing Geant4 code. LightGrid allows for integration between Geant4 and MySQL, which both increases flexibility in the grid as well as provides a faster, reliable, and more portable method for accessing results than traditional data storage systems. This unique method of data acquisition allows for more fault tolerant runs as well as instant results from simulations as they occur. The performance increases brought along by using LightGrid allow simulation times to be decreased linearly. LightGrid also allows for pseudo-parallelization with minimal Geant4 code changes.

  13. Improving Software Performance in the Compute Unified Device Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru PIRJAN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes several aspects regarding the improvement of software performance for applications written in the Compute Unified Device Architecture CUDA. We address an issue of great importance when programming a CUDA application: the Graphics Processing Unit’s (GPU’s memory management through ranspose ernels. We also benchmark and evaluate the performance for progressively optimizing a transposing matrix application in CUDA. One particular interest was to research how well the optimization techniques, applied to software application written in CUDA, scale to the latest generation of general-purpose graphic processors units (GPGPU, like the Fermi architecture implemented in the GTX480 and the previous architecture implemented in GTX280. Lately, there has been a lot of interest in the literature for this type of optimization analysis, but none of the works so far (to our best knowledge tried to validate if the optimizations can apply to a GPU from the latest Fermi architecture and how well does the Fermi architecture scale to these software performance improving techniques.

  14. International Conference on Advanced Computing for Innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Angelova, Galia; Agre, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    This volume is a selected collection of papers presented and discussed at the International Conference “Advanced Computing for Innovation (AComIn 2015)”. The Conference was held at 10th -11th of November, 2015 in Sofia, Bulgaria and was aimed at providing a forum for international scientific exchange between Central/Eastern Europe and the rest of the world on several fundamental topics of computational intelligence. The papers report innovative approaches and solutions in hot topics of computational intelligence – advanced computing, language and semantic technologies, signal and image processing, as well as optimization and intelligent control.

  15. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  16. Advanced Sensor Platform to Evaluate Manloads For Exploration Suit Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Shane; Pierce, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Space suit manloads are defined as the outer bounds of force that the human occupant of a suit is able to exert onto the suit during motion. They are defined on a suit-component basis as a unit of maximum force that the suit component in question must withstand without failure. Existing legacy manloads requirements are specific to the suit architecture of the EMU and were developed in an iterative fashion; however, future exploration needs dictate a new suit architecture with bearings, load paths, and entry capability not previously used in any flight suit. No capability currently exists to easily evaluate manloads imparted by a suited occupant, which would be required to develop requirements for a flight-rated design. However, sensor technology has now progressed to the point where an easily-deployable, repeatable and flexible manloads measuring technique could be developed leveraging recent advances in sensor technology. INNOVATION: This development positively impacts schedule, cost and safety risk associated with new suit exploration architectures. For a final flight design, a comprehensive and accurate man loads requirements set must be communicated to the contractor; failing that, a suit design which does not meet necessary manloads limits is prone to failure during testing or worse, during an EVA, which could cause catastrophic failure of the pressure garment posing risk to the crew. This work facilitates a viable means of developing manloads requirements using a range of human sizes & strengths. OUTCOME / RESULTS: Performed sensor market research. Highlighted three viable options (primary, secondary, and flexible packaging option). Designed/fabricated custom bracket to evaluate primary option on a single suit axial. Manned suited manload testing completed and general approach verified.

  17. Nanotube devices based crossbar architecture: toward neuromorphic computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W S; Gamrat, C; Agnus, G; Derycke, V; Filoramo, A; Bourgoin, J-P

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale devices such as carbon nanotube and nanowires based transistors, memristors and molecular devices are expected to play an important role in the development of new computing architectures. While their size represents a decisive advantage in terms of integration density, it also raises the critical question of how to efficiently address large numbers of densely integrated nanodevices without the need for complex multi-layer interconnection topologies similar to those used in CMOS technology. Two-terminal programmable devices in crossbar geometry seem particularly attractive, but suffer from severe addressing difficulties due to cross-talk, which implies complex programming procedures. Three-terminal devices can be easily addressed individually, but with limited gain in terms of interconnect integration. We show how optically gated carbon nanotube devices enable efficient individual addressing when arranged in a crossbar geometry with shared gate electrodes. This topology is particularly well suited for parallel programming or learning in the context of neuromorphic computing architectures.

  18. Benchmarking high performance computing architectures with CMS’ skeleton framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Gartung, P.; Jones, C. D.

    2017-10-01

    In 2012 CMS evaluated which underlying concurrency technology would be the best to use for its multi-threaded framework. The available technologies were evaluated on the high throughput computing systems dominating the resources in use at that time. A skeleton framework benchmarking suite that emulates the tasks performed within a CMSSW application was used to select Intel’s Thread Building Block library, based on the measured overheads in both memory and CPU on the different technologies benchmarked. In 2016 CMS will get access to high performance computing resources that use new many core architectures; machines such as Cori Phase 1&2, Theta, Mira. Because of this we have revived the 2012 benchmark to test it’s performance and conclusions on these new architectures. This talk will discuss the results of this exercise.

  19. Network architecture test-beds as platforms for ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Timothy

    2008-10-28

    Distributed systems research, and in particular ubiquitous computing, has traditionally assumed the Internet as a basic underlying communications substrate. Recently, however, the networking research community has come to question the fundamental design or 'architecture' of the Internet. This has been led by two observations: first, that the Internet as it stands is now almost impossible to evolve to support new functionality; and second, that modern applications of all kinds now use the Internet rather differently, and frequently implement their own 'overlay' networks above it to work around its perceived deficiencies. In this paper, I discuss recent academic projects to allow disruptive change to the Internet architecture, and also outline a radically different view of networking for ubiquitous computing that such proposals might facilitate.

  20. Soft computing in advanced robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Ichiro; Kim, Euntai

    2014-01-01

    Intelligent system and robotics are inevitably bound up; intelligent robots makes embodiment of system integration by using the intelligent systems. We can figure out that intelligent systems are to cell units, while intelligent robots are to body components. The two technologies have been synchronized in progress. Making leverage of the robotics and intelligent systems, applications cover boundlessly the range from our daily life to space station; manufacturing, healthcare, environment, energy, education, personal assistance, logistics. This book aims at presenting the research results in relevance with intelligent robotics technology. We propose to researchers and practitioners some methods to advance the intelligent systems and apply them to advanced robotics technology. This book consists of 10 contributions that feature mobile robots, robot emotion, electric power steering, multi-agent, fuzzy visual navigation, adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system, swarm EKF localization and inspection robot. Th...

  1. Computer networks and advanced communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koederitz, W.L.; Macon, B.S.

    1992-01-01

    One of the major methods for getting the most productivity and benefits from computer usage is networking. However, for those who are contemplating a change from stand-alone computers to a network system, the investigation of actual networks in use presents a paradox: network systems can be highly productive and beneficial; at the same time, these networks can create many complex, frustrating problems. The issue becomes a question of whether the benefits of networking are worth the extra effort and cost. In response to this issue, the authors review in this paper the implementation and management of an actual network in the LSU Petroleum Engineering Department. The network, which has been in operation for four years, is large and diverse (50 computers, 2 sites, PC's, UNIX RISC workstations, etc.). The benefits, costs, and method of operation of this network will be described, and an effort will be made to objectively weigh these elements from the point of view of the average computer user

  2. Efficient universal computing architectures for decoding neural activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin I Rapoport

    Full Text Available The ability to decode neural activity into meaningful control signals for prosthetic devices is critical to the development of clinically useful brain- machine interfaces (BMIs. Such systems require input from tens to hundreds of brain-implanted recording electrodes in order to deliver robust and accurate performance; in serving that primary function they should also minimize power dissipation in order to avoid damaging neural tissue; and they should transmit data wirelessly in order to minimize the risk of infection associated with chronic, transcutaneous implants. Electronic architectures for brain- machine interfaces must therefore minimize size and power consumption, while maximizing the ability to compress data to be transmitted over limited-bandwidth wireless channels. Here we present a system of extremely low computational complexity, designed for real-time decoding of neural signals, and suited for highly scalable implantable systems. Our programmable architecture is an explicit implementation of a universal computing machine emulating the dynamics of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons; it requires no arithmetic operations except for counting, and decodes neural signals using only computationally inexpensive logic operations. The simplicity of this architecture does not compromise its ability to compress raw neural data by factors greater than [Formula: see text]. We describe a set of decoding algorithms based on this computational architecture, one designed to operate within an implanted system, minimizing its power consumption and data transmission bandwidth; and a complementary set of algorithms for learning, programming the decoder, and postprocessing the decoded output, designed to operate in an external, nonimplanted unit. The implementation of the implantable portion is estimated to require fewer than 5000 operations per second. A proof-of-concept, 32-channel field-programmable gate array (FPGA implementation of this portion

  3. Architecture and Programming Models for High Performance Intensive Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-29

    commands from the data processing center to the sensors is needed. It has been noted that the ubiquity of mobile communication devices offers the...commands from a Processing Facility by way of mobile Relay Stations. The activity of each component of this model other than the Merge module can be...evaluation of the initial system implementation. Gao also was in charge of the development of Fresh Breeze architecture backend on new many-core computers

  4. Towards Energy-Centric Computing and Computer Architecture

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Technology forecasts indicate that device scaling will continue well into the next decade.  Unfortunately, it is becoming extremely difficult to harness this increase in the number of transistors into performance due to a number of technological, circuit, architectural, methodological and  programming challenges.In this talk, I will argue that the key emerging showstopper is power.  Voltage scaling as a means to maintain a constant power envelope with an increase in transistor  numbers is hitting diminishing returns. As such, to continue riding the Moore's law we need to look  for drastic measures to cut power. This is definitely the case for server chips in future datacenters, where abundant server parallelism, redundancy and 3D chip integration are likely to remove  programming, reliability and bandwidth hurdles, leaving power as the only true limiter.I will present  results backing this argument based on validated models for f...

  5. Preface (to: Advances in Computer Entertainment)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romão, Teresa; Nijholt, Antinus; Romão, Teresa; Reidsma, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment ACE 2012). ACE has become the leading scientific forum for dissemination of cutting-edge research results in the area of entertainment computing. Interactive entertainment is one of the most vibrant

  6. Advance Trends in Soft Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Kreinovich, Vladik; Kacprzyk, Janusz; WCSC 2013

    2014-01-01

    This book is the proceedings of the 3rd World Conference on Soft Computing (WCSC), which was held in San Antonio, TX, USA, on December 16-18, 2013. It presents start-of-the-art theory and applications of soft computing together with an in-depth discussion of current and future challenges in the field, providing readers with a 360 degree view on soft computing. Topics range from fuzzy sets, to fuzzy logic, fuzzy mathematics, neuro-fuzzy systems, fuzzy control, decision making in fuzzy environments, image processing and many more. The book is dedicated to Lotfi A. Zadeh, a renowned specialist in signal analysis and control systems research who proposed the idea of fuzzy sets, in which an element may have a partial membership, in the early 1960s, followed by the idea of fuzzy logic, in which a statement can be true only to a certain degree, with degrees described by numbers in the interval [0,1]. The performance of fuzzy systems can often be improved with the help of optimization techniques, e.g. evolutionary co...

  7. Parallel algorithms and architecture for computation of manipulator forward dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1989-01-01

    Parallel computation of manipulator forward dynamics is investigated. Considering three classes of algorithms for the solution of the problem, that is, the O(n), the O(n exp 2), and the O(n exp 3) algorithms, parallelism in the problem is analyzed. It is shown that the problem belongs to the class of NC and that the time and processors bounds are of O(log2/2n) and O(n exp 4), respectively. However, the fastest stable parallel algorithms achieve the computation time of O(n) and can be derived by parallelization of the O(n exp 3) serial algorithms. Parallel computation of the O(n exp 3) algorithms requires the development of parallel algorithms for a set of fundamentally different problems, that is, the Newton-Euler formulation, the computation of the inertia matrix, decomposition of the symmetric, positive definite matrix, and the solution of triangular systems. Parallel algorithms for this set of problems are developed which can be efficiently implemented on a unique architecture, a triangular array of n(n+2)/2 processors with a simple nearest-neighbor interconnection. This architecture is particularly suitable for VLSI and WSI implementations. The developed parallel algorithm, compared to the best serial O(n) algorithm, achieves an asymptotic speedup of more than two orders-of-magnitude in the computation the forward dynamics.

  8. A Multi-Time Scale Morphable Software Milieu for Polymorphous Computing Architectures (PCA) - Composable, Scalable Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skjellum, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Polymorphous Computing Architectures (PCA) rapidly "morph" (reorganize) software and hardware configurations in order to achieve high performance on computation styles ranging from specialized streaming to general threaded applications...

  9. Methodology of modeling and measuring computer architectures for plasma simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. P. T.

    1977-01-01

    A brief introduction to plasma simulation using computers and the difficulties on currently available computers is given. Through the use of an analyzing and measuring methodology - SARA, the control flow and data flow of a particle simulation model REM2-1/2D are exemplified. After recursive refinements the total execution time may be greatly shortened and a fully parallel data flow can be obtained. From this data flow, a matched computer architecture or organization could be configured to achieve the computation bound of an application problem. A sequential type simulation model, an array/pipeline type simulation model, and a fully parallel simulation model of a code REM2-1/2D are proposed and analyzed. This methodology can be applied to other application problems which have implicitly parallel nature.

  10. An evolutionary method for synthesizing technological planning and architectural advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Bjorn Forstrom

    In the development of systems with ever-increasing performance and/or decreasing drawbacks, there inevitably comes a point where more progress is available by shifting to a new set of principles of use. This shift marks a change in architecture, such as between the piston-driven propeller and the jet engine. The shift also often involves an abandonment of previous competencies that have been developed with great effort, and so a foreknowledge of these shifts can be advantageous. A further motivation for this work is the consideration of the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) project, which aims to develop very small (thesis provide context and a philosophical background to the studies and research that was conducted. In particular, the idea that technology progresses in a fundamentally gradual way is developed and supported with previous historical research. The import of this is that the future can to some degree be predicted by the past, provided that the appropriate technological antecedents are accounted for in developing the projection. The third chapter of the thesis compiles a series of observations and philosophical considerations into a series of research questions. Some research questions are then answered with further thought, observation, and reading, leading to conjectures on the problem. The remainder require some form of experimentation, and so are used to formulate hypotheses. Falsifiability conditions are then generated from those hypotheses, and used to get the development of experiments to be performed, in this case on a computer upon various conditions of use of a genetic algorithm. The fourth chapter of the thesis walks through the formulation of a method to attack the problem of strategically choosing an architecture. This method is designed to find the optimum architecture under multiple conditions, which is required for the ability to play the "what if" games typically undertaken in strategic situations. The chapter walks through

  11. Advances in randomized parallel computing

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    1999-01-01

    The technique of randomization has been employed to solve numerous prob­ lems of computing both sequentially and in parallel. Examples of randomized algorithms that are asymptotically better than their deterministic counterparts in solving various fundamental problems abound. Randomized algorithms have the advantages of simplicity and better performance both in theory and often in practice. This book is a collection of articles written by renowned experts in the area of randomized parallel computing. A brief introduction to randomized algorithms In the aflalysis of algorithms, at least three different measures of performance can be used: the best case, the worst case, and the average case. Often, the average case run time of an algorithm is much smaller than the worst case. 2 For instance, the worst case run time of Hoare's quicksort is O(n ), whereas its average case run time is only O( n log n). The average case analysis is conducted with an assumption on the input space. The assumption made to arrive at t...

  12. Advanced information processing system: Inter-computer communication services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Masotto, Tom; Sims, J. Terry; Whittredge, Roy; Alger, Linda S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to document the functional requirements and detailed specifications for the Inter-Computer Communications Services (ICCS) of the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS). An introductory section is provided to outline the overall architecture and functional requirements of the AIPS and to present an overview of the ICCS. An overview of the AIPS architecture as well as a brief description of the AIPS software is given. The guarantees of the ICCS are provided, and the ICCS is described as a seven-layered International Standards Organization (ISO) Model. The ICCS functional requirements, functional design, and detailed specifications as well as each layer of the ICCS are also described. A summary of results and suggestions for future work are presented.

  13. Blackboard architecture and qualitative model in a computer aided assistant designed to define computers for HEP computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodarse, F.F.; Ivanov, V.G.

    1991-01-01

    Using BLACKBOARD architecture and qualitative model, an expert systm was developed to assist the use in defining the computers method for High Energy Physics computing. The COMEX system requires an IBM AT personal computer or compatible with than 640 Kb RAM and hard disk. 5 refs.; 9 figs

  14. NET-COMPUTER: Internet Computer Architecture and its Application in E-Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Umenne

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in Intelligent Agents has yielded interesting results, some of which have been translated into commer­cial ventures. Intelligent Agents are executable software components that represent the user, perform tasks on behalf of the user and when the task terminates, the Agents send the result to the user. Intelligent Agents are best suited for the Internet: a collection of computers connected together in a world-wide computer network. Swarm and HYDRA computer architectures for Agents’ execution were developed at the University of Surrey, UK in the 90s. The objective of the research was to develop a software-based computer architecture on which Agents execution could be explored. The combination of Intelligent Agents and HYDRA computer architecture gave rise to a new computer concept: the NET-Computer in which the comput­ing resources reside on the Internet. The Internet computers form the hardware and software resources, and the user is provided with a simple interface to access the Internet and run user tasks. The Agents autonomously roam the Internet (NET-Computer executing the tasks. A growing segment of the Internet is E-Commerce for online shopping for products and services. The Internet computing resources provide a marketplace for product suppliers and consumers alike. Consumers are looking for suppliers selling products and services, while suppliers are looking for buyers. Searching the vast amount of information available on the Internet causes a great deal of problems for both consumers and suppliers. Intelligent Agents executing on the NET-Computer can surf through the Internet and select specific information of interest to the user. The simulation results show that Intelligent Agents executing HYDRA computer architecture could be applied in E-Commerce.

  15. Memristor-Based Synapse Design and Training Scheme for Neuromorphic Computing Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    system level built upon the conventional Von Neumann computer architecture [2][3]. Developing the neuromorphic architecture at chip level by...SCHEME FOR NEUROMORPHIC COMPUTING ARCHITECTURE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-11-2-0046 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62788F 6...creation of memristor-based neuromorphic computing architecture. Rather than the existing crossbar-based neuron network designs, we focus on memristor

  16. Contagious architecture: computation, aesthetics, and space (technologies of lived abstraction)

    CERN Document Server

    Parisi, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    In Contagious Architecture, Luciana Parisi offers a philosophical inquiry into the status of the algorithm in architectural and interaction design. Her thesis is that algorithmic computation is not simply an abstract mathematical tool but constitutes a mode of thought in its own right, in that its operation extends into forms of abstraction that lie beyond direct human cognition and control. These include modes of infinity, contingency, and indeterminacy, as well as incomputable quantities underlying the iterative process of algorithmic processing. The main philosophical source for the project is Alfred North Whitehead, whose process philosophy is specifically designed to provide a vocabulary for "modes of thought" exhibiting various degrees of autonomy from human agency even as they are mobilized by it. Because algorithmic processing lies at the heart of the design practices now reshaping our world -- from the physical spaces of our built environment to the networked spaces of digital culture -- the nature o...

  17. Thrifty: An Exascale Architecture for Energy Proportional Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrellas, Josep [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-12-23

    The objective of this project is to design different aspects of a novel exascale architecture called Thrifty. Our goal is to focus on the challenges of power/energy efficiency, performance, and resiliency in exascale systems. The project includes work on computer architecture (Josep Torrellas from University of Illinois), compilation (Daniel Quinlan from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), runtime and applications (Laura Carrington from University of California San Diego), and circuits (Wilfred Pinfold from Intel Corporation). In this report, we focus on the progress at the University of Illinois during the last year of the grant (September 1, 2013 to August 31, 2014). We also point to the progress in the other collaborating institutions when needed.

  18. The Architecture and Administration of the ATLAS Online Computing System

    CERN Document Server

    Dobson, M; Ertorer, E; Garitaonandia, H; Leahu, L; Leahu, M; Malciu, I M; Panikashvili, E; Topurov, A; Ünel, G; Computing In High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    2006-01-01

    The needs of ATLAS experiment at the upcoming LHC accelerator, CERN, in terms of data transmission rates and processing power require a large cluster of computers (of the order of thousands) administrated and exploited in a coherent and optimal manner. Requirements like stability, robustness and fast recovery in case of failure impose a server-client system architecture with servers distributed in a tree like structure and clients booted from the network. For security reasons, the system should be accessible only through an application gateway and, also to ensure the autonomy of the system, the network services should be provided internally by dedicated machines in synchronization with CERN IT department's central services. The paper describes a small scale implementation of the system architecture that fits the given requirements and constraints. Emphasis will be put on the mechanisms and tools used to net boot the clients via the "Boot With Me" project and to synchronize information within the cluster via t...

  19. HTMT-class Latency Tolerant Parallel Architecture for Petaflops Scale Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Thomas; Bergman, Larry

    2000-01-01

    Computational Aero Sciences and other numeric intensive computation disciplines demand computing throughputs substantially greater than the Teraflops scale systems only now becoming available. The related fields of fluids, structures, thermal, combustion, and dynamic controls are among the interdisciplinary areas that in combination with sufficient resolution and advanced adaptive techniques may force performance requirements towards Petaflops. This will be especially true for compute intensive models such as Navier-Stokes are or when such system models are only part of a larger design optimization computation involving many design points. Yet recent experience with conventional MPP configurations comprising commodity processing and memory components has shown that larger scale frequently results in higher programming difficulty and lower system efficiency. While important advances in system software and algorithms techniques have had some impact on efficiency and programmability for certain classes of problems, in general it is unlikely that software alone will resolve the challenges to higher scalability. As in the past, future generations of high-end computers may require a combination of hardware architecture and system software advances to enable efficient operation at a Petaflops level. The NASA led HTMT project has engaged the talents of a broad interdisciplinary team to develop a new strategy in high-end system architecture to deliver petaflops scale computing in the 2004/5 timeframe. The Hybrid-Technology, MultiThreaded parallel computer architecture incorporates several advanced technologies in combination with an innovative dynamic adaptive scheduling mechanism to provide unprecedented performance and efficiency within practical constraints of cost, complexity, and power consumption. The emerging superconductor Rapid Single Flux Quantum electronics can operate at 100 GHz (the record is 770 GHz) and one percent of the power required by convention

  20. Advances and challenges in computational plasma science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W M; Chan, V S

    2005-01-01

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behaviour. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper, with illustrative examples, chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics and other topics. Progress has been stimulated, in particular, by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modelling. This was enabled by two key factors: (a) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (b) access to powerful new computational resources. Excellent progress has been made in developing codes for which computer run-time and problem-size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel processors (MPPs). Examples include the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPPs to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations that have accelerated advances in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. These calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In looking towards the future, the current results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. This

  1. Urban Combat Advanced Training Technology Architecture (Architecture de technologie avancee pour l’entrainement au combat urbain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANIZATION AC/323(MSG-098)TP/740 www.sto.nato.int STO TECHNICAL...REPORT TR-MSG-098 Urban Combat Advanced Training Technology Architecture (Architecture de technologie avancée pour l’entraînement au combat urbain...NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANIZATION AC/323(MSG-098)TP/740 www.sto.nato.int STO TECHNICAL

  2. NET-COMPUTER: Internet Computer Architecture and its Application in E-Commerce

    OpenAIRE

    P. O. Umenne; M. O. Odhiambo

    2012-01-01

    Research in Intelligent Agents has yielded interesting results, some of which have been translated into commer­cial ventures. Intelligent Agents are executable software components that represent the user, perform tasks on behalf of the user and when the task terminates, the Agents send the result to the user. Intelligent Agents are best suited for the Internet: a collection of computers connected together in a world-wide computer network. Swarm and HYDRA computer architectures for Agents’ ex...

  3. Client-server computer architecture saves costs and eliminates bottlenecks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darukhanavala, P.P.; Davidson, M.C.; Tyler, T.N.; Blaskovich, F.T.; Smith, C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that workstation, client-server architecture saved costs and eliminated bottlenecks that BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. experienced with mainframe computer systems. In 1991, BP embarked on an ambitious project to change technical computing for its Prudhoe Bay, Endicott, and Kuparuk operations on Alaska's North Slope. This project promised substantial rewards, but also involved considerable risk. The project plan called for reservoir simulations (which historically had run on a Cray Research Inc. X-MP supercomputer in the company's Houston data center) to be run on small computer workstations. Additionally, large Prudhoe Bay, Endicott, and Kuparuk production and reservoir engineering data bases and related applications also would be moved to workstations, replacing a Digital Equipment Corp. VAX cluster in Anchorage

  4. Biomorphic Multi-Agent Architecture for Persistent Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodding, Kenneth N.; Brewster, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A multi-agent software/hardware architecture, inspired by the multicellular nature of living organisms, has been proposed as the basis of design of a robust, reliable, persistent computing system. Just as a multicellular organism can adapt to changing environmental conditions and can survive despite the failure of individual cells, a multi-agent computing system, as envisioned, could adapt to changing hardware, software, and environmental conditions. In particular, the computing system could continue to function (perhaps at a reduced but still reasonable level of performance) if one or more component( s) of the system were to fail. One of the defining characteristics of a multicellular organism is unity of purpose. In biology, the purpose is survival of the organism. The purpose of the proposed multi-agent architecture is to provide a persistent computing environment in harsh conditions in which repair is difficult or impossible. A multi-agent, organism-like computing system would be a single entity built from agents or cells. Each agent or cell would be a discrete hardware processing unit that would include a data processor with local memory, an internal clock, and a suite of communication equipment capable of both local line-of-sight communications and global broadcast communications. Some cells, denoted specialist cells, could contain such additional hardware as sensors and emitters. Each cell would be independent in the sense that there would be no global clock, no global (shared) memory, no pre-assigned cell identifiers, no pre-defined network topology, and no centralized brain or control structure. Like each cell in a living organism, each agent or cell of the computing system would contain a full description of the system encoded as genes, but in this case, the genes would be components of a software genome.

  5. Computation of Asteroid Proper Elements: Recent Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knežević, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The recent advances in computation of asteroid proper elements are briefly reviewed. Although not representing real breakthroughs in computation and stability assessment of proper elements, these advances can still be considered as important improvements offering solutions to some practical problems encountered in the past. The problem of getting unrealistic values of perihelion frequency for very low eccentricity orbits is solved by computing frequencies using the frequency-modified Fourier transform. The synthetic resonant proper elements adjusted to a given secular resonance helped to prove the existence of Astraea asteroid family. The preliminary assessment of stability with time of proper elements computed by means of the analytical theory provides a good indication of their poorer performance with respect to their synthetic counterparts, and advocates in favor of ceasing their regular maintenance; the final decision should, however, be taken on the basis of more comprehensive and reliable direct estimate of their individual and sample average deviations from constancy.

  6. Supporting Undergraduate Computer Architecture Students Using a Visual MIPS64 CPU Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, D.; Spadaccini, A.; Palesi, M.; Fazzino, F.; Catania, V.

    2012-01-01

    The topics of computer architecture are always taught using an Assembly dialect as an example. The most commonly used textbooks in this field use the MIPS64 Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) to help students in learning the fundamentals of computer architecture because of its orthogonality and its suitability for real-world applications. This…

  7. Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems for a Flexible Space Exploration Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Smith, Leigh M.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems (AAPS) project, formerly known as the Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project, endeavors to develop advanced avionic and processor technologies anticipated to be used by NASA s currently evolving space exploration architectures. The AAPS project is a part of the Exploration Technology Development Program, which funds an entire suite of technologies that are aimed at enabling NASA s ability to explore beyond low earth orbit. NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) manages the AAPS project. AAPS uses a broad-scoped approach to developing avionic and processor systems. Investment areas include advanced electronic designs and technologies capable of providing environmental hardness, reconfigurable computing techniques, software tools for radiation effects assessment, and radiation environment modeling tools. Near-term emphasis within the multiple AAPS tasks focuses on developing prototype components using semiconductor processes and materials (such as Silicon-Germanium (SiGe)) to enhance a device s tolerance to radiation events and low temperature environments. As the SiGe technology will culminate in a delivered prototype this fiscal year, the project emphasis shifts its focus to developing low-power, high efficiency total processor hardening techniques. In addition to processor development, the project endeavors to demonstrate techniques applicable to reconfigurable computing and partially reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). This capability enables avionic architectures the ability to develop FPGA-based, radiation tolerant processor boards that can serve in multiple physical locations throughout the spacecraft and perform multiple functions during the course of the mission. The individual tasks that comprise AAPS are diverse, yet united in the common endeavor to develop electronics capable of operating within the harsh environment of space. Specifically, the AAPS tasks for

  8. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Chan, V.S.

    2005-01-01

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology

  9. Preface (to: Advances in Computer Entertainment)

    OpenAIRE

    Romão, Teresa; Nijholt, Antinus; Romão, Teresa; Reidsma, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment ACE 2012). ACE has become the leading scientific forum for dissemination of cutting-edge research results in the area of entertainment computing. Interactive entertainment is one of the most vibrant areas of interest in modern society and is amongst the fastest growing industries in the world. ACE 2012 will bring together leading researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to prese...

  10. Advanced computational electromagnetic methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wenxing; Elsherbeni, Atef; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    This new resource covers the latest developments in computational electromagnetic methods, with emphasis on cutting-edge applications. This book is designed to extend existing literature to the latest development in computational electromagnetic methods, which are of interest to readers in both academic and industrial areas. The topics include advanced techniques in MoM, FEM and FDTD, spectral domain method, GPU and Phi hardware acceleration, metamaterials, frequency and time domain integral equations, and statistics methods in bio-electromagnetics.

  11. ARCHITECTURE OF WEB BASED COMPUTER-AIDED MANUFACTURING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Filyukov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with design of a web-based system for Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM. Remote applications and databases located in the "private cloud" are proposed to be the basis of such system. The suggested approach contains: service - oriented architecture, using web applications and web services as modules, multi-agent technologies for implementation of information exchange functions between the components of the system and the usage of PDM - system for managing technology projects within the CAM. The proposed architecture involves CAM conversion into the corporate information system that will provide coordinated functioning of subsystems based on a common information space, as well as parallelize collective work on technology projects and be able to provide effective control of production planning. A system has been developed within this architecture which gives the possibility for a rather simple technological subsystems connect to the system and implementation of their interaction. The system makes it possible to produce CAM configuration for a particular company on the set of developed subsystems and databases specifying appropriate access rights for employees of the company. The proposed approach simplifies maintenance of software and information support for CAM subsystems due to their central location in the data center. The results can be used as a basis for CAM design and testing within the learning process for development and modernization of the system algorithms, and then can be tested in the extended enterprise.

  12. Advanced information processing system: The Army Fault-Tolerant Architecture detailed design overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Richard E.; Babikyan, Carol A.; Butler, Bryan P.; Clasen, Robert J.; Harris, Chris H.; Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Masotto, Thomas K.; Nagle, Gail A.; Prizant, Mark J.; Treadwell, Steven

    1994-01-01

    The Army Avionics Research and Development Activity (AVRADA) is pursuing programs that would enable effective and efficient management of large amounts of situational data that occurs during tactical rotorcraft missions. The Computer Aided Low Altitude Night Helicopter Flight Program has identified automated Terrain Following/Terrain Avoidance, Nap of the Earth (TF/TA, NOE) operation as key enabling technology for advanced tactical rotorcraft to enhance mission survivability and mission effectiveness. The processing of critical information at low altitudes with short reaction times is life-critical and mission-critical necessitating an ultra-reliable/high throughput computing platform for dependable service for flight control, fusion of sensor data, route planning, near-field/far-field navigation, and obstacle avoidance operations. To address these needs the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) is being designed and developed. This computer system is based upon the Fault Tolerant Parallel Processor (FTPP) developed by Charles Stark Draper Labs (CSDL). AFTA is hard real-time, Byzantine, fault-tolerant parallel processor which is programmed in the ADA language. This document describes the results of the Detailed Design (Phase 2 and 3 of a 3-year project) of the AFTA development. This document contains detailed descriptions of the program objectives, the TF/TA NOE application requirements, architecture, hardware design, operating systems design, systems performance measurements and analytical models.

  13. Exploring Hardware-Based Primitives to Enhance Parallel Security Monitoring in a Novel Computing Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mott, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    .... In doing this, we propose a novel computing architecture, derived from a contemporary shared memory architecture, that facilitates efficient security-related monitoring in real-time, while keeping...

  14. Computational Intelligence Paradigms in Advanced Pattern Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi

    2012-01-01

    This monograph presents selected areas of application of pattern recognition and classification approaches including handwriting recognition, medical image analysis and interpretation, development of cognitive systems for image computer understanding, moving object detection, advanced image filtration and intelligent multi-object labelling and classification. It is directed to the scientists, application engineers, professors, professors and students will find this book useful.

  15. Computing Architecture of the ALICE Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Augustinus, A; Moreno, A; Kurepin, A N; De Cataldo, G; Pinazza, O; Rosinský, P; Lechman, M; Jirdén, L S

    2011-01-01

    The ALICE Detector Control System (DCS) is based on a commercial SCADA product, running on a large Windows computer cluster. It communicates with about 1200 network attached devices to assure safe and stable operation of the experiment. In the presentation we focus on the design of the ALICE DCS computer systems. We describe the management of data flow, mechanisms for handling the large data amounts and information exchange with external systems. One of the key operational requirements is an intuitive, error proof and robust user interface allowing for simple operation of the experiment. At the same time the typical operator task, like trending or routine checks of the devices, must be decoupled from the automated operation in order to prevent overload of critical parts of the system. All these requirements must be implemented in an environment with strict security requirements. In the presentation we explain how these demands affected the architecture of the ALICE DCS.

  16. An ATLAS distributed computing architecture for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, Simone; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration started a process to understand the computing needs for the High Luminosity LHC era. Based on our best understanding of the computing model input parameters for the HL-LHC data taking conditions, results indicate the need for a larger amount of computational and storage resources with respect of the projection of constant yearly budget for computing in 2026. Filling the gap between the projection and the needs will be one of the challenges in preparation for LHC Run-4. While the gains from improvements in offline software will play a crucial role in this process, a different model for data processing, management, access and bookkeeping should also be envisaged to optimise resource usage. In this contribution we will describe a straw man of this model, founded on basic principles such as single event level granularity for data processing and virtual data. We will explain how the current architecture will evolve adiabatically into the future distributed computing system, through the prot...

  17. Computer aided design of architecture of degradable tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heljak, M K; Kurzydlowski, K J; Swieszkowski, W

    2017-11-01

    One important factor affecting the process of tissue regeneration is scaffold stiffness loss, which should be properly balanced with the rate of tissue regeneration. The aim of the research reported here was to develop a computer tool for designing the architecture of biodegradable scaffolds fabricated by melt-dissolution deposition systems (e.g. Fused Deposition Modeling) to provide the required scaffold stiffness at each stage of degradation/regeneration. The original idea presented in the paper is that the stiffness of a tissue engineering scaffold can be controlled during degradation by means of a proper selection of the diameter of the constituent fibers and the distances between them. This idea is based on the size-effect on degradation of aliphatic polyesters. The presented computer tool combines a genetic algorithm and a diffusion-reaction model of polymer hydrolytic degradation. In particular, we show how to design the architecture of scaffolds made of poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) with the required Young's modulus change during hydrolytic degradation.

  18. A modular architecture for transparent computation in recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmantini, Giovanni S; Beim Graben, Peter; Desroches, Mathieu; Rodrigues, Serafim

    2017-01-01

    Computation is classically studied in terms of automata, formal languages and algorithms; yet, the relation between neural dynamics and symbolic representations and operations is still unclear in traditional eliminative connectionism. Therefore, we suggest a unique perspective on this central issue, to which we would like to refer as transparent connectionism, by proposing accounts of how symbolic computation can be implemented in neural substrates. In this study we first introduce a new model of dynamics on a symbolic space, the versatile shift, showing that it supports the real-time simulation of a range of automata. We then show that the Gödelization of versatile shifts defines nonlinear dynamical automata, dynamical systems evolving on a vectorial space. Finally, we present a mapping between nonlinear dynamical automata and recurrent artificial neural networks. The mapping defines an architecture characterized by its granular modularity, where data, symbolic operations and their control are not only distinguishable in activation space, but also spatially localizable in the network itself, while maintaining a distributed encoding of symbolic representations. The resulting networks simulate automata in real-time and are programmed directly, in the absence of network training. To discuss the unique characteristics of the architecture and their consequences, we present two examples: (i) the design of a Central Pattern Generator from a finite-state locomotive controller, and (ii) the creation of a network simulating a system of interactive automata that supports the parsing of garden-path sentences as investigated in psycholinguistics experiments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Defense Science Board Report on Advanced Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    computers  will  require extensive  research and development  to have a chance of  reaching  the  exascale   level.  Even  if  exascale   level machines  can...generations of petascale and then  exascale   level  computing  capability.  This  includes  both  the  hardware  and  the  complex  software  that  may  be...required  for  the  architectures  needed  for  exacscale  capability.  The  challenges  are  extremely  daunting,  especially  at  the  exascale

  20. Advanced quality prediction model for software architectural knowledge sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Peng; Jansen, Anton; Avgeriou, Paris; Tang, Antony; Xu, Lai

    In the field of software architecture, a paradigm shift is occurring from describing the outcome of architecting process to describing the Architectural Knowledge (AK) created and used during architecting. Many AK models have been defined to represent domain concepts and their relationships, and

  1. An Overview of the Most Important Reference Architectures for Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan Daniel ZOTA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have presented the main characteristics of the most important reference archi-tectures designed for the cloud computing environment. Specifically, we have introduced the proposed architectures of the worldwide cloud computing companies like Cisco, IBM and VMware and we also had a look at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST reference architecture which is the starting point for all proposed architectures in the field. As one would expect, the provider dependent reference architectures are written is such a way to suit the services and products of the company, while NIST’s architecture is a more general model with more comprehensive architectural details that we highlighted in this article. In the end of the article we draw out some conclusions regarding the existing reference architectures for cloud computing.

  2. Why advanced computing? The key to space-based operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phister, Paul W., Jr.; Plonisch, Igor; Mineo, Jack

    2000-11-01

    The 'what is the requirement?' aspect of advanced computing and how it relates to and supports Air Force space-based operations is a key issue. In support of the Air Force Space Command's five major mission areas (space control, force enhancement, force applications, space support and mission support), two-fifths of the requirements have associated stringent computing/size implications. The Air Force Research Laboratory's 'migration to space' concept will eventually shift Science and Technology (S&T) dollars from predominantly airborne systems to airborne-and-space related S&T areas. One challenging 'space' area is in the development of sophisticated on-board computing processes for the next generation smaller, cheaper satellite systems. These new space systems (called microsats or nanosats) could be as small as a softball, yet perform functions that are currently being done by large, vulnerable ground-based assets. The Joint Battlespace Infosphere (JBI) concept will be used to manage the overall process of space applications coupled with advancements in computing. The JBI can be defined as a globally interoperable information 'space' which aggregates, integrates, fuses, and intelligently disseminates all relevant battlespace knowledge to support effective decision-making at all echelons of a Joint Task Force (JTF). This paper explores a single theme -- on-board processing is the best avenue to take advantage of advancements in high-performance computing, high-density memories, communications, and re-programmable architecture technologies. The goal is to break away from 'no changes after launch' design to a more flexible design environment that can take advantage of changing space requirements and needs while the space vehicle is 'on orbit.'

  3. Advances in computers improving the web

    CERN Document Server

    Zelkowitz, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    This is volume 78 of Advances in Computers. This series, which began publication in 1960, is the oldest continuously published anthology that chronicles the ever- changing information technology field. In these volumes we publish from 5 to 7 chapters, three times per year, that cover the latest changes to the design, development, use and implications of computer technology on society today.Covers the full breadth of innovations in hardware, software, theory, design, and applications.Many of the in-depth reviews have become standard references that continue to be of significant, lasting value i

  4. Optimizations of Unstructured Aerodynamics Computations for Many-core Architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Al Farhan, Mohammed Ahmed

    2018-04-13

    We investigate several state-of-the-practice shared-memory optimization techniques applied to key routines of an unstructured computational aerodynamics application with irregular memory accesses. We illustrate for the Intel KNL processor, as a representative of the processors in contemporary leading supercomputers, identifying and addressing performance challenges without compromising the floating point numerics of the original code. We employ low and high-level architecture-specific code optimizations involving thread and data-level parallelism. Our approach is based upon a multi-level hierarchical distribution of work and data across both the threads and the SIMD units within every hardware core. On a 64-core KNL chip, we achieve nearly 2.9x speedup of the dominant routines relative to the baseline. These exhibit almost linear strong scalability up to 64 threads, and thereafter some improvement with hyperthreading. At substantially fewer Watts, we achieve up to 1.7x speedup relative to the performance of 72 threads of a 36-core Haswell CPU and roughly equivalent performance to 112 threads of a 56-core Skylake scalable processor. These optimizations are expected to be of value for many other unstructured mesh PDE-based scientific applications as multi and many-core architecture evolves.

  5. Resistive content addressable memory based in-memory computation architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Khaled N.; Zidan, Mohammed A.; Kurdahi, Fadi; Eltawil, Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    Various examples are provided examples related to resistive content addressable memory (RCAM) based in-memory computation architectures. In one example, a system includes a content addressable memory (CAM) including an array of cells having a memristor based crossbar and an interconnection switch matrix having a gateless memristor array, which is coupled to an output of the CAM. In another example, a method, includes comparing activated bit values stored a key register with corresponding bit values in a row of a CAM, setting a tag bit value to indicate that the activated bit values match the corresponding bit values, and writing masked key bit values to corresponding bit locations in the row of the CAM based on the tag bit value.

  6. Resistive content addressable memory based in-memory computation architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Khaled N.

    2016-12-08

    Various examples are provided examples related to resistive content addressable memory (RCAM) based in-memory computation architectures. In one example, a system includes a content addressable memory (CAM) including an array of cells having a memristor based crossbar and an interconnection switch matrix having a gateless memristor array, which is coupled to an output of the CAM. In another example, a method, includes comparing activated bit values stored a key register with corresponding bit values in a row of a CAM, setting a tag bit value to indicate that the activated bit values match the corresponding bit values, and writing masked key bit values to corresponding bit locations in the row of the CAM based on the tag bit value.

  7. Advanced computational approaches to biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Punam K; Basu, Subhadip

    2014-01-01

    There has been rapid growth in biomedical engineering in recent decades, given advancements in medical imaging and physiological modelling and sensing systems, coupled with immense growth in computational and network technology, analytic approaches, visualization and virtual-reality, man-machine interaction and automation. Biomedical engineering involves applying engineering principles to the medical and biological sciences and it comprises several topics including biomedicine, medical imaging, physiological modelling and sensing, instrumentation, real-time systems, automation and control, sig

  8. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  9. A Concept Plane using electric distributed propulsion Evaluation of advanced power architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Ridel , M.; Paluch , B.; Doll , C.; Donjat , D.; Hermetz , J.; Guigon , A.; Schmollgruber , P.; Atinault , O.; Choy , P.; Le Tallec , P.; Dessornes , O.; Lefebvre , T.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Starting from electrical distributed propulsion system concept, the ONERA’s engineers demonstrated the viability of an all electrical aircraft for a small business aircraft. This paper describes the advanced power architecture considering energy conversion and power distribution. The design of this advanced power architecture requires the multi-physic integration of different domains as flight performances, safety and environmental requirements (thermal, electric, elec...

  10. Level-2 Milestone 5588: Deliver Strategic Plan and Initial Scalability Assessment by Advanced Architecture and Portability Specialists Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draeger, Erik W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This report documents the fact that the work in creating a strategic plan and beginning customer engagements has been completed. The description of milestone is: The newly formed advanced architecture and portability specialists (AAPS) team will develop a strategic plan to meet the goals of 1) sharing knowledge and experience with code teams to ensure that ASC codes run well on new architectures, and 2) supplying skilled computational scientists to put the strategy into practice. The plan will be delivered to ASC management in the first quarter. By the fourth quarter, the team will identify their first customers within PEM and IC, perform an initial assessment and scalability and performance bottleneck for next-generation architectures, and embed AAPS team members with customer code teams to assist with initial portability development within standalone kernels or proxy applications.

  11. Advances in Architectural Elements For Future Missions to Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reh, Kim; Coustenis, Athena; Lunine, Jonathan; Matson, Dennis; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Vargas, Andre; Beauchamp, Pat; Spilker, Tom; Strange, Nathan; Elliott, John

    2010-05-01

    The future exploration of Titan is of high priority for the solar system exploration community as recommended by the 2003 National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey [1] and ESA's Cosmic Vision Program themes. Recent Cassini-Huygens discoveries continue to emphasize that Titan is a complex world with very many Earth-like features. Titan has a dense, nitrogen atmosphere, an active climate and meteorological cycles where conditions are such that the working fluid, methane, plays the role that water does on Earth. Titan's surface, with lakes and seas, broad river valleys, sand dunes and mountains was formed by processes like those that have shaped the Earth. Supporting this panoply of Earth-like processes is an ice crust that floats atop what might be a liquid water ocean. Furthermore, Titan is rich in very many different organic compounds—more so than any place in the solar system, except Earth. The Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) concept that followed the 2007 TandEM ESA CV proposal [2] and the 2007 Titan Explorer NASA Flagship study [3], was examined [4,5] and prioritized by NASA and ESA in February 2009 as a mission to follow the Europa Jupiter System Mission. The TSSM study, like others before it, again concluded that an orbiter, a montgolfiere hot-air balloon and a surface package (e.g. lake lander, Geosaucer (instrumented heat shield), …) are very high priority elements for any future mission to Titan. Such missions could be conceived as Flagship/Cosmic Vision L-Class or as individual smaller missions that could possibly fit into NASA New Frontiers or ESA Cosmic Vision M-Class budgets. As a result of a multitude of Titan mission studies, a clear blueprint has been laid out for the work needed to reduce the risks inherent in such missions and the areas where advances would be beneficial for elements critical to future Titan missions have been identified. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the flagship mission architecture and

  12. Advanced Computational Methods in Bio-Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qahtani, Waleed M S; El-Anwar, Mohamed I

    2018-04-15

    A novel partnership between surgeons and machines, made possible by advances in computing and engineering technology, could overcome many of the limitations of traditional surgery. By extending surgeons' ability to plan and carry out surgical interventions more accurately and with fewer traumas, computer-integrated surgery (CIS) systems could help to improve clinical outcomes and the efficiency of healthcare delivery. CIS systems could have a similar impact on surgery to that long since realised in computer-integrated manufacturing. Mathematical modelling and computer simulation have proved tremendously successful in engineering. Computational mechanics has enabled technological developments in virtually every area of our lives. One of the greatest challenges for mechanists is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. Biomechanics has significant potential for applications in orthopaedic industry, and the performance arts since skills needed for these activities are visibly related to the human musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Although biomechanics is widely used nowadays in the orthopaedic industry to design orthopaedic implants for human joints, dental parts, external fixations and other medical purposes, numerous researches funded by billions of dollars are still running to build a new future for sports and human healthcare in what is called biomechanics era.

  13. Computational Strategies for the Architectural Design of Bending Active Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Nicholas, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Active bending introduces a new level of integration into the design of architectural structures, and opens up new complexities for the architectural design process. In particular, the introduction of material variation reconfigures the design space. Through the precise specification...

  14. Earth Science Computational Architecture for Multi-disciplinary Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. W.; Blom, R.; Gurrola, E.; Katz, D.; Lyzenga, G.; Norton, C.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the processes underlying Earth's deformation and mass transport requires a non-traditional, integrated, interdisciplinary, approach dependent on multiple space and ground based data sets, modeling, and computational tools. Currently, details of geophysical data acquisition, analysis, and modeling largely limit research to discipline domain experts. Interdisciplinary research requires a new computational architecture that is optimized to perform complex data processing of multiple solid Earth science data types in a user-friendly environment. A web-based computational framework is being developed and integrated with applications for automatic interferometric radar processing, and models for high-resolution deformation & gravity, forward models of viscoelastic mass loading over short wavelengths & complex time histories, forward-inverse codes for characterizing surface loading-response over time scales of days to tens of thousands of years, and inversion of combined space magnetic & gravity fields to constrain deep crustal and mantle properties. This framework combines an adaptation of the QuakeSim distributed services methodology with the Pyre framework for multiphysics development. The system uses a three-tier architecture, with a middle tier server that manages user projects, available resources, and security. This ensures scalability to very large networks of collaborators. Users log into a web page and have a personal project area, persistently maintained between connections, for each application. Upon selection of an application and host from a list of available entities, inputs may be uploaded or constructed from web forms and available data archives, including gravity, GPS and imaging radar data. The user is notified of job completion and directed to results posted via URLs. Interdisciplinary work is supported through easy availability of all applications via common browsers, application tutorials and reference guides, and worked examples with

  15. 3D-SoftChip: A Novel Architecture for Next-Generation Adaptive Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Mike Myung-Ok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel architecture for next-generation adaptive computing systems, which we term 3D-SoftChip. The 3D-SoftChip is a 3-dimensional (3D vertically integrated adaptive computing system combining state-of-the-art processing and 3D interconnection technology. It comprises the vertical integration of two chips (a configurable array processor and an intelligent configurable switch through an indium bump interconnection array (IBIA. The configurable array processor (CAP is an array of heterogeneous processing elements (PEs, while the intelligent configurable switch (ICS comprises a switch block, 32-bit dedicated RISC processor for control, on-chip program/data memory, data frame buffer, along with a direct memory access (DMA controller. This paper introduces the novel 3D-SoftChip architecture for real-time communication and multimedia signal processing as a next-generation computing system. The paper further describes the advanced HW/SW codesign and verification methodology, including high-level system modeling of the 3D-SoftChip using SystemC, being used to determine the optimum hardware specification in the early design stage.

  16. Advances in architectural concepts to support distributed systems design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira Pires, Luis; Vissers, C.A.; van Sinderen, Marten J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses some architectural concepts for distributed systems design. These concepts are derived from an analysis of limitations of some currently available standard design languages. We conclude that language design should be based upon the careful consideration of

  17. Specification, Design, and Analysis of Advanced HUMS Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    2004-01-01

    During the two-year project period, we have worked on several aspects of domain-specific architectures for HUMS. In particular, we looked at using scenario-based approach for the design and designed a language for describing such architectures. The language is now being used in all aspects of our HUMS design. In particular, we have made contributions in the following areas. 1) We have employed scenarios in the development of HUMS in three main areas. They are: (a) To improve reusability by using scenarios as a library indexing tool and as a domain analysis tool; (b) To improve maintainability by recording design rationales from two perspectives - problem domain and solution domain; (c) To evaluate the software architecture. 2) We have defined a new architectural language called HADL or HUMS Architectural Definition Language. It is a customized version of xArch/xADL. It is based on XML and, hence, is easily portable from domain to domain, application to application, and machine to machine. Specifications written in HADL can be easily read and parsed using the currently available XML parsers. Thus, there is no need to develop a plethora of software to support HADL. 3) We have developed an automated design process that involves two main techniques: (a) Selection of solutions from a large space of designs; (b) Synthesis of designs. However, the automation process is not an absolute Artificial Intelligence (AI) approach though it uses a knowledge-based system that epitomizes a specific HUMS domain. The process uses a database of solutions as an aid to solve the problems rather than creating a new design in the literal sense. Since searching is adopted as the main technique, the challenges involved are: (a) To minimize the effort in searching the database where a very large number of possibilities exist; (b) To develop representations that could conveniently allow us to depict design knowledge evolved over many years; (c) To capture the required information that aid the

  18. Advances of evolutionary computation methods and operators

    CERN Document Server

    Cuevas, Erik; Oliva Navarro, Diego Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this book is to present advances that discuss alternative Evolutionary Computation (EC) developments and non-conventional operators which have proved to be effective in the solution of several complex problems. The book has been structured so that each chapter can be read independently from the others. The book contains nine chapters with the following themes: 1) Introduction, 2) the Social Spider Optimization (SSO), 3) the States of Matter Search (SMS), 4) the collective animal behavior (CAB) algorithm, 5) the Allostatic Optimization (AO) method, 6) the Locust Search (LS) algorithm, 7) the Adaptive Population with Reduced Evaluations (APRE) method, 8) the multimodal CAB, 9) the constrained SSO method.

  19. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savrasov, Sergey; Kotliar, Gabriel; Haule, Kristjan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  20. International Conference on Computers and Advanced Technology in Education

    CERN Document Server

    Advanced Information Technology in Education

    2012-01-01

    The volume includes a set of selected papers extended and revised from the 2011 International Conference on Computers and Advanced Technology in Education. With the development of computers and advanced technology, the human social activities are changing basically. Education, especially the education reforms in different countries, has been experiencing the great help from the computers and advanced technology. Generally speaking, education is a field which needs more information, while the computers, advanced technology and internet are a good information provider. Also, with the aid of the computer and advanced technology, persons can make the education an effective combination. Therefore, computers and advanced technology should be regarded as an important media in the modern education. Volume Advanced Information Technology in Education is to provide a forum for researchers, educators, engineers, and government officials involved in the general areas of computers and advanced technology in education to d...

  1. Advanced laser architectures for high power eyesafe illuminators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, N.; Pati, B.; Stebbins, K.; Bystryak, I.; Rayno, M.; Ezzo, K.; DePriest, C.

    2018-02-01

    Q-Peak has demonstrated a novel pulsed eyesafe laser architecture operating with >50 mJ pulse energies at Pulse Repetition Frequencies (PRFs) as high as 320 Hz. The design leverages an Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) and Optical Parametric Amplifier (OPA) geometry, which provides the unique capability for high power in a comparatively compact package, while also offering the potential for additional eyesafe power scaling. The laser consists of a Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Q-switched front-end seed laser to produce pulse-widths around 10 ns at 1.06-μm, which is then followed by a pair of Multi-Pass Amplifier (MPA) architectures (comprised of side-pumped, multi-pass Nd:YAG slabs with a compact diode-pump-array imaging system), and finally involving two sequential nonlinear optical conversion architectures for transfer into the eyesafe regime. The initial seed beam is first amplified through the MPA, and then split into parallel optical paths. An OPO provides effective nonlinear conversion on one optical path, while a second MPA further amplifies the 1.06-μm beam for use in pumping an OPA on the second optical path. These paths are then recombined prior to seeding the OPA. Each nonlinear conversion subsystem utilizes Potassium Titanyl Arsenate (KTA) for effective nonlinear conversion with lower risk to optical damage. This laser architecture efficiently produces pulse energies of >50 mJ in the eyesafe band at PRFs as high as 320 Hz, and has been designed to fit within a volume of 4,500 in3 (0.074 m3 ). We will discuss theoretical and experimental details of the nonlinear optical system for achieving higher eyesafe powers.

  2. Developing Materials Processing to Performance Modeling Capabilities and the Need for Exascale Computing Architectures (and Beyond)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schraad, Mark William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Physics and Engineering Models; Luscher, Darby Jon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Advanced Simulation and Computing

    2016-09-06

    Additive Manufacturing techniques are presenting the Department of Energy and the NNSA Laboratories with new opportunities to consider novel component production and repair processes, and to manufacture materials with tailored response and optimized performance characteristics. Additive Manufacturing technologies already are being applied to primary NNSA mission areas, including Nuclear Weapons. These mission areas are adapting to these new manufacturing methods, because of potential advantages, such as smaller manufacturing footprints, reduced needs for specialized tooling, an ability to embed sensing, novel part repair options, an ability to accommodate complex geometries, and lighter weight materials. To realize the full potential of Additive Manufacturing as a game-changing technology for the NNSA’s national security missions; however, significant progress must be made in several key technical areas. In addition to advances in engineering design, process optimization and automation, and accelerated feedstock design and manufacture, significant progress must be made in modeling and simulation. First and foremost, a more mature understanding of the process-structure-property-performance relationships must be developed. Because Additive Manufacturing processes change the nature of a material’s structure below the engineering scale, new models are required to predict materials response across the spectrum of relevant length scales, from the atomistic to the continuum. New diagnostics will be required to characterize materials response across these scales. And not just models, but advanced algorithms, next-generation codes, and advanced computer architectures will be required to complement the associated modeling activities. Based on preliminary work in each of these areas, a strong argument for the need for Exascale computing architectures can be made, if a legitimate predictive capability is to be developed.

  3. Computational advances in transition phase analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, K.; Kondo, S.; Tobita, Y.; Shirakawa, N.; Brear, D.J.; Fischer, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, historical perspective and recent advances are reviewed on computational technologies to evaluate a transition phase of core disruptive accidents in liquid-metal fast reactors. An analysis of the transition phase requires treatment of multi-phase multi-component thermohydraulics coupled with space- and energy-dependent neutron kinetics. Such a comprehensive modeling effort was initiated when the program of SIMMER-series computer code development was initiated in the late 1970s in the USA. Successful application of the latest SIMMER-II in USA, western Europe and Japan have proved its effectiveness, but, at the same time, several areas that require further research have been identified. Based on the experience and lessons learned during the SIMMER-II application through 1980s, a new project of SIMMER-III development is underway at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), Japan. The models and methods of SIMMER-III are briefly described with emphasis on recent advances in multi-phase multi-component fluid dynamics technologies and their expected implication on a future reliable transition phase analysis. (author)

  4. PHENIX On-Line Distributed Computing System Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmond, Edmond; Haggerty, John; Kehayias, Hyon Joo; Purschke, Martin L.; Witzig, Chris; Kozlowski, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    PHENIX is one of the two large experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detector consists of 11 sub-detectors, that are further subdivided into 29 units (''granules'') that can be operated independently, which includes simultaneous data taking with independent data streams and independent triggers. The detector has 250,000 channels and is read out by front end modules, where the data is buffered in a pipeline while awaiting the level trigger decision. Zero suppression and calibration is done after the level accept in custom built data collection modules (DCMs) with DSPs before the data is sent to an event builder (design throughput of 2 Gb/sec) and higher level triggers. The On-line Computing Systems Group (ONCS) has two responsibilities. Firstly it is responsible for receiving the data from the event builder, routing it through a network of workstations to consumer processes and archiving it at a data rate of 20 MB/sec. Secondly it is also responsible for the overall configuration, control and operation of the detector and data acquisition chain, which comprises the software integration for several thousand custom built hardware modules. The software must furthermore support the independent operation of the above mentioned granules, which includes the coordination of processes that run in 60-100 VME processors and workstations. ONOS has adapted the Shlaer- Mellor Object Oriented Methodology for the design of the top layer software. CORBA is used as communication layer between the distributed objects, which are implemented as asynchronous finite state machines. We will give an overview of the PHENIX online system with the main focus on the system architecture, software components and integration tasks of the On-line Computing group ONCS and report on the status of the current prototypes

  5. Advances in network systems architectures, security, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Awad, Ali; Furtak, Janusz; Legierski, Jarosław

    2017-01-01

    This book provides the reader with a comprehensive selection of cutting–edge algorithms, technologies, and applications. The volume offers new insights into a range of fundamentally important topics in network architectures, network security, and network applications. It serves as a reference for researchers and practitioners by featuring research contributions exemplifying research done in the field of network systems. In addition, the book highlights several key topics in both theoretical and practical aspects of networking. These include wireless sensor networks, performance of TCP connections in mobile networks, photonic data transport networks, security policies, credentials management, data encryption for network transmission, risk management, live TV services, and multicore energy harvesting in distributed systems. .

  6. Advanced Control Architectures for Intelligent MicroGrids, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrero, Josep M.; Chandorkar, Mukul; Lee, Tzung-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a review of advanced control techniques for microgrids. The paper covers decentralized, distributed, and hierarchical control of grid connected and islanded microgrids. At first, decentralized control techniques for microgrids are reviewed. Then, the recent developments in the...

  7. Real-time FPGA architectures for computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Estrada, Miguel; Torres-Huitzil, Cesar

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents an architecture for real-time generic convolution of a mask and an image. The architecture is intended for fast low level image processing. The FPGA-based architecture takes advantage of the availability of registers in FPGAs to implement an efficient and compact module to process the convolutions. The architecture is designed to minimize the number of accesses to the image memory and is based on parallel modules with internal pipeline operation in order to improve its performance. The architecture is prototyped in a FPGA, but it can be implemented on a dedicated VLSI to reach higher clock frequencies. Complexity issues, FPGA resources utilization, FPGA limitations, and real time performance are discussed. Some results are presented and discussed.

  8. Architectures, Concepts and Architectures for Service Oriented Computing : proceedings of the 1st International Workshop - ACT4SOC 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, Marten J.; Unknown, [Unknown

    2007-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the First International Workshop on Architectures, Concepts and Technologies for Service Oriented Computing (ACT4SOC 2007), held on July 22 in Barcelona, Spain, in conjunction with the Second International Conference on Software and Data Technologies (ICSOFT

  9. Electro-optic architecture for servicing sensors and actuators in advanced aircraft propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed design of a fiber optic propulsion control system, integrating favored sensors and electro-optics architecture is presented. Layouts, schematics, and sensor lists describe an advanced fighter engine system model. Components and attributes of candidate fiber optic sensors are identified, and evaluation criteria are used in a trade study resulting in favored sensors for each measurand. System architectural ground rules were applied to accomplish an electro-optics architecture for the favored sensors. A key result was a considerable reduction in signal conductors. Drawings, schematics, specifications, and printed circuit board layouts describe the detailed system design, including application of a planar optical waveguide interface.

  10. A structured architecture for advanced plasma control experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penaflor, B.G.; Ferron, J.R.; Walker, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    Recent new and improved plasma control regimes have evolved from enhancements to the systems responsible for managing the plasma configuration on the DIII-D tokamak. The collection of hardware and software components designed for this purpose is known at DIII-D as the Plasma Control System or PCS. Several new user requirements have contributed to the rapid growth of the PCS. Experiments involving digital control of the plasma vertical position have resulted in the addition of new high performance processors to operate in real-time. Recent studies in plasma disruptions involving the use of neural network based software have resulted in an increase in the number of input diagnostic signals sampled. Better methods for estimating the plasma shape and position have brought about numerous software changes and the addition of several new code modules. Furthermore, requests for performing multivariable control and feedback on the current profile are continuing to add to the demands being placed on the PCS. To support all of these demands has required a structured yet flexible hardware and software architecture for maintaining existing capabilities and easily adding new ones. This architecture along with a general overview of the DIII-D Plasma Control System is described. In addition, the latest improvements to the PCS are presented

  11. UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, H; Stoitsov, M; Nazarewicz, W; Hagen, G; Kortelainen, M; Pei, J C; Bulgac, A; Maris, P; Vary, J P; Roche, K J; Schunck, N; Thompson, I; Wild, S M

    2012-01-01

    The demands of cutting-edge science are driving the need for larger and faster computing resources. With the rapidly growing scale of computing systems and the prospect of technologically disruptive architectures to meet these needs, scientists face the challenge of effectively using complex computational resources to advance scientific discovery. Multi-disciplinary collaborating networks of researchers with diverse scientific backgrounds are needed to address these complex challenges. The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper describes UNEDF and identifies attributes that classify it as a successful computational collaboration. We illustrate significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, most advanced algorithms, and leadership-class computational resources.

  12. Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Clear, Nic

    2014-01-01

    When discussing science fiction’s relationship with architecture, the usual practice is to look at the architecture “in” science fiction—in particular, the architecture in SF films (see Kuhn 75-143) since the spaces of literary SF present obvious difficulties as they have to be imagined. In this essay, that relationship will be reversed: I will instead discuss science fiction “in” architecture, mapping out a number of architectural movements and projects that can be viewed explicitly as scien...

  13. Missile signal processing common computer architecture for rapid technology upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinkin, Daniel V.; Rutledge, Edward; Monticciolo, Paul

    2004-10-01

    Interceptor missiles process IR images to locate an intended target and guide the interceptor towards it. Signal processing requirements have increased as the sensor bandwidth increases and interceptors operate against more sophisticated targets. A typical interceptor signal processing chain is comprised of two parts. Front-end video processing operates on all pixels of the image and performs such operations as non-uniformity correction (NUC), image stabilization, frame integration and detection. Back-end target processing, which tracks and classifies targets detected in the image, performs such algorithms as Kalman tracking, spectral feature extraction and target discrimination. In the past, video processing was implemented using ASIC components or FPGAs because computation requirements exceeded the throughput of general-purpose processors. Target processing was performed using hybrid architectures that included ASICs, DSPs and general-purpose processors. The resulting systems tended to be function-specific, and required custom software development. They were developed using non-integrated toolsets and test equipment was developed along with the processor platform. The lifespan of a system utilizing the signal processing platform often spans decades, while the specialized nature of processor hardware and software makes it difficult and costly to upgrade. As a result, the signal processing systems often run on outdated technology, algorithms are difficult to update, and system effectiveness is impaired by the inability to rapidly respond to new threats. A new design approach is made possible three developments; Moore's Law - driven improvement in computational throughput; a newly introduced vector computing capability in general purpose processors; and a modern set of open interface software standards. Today's multiprocessor commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) platforms have sufficient throughput to support interceptor signal processing requirements. This application

  14. Transport modeling and advanced computer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.C.; Ross, D.W.; Miner, W.H. Jr.

    1988-11-01

    A workshop was held at the University of Texas in June 1988 to consider the current state of transport codes and whether improved user interfaces would make the codes more usable and accessible to the fusion community. Also considered was the possibility that a software standard could be devised to ease the exchange of routines between groups. It was noted that two of the major obstacles to exchanging routines now are the variety of geometrical representation and choices of units. While the workshop formulated no standards, it was generally agreed that good software engineering would aid in the exchange of routines, and that a continued exchange of ideas between groups would be worthwhile. It seems that before we begin to discuss software standards we should review the current state of computer technology --- both hardware and software to see what influence recent advances might have on our software goals. This is done in this paper

  15. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  16. Could running experience on SPMD computers contribute to the architectural choices for future dedicated computers for high energy physics simulation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jejcic, A.; Maillard, J.; Silva, J.; Auguin, M.; Boeri, F.

    1989-01-01

    Results obtained on a strongly coupled parallel computer are reported. They concern Monte-Carlo simulation and pattern recognition. Though the calculations were made on an experimental computer of rather low processing power, it is believed that the quoted figures could give useful indications on architectural choices for dedicated computers. (orig.)

  17. Could running experience on SPMD computers contribute to the architectural choices for future dedicated computers for high energy physics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jejcic, A.; Maillard, J.; Silva, J.; Auguin, M.; Boeri, F.

    1989-01-01

    Results obtained on strongly coupled parallel computer are reported. They concern Monte-Carlo simulation and pattern recognition. Though the calculations were made on an experimental computer of rather low processing power, it is believed that the quoted figures could give useful indications on architectural choices for dedicated computers

  18. Advances in Integrated Computational Materials Engineering "ICME"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jürgen

    The methods of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering that were developed and successfully applied for Aluminium have been constantly improved. The main aspects and recent advances of integrated material and process modeling are simulations of material properties like strength and forming properties and for the specific microstructure evolution during processing (rolling, extrusion, annealing) under the influence of material constitution and process variations through the production process down to the final application. Examples are discussed for the through-process simulation of microstructures and related properties of Aluminium sheet, including DC ingot casting, pre-heating and homogenization, hot and cold rolling, final annealing. New results are included of simulation solution annealing and age hardening of 6xxx alloys for automotive applications. Physically based quantitative descriptions and computer assisted evaluation methods are new ICME methods of integrating new simulation tools also for customer applications, like heat affected zones in welding of age hardening alloys. The aspects of estimating the effect of specific elements due to growing recycling volumes requested also for high end Aluminium products are also discussed, being of special interest in the Aluminium producing industries.

  19. OPENING REMARKS: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Good morning. Welcome to SciDAC 2006 and Denver. I share greetings from the new Undersecretary for Energy, Ray Orbach. Five years ago SciDAC was launched as an experiment in computational science. The goal was to form partnerships among science applications, computer scientists, and applied mathematicians to take advantage of the potential of emerging terascale computers. This experiment has been a resounding success. SciDAC has emerged as a powerful concept for addressing some of the biggest challenges facing our world. As significant as these successes were, I believe there is also significance in the teams that achieved them. In addition to their scientific aims these teams have advanced the overall field of computational science and set the stage for even larger accomplishments as we look ahead to SciDAC-2. I am sure that many of you are expecting to hear about the results of our current solicitation for SciDAC-2. I’m afraid we are not quite ready to make that announcement. Decisions are still being made and we will announce the results later this summer. Nearly 250 unique proposals were received and evaluated, involving literally thousands of researchers, postdocs, and students. These collectively requested more than five times our expected budget. This response is a testament to the success of SciDAC in the community. In SciDAC-2 our budget has been increased to about 70 million for FY 2007 and our partnerships have expanded to include the Environment and National Security missions of the Department. The National Science Foundation has also joined as a partner. These new partnerships are expected to expand the application space of SciDAC, and broaden the impact and visibility of the program. We have, with our recent solicitation, expanded to turbulence, computational biology, and groundwater reactive modeling and simulation. We are currently talking with the Department’s applied energy programs about risk assessment, optimization of complex systems - such

  20. Integrating Computing Resources: A Shared Distributed Architecture for Academics and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrametti, Monica; English, Will

    1994-01-01

    Development and implementation of a shared distributed computing architecture at the University of Alberta (Canada) are described. Aspects discussed include design of the architecture, users' views of the electronic environment, technical and managerial challenges, and the campuswide human infrastructures needed to manage such an integrated…

  1. Verification of Electromagnetic Physics Models for Parallel Computing Architectures in the GeantV Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amadio, G.; et al.

    2017-11-22

    An intensive R&D and programming effort is required to accomplish new challenges posed by future experimental high-energy particle physics (HEP) programs. The GeantV project aims to narrow the gap between the performance of the existing HEP detector simulation software and the ideal performance achievable, exploiting latest advances in computing technology. The project has developed a particle detector simulation prototype capable of transporting in parallel particles in complex geometries exploiting instruction level microparallelism (SIMD and SIMT), task-level parallelism (multithreading) and high-level parallelism (MPI), leveraging both the multi-core and the many-core opportunities. We present preliminary verification results concerning the electromagnetic (EM) physics models developed for parallel computing architectures within the GeantV project. In order to exploit the potential of vectorization and accelerators and to make the physics model effectively parallelizable, advanced sampling techniques have been implemented and tested. In this paper we introduce a set of automated statistical tests in order to verify the vectorized models by checking their consistency with the corresponding Geant4 models and to validate them against experimental data.

  2. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 1: Army fault tolerant architecture overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Digital computing systems needed for Army programs such as the Computer-Aided Low Altitude Helicopter Flight Program and the Armored Systems Modernization (ASM) vehicles may be characterized by high computational throughput and input/output bandwidth, hard real-time response, high reliability and availability, and maintainability, testability, and producibility requirements. In addition, such a system should be affordable to produce, procure, maintain, and upgrade. To address these needs, the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) is being designed and constructed under a three-year program comprised of a conceptual study, detailed design and fabrication, and demonstration and validation phases. Described here are the results of the conceptual study phase of the AFTA development. Given here is an introduction to the AFTA program, its objectives, and key elements of its technical approach. A format is designed for representing mission requirements in a manner suitable for first order AFTA sizing and analysis, followed by a discussion of the current state of mission requirements acquisition for the targeted Army missions. An overview is given of AFTA's architectural theory of operation.

  3. Evolution of the Milieu Approach for Software Development for the Polymorphous Computing Architecture Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandass, Yoginder

    2004-01-01

    A key goal of the DARPA Polymorphous Computing Architectures (PCA) program is to develop reactive closed-loop systems that are capable of being dynamically reconfigured in order to respond to changing mission scenarios...

  4. Unstructured Computational Aerodynamics on Many Integrated Core Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Al Farhan, Mohammed A.

    2016-06-08

    Shared memory parallelization of the flux kernel of PETSc-FUN3D, an unstructured tetrahedral mesh Euler flow code previously studied for distributed memory and multi-core shared memory, is evaluated on up to 61 cores per node and up to 4 threads per core. We explore several thread-level optimizations to improve flux kernel performance on the state-of-the-art many integrated core (MIC) Intel processor Xeon Phi “Knights Corner,” with a focus on strong thread scaling. While the linear algebraic kernel is bottlenecked by memory bandwidth for even modest numbers of cores sharing a common memory, the flux kernel, which arises in the control volume discretization of the conservation law residuals and in the formation of the preconditioner for the Jacobian by finite-differencing the conservation law residuals, is compute-intensive and is known to exploit effectively contemporary multi-core hardware. We extend study of the performance of the flux kernel to the Xeon Phi in three thread affinity modes, namely scatter, compact, and balanced, in both offload and native mode, with and without various code optimizations to improve alignment and reduce cache coherency penalties. Relative to baseline “out-of-the-box” optimized compilation, code restructuring optimizations provide about 3.8x speedup using the offload mode and about 5x speedup using the native mode. Even with these gains for the flux kernel, with respect to execution time the MIC simply achieves par with optimized compilation on a contemporary multi-core Intel CPU, the 16-core Sandy Bridge E5 2670. Nevertheless, the optimizations employed to reduce the data motion and cache coherency protocol penalties of the MIC are expected to be of value for CFD and many other unstructured applications as many-core architecture evolves. We explore large-scale distributed-shared memory performance on the Cray XC40 supercomputer, to demonstrate that optimizations employed on Phi hybridize to this context, where each of

  5. Unstructured Computational Aerodynamics on Many Integrated Core Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Al Farhan, Mohammed A.; Kaushik, Dinesh K.; Keyes, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Shared memory parallelization of the flux kernel of PETSc-FUN3D, an unstructured tetrahedral mesh Euler flow code previously studied for distributed memory and multi-core shared memory, is evaluated on up to 61 cores per node and up to 4 threads per core. We explore several thread-level optimizations to improve flux kernel performance on the state-of-the-art many integrated core (MIC) Intel processor Xeon Phi “Knights Corner,” with a focus on strong thread scaling. While the linear algebraic kernel is bottlenecked by memory bandwidth for even modest numbers of cores sharing a common memory, the flux kernel, which arises in the control volume discretization of the conservation law residuals and in the formation of the preconditioner for the Jacobian by finite-differencing the conservation law residuals, is compute-intensive and is known to exploit effectively contemporary multi-core hardware. We extend study of the performance of the flux kernel to the Xeon Phi in three thread affinity modes, namely scatter, compact, and balanced, in both offload and native mode, with and without various code optimizations to improve alignment and reduce cache coherency penalties. Relative to baseline “out-of-the-box” optimized compilation, code restructuring optimizations provide about 3.8x speedup using the offload mode and about 5x speedup using the native mode. Even with these gains for the flux kernel, with respect to execution time the MIC simply achieves par with optimized compilation on a contemporary multi-core Intel CPU, the 16-core Sandy Bridge E5 2670. Nevertheless, the optimizations employed to reduce the data motion and cache coherency protocol penalties of the MIC are expected to be of value for CFD and many other unstructured applications as many-core architecture evolves. We explore large-scale distributed-shared memory performance on the Cray XC40 supercomputer, to demonstrate that optimizations employed on Phi hybridize to this context, where each of

  6. Quantum perceptron over a field and neural network architecture selection in a quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Adenilton José; Ludermir, Teresa Bernarda; de Oliveira, Wilson Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum neural network named quantum perceptron over a field (QPF). Quantum computers are not yet a reality and the models and algorithms proposed in this work cannot be simulated in actual (or classical) computers. QPF is a direct generalization of a classical perceptron and solves some drawbacks found in previous models of quantum perceptrons. We also present a learning algorithm named Superposition based Architecture Learning algorithm (SAL) that optimizes the neural network weights and architectures. SAL searches for the best architecture in a finite set of neural network architectures with linear time over the number of patterns in the training set. SAL is the first learning algorithm to determine neural network architectures in polynomial time. This speedup is obtained by the use of quantum parallelism and a non-linear quantum operator. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Advances in computational actinide chemistry in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongqi; Wu, Jingyi; Chai, Zhifang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Multidisciplinary Initiative Center; Su, Jing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Div. of Nuclear Materials Science and Engineering; Li, Jun [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemistry and Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering

    2014-04-01

    The advances in computational actinide chemistry made in China are reviewed. Several areas relevant to chemistry of actinides in gas, liquid, and solid phases have been explored. However, we limit the scope to selected contributions in the chemistry of molecular actinide systems in gas and liquid phases. These studies may be classified into two categories: treatment of relativistic effects, which cover the development of two- and four-component Hamiltonians and the optimization of relativistic pseudopotentials, and the applications of theoretical methods in actinide chemistry. The applications include (1) the electronic structures of actinocene, noble gas complexes, An-C multiple bonding compounds, uranyl and its isoelectronic species, fluorides and oxides, molecular systems with metal-metal bonding in their isolated forms (U{sub 2}, Pu{sub 2}) and in fullerene (U{sub 2} rate at C{sub 60}), and the excited states of actinide complexes; (2) chemical reactions, including oxidation, hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}, ligand exchange, reactivities of thorium oxo and sulfido metallocenes, CO{sub 2}/CS{sub 2} functionalization promoted by trivalent uranium complex; and (3) migration of actinides in the environment. A future outlook is discussed. (orig.)

  8. First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics: Advanced Topics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nolan, Richard; Baker, Marie; Branson, Jake; Hammerstein, Josh; Rush, Kris; Waits, Cal; Schweinsberg, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics: Advanced Topics expands on the technical material presented in SEI handbook CMU/SEI-2005-HB-001, First Responders Guide to Computer Forensics [Nolan 05...

  9. An Advanced Electrospinning Method of Fabricating Nanofibrous Patterned Architectures with Controlled Deposition and Desired Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasel, Sheikh Md

    containing 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt % of fillers. Morphological analyses carried out by digital optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray computed tomography, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, confirmed the presence and well dispersion of fillers in the composites. In addition, improvement of mechanical properties with increased filler content further emphasized the adhesion between matrix and reinforcement. PVA with 20 wt % wollastonite composite exhibited the highest tensile strength (11.99 MPa) and tensile module (198 MPa) as compared to pure PVA (3.92 MPa and 83 MPa, respectively). Moreover, the thermal tests demonstrated that there is no major deviation in the thermal stability due to the addition of wollastonite in PVA scaffolds. Almost similar trend was observed in PVA/wood flour nanocomposites where tensile strength improved by 228 % for 20 wt % of reinforcement. The PVA/wollastonite and PVA/wood flour fibrous nanocomposite which poses higher mechanical properties might be potentially suitable for many advanced applications such as filtration, tissue engineering, and food processing. We believe this study will contribute to further scientific understanding of the patterning mechanism of electrospun nanofibers and to allow for variety of design of specific patterned nanofibrous architectures with desired functional properties. Therefore, this improved scheme of electrospinning can have significant impact in a broad range of applications including tissue engineering scaffolds, filtrations, and nanoelectronics.

  10. Architecture of 32 bit CISC (Complex Instruction Set Computer) microprocessors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jove, T.M.; Ayguade, E.; Valero, M.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we describe the main topics about the architecture of the best known 32-bit CISC microprocessors; i80386, MC68000 family, NS32000 series and Z80000. We focus on the high level languages support, operating system design facilities, memory management, techniques to speed up the overall performance and program debugging facilities. (Author)

  11. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)-based fault tolerant avionics architecture for launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    1990-01-01

    An avionics architecture for the advanced launch system (ALS) that uses validated hardware and software building blocks developed under the advanced information processing system program is presented. The AIPS for ALS architecture defined is preliminary, and reliability requirements can be met by the AIPS hardware and software building blocks that are built using the state-of-the-art technology available in the 1992-93 time frame. The level of detail in the architecture definition reflects the level of detail available in the ALS requirements. As the avionics requirements are refined, the architecture can also be refined and defined in greater detail with the help of analysis and simulation tools. A useful methodology is demonstrated for investigating the impact of the avionics suite to the recurring cost of the ALS. It is shown that allowing the vehicle to launch with selected detected failures can potentially reduce the recurring launch costs. A comparative analysis shows that validated fault-tolerant avionics built out of Class B parts can result in lower life-cycle-cost in comparison to simplex avionics built out of Class S parts or other redundant architectures.

  12. Broadband PLC for Clustered Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine Ikpehai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI subsystems monitor and control energy distribution through exchange of information between smart meters and utility networks. A key challenge is how to select a cost-effective communication system without compromising the performance of the applications. Current communication technologies were developed for conventional data networks with different requirements. It is therefore necessary to investigate how much of existing communication technologies can be retrofitted into the new energy infrastructure to cost-effectively deliver acceptable level of service. This paper investigates broadband power line communications (BPLC as a backhaul solution in AMI. By applying the disparate traffic characteristics of selected AMI applications, the network performance is evaluated. This study also examines the communication network response to changes in application configurations in terms of packet sizes. In each case, the network is stress-tested and performance is assessed against acceptable thresholds documented in the literature. Results show that, like every other communication technology, BPLC has certain limitations; however, with some modifications in the network topology, it indeed can fulfill most AMI traffic requirements for flexible and time-bounded applications. These opportunities, if tapped, can significantly improve fiscal and operational efficiencies in AMI services. Simulation results also reveal that BPLC as a backhaul can support flat and clustered AMI structures with cluster size ranging from 1 to 150 smart meters.

  13. Relay Architectures for 3GPP LTE-Advanced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters StevenW

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Third Generation Partnership Project's Long Term Evolution-Advanced is considering relaying for cost-effective throughput enhancement and coverage extension. While analog repeaters have been used to enhance coverage in commercial cellular networks, the use of more sophisticated fixed relays is relatively new. The main challenge faced by relay deployments in cellular systems is overcoming the extra interference added by the presence of relays. Most prior work on relaying does not consider interference, however. This paper analyzes the performance of several emerging half-duplex relay strategies in interference-limited cellular systems: one-way, two-way, and shared relays. The performance of each strategy as a function of location, sectoring, and frequency reuse are compared with localized base station coordination. One-way relaying is shown to provide modest gains over single-hop cellular networks in some regimes. Shared relaying is shown to approach the gains of local base station coordination at reduced complexity, while two-way relaying further reduces complexity but only works well when the relay is close to the handset. Frequency reuse of one, where each sector uses the same spectrum, is shown to have the highest network throughput. Simulations with realistic channel models provide performance comparisons that reveal the importance of interference mitigation in multihop cellular networks.

  14. Audio Arduino - an ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture) audio driver for FTDI-based Arduinos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Smilen; Serafin, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    be considered to be a system, that encompasses design decisions on both hardware and software levels - that also demand a certain understanding of the architecture of the target PC operating system. This project outlines how an Arduino Duemillanove board (containing a USB interface chip, manufactured by Future...... Technology Devices International Ltd [FTDI] company) can be demonstrated to behave as a full-duplex, mono, 8-bit 44.1 kHz soundcard, through an implementation of: a PC audio driver for ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture); a matching program for the Arduino's ATmega microcontroller - and nothing more...

  15. Cloud Computing: A study of cloud architecture and its patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Mandeep Handa,; Shriya Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a general term for anything that involves delivering hosted services over the Internet. Cloud computing is a paradigm shift following the shift from mainframe to client–server in the early 1980s. Cloud computing can be defined as accessing third party software and services on web and paying as per usage. It facilitates scalability and virtualized resources over Internet as a service providing cost effective and scalable solution to customers. Cloud computing has...

  16. Advanced topics in security computer system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachniak, D.E.; Lamb, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    The capability, performance, and speed of contemporary computer processors, plus the associated performance capability of the operating systems accommodating the processors, have enormously expanded the scope of possibilities for designers of nuclear power plant security computer systems. This paper addresses the choices that could be made by a designer of security computer systems working with contemporary computers and describes the improvement in functionality of contemporary security computer systems based on an optimally chosen design. Primary initial considerations concern the selection of (a) the computer hardware and (b) the operating system. Considerations for hardware selection concern processor and memory word length, memory capacity, and numerous processor features

  17. Memory intensive functional architecture for distributed computer control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmler, D.G.

    1983-10-01

    A memory-intensive functional architectue for distributed data-acquisition, monitoring, and control systems with large numbers of nodes has been conceptually developed and applied in several large-scale and some smaller systems. This discussion concentrates on: (1) the basic architecture; (2) recent expansions of the architecture which now become feasible in view of the rapidly developing component technologies in microprocessors and functional large-scale integration circuits; and (3) implementation of some key hardware and software structures and one system implementation which is a system for performing control and data acquisition of a neutron spectrometer at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. The spectrometer is equipped with a large-area position-sensitive neutron detector

  18. An overview of the activities of the OECD/NEA Task Force on adapting computer codes in nuclear applications to parallel architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, B.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sartori, E. [OCDE/OECD NEA Data Bank, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Viedma, L.G. de [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-06-01

    Subsequent to the introduction of High Performance Computing in the developed countries, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) created the Task Force on Adapting Computer Codes in Nuclear Applications to Parallel Architectures (under the guidance of the Nuclear Science Committee`s Working Party on Advanced Computing) to study the growth area in supercomputing and its applicability to the nuclear community`s computer codes. The result has been four years of investigation for the Task Force in different subject fields - deterministic and Monte Carlo radiation transport, computational mechanics and fluid dynamics, nuclear safety, atmospheric models and waste management.

  19. An overview of the activities of the OECD/NEA Task Force on adapting computer codes in nuclear applications to parallel architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, B.L.; Sartori, E.; Viedma, L.G. de

    1997-01-01

    Subsequent to the introduction of High Performance Computing in the developed countries, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) created the Task Force on Adapting Computer Codes in Nuclear Applications to Parallel Architectures (under the guidance of the Nuclear Science Committee's Working Party on Advanced Computing) to study the growth area in supercomputing and its applicability to the nuclear community's computer codes. The result has been four years of investigation for the Task Force in different subject fields - deterministic and Monte Carlo radiation transport, computational mechanics and fluid dynamics, nuclear safety, atmospheric models and waste management

  20. Impact of Cognitive Architectures on Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    activation, reinforced learning, emotion, semantic memory , episodic memory , and visual imagery.12 In 2010 Rosenbloom created a variant of the Soar...being added to almost every new version. In 2004 Nuxoll and Laird added episodic memory to the Soar architecture.11 In 2008 Laird presented...York (NY): Psychology Press; 2014; p. 1–50. 11. Nuxoll A, Laird JE. A cognitive model of episodic memory integrated with a general cognitive

  1. Efficient Numeric and Geometric Computations using Heterogeneous Shared Memory Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-04

    to the memory architectures of CPUs and GPUs to obtain good performance and result in good memory performance using cache management. These methods ...Accomplishments: The PI and students has developed new methods for path and ray tracing and their Report Date: 14-Oct-2017 INVESTIGATOR(S): Phone...The efficiency of our method makes it a good candidate for forming hybrid schemes with wave-based models. One possibility is to couple the ray curve

  2. A Survey and Evaluation of Simulators Suitable for Teaching Courses in Computer Architecture and Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, B.; Radivojevic, Z.; Djordjevic, J.; Milutinovic, V.

    2009-01-01

    Courses in Computer Architecture and Organization are regularly included in Computer Engineering curricula. These courses are usually organized in such a way that students obtain not only a purely theoretical experience, but also a practical understanding of the topics lectured. This practical work is usually done in a laboratory using simulators…

  3. From Archi Torture to Architecture: Undergraduate Students Design and Implement Computers Using the Multimedia Logic Emulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Timothy D.; Wong, Lap Kei; Prigmore, Daniel; Benson, Justin; Fishler, Nathan; Fife, Leslie; Colton, Don

    2007-01-01

    Students learn better when they both hear and do. In computer architecture courses "doing" can be difficult in small schools without hardware laboratories hosted by computer engineering, electrical engineering, or similar departments. Software solutions exist. Our success with George Mills' Multimedia Logic (MML) is the focus of this paper. MML…

  4. A Project-Based Learning Approach to Programmable Logic Design and Computer Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a course in programmable logic design and computer architecture as it is taught at the University of Newcastle, Australia. The course is designed around a major design project and has two supplemental assessment tasks that are also described. The context of the Computer Engineering degree program within which the course is…

  5. Cloud Computing Databases: Latest Trends and Architectural Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Tarandeep Singh; Parvinder S. Sandhu

    2011-01-01

    The Economic factors are leading to the rise of infrastructures provides software and computing facilities as a service, known as cloud services or cloud computing. Cloud services can provide efficiencies for application providers, both by limiting up-front capital expenses, and by reducing the cost of ownership over time. Such services are made available in a data center, using shared commodity hardware for computation and storage. There is a varied set of cloud services...

  6. A learnable parallel processing architecture towards unity of memory and computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Gao, B; Chen, Z; Zhao, Y; Huang, P; Ye, H; Liu, L; Liu, X; Kang, J

    2015-08-14

    Developing energy-efficient parallel information processing systems beyond von Neumann architecture is a long-standing goal of modern information technologies. The widely used von Neumann computer architecture separates memory and computing units, which leads to energy-hungry data movement when computers work. In order to meet the need of efficient information processing for the data-driven applications such as big data and Internet of Things, an energy-efficient processing architecture beyond von Neumann is critical for the information society. Here we show a non-von Neumann architecture built of resistive switching (RS) devices named "iMemComp", where memory and logic are unified with single-type devices. Leveraging nonvolatile nature and structural parallelism of crossbar RS arrays, we have equipped "iMemComp" with capabilities of computing in parallel and learning user-defined logic functions for large-scale information processing tasks. Such architecture eliminates the energy-hungry data movement in von Neumann computers. Compared with contemporary silicon technology, adder circuits based on "iMemComp" can improve the speed by 76.8% and the power dissipation by 60.3%, together with a 700 times aggressive reduction in the circuit area.

  7. A learnable parallel processing architecture towards unity of memory and computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Gao, B.; Chen, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, P.; Ye, H.; Liu, L.; Liu, X.; Kang, J.

    2015-08-01

    Developing energy-efficient parallel information processing systems beyond von Neumann architecture is a long-standing goal of modern information technologies. The widely used von Neumann computer architecture separates memory and computing units, which leads to energy-hungry data movement when computers work. In order to meet the need of efficient information processing for the data-driven applications such as big data and Internet of Things, an energy-efficient processing architecture beyond von Neumann is critical for the information society. Here we show a non-von Neumann architecture built of resistive switching (RS) devices named “iMemComp”, where memory and logic are unified with single-type devices. Leveraging nonvolatile nature and structural parallelism of crossbar RS arrays, we have equipped “iMemComp” with capabilities of computing in parallel and learning user-defined logic functions for large-scale information processing tasks. Such architecture eliminates the energy-hungry data movement in von Neumann computers. Compared with contemporary silicon technology, adder circuits based on “iMemComp” can improve the speed by 76.8% and the power dissipation by 60.3%, together with a 700 times aggressive reduction in the circuit area.

  8. Computational intelligence for big data analysis frontier advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dehuri, Satchidananda; Sanyal, Sugata

    2015-01-01

    The work presented in this book is a combination of theoretical advancements of big data analysis, cloud computing, and their potential applications in scientific computing. The theoretical advancements are supported with illustrative examples and its applications in handling real life problems. The applications are mostly undertaken from real life situations. The book discusses major issues pertaining to big data analysis using computational intelligence techniques and some issues of cloud computing. An elaborate bibliography is provided at the end of each chapter. The material in this book includes concepts, figures, graphs, and tables to guide researchers in the area of big data analysis and cloud computing.

  9. NASA's Advanced Multimission Operations System: A Case Study in Formalizing Software Architecture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    All software systems of significant size and longevity eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by evolving requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the cause, software architecture evolution is commonplace in real world software projects. Recently, software architecture researchers have begun to study this phenomenon in depth. However, this work has suffered from problems of validation; research in this area has tended to make heavy use of toy examples and hypothetical scenarios and has not been well supported by real world examples. To help address this problem, I describe an ongoing effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to re-architect the Advanced Multimission Operations System (AMMOS), which is used to operate NASA's deep-space and astrophysics missions. Based on examination of project documents and interviews with project personnel, I describe the goals and approach of this evolution effort and then present models that capture some of the key architectural changes. Finally, I demonstrate how approaches and formal methods from my previous research in architecture evolution may be applied to this evolution, while using languages and tools already in place at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. Computer Assessed Design – A Vehicle of Architectural Communication and a Design Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Petrovici, Liliana-Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    In comparison with the limits of the traditional representation tools, the development of the computer graphics constitutes an opportunity to assert architectural values. The differences between communication codes of the architects and public are diminished; the architectural ideas can be represented in a coherent, intelligible and attractive way, so that they get more chances to be materialized according to the thinking of the creator. Concurrently, the graphic software have been improving ...

  11. A SECURE MESSAGE TRANSMISSION SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE FOR COMPUTER NETWORKS EMPLOYING SMART CARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geylani KARDAŞ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce a mobile system architecture which employs smart cards for secure message transmission in computer networks. The use of smart card provides two security services as authentication and confidentiality in our design. The security of the system is provided by asymmetric encryption. Hence, smart cards are used to store personal account information as well as private key of each user for encryption / decryption operations. This offers further security, authentication and mobility to the system architecture. A real implementation of the proposed architecture which utilizes the JavaCard technology is also discussed in this study.

  12. Advanced Technologies, Embedded and Multimedia for Human-Centric Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Chao, Han-Chieh; Deng, Der-Jiunn; Park, James; HumanCom and EMC 2013

    2014-01-01

    The theme of HumanCom and EMC are focused on the various aspects of human-centric computing for advances in computer science and its applications, embedded and multimedia computing and provides an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss the latest issues and progress in the area of human-centric computing. And the theme of EMC (Advanced in Embedded and Multimedia Computing) is focused on the various aspects of embedded system, smart grid, cloud and multimedia computing, and it provides an opportunity for academic, industry professionals to discuss the latest issues and progress in the area of embedded and multimedia computing. Therefore this book will be include the various theories and practical applications in human-centric computing and embedded and multimedia computing.

  13. Gate errors in solid-state quantum-computer architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xuedong; Das Sarma, S.

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically consider possible errors in solid-state quantum computation due to the interplay of the complex solid-state environment and gate imperfections. In particular, we study two examples of gate operations in the opposite ends of the gate speed spectrum, an adiabatic gate operation in electron-spin-based quantum dot quantum computation and a sudden gate operation in Cooper-pair-box superconducting quantum computation. We evaluate quantitatively the nonadiabatic operation of a two-qubit gate in a two-electron double quantum dot. We also analyze the nonsudden pulse gate in a Cooper-pair-box-based quantum-computer model. In both cases our numerical results show strong influences of the higher excited states of the system on the gate operation, clearly demonstrating the importance of a detailed understanding of the relevant Hilbert-space structure on the quantum-computer operations

  14. Polymorphous Computing Architecture (PCA) Kernel-Level Benchmarks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lebak, J

    2004-01-01

    .... "Computation" aspects include floating-point and integer performance, as well as the memory hierarchy, while the "communication" aspects include the network, the memory hierarchy, and the 110 capabilities...

  15. A Distributed Agent Architecture for a Computer Virus Immune System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harmer, Paul

    2000-01-01

    .... Information protection and information assurance are vital components required for achieving superiority in the Infosphere, but these goals are threatened by the exponential birth rate of new computer viruses...

  16. Implicit Unstructured Computational Aerodynamics on Many-Integrated Core Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Al Farhan, Mohammed A.

    2014-05-04

    This research aims to understand the performance of PETSc-FUN3D, a fully nonlinear implicit unstructured grid incompressible or compressible Euler code with origins at NASA and the U.S. DOE, on many-integrated core architecture and how a hybridprogramming paradigm (MPI+OpenMP) can exploit Intel Xeon Phi hardware with upwards of 60 cores per node and 4 threads per core. For the current contribution, we focus on strong scaling with many-integrated core hardware. In most implicit PDE-based codes, while the linear algebraic kernel is limited by the bottleneck of memory bandwidth, the flux kernel arising in control volume discretization of the conservation law residuals and the preconditioner for the Jacobian exploits the Phi hardware well.

  17. Single instruction computer architecture and its application in image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplante, Phillip A.

    1992-03-01

    A single processing computer system using only half-adder circuits is described. In addition, it is shown that only a single hard-wired instruction is needed in the control unit to obtain a complete instruction set for this general purpose computer. Such a system has several advantages. First it is intrinsically a RISC machine--in fact the 'ultimate RISC' machine. Second, because only a single type of logic element is employed the entire computer system can be easily realized on a single, highly integrated chip. Finally, due to the homogeneous nature of the computer's logic elements, the computer has possible implementations as an optical or chemical machine. This in turn suggests possible paradigms for neural computing and artificial intelligence. After showing how we can implement a full-adder, min, max and other operations using the half-adder, we use an array of such full-adders to implement the dilation operation for two black and white images. Next we implement the erosion operation of two black and white images using a relative complement function and the properties of erosion and dilation. This approach was inspired by papers by van der Poel in which a single instruction is used to furnish a complete set of general purpose instructions and by Bohm- Jacopini where it is shown that any problem can be solved using a Turing machine with one entry and one exit.

  18. Second International Conference on Advanced Computing, Networking and Informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Mohapatra, Durga; Konar, Amit; Chakraborty, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Computing, Networking and Informatics are three distinct and mutually exclusive disciplines of knowledge with no apparent sharing/overlap among them. However, their convergence is observed in many real world applications, including cyber-security, internet banking, healthcare, sensor networks, cognitive radio, pervasive computing amidst many others. This two-volume proceedings explore the combined use of Advanced Computing and Informatics in the next generation wireless networks and security, signal and image processing, ontology and human-computer interfaces (HCI). The two volumes together include 148 scholarly papers, which have been accepted for presentation from over 640 submissions in the second International Conference on Advanced Computing, Networking and Informatics, 2014, held in Kolkata, India during June 24-26, 2014. The first volume includes innovative computing techniques and relevant research results in informatics with selective applications in pattern recognition, signal/image process...

  19. Advances in Future Computer and Control Systems v.1

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Sally; 2012 International Conference on Future Computer and Control Systems(FCCS2012)

    2012-01-01

    FCCS2012 is an integrated conference concentrating its focus on Future Computer and Control Systems. “Advances in Future Computer and Control Systems” presents the proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Future Computer and Control Systems(FCCS2012) held April 21-22,2012, in Changsha, China including recent research results on Future Computer and Control Systems of researchers from all around the world.

  20. Advances in Future Computer and Control Systems v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Sally; 2012 International Conference on Future Computer and Control Systems(FCCS2012)

    2012-01-01

    FCCS2012 is an integrated conference concentrating its focus on Future Computer and Control Systems. “Advances in Future Computer and Control Systems” presents the proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Future Computer and Control Systems(FCCS2012) held April 21-22,2012, in Changsha, China including recent research results on Future Computer and Control Systems of researchers from all around the world.

  1. The NILE system architecture: fault-tolerant, wide-area access to computing and data resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, Aleta; Ogg, Michael; Rothfus, Eric

    1996-01-01

    NILE is a multi-disciplinary project building a distributed computing environment for HEP. It provides wide-area, fault-tolerant, integrated access to processing and data resources for collaborators of the CLEO experiment, though the goals and principles are applicable to many domains. NILE has three main objectives: a realistic distributed system architecture design, the design of a robust data model, and a Fast-Track implementation providing a prototype design environment which will also be used by CLEO physicists. This paper focuses on the software and wide-area system architecture design and the computing issues involved in making NILE services highly-available. (author)

  2. Laboratory Works Designed for Developing Student Motivation in Computer Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre Ogrutan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In light of the current difficulties related to maintaining the students’ interest and to stimulate their motivation for learning, the authors have developed a range of new laboratory exercises intended for first-year students in Computer Science as well as for engineering students after completion of at least one course in computers. The educational goal of the herein proposed laboratory exercises is to enhance the students’ motivation and creative thinking by organizing a relaxed yet competitive learning environment. The authors have developed a device including LEDs and switches, which is connected to a computer. By using assembly language, commands can be issued to flash several LEDs and read the states of the switches. The effectiveness of this idea was confirmed by a statistical study.

  3. Advanced Computational Methods for Monte Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-12

    This course is intended for graduate students who already have a basic understanding of Monte Carlo methods. It focuses on advanced topics that may be needed for thesis research, for developing new state-of-the-art methods, or for working with modern production Monte Carlo codes.

  4. CE-ACCE: The Cloud Enabled Advanced sCience Compute Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquini, L.; Freeborn, D. J.; Hardman, S. H.; Wong, C.

    2017-12-01

    Traditionally, Earth Science data from NASA remote sensing instruments has been processed by building custom data processing pipelines (often based on a common workflow engine or framework) which are typically deployed and run on an internal cluster of computing resources. This approach has some intrinsic limitations: it requires each mission to develop and deploy a custom software package on top of the adopted framework; it makes use of dedicated hardware, network and storage resources, which must be specifically purchased, maintained and re-purposed at mission completion; and computing services cannot be scaled on demand beyond the capability of the available servers.More recently, the rise of Cloud computing, coupled with other advances in containerization technology (most prominently, Docker) and micro-services architecture, has enabled a new paradigm, whereby space mission data can be processed through standard system architectures, which can be seamlessly deployed and scaled on demand on either on-premise clusters, or commercial Cloud providers. In this talk, we will present one such architecture named CE-ACCE ("Cloud Enabled Advanced sCience Compute Environment"), which we have been developing at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory over the past year. CE-ACCE is based on the Apache OODT ("Object Oriented Data Technology") suite of services for full data lifecycle management, which are turned into a composable array of Docker images, and complemented by a plug-in model for mission-specific customization. We have applied this infrastructure to both flying and upcoming NASA missions, such as ECOSTRESS and SMAP, and demonstrated deployment on the Amazon Cloud, either using simple EC2 instances, or advanced AWS services such as Amazon Lambda and ECS (EC2 Container Services).

  5. Connection machine: a computer architecture based on cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillis, W D

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the connection machine, a programmable computer based on cellular automata. The essential idea behind the connection machine is that a regular locally-connected cellular array can be made to behave as if the processing cells are connected into any desired topology. When the topology of the machine is chosen to match the topology of the application program, the result is a fast, powerful computing engine. The connection machine was originally designed to implement knowledge retrieval operations in artificial intelligence programs, but the hardware and the programming techniques are apparently applicable to a much larger class of problems. A machine with 100000 processing cells is currently being constructed. 27 references.

  6. A performance analysis of advanced I/O architectures for PC-based network file servers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, K. D.; Khoshgoftaar, T. M.

    1994-12-01

    In the personal computing and workstation environments, more and more I/O adapters are becoming complete functional subsystems that are intelligent enough to handle I/O operations on their own without much intervention from the host processor. The IBM Subsystem Control Block (SCB) architecture has been defined to enhance the potential of these intelligent adapters by defining services and conventions that deliver command information and data to and from the adapters. In recent years, a new storage architecture, the Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID), has been quickly gaining acceptance in the world of computing. In this paper, we would like to discuss critical system design issues that are important to the performance of a network file server. We then present a performance analysis of the SCB architecture and disk array technology in typical network file server environments based on personal computers (PCs). One of the key issues investigated in this paper is whether a disk array can outperform a group of disks (of same type, same data capacity, and same cost) operating independently, not in parallel as in a disk array.

  7. CSP: A Multifaceted Hybrid Architecture for Space Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Dylan; Wilson, Christopher; Stewart, Jacob; Gauvin, Patrick; George, Alan; Lam, Herman; Crum, Gary Alex; Wirthlin, Mike; Wilson, Alex; Stoddard, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Research on the CHREC Space Processor (CSP) takes a multifaceted hybrid approach to embedded space computing. Working closely with the NASA Goddard SpaceCube team, researchers at the National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing (CHREC) at the University of Florida and Brigham Young University are developing hybrid space computers that feature an innovative combination of three technologies: commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices, radiation-hardened (RadHard) devices, and fault-tolerant computing. Modern COTS processors provide the utmost in performance and energy-efficiency but are susceptible to ionizing radiation in space, whereas RadHard processors are virtually immune to this radiation but are more expensive, larger, less energy-efficient, and generations behind in speed and functionality. By featuring COTS devices to perform the critical data processing, supported by simpler RadHard devices that monitor and manage the COTS devices, and augmented with novel uses of fault-tolerant hardware, software, information, and networking within and between COTS devices, the resulting system can maximize performance and reliability while minimizing energy consumption and cost. NASA Goddard has adopted the CSP concept and technology with plans underway to feature flight-ready CSP boards on two upcoming space missions.

  8. Advances in Computer, Communication, Control and Automation

    CERN Document Server

    011 International Conference on Computer, Communication, Control and Automation

    2012-01-01

    The volume includes a set of selected papers extended and revised from the 2011 International Conference on Computer, Communication, Control and Automation (3CA 2011). 2011 International Conference on Computer, Communication, Control and Automation (3CA 2011) has been held in Zhuhai, China, November 19-20, 2011. This volume  topics covered include signal and Image processing, speech and audio Processing, video processing and analysis, artificial intelligence, computing and intelligent systems, machine learning, sensor and neural networks, knowledge discovery and data mining, fuzzy mathematics and Applications, knowledge-based systems, hybrid systems modeling and design, risk analysis and management, system modeling and simulation. We hope that researchers, graduate students and other interested readers benefit scientifically from the proceedings and also find it stimulating in the process.

  9. CISM-IUTAM School on Advanced Turbulent Flow Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Egon

    2000-01-01

    This book collects the lecture notes concerning the IUTAM School on Advanced Turbulent Flow Computations held at CISM in Udine September 7–11, 1998. The course was intended for scientists, engineers and post-graduate students interested in the application of advanced numerical techniques for simulating turbulent flows. The topic comprises two closely connected main subjects: modelling and computation, mesh pionts necessary to simulate complex turbulent flow.

  10. A Systematic Review on Recent Advances in mHealth Systems: Deployment Architecture for Emergency Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Enrique; Peña, Raul; Avila, Alfonso; Vargas-Rosales, Cesar; Munoz-Rodriguez, David

    2017-01-01

    The continuous technological advances in favor of mHealth represent a key factor in the improvement of medical emergency services. This systematic review presents the identification, study, and classification of the most up-to-date approaches surrounding the deployment of architectures for mHealth. Our review includes 25 articles obtained from databases such as IEEE Xplore, Scopus, SpringerLink, ScienceDirect, and SAGE. This review focused on studies addressing mHealth systems for outdoor emergency situations. In 60% of the articles, the deployment architecture relied in the connective infrastructure associated with emergent technologies such as cloud services, distributed services, Internet-of-things, machine-to-machine, vehicular ad hoc network, and service-oriented architecture. In 40% of the literature review, the deployment architecture for mHealth considered traditional connective infrastructure. Only 20% of the studies implemented an energy consumption protocol to extend system lifetime. We concluded that there is a need for more integrated solutions specifically for outdoor scenarios. Energy consumption protocols are needed to be implemented and evaluated. Emergent connective technologies are redefining the information management and overcome traditional technologies.

  11. A Systematic Review on Recent Advances in mHealth Systems: Deployment Architecture for Emergency Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous technological advances in favor of mHealth represent a key factor in the improvement of medical emergency services. This systematic review presents the identification, study, and classification of the most up-to-date approaches surrounding the deployment of architectures for mHealth. Our review includes 25 articles obtained from databases such as IEEE Xplore, Scopus, SpringerLink, ScienceDirect, and SAGE. This review focused on studies addressing mHealth systems for outdoor emergency situations. In 60% of the articles, the deployment architecture relied in the connective infrastructure associated with emergent technologies such as cloud services, distributed services, Internet-of-things, machine-to-machine, vehicular ad hoc network, and service-oriented architecture. In 40% of the literature review, the deployment architecture for mHealth considered traditional connective infrastructure. Only 20% of the studies implemented an energy consumption protocol to extend system lifetime. We concluded that there is a need for more integrated solutions specifically for outdoor scenarios. Energy consumption protocols are needed to be implemented and evaluated. Emergent connective technologies are redefining the information management and overcome traditional technologies.

  12. 3rd International Conference on Advanced Computing, Networking and Informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Mohapatra, Durga; Chaki, Nabendu

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Computing, Networking and Informatics are three distinct and mutually exclusive disciplines of knowledge with no apparent sharing/overlap among them. However, their convergence is observed in many real world applications, including cyber-security, internet banking, healthcare, sensor networks, cognitive radio, pervasive computing amidst many others. This two volume proceedings explore the combined use of Advanced Computing and Informatics in the next generation wireless networks and security, signal and image processing, ontology and human-computer interfaces (HCI). The two volumes together include 132 scholarly articles, which have been accepted for presentation from over 550 submissions in the Third International Conference on Advanced Computing, Networking and Informatics, 2015, held in Bhubaneswar, India during June 23–25, 2015.

  13. Advanced Simulation and Computing Business Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummel, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    To maintain a credible nuclear weapons program, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Office of Defense Programs (DP) needs to make certain that the capabilities, tools, and expert staff are in place and are able to deliver validated assessments. This requires a complete and robust simulation environment backed by an experimental program to test ASC Program models. This ASC Business Plan document encapsulates a complex set of elements, each of which is essential to the success of the simulation component of the Nuclear Security Enterprise. The ASC Business Plan addresses the hiring, mentoring, and retaining of programmatic technical staff responsible for building the simulation tools of the nuclear security complex. The ASC Business Plan describes how the ASC Program engages with industry partners—partners upon whom the ASC Program relies on for today’s and tomorrow’s high performance architectures. Each piece in this chain is essential to assure policymakers, who must make decisions based on the results of simulations, that they are receiving all the actionable information they need.

  14. Characterization of the MCNPX computer code in micro processed architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Helder C.; Dominguez, Dany S.; Orellana, Esbel T.V.; Milian, Felix M.

    2009-01-01

    The MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle extended) can be used to simulate the transport of several types of nuclear particles, using probabilistic methods. The technique used for MCNPX is to follow the history of each particle from its origin to its extinction that can be given by absorption, escape or other reasons. To obtain accurate results in simulations performed with the MCNPX is necessary to process a large number of histories, which demand high computational cost. Currently the MCNPX can be installed in virtually all computing platforms available, however there is virtually no information on the performance of the application in each. This paper studies the performance of MCNPX, to work with electrons and photons in phantom Faux on two platforms used by most researchers, Windows and Li nux. Both platforms were tested on the same computer to ensure the reliability of the hardware in the measures of performance. The performance of MCNPX was measured by time spent to run a simulation, making the variable time the main measure of comparison. During the tests the difference in performance between the two platforms MCNPX was evident. In some cases we were able to gain speed more than 10% only with the exchange platforms, without any specific optimization. This shows the relevance of the study to optimize this tool on the platform most appropriate for its use. (author)

  15. Analysis of multigrid methods on massively parallel computers: Architectural implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Lesley R.; Tarjan, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    We study the potential performance of multigrid algorithms running on massively parallel computers with the intent of discovering whether presently envisioned machines will provide an efficient platform for such algorithms. We consider the domain parallel version of the standard V cycle algorithm on model problems, discretized using finite difference techniques in two and three dimensions on block structured grids of size 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 9), respectively. Our models of parallel computation were developed to reflect the computing characteristics of the current generation of massively parallel multicomputers. These models are based on an interconnection network of 256 to 16,384 message passing, 'workstation size' processors executing in an SPMD mode. The first model accomplishes interprocessor communications through a multistage permutation network. The communication cost is a logarithmic function which is similar to the costs in a variety of different topologies. The second model allows single stage communication costs only. Both models were designed with information provided by machine developers and utilize implementation derived parameters. With the medium grain parallelism of the current generation and the high fixed cost of an interprocessor communication, our analysis suggests an efficient implementation requires the machine to support the efficient transmission of long messages, (up to 1000 words) or the high initiation cost of a communication must be significantly reduced through an alternative optimization technique. Furthermore, with variable length message capability, our analysis suggests the low diameter multistage networks provide little or no advantage over a simple single stage communications network.

  16. Information management architecture for an integrated computing environment for the Environmental Restoration Program. Environmental Restoration Program, Volume 3, Interim technical architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This third volume of the Information Management Architecture for an Integrated Computing Environment for the Environmental Restoration Program--the Interim Technical Architecture (TA) (referred to throughout the remainder of this document as the ER TA)--represents a key milestone in establishing a coordinated information management environment in which information initiatives can be pursued with the confidence that redundancy and inconsistencies will be held to a minimum. This architecture is intended to be used as a reference by anyone whose responsibilities include the acquisition or development of information technology for use by the ER Program. The interim ER TA provides technical guidance at three levels. At the highest level, the technical architecture provides an overall computing philosophy or direction. At this level, the guidance does not address specific technologies or products but addresses more general concepts, such as the use of open systems, modular architectures, graphical user interfaces, and architecture-based development. At the next level, the technical architecture provides specific information technology recommendations regarding a wide variety of specific technologies. These technologies include computing hardware, operating systems, communications software, database management software, application development software, and personal productivity software, among others. These recommendations range from the adoption of specific industry or Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) standards to the specification of individual products. At the third level, the architecture provides guidance regarding implementation strategies for the recommended technologies that can be applied to individual projects and to the ER Program as a whole

  17. Hardware architecture design of image restoration based on time-frequency domain computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Bo; Zhang, Jing; Jiao, Zipeng

    2013-10-01

    The image restoration algorithms based on time-frequency domain computation is high maturity and applied widely in engineering. To solve the high-speed implementation of these algorithms, the TFDC hardware architecture is proposed. Firstly, the main module is designed, by analyzing the common processing and numerical calculation. Then, to improve the commonality, the iteration control module is planed for iterative algorithms. In addition, to reduce the computational cost and memory requirements, the necessary optimizations are suggested for the time-consuming module, which include two-dimensional FFT/IFFT and the plural calculation. Eventually, the TFDC hardware architecture is adopted for hardware design of real-time image restoration system. The result proves that, the TFDC hardware architecture and its optimizations can be applied to image restoration algorithms based on TFDC, with good algorithm commonality, hardware realizability and high efficiency.

  18. Advances in quantum control of three-level superconducting circuit architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falci, G.; Paladino, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); CNR-IMM UOS Universita (MATIS), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Di Stefano, P.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast(United Kingdom); Ridolfo, A.; D' Arrigo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); Paraoanu, G.S. [Low Temperature Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science (Finland)

    2017-06-15

    Advanced control in Lambda (Λ) scheme of a solid state architecture of artificial atoms and quantized modes would allow the translation to the solid-state realm of a whole class of phenomena from quantum optics, thus exploiting new physics emerging in larger integrated quantum networks and for stronger couplings. However control solid-state devices has constraints coming from selection rules, due to symmetries which on the other hand yield protection from decoherence, and from design issues, for instance that coupling to microwave cavities is not directly switchable. We present two new schemes for the Λ-STIRAP control problem with the constraint of one or two classical driving fields being always-on. We show how these protocols are converted to apply to circuit-QED architectures. We finally illustrate an application to coherent spectroscopy of the so called ultrastrong atom-cavity coupling regime. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Advances in Computer Science and Education

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    CSE2011 is an integrated conference concentration its focus on computer science and education. In the proceeding, you can learn much more knowledge about computer science and education of researchers from all around the world. The main role of the proceeding is to be used as an exchange pillar for researchers who are working in the mentioned fields. In order to meet the high quality of Springer, AISC series, the organization committee has made their efforts to do the following things. Firstly, poor quality paper has been refused after reviewing course by anonymous referee experts. Secondly, periodically review meetings have been held around the reviewers about five times for exchanging reviewing suggestions. Finally, the conference organizers had several preliminary sessions before the conference. Through efforts of different people and departments, the conference will be successful and fruitful

  20. ASDA - Advanced Suit Design Analyzer computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant C.; Conger, Bruce C.; Iovine, John V.; Chang, Chi-Min

    1992-01-01

    An ASDA model developed to evaluate the heat and mass transfer characteristics of advanced pressurized suit design concepts for low pressure or vacuum planetary applications is presented. The model is based on a generalized 3-layer suit that uses the Systems Integrated Numerical Differencing Analyzer '85 in conjunction with a 41-node FORTRAN routine. The latter simulates the transient heat transfer and respiratory processes of a human body in a suited environment. The user options for the suit encompass a liquid cooled garment, a removable jacket, a CO2/H2O permeable layer, and a phase change layer.

  1. Guest editorial preface : Special Issue on Advances in Computer Entertainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Romão, Teresa; Cheok, Adrian D.

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of the International Journal of Creative Interfaces and Computer Graphics contains a selection of papers from ACE 2012, the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment (Nijholt et al., 2012). ACE is the leading scientific forum for dissemination of

  2. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics

  3. Algorithm-structured computer arrays and networks architectures and processes for images, percepts, models, information

    CERN Document Server

    Uhr, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    Computer Science and Applied Mathematics: Algorithm-Structured Computer Arrays and Networks: Architectures and Processes for Images, Percepts, Models, Information examines the parallel-array, pipeline, and other network multi-computers.This book describes and explores arrays and networks, those built, being designed, or proposed. The problems of developing higher-level languages for systems and designing algorithm, program, data flow, and computer structure are also discussed. This text likewise describes several sequences of successively more general attempts to combine the power of arrays wi

  4. Advances in Computing and Information Technology : Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Advances in Computing and Information Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Nagamalai, Dhinaharan; Chaki, Nabendu

    2013-01-01

    The international conference on Advances in Computing and Information technology (ACITY 2012) provides an excellent international forum for both academics and professionals for sharing knowledge and results in theory, methodology and applications of Computer Science and Information Technology. The Second International Conference on Advances in Computing and Information technology (ACITY 2012), held in Chennai, India, during July 13-15, 2012, covered a number of topics in all major fields of Computer Science and Information Technology including: networking and communications, network security and applications, web and internet computing, ubiquitous computing, algorithms, bioinformatics, digital image processing and pattern recognition, artificial intelligence, soft computing and applications. Upon a strength review process, a number of high-quality, presenting not only innovative ideas but also a founded evaluation and a strong argumentation of the same, were selected and collected in the present proceedings, ...

  5. p88110: A Graphical Simulator for Computer Architecture and Organization Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. I.; Rodriguez, S.; Perez, A.; Garcia, A.

    2009-01-01

    Studying fundamental Computer Architecture and Organization topics requires a significant amount of practical work if students are to acquire a good grasp of the theoretical concepts presented in classroom lectures or textbooks. The use of simulators is commonly adopted in order to reach this objective. However, as most of the available…

  6. Computer Security Primer: Systems Architecture, Special Ontology and Cloud Virtual Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waguespack, Leslie J.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing proliferation of multitasking and Internet-connected devices, security has reemerged as a fundamental design concern in information systems. The shift of IS curricula toward a largely organizational perspective of security leaves little room for focus on its foundation in systems architecture, the computational underpinnings of…

  7. Architecture and pervasive Computing when buildings and design artifacts become popular interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Peter Gall; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2001-01-01

    One of the main areas of architecture is buildings design, and we will focus on the impact of pervasive computing in this area. The breakthrough of the Internet has triggered a significant increase in what is often called intelligent buildings 1  in recent years. Due to development in pervasive c...

  8. Combining Self-Explaining with Computer Architecture Diagrams to Enhance the Learning of Assembly Language Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Y.-C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of combining self explaining (SE) with computer architecture diagrams to help novice students learn assembly language programming. Pre- and post-test scores for the experimental and control groups were compared and subjected to covariance (ANCOVA) statistical analysis. Results indicate that the SE-plus-diagram…

  9. Extending the horizons advances in computing, optimization, and decision technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Joseph, Anito; Mehrotra, Anuj; Trick, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Computer Science and Operations Research continue to have a synergistic relationship and this book represents the results of cross-fertilization between OR/MS and CS/AI. It is this interface of OR/CS that makes possible advances that could not have been achieved in isolation. Taken collectively, these articles are indicative of the state-of-the-art in the interface between OR/MS and CS/AI and of the high caliber of research being conducted by members of the INFORMS Computing Society. EXTENDING THE HORIZONS: Advances in Computing, Optimization, and Decision Technologies is a volume that presents the latest, leading research in the design and analysis of algorithms, computational optimization, heuristic search and learning, modeling languages, parallel and distributed computing, simulation, computational logic and visualization. This volume also emphasizes a variety of novel applications in the interface of CS, AI, and OR/MS.

  10. Architecture and Initial Development of a Digital Library Platform for Computable Knowledge Objects for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Allen J; Bahulekar, Namita; Boisvert, Peter; Lagoze, Carl; Meng, George; Rampton, James; Friedman, Charles P

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the world, biomedical knowledge is routinely generated and shared through primary and secondary scientific publications. However, there is too much latency between publication of knowledge and its routine use in practice. To address this latency, what is actionable in scientific publications can be encoded to make it computable. We have created a purpose-built digital library platform to hold, manage, and share actionable, computable knowledge for health called the Knowledge Grid Library. Here we present it with its system architecture.

  11. Reconfigurable FPGA architecture for computer vision applications in Smart Camera Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Maggiani , Luca; Salvadori , Claudio; Petracca , Matteo; Pagano , Paolo; Saletti , Roberto

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Smart Camera Networks (SCNs) is nowadays an emerging research field which represents the natural evolution of centralized computer vision applications towards full distributed and pervasive systems. In such a scenario, one of the biggest effort is in the definition of a flexible and reconfigurable SCN node architecture able to remotely support the possibility of updating the application parameters and changing the running computer vision applications at run-time. In th...

  12. MAINS: MULTI-AGENT INTELLIGENT SERVICE ARCHITECTURE FOR CLOUD COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Joshva Devadas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Computing has been transformed to a model having commoditized services. These services are modeled similar to the utility services water and electricity. The Internet has been stunningly successful over the course of past three decades in supporting multitude of distributed applications and a wide variety of network technologies. However, its popularity has become the biggest impediment to its further growth with the handheld devices mobile and laptops. Agents are intelligent software system that works on behalf of others. Agents are incorporated in many innovative applications in order to improve the performance of the system. Agent uses its possessed knowledge to react with the system and helps to improve the performance. Agents are introduced in the cloud computing is to minimize the response time when similar request is raised from an end user in the globe. In this paper, we have introduced a Multi Agent Intelligent system (MAINS prior to cloud service models and it was tested using sample dataset. Performance of the MAINS layer was analyzed in three aspects and the outcome of the analysis proves that MAINS Layer provides a flexible model to create cloud applications and deploying them in variety of applications.

  13. Advances in Reactor Physics, Mathematics and Computation. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings of the international topical meeting on advances in reactor physics, mathematics and computation, volume one, are divided into 6 sessions bearing on: - session 1: Advances in computational methods including utilization of parallel processing and vectorization (7 conferences) - session 2: Fast, epithermal, reactor physics, calculation, versus measurements (9 conferences) - session 3: New fast and thermal reactor designs (9 conferences) - session 4: Thermal radiation and charged particles transport (7 conferences) - session 5: Super computers (7 conferences) - session 6: Thermal reactor design, validation and operating experience (8 conferences).

  14. Special issue on advances in computer entertainment: editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Romão, T.; Romão, Teresa; Nijholt, Antinus; Cheok, J.D.; Cheok, Adrian David

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of the International Journal of Arts and Technology comprises a selection of papers from ACE 2012, the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment (Nijholt et al., 2012). ACE is the leading scientific forum for dissemination of cutting-edge research results in the area of entertainment computing. The main goal of ACE is to stimulate discussion in the development of new and compelling entertainment computing and interactive art concepts and application...

  15. On the impact of approximate computation in an analog DeSTIN architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven; Lu, Junjie; Holleman, Jeremy; Arel, Itamar

    2014-05-01

    Deep machine learning (DML) holds the potential to revolutionize machine learning by automating rich feature extraction, which has become the primary bottleneck of human engineering in pattern recognition systems. However, the heavy computational burden renders DML systems implemented on conventional digital processors impractical for large-scale problems. The highly parallel computations required to implement large-scale deep learning systems are well suited to custom hardware. Analog computation has demonstrated power efficiency advantages of multiple orders of magnitude relative to digital systems while performing nonideal computations. In this paper, we investigate typical error sources introduced by analog computational elements and their impact on system-level performance in DeSTIN--a compositional deep learning architecture. These inaccuracies are evaluated on a pattern classification benchmark, clearly demonstrating the robustness of the underlying algorithm to the errors introduced by analog computational elements. A clear understanding of the impacts of nonideal computations is necessary to fully exploit the efficiency of analog circuits.

  16. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  17. Computational neuroscience for advancing artificial intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando P. Ponce

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available resumen del libro de Alonso, E. y Mondragón, E. (2011. Hershey, NY: Medical Information Science Reference. La neurociencia como disciplinapersigue el entendimiento del cerebro y su relación con el funcionamiento de la mente a través del análisis de la comprensión de la interacción de diversos procesos físicos, químicos y biológicos (Bassett & Gazzaniga, 2011. Por otra parte, numerosas disciplinasprogresivamente han realizado significativas contribuciones en esta empresa tales como la matemática, la psicología o la filosofía, entre otras. Producto de este esfuerzo, es que junto con la neurociencia tradicional han aparecido disciplinas complementarias como la neurociencia cognitiva, la neuropsicología o la neurocienciacomputacional (Bengio, 2007; Dayan & Abbott, 2005. En el contexto de la neurociencia computacional como disciplina complementaria a laneurociencia tradicional. Alonso y Mondragón (2011 editan el libroComputacional Neuroscience for Advancing Artificial Intelligence: Models, Methods and Applications.

  18. Architecture and program structures for a special purpose finite element computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norrie, D.H.; Norrie, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The development of very large scale integration (VLSI) has made special-purpose computers economically possible. With such a machine, the loss of flexibility compared with a general-purpose computer can be offset by the increased speed which can be obtained by tailoring the architecture to the particular problem or class of problem. The first kind of special-purpose machine has its architecture modelled on the physical structure of the problem and the second kind has its design tailored to the computational algorithm used. The parallel finite element machine (PARFEM) being designed at the University of Calgary for the solution of finite element problems is of the second kind. Its conceptual design is described and progress to date outlined. 14 references.

  19. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  20. Reusable Rocket Engine Advanced Health Management System. Architecture and Technology Evaluation: Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, C. D.; Barkhoudarian, S.; Daumann, A. G., Jr.; Provan, G. M.; ElFattah, Y. M.; Glover, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we proposed an Advanced Health Management System (AHMS) functional architecture and conducted a technology assessment for liquid propellant rocket engine lifecycle health management. The purpose of the AHMS is to improve reusable rocket engine safety and to reduce between-flight maintenance. During the study, past and current reusable rocket engine health management-related projects were reviewed, data structures and health management processes of current rocket engine programs were assessed, and in-depth interviews with rocket engine lifecycle and system experts were conducted. A generic AHMS functional architecture, with primary focus on real-time health monitoring, was developed. Fourteen categories of technology tasks and development needs for implementation of the AHMS were identified, based on the functional architecture and our assessment of current rocket engine programs. Five key technology areas were recommended for immediate development, which (1) would provide immediate benefits to current engine programs, and (2) could be implemented with minimal impact on the current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) engine controllers.

  1. A cerebellar neuroprosthetic system: computational architecture and in vivo experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan eHerreros Alonso

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Emulating the input-output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuro-prosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model's inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuro-prosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step towards replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuro-prosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuro-prosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step towards the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term

  2. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea; Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari; Bamford, Sim; Prueckl, Robert; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans.

  3. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea [Synthetic Perceptive, Emotive and Cognitive Systems group (SPECS), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari [Psychobiology Research Unit, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bamford, Sim [Physics Laboratory, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome (Italy); Prueckl, Robert [Guger Technologies OG, Graz (Austria); Verschure, Paul F. M. J., E-mail: paul.verschure@upf.edu [Synthetic Perceptive, Emotive and Cognitive Systems group (SPECS), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-05-21

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans.

  4. Architecture and VHDL behavioural validation of a parallel processor dedicated to computer vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collette, Thierry

    1992-01-01

    Speeding up image processing is mainly obtained using parallel computers; SIMD processors (single instruction stream, multiple data stream) have been developed, and have proven highly efficient regarding low-level image processing operations. Nevertheless, their performances drop for most intermediate of high level operations, mainly when random data reorganisations in processor memories are involved. The aim of this thesis was to extend the SIMD computer capabilities to allow it to perform more efficiently at the image processing intermediate level. The study of some representative algorithms of this class, points out the limits of this computer. Nevertheless, these limits can be erased by architectural modifications. This leads us to propose SYMPATIX, a new SIMD parallel computer. To valid its new concept, a behavioural model written in VHDL - Hardware Description Language - has been elaborated. With this model, the new computer performances have been estimated running image processing algorithm simulations. VHDL modeling approach allows to perform the system top down electronic design giving an easy coupling between system architectural modifications and their electronic cost. The obtained results show SYMPATIX to be an efficient computer for low and intermediate level image processing. It can be connected to a high level computer, opening up the development of new computer vision applications. This thesis also presents, a top down design method, based on the VHDL, intended for electronic system architects. (author) [fr

  5. Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing in Plasma Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, William

    2005-03-01

    Advanced computing is generally recognized to be an increasingly vital tool for accelerating progress in scientific research during the 21st Century. For example, the Department of Energy's ``Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing'' (SciDAC) Program was motivated in large measure by the fact that formidable scientific challenges in its research portfolio could best be addressed by utilizing the combination of the rapid advances in super-computing technology together with the emergence of effective new algorithms and computational methodologies. The imperative is to translate such progress into corresponding increases in the performance of the scientific codes used to model complex physical systems such as those encountered in high temperature plasma research. If properly validated against experimental measurements and analytic benchmarks, these codes can provide reliable predictive capability for the behavior of a broad range of complex natural and engineered systems. This talk reviews recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations with some illustrative examples taken from the plasma science applications area. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by the combination of access to powerful new computational resources together with innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning a huge range in time and space scales. In particular, the plasma science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations

  6. Heterogeneous computing architecture for fast detection of SNP-SNP interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluga, Davor; Curk, Tomaz; Zupan, Blaz; Lotric, Uros

    2014-06-25

    The extent of data in a typical genome-wide association study (GWAS) poses considerable computational challenges to software tools for gene-gene interaction discovery. Exhaustive evaluation of all interactions among hundreds of thousands to millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may require weeks or even months of computation. Massively parallel hardware within a modern Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) and Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessors can shorten the run time considerably. While the utility of GPU-based implementations in bioinformatics has been well studied, MIC architecture has been introduced only recently and may provide a number of comparative advantages that have yet to be explored and tested. We have developed a heterogeneous, GPU and Intel MIC-accelerated software module for SNP-SNP interaction discovery to replace the previously single-threaded computational core in the interactive web-based data exploration program SNPsyn. We report on differences between these two modern massively parallel architectures and their software environments. Their utility resulted in an order of magnitude shorter execution times when compared to the single-threaded CPU implementation. GPU implementation on a single Nvidia Tesla K20 runs twice as fast as that for the MIC architecture-based Xeon Phi P5110 coprocessor, but also requires considerably more programming effort. General purpose GPUs are a mature platform with large amounts of computing power capable of tackling inherently parallel problems, but can prove demanding for the programmer. On the other hand the new MIC architecture, albeit lacking in performance reduces the programming effort and makes it up with a more general architecture suitable for a wider range of problems.

  7. Simulation of electronic structure Hamiltonians in a superconducting quantum computer architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaicher, Michael; Wilhelm, Frank K. [Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Love, Peter J. [Department of Physics, Haverford College, Haverford, Pennsylvania 19041 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Quantum chemistry has become one of the most promising applications within the field of quantum computation. Simulating the electronic structure Hamiltonian (ESH) in the Bravyi-Kitaev (BK)-Basis to compute the ground state energies of atoms/molecules reduces the number of qubit operations needed to simulate a single fermionic operation to O(log(n)) as compared to O(n) in the Jordan-Wigner-Transformation. In this work we will present the details of the BK-Transformation, show an example of implementation in a superconducting quantum computer architecture and compare it to the most recent quantum chemistry algorithms suggesting a constant overhead.

  8. Performance evaluation for compressible flow calculations on five parallel computers of different architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Toshiya.

    1997-03-01

    A two-dimensional explicit Euler solver has been implemented for five MIMD parallel computers of different machine architectures in Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. These parallel computers are Fujitsu VPP300, NEC SX-4, CRAY T94, IBM SP2, and Hitachi SR2201. The code was parallelized by several parallelization methods, and a typical compressible flow problem has been calculated for different grid sizes changing the number of processors. Their effective performances for parallel calculations, such as calculation speed, speed-up ratio and parallel efficiency, have been investigated and evaluated. The communication time among processors has been also measured and evaluated. As a result, the differences on the performance and the characteristics between vector-parallel and scalar-parallel computers can be pointed, and it will present the basic data for efficient use of parallel computers and for large scale CFD simulations on parallel computers. (author)

  9. Experimental Demonstration of a Self-organized Architecture for Emerging Grid Computing Applications on OBS Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Hong, Xiaobin; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    As Grid computing continues to gain popularity in the industry and research community, it also attracts more attention from the customer level. The large number of users and high frequency of job requests in the consumer market make it challenging. Clearly, all the current Client/Server(C/S)-based architecture will become unfeasible for supporting large-scale Grid applications due to its poor scalability and poor fault-tolerance. In this paper, based on our previous works [1, 2], a novel self-organized architecture to realize a highly scalable and flexible platform for Grids is proposed. Experimental results show that this architecture is suitable and efficient for consumer-oriented Grids.

  10. Advances in FDTD computational electrodynamics photonics and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Oskooi, Ardavan; Johnson, Steven G

    2013-01-01

    Advances in photonics and nanotechnology have the potential to revolutionize humanity s ability to communicate and compute. To pursue these advances, it is mandatory to understand and properly model interactions of light with materials such as silicon and gold at the nanoscale, i.e., the span of a few tens of atoms laid side by side. These interactions are governed by the fundamental Maxwell s equations of classical electrodynamics, supplemented by quantum electrodynamics. This book presents the current state-of-the-art in formulating and implementing computational models of these interactions. Maxwell s equations are solved using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, pioneered by the senior editor, whose prior Artech books in this area are among the top ten most-cited in the history of engineering. You discover the most important advances in all areas of FDTD and PSTD computational modeling of electromagnetic wave interactions. This cutting-edge resource helps you understand the latest develo...

  11. SCinet Architecture: Featured at the International Conference for High Performance Computing,Networking, Storage and Analysis 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyonnais, Marc; Smith, Matt; Mace, Kate P.

    2017-02-06

    SCinet is the purpose-built network that operates during the International Conference for High Performance Computing,Networking, Storage and Analysis (Super Computing or SC). Created each year for the conference, SCinet brings to life a high-capacity network that supports applications and experiments that are a hallmark of the SC conference. The network links the convention center to research and commercial networks around the world. This resource serves as a platform for exhibitors to demonstrate the advanced computing resources of their home institutions and elsewhere by supporting a wide variety of applications. Volunteers from academia, government and industry work together to design and deliver the SCinet infrastructure. Industry vendors and carriers donate millions of dollars in equipment and services needed to build and support the local and wide area networks. Planning begins more than a year in advance of each SC conference and culminates in a high intensity installation in the days leading up to the conference. The SCinet architecture for SC16 illustrates a dramatic increase in participation from the vendor community, particularly those that focus on network equipment. Software-Defined Networking (SDN) and Data Center Networking (DCN) are present in nearly all aspects of the design.

  12. A COMPUTER APPLICATION FOR THE ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT IN DESIGN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Carvalho Moreira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of the architectural program in the design studio faces several difficulties. The purpose of the program is to describe the conditions where the building being designed will operate; this requires a lot of information and organization. Due to its complexity, the architetural program definition in the disciplines of design is often simplified. This article discusses such issue and proposes a computer application (SINFORMA that gathers information about the building and the theme of the project in order to develop the architectural program based on structures proposed by bibliographic references. The SINFORMA is composed by a framework which includes a data base and modules which analyze and organize functional requirements, according to the Problem Seeking method and the contemporary values of architecture enumerated by Hershberger. It is discussed how the application can be applied in design education and how it offers students a practical approach and a comprehensive data analysis for the design of built environment. Keywords: Architectural programming, Architectural design, Education.

  13. RSAM: An enhanced architecture for achieving web services reliability in mobile cloud computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr S. Abdelfattah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the mobile landscape is coupled with the ubiquitous nature of the internet with its intermittent wireless connectivity and the web services. Achieving the web service reliability results in low communication overhead and retrieving the appropriate response. The middleware approach (MA is highly tended to achieve the web service reliability. This paper proposes a Reliable Service Architecture using Middleware (RSAM that achieves the reliable web services consumption. The enhanced architecture focuses on ensuring and tracking the request execution under the communication limitations and service temporal unavailability. It considers the most measurement factors including: request size, response size, and consuming time. We conducted experiments to compare the enhanced architecture with the traditional one. In these experiments, we covered several cases to prove the achievement of reliability. Results also show that the request size was found to be constant, the response size is identical to the traditional architecture, and the increase in the consuming time was less than 5% of the transaction time with the different response sizes. Keywords: Reliable web service, Middleware architecture, Mobile cloud computing

  14. 9th International Conference on Advanced Computing & Communication Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Jyotsna; Auluck, Nitin; Nagarajaram, H

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights a collection of high-quality peer-reviewed research papers presented at the Ninth International Conference on Advanced Computing & Communication Technologies (ICACCT-2015) held at Asia Pacific Institute of Information Technology, Panipat, India during 27–29 November 2015. The book discusses a wide variety of industrial, engineering and scientific applications of the emerging techniques. Researchers from academia and industry present their original work and exchange ideas, information, techniques and applications in the field of Advanced Computing and Communication Technology.

  15. Reststrahlen Band Optics for the Advancement of Far-Infrared Optical Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streyer, William Henderson

    The dissertation aims to build a case for the benefits and means of investigating novel optical materials and devices operating in the underdeveloped far-infrared (20 - 60 microns) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This dissertation and the proposed future investigations described here have the potential to further the advancement of new and enhanced capabilities in fields such as astronomy, medicine, and the petrochemical industry. The first several completed projects demonstrate techniques for developing far-infrared emission sources using selective thermal emitters, which could operate more efficiently than their simple blackbody counterparts commonly used as sources in this wavelength region. The later projects probe the possible means of linking bulk optical phonon populations through interaction with surface modes to free space photons. This is a breakthrough that would enable the development of a new class of light sources operating in the far-infrared. Chapter 1 introduces the far-infrared wavelength range along with many of its current and potential applications. The limited capabilities of the available optical architecture in this range are outlined along with a discussion of the state-of-the-art technology available in this range. Some of the basic physical concepts routinely applied in this dissertation are reviewed; namely, the Drude formalism, semiconductor Reststrahlen bands, and surface polaritons. Lastly, some of the physical challenges that impede the further advancement of far-infrared technology, despite remarkable recent success in adjacent regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, are discussed. Chapter 2 describes the experimental and computational methods employed in this dissertation. Spectroscopic techniques used to investigate both the mid-infrared and far-infrared wavelength ranges are reviewed, including a brief description of the primary instrument of infrared spectroscopy, the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer

  16. CPU SIM: A Computer Simulator for Use in an Introductory Computer Organization-Architecture Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrein, Dale

    1994-01-01

    CPU SIM, an interactive low-level computer simulation package that runs on the Macintosh computer, is described. The program is designed for instructional use in the first or second year of undergraduate computer science, to teach various features of typical computer organization through hands-on exercises. (MSE)

  17. New or improved computational methods and advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Takeda, Toshikazu; Ushio, Tadashi

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear computational method has been studied continuously up to date, as a fundamental technology supporting the nuclear development. At present, research on computational method according to new theory and the calculating method thought to be difficult to practise are also continued actively to find new development due to splendid improvement of features of computer. In Japan, many light water type reactors are now in operations, new computational methods are induced for nuclear design, and a lot of efforts are concentrated for intending to more improvement of economics and safety. In this paper, some new research results on the nuclear computational methods and their application to nuclear design of the reactor were described for introducing recent trend of the nuclear design of the reactor. 1) Advancement of the computational method, 2) Reactor core design and management of the light water reactor, and 3) Nuclear design of the fast reactor. (G.K.)

  18. Advances in equine computed tomography and use of contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchalski, Sarah M

    2012-12-01

    Advances in equine computed tomography have been made as a result of improvements in software and hardware and an increasing body of knowledge. Contrast media can be administered intravascularly or intrathecally. Contrast media is useful to differentiate between tissues of similar density. Equine computed tomography can be used for many different clinical conditions, including lameness diagnosis, fracture identification and characterization, preoperative planning, and characterization of skull diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The research of contamination regularities of historical buildings and architectural monuments by methods of computer modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmichev Andrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the active step of urbanization and rapid development of industry the external appearance of buildings and architectural monuments of urban environment from visual ecology position requires special attention. Dust deposition by polluted atmospheric air is one of the key aspects of degradation of the facades of buildings. With the help of modern computer modeling methods it is possible to evaluate the impact of polluted atmospheric air on the external facades of the buildings in order to save them.

  20. Innovations and Advances in Computer, Information, Systems Sciences, and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sobh, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Innovations and Advances in Computer, Information, Systems Sciences, and Engineering includes the proceedings of the International Joint Conferences on Computer, Information, and Systems Sciences, and Engineering (CISSE 2011). The contents of this book are a set of rigorously reviewed, world-class manuscripts addressing and detailing state-of-the-art research projects in the areas of  Industrial Electronics, Technology and Automation, Telecommunications and Networking, Systems, Computing Sciences and Software Engineering, Engineering Education, Instructional Technology, Assessment, and E-learning.

  1. Advances in computers dependable and secure systems engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hurson, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Since its first volume in 1960, Advances in Computers has presented detailed coverage of innovations in computer hardware, software, theory, design, and applications. It has also provided contributors with a medium in which they can explore their subjects in greater depth and breadth than journal articles usually allow. As a result, many articles have become standard references that continue to be of sugnificant, lasting value in this rapidly expanding field. In-depth surveys and tutorials on new computer technologyWell-known authors and researchers in the fieldExtensive bibliographies with m

  2. Advances in Reactor physics, mathematics and computation. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings of the international topical meeting on advances in reactor physics, mathematics and computation, volume 3, are divided into sessions bearing on: - poster sessions on benchmark and codes: 35 conferences - review of status of assembly spectrum codes: 9 conferences - Numerical methods in fluid mechanics and thermal hydraulics: 16 conferences - stochastic transport and methods: 7 conferences.

  3. Editorial : Special Issue on Advances in Computer Entertainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romão, Teresa; Nijholt, Anton; Cheok, Adrian David

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of the International Journal of Arts and Technology comprises a selection of papers from ACE 2012, the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment (Nijholt et al., 2012). ACE is the leading scientific forum for the dissemination of cutting-edge research

  4. Advances in Computer Entertainment. 10th International Conference, ACE 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; Katayose, H.; Nijholt, Antinus; Unknown, [Unknown

    2013-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment (ACE 2013), hosted by the Human Media Interaction research group of the Centre for Telematics and Information Technology at the University of Twente, The Netherlands. The ACE series of conferences,

  5. Attitudes toward Advanced and Multivariate Statistics When Using Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Robert L.; McCallister, Corliss Jean

    This study investigated the attitudes toward statistics of graduate students who studied advanced statistics in a course in which the focus of instruction was the use of a computer program in class. The use of the program made it possible to provide an individualized, self-paced, student-centered, and activity-based course. The three sections…

  6. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  7. A Conceptual Architecture for Adaptive Human-Computer Interface of a PT Operation Platform Based on Context-Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a conceptual architecture for adaptive human-computer interface of a PT operation platform based on context-awareness. This architecture will form the basis of design for such an interface. This paper describes components, key technologies, and working principles of the architecture. The critical contents covered context information modeling, processing, relationship establishing between contexts and interface design knowledge by use of adaptive knowledge reasoning, and visualization implementing of adaptive interface with the aid of interface tools technology.

  8. [Activities of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of IT research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: 1. Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. 2. Human-Centered Computing Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities. 3. High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to analysis of large scientific datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply IT research to a variety of NASA application domains. RIACS also engages in other activities, such as workshops, seminars, visiting scientist programs and student summer programs, designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration between the university and NASA IT research communities.

  9. High-performance computing on the Intel Xeon Phi how to fully exploit MIC architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Endong; Shen, Bo; Zhang, Guangyong; Lu, Xiaowei; Wu, Qing; Wang, Yajuan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to explain to high-performance computing (HPC) developers how to utilize the Intel® Xeon Phi™ series products efficiently. To that end, it introduces some computing grammar, programming technology and optimization methods for using many-integrated-core (MIC) platforms and also offers tips and tricks for actual use, based on the authors' first-hand optimization experience.The material is organized in three sections. The first section, "Basics of MIC", introduces the fundamentals of MIC architecture and programming, including the specific Intel MIC programming environment

  10. Proposing Hybrid Architecture to Implement Cloud Computing in Higher Education Institutions Using a Meta-synthesis Appro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hamid reza bazi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new technology that considerably helps Higher Education Institutions (HEIs to develop and create competitive advantage with inherent characteristics such as flexibility, scalability, accessibility, reliability, fault tolerant and economic efficiency. Due to the numerous advantages of cloud computing, and in order to take advantage of cloud computing infrastructure, services of universities and HEIs need to migrate to the cloud. However, this transition involves many challenges, one of which is lack or shortage of appropriate architecture for migration to the technology. Using a reliable architecture for migration ensures managers to mitigate risks in the cloud computing technology. Therefore, organizations always search for suitable cloud computing architecture. In previous studies, these important features have received less attention and have not been achieved in a comprehensive way. The aim of this study is to use a meta-synthesis method for the first time to analyze the previously published studies and to suggest appropriate hybrid cloud migration architecture (IUHEC. We reviewed many papers from relevant journals and conference proceedings. The concepts extracted from these papers are classified to related categories and sub-categories. Then, we developed our proposed hybrid architecture based on these concepts and categories. The proposed architecture was validated by a panel of experts and Lawshe’s model was used to determine the content validity. Due to its innovative yet user-friendly nature, comprehensiveness, and high security, this architecture can help HEIs have an effective migration to cloud computing environment.

  11. Advanced payload concepts and system architecture for emerging services in Indian National Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, E. P.; Rao, N. Prahlad; Sarkar, S.; Singh, D. K.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past two decades Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) has developed and operationalized satellites to generate a large capacity of transponders for telecommunication service use in INSAT system. More powerful on-board transmitters are built to usher-in direct-to-home broadcast services. These have transformed the Satcom application scenario in the country. With the proliferation of satellite technology, a shift in the Indian market is witnessed today in terms of demand for new services like Broadband Internet, Interactive Multimedia, etc. While it is imperative to pay attention to market trends, ISRO is also committed towards taking the benefits of technological advancement to all round growth of our population, 70% of which dwell in rural areas. The initiatives already taken in space application related to telemedicine, tele-education and Village Resource Centres are required to be taken to a greater height of efficiency. These targets pose technological challenges to build a large capacity and cost-effective satellite system. This paper addresses advanced payload concepts and system architecture along with the trade-off analysis on design parameters in proposing a new generation satellite system capable of extending the reach of the Indian broadband structure to individual users, educational and medical institutions and enterprises for interactive services. This will be a strategic step in the evolution of INSAT system to employ advanced technology to touch every human face of our population.

  12. Recent advances in metal oxide-based electrode architecture design for electrochemical energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jian; Liu, Jinping; Huang, Xintang [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Department of Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Li, Yuanyuan [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Yuan, Changzhou; Lou, Xiong Wen [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (China)

    2012-10-02

    Metal oxide nanostructures are promising electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors because of their high specific capacity/capacitance, typically 2-3 times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials. However, their cycling stability and rate performance still can not meet the requirements of practical applications. It is therefore urgent to improve their overall device performance, which depends on not only the development of advanced electrode materials but also in a large part ''how to design superior electrode architectures''. In the article, we will review recent advances in strategies for advanced metal oxide-based hybrid nanostructure design, with the focus on the binder-free film/array electrodes. These binder-free electrodes, with the integration of unique merits of each component, can provide larger electrochemically active surface area, faster electron transport and superior ion diffusion, thus leading to substantially improved cycling and rate performance. Several recently emerged concepts of using ordered nanostructure arrays, synergetic core-shell structures, nanostructured current collectors, and flexible paper/textile electrodes will be highlighted, pointing out advantages and challenges where appropriate. Some future electrode design trends and directions are also discussed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Recent advances in metal oxide-based electrode architecture design for electrochemical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jinping; Huang, Xintang; Yuan, Changzhou; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2012-10-02

    Metal oxide nanostructures are promising electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors because of their high specific capacity/capacitance, typically 2-3 times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials. However, their cycling stability and rate performance still can not meet the requirements of practical applications. It is therefore urgent to improve their overall device performance, which depends on not only the development of advanced electrode materials but also in a large part "how to design superior electrode architectures". In the article, we will review recent advances in strategies for advanced metal oxide-based hybrid nanostructure design, with the focus on the binder-free film/array electrodes. These binder-free electrodes, with the integration of unique merits of each component, can provide larger electrochemically active surface area, faster electron transport and superior ion diffusion, thus leading to substantially improved cycling and rate performance. Several recently emerged concepts of using ordered nanostructure arrays, synergetic core-shell structures, nanostructured current collectors, and flexible paper/textile electrodes will be highlighted, pointing out advantages and challenges where appropriate. Some future electrode design trends and directions are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 2: Army fault tolerant architecture design and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) hardware architecture and components and the operating system. The architectural and operational theory of the AFTA Fault Tolerant Data Bus is discussed. The test and maintenance strategy developed for use in fielded AFTA installations is presented. An approach to be used in reducing the probability of AFTA failure due to common mode faults is described. Analytical models for AFTA performance, reliability, availability, life cycle cost, weight, power, and volume are developed. An approach is presented for using VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) to describe and design AFTA's developmental hardware. A plan is described for verifying and validating key AFTA concepts during the Dem/Val phase. Analytical models and partial mission requirements are used to generate AFTA configurations for the TF/TA/NOE and Ground Vehicle missions.

  15. Emerging Nanophotonic Applications Explored with Advanced Scientific Parallel Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiang

    The domain of nanoscale optical science and technology is a combination of the classical world of electromagnetics and the quantum mechanical regime of atoms and molecules. Recent advancements in fabrication technology allows the optical structures to be scaled down to nanoscale size or even to the atomic level, which are far smaller than the wavelength they are designed for. These nanostructures can have unique, controllable, and tunable optical properties and their interactions with quantum materials can have important near-field and far-field optical response. Undoubtedly, these optical properties can have many important applications, ranging from the efficient and tunable light sources, detectors, filters, modulators, high-speed all-optical switches; to the next-generation classical and quantum computation, and biophotonic medical sensors. This emerging research of nanoscience, known as nanophotonics, is a highly interdisciplinary field requiring expertise in materials science, physics, electrical engineering, and scientific computing, modeling and simulation. It has also become an important research field for investigating the science and engineering of light-matter interactions that take place on wavelength and subwavelength scales where the nature of the nanostructured matter controls the interactions. In addition, the fast advancements in the computing capabilities, such as parallel computing, also become as a critical element for investigating advanced nanophotonic devices. This role has taken on even greater urgency with the scale-down of device dimensions, and the design for these devices require extensive memory and extremely long core hours. Thus distributed computing platforms associated with parallel computing are required for faster designs processes. Scientific parallel computing constructs mathematical models and quantitative analysis techniques, and uses the computing machines to analyze and solve otherwise intractable scientific challenges. In

  16. 2014 National Workshop on Advances in Communication and Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Prasanna, S; Sarma, Kandarpa; Saikia, Navajit

    2015-01-01

    The present volume is a compilation of research work in computation, communication, vision sciences, device design, fabrication, upcoming materials and related process design, etc. It is derived out of selected manuscripts submitted to the 2014 National Workshop on Advances in Communication and Computing (WACC 2014), Assam Engineering College, Guwahati, Assam, India which is emerging out to be a premier platform for discussion and dissemination of knowhow in this part of the world. The papers included in the volume are indicative of the recent thrust in computation, communications and emerging technologies. Certain recent advances in ZnO nanostructures for alternate energy generation provide emerging insights into an area that has promises for the energy sector including conservation and green technology. Similarly, scholarly contributions have focused on malware detection and related issues. Several contributions have focused on biomedical aspects including contributions related to cancer detection using act...

  17. Molecular architectures based on π-conjugated block copolymers for global quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujica Martinez, C A; Arce, J C; Reina, J H; Thorwart, M

    2009-01-01

    We propose a molecular setup for the physical implementation of a barrier global quantum computation scheme based on the electron-doped π-conjugated copolymer architecture of nine blocks PPP-PDA-PPP-PA-(CCH-acene)-PA-PPP-PDA-PPP (where each block is an oligomer). The physical carriers of information are electrons coupled through the Coulomb interaction, and the building block of the computing architecture is composed by three adjacent qubit systems in a quasi-linear arrangement, each of them allowing qubit storage, but with the central qubit exhibiting a third accessible state of electronic energy far away from that of the qubits' transition energy. The third state is reached from one of the computational states by means of an on-resonance coherent laser field, and acts as a barrier mechanism for the direct control of qubit entanglement. Initial estimations of the spontaneous emission decay rates associated to the energy level structure allow us to compute a damping rate of order 10 -7 s, which suggest a not so strong coupling to the environment. Our results offer an all-optical, scalable, proposal for global quantum computing based on semiconducting π-conjugated polymers.

  18. Molecular architectures based on pi-conjugated block copolymers for global quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujica Martinez, C A; Arce, J C [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de QuImica, A. A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Reina, J H [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de Fisica, A. A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Thorwart, M, E-mail: camujica@univalle.edu.c, E-mail: j.reina-estupinan@physics.ox.ac.u, E-mail: jularce@univalle.edu.c [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2009-05-01

    We propose a molecular setup for the physical implementation of a barrier global quantum computation scheme based on the electron-doped pi-conjugated copolymer architecture of nine blocks PPP-PDA-PPP-PA-(CCH-acene)-PA-PPP-PDA-PPP (where each block is an oligomer). The physical carriers of information are electrons coupled through the Coulomb interaction, and the building block of the computing architecture is composed by three adjacent qubit systems in a quasi-linear arrangement, each of them allowing qubit storage, but with the central qubit exhibiting a third accessible state of electronic energy far away from that of the qubits' transition energy. The third state is reached from one of the computational states by means of an on-resonance coherent laser field, and acts as a barrier mechanism for the direct control of qubit entanglement. Initial estimations of the spontaneous emission decay rates associated to the energy level structure allow us to compute a damping rate of order 10{sup -7} s, which suggest a not so strong coupling to the environment. Our results offer an all-optical, scalable, proposal for global quantum computing based on semiconducting pi-conjugated polymers.

  19. Fog Computing and Edge Computing Architectures for Processing Data From Diabetes Devices Connected to the Medical Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonoff, David C

    2017-07-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is generating an immense volume of data. With cloud computing, medical sensor and actuator data can be stored and analyzed remotely by distributed servers. The results can then be delivered via the Internet. The number of devices in IoT includes such wireless diabetes devices as blood glucose monitors, continuous glucose monitors, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and closed-loop systems. The cloud model for data storage and analysis is increasingly unable to process the data avalanche, and processing is being pushed out to the edge of the network closer to where the data-generating devices are. Fog computing and edge computing are two architectures for data handling that can offload data from the cloud, process it nearby the patient, and transmit information machine-to-machine or machine-to-human in milliseconds or seconds. Sensor data can be processed near the sensing and actuating devices with fog computing (with local nodes) and with edge computing (within the sensing devices). Compared to cloud computing, fog computing and edge computing offer five advantages: (1) greater data transmission speed, (2) less dependence on limited bandwidths, (3) greater privacy and security, (4) greater control over data generated in foreign countries where laws may limit use or permit unwanted governmental access, and (5) lower costs because more sensor-derived data are used locally and less data are transmitted remotely. Connected diabetes devices almost all use fog computing or edge computing because diabetes patients require a very rapid response to sensor input and cannot tolerate delays for cloud computing.

  20. PREFACE: 16th International workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in physics research (ACAT2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, L.; Lokajicek, M.; Tumova, N.

    2015-05-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series is dedicated to scientific contributions presented at the 16th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2014), this year the motto was ''bridging disciplines''. The conference took place on September 1-5, 2014, at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic. The 16th edition of ACAT explored the boundaries of computing system architectures, data analysis algorithmics, automatic calculations, and theoretical calculation technologies. It provided a forum for confronting and exchanging ideas among these fields, where new approaches in computing technologies for scientific research were explored and promoted. This year's edition of the workshop brought together over 140 participants from all over the world. The workshop's 16 invited speakers presented key topics on advanced computing and analysis techniques in physics. During the workshop, 60 talks and 40 posters were presented in three tracks: Computing Technology for Physics Research, Data Analysis - Algorithms and Tools, and Computations in Theoretical Physics: Techniques and Methods. The round table enabled discussions on expanding software, knowledge sharing and scientific collaboration in the respective areas. ACAT 2014 was generously sponsored by Western Digital, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hewlett Packard, DataDirect Networks, M Computers, Bright Computing, Huawei and PDV-Systemhaus. Special appreciations go to the track liaisons Lorenzo Moneta, Axel Naumann and Grigory Rubtsov for their work on the scientific program and the publication preparation. ACAT's IACC would also like to express its gratitude to all referees for their work on making sure the contributions are published in the proceedings. Our thanks extend to the conference liaisons Andrei Kataev and Jerome Lauret who worked with the local contacts and made this conference possible as well as to the program

  1. Evaluation of existing and proposed computer architectures for future ground-based systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulbach, C.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel processing architectures and techniques used in current supercomputers are described and projections are made of future advances. Presently, the von Neumann sequential processing pattern has been accelerated by having separate I/O processors, interleaved memories, wide memories, independent functional units and pipelining. Recent supercomputers have featured single-input, multiple data stream architectures, which have different processors for performing various operations (vector or pipeline processors). Multiple input, multiple data stream machines have also been developed. Data flow techniques, wherein program instructions are activated only when data are available, are expected to play a large role in future supercomputers, along with increased parallel processor arrays. The enhanced operational speeds are essential for adequately treating data from future spacecraft remote sensing instruments such as the Thematic Mapper.

  2. Molecular computing towards a novel computing architecture for complex problem solving

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Weng-Long

    2014-01-01

    This textbook introduces a concise approach to the design of molecular algorithms for students or researchers who are interested in dealing with complex problems. Through numerous examples and exercises, you will understand the main difference of molecular circuits and traditional digital circuits to manipulate the same problem and you will also learn how to design a molecular algorithm of solving any a problem from start to finish. The book starts with an introduction to computational aspects of digital computers and molecular computing, data representation of molecular computing, molecular operations of molecular computing and number representation of molecular computing, and provides many molecular algorithm to construct the parity generator and the parity checker of error-detection codes on digital communication, to encode integers of different formats, single precision and double precision of floating-point numbers, to implement addition and subtraction of unsigned integers, to construct logic operations...

  3. 17th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Preface The 2016 version of the International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research took place on January 18-22, 2016, at the Universidad Técnica Federico Santa Maria -UTFSM- in Valparaiso, Chile. The present volume of IOP Conference Series is devoted to the selected scientific contributions presented at the workshop. In order to guarantee the scientific quality of the Proceedings all papers were thoroughly peer-reviewed by an ad-hoc Editorial Committee with the help of many careful reviewers. The ACAT Workshop series has a long tradition starting in 1990 (Lyon, France), and takes place in intervals of a year and a half. Formerly these workshops were known under the name AIHENP (Artificial Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics). Each edition brings together experimental and theoretical physicists and computer scientists/experts, from particle and nuclear physics, astronomy and astrophysics in order to exchange knowledge and experience in computing and data analysis in physics. Three tracks cover the main topics: Computing technology: languages and system architectures. Data analysis: algorithms and tools. Theoretical Physics: techniques and methods. Although most contributions and discussions are related to particle physics and computing, other fields like condensed matter physics, earth physics, biophysics are often addressed in the hope to share our approaches and visions. It created a forum for exchanging ideas among fields, exploring and promoting cutting-edge computing technologies and debating hot topics. (paper)

  4. Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics pilot project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP) Program was launched in January, 1990. A principal objective of the program has been to utilize the emerging capabilities of massively parallel scientific computers in the challenge of regional scale predictions of decade-to-century climate change. CHAMMP has already demonstrated the feasibility of achieving a 10,000 fold increase in computational throughput for climate modeling in this decade. What we have also recognized, however, is the need for new algorithms and computer software to capitalize on the radically new computing architectures. This report describes the pilot CHAMMP projects at the DOE National Laboratories and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The pilot projects were selected to identify the principal challenges to CHAMMP and to entrain new scientific computing expertise. The success of some of these projects has aided in the definition of the CHAMMP scientific plan. Many of the papers in this report have been or will be submitted for publication in the open literature. Readers are urged to consult with the authors directly for questions or comments about their papers

  5. The OGC Innovation Program Testbeds - Advancing Architectures for Earth and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, L. E.; Percivall, G.; Simonis, I.; Serich, S.

    2017-12-01

    The OGC Innovation Program provides a collaborative agile process for solving challenging science problems and advancing new technologies. Since 1999, 100 initiatives have taken place, from multi-million dollar testbeds to small interoperability experiments. During these initiatives, sponsors and technology implementers (including academia and private sector) come together to solve problems, produce prototypes, develop demonstrations, provide best practices, and advance the future of standards. This presentation will provide the latest system architectures that can be used for Earth and space systems as a result of the OGC Testbed 13, including the following components: Elastic cloud autoscaler for Earth Observations (EO) using a WPS in an ESGF hybrid climate data research platform. Accessibility of climate data for the scientist and non-scientist users via on demand models wrapped in WPS. Standards descriptions for containerize applications to discover processes on the cloud, including using linked data, a WPS extension for hybrid clouds and linking to hybrid big data stores. OpenID and OAuth to secure OGC Services with built-in Attribute Based Access Control (ABAC) infrastructures leveraging GeoDRM patterns. Publishing and access of vector tiles, including use of compression and attribute options reusing patterns from WMS, WMTS and WFS. Servers providing 3D Tiles and streaming of data, including Indexed 3d Scene Layer (I3S), CityGML and Common DataBase (CDB). Asynchronous Services with advanced pushed notifications strategies, with a filter language instead of simple topic subscriptions, that can be use across OGC services. Testbed 14 will continue advancing topics like Big Data, security, and streaming, as well as making easier to use OGC services (e.g. RESTful APIs). The Call for Participation will be issued in December and responses are due on mid January 2018.

  6. How computer science can help in understanding the 3D genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Yoli; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Lio', Pietro

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome conformation capture techniques are producing a huge amount of data about the architecture of our genome. These data can provide us with a better understanding of the events that induce critical regulations of the cellular function from small changes in the three-dimensional genome architecture. Generating a unified view of spatial, temporal, genetic and epigenetic properties poses various challenges of data analysis, visualization, integration and mining, as well as of high performance computing and big data management. Here, we describe the critical issues of this new branch of bioinformatics, oriented at the comprehension of the three-dimensional genome architecture, which we call 'Nucleome Bioinformatics', looking beyond the currently available tools and methods, and highlight yet unaddressed challenges and the potential approaches that could be applied for tackling them. Our review provides a map for researchers interested in using computer science for studying 'Nucleome Bioinformatics', to achieve a better understanding of the biological processes that occur inside the nucleus. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Developing a New Framework for Integration and Teaching of Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) in Nigerian Schools of Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwakonye, Obioha; Alagbe, Oluwole; Oluwatayo, Adedapo; Alagbe, Taiye; Alalade, Gbenga

    2015-01-01

    As a result of globalization of digital technology, intellectual discourse on what constitutes the basic body of architectural knowledge to be imparted to future professionals has been on the increase. This digital revolution has brought to the fore the need to review the already overloaded architectural education curriculum of Nigerian schools of…

  8. Confabulation Based Real-time Anomaly Detection for Wide-area Surveillance Using Heterogeneous High Performance Computing Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    CONFABULATION BASED REAL-TIME ANOMALY DETECTION FOR WIDE-AREA SURVEILLANCE USING HETEROGENEOUS HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING ARCHITECTURE SYRACUSE...DETECTION FOR WIDE-AREA SURVEILLANCE USING HETEROGENEOUS HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING ARCHITECTURE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-12-1-0251 5b. GRANT...processors including graphic processor units (GPUs) and Intel Xeon Phi processors. Experimental results showed significant speedups, which can enable

  9. Computer code qualification program for the Advanced CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.K.; Wren, D.J.; Snell, V.G.; White, A.J.; Boczar, P.G.

    2003-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL) has developed and implemented a Software Quality Assurance program (SQA) to ensure that its analytical, scientific and design computer codes meet the required standards for software used in safety analyses. This paper provides an overview of the computer programs used in Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) safety analysis, and assessment of their applicability in the safety analyses of the ACR design. An outline of the incremental validation program, and an overview of the experimental program in support of the code validation are also presented. An outline of the SQA program used to qualify these computer codes is also briefly presented. To provide context to the differences in the SQA with respect to current CANDUs, the paper also provides an overview of the ACR design features that have an impact on the computer code qualification. (author)

  10. Advanced computer graphics techniques as applied to the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.J.; Koontz, A.S.

    1985-08-01

    Computer graphics is a rapidly advancing technological area in computer science. This is being motivated by increased hardware capability coupled with reduced hardware costs. This paper will cover six topics in computer graphics, with examples forecasting how each of these capabilities could be used in the nuclear industry. These topics are: (1) Image Realism with Surfaces and Transparency; (2) Computer Graphics Motion; (3) Graphics Resolution Issues and Examples; (4) Iconic Interaction; (5) Graphic Workstations; and (6) Data Fusion - illustrating data coming from numerous sources, for display through high dimensional, greater than 3-D, graphics. All topics will be discussed using extensive examples with slides, video tapes, and movies. Illustrations have been omitted from the paper due to the complexity of color reproduction. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Emerging opportunities in enterprise integration with open architecture computer numerical controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Christopher A.

    1997-01-01

    The shift to open-architecture machine tool computer numerical controls is providing new opportunities for metal working oriented manufacturers to streamline the entire 'art to part' process. Production cycle times, accuracy, consistency, predictability and process reliability are just some of the factors that can be improved, leading to better manufactured product at lower costs. Open architecture controllers are allowing manufacturers to apply general purpose software and hardware tools increase where previous approaches relied on proprietary and unique hardware and software. This includes DNC, SCADA, CAD, and CAM, where the increasing use of general purpose components is leading to lower cost system that are also more reliable and robust than the past proprietary approaches. In addition, a number of new opportunities exist, which in the past were likely impractical due to cost or performance constraints.

  12. An FPGA-Based Quantum Computing Emulation Framework Based on Serial-Parallel Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hardware emulation of quantum systems can mimic more efficiently the parallel behaviour of quantum computations, thus allowing higher processing speed-up than software simulations. In this paper, an efficient hardware emulation method that employs a serial-parallel hardware architecture targeted for field programmable gate array (FPGA is proposed. Quantum Fourier transform and Grover’s search are chosen as case studies in this work since they are the core of many useful quantum algorithms. Experimental work shows that, with the proposed emulation architecture, a linear reduction in resource utilization is attained against the pipeline implementations proposed in prior works. The proposed work contributes to the formulation of a proof-of-concept baseline FPGA emulation framework with optimization on datapath designs that can be extended to emulate practical large-scale quantum circuits.

  13. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY17 Implementation Plan, Version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Michel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Archer, Bill [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hendrickson, Bruce [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wade, Doug [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional Research and Development; Hoang, Thuc [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States). Computational Systems and Software Environment

    2016-08-29

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is an integrated technical program for maintaining the safety, surety, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational capabilities to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources that support annual stockpile assessment and certification, study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balance of resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. ASC is now focused on increasing predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (sufficient resolution, dimensionality, and scientific details), and quantifying critical margins and uncertainties. Resolving each issue requires increasingly difficult analyses because the aging process has progressively moved the stockpile further away from the original test base. Where possible, the program also enables the use of high performance computing (HPC) and simulation tools to address broader national security needs, such as foreign nuclear weapon assessments and counter nuclear terrorism.

  14. Activities of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) was established by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) on June 6, 1983. RIACS is privately operated by USRA, a consortium of universities with research programs in the aerospace sciences, under contract with NASA. The primary mission of RIACS is to provide research and expertise in computer science and scientific computing to support the scientific missions of NASA ARC. The research carried out at RIACS must change its emphasis from year to year in response to NASA ARC's changing needs and technological opportunities. Research at RIACS is currently being done in the following areas: (1) parallel computing; (2) advanced methods for scientific computing; (3) high performance networks; and (4) learning systems. RIACS technical reports are usually preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to research journals or conference proceedings. A list of these reports for the period January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 is in the Reports and Abstracts section of this report.

  15. Advanced Laser Architecture for Two-Step Laser Tandem Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Molly E.; Li, Steven X.; Yu, Anthony W.; Getty, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Future astrobiology missions will focus on planets with significant astrochemical or potential astrobiological features, such as small, primitive bodies and the icy moons of the outer planets that may host diverse organic compounds. These missions require advanced instrument techniques to fully and unambiguously characterize the composition of surface and dust materials. Laser desorptionionization mass spectrometry (LDMS) is an emerging instrument technology for in situ mass analysis of non-volatile sample composition. A recent Goddard LDMS advancement is the two-step laser tandem mass spectrometer (L2MS) instrument to address the need for future flight instrumentation to deconvolve complex organic signatures. The L2MS prototype uses a resonance enhanced multi-photon laser ionization mechanism to selectively detect aromatic species from a more complex sample. By neglecting the aliphatic and inorganic mineral signatures in the two-step mass spectrum, the L2MS approach can provide both mass assignments and clues to structural information for an in situ investigation of non-volatile sample composition. In this paper we will describe our development effort on a new laser architecture that is based on the previously flown Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) laser transmitter for the L2MS instrument. The laser provides two discrete midinfrared wavelengths (2.8 m and 3.4 m) using monolithic optical parametric oscillators and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength (266 nm) on a single laser bench with a straightforward development path toward flight readiness.

  16. An energy efficient and high speed architecture for convolution computing based on binary resistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Han, Runze; Zhou, Zheng; Huang, Peng; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jinfeng

    2018-04-01

    In this work we present a novel convolution computing architecture based on metal oxide resistive random access memory (RRAM) to process the image data stored in the RRAM arrays. The proposed image storage architecture shows performances of better speed-device consumption efficiency compared with the previous kernel storage architecture. Further we improve the architecture for a high accuracy and low power computing by utilizing the binary storage and the series resistor. For a 28 × 28 image and 10 kernels with a size of 3 × 3, compared with the previous kernel storage approach, the newly proposed architecture shows excellent performances including: 1) almost 100% accuracy within 20% LRS variation and 90% HRS variation; 2) more than 67 times speed boost; 3) 71.4% energy saving.

  17. Advances in Reactor Physics, Mathematics and Computation. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings of the international topical meeting on advances in reactor physics, mathematics and computation, Volume 2, are divided into 7 sessions bearing on: - session 7: Deterministic transport methods 1 (7 conferences), - session 8: Interpretation and analysis of reactor instrumentation (6 conferences), - session 9: High speed computing applied to reactor operations (5 conferences), - session 10: Diffusion theory and kinetics (7 conferences), - session 11: Fast reactor design, validation and operating experience (8 conferences), - session 12: Deterministic transport methods 2 (7 conferences), - session 13: Application of expert systems to physical aspects of reactor design and operation.

  18. Medical image computing for computer-supported diagnostics and therapy. Advances and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handels, H; Ehrhardt, J

    2009-01-01

    Medical image computing has become one of the most challenging fields in medical informatics. In image-based diagnostics of the future software assistance will become more and more important, and image analysis systems integrating advanced image computing methods are needed to extract quantitative image parameters to characterize the state and changes of image structures of interest (e.g. tumors, organs, vessels, bones etc.) in a reproducible and objective way. Furthermore, in the field of software-assisted and navigated surgery medical image computing methods play a key role and have opened up new perspectives for patient treatment. However, further developments are needed to increase the grade of automation, accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Moreover, the systems developed have to be integrated into the clinical workflow. For the development of advanced image computing systems methods of different scientific fields have to be adapted and used in combination. The principal methodologies in medical image computing are the following: image segmentation, image registration, image analysis for quantification and computer assisted image interpretation, modeling and simulation as well as visualization and virtual reality. Especially, model-based image computing techniques open up new perspectives for prediction of organ changes and risk analysis of patients and will gain importance in diagnostic and therapy of the future. From a methodical point of view the authors identify the following future trends and perspectives in medical image computing: development of optimized application-specific systems and integration into the clinical workflow, enhanced computational models for image analysis and virtual reality training systems, integration of different image computing methods, further integration of multimodal image data and biosignals and advanced methods for 4D medical image computing. The development of image analysis systems for diagnostic support or

  19. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Methods in Computational Molecular Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Diercksen, Geerd

    1992-01-01

    This volume records the lectures given at a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Methods in Computational Molecular Physics held in Bad Windsheim, Germany, from 22nd July until 2nd. August, 1991. This NATO Advanced Study Institute sought to bridge the quite considerable gap which exist between the presentation of molecular electronic structure theory found in contemporary monographs such as, for example, McWeeny's Methods 0/ Molecular Quantum Mechanics (Academic Press, London, 1989) or Wilson's Electron correlation in moleeules (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1984) and the realization of the sophisticated computational algorithms required for their practical application. It sought to underline the relation between the electronic structure problem and the study of nuc1ear motion. Software for performing molecular electronic structure calculations is now being applied in an increasingly wide range of fields in both the academic and the commercial sectors. Numerous applications are reported in areas as diverse as catalysi...

  20. Soft computing in design and manufacturing of advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.; Baaklini, George Y; Vary, Alex

    1993-01-01

    The potential of fuzzy sets and neural networks, often referred to as soft computing, for aiding in all aspects of manufacturing of advanced materials like ceramics is addressed. In design and manufacturing of advanced materials, it is desirable to find which of the many processing variables contribute most to the desired properties of the material. There is also interest in real time quality control of parameters that govern material properties during processing stages. The concepts of fuzzy sets and neural networks are briefly introduced and it is shown how they can be used in the design and manufacturing processes. These two computational methods are alternatives to other methods such as the Taguchi method. The two methods are demonstrated by using data collected at NASA Lewis Research Center. Future research directions are also discussed.

  1. Soft Computing Techniques for the Protein Folding Problem on High Performance Computing Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanes, Antonio; Muñoz, Andrés; Bueno-Crespo, Andrés; García-Valverde, Teresa; Sánchez, Antonia; Arcas-Túnez, Francisco; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Cecilia, José M

    2016-01-01

    The protein-folding problem has been extensively studied during the last fifty years. The understanding of the dynamics of global shape of a protein and the influence on its biological function can help us to discover new and more effective drugs to deal with diseases of pharmacological relevance. Different computational approaches have been developed by different researchers in order to foresee the threedimensional arrangement of atoms of proteins from their sequences. However, the computational complexity of this problem makes mandatory the search for new models, novel algorithmic strategies and hardware platforms that provide solutions in a reasonable time frame. We present in this revision work the past and last tendencies regarding protein folding simulations from both perspectives; hardware and software. Of particular interest to us are both the use of inexact solutions to this computationally hard problem as well as which hardware platforms have been used for running this kind of Soft Computing techniques.

  2. Advances in Cross-Cutting Ideas for Computational Climate Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Esmond [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Evans, Katherine J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Caldwell, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hoffman, Forrest M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Charles [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Kerstin, Van Dam [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Leung, Ruby [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Martin, Daniel F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ostrouchov, George [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tuminaro, Raymond [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ullrich, Paul [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Wild, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Williams, Samuel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This report presents results from the DOE-sponsored workshop titled, ``Advancing X-Cutting Ideas for Computational Climate Science Workshop,'' known as AXICCS, held on September 12--13, 2016 in Rockville, MD. The workshop brought together experts in climate science, computational climate science, computer science, and mathematics to discuss interesting but unsolved science questions regarding climate modeling and simulation, promoted collaboration among the diverse scientists in attendance, and brainstormed about possible tools and capabilities that could be developed to help address them. Emerged from discussions at the workshop were several research opportunities that the group felt could advance climate science significantly. These include (1) process-resolving models to provide insight into important processes and features of interest and inform the development of advanced physical parameterizations, (2) a community effort to develop and provide integrated model credibility, (3) including, organizing, and managing increasingly connected model components that increase model fidelity yet complexity, and (4) treating Earth system models as one interconnected organism without numerical or data based boundaries that limit interactions. The group also identified several cross-cutting advances in mathematics, computer science, and computational science that would be needed to enable one or more of these big ideas. It is critical to address the need for organized, verified, and optimized software, which enables the models to grow and continue to provide solutions in which the community can have confidence. Effectively utilizing the newest computer hardware enables simulation efficiency and the ability to handle output from increasingly complex and detailed models. This will be accomplished through hierarchical multiscale algorithms in tandem with new strategies for data handling, analysis, and storage. These big ideas and cross-cutting technologies for

  3. Advances in Cross-Cutting Ideas for Computational Climate Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, E.; Evans, K.; Caldwell, P.; Hoffman, F.; Jackson, C.; Van Dam, K.; Leung, R.; Martin, D.; Ostrouchov, G.; Tuminaro, R.; Ullrich, P.; Wild, S.; Williams, S.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents results from the DOE-sponsored workshop titled, Advancing X-Cutting Ideas for Computational Climate Science Workshop,'' known as AXICCS, held on September 12--13, 2016 in Rockville, MD. The workshop brought together experts in climate science, computational climate science, computer science, and mathematics to discuss interesting but unsolved science questions regarding climate modeling and simulation, promoted collaboration among the diverse scientists in attendance, and brainstormed about possible tools and capabilities that could be developed to help address them. Emerged from discussions at the workshop were several research opportunities that the group felt could advance climate science significantly. These include (1) process-resolving models to provide insight into important processes and features of interest and inform the development of advanced physical parameterizations, (2) a community effort to develop and provide integrated model credibility, (3) including, organizing, and managing increasingly connected model components that increase model fidelity yet complexity, and (4) treating Earth system models as one interconnected organism without numerical or data based boundaries that limit interactions. The group also identified several cross-cutting advances in mathematics, computer science, and computational science that would be needed to enable one or more of these big ideas. It is critical to address the need for organized, verified, and optimized software, which enables the models to grow and continue to provide solutions in which the community can have confidence. Effectively utilizing the newest computer hardware enables simulation efficiency and the ability to handle output from increasingly complex and detailed models. This will be accomplished through hierarchical multiscale algorithms in tandem with new strategies for data handling, analysis, and storage. These big ideas and cross-cutting technologies for enabling

  4. Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragt, Alex J.

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Dragt of the University of Maryland is one of the Institutional Principal Investigators for the SciDAC Accelerator Modeling Project Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology whose principal investigators are Dr. Kwok Ko (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and Dr. Robert Ryne (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). This report covers the activities of Dr. Dragt while at Berkeley during spring 2002 and at Maryland during fall 2003

  5. A Very Compact AES-SPIHT Selective Encryption Computer Architecture Design with Improved S-Box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Hao Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The “S-box” algorithm is a key component in the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES due to its nonlinear property. Various implementation approaches have been researched and discussed meeting stringent application goals (such as low power, high throughput, low area, but the ultimate goal for many researchers is to find a compact and small hardware footprint for the S-box circuit. In this paper, we present our version of minimized S-box with two separate proposals and improvements in the overall gate count. The compact S-box is adopted with a compact and optimum processor architecture specifically tailored for the AES, namely, the compact instruction set architecture (CISA. To further justify and strengthen the purpose of the compact crypto-processor’s application, we have also presented a selective encryption architecture (SEA which incorporates the CISA as a part of the encryption core, accompanied by the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT algorithm as a complete selective encryption system.

  6. Parallel processing algorithms for hydrocodes on a computer with MIMD architecture (DENELCOR's HEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.L.

    1983-11-01

    In real time simulation/prediction of complex systems such as water-cooled nuclear reactors, if reactor operators had fast simulator/predictors to check the consequences of their operations before implementing them, events such as the incident at Three Mile Island might be avoided. However, existing simulator/predictors such as RELAP run slower than real time on serial computers. It appears that the only way to overcome the barrier to higher computing rates is to use computers with architectures that allow concurrent computations or parallel processing. The computer architecture with the greatest degree of parallelism is labeled Multiple Instruction Stream, Multiple Data Stream (MIMD). An example of a machine of this type is the HEP computer by DENELCOR. It appears that hydrocodes are very well suited for parallelization on the HEP. It is a straightforward exercise to parallelize explicit, one-dimensional Lagrangean hydrocodes in a zone-by-zone parallelization. Similarly, implicit schemes can be parallelized in a zone-by-zone fashion via an a priori, symbolic inversion of the tridiagonal matrix that arises in an implicit scheme. These techniques are extended to Eulerian hydrocodes by using Harlow's rezone technique. The extension from single-phase Eulerian to two-phase Eulerian is straightforward. This step-by-step extension leads to hydrocodes with zone-by-zone parallelization that are capable of two-phase flow simulation. Extensions to two and three spatial dimensions can be achieved by operator splitting. It appears that a zone-by-zone parallelization is the best way to utilize the capabilities of an MIMD machine. 40 references

  7. Development of a Computer Architecture to Support the Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsinis, Constantine

    1996-01-01

    The NASA OPAD spectrometer system relies heavily on extensive software which repetitively extracts spectral information from the engine plume and reports the amounts of metals which are present in the plume. The development of this software is at a sufficiently advanced stage where it can be used in actual engine tests to provide valuable data on engine operation and health. This activity will continue and, in addition, the OPAD system is planned to be used in flight aboard space vehicles. The two implementations, test-stand and in-flight, may have some differing requirements. For example, the data stored during a test-stand experiment are much more extensive than in the in-flight case. In both cases though, the majority of the requirements are similar. New data from the spectrograph is generated at a rate of once every 0.5 sec or faster. All processing must be completed within this period of time to maintain real-time performance. Every 0.5 sec, the OPAD system must report the amounts of specific metals within the engine plume, given the spectral data. At present, the software in the OPAD system performs this function by solving the inverse problem. It uses powerful physics-based computational models (the SPECTRA code), which receive amounts of metals as inputs to produce the spectral data that would have been observed, had the same metal amounts been present in the engine plume. During the experiment, for every spectrum that is observed, an initial approximation is performed using neural networks to establish an initial metal composition which approximates as accurately as possible the real one. Then, using optimization techniques, the SPECTRA code is repetitively used to produce a fit to the data, by adjusting the metal input amounts until the produced spectrum matches the observed one to within a given level of tolerance. This iterative solution to the original problem of determining the metal composition in the plume requires a relatively long period of time

  8. Condition Monitoring Through Advanced Sensor and Computational Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Taek; Park, Won Man; Kim, Jung Soo; Seong, Soeng Hwan; Hur, Sub; Cho, Jae Hwan; Jung, Hyung Gue

    2005-05-01

    The overall goal of this joint research project was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensors and computational technology for continuous monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This project included investigating and adapting several advanced sensor technologies from Korean and US national laboratory research communities, some of which were developed and applied in non-nuclear industries. The project team investigated and developed sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms. The researchers installed sensors and conducted condition monitoring tests on two test loops, a check valve (an active component) and a piping elbow (a passive component), to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced sensors and computational technology to achieve the project goal. Acoustic emission (AE) devices, optical fiber sensors, accelerometers, and ultrasonic transducers (UTs) were used to detect mechanical vibratory response of check valve and piping elbow in normal and degraded configurations. Chemical sensors were also installed to monitor the water chemistry in the piping elbow test loop. Analysis results of processed sensor data indicate that it is feasible to differentiate between the normal and degraded (with selected degradation mechanisms) configurations of these two components from the acquired sensor signals, but it is questionable that these methods can reliably identify the level and type of degradation. Additional research and development efforts are needed to refine the differentiation techniques and to reduce the level of uncertainties

  9. Architecture for an advanced biomedical collaboration domain for the European paediatric cancer research community (ABCD-4-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzlnader, Michael; Falgenhauer, Markus; Gossy, Christian; Schreier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Today, progress in biomedical research often depends on large, interdisciplinary research projects and tailored information and communication technology (ICT) support. In the context of the European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) project the exchange of data between data source (Source Domain) and data consumer (Consumer Domain) systems in a distributed computing environment needs to be facilitated. This work presents the requirements and the corresponding solution architecture of the Advanced Biomedical Collaboration Domain for Europe (ABCD-4-E). The proposed concept utilises public as well as private cloud systems, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) framework and web-based applications to provide the core capabilities in accordance with privacy and security needs. The utility of crucial parts of the concept was evaluated by prototypic implementation. A discussion of the design indicates that the requirements of ENCCA are fully met. A whole system demonstration is currently being prepared to verify that ABCD-4-E has the potential to evolve into a domain-bridging collaboration platform in the future.

  10. South Florida freight advanced traveler information system : architecture and implementation as built documentation report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The primary purpose of the As Built Documentation is to provide a description of any modifications made to the original architecture along with justification as to why the architecture was changed. In addition, this documentation provides the followi...

  11. Efficient Machine Learning Approach for Optimizing Scientific Computing Applications on Emerging HPC Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugam, Kamesh [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Efficient parallel implementations of scientific applications on multi-core CPUs with accelerators such as GPUs and Xeon Phis is challenging. This requires - exploiting the data parallel architecture of the accelerator along with the vector pipelines of modern x86 CPU architectures, load balancing, and efficient memory transfer between different devices. It is relatively easy to meet these requirements for highly structured scientific applications. In contrast, a number of scientific and engineering applications are unstructured. Getting performance on accelerators for these applications is extremely challenging because many of these applications employ irregular algorithms which exhibit data-dependent control-ow and irregular memory accesses. Furthermore, these applications are often iterative with dependency between steps, and thus making it hard to parallelize across steps. As a result, parallelism in these applications is often limited to a single step. Numerical simulation of charged particles beam dynamics is one such application where the distribution of work and memory access pattern at each time step is irregular. Applications with these properties tend to present significant branch and memory divergence, load imbalance between different processor cores, and poor compute and memory utilization. Prior research on parallelizing such irregular applications have been focused around optimizing the irregular, data-dependent memory accesses and control-ow during a single step of the application independent of the other steps, with the assumption that these patterns are completely unpredictable. We observed that the structure of computation leading to control-ow divergence and irregular memory accesses in one step is similar to that in the next step. It is possible to predict this structure in the current step by observing the computation structure of previous steps. In this dissertation, we present novel machine learning based optimization techniques to address

  12. Hybrid Cloud Computing Architecture Optimization by Total Cost of Ownership Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Valeryevna Makarenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Achieving the goals of information security is a key factor in the decision to outsource information technology and, in particular, to decide on the migration of organizational data, applications, and other resources to the infrastructure, based on cloud computing. And the key issue in the selection of optimal architecture and the subsequent migration of business applications and data to the cloud organization information environment is the question of the total cost of ownership of IT infrastructure. This paper focuses on solving the problem of minimizing the total cost of ownership cloud.

  13. Efficient reconfigurable hardware architecture for accurately computing success probability and data complexity of linear attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogdanov, Andrey; Kavun, Elif Bilge; Tischhauser, Elmar

    2012-01-01

    An accurate estimation of the success probability and data complexity of linear cryptanalysis is a fundamental question in symmetric cryptography. In this paper, we propose an efficient reconfigurable hardware architecture to compute the success probability and data complexity of Matsui's Algorithm...... block lengths ensures that any empirical observations are not due to differences in statistical behavior for artificially small block lengths. Rather surprisingly, we observed in previous experiments a significant deviation between the theory and practice for Matsui's Algorithm 2 for larger block sizes...

  14. Concept of a computer network architecture for complete automation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Ray, A.

    1990-01-01

    The state of the art in automation of nuclear power plants has been largely limited to computerized data acquisition, monitoring, display, and recording of process signals. Complete automation of nuclear power plants, which would include plant operations, control, and management, fault diagnosis, and system reconfiguration with efficient and reliable man/machine interactions, has been projected as a realistic goal. This paper presents the concept of a computer network architecture that would use a high-speed optical data highway to integrate diverse, interacting, and spatially distributed functions that are essential for a fully automated nuclear power plant

  15. Computation studies into architecture and energy transfer properties of photosynthetic units from filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnanto, Juha Matti [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Freiberg, Arvi [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu, Estonia and Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Tartu, Riia 23, 51010 Tartu (Estonia)

    2014-10-06

    We have used different computational methods to study structural architecture, and light-harvesting and energy transfer properties of the photosynthetic unit of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs. Due to the huge number of atoms in the photosynthetic unit, a combination of atomistic and coarse methods was used for electronic structure calculations. The calculations reveal that the light energy absorbed by the peripheral chlorosome antenna complex transfers efficiently via the baseplate and the core B808–866 antenna complexes to the reaction center complex, in general agreement with the present understanding of this complex system.

  16. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

    2002-01-01

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts

  17. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

    2002-05-21

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts

  18. The Activity-Based Computing Project - A Software Architecture for Pervasive Computing Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    . Special attention should be drawn to publication [25], which gives an overview of the ABC project to the IEEE Pervasive Computing community; the ACM CHI 2006 [19] paper that documents the implementation of the ABC technology; and the ACM ToCHI paper [12], which is the main publication of the project......, documenting all of the project’s four objectives. All of these publication venues are top-tier journals and conferences within computer science. From a business perspective, the project had the objective of incorporating relevant parts of the ABC technology into the products of Medical Insight, which has been...... done. Moreover, partly based on the research done in the ABC project, the company Cetrea A/S has been founded, which incorporate ABC concepts and technologies in its products. The concepts of activity-based computing have also been researched in cooperation with IBM Research, and the ABC project has...

  19. Computational experiment approach to advanced secondary mathematics curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Abramovich, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    This book promotes the experimental mathematics approach in the context of secondary mathematics curriculum by exploring mathematical models depending on parameters that were typically considered advanced in the pre-digital education era. This approach, by drawing on the power of computers to perform numerical computations and graphical constructions, stimulates formal learning of mathematics through making sense of a computational experiment. It allows one (in the spirit of Freudenthal) to bridge serious mathematical content and contemporary teaching practice. In other words, the notion of teaching experiment can be extended to include a true mathematical experiment. When used appropriately, the approach creates conditions for collateral learning (in the spirit of Dewey) to occur including the development of skills important for engineering applications of mathematics. In the context of a mathematics teacher education program, this book addresses a call for the preparation of teachers capable of utilizing mo...

  20. Transportable GPU (General Processor Units) chip set technology for standard computer architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosdick, R. E.; Denison, H. C.

    1982-11-01

    The USAFR-developed GPU Chip Set has been utilized by Tracor to implement both USAF and Navy Standard 16-Bit Airborne Computer Architectures. Both configurations are currently being delivered into DOD full-scale development programs. Leadless Hermetic Chip Carrier packaging has facilitated implementation of both architectures on single 41/2 x 5 substrates. The CMOS and CMOS/SOS implementations of the GPU Chip Set have allowed both CPU implementations to use less than 3 watts of power each. Recent efforts by Tracor for USAF have included the definition of a next-generation GPU Chip Set that will retain the application-proven architecture of the current chip set while offering the added cost advantages of transportability across ISO-CMOS and CMOS/SOS processes and across numerous semiconductor manufacturers using a newly-defined set of common design rules. The Enhanced GPU Chip Set will increase speed by an approximate factor of 3 while significantly reducing chip counts and costs of standard CPU implementations.

  1. Advanced neural network-based computational schemes for robust fault diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    Mrugalski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    The present book is devoted to problems of adaptation of artificial neural networks to robust fault diagnosis schemes. It presents neural networks-based modelling and estimation techniques used for designing robust fault diagnosis schemes for non-linear dynamic systems. A part of the book focuses on fundamental issues such as architectures of dynamic neural networks, methods for designing of neural networks and fault diagnosis schemes as well as the importance of robustness. The book is of a tutorial value and can be perceived as a good starting point for the new-comers to this field. The book is also devoted to advanced schemes of description of neural model uncertainty. In particular, the methods of computation of neural networks uncertainty with robust parameter estimation are presented. Moreover, a novel approach for system identification with the state-space GMDH neural network is delivered. All the concepts described in this book are illustrated by both simple academic illustrative examples and practica...

  2. Design and installation of advanced computer safety related instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, S.; Andolina, K.; Ruether, J.

    1993-01-01

    The rapidly developing area of computer systems creates new opportunities for commercial utilities operating nuclear reactors to improve plant operation and efficiency. Two of the main obstacles to utilizing the new technology in safety-related applications is the current policy of the licensing agencies and the fear of decision making managers to introduce new technologies. Once these obstacles are overcome, advanced diagnostic systems, CRT-based displays, and advanced communication channels can improve plant operation considerably. The article discusses outstanding issues in the area of designing, qualifying, and licensing of computer-based instrumentation and control systems. The authors describe the experience gained in designing three safety-related systems, that include a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based Safeguard Load Sequencer for NSP Prairie Island, a digital Containment Isolation monitoring system for TVA Browns Ferry, and a study that was conducted for EPRI/NSP regarding a PLC-based Reactor Protection system. This article presents the benefits to be gained in replacing existing, outdated equipment with new advanced instrumentation

  3. Simulation of Si:P spin-based quantum computer architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Yiachung; Fang Angbo

    2008-01-01

    We present realistic simulation for single and double phosphorous donors in a silicon-based quantum computer design by solving a valley-orbit coupled effective-mass equation for describing phosphorous donors in strained silicon quantum well (QW). Using a generalized unrestricted Hartree-Fock method, we solve the two-electron effective-mass equation with quantum well confinement and realistic gate potentials. The effects of QW width, gate voltages, donor separation, and donor position shift on the lowest singlet and triplet energies and their charge distributions for a neighboring donor pair in the quantum computer(QC) architecture are analyzed. The gate tunability are defined and evaluated for a typical QC design. Estimates are obtained for the duration of spin half-swap gate operation.

  4. Integration of highly probabilistic sources into optical quantum architectures: perpetual quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devitt, Simon J; Stephens, Ashley M; Munro, William J; Nemoto, Kae

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a design for an optical topological cluster state computer constructed exclusively from a single quantum component. Unlike previous efforts we eliminate the need for on demand, high fidelity photon sources and detectors and replace them with the same device utilized to create photon/photon entanglement. This introduces highly probabilistic elements into the optical architecture while maintaining complete specificity of the structure and operation for a large-scale computer. Photons in this system are continually recycled back into the preparation network, allowing for an arbitrarily deep three-dimensional cluster to be prepared using a comparatively small number of photonic qubits and consequently the elimination of high-frequency, deterministic photon sources.

  5. Porting plasma physics simulation codes to modern computing architectures using the libmrc framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaschewski, Kai; Abbott, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Available computing power has continued to grow exponentially even after single-core performance satured in the last decade. The increase has since been driven by more parallelism, both using more cores and having more parallelism in each core, e.g. in GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. Adapting existing plasma physics codes is challenging, in particular as there is no single programming model that covers current and future architectures. We will introduce the open-source libmrc framework that has been used to modularize and port three plasma physics codes: The extended MHD code MRCv3 with implicit time integration and curvilinear grids; the OpenGGCM global magnetosphere model; and the particle-in-cell code PSC. libmrc consolidates basic functionality needed for simulations based on structured grids (I/O, load balancing, time integrators), and also introduces a parallel object model that makes it possible to maintain multiple implementations of computational kernels, on e.g. conventional processors and GPUs. It handles data layout conversions and enables us to port performance-critical parts of a code to a new architecture step-by-step, while the rest of the code can remain unchanged. We will show examples of the performance gains and some physics applications.

  6. New Developments in Modeling MHD Systems on High Performance Computing Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaschewski, K.; Raeder, J.; Larson, D. J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2009-04-01

    Modeling the wide range of time and length scales present even in fluid models of plasmas like MHD and X-MHD (Extended MHD including two fluid effects like Hall term, electron inertia, electron pressure gradient) is challenging even on state-of-the-art supercomputers. In the last years, HPC capacity has continued to grow exponentially, but at the expense of making the computer systems more and more difficult to program in order to get maximum performance. In this paper, we will present a new approach to managing the complexity caused by the need to write efficient codes: Separating the numerical description of the problem, in our case a discretized right hand side (r.h.s.), from the actual implementation of efficiently evaluating it. An automatic code generator is used to describe the r.h.s. in a quasi-symbolic form while leaving the translation into efficient and parallelized code to a computer program itself. We implemented this approach for OpenGGCM (Open General Geospace Circulation Model), a model of the Earth's magnetosphere, which was accelerated by a factor of three on regular x86 architecture and a factor of 25 on the Cell BE architecture (commonly known for its deployment in Sony's PlayStation 3).

  7. Peer-to-peer architectures for exascale computing : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Mayo, Jackson R.; Minnich, Ronald G.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Rudish, Donald W.

    2010-09-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate the potential for employing dynamic, decentralized software architectures to achieve reliability in future high-performance computing platforms. These architectures, inspired by peer-to-peer networks such as botnets that already scale to millions of unreliable nodes, hold promise for enabling scientific applications to run usefully on next-generation exascale platforms ({approx} 10{sup 18} operations per second). Traditional parallel programming techniques suffer rapid deterioration of performance scaling with growing platform size, as the work of coping with increasingly frequent failures dominates over useful computation. Our studies suggest that new architectures, in which failures are treated as ubiquitous and their effects are considered as simply another controllable source of error in a scientific computation, can remove such obstacles to exascale computing for certain applications. We have developed a simulation framework, as well as a preliminary implementation in a large-scale emulation environment, for exploration of these 'fault-oblivious computing' approaches. High-performance computing (HPC) faces a fundamental problem of increasing total component failure rates due to increasing system sizes, which threaten to degrade system reliability to an unusable level by the time the exascale range is reached ({approx} 10{sup 18} operations per second, requiring of order millions of processors). As computer scientists seek a way to scale system software for next-generation exascale machines, it is worth considering peer-to-peer (P2P) architectures that are already capable of supporting 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} unreliable nodes. Exascale platforms will require a different way of looking at systems and software because the machine will likely not be available in its entirety for a meaningful execution time. Realistic estimates of failure rates range from a few times per day to more than once per hour for these

  8. Energy footprint of advanced dense numerical linear algebra using tile algorithms on multicore architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Dongarra, Jack; Ltaief, Hatem; Luszczek, Piotr R.; Weaver, Vincent M.

    2012-01-01

    We propose to study the impact on the energy footprint of two advanced algorithmic strategies in the context of high performance dense linear algebra libraries: (1) mixed precision algorithms with iterative refinement allow to run at the peak performance of single precision floating-point arithmetic while achieving double precision accuracy and (2) tree reduction technique exposes more parallelism when factorizing tall and skinny matrices for solving over determined systems of linear equations or calculating the singular value decomposition. Integrated within the PLASMA library using tile algorithms, which will eventually supersede the block algorithms from LAPACK, both strategies further excel in performance in the presence of a dynamic task scheduler while targeting multicore architecture. Energy consumption measurements are reported along with parallel performance numbers on a dual-socket quad-core Intel Xeon as well as a quad-socket quad-core Intel Sandy Bridge chip, both providing component-based energy monitoring at all levels of the system, through the Power Pack framework and the Running Average Power Limit model, respectively. © 2012 IEEE.

  9. Advanced Architectures and Relatives of Air Electrodes in Zn–Air Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing; Xu, Yang Yang; Yang, Huan; Dong, Zehua; Liu, Hongfang

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Zn–air batteries are becoming the promising power sources for portable and wearable electronic devices and hybrid/electric vehicles because of their high specific energy density and the low cost for next‐generation green and sustainable energy technologies. An air electrode integrated with an oxygen electrocatalyst is the most important component and inevitably determines the performance and cost of a Zn–air battery. This article presents exciting advances and challenges related to air electrodes and their relatives. After a brief introduction of the Zn–air battery, the architectures and oxygen electrocatalysts of air electrodes and relevant electrolytes are highlighted in primary and rechargeable types with different configurations, respectively. Moreover, the individual components and major issues of flexible Zn–air batteries are also highlighted, along with the strategies to enhance the battery performance. Finally, a perspective for design, preparation, and assembly of air electrodes is proposed for the future innovations of Zn–air batteries with high performance. PMID:29721418

  10. Energy footprint of advanced dense numerical linear algebra using tile algorithms on multicore architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Dongarra, Jack

    2012-11-01

    We propose to study the impact on the energy footprint of two advanced algorithmic strategies in the context of high performance dense linear algebra libraries: (1) mixed precision algorithms with iterative refinement allow to run at the peak performance of single precision floating-point arithmetic while achieving double precision accuracy and (2) tree reduction technique exposes more parallelism when factorizing tall and skinny matrices for solving over determined systems of linear equations or calculating the singular value decomposition. Integrated within the PLASMA library using tile algorithms, which will eventually supersede the block algorithms from LAPACK, both strategies further excel in performance in the presence of a dynamic task scheduler while targeting multicore architecture. Energy consumption measurements are reported along with parallel performance numbers on a dual-socket quad-core Intel Xeon as well as a quad-socket quad-core Intel Sandy Bridge chip, both providing component-based energy monitoring at all levels of the system, through the Power Pack framework and the Running Average Power Limit model, respectively. © 2012 IEEE.

  11. Scaling to Nanotechnology Limits with the PIMS Computer Architecture and a new Scaling Rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debenedictis, Erik P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new approach to computing that moves towards the limits of nanotechnology using a newly formulated sc aling rule. This is in contrast to the current computer industry scali ng away from von Neumann's original computer at the rate of Moore's Law. We extend Moore's Law to 3D, which l eads generally to architectures that integrate logic and memory. To keep pow er dissipation cons tant through a 2D surface of the 3D structure requires using adiabatic principles. We call our newly proposed architecture Processor In Memory and Storage (PIMS). We propose a new computational model that integrates processing and memory into "tiles" that comprise logic, memory/storage, and communications functions. Since the programming model will be relatively stable as a system scales, programs repr esented by tiles could be executed in a PIMS system built with today's technology or could become the "schematic diagram" for implementation in an ultimate 3D nanotechnology of the future. We build a systems software approach that offers advantages over and above the technological and arch itectural advantages. Firs t, the algorithms may be more efficient in the conventional sens e of having fewer steps. Second, the algorithms may run with higher power efficiency per operation by being a better match for the adiabatic scaling ru le. The performance analysis based on demonstrated ideas in physical science suggests 80,000 x improvement in cost per operation for the (arguably) gene ral purpose function of emulating neurons in Deep Learning.

  12. The history of cosmic baryons: discoveries using advanced computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    We live in the era of the cosmological concordance model. This refers to the precise set of cosmological parameters which describe the average composition, geometry, and expansion rate of the universe we inhabit. Due to recent observational, theoretical, and computational advances, these parameters are now known to approximately 10% accuracy, and new efforts are underway to increase precision tenfold. It is found that we live in a spatially flat, dark matter-dominated universe whose rate of expansion is accelerating due to an unseen, unknown dark energy field. Baryons-the stuff of stars, galaxies, and us-account for only 4% of the total mass-energy inventory. And yet, it is through the astronomical study of baryons that we infer the rest. In this talk I will highlight the important role advanced scientific computing has played in getting us to the concordance model, and also the computational discoveries that have been made about the history of cosmic baryons using hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. I will conclude by discussing the central role that very large scale simulations of cosmological structure formation will play in deciphering the results of upcoming dark energy surveys

  13. Computational methods for predicting the response of critical as-built infrastructure to dynamic loads (architectural surety)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preece, D.S.; Weatherby, J.R.; Attaway, S.W.; Swegle, J.W.; Matalucci, R.V.

    1998-06-01

    Coupled blast-structural computational simulations using supercomputer capabilities will significantly advance the understanding of how complex structures respond under dynamic loads caused by explosives and earthquakes, an understanding with application to the surety of both federal and nonfederal buildings. Simulation of the effects of explosives on structures is a challenge because the explosive response can best be simulated using Eulerian computational techniques and structural behavior is best modeled using Lagrangian methods. Due to the different methodologies of the two computational techniques and code architecture requirements, they are usually implemented in different computer programs. Explosive and structure modeling in two different codes make it difficult or next to impossible to do coupled explosive/structure interaction simulations. Sandia National Laboratories has developed two techniques for solving this problem. The first is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a relatively new gridless method comparable to Eulerian, that is especially suited for treating liquids and gases such as those produced by an explosive. The SPH capability has been fully implemented into the transient dynamics finite element (Lagrangian) codes PRONTO-2D and -3D. A PRONTO-3D/SPH simulation of the effect of a blast on a protective-wall barrier is presented in this paper. The second technique employed at Sandia National Laboratories uses a relatively new code called ALEGRA which is an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) wave code with specific emphasis on large deformation and shock propagation. ALEGRA is capable of solving many shock-wave physics problems but it is especially suited for modeling problems involving the interaction of decoupled explosives with structures.

  14. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-01-01

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  15. 3D data processing with advanced computer graphics tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Ekstrand, Laura; Grieve, Taylor; Eisenmann, David J.; Chumbley, L. Scott

    2012-09-01

    Often, the 3-D raw data coming from an optical profilometer contains spiky noises and irregular grid, which make it difficult to analyze and difficult to store because of the enormously large size. This paper is to address these two issues for an optical profilometer by substantially reducing the spiky noise of the 3-D raw data from an optical profilometer, and by rapidly re-sampling the raw data into regular grids at any pixel size and any orientation with advanced computer graphics tools. Experimental results will be presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. Advanced computational modelling for drying processes – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defraeye, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Understanding the product dehydration process is a key aspect in drying technology. • Advanced modelling thereof plays an increasingly important role for developing next-generation drying technology. • Dehydration modelling should be more energy-oriented. • An integrated “nexus” modelling approach is needed to produce more energy-smart products. • Multi-objective process optimisation requires development of more complete multiphysics models. - Abstract: Drying is one of the most complex and energy-consuming chemical unit operations. R and D efforts in drying technology have skyrocketed in the past decades, as new drivers emerged in this industry next to procuring prime product quality and high throughput, namely reduction of energy consumption and carbon footprint as well as improving food safety and security. Solutions are sought in optimising existing technologies or developing new ones which increase energy and resource efficiency, use renewable energy, recuperate waste heat and reduce product loss, thus also the embodied energy therein. Novel tools are required to push such technological innovations and their subsequent implementation. Particularly computer-aided drying process engineering has a large potential to develop next-generation drying technology, including more energy-smart and environmentally-friendly products and dryers systems. This review paper deals with rapidly emerging advanced computational methods for modelling dehydration of porous materials, particularly for foods. Drying is approached as a combined multiphysics, multiscale and multiphase problem. These advanced methods include computational fluid dynamics, several multiphysics modelling methods (e.g. conjugate modelling), multiscale modelling and modelling of material properties and the associated propagation of material property variability. Apart from the current challenges for each of these, future perspectives should be directed towards material property

  17. Software for the ACP [Advanced Computer Program] multiprocessor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biel, J.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.

    1987-01-01

    Software has been developed for use with the Fermilab Advanced Computer Program (ACP) multiprocessor system. The software was designed to make a system of a hundred independent node processors as easy to use as a single, powerful CPU. Subroutines have been developed by which a user's host program can send data to and get results from the program running in each of his ACP node processors. Utility programs make it easy to compile and link host and node programs, to debug a node program on an ACP development system, and to submit a debugged program to an ACP production system

  18. Selecting an Architecture for a Safety-Critical Distributed Computer System with Power, Weight and Cost Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2014-01-01

    This report presents an example of the application of multi-criteria decision analysis to the selection of an architecture for a safety-critical distributed computer system. The design problem includes constraints on minimum system availability and integrity, and the decision is based on the optimal balance of power, weight and cost. The analysis process includes the generation of alternative architectures, evaluation of individual decision criteria, and the selection of an alternative based on overall value. In this example presented here, iterative application of the quantitative evaluation process made it possible to deliberately generate an alternative architecture that is superior to all others regardless of the relative importance of cost.

  19. Fermilab advanced computer program multi-microprocessor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Biel, J.

    1985-06-01

    Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program is constructing a powerful 128 node multi-microprocessor system for data analysis in high-energy physics. The system will use commercial 32-bit microprocessors programmed in Fortran-77. Extensive software supports easy migration of user applications from a uniprocessor environment to the multiprocessor and provides sophisticated program development, debugging, and error handling and recovery tools. This system is designed to be readily copied, providing computing cost effectiveness of below $2200 per VAX 11/780 equivalent. The low cost, commercial availability, compatibility with off-line analysis programs, and high data bandwidths (up to 160 MByte/sec) make the system an ideal choice for applications to on-line triggers as well as an offline data processor

  20. Review of research on advanced computational science in FY2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-12-01

    Research on advanced computational science for nuclear applications, based on “Plan to Achieve Medium- to Long-term Objectives of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Medium- to Long-term Plan)”, has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), Japan Atomic Energy Agency. CCSE established the committee consisting of outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the followings. (1) Results of the R and D performed at CCSE in FY 2016 (April 1st, 2016 - March 31st, 2017), (2) Results of the evaluation on the R and D by the committee in FY 2016. (author)

  1. Advanced data analysis in neuroscience integrating statistical and computational models

    CERN Document Server

    Durstewitz, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This book is intended for use in advanced graduate courses in statistics / machine learning, as well as for all experimental neuroscientists seeking to understand statistical methods at a deeper level, and theoretical neuroscientists with a limited background in statistics. It reviews almost all areas of applied statistics, from basic statistical estimation and test theory, linear and nonlinear approaches for regression and classification, to model selection and methods for dimensionality reduction, density estimation and unsupervised clustering.  Its focus, however, is linear and nonlinear time series analysis from a dynamical systems perspective, based on which it aims to convey an understanding also of the dynamical mechanisms that could have generated observed time series. Further, it integrates computational modeling of behavioral and neural dynamics with statistical estimation and hypothesis testing. This way computational models in neuroscience are not only explanat ory frameworks, but become powerfu...

  2. Advanced intelligent computational technologies and decision support systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kountchev, Roumen

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a state of the art collection covering themes related to Advanced Intelligent Computational Technologies and Decision Support Systems which can be applied to fields like healthcare assisting the humans in solving problems. The book brings forward a wealth of ideas, algorithms and case studies in themes like: intelligent predictive diagnosis; intelligent analyzing of medical images; new format for coding of single and sequences of medical images; Medical Decision Support Systems; diagnosis of Down’s syndrome; computational perspectives for electronic fetal monitoring; efficient compression of CT Images; adaptive interpolation and halftoning for medical images; applications of artificial neural networks for real-life problems solving; present and perspectives for Electronic Healthcare Record Systems; adaptive approaches for noise reduction in sequences of CT images etc.

  3. Review of research on advanced computational science in FY2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Research on advanced computational science for nuclear applications, based on 'Plan to Achieve Medium- to Long-term Objectives of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Medium- to Long-term Plan)', has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), Japan Atomic Energy Agency. CCSE established the committee consisting of outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the followings. (1) Results of the R and D performed at CCSE in FY 2015 (April 1st, 2015 - March 31st, 2016), (2) Results of the evaluation on the R and D by the committee in FY 2015 (April 1st, 2015 - March 31st, 2016). (author)

  4. OPENING REMARKS: SciDAC: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    with industry and virtual prototyping. New instruments of collaboration will include institutes and centers while summer schools, workshops and outreach will invite new talent and expertise. Computational science adds new dimensions to science and its practice. Disciplines of fusion, accelerator science, and combustion are poised to blur the boundaries between pure and applied science. As we open the door into FY2006 we shall see a landscape of new scientific challenges: in biology, chemistry, materials, and astrophysics to name a few. The enabling technologies of SciDAC have been transformational as drivers of change. Planning for major new software systems assumes a base line employing Common Component Architectures and this has become a household word for new software projects. While grid algorithms and mesh refinement software have transformed applications software, data management and visualization have transformed our understanding of science from data. The Gordon Bell prize now seems to be dominated by computational science and solvers developed by TOPS ISIC. The priorities of the Office of Science in the Department of Energy are clear. The 20 year facilities plan is driven by new science. High performance computing is placed amongst the two highest priorities. Moore's law says that by the end of the next cycle of SciDAC we shall have peta-flop computers. The challenges of petascale computing are enormous. These and the associated computational science are the highest priorities for computing within the Office of Science. Our effort in Leadership Class computing is just a first step towards this goal. Clearly, computational science at this scale will face enormous challenges and possibilities. Performance evaluation and prediction will be critical to unraveling the needed software technologies. We must not lose sight of our overarching goal—that of scientific discovery. Science does not stand still and the landscape of science discovery and computing holds

  5. Ontology Design for Solving Computationally-Intensive Problems on Heterogeneous Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam M. Faheem

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Viewing a computationally-intensive problem as a self-contained challenge with its own hardware, software and scheduling strategies is an approach that should be investigated. We might suggest assigning heterogeneous hardware architectures to solve a problem, while parallel computing paradigms may play an important role in writing efficient code to solve the problem; moreover, the scheduling strategies may be examined as a possible solution. Depending on the problem complexity, finding the best possible solution using an integrated infrastructure of hardware, software and scheduling strategy can be a complex job. Developing and using ontologies and reasoning techniques play a significant role in reducing the complexity of identifying the components of such integrated infrastructures. Undertaking reasoning and inferencing regarding the domain concepts can help to find the best possible solution through a combination of hardware, software and scheduling strategies. In this paper, we present an ontology and show how we can use it to solve computationally-intensive problems from various domains. As a potential use for the idea, we present examples from the bioinformatics domain. Validation by using problems from the Elastic Optical Network domain has demonstrated the flexibility of the suggested ontology and its suitability for use with any other computationally-intensive problem domain.

  6. The ACP (Advanced Computer Program) multiprocessor system at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Case, G.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Hance, R.; Husby, D.

    1986-09-01

    The Advanced Computer Program at Fermilab has developed a multiprocessor system which is easy to use and uniquely cost effective for many high energy physics problems. The system is based on single board computers which cost under $2000 each to build including 2 Mbytes of on board memory. These standard VME modules each run experiment reconstruction code in Fortran at speeds approaching that of a VAX 11/780. Two versions have been developed: one uses Motorola's 68020 32 bit microprocessor, the other runs with AT and T's 32100. both include the corresponding floating point coprocessor chip. The first system, when fully configured, uses 70 each of the two types of processors. A 53 processor system has been operated for several months with essentially no down time by computer operators in the Fermilab Computer Center, performing at nearly the capacity of 6 CDC Cyber 175 mainframe computers. The VME crates in which the processing ''nodes'' sit are connected via a high speed ''Branch Bus'' to one or more MicroVAX computers which act as hosts handling system resource management and all I/O in offline applications. An interface from Fastbus to the Branch Bus has been developed for online use which has been tested error free at 20 Mbytes/sec for 48 hours. ACP hardware modules are now available commercially. A major package of software, including a simulator that runs on any VAX, has been developed. It allows easy migration of existing programs to this multiprocessor environment. This paper describes the ACP Multiprocessor System and early experience with it at Fermilab and elsewhere.

  7. The ACP [Advanced Computer Program] multiprocessor system at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.

    1986-09-01

    The Advanced Computer Program at Fermilab has developed a multiprocessor system which is easy to use and uniquely cost effective for many high energy physics problems. The system is based on single board computers which cost under $2000 each to build including 2 Mbytes of on board memory. These standard VME modules each run experiment reconstruction code in Fortran at speeds approaching that of a VAX 11/780. Two versions have been developed: one uses Motorola's 68020 32 bit microprocessor, the other runs with AT and T's 32100. both include the corresponding floating point coprocessor chip. The first system, when fully configured, uses 70 each of the two types of processors. A 53 processor system has been operated for several months with essentially no down time by computer operators in the Fermilab Computer Center, performing at nearly the capacity of 6 CDC Cyber 175 mainframe computers. The VME crates in which the processing ''nodes'' sit are connected via a high speed ''Branch Bus'' to one or more MicroVAX computers which act as hosts handling system resource management and all I/O in offline applications. An interface from Fastbus to the Branch Bus has been developed for online use which has been tested error free at 20 Mbytes/sec for 48 hours. ACP hardware modules are now available commercially. A major package of software, including a simulator that runs on any VAX, has been developed. It allows easy migration of existing programs to this multiprocessor environment. This paper describes the ACP Multiprocessor System and early experience with it at Fermilab and elsewhere

  8. Advanced soft computing diagnosis method for tumour grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, E I; Spyridonos, P P; Stylios, C D; Ravazoula, P; Groumpos, P P; Nikiforidis, G N

    2006-01-01

    To develop an advanced diagnostic method for urinary bladder tumour grading. A novel soft computing modelling methodology based on the augmentation of fuzzy cognitive maps (FCMs) with the unsupervised active Hebbian learning (AHL) algorithm is applied. One hundred and twenty-eight cases of urinary bladder cancer were retrieved from the archives of the Department of Histopathology, University Hospital of Patras, Greece. All tumours had been characterized according to the classical World Health Organization (WHO) grading system. To design the FCM model for tumour grading, three experts histopathologists defined the main histopathological features (concepts) and their impact on grade characterization. The resulted FCM model consisted of nine concepts. Eight concepts represented the main histopathological features for tumour grading. The ninth concept represented the tumour grade. To increase the classification ability of the FCM model, the AHL algorithm was applied to adjust the weights of the FCM. The proposed FCM grading model achieved a classification accuracy of 72.5%, 74.42% and 95.55% for tumours of grades I, II and III, respectively. An advanced computerized method to support tumour grade diagnosis decision was proposed and developed. The novelty of the method is based on employing the soft computing method of FCMs to represent specialized knowledge on histopathology and on augmenting FCMs ability using an unsupervised learning algorithm, the AHL. The proposed method performs with reasonably high accuracy compared to other existing methods and at the same time meets the physicians' requirements for transparency and explicability.

  9. Performance Evaluation of Computation and Communication Kernels of the Fast Multipole Method on Intel Manycore Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulJabbar, Mustafa Abdulmajeed

    2017-07-31

    Manycore optimizations are essential for achieving performance worthy of anticipated exascale systems. Utilization of manycore chips is inevitable to attain the desired floating point performance of these energy-austere systems. In this work, we revisit ExaFMM, the open source Fast Multiple Method (FMM) library, in light of highly tuned shared-memory parallelization and detailed performance analysis on the new highly parallel Intel manycore architecture, Knights Landing (KNL). We assess scalability and performance gain using task-based parallelism of the FMM tree traversal. We also provide an in-depth analysis of the most computationally intensive part of the traversal kernel (i.e., the particle-to-particle (P2P) kernel), by comparing its performance across KNL and Broadwell architectures. We quantify different configurations that exploit the on-chip 512-bit vector units within different task-based threading paradigms. MPI communication-reducing and NUMA-aware approaches for the FMM’s global tree data exchange are examined with different cluster modes of KNL. By applying several algorithm- and architecture-aware optimizations for FMM, we show that the N-Body kernel on 256 threads of KNL achieves on average 2.8× speedup compared to the non-vectorized version, whereas on 56 threads of Broadwell, it achieves on average 2.9× speedup. In addition, the tree traversal kernel on KNL scales monotonically up to 256 threads with task-based programming models. The MPI-based communication-reducing algorithms show expected improvements of the data locality across the KNL on-chip network.

  10. Performance Evaluation of Computation and Communication Kernels of the Fast Multipole Method on Intel Manycore Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulJabbar, Mustafa Abdulmajeed; Al Farhan, Mohammed; Yokota, Rio; Keyes, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Manycore optimizations are essential for achieving performance worthy of anticipated exascale systems. Utilization of manycore chips is inevitable to attain the desired floating point performance of these energy-austere systems. In this work, we revisit ExaFMM, the open source Fast Multiple Method (FMM) library, in light of highly tuned shared-memory parallelization and detailed performance analysis on the new highly parallel Intel manycore architecture, Knights Landing (KNL). We assess scalability and performance gain using task-based parallelism of the FMM tree traversal. We also provide an in-depth analysis of the most computationally intensive part of the traversal kernel (i.e., the particle-to-particle (P2P) kernel), by comparing its performance across KNL and Broadwell architectures. We quantify different configurations that exploit the on-chip 512-bit vector units within different task-based threading paradigms. MPI communication-reducing and NUMA-aware approaches for the FMM’s global tree data exchange are examined with different cluster modes of KNL. By applying several algorithm- and architecture-aware optimizations for FMM, we show that the N-Body kernel on 256 threads of KNL achieves on average 2.8× speedup compared to the non-vectorized version, whereas on 56 threads of Broadwell, it achieves on average 2.9× speedup. In addition, the tree traversal kernel on KNL scales monotonically up to 256 threads with task-based programming models. The MPI-based communication-reducing algorithms show expected improvements of the data locality across the KNL on-chip network.

  11. Architecture and Functionality of the Advanced Life Support On-Line Project Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, John A.; Levri, Julie A.; Morrow, Rich; Cavazzoni, Jim; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Riano, Rebecca; Whitaker, Dawn R.

    2004-01-01

    An ongoing effort is underway at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) to develop an On-line Project Information System (OPIS) for the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The objective of this three-year project is to develop, test, revise and deploy OPIS to enhance the quality of decision-making metrics and attainment of Program goals through improved knowledge sharing. OPIS will centrally locate detailed project information solicited from investigators on an annual basis and make it readily accessible by the ALS Community via a Web-accessible interface. The data will be stored in an object-oriented relational database (created in MySQL) located on a secure server at NASA ARC. OPE will simultaneously serve several functions, including being an research and technology development (R&TD) status information hub that can potentially serve as the primary annual reporting mechanism for ALS-funded projects. Using OPIS, ALS managers and element leads will be able to carry out informed R&TD investment decisions, and allow analysts to perform accurate systems evaluations. Additionally, the range and specificity of information solicited will serve to educate technology developers of programmatic needs. OPIS will collect comprehensive information from all ALS projects as well as highly detailed information specific to technology development in each ALS area (Waste, Water, Air, Biomass, Food, Thermal, Controls and Systems Analysis). Because the scope of needed information can vary dramatically between areas, element-specific technology information is being compiled with the aid of multiple specialized working groups. This paper presents the current development status in terms of the architecture and functionality of OPIS. Possible implementation approaches for OPIS are also discussed.

  12. Architecture and Functionality of the Advanced Life Support On-Line Project Information System (OPIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, John A.; Levri, Julie A.; Morrow, Rich; Cavazzoni, Jim; Rodriquez, Luis F.; Riano, Rebecca; Whitaker, Dawn R.

    2004-01-01

    An ongoing effort is underway at NASA Amcs Research Center (ARC) tu develop an On-line Project Information System (OPIS) for the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The objective of this three-year project is to develop, test, revise and deploy OPIS to enhance the quality of decision-making metrics and attainment of Program goals through improved knowledge sharing. OPIS will centrally locate detailed project information solicited from investigators on an annual basis and make it readily accessible by the ALS Community via a web-accessible interface. The data will be stored in an object-oriented relational database (created in MySQL(Trademark) located on a secure server at NASA ARC. OPE will simultaneously serve several functions, including being an R&TD status information hub that can potentially serve as the primary annual reporting mechanism. Using OPIS, ALS managers and element leads will be able to carry out informed research and technology development investment decisions, and allow analysts to perform accurate systems evaluations. Additionally, the range and specificity of information solicited will serve to educate technology developers of programmatic needs. OPIS will collect comprehensive information from all ALS projects as well as highly detailed information specific to technology development in each ALS area (Waste, Water, Air, Biomass, Food, Thermal, and Control). Because the scope of needed information can vary dramatically between areas, element-specific technology information is being compiled with the aid of multiple specialized working groups. This paper presents the current development status in terms of the architecture and functionality of OPIS. Possible implementation approaches for OPIS are also discussed.

  13. Precision Agriculture Design Method Using a Distributed Computing Architecture on Internet of Things Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Ferrández-Pastor

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT has opened productive ways to cultivate soil with the use of low-cost hardware (sensors/actuators and communication (Internet technologies. Remote equipment and crop monitoring, predictive analytic, weather forecasting for crops or smart logistics and warehousing are some examples of these new opportunities. Nevertheless, farmers are agriculture experts but, usually, do not have experience in IoT applications. Users who use IoT applications must participate in its design, improving the integration and use. In this work, different industrial agricultural facilities are analysed with farmers and growers to design new functionalities based on IoT paradigms deployment. User-centred design model is used to obtain knowledge and experience in the process of introducing technology in agricultural applications. Internet of things paradigms are used as resources to facilitate the decision making. IoT architecture, operating rules and smart processes are implemented using a distributed model based on edge and fog computing paradigms. A communication architecture is proposed using these technologies. The aim is to help farmers to develop smart systems both, in current and new facilities. Different decision trees to automate the installation, designed by the farmer, can be easily deployed using the method proposed in this document.

  14. A Trusted Computing Architecture of Embedded System Based on Improved TPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaosheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Trusted Platform Module (TPM currently used by PCs is not suitable for embedded systems, it is necessary to improve existing TPM. The paper proposes a trusted computing architecture with new TPM and the cryptographic system developed by China for the embedded system. The improved TPM consists of the Embedded System Trusted Cryptography Module (eTCM and the Embedded System Trusted Platform Control Module (eTPCM, which are combined and implemented the TPM’s autonomous control, active defense, high-speed encryption/decryption and other function through its internal bus arbitration module and symmetric and asymmetric cryptographic engines to effectively protect the security of embedded system. In our improved TPM, a trusted measurement method with chain model and star type model is used. Finally, the improved TPM is designed by FPGA, and it is used to a trusted PDA to carry out experimental verification. Experiments show that the trusted architecture of the embedded system based on the improved TPM is efficient, reliable and secure.

  15. Every Second Counts: Integrating Edge Computing and Service Oriented Architecture for Automatic Emergency Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency management has long been recognized as a social challenge due to the criticality of the response time. In emergency situations such as severe traffic accidents, minimizing the response time, which requires close collaborations between all stakeholders involved and distributed intelligence support, leads to greater survival chance of the injured. However, the current response system is far from efficient, despite the rapid development of information and communication technologies. This paper presents an automated collaboration framework for emergency management that coordinates all stakeholders within the emergency response system and fully automates the rescue process. Applying the concept of multiaccess edge computing architecture, as well as choreography of the service oriented architecture, the system allows seamless coordination between multiple organizations in a distributed way through standard web services. A service choreography is designed to globally model the emergency management process from the time an accident occurs until the rescue is finished. The choreography can be synthesized to generate detailed specification on peer-to-peer interaction logic, and then the specification can be enacted and deployed on cloud infrastructures.

  16. Precision Agriculture Design Method Using a Distributed Computing Architecture on Internet of Things Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrández-Pastor, Francisco Javier; García-Chamizo, Juan Manuel; Nieto-Hidalgo, Mario; Mora-Martínez, José

    2018-05-28

    The Internet of Things (IoT) has opened productive ways to cultivate soil with the use of low-cost hardware (sensors/actuators) and communication (Internet) technologies. Remote equipment and crop monitoring, predictive analytic, weather forecasting for crops or smart logistics and warehousing are some examples of these new opportunities. Nevertheless, farmers are agriculture experts but, usually, do not have experience in IoT applications. Users who use IoT applications must participate in its design, improving the integration and use. In this work, different industrial agricultural facilities are analysed with farmers and growers to design new functionalities based on IoT paradigms deployment. User-centred design model is used to obtain knowledge and experience in the process of introducing technology in agricultural applications. Internet of things paradigms are used as resources to facilitate the decision making. IoT architecture, operating rules and smart processes are implemented using a distributed model based on edge and fog computing paradigms. A communication architecture is proposed using these technologies. The aim is to help farmers to develop smart systems both, in current and new facilities. Different decision trees to automate the installation, designed by the farmer, can be easily deployed using the method proposed in this document.

  17. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  18. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Report: Exascale Computing Initiative Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Daniel [University of Iowa; Berzins, Martin [University of Utah; Pennington, Robert; Sarkar, Vivek [Rice University; Taylor, Valerie [Texas A& M University

    2015-08-01

    On November 19, 2014, the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) was charged with reviewing the Department of Energy’s conceptual design for the Exascale Computing Initiative (ECI). In particular, this included assessing whether there are significant gaps in the ECI plan or areas that need to be given priority or extra management attention. Given the breadth and depth of previous reviews of the technical challenges inherent in exascale system design and deployment, the subcommittee focused its assessment on organizational and management issues, considering technical issues only as they informed organizational or management priorities and structures. This report presents the observations and recommendations of the subcommittee.

  19. A Development Architecture for Serious Games Using BCI (Brain Computer Interface Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyhyun Um

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Games that use brainwaves via brain–computer interface (BCI devices, to improve brain functions are known as BCI serious games. Due to the difficulty of developing BCI serious games, various BCI engines and authoring tools are required, and these reduce the development time and cost. However, it is desirable to reduce the amount of technical knowledge of brain functions and BCI devices needed by game developers. Moreover, a systematic BCI serious game development process is required. In this paper, we present a methodology for the development of BCI serious games. We describe an architecture, authoring tools, and development process of the proposed methodology, and apply it to a game development approach for patients with mild cognitive impairment as an example. This application demonstrates that BCI serious games can be developed on the basis of expert-verified theories.

  20. A development architecture for serious games using BCI (brain computer interface) sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yunsick; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun

    2012-11-12

    Games that use brainwaves via brain-computer interface (BCI) devices, to improve brain functions are known as BCI serious games. Due to the difficulty of developing BCI serious games, various BCI engines and authoring tools are required, and these reduce the development time and cost. However, it is desirable to reduce the amount of technical knowledge of brain functions and BCI devices needed by game developers. Moreover, a systematic BCI serious game development process is required. In this paper, we present a methodology for the development of BCI serious games. We describe an architecture, authoring tools, and development process of the proposed methodology, and apply it to a game development approach for patients with mild cognitive impairment as an example. This application demonstrates that BCI serious games can be developed on the basis of expert-verified theories.

  1. Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E; Gschwind, Michael K; Gunnels, John A

    2013-11-05

    Mechanisms for performing matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture are provided. A vector load operation is performed to load a first vector operand of the matrix multiplication operation to a first target vector register. A load and splat operation is performed to load an element of a second vector operand and replicating the element to each of a plurality of elements of a second target vector register. A multiply add operation is performed on elements of the first target vector register and elements of the second target vector register to generate a partial product of the matrix multiplication operation. The partial product of the matrix multiplication operation is accumulated with other partial products of the matrix multiplication operation.

  2. A Development Architecture for Serious Games Using BCI (Brain Computer Interface) Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yunsick; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun

    2012-01-01

    Games that use brainwaves via brain–computer interface (BCI) devices, to improve brain functions are known as BCI serious games. Due to the difficulty of developing BCI serious games, various BCI engines and authoring tools are required, and these reduce the development time and cost. However, it is desirable to reduce the amount of technical knowledge of brain functions and BCI devices needed by game developers. Moreover, a systematic BCI serious game development process is required. In this paper, we present a methodology for the development of BCI serious games. We describe an architecture, authoring tools, and development process of the proposed methodology, and apply it to a game development approach for patients with mild cognitive impairment as an example. This application demonstrates that BCI serious games can be developed on the basis of expert-verified theories. PMID:23202227

  3. From variability tolerance to approximate computing in parallel integrated architectures and accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rahimi, Abbas; Gupta, Rajesh K

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on computing devices and their design at various levels to combat variability. The authors provide a review of key concepts with particular emphasis on timing errors caused by various variability sources. They discuss methods to predict and prevent, detect and correct, and finally conditions under which such errors can be accepted; they also consider their implications on cost, performance and quality. Coverage includes a comparative evaluation of methods for deployment across various layers of the system from circuits, architecture, to application software. These can be combined in various ways to achieve specific goals related to observability and controllability of the variability effects, providing means to achieve cross layer or hybrid resilience. · Covers challenges and opportunities in identifying microelectronic variability and the resulting errors at various layers in the system abstraction; · Enables readers to assess how various levels of circuit and system design can mitigate t...

  4. Universal Quantum Computing with Measurement-Induced Continuous-Variable Gate Sequence in a Loop-Based Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shuntaro; Furusawa, Akira

    2017-09-22

    We propose a scalable scheme for optical quantum computing using measurement-induced continuous-variable quantum gates in a loop-based architecture. Here, time-bin-encoded quantum information in a single spatial mode is deterministically processed in a nested loop by an electrically programmable gate sequence. This architecture can process any input state and an arbitrary number of modes with almost minimum resources, and offers a universal gate set for both qubits and continuous variables. Furthermore, quantum computing can be performed fault tolerantly by a known scheme for encoding a qubit in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space of a single light mode.

  5. International conference on Advances in Intelligent Control and Innovative Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo, Oscar; Huang, Xu; Intelligent Control and Innovative Computing

    2012-01-01

    In the lightning-fast world of intelligent control and cutting-edge computing, it is vitally important to stay abreast of developments that seem to follow each other without pause. This publication features the very latest and some of the very best current research in the field, with 32 revised and extended research articles written by prominent researchers in the field. Culled from contributions to the key 2011 conference Advances in Intelligent Control and Innovative Computing, held in Hong Kong, the articles deal with a wealth of relevant topics, from the most recent work in artificial intelligence and decision-supporting systems, to automated planning, modelling and simulation, signal processing, and industrial applications. Not only does this work communicate the current state of the art in intelligent control and innovative computing, it is also an illuminating guide to up-to-date topics for researchers and graduate students in the field. The quality of the contents is absolutely assured by the high pro...

  6. Computational brain models: Advances from system biology and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Barreto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Computational brain models focused on the interactions between neurons and astrocytes, modeled via metabolic reconstructions, are reviewed. The large source of experimental data provided by the -omics techniques and the advance/application of computational and data-management tools are being fundamental. For instance, in the understanding of the crosstalk between these cells, the key neuroprotective mechanisms mediated by astrocytes in specific metabolic scenarios (1 and the identification of biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases (2,3. However, the modeling of these interactions demands a clear view of the metabolic and signaling pathways implicated, but most of them are controversial and are still under evaluation (4. Hence, to gain insight into the complexity of these interactions a current view of the main pathways implicated in the neuron-astrocyte communication processes have been made from recent experimental reports and reviews. Furthermore, target problems, limitations and main conclusions have been identified from metabolic models of the brain reported from 2010. Finally, key aspects to take into account into the development of a computational model of the brain and topics that could be approached from a systems biology perspective in future research are highlighted.

  7. ''Beauty of Wholeness and Beauty of Partiality.'' New Terms Defining the Concept of Beauty in Architecture in Terms of Sustainability and Computer Aided Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Ayman A.; Zaghloul, Weaam M.; Dewidar, Khaled M.

    2014-01-01

    The great shift in sustainability and computer aided design in the field of architecture caused a remarkable change in the architecture philosophy, new aspects of beauty and aesthetic values are being introduced, and traditional definitions for beauty cannot fully cover this aspects, which causes a gap between; new architecture works criticism and…

  8. DOE's Institute for Advanced Architecture and Algorithms: An application-driven approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Richard C

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an application driven methodology for understanding the impact of future architecture decisions on the end of the MPP era. Fundamental transistor device limitations combined with application performance characteristics have created the switch to multicore/multithreaded architectures. Designing large-scale supercomputers to match application demands is particularly challenging since performance characteristics are highly counter-intuitive. In fact, data movement more than FLOPS dominates. This work discusses some basic performance analysis for a set of DOE applications, the limits of CMOS technology, and the impact of both on future architectures.

  9. Freight Advanced Traveler Information System (FRATIS) Dallas-Fort Worth : software architecture design and implementation options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This document describes the Software Architecture Design and Implementation Options for FRATIS : system. The demonstration component of this task will serve to test the technical feasibility of the : FRATIS prototype while also facilitating the colle...

  10. South Florida Freight Advanced Traveler Information System : architecture and implementation options summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This Final Architecture and Design report has been prepared to describe the structure and design of all the : system components for the South Florida FRATIS Demonstration Project. More specifically, this document : provides: : Detailed descriptio...

  11. SciDAC advances and applications in computational beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, R; Abell, D; Adelmann, A; Amundson, J; Bohn, C; Cary, J; Colella, P; Dechow, D; Decyk, V; Dragt, A; Gerber, R; Habib, S; Higdon, D; Katsouleas, T; Ma, K-L; McCorquodale, P; Mihalcea, D; Mitchell, C; Mori, W; Mottershead, C T; Neri, F; Pogorelov, I; Qiang, J; Samulyak, R; Serafini, D; Shalf, J; Siegerist, C; Spentzouris, P; Stoltz, P; Terzic, B; Venturini, M; Walstrom, P

    2005-01-01

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators-which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook-are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this paper we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications

  12. SciDAC Advances and Applications in Computational Beam Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, R.; Abell, D.; Adelmann, A.; Amundson, J.; Bohn, C.; Cary, J.; Colella, P.; Dechow, D.; Decyk, V.; Dragt, A.; Gerber, R.; Habib, S.; Higdon, D.; Katsouleas, T.; Ma, K.-L.; McCorquodale, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitchell, C.; Mori, W.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neri, F.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Samulyak, R.; Serafini, D.; Shalf, J.; Siegerist, C.; Spentzouris, P.; Stoltz, P.; Terzic, B.; Venturini, M.; Walstrom, P.

    2005-01-01

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators--which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook--are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this poster we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications

  13. Computational modeling, optimization and manufacturing simulation of advanced engineering materials

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents recent research work focused in the development of adequate theoretical and numerical formulations to describe the behavior of advanced engineering materials.  Particular emphasis is devoted to applications in the fields of biological tissues, phase changing and porous materials, polymers and to micro/nano scale modeling. Sensitivity analysis, gradient and non-gradient based optimization procedures are involved in many of the chapters, aiming at the solution of constitutive inverse problems and parameter identification. All these relevant topics are exposed by experienced international and inter institutional research teams resulting in a high level compilation. The book is a valuable research reference for scientists, senior undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for engineers acting in the area of computational material modeling.

  14. Control bandwidth improvements in GRAVITY fringe tracker by switching to a synchronous real time computer architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuter, Roberto; Dembet, Roderick; Lacour, Sylvestre; di Lieto, Nicola; Woillez, Julien; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fedou, Pierre; Phan Duc, Than

    2016-08-01

    The new VLTI (Very Large Telescope Interferometer) 1 instrument GRAVITY5, 22, 23 is equipped with a fringe tracker16 able to stabilize the K-band fringes on six baselines at the same time. It has been designed to achieve a performance for average seeing conditions of a residual OPD (Optical Path Difference) lower than 300 nm with objects brighter than K = 10. The control loop implementing the tracking is composed of a four stage real time computer system compromising: a sensor where the detector pixels are read in and the OPD and GD (Group Delay) are calculated; a controller receiving the computed sensor quantities and producing commands for the piezo actuators; a concentrator which combines both the OPD commands with the real time tip/tilt corrections offloading them to the piezo actuator; and finally a Kalman15 parameter estimator. This last stage is used to monitor current measurements over a window of few seconds and estimate new values for the main Kalman15 control loop parameters. The hardware and software implementation of this design runs asynchronously and communicates the four computers for data transfer via the Reflective Memory Network3. With the purpose of improving the performance of the GRAVITY5, 23 fringe tracking16, 22 control loop, a deviation from the standard asynchronous communication mechanism has been proposed and implemented. This new scheme operates the four independent real time computers involved in the tracking loop synchronously using the Reflective Memory Interrupts2 as the coordination signal. This synchronous mechanism had the effect of reducing the total pure delay of the loop from 3.5 [ms] to 2.0 [ms] which then translates on a better stabilization of the fringes as the bandwidth of the system is substantially improved. This paper will explain in detail the real time architecture of the fringe tracker in both is synchronous and synchronous implementation. The achieved improvements on reducing the delay via this mechanism will be

  15. High performance parallel computers for science: New developments at the Fermilab advanced computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.

    1988-08-01

    Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program (ACP) has been developing highly cost effective, yet practical, parallel computers for high energy physics since 1984. The ACP's latest developments are proceeding in two directions. A Second Generation ACP Multiprocessor System for experiments will include $3500 RISC processors each with performance over 15 VAX MIPS. To support such high performance, the new system allows parallel I/O, parallel interprocess communication, and parallel host processes. The ACP Multi-Array Processor, has been developed for theoretical physics. Each $4000 node is a FORTRAN or C programmable pipelined 20 MFlops (peak), 10 MByte single board computer. These are plugged into a 16 port crossbar switch crate which handles both inter and intra crate communication. The crates are connected in a hypercube. Site oriented applications like lattice gauge theory are supported by system software called CANOPY, which makes the hardware virtually transparent to users. A 256 node, 5 GFlop, system is under construction. 10 refs., 7 figs

  16. Recent advances in computational structural reliability analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Ben H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, Harry R.; Torng, Tony Y.; Riha, David S.

    1993-10-01

    The goal of structural reliability analysis is to determine the probability that the structure will adequately perform its intended function when operating under the given environmental conditions. Thus, the notion of reliability admits the possibility of failure. Given the fact that many different modes of failure are usually possible, achievement of this goal is a formidable task, especially for large, complex structural systems. The traditional (deterministic) design methodology attempts to assure reliability by the application of safety factors and conservative assumptions. However, the safety factor approach lacks a quantitative basis in that the level of reliability is never known and usually results in overly conservative designs because of compounding conservatisms. Furthermore, problem parameters that control the reliability are not identified, nor their importance evaluated. A summary of recent advances in computational structural reliability assessment is presented. A significant level of activity in the research and development community was seen recently, much of which was directed towards the prediction of failure probabilities for single mode failures. The focus is to present some early results and demonstrations of advanced reliability methods applied to structural system problems. This includes structures that can fail as a result of multiple component failures (e.g., a redundant truss), or structural components that may fail due to multiple interacting failure modes (e.g., excessive deflection, resonate vibration, or creep rupture). From these results, some observations and recommendations are made with regard to future research needs.

  17. Reliability of an interactive computer program for advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubart, Jane R; Levi, Benjamin H; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83-0.95, and 0.86-0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time.

  18. Reliability of an Interactive Computer Program for Advance Care Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Benjamin H.; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83–0.95, and 0.86–0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time. PMID:22512830

  19. Neuromorphic Computing, Architectures, Models, and Applications. A Beyond-CMOS Approach to Future Computing, June 29-July 1, 2016, Oak Ridge, TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potok, Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schuman, Catherine [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hylton, Todd [Brain Corporation, San Diego, CA (United States); Li, Hai [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pino, Robinson [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-12-31

    The White House and Department of Energy have been instrumental in driving the development of a neuromorphic computing program to help the United States continue its lead in basic research into (1) Beyond Exascale—high performance computing beyond Moore’s Law and von Neumann architectures, (2) Scientific Discovery—new paradigms for understanding increasingly large and complex scientific data, and (3) Emerging Architectures—assessing the potential of neuromorphic and quantum architectures. Neuromorphic computing spans a broad range of scientific disciplines from materials science to devices, to computer science, to neuroscience, all of which are required to solve the neuromorphic computing grand challenge. In our workshop we focus on the computer science aspects, specifically from a neuromorphic device through an application. Neuromorphic devices present a very different paradigm to the computer science community from traditional von Neumann architectures, which raises six major questions about building a neuromorphic application from the device level. We used these fundamental questions to organize the workshop program and to direct the workshop panels and discussions. From the white papers, presentations, panels, and discussions, there emerged several recommendations on how to proceed.

  20. Computer sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The Computer Science Program provides advanced concepts, techniques, system architectures, algorithms, and software for both space and aeronautics information sciences and computer systems. The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA for the advancement of computing technology in aerospace applications. The research program is improving the state of knowledge of fundamental aerospace computing principles and advancing computing technology in space applications such as software engineering and information extraction from data collected by scientific instruments in space. The program includes the development of special algorithms and techniques to exploit the computing power provided by high performance parallel processors and special purpose architectures. Research is being conducted in the fundamentals of data base logic and improvement techniques for producing reliable computing systems.

  1. Simulating Hydrologic Flow and Reactive Transport with PFLOTRAN and PETSc on Emerging Fine-Grained Parallel Computer Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R. T.; Rupp, K.; Smith, B. F.; Brown, J.; Knepley, M.; Zhang, H.; Adams, M.; Hammond, G. E.

    2017-12-01

    As the high-performance computing community pushes towards the exascale horizon, power and heat considerations have driven the increasing importance and prevalence of fine-grained parallelism in new computer architectures. High-performance computing centers have become increasingly reliant on GPGPU accelerators and "manycore" processors such as the Intel Xeon Phi line, and 512-bit SIMD registers have even been introduced in the latest generation of Intel's mainstream Xeon server processors. The high degree of fine-grained parallelism and more complicated memory hierarchy considerations of such "manycore" processors present several challenges to existing scientific software. Here, we consider how the massively parallel, open-source hydrologic flow and reactive transport code PFLOTRAN - and the underlying Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) library on which it is built - can best take advantage of such architectures. We will discuss some key features of these novel architectures and our code optimizations and algorithmic developments targeted at them, and present experiences drawn from working with a wide range of PFLOTRAN benchmark problems on these architectures.

  2. T and D-Bench--Innovative Combined Support for Education and Research in Computer Architecture and Embedded Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, S. N.; Wagner, F. R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching and Design Workbench (T&D-Bench) is a framework aimed at education and research in the areas of computer architecture and embedded systems. It includes a set of features not found in other educational environments. This set of features is the result of an original combination of design requirements for T&D-Bench: that the…

  3. TerraFERMA: Harnessing Advanced Computational Libraries in Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. R.; Spiegelman, M.; van Keken, P.

    2012-12-01

    Many important problems in Earth sciences can be described by non-linear coupled systems of partial differential equations. These "multi-physics" problems include thermo-chemical convection in Earth and planetary interiors, interactions of fluids and magmas with the Earth's mantle and crust and coupled flow of water and ice. These problems are of interest to a large community of researchers but are complicated to model and understand. Much of this complexity stems from the nature of multi-physics where small changes in the coupling between variables or constitutive relations can lead to radical changes in behavior, which in turn affect critical computational choices such as discretizations, solvers and preconditioners. To make progress in understanding such coupled systems requires a computational framework where multi-physics problems can be described at a high-level while maintaining the flexibility to easily modify the solution algorithm. Fortunately, recent advances in computational science provide a basis for implementing such a framework. Here we present the Transparent Finite Element Rapid Model Assembler (TerraFERMA), which leverages several advanced open-source libraries for core functionality. FEniCS (fenicsproject.org) provides a high level language for describing the weak forms of coupled systems of equations, and an automatic code generator that produces finite element assembly code. PETSc (www.mcs.anl.gov/petsc) provides a wide range of scalable linear and non-linear solvers that can be composed into effective multi-physics preconditioners. SPuD (amcg.ese.ic.ac.uk/Spud) is an application neutral options system that provides both human and machine-readable interfaces based on a single xml schema. Our software integrates these libraries and provides the user with a framework for exploring multi-physics problems. A single options file fully describes the problem, including all equations, coefficients and solver options. Custom compiled applications are

  4. ANL/Star project: a new architecture for large scale theoretical physics computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rushton, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The project reported consists of two phases, each of which has goals of substantial physics content on its own. In Phase 1, we have selected Star Technologies' ST-100 as the array processor for the prototype coupled system and have installed one on a Vax 11/750 host. Our goals with this system are to institute a substantial program in computational physics at Argonne based on the power provided by this system and thereby to gain experience with both the hardware and software architecture of the ST-100. In Phase II, we propose to build a prototype consisting of two coupled array processors with shared memory to prove that this design can achieve high speed and efficiency in a readily extensible and cost-effective manner. This will implement all of the hardware and software modifications necessary to extend this design to as many as 64 (or more) nodes. In our design, we seek to minimize the changes made in the standard system hardware and software; this drastically reduces the effort required by our group to implement such a design and enables us to more readily incorporate the companies' upgrades to the array processor. It should be emphasized that our design is intended as a special purpose system for theoretical calculations; however it can be efficiently applied to a surprisingly broad class of problems. I shall discuss first the architecture of the ST-100 and then the physics program being currently implemented on a single system. Finally the proposed design of the coupled system is presented

  5. ANL/Star project: a new architecture for large scale theoretical physics computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rushton, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The project reported consists of two phases, each of which has goals of substantial physics content on its own. In Phase 1, we have selected Star Technologies' ST-100 as the array processor for the prototype coupled system and have installed one on a Vax 11/750 host. Our goals with this system are to institute a substantial program in computational physics at Argonne based on the power provided by this system and thereby to gain experience with both the hardware and software architecture of the ST-100. In Phase II, we propose to build a prototype consisting of two coupled array processors with shared memory to prove that this design can achieve high speed and efficiency in a readily extensible and cost-effective manner. This will implement all of the hardware and software modifications necessary to extend this design to as many as 64 (or more) nodes. In our design, we seek to minimize the changes made in the standard system hardware and software; this drastically reduces the effort required by our group to implement such a design and enables us to more readily incorporate the companies' upgrades to the array processor. It should be emphasized that our design is intended as a special purpose system for theoretical calculations; however it can be efficiently applied to a surprisingly broad class of problems. I shall discuss first the architecture of the ST-100 and then the physics program being currently implemented on a single system. Finally the proposed design of the coupled system is presented.

  6. Apolux : an innovative computer code for daylight design and analysis in architecture and urbanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claro, A.; Pereira, F.O.R.; Ledo, R.Z. [Santa Catarina Federal Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The main capabilities of a new computer program for calculating and analyzing daylighting in architectural space were discussed. Apolux 1.0 was designed to use three-dimensional files generated in graphic editors in the data exchange file (DXF) format and was developed to integrate an architect's design characteristics. An example of its use in a design context development was presented. The program offers fast and flexible manipulation of video card models in different visualization conditions. The algorithm for working with the physics of light is based on the radiosity method representing the surfaces through finite elements divided in small triangular units of area which are fully confronted to each other. The form factors of each triangle are determined in relation to all others in the primary calculation. Visible directions of the sky are also included according to the modular units of a subdivided globe. Following these primary calculations, the different and successive daylighting solutions can be determined under different sky conditions. The program can also change the properties of the materials to quickly recalculate the solutions. The program has been applied in an office building in Florianopolis, Brazil. The four stages of design include initial discussion with the architects about the conceptual possibilities; development of a comparative study based on 2 architectural designs with different conceptual elements regarding daylighting exploitation in order to compare internal daylighting levels and distribution of the 2 options exposed to the same external conditions; study the solar shading devices for specific facades; and, simulations to test the performance of different designs. The program has proven to be very flexible with reliable results. It has the possibility of incorporating situations of the real sky through the input of the Spherical model of real sky luminance values. 3 refs., 14 figs.

  7. Recent advances in compartmentalized synthetic architectures as drug carriers, cell mimics and artificial organelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    York-Durán, María José; Gallardo, Maria Godoy; Labay, Cédric Pierre

    2017-01-01

    significant research attention and these assemblies are proposed as candidate materials for a range of biomedical applications. In this Review article, the recent successes of multicompartment architectures as carriers for the delivery of therapeutic cargo or the creation of micro- and nanoreactors that mimic...

  8. Open Computer Forensic Architecture a Way to Process Terabytes of Forensic Disk Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaas, Oscar; Simons, Joep; Meijer, Rob

    This chapter describes the Open Computer Forensics Architecture (OCFA), an automated system that dissects complex file types, extracts metadata from files and ultimately creates indexes on forensic images of seized computers. It consists of a set of collaborating processes, called modules. Each module is specialized in processing a certain file type. When it receives a so called 'evidence', the information that has been extracted so far about the file together with the actual data, it either adds new information about the file or uses the file to derive a new 'evidence'. All evidence, original and derived, is sent to a router after being processed by a particular module. The router decides which module should process the evidence next, based upon the metadata associated with the evidence. Thus the OCFA system can recursively process images until from every compound file the embedded files, if any, are extracted, all information that the system can derive, has been derived and all extracted text is indexed. Compound files include, but are not limited to, archive- and zip-files, disk images, text documents of various formats and, for example, mailboxes. The output of an OCFA run is a repository full of derived files, a database containing all extracted information about the files and an index which can be used when searching. This is presented in a web interface. Moreover, processed data is easily fed to third party software for further analysis or to be used in data mining or text mining-tools. The main advantages of the OCFA system are Scalability, it is able to process large amounts of data.

  9. Recent Advances in Computational Methods for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data Processing

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    research attention from specialists in bioinformatics and computational biology. In this paper, we review recent advances in computational methods for NMR protein structure determination. We summarize the advantages of and bottlenecks in the existing

  10. A Parallel Implementation of a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Method on Graphics Hardware Using the Compute Unified Device Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong Unhong; Wong Honcheng; Tang Zesheng

    2010-01-01

    The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), which is a class of meshfree particle methods (MPMs), has a wide range of applications from micro-scale to macro-scale as well as from discrete systems to continuum systems. Graphics hardware, originally designed for computer graphics, now provide unprecedented computational power for scientific computation. Particle system needs a huge amount of computations in physical simulation. In this paper, an efficient parallel implementation of a SPH method on graphics hardware using the Compute Unified Device Architecture is developed for fluid simulation. Comparing to the corresponding CPU implementation, our experimental results show that the new approach allows significant speedups of fluid simulation through handling huge amount of computations in parallel on graphics hardware.

  11. HONEI: A collection of libraries for numerical computations targeting multiple processor architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyk, Danny; Geveler, Markus; Mallach, Sven; Ribbrock, Dirk; Göddeke, Dominik; Gutwenger, Carsten

    2009-12-01

    We present HONEI, an open-source collection of libraries offering a hardware oriented approach to numerical calculations. HONEI abstracts the hardware, and applications written on top of HONEI can be executed on a wide range of computer architectures such as CPUs, GPUs and the Cell processor. We demonstrate the flexibility and performance of our approach with two test applications, a Finite Element multigrid solver for the Poisson problem and a robust and fast simulation of shallow water waves. By linking against HONEI's libraries, we achieve a two-fold speedup over straight forward C++ code using HONEI's SSE backend, and additional 3-4 and 4-16 times faster execution on the Cell and a GPU. A second important aspect of our approach is that the full performance capabilities of the hardware under consideration can be exploited by adding optimised application-specific operations to the HONEI libraries. HONEI provides all necessary infrastructure for development and evaluation of such kernels, significantly simplifying their development. Program summaryProgram title: HONEI Catalogue identifier: AEDW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPLv2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 216 180 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 270 140 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: x86, x86_64, NVIDIA CUDA GPUs, Cell blades and PlayStation 3 Operating system: Linux RAM: at least 500 MB free Classification: 4.8, 4.3, 6.1 External routines: SSE: none; [1] for GPU, [2] for Cell backend Nature of problem: Computational science in general and numerical simulation in particular have reached a turning point. The revolution developers are facing is not primarily driven by a change in (problem-specific) methodology, but rather by the fundamental paradigm shift of the

  12. The Jupyter/IPython architecture: a unified view of computational research, from interactive exploration to communication and publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan-Kelley, M.; Perez, F.; Granger, B.; Kluyver, T.; Ivanov, P.; Frederic, J.; Bussonnier, M.

    2014-12-01

    IPython has provided terminal-based tools for interactive computing in Python since 2001. The notebook document format and multi-process architecture introduced in 2011 have expanded the applicable scope of IPython into teaching, presenting, and sharing computational work, in addition to interactive exploration. The new architecture also allows users to work in any language, with implementations in Python, R, Julia, Haskell, and several other languages. The language agnostic parts of IPython have been renamed to Jupyter, to better capture the notion that a cross-language design can encapsulate commonalities present in computational research regardless of the programming language being used. This architecture offers components like the web-based Notebook interface, that supports rich documents that combine code and computational results with text narratives, mathematics, images, video and any media that a modern browser can display. This interface can be used not only in research, but also for publication and education, as notebooks can be converted to a variety of output formats, including HTML and PDF. Recent developments in the Jupyter project include a multi-user environment for hosting notebooks for a class or research group, a live collaboration notebook via Google Docs, and better support for languages other than Python.

  13. Real-time field programmable gate array architecture for computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Estrada, Miguel; Torres-Huitzil, Cesar

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for real-time generic convolution of a mask and an image. The architecture is intended for fast low-level image processing. The field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based architecture takes advantage of the availability of registers in FPGAs to implement an efficient and compact module to process the convolutions. The architecture is designed to minimize the number of accesses to the image memory and it is based on parallel modules with internal pipeline operation in order to improve its performance. The architecture is prototyped in a FPGA, but it can be implemented on dedicated very- large-scale-integrated devices to reach higher clock frequencies. Complexity issues, FPGA resources utilization, FPGA limitations, and real-time performance are discussed. Some results are presented and discussed.

  14. Advanced computational modeling for in vitro nanomaterial dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoid, Glen M; Cohen, Joel M; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Pirela, Sandra V; Pal, Anoop; Liu, Jiying; Srebric, Jelena; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-10-24

    Accurate and meaningful dose metrics are a basic requirement for in vitro screening to assess potential health risks of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Correctly and consistently quantifying what cells "see," during an in vitro exposure requires standardized preparation of stable ENM suspensions, accurate characterizatoin of agglomerate sizes and effective densities, and predictive modeling of mass transport. Earlier transport models provided a marked improvement over administered concentration or total mass, but included assumptions that could produce sizable inaccuracies, most notably that all particles at the bottom of the well are adsorbed or taken up by cells, which would drive transport downward, resulting in overestimation of deposition. Here we present development, validation and results of two robust computational transport models. Both three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and a newly-developed one-dimensional Distorted Grid (DG) model were used to estimate delivered dose metrics for industry-relevant metal oxide ENMs suspended in culture media. Both models allow simultaneous modeling of full size distributions for polydisperse ENM suspensions, and provide deposition metrics as well as concentration metrics over the extent of the well. The DG model also emulates the biokinetics at the particle-cell interface using a Langmuir isotherm, governed by a user-defined dissociation constant, K(D), and allows modeling of ENM dissolution over time. Dose metrics predicted by the two models were in remarkably close agreement. The DG model was also validated by quantitative analysis of flash-frozen, cryosectioned columns of ENM suspensions. Results of simulations based on agglomerate size distributions differed substantially from those obtained using mean sizes. The effect of cellular adsorption on delivered dose was negligible for K(D) values consistent with non-specific binding (> 1 nM), whereas smaller values (≤ 1 nM) typical of specific high

  15. Cloud/Fog Computing System Architecture and Key Technologies for South-North Water Transfer Project Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoling Fan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the real-time and distributed features of Internet of Things (IoT safety system in water conservancy engineering, this study proposed a new safety system architecture for water conservancy engineering based on cloud/fog computing and put forward a method of data reliability detection for the false alarm caused by false abnormal data from the bottom sensors. Designed for the South-North Water Transfer Project (SNWTP, the architecture integrated project safety, water quality safety, and human safety. Using IoT devices, fog computing layer was constructed between cloud server and safety detection devices in water conservancy projects. Technologies such as real-time sensing, intelligent processing, and information interconnection were developed. Therefore, accurate forecasting, accurate positioning, and efficient management were implemented as required by safety prevention of the SNWTP, and safety protection of water conservancy projects was effectively improved, and intelligential water conservancy engineering was developed.

  16. Workflow Support for Advanced Grid-Enabled Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Fenglian; Eres, M.H.; Tao, Feng; Cox, Simon J.

    2004-01-01

    The Geodise project brings computer scientists and engineer's skills together to build up a service-oriented computing environmnet for engineers to perform complicated computations in a distributed system. The workflow tool is a front GUI to provide a full life cycle of workflow functions for Grid-enabled computing. The full life cycle of workflow functions have been enhanced based our initial research and development. The life cycle starts with a composition of a workflow, followed by an ins...

  17. Advanced Certification Program for Computer Graphic Specialists. Final Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkland Coll., Champaign, IL.

    A pioneer program in computer graphics was implemented at Parkland College (Illinois) to meet the demand for specialized technicians to visualize data generated on high performance computers. In summer 1989, 23 students were accepted into the pilot program. Courses included C programming, calculus and analytic geometry, computer graphics, and…

  18. Micro-computed tomography assessment of human alveolar bone: bone density and three-dimensional micro-architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jeong; Henkin, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a valuable means to evaluate and secure information related to bone density and quality in human necropsy samples and small live animals. The aim of this study was to assess the bone density of the alveolar jaw bones in human cadaver, using micro-CT. The correlation between bone density and three-dimensional micro architecture of trabecular bone was evaluated. Thirty-four human cadaver jaw bone specimens were harvested. Each specimen was scanned with micro-CT at resolution of 10.5 μm. The bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and the bone mineral density (BMD) value within a volume of interest were measured. The three-dimensional micro architecture of trabecular bone was assessed. All the parameters in the maxilla and the mandible were subject to comparison. The variables for the bone density and the three-dimensional micro architecture were analyzed for nonparametric correlation using Spearman's rho at the significance level of p architecture parameters were consistently higher in the mandible, up to 3.3 times greater than those in the maxilla. The most linear correlation was observed between BV/TV and BMD, with Spearman's rho = 0.99 (p = .01). Both BV/TV and BMD were highly correlated with all micro architecture parameters with Spearman's rho above 0.74 (p = .01). Two aspects of bone density using micro-CT, the BV/TV and BMD, are highly correlated with three-dimensional micro architecture parameters, which represent the quality of trabecular bone. This noninvasive method may adequately enhance evaluation of the alveolar bone. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Computer visualization for enhanced operator performance for advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, B.H.; Raghavan, R.

    1993-01-01

    The operators of nuclear power plants are presented with an often uncoordinated and arbitrary array of displays and controls. Information is presented in different formats and on physically dissimilar instruments. In an accident situation, an operator must be very alert to quickly diagnose and respond to the state of the plant as represented by the control room displays. Improvements in display technology and increased automation have helped reduce operator burden; however, too much automation may lead to operator apathy and decreased efficiency. A proposed approach to the human-system interface uses modern graphics technology and advances in computational power to provide a visualization or ''virtual reality'' framework for the operator. This virtual reality comprises a simulated perception of another existence, complete with three-dimensional structures, backgrounds, and objects. By placing the operator in an environment that presents an integrated, graphical, and dynamic view of the plant, his attention is directly engaged. Through computer simulation, the operator can view plant equipment, read local displays, and manipulate controls as if he were in the local area. This process not only keeps an operator involved in plant operation and testing procedures, but also reduces personnel exposure. In addition, operator stress is reduced because, with realistic views of plant areas and equipment, the status of the plant can be accurately grasped without interpreting a large number of displays. Since a single operator can quickly ''visit'' many different plant areas without physically moving from the control room, these techniques are useful in reducing labor requirements for surveillance and maintenance activities. This concept requires a plant dynamic model continuously updated via real-time process monitoring. This model interacts with a three-dimensional, solid-model architectural configuration of the physical plant

  20. Formal computer-aided product family architecture design for mass customization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonev, Martin; Hvam, Lars; Clarkson, John

    2015-01-01

    With product customization companies aim at creating higher customer value and stronger economic benefits. The profitability of the offered variety relies on the quality of the developed product family architectures and their consistent implementation in configuration systems. Yet existing method...