WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced composite structures

  1. Advanced tow placement of composite fuselage structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert L.; Grant, Carroll G.

    1992-01-01

    The Hercules NASA ACT program was established to demonstrate and validate the low cost potential of the automated tow placement process for fabrication of aircraft primary structures. The program is currently being conducted as a cooperative program in collaboration with the Boeing ATCAS Program. The Hercules advanced tow placement process has been in development since 1982 and was developed specifically for composite aircraft structures. The second generation machine, now in operation at Hercules, is a production-ready machine that uses a low cost prepreg tow material form to produce structures with laminate properties equivalent to prepreg tape layup. Current program activities are focused on demonstration of the automated tow placement process for fabrication of subsonic transport aircraft fuselage crown quadrants. We are working with Boeing Commercial Aircraft and Douglas Aircraft during this phase of the program. The Douglas demonstration panels has co-cured skin/stringers, and the Boeing demonstration panel is an intricately bonded part with co-cured skin/stringers and co-bonded frames. Other aircraft structures that were evaluated for the automated tow placement process include engine nacelle components, fuselage pressure bulkheads, and fuselage tail cones. Because of the cylindrical shape of these structures, multiple parts can be fabricated on one two placement tool, thus reducing the cost per pound of the finished part.

  2. Strengthening of structure using advanced composites

    OpenAIRE

    Recuero, A.; Miravete, A.

    1997-01-01

    [EN] Restoration, strengthening and rehabilitation of buildings becomes one of the more interesting aspects of the use of composites. Construction industry has not yet accepted the wide structural use of these new materials because it does not know the advantages of composites in comparison with traditional materials, such as concrete or steel. Proffesionals involved in design and construction are conservative and resist to changes. They require codes and specifications, ...

  3. Advanced Composite Structures At NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Eldred's presentation will discuss several NASA efforts to improve and expand the use of composite structures within aerospace vehicles. Topics will include an overview of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP), Space Launch System (SLS) applications, and Langley's ISAAC robotic composites research tool.

  4. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  5. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  6. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  7. Applications for thermal NDT on advanced composites in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Steve R.

    1998-03-01

    Following several years of investigating active thermal imaging techniques, Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems Company (LMASC) has introduced a portable, time-dependent thermography (TDT) system into the production inspection environment. Originally pursued as a rapid, non-contacting, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool for inspecting large surface areas, the TDT system has proven most useful as a rapid verification tool on advanced composite assemblies. TDT is a relatively new NDE methodology as compared to conventional ultrasonic and radiography testing. SEveral technical issues are being addressed as confidence in the system's capabilities increase. These include inspector training and certification, system sensitivity assessments, and test results interpretation. Starting in 1991, LMASC began a beta-site evaluation of a prototype TDT system developed by the Institute of Manufacturing Research at Wayne State University. This prototype was the forerunner of the current production system, which is offered commercially as a fully integrated thermal NDE system. Applications investigated to data include quality assurance of advanced aerospace composite structures/assemblies for disbonds/voids between skin and core. TDT has a number of advantages over traditional NDT methods. The process of acquiring thermal images is fast, and can decrease inspection time required to locate suspect areas. The system also holds promise for depot level inspections due to its portability. This paper describes a systematic approach to implementing TDT into the production inspection arena.

  8. Structural Assessment of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stanford, Bret K.; Hrinda, Glenn A.; Wang, Zhuosong; Martin, Robert a.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells, manufactured using a fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles vary continuously around the shell circumference from 10 degrees on the shell crown and keel, to 45 degrees on the shell sides. The two shells differ in that one shell has the full 24-tow course applied during each pass of the fiber placement system, while the second shell uses the fiber placement system s tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform shell wall thickness. The shells are tested in axial compression, and estimates of their prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads are predicted using linear finite element analyses. These preliminary predictions compare well with the test results, with an average agreement of approximately 10 percent.

  9. Development of Stitched Composite Structure for Advanced Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn; Przekop, Adam; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew; Velicki, Alex; Linton, Kim; Wu, Hsi-Yung; Baraja, Jaime; Thrash, Patrick; Hoffman, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to develop technologies which will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations. NASA and The Boeing Company are working together to develop a structural concept that is lightweight and an advancement beyond state-of-the-art composites. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is an integrally stiffened panel design where elements are stitched together and designed to maintain residual load-carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. With the PRSEUS concept, through-the-thickness stitches are applied through dry fabric prior to resin infusion, and replace fasteners throughout each integral panel. Through-the-thickness reinforcement at discontinuities, such as along flange edges, has been shown to suppress delamination and turn cracks, which expands the design space and leads to lighter designs. The pultruded rod provides stiffening away from the more vulnerable skin surface and improves bending stiffness. A series of building blocks were evaluated to explore the fundamental assumptions related to the capability and advantages of PRSEUS panels. These building blocks addressed tension, compression, and pressure loading conditions. The emphasis of the development work has been to assess the loading capability, damage arrestment features, repairability, post-buckling behavior, and response of PRSEUS flat panels to out-of plane pressure loading. The results of this building-block program from coupons through an 80%-scale pressure box have demonstrated the viability of a PRSEUS center body for the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) transport aircraft. This development program shows that the PRSEUS benefits are also applicable to traditional tube-andwing aircraft, those of advanced configurations, and other

  10. Project on strengthening of structures using advanced composites

    OpenAIRE

    Recuero, A.; Miravete, A.

    1997-01-01

    Restoration, strengthening and rehabilitation of buildings becomes one of the more interesting aspects of the use of composites. Construction industry has not yet accepted the wide structural use of these new materials because it does not know the advantages of composites in comparison with traditional materials, such as concrete or steel. Engineers involved in design and construction are conservative and resist to changes. They require codes and specifications, what makes that an entity shou...

  11. Advanced Design of Composite Steel-Concrete Structural element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. D. R. Panchal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite framing system consisting of steel beams acting interactively with metal deck-concrete slab and concrete encased composite columns, has been as a viable alternative to the conventional steel or reinforced concrete system in the high-rise construction. However, in Indian context, it is comparatively new and no appropriate design codes are available for the same. Complications in the analysis and design of composite structures have led numerous researchers to develop simplified methods so as to eliminate a number of large scale tests needed for the design. In the present work, a simplified method of composite slabs, beams and columns design is used and software is developed with pre- and post- processing facilities in VB.NET. All principal design checks are incorporated in the software. The full and partial shear connection and the requirement for transverse reinforcement are also considered. To facilitate direct selection of steel section, a database is prepared and is available at the back end with the properties of all standard steel sections. Screen shots are included in the paper to illustrate the method employed for selecting the appropriate section and shear connectors and thus to verify the design adequacy.

  12. Advanced ultrasonic testing of complex shaped composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmatov, D.; Zhvyrblya, V.; Filippov, G.; Salchak, Y.; Sedanova, E.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the wide application of composite materials it is necessary to develop unconventional quality control techniques. One of the methods that can be used for this purpose is ultrasonic tomography. In this article an application of a robotic ultrasonic system is considered. Precise positioning of the robotic scanner and path generating are defined as ones of the most important aspects. This study proposes a non-contact calibration method of a robotic ultrasonic system. Path of the scanner requires a 3D model of controlled objects which are created in accordance with the proposed algorithm. The suggested techniques are based on implementation of structured light method.

  13. Recent advances in active fiber composites for structural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Aaron A.; Pizzochero, Alessandro E.

    2000-06-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFCs) provide a novel method for large scale actuation and sensing in active structures. The composite comprises unidirectionally aligned piezoelectric fibers, a resin matrix system, and interdigital electrode. AFCs have demonstrated distinct advantages over current monolithic piezoceramic actuators, including: higher planar actuation strain, tailorable orthotropic actuation, robustness to damage, conformability to curved surfaces, and potential for large area distributed actuation/sensing system. This manuscript focuses on recent developments in three key areas. The first area describes the completion of a standard AFC baseline material. The baseline AFC consists of 5.5mil diameter PZT-5A fibers laminated with an epoxy film adhesive and silver screen-printed electrodes. A scalable fabrication process based on lamination industry equipment has been implemented. Baseline AFC performance has been characterized, including free strains and blocked force. The send area describes continued work in developing optimized geometry/materials for future AFCs. AFC performance and efficiency can be affected significantly by changes in electrode pitch and fiber diameter and/or cross- sectional geometry. Various improved design have been identified. Third is review of application demonstration that exploit the benefits of AFCs to solve structural control problems.

  14. Project on strengthening of structures using advanced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recuero, A.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Restoration, strengthening and rehabilitation of buildings becomes one of the more interesting aspects of the use of composites. Construction industry has not yet accepted the wide structural use of these new materials because it does not know the advantages of composites in comparison with traditional materials, such as concrete or steel. Engineers involved in design and construction are conservative and resist to changes. They require codes and specifications, what makes that an entity should lead the use of the new material or technology. At present, the experience needed to prepare those codes does not exist. Experimental tests and successful cases are necessary for the acceptance of these materials in construction. A project is presented, with the aim to provide the experimental basis, needed to update design codes and standards, and the technology for the use of these new composites in building and civil structures strengthening, taking actual pathology, quality and durability into account, as well as urban aesthetics. Research specialists in composites, structural analysis and testing, and in structural pathology, as well as composites and adhesives manufacturers and users, designers and final users will co-work in this project. This will allow that all relevant aspects of the problem be considered.

    La restauración, refuerzo o rehabilitación de estructuras resulta ser uno de los campos de aplicación de mayor interés y más directamente relacionado con los nuevos materiales compuestos. La Industria de la Construcción no ha aceptado aún el uso estructural extenso de los nuevos materiales compuestos porque todavía no conoce bien sus ventajas respecto a los materiales tradicionales, tales como el hormigón o el acero. Los profesionales implicados en el proyecto y en la ejecución de obras suelen ser conservadores y resistirse a los cambios. Para aceptar un nuevo material requieren disponer de normativa relativa a la nueva

  15. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  16. Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms for low cost composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, J. G.; Bayha, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms are being evaluated at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company (LASC) under NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. This work is aimed towards the development of low-cost, damage-tolerant composite fuselage structures. Resin systems for resin transfer molding and powder epoxy towpreg materials are being evaluated for processability, performance and cost. Three developmental epoxy resin systems for resin transfer molding (RTM) and three resin systems for powder towpregging are being investigated. Various 3D textile preform architectures using advanced weaving and braiding processes are also being evaluated. Trials are being conducted with powdered towpreg, in 2D weaving and 3D braiding processes for their textile processability and their potential for fabrication in 'net shape' fuselage structures. The progress in advanced resin screening and textile preform development is reviewed here.

  17. A study on the utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composite materials in the wing structure of future production aircraft. The study accomplished the following: (1) definition of acceptance factors, (2) identification of technology issues, (3) evaluation of six candidate wing structures, (4) evaluation of five program options, (5) definition of a composite wing technology development plan, (6) identification of full-scale tests, (7) estimation of program costs for the total development plan, (8) forecast of future utilization of composites in commercial transport aircraft and (9) identification of critical technologies for timely program planning.

  18. A study on the utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structure: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The overall wing study objectives are to study and plan the effort by commercial transport aircraft manufacturers to accomplish the transition from current conventional materials and practices to extensive use of advanced composites in wings of aircraft that will enter service in the 1985-1990 time period. Specific wing study objectives are to define the technology and data needed to support an aircraft manufacturer's commitment to utilize composites primary wing structure in future production aircraft and to develop plans for a composite wing technology program which will provide the needed technology and data.

  19. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaella Di Sante

    2015-01-01

    In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS) have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same s...

  20. A Study of the Utilization of Advanced Composites in Fuselage Structures of Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D. J.; Sumida, P. T.; Bunin, B. L.; Janicki, G. S.; Walker, J. V.; Fox, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composites in the future production of fuselage structure in large transport aircraft. Fuselage structures of six candidate airplanes were evaluated for the baseline component. The MD-100 was selected on the basis of its representation of 1990s fuselage structure, an available data base, its impact on the schedule and cost of the development program, and its availability and suitability for flight service evaluation. Acceptance criteria were defined, technology issues were identified, and a composite fuselage technology development plan, including full-scale tests, was identified. The plan was based on composite materials to be available in the mid to late 1980s. Program resources required to develop composite fuselage technology are estimated at a rough order of magnitude to be 877 man-years exclusive of the bird strike and impact dynamic test components. A conceptual composite fuselage was designed, retaining the basic MD-100 structural arrangement for doors, windows, wing, wheel wells, cockpit enclosure, major bulkheads, etc., resulting in a 32 percent weight savings.

  1. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Di Sante

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques.

  2. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS) have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques. PMID:26263987

  3. Advances in Micromechanics Modeling of Composites Structures for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Albert

    Although high performance, light-weight composites are increasingly being used in applications ranging from aircraft, rotorcraft, weapon systems and ground vehicles, the assurance of structural reliability remains a critical issue. In composites, damage is absorbed through various fracture processes, including fiber failure, matrix cracking and delamination. An important element in achieving reliable composite systems is a strong capability of assessing and inspecting physical damage of critical structural components. Installation of a robust Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system would be very valuable in detecting the onset of composite failure. A number of major issues still require serious attention in connection with the research and development aspects of sensor-integrated reliable SHM systems for composite structures. In particular, the sensitivity of currently available sensor systems does not allow detection of micro level damage; this limits the capability of data driven SHM systems. As a fundamental layer in SHM, modeling can provide in-depth information on material and structural behavior for sensing and detection, as well as data for learning algorithms. This dissertation focuses on the development of a multiscale analysis framework, which is used to detect various forms of damage in complex composite structures. A generalized method of cells based micromechanics analysis, as implemented in NASA's MAC/GMC code, is used for the micro-level analysis. First, a baseline study of MAC/GMC is performed to determine the governing failure theories that best capture the damage progression. The deficiencies associated with various layups and loading conditions are addressed. In most micromechanics analysis, a representative unit cell (RUC) with a common fiber packing arrangement is used. The effect of variation in this arrangement within the RUC has been studied and results indicate this variation influences the macro-scale effective material properties and

  4. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration, task 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A structural design study was conducted to assess the relative merits of structural concepts using advanced composite materials for an advanced supersonic aircraft cruising at Mach 2.7. The configuration and structural arrangement developed during Task I and II of the study, was used as the baseline configuration. Allowable stresses and strains were established for boron and advanced graphite fibers based on projected fiber properties available in the next decade. Structural concepts were designed and analyzed using graphite polyimide and boron polyimide, applied to stiffened panels and conventional sandwich panels. The conventional sandwich panels were selected as the structural concept to be used on the wing structure. The upper and lower surface panels of the Task I arrow wing were redesigned using high-strength graphite polyimide sandwich panels over the titanium spars and ribs. The ATLAS computer system was used as the basis for stress analysis and resizing the surface panels using the loads from the Task II study, without adjustment for change in aeroelastic deformation. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium wing, with a weight penalty less than that of the metallic airplane.

  5. A hybrid method for damage detection and quantification in advanced X-COR composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neerukatti, Rajesh Kumar; Rajadas, Abhishek; Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Huff, Daniel W.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced composite structures, such as foam core carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites, are increasingly being used in applications which require high strength, high in-plane and flexural stiffness, and low weight. However, the presence of in situ damage due to manufacturing defects and/or service conditions can complicate the failure mechanisms and compromise their strength and reliability. In this paper, the capability of detecting damages such as delaminations and foam-core separations in X-COR composite structures using non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques is investigated. Two NDE techniques, flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics, were used to detect and quantify the damage size and locations. Macro fiber composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors to study the interaction of Lamb waves with delaminations and foam-core separations. The results indicate that both flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics were capable of detecting damage in X-COR sandwich structures, although low frequency ultrasonic methods were capable of detecting through thickness damages more accurately than flash thermography. It was also observed that the presence of foam-core separations significantly changes the wave behavior when compared to delamination, which complicates the use of wave based SHM techniques. Further, a wave propagation model was developed to model the wave interaction with damages at different locations on the X-COR sandwich plate.

  6. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. J.; Grande, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Based on estimated graphite and boron fiber properties, allowable stresses and strains were established for advanced composite materials. Stiffened panel and conventional sandwich panel concepts were designed and analyzed, using graphite/polyimide and boron/polyimide materials. The conventional sandwich panel was elected as the structural concept for the modified wing structure. Upper and lower surface panels of the arrow wing structure were then redesigned, using high strength graphite/polyimide sandwich panels, retaining the titanium spars and ribs from the prior study. The ATLAS integrated analysis and design system was used for stress analysis and automated resizing of surface panels. Flutter analysis of the hybrid structure showed a significant decrease in flutter speed relative to the titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium design by selective increase in laminate thickness and by using graphite fibers with properties intermediate between high strength and high modulus values.

  7. Study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, I. F.; Ostrom, R. B.; Cardinale, S. V.

    1978-01-01

    The effort required by commercial transport manufacturers to accomplish the transition from current construction materials and practices to extensive use of composites in aircraft wings was investigated. The engineering and manufacturing disciplines which normally participate in the design, development, and production of an aircraft were employed to ensure that all of the factors that would enter a decision to commit to production of a composite wing structure were addressed. A conceptual design of an advanced technology reduced energy aircraft provided the framework for identifying and investigating unique design aspects. A plan development effort defined the essential technology needs and formulated approaches for effecting the required wing development. The wing development program plans, resource needs, and recommendations are summarized.

  8. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Design/manufacturing concept assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Robert L.; Bayha, Tom D.; Davis, HU; Ingram, J. ED; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Composite Wing and Fuselage Structural Design/Manufacturing Concepts have been developed and evaluated. Trade studies were performed to determine how well the concepts satisfy the program goals of 25 percent cost savings, 40 percent weight savings with aircraft resizing, and 50 percent part count reduction as compared to the aluminum Lockheed L-1011 baseline. The concepts developed using emerging technologies such as large scale resin transfer molding (RTM), automatic tow placed (ATP), braiding, out-of-autoclave and automated manufacturing processes for both thermoset and thermoplastic materials were evaluated for possible application in the design concepts. Trade studies were used to determine which concepts carry into the detailed design development subtask.

  9. Advanced imaging techniques for assessment of structure, composition and function in biofilm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Thomas R; Manz, Bertram; Volke, Frank; Dynes, James J; Hitchcock, Adam P; Lawrence, John R

    2010-04-01

    Scientific imaging represents an important and accepted research tool for the analysis and understanding of complex natural systems. Apart from traditional microscopic techniques such as light and electron microscopy, new advanced techniques have been established including laser scanning microscopy (LSM), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These new techniques allow in situ analysis of the structure, composition, processes and dynamics of microbial communities. The three techniques open up quantitative analytical imaging possibilities that were, until a few years ago, impossible. The microscopic techniques represent powerful tools for examination of mixed environmental microbial communities usually encountered in the form of aggregates and films. As a consequence, LSM, MRI and STXM are being used in order to study complex microbial biofilm systems. This mini review provides a short outline of the more recent applications with the intention to stimulate new research and imaging approaches in microbiology.

  10. Structural Characterization of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells with Large Cutouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Gardner, Nathaniel W.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with large cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles of the shells vary continuously around their circumference from +/- 10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/- 45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the tow drop/add capability of the system to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells, both without and with small cutouts, were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. In this study, a single unreinforced cutout, scaled to represent a cargo door on a commercial aircraft, is machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of these shells with large cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for preliminary comparisons with test data. During testing, large displacements are observed around the large cutouts, but the shells maintain an average of 91 percent of the axial stiffness, and also carry 85 percent of the buckling loads, when compared to the pristine shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions indicate that there is great potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of large cutouts on the overall structural performance.

  11. Structural Performance of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells With Cutouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The shells' fiber orientation angles vary continuously around their circumference from +/-10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/-45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the system's tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. A single cutout, scaled to represent a passenger door on a commercial aircraft, is then machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of the shells with cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for initial comparisons with test data. When retested, large deflections were observed around the cutouts, but the shells carried an average of 92 percent of the axial stiffness, and 86 percent of the buckling loads, of the shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions in performance demonstrate the potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of typical design features on the overall structural performance.

  12. Characteristics of sandwich-type structural elements built of advanced composite materials from three dimensional fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castejón, L.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich-type structures have proved to be alternatives of great success for several fields of application, and specially in the building sector. This is due to their outstanding properties of .specific rigidity and strength against bending loads and other range of advantages like fatigue and impact resistance, attainment of flat and smooth surfaces, high electric and thermal insulation, design versatility and some others. However, traditional sandwich structures present problems like their tendency towards delamination, stress concentrations in bores or screwed Joints, and pre resistance. These problems are alleviated thanks to the use of new sandwich structures built using three dimensional structures of advanced composite materials, maintaining the present advantages for more traditional sandwich structures. At this rate, these new structures can be applied in several areas where conventional sandwich structures used to be like walls, partitions, floor and ceiling structures, domes, vaults and dwellings, but with greater success.

    Las estructuras tipo sándwich han demostrado ser alternativas de gran éxito para diversos campos de aplicación y, en concreto, en el sector de la construcción, listo es gracias a sus excelentes propiedades de rigidez y resistencia específica frente a cargas de flexión y otra larga lista de ventajas, a la que pertenecen, por ejemplo, su buena resistencia a fatiga, resistencia al impacto, obtención de superficies lisas y suaves, elevado aislamiento térmico y eléctrico, versatilidad de diseño y otras. Sin embargo, las estructuras sándwich, tradicionales presentan una problemática consistente en su tendencia a la delaminación, concentraciones de tensiones ¿aparecidas ante la existencia de agujeros o uniones atornilladas y resistencia al fuego. Estos problemas son pifiados gracias a la aplicación de estructuras novedosas tipo sándwich, construidas a partir de tejidos tridimensionales de materiales

  13. Effect of Interface Structure on Mechanical Properties of Advanced Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong X. Gan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the effect of interface structures on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composite materials. First, the background of research, development and applications on hybrid composite materials is introduced. Second, metal/polymer composite bonded structures are discussed. Then, the rationale is given for nanostructuring the interface in composite materials and structures by introducing nanoscale features such as nanopores and nanofibers. The effects of modifying matrices and nano-architecturing interfaces on the mechanical properties of nanocomposite materials are examined. A nonlinear damage model for characterizing the deformation behavior of polymeric nanocomposites is presented and the application of this model to carbon nanotube-reinforced and reactive graphite nanotube-reinforced epoxy composite materials is shown.

  14. ISAAC Advanced Composites Research Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stewart, Brian K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center is acquiring a state-of-art composites fabrication capability to support the Center's advanced research and technology mission. The system introduced in this paper is named ISAAC (Integrated Structural Assembly of Advanced Composites). The initial operational capability of ISAAC is automated fiber placement, built around a commercial system from Electroimpact, Inc. that consists of a multi-degree of freedom robot platform, a tool changer mechanism, and a purpose-built fiber placement end effector. Examples are presented of the advanced materials, structures, structural concepts, fabrication processes and technology development that may be enabled using the ISAAC system. The fiber placement end effector may be used directly or with appropriate modifications for these studies, or other end effectors with different capabilities may either be bought or developed with NASA's partners in industry and academia.

  15. LiNiFe-based layered structure oxide and composite for advanced single layer fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Fan, Liangdong; Deng, Hui; He, Yunjune; Afzal, Muhammad; Dong, Wenjing; Yaqub, Azra; Janjua, Naveed K.

    2016-06-01

    A layered structure metal oxide, LiNi0.1Fe0.90O2-δ (LNF), is explored for the advanced single layer fuel cells (SLFCs). The temperature dependent impedance profiles and concentration cells (hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and H2/air atmospheres) tests prove LNF to be an intrinsically electronic conductor in air while mixed electronic and proton conductor in H2/air environment. SLFCs constructed by pure LNF materials show significant short circuiting reflected by a low device OCV and power output (175 mW cm-2 at 500 °C) due to high intrinsic electronic conduction. The power output is improved up to 640 and 760 mW cm-2, respectively at 500 and 550 °C by compositing LNF with ion conducting material, e.g., samarium doped ceria (SDC), to balance the electronic and ionic conductivity; both reached at 0.1 S cm-1 level. Such an SLFC gives super-performance and simplicity over the conventional 3-layer (anode, electrolyte and cathode) FCs, suggesting strong scientific and commercial impacts.

  16. Resin Flow of an Advanced Grid-Stiffened Composite Structure in the Co-Curing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qizhong; Ren, Mingfa; Chen, Haoran

    2013-06-01

    The soft-mold aided co-curing process which cures the skin part and ribs part simultaneously was introduced for reducing the cost of advanced grid-stiffened composite structure (AGS). The co-curing process for a typical AGS, preformed by the prepreg AS4/3501-6, was simulated by a finite element program incorporated with the user-subroutines `thermo-chemical' module and the `chemical-flow' module. The variations of temperature, cure degree, resin pressure and fiber volume fraction of the AGS were predicted. It shows that the uniform distributions of temperature, cure degree and viscosity in the AGS would be disturbed by the unique geometrical pattern of AGS. There is an alternation in distribution of resin pressure at the interface between ribs and skin, and the duration time of resin flow is sensitive to the thickness of the AGS. To obtain a desired AGS, the process parameters of the co-curing process should be determined by the geometry of an AGS and the kinds of resin.

  17. Study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, I. F.; Ostrom, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    A plan is defined for a composite wing development effort which will assist commercial transport manufacturers in reaching a level of technology readiness where the utilization of composite wing structure is a cost competitive option for a new aircraft production plan. The recommended development effort consists of two programs: a joint government/industry material development program and a wing structure development program. Both programs are described in detail.

  18. Advances in Stability of Composite Airframe Structures Regarding Collapse, Robust Design and Dynamic Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Degenhardt, Richard

    2008-01-01

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs, by 20% and 50% in the short and long term, respectively. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents new achievements from the area of computational and experimental stability resear...

  19. Advanced composites technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E; Sanchez, R J

    1998-10-01

    The development of fiber composite components in next-generation munitions, such as sabots for kinetic energy penetrators and lightweight cases for advanced artillery projectiles, relies on design trade-off studies using validated computer code simulations. We are developing capabilities to determine the failure of advanced fiber composites under multiaxial stresses to critically evaluate three-dimensional failure models and develop new ones if necessary. The effects of superimposed hydrostatic pressure on failure of composites are being investigated using a high-pressure testing system that incorporates several unique features. Several improvements were made to the system this year, and we report on the first tests of both isotropic and fiber composite materials. The preliminary results indicate that pressure has little effect on longitudinal compression strength of unidirectional composites, but issues with obtaining reliable failures in these materials still remain to be resolved. The transverse compression strength was found to be significantly enhanced by pressure, and the trends observed for this property and the longitudinal strength are in agreement with recent models for failure of fiber composites.

  20. Advances in HDS catalysts design: relation between catalyst structure and feed composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kagami, Narinobu

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a better understanding of ultra deep HDS for diesel, to contribute to the development of advanced catalysts. The characterization of catalyst structure was examined by XRD, TPR, TPS and Raman spectroscopy. The ranking of catalytic activities were tested using vario

  1. Standardization of Tests for Advanced Composites

    OpenAIRE

    石川, 隆司; Ishikawa, Takashi; 野口, 義男; Noguchi, Yoshio; 濱口, 泰正; Hamaguchi, Yasumasa

    2003-01-01

    Advanced composites are essentially the only feasible materials for the construction of newly developed aerospace vehicle. However, the path to be followed for the validation, evaluation and certification of composite aircraft structures is quite different from that of traditional metallic aircraft structures, and the importance of a composites database is now well recognized. A key issue in constructing a fully descriptive composites database is to establish standard composite test methods, ...

  2. Advances in Composites Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, D. R.; Dexter, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    A significant level of research is currently focused on the development of tough resins and high strain fibers in an effort to gain improved damage tolerance. Moderate success has been achieved with the development of new resins such as PEEK and additional improvements look promising with new thermoplastic resins. Development of innovative material forms such as 2-D and 3-D woven fabrics and braided structural subelements is also expected to improve damage tolerance and durability of composite hardware. The new thrust in composites is to develop low cost manufacturing and design concepts to lower the cost of composite hardware. Processes being examined include automated material placement, filament winding, pultrusion, and thermoforming. The factory of the future will likely incorporate extensive automation in all aspects of manufacturing composite components.

  3. Mechanics of composite structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kollár, László P

    2003-01-01

    An increase in the use of composite materials has led to a greater demand for engineers versed in the design of structures made from such materials. This book demonstrates advanced concepts and emphasizes structures. More than 300 illustrations, 50 fully worked problems, and material properties data sets are included

  4. Recent advance on design and manufacturing of composite anisogrid structures for space launchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totaro, G.; De Nicola, F.

    2012-12-01

    Anisogrid composite shells have been developed and applied since the eighties by the Russian technology aiming at critical weight structures for space launchers, as interstages and cone adapters. The manufacturing process commonly applied is based on the wet filament winding. The paper concerns with some developments of design and manufacturing recently performed at the Italian Aerospace Research Center on a cylindrical structural model representative of this kind of structures. The framework of preliminary design is improved by introducing the concept of suboptimal configuration in order to match the stiffness requirement of the shell and minimise the mass, in conjunction with the typical strength constraints. The undertaken manufacturing process is based on dry robotic winding for the lattice structure and for the outer skin, with the aid of usual rubber tooling and new devices for the automated deposition strategy. Resin infusion under vacuum bag and co-cure of the system of ribs and skin is finally applied out-of-autoclave, with the aid of a heated mandrel. With such approach an interstage structural model (scale factor 1:1.5) has been designed, manufactured and tested. Design requirements and loads refer to a typical space launcher whose baseline configuration is made in aluminium. The global mechanical test of the manufactured structure has confirmed the expected high structural performance. The possibility to reach substantial weight savings in comparison with the aluminium benchmark has been fully demonstrated.

  5. Evaluation of Advanced Composite Structures Technologies for Application to NASA's Vision for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Ross

    2008-01-01

    An assessment was performed to identify the applicability of composite material technologies to major structural elements of the NASA Constellation program. A qualitative technology assessment methodology was developed to document the relative benefit of 24 structural systems with respect to 33 major structural elements of Ares I, Orion, Ares V, and Altair. Technology maturity assessments and development plans were obtained from more than 30 Boeing subject matter experts for more than 100 technologies. These assessment results and technology plans were combined to generate a four-level hierarchy of recommendations. An overarching strategy is suggested, followed by a Constellation-wide development plan, three integrated technology demonstrations, and three focused projects for a task order follow-on.

  6. Recent Advances in Polyimides Matrix Structural Composites%聚酰亚胺复合材料研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵伟栋; 王磊; 潘玲英; 刘含洋; 赵翠梅

    2013-01-01

    综述了国内外聚酰亚胺树脂基复合材料的研究现状和在航空航天等领域的应用现状,简要介绍了国内在改进聚酰亚胺基复合材料流变性能、提高耐热性和力学性能以及聚酰亚胺蜂窝夹层结构和石英增强聚酰亚胺复合材料等方面所取得的研究进展,并展望了该技术的发展方向和研究重点.%Recent advances on high temperature polyimide thermoset resins and the fiber reinforced composites especially their applications in aerospace industry are reviewed.The rheological mechanical and physical properties of several domestic novel high temperature polyimide matrix composites are summarized.The polyimide matrix honeycomb sandwich structural composites and quartz fiber reinforced composites are discussed.The development trends of PMR polyimide matrix composites are proposed.

  7. Large-Deformation Curling Actuators Based on Carbon Nanotube Composite: Advanced-Structure Design and Biomimetic Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lingling; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, electroactive polymers have been developed as actuator materials. As an important branch of electroactive polymers, electrothermal actuators (ETAs) demonstrate potential applications in the fields of artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, robotics, and so on. Large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation, and ultrafast fabrication are critical to the development of ETA. However, a simultaneous optimization of all of these advantages has not been realized yet. Practical biomimetic applications are also rare. In this work, we introduce an ultrafast approach to fabricate a curling actuator based on a newly designed carbon nanotube and polymer composite, which completely realizes all of the above required advantages. The actuator shows an ultralarge curling actuation with a curvature greater than 1.0 cm(-1) and bending angle larger than 360°, even curling into a tubular structure. The driving voltage is down to a low voltage of 5 V. The remarkable actuation is attributed not only to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion but also to the mechanical property changes of materials during temperature change. We also construct an S-shape actuator to show the possibility of building advanced-structure actuators. A weightlifting walking robot is further designed that exhibits a fast-moving motion while lifting a sample heavier than itself, demonstrating promising biomimetic applications. PMID:26512734

  8. TTT diagram and phase structure control of 2/4 functional epoxy blends used in advanced composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming; AN Xuefeng; TANG Bangming; YI Xiaosu

    2007-01-01

    A 2/4 functional epoxy blend system (DGEBA/TGMDA) cured with 4,4'-diamino diphenyl sulphone (DDS) was used as the raw material in this research.Round disk compression mode DMA (dynamic mechanical analyzer) was employed to study the gelation at the different temperatures, and the relationship between gel-time (tgel) and temperature was obtained.The cure kinetics was studied by dynamic DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) analysis,and the parame-ters of the cure reaction were obtained to establish a phenom-enological model.The relationship between glass transition temperature (Tg) and cure degree (α) was analyzed by an iso-thermal plus dynamic DSC method based on the DiBenedetto equation,which gave a mathematical description of Tg as a function of both time and temperature.Characteristic tem- peratures such as Tgo,gelTg and Tg∞ were also determined.The cure degree at gelation turned out to be 0.4539,while the tem-perature at which vitrification line and gel line transected was found to be 70.2℃.The time-temperature-transition (TTT) diagram was plotted based on the work above,which served as a tool for process optimization in the manufacture of advanced composites.A new cure procedure of this practical thermosetting system was extracted from the TTT diagram by prolonging the pre-gel time to restrict the diffusion ability and the flow ability of the solution.The final phase structure was proved by SEM to be ex-situ phase morphology com-pared with the traditional in-situ phase structure by exerting different cure procedures.

  9. ACEE Composite Structures Technology: Review of selected NASA research on composite materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program was designed to develop technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Research on composite materials, aircraft structures, and aircraft design is presented herein. The following parameters of composite materials were addressed: residual strength, damage tolerance, toughness, tensile strength, impact resistance, buckling, and noise transmission within composite materials structures.

  10. Deployable Composite Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking innovative structure technologies that will advance expandable modules for orbital and surface based habitats. These secondary structures must...

  11. Recent Advances on the Understanding of Structural and Composition Evolution of LMR Cathodes for Li-ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-and-manganese-rich (LMR) cathode materials have been regarded as very promising for lithium (Li)-ion battery applications. However, their practical application is still limited by several barriers such as their limited electrochemical stability and rate capability. In this work, we present recent progress on the understanding of structural and compositional evolution of LMR cathode materials, with an emphasis being placed on the correlation between structural/chemical evolution and el...

  12. Micro-nano structure composite cathode material with high sulfur loading for advanced lithium–sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABSTRACT: A micro-nano structure based on polydopamine-grafted hollow carbon nanofiber–sulfur composite (HCNF@PDA–S) is designed as a cathode material for effective trapping of sulfur and polysulfides for lithium–sulfur batteries. Hollow carbon nanofiber@polydopamine (HCNF@PDA) micro-nano structure hybrid is first prepared by an in-situ polymerization dopamine monomer decorating on the surface of HCNFs and then elemental sulfur is infiltrated into the HCNF@PDA hybrid nanostructure by thermal treatment. The obtained HCNF@PDA–S composite shows the micro-nano structure based on the micron-sized hollow carbon nanofiber in length and nano-sized polydopamine grafted on the outer surfaces of the HCNFs with homogeneously distribution of sulfur. Compared with the HCNF–S composite, HCNF@PDA–S composite with a high sulfur content of approximately 80 wt% exhibits better electrochemical performance, which delivers initial discharge capacity of 800 mAh g−1 and maintains 530 mAh g−1 after 200 cycles at 0.5 C rate. The enhancements of electrochemical performances may be attributed to the unique micro-nano hybrid structure based on HCNFs and PDA coating layer, in which the micro-sized HCNFs offer the electronic conductivity and provide a firm porous network of the cathode tolerating the volume expansion of sulfur cathode, and nano-sized PDA layers effectively prevent the dissolution of the polysulfides into the electrolyte

  13. Future Design for Composite Airframe Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Degenhardt, Richard; Kling, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    European space and aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite space and aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribut...

  14. Recent advances in aerospace composite NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgeson, Gary E.

    2002-06-01

    As the aerospace industry continues to advance the design and use of composite structure, the NDE community faces the difficulties of trying to keep up. The challenges lie in manufacturing evaluation of the newest aerospace structures and materials and the in-service inspection and monitoring of damaged or aging composites. This paper provides examples of several promising NDI applications in the world of aerospace composites. Airborne (or non-contact) Ultrasonic Testing (UT) has been available for decades, but recently has generated new interest due to significant improvements in transducer design and low noise electronics. Boeing is developing inspection techniques for composite joints and core blankets using this technology. In-service inspection techniques for thick, multi-layer structures are also being advanced. One effective technique integrates the S-9 Sondicator, a traditional bond testing device, with Boeing's Mobile Automated Scanner (MAUS) platform. Composite patches have seen limited use on-aircraft, due, in part, to the difficulty of determining the quality of a bonded joint. A unique approach using Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) is showing promise as a bonded patch-inspection method. Other NDI techniques currently being developed for aerospace application are also briefly discussed.

  15. Imaging Structure and Composition Homogeneity of 300 mm SiGe Virtual Substrates for Advanced CMOS Applications by Scanning X-ray Diffraction Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Marvin H; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Chahine, Gilbert A; Zaumseil, Peter; Reich, Christian; Capellini, Giovanni; Montalenti, Francesco; Marzegalli, Anna; Xie, Ya-Hong; Schülli, Tobias U; Häberlen, Maik; Storck, Peter; Schroeder, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Advanced semiconductor heterostructures are at the very heart of many modern technologies, including aggressively scaled complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistors for high performance computing and laser diodes for low power solid state lighting applications. The control of structural and compositional homogeneity of these semiconductor heterostructures is the key to success to further develop these state-of-the-art technologies. In this article, we report on the lateral distribution of tilt, composition, and strain across step-graded SiGe strain relaxed buffer layers on 300 mm Si(001) wafers treated with and without chemical-mechanical polishing. By using the advanced synchrotron based scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy technique K-Map together with micro-Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy, we are able to establish a partial correlation between real space morphology and structural properties of the sample resolved at the micrometer scale. In particular, we demonstrate that the lattice plane bending of the commonly observed cross-hatch pattern is caused by dislocations. Our results show a strong local correlation between the strain field and composition distribution, indicating that the adatom surface diffusion during growth is driven by strain field fluctuations induced by the underlying dislocation network. Finally, it is revealed that a superficial chemical-mechanical polishing of cross-hatched surfaces does not lead to any significant change of tilt, composition, and strain variation compared to that of as-grown samples. PMID:25871429

  16. Advanced structural wind engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kareem, Ahsan

    2013-01-01

    This book serves as a textbook for advanced courses as it introduces state-of-the-art information and the latest research results on diverse problems in the structural wind engineering field. The topics include wind climates, design wind speed estimation, bluff body aerodynamics and applications, wind-induced building responses, wind, gust factor approach, wind loads on components and cladding, debris impacts, wind loading codes and standards, computational tools and computational fluid dynamics techniques, habitability to building vibrations, damping in buildings, and suppression of wind-induced vibrations. Graduate students and expert engineers will find the book especially interesting and relevant to their research and work.

  17. Deployable Composite Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking innovative structure technologies that will advance expandable exploration space modules and surface based habitats. To address this need CTD has...

  18. Anatase TiO2@C composites with porous structure as an advanced anode material for Na ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zhian; Du, Ke; Lai, Yanqing; Fang, Jing; Li, Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a facile strategy to synthesize the porous structure TiO2@C composites through a two-step method, in which the precursor of MIL-125(Ti) was firstly prepared by solvent thermal method and then calcined under inert atmosphere. When employed as anodes for Na ion batteries, TiO2@C composites can exhibit a superior cyclability with a reversible sodium storage capacity of 148 mAh g-1 at the current density 0.5 A g-1 after 500 cycles and an excellent rate performance with a capacity of 88.9 mAh g-1 even the current reached to 2.5 A g-1 due to the dispersion of anatase TiO2 throughout amorphous carbon matrix and the synergistic effect between the anatase TiO2 nanocrystals and carbon matrix, which can availably enhance the electric conductivity and alleviate the volumetric variation of TiO2 during the insertion/extraction process of Na+.

  19. Advanced X-Ray Inspection of Reinforced Carbon Composite Materials on the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jose M.; Berry, Robert F.; Osborn, Robin; Bueno, Clifford; Osterlitz, Mark; Mills, Richard; Morris, Philip; Phalen, Robert; McNab, Jim; Thibodeaux, Tahanie; Thompson, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    The post return-to-flight (RTF) inspection methodology for the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) is currently being defined. Numerous NDT modalities and techniques are being explored to perform the flight-to-flight inspections of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite material for impact damage, general loss of mass in the bulk layers, or other anomalous conditions that would pose risk to safe return upon re-entry. It is possible to have an impact upon ascent that is not visually observable on the surface, yet causes internal damage. Radiographic testing may be a useful NDT technique for such occurrences. The authors have performed radiographic tests on full-sized mock samples of LESS hardware with embedded image quality phantoms. Digitized radiographic film, computed radiography and flat panel digital real-time radiography was acquired using a GE Eresco 200 x-ray tube, and Se-75 and Yb-169 radioisotopes.

  20. Graphite/Polyimide Composites. [conference on Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. B. (Editor); Davis, J. G., Jr. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed under the Composites for Advanced Space Transportation System Project is reported. Specific topics covered include fabrication, adhesives, test methods, structural integrity, design and analysis, advanced technology developments, high temperature polymer research, and the state of the art of graphite/polyimide composites.

  1. Analysis of composite structural elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The themes of the study are composite structural components. For this purpose have been designed and built several research positions.Design/methodology/approach: Using different structural materials to build new device components requires multiple tests of the components. Research posts were designed in the advanced graphical program CAx Siemens NX 7.5. Analysed samples were made from the glass fibre, aramid and carbon of various weights. Due to the specific use of composite materials it focuses on the elements in the form of plates and flat bars. For the examination of experimental strain gauge technique was used bead, the force sensor and displacement sensor. The experimental methods were compared with computer simulation using the FEM.Findings: The aim of this study was to determine the basic material constants and a comparison of the experimental method and the method of computer simulation.Research limitations/implications: Change the number of layers and how to connect the laminate with the steel plate changes mechanical properties of the structural component.Practical implications: The ultimate result will be knowledge on the different forms of laminates, such as material properties, the stresses in all layers, strain and comparing the results obtained by two methods.Originality/value: The expected outcome of the study will be the composition and method of joining composite laminate with a steel plate to the possible application in the repair and construction of structural elements of freight wagons.

  2. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Hugo Rodrigue; Sung-Hoon Ahn

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and sim...

  3. Tendon Structure and Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are soft, fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone. Their main function is to transfer muscle generated force to the bony skeleton, facilitating movement around a joint, and as such they are relatively passive, inelastic structures, able to resist high forces. Tendons are predominantly composed of collagen, which is arranged in a hierarchical manner parallel to the long axis of the tendon, resulting in high tensile strength. Tendon also contains a range of non-collagenous proteins, present in low amounts, which nevertheless have important functional roles. In this chapter, we describe general tendon composition and structure, and discuss how variations in composition and structure at different levels of the tendon hierarchy confer specific mechanical properties, which are related to tendon function. PMID:27535244

  4. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, Markus; Conger, Robert; Bauer, Thomas; Newman, John

    2013-01-01

    An integrated, generic unibody composite pressurized structure (UCPS) combined with a positive expulsion device (PED), consisting of an elastomeric bladder for monopropellant hydrazine, has been quasi-standardized for spacecraft use. The combination functions as an all-composite, non-metallic, propellant tank with bladder. The integrated UCPS combines several previous innovations - specifically, the linerless, all-composite cryogenic tank technology; all-composite boss; resin formulation; and integrated stringer system. The innovation combines the UCPS with an integrated propellant management device (PMD), the PED or bladder, to create an entirely unique system for in-space use. The UCPS is a pressure vessel that incorporates skirts, stringers, and other structures so that it is both an in-space hydrazine tank, and also a structural support system for a spacecraft in a single, all-composite unit. This innovation builds on the progress in the development of a previous SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase I with Glenn Research Center and an SBIR III with Johnson Space Center that included the fabrication of two 42-in. (˜107-cm) diameter all-composite cryogenic (LOX and liquid methane) UCPS test tanks for a lunar lander. This Phase II provides hydra zine compatibility testing of the elastomeric bladder, a see-through PED to validate the expulsion process and model, and a complete UCPS-based PED with stringers and skirts that will be used to conduct initial qualification and expulsion tests. This extends the UCPS technology to include hydrazine-based, in-space pro - pulsion applications and can also be used for electric propulsion. This innovation creates a system that, in comparison to the traditional approach, is lower in weight, cost, volume, and production time; is stronger; and is capable of much higher pressures. It also has fewer failure modes, and is applicable to both chemical and electric propulsion systems.

  5. Epoxy/Glass Fiber Laminated Composites Integrated with Amino Functionalized ZrO2 for Advanced Structural Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sudipta; Ahemad, Soyeb; Das, Subhankar; Wang, Jialai

    2016-01-27

    This work demonstrates the successful silanization of ZrO2 nanoparticles (ZN) and their incorporation in glass fiber/epoxy composites. Microscopic investigation under transmission electron microscope elucidates antiaggregation and size enhancement of silanized ZrO2 nanoparticles (SZNs). FTIR spectroscopy has been used to demonstrate the chemical nature of the SZNs prepared. EDX results reveal the presence of Si onto SZNs. Incorporation of SZNs shows a strong influence on tensile and flexural properties of hybrid multiscale glass fiber composite (SZGFRP) compared to that of the neat epoxy glass fiber composite (GFRP). A significant variation of tensile strength, stiffness, and toughness of ∼27%, 62%, and 110% is observed with respect to GFRP. Strength and modulus under bending are also enhanced to ∼22% and ∼38%, respectively. Failure mechanisms obtained from macroscopic and microscopic investigation demonstrate reduced interfacial delamination for SZGFRP. Additionally, increased roughness of the fiber surface in SZGFRP laminates produces better interfacial bonding arising from SZN incorporation in laminates. This symptomatic behavior exposes the espousal of organically modified ZrO2 to enhance the interfacial bonding for their use in next generation hybrid laminates. PMID:26714570

  6. Advanced structural inorganic chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wai-Kee; Mak, Thomas C W

    2008-01-01

    An English edition of a textbook based on teaching at the final year undergraduate and graduate level. It presents structure and bonding, generalizations of structural trends, crystallographic data, as well as highlights from the recent literature.

  7. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  8. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  9. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  10. Predicting the Structural Performance of Composite Structures Under Cyclic Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Kassapoglou, C.

    2012-01-01

    The increased use of advanced composite materials on primary aircraft structure has brought back to the forefront the question of how such structures perform under repeated loading. In particular, when damage or other stress risers are present, tests have shown that the load to cause failure after a given number of cycles is a decreasing function of these cycles. This is a result of damage that was already present in the structure or was created during cyclic loading. In composites, multiple ...

  11. Causality and Composite Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Joglekar, Satish D

    2007-01-01

    We study the question of whether a composite structure of elementary particles, with a length scale $1/\\Lambda$, can leave observable effects of non-locality and causality violation at higher energies (but $\\lesssim \\Lambda$). We formulate a model-independent approach based on Bogoliubov-Shirkov formulation of causality. We analyze the relation between the fundamental theory (of finer constituents) and the derived theory (of composite particles). We assume that the fundamental theory is causal and formulate a condition which must be fulfilled for the derived theory to be causal. We analyze the condition and exhibit possibilities which fulfil and which violate the condition. We make comments on how causality violating amplitudes can arise.

  12. Nondestructive characterization of advanced composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive review of nondestructive characterization (NDC) techniques and their application to metal-matrix, polymer-matrix and ceramic-matrix composites is presented. Particular attention is given to the identification of critical materials properties and defects in these advanced composites. NDC is required: (i) to detect discrete defects, such as delaminations and cracking, and (ii) to measure distributed material properties, such as density, resistivity and elastic constants. Ultrasonic and eddy-current characterization are described in detail, along with new NDC results obtained at the Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory. These include a method for the determination of fibre volume fraction in continuous fibre reinforced metal-matrix composites using eddy-current NDC, and the use of eddy-current methods to complement ultrasonic testing for characterization of impact damage in graphite-epoxy laminates. Future problem areas and possible solutions in NDC of advanced composites are also discussed. 90 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  13. Fluid-structure interaction in composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Plessas, Spyridon D.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. In this research, dynamic characteristics of polymer composite beam and plate structures were studied when the structures were in contact with water. The effect of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) on natural frequencies, mode shapes, and dynamic responses was examined for polymer composite structures using multiphysics-based computational techniques. Composite structures were modeled using the finite element method. The fluid was mod...

  14. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  15. Structured Nanoobjects of Polytetrafluoroethylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.F. Budnik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shown that the design of polymer composites (composite science and their technology in many ways are akin to nanotechnology. Structured matrix, fibers, powders, and their interfaces in the formed composite (interfacial layers determine the unique physical, mechanical and operational characteristics of composite materials. The technology of obtaining nanostructured materials, features of their structure and properties, examples of practical applications of composite materials are considered.

  16. Adaptive, tolerant and efficient composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Martin; Sinapius, Michael (eds.) [German Aerospace Center DLR, Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. of Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems

    2013-07-01

    Polymer composites offer the possibility for functional integration since the material is produced simultaneously with the product. The efficiency of composite structures raises through functional integration. The specific production processes of composites offer the possibility to improve and to integrate more functions thus making the structure more valuable. Passive functions can be improved by combination of different materials from nano to macro scale, i.e. strength, toughness, bearing strength, compression after impact properties or production tolerances. Active functions can be realized by smart materials, i.e. morphing, active vibration control, active structure acoustic control or structure health monitoring. The basis is a comprehensive understanding of materials, simulation, design methods, production technologies and adaptronics. These disciplines together deliver advanced lightweight solutions for applications ranging from mechanical engineering to vehicles, airframe and space structures along the complete process chain. The book provides basics as well as inspiring ideas for engineers working in the field of adaptive, tolerant and robust composite structures.

  17. Computational Methods For Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    Selected methods of computation for simulation of mechanical behavior of fiber/matrix composite materials described in report. For each method, report describes significance of behavior to be simulated, procedure for simulation, and representative results. Following applications discussed: effects of progressive degradation of interply layers on responses of composite structures, dynamic responses of notched and unnotched specimens, interlaminar fracture toughness, progressive fracture, thermal distortions of sandwich composite structure, and metal-matrix composite structures for use at high temperatures. Methods demonstrate effectiveness of computational simulation as applied to complex composite structures in general and aerospace-propulsion structural components in particular.

  18. CAD/CAM of braided preforms for advanced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gui; Pastore, Christopher; Tsai, Yung Jia; Soebroto, Heru; Ko, Frank

    A CAD/CAM system for braiding to produce preforms for advanced textile structural composites is presented in this paper. The CAD and CAM systems are illustrated in detail. The CAD system identifies the fiber placement and orientation needed to fabricate a braided structure over a mandrel, for subsequent composite formation. The CAM system uses the design parameters generated by the CAD system to control the braiding machine. Experimental evidence demonstrating the success of combining these two technologies to form a unified CAD/CAM system for the manufacture of braided fabric preforms with complex structural shapes is presented.

  19. Radiation Processing of Advanced Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics, are being used widely for many applications. Carbon fiber/epoxies composites have attracted special attention from the aircraft, aerospace, marine engineering, sporting goods and transportation industries, because they have useful mechanical properties including high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios, a corrosion resistant, impact and damage tolerance characteristics and wear properties. Thermal curing has been the dominant industrial process for advanced composites until now, however, a radiation curing process using UV, microwave x-ray, electron-beam(E-beam) and γ-ray has emerged as a better alternative in recent years. These processes are compatible with the manufacturing of composites using traditional fabrication methods including a filament/tape winding, pultrusion, resin transfer moulding and hand lay-up. In this study, E-beam curable carbon fiber/epoxy composites were manufactured, and their mechanical properties were investigated. Two epoxy resins (bisphenol-A, bisphenol-F) containing photo-initiators (tri aryl sulfonium hexafluorophosphate, tri aryl sulfonium hexafluoroantimonate) were used as a matrix and a 4H-satin carbon woven fabric was used as a reinforcement. And then an electron beam irradiated the composites up to 200 kGy in a vacuum and an inert atmosphere. The cure cycle was optimized and the properties of composites were evaluated and analyzed via a differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, sol-gel extractions, FT-NIR, universal test machine, and an impact tester. The gel content, glass transition temperature and mechanical strength of the irradiated composites were increased with an increasing radiation dose

  20. Large floating structures technological advances

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, BT

    2015-01-01

    This book surveys key projects that have seen the construction of large floating structures or have attained detailed conceptual designs. This compilation of key floating structures in a single volume captures the innovative features that mark the technological advances made in this field of engineering, and will provide a useful reference for ideas, analysis, design, and construction of these unique and emerging urban projects to offshore and marine engineers, urban planners, architects and students.

  1. Advanced composite elevator for Boeing 727 aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Detail design activities are reported for a program to develop an advanced composites elevator for the Boeing 727 commercial transport. Design activities include discussion of the full scale ground test and flight test activities, the ancillary test programs, sustaining efforts, weight status, and the production status. Prior to flight testing of the advanced composites elevator, ground, flight flutter, and stability and control test plans were reviewed and approved by the FAA. Both the ground test and the flight test were conducted according to the approved plan, and were witnessed by the FAA. Three and one half shipsets have now been fabricated without any significant difficulty being encountered. Two elevator system shipsets were weighed, and results validated the 26% predicted weight reduction. The program is on schedule.

  2. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  3. Program for establishing long-time flight service performance of composite materials in the center wing structure of C-130 aircraft. Phase 1: Advanced development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvill, W. E.; Kays, A. O.; Young, E. C.; Mcgee, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    Areas where selective reinforcement of conventional metallic structure can improve static strength/fatigue endurance at lower weight than would be possible if metal reinforcement were used are discussed. These advantages are now being demonstrated by design, fabrication, and tests of three boron-epoxy reinforced C-130E center wing boxes. This structural component was previously redesigned using an aluminum build-up to meet increased severity of fatigue loadings. Direct comparisons of relative structural weights, manufacturing costs, and producibility can therefore be obtained, and the long-time flight service performance of the composite reinforced structure can be evaluated against the wide background of metal reinforced structure.

  4. Investigation of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    This final report consists of a compilation of four separate written documents, three dealing with the response and failure of elliptical composite cylinders to an internal pressure load, and the fourth dealing with the influence of manufacturing imperfections in curved composite panels. The three focused on elliptical cylinders consist of the following: 1 - A paper entitled "Progressive Failure Analysis of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cylinders," 2 - A paper entitled "Influence of Geometric Nonlinearities on the Response and Failure of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cylinders," and 3 - A report entitled "Response and Failure of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cyclinders." The document which deals with the influence of manufacturing imperfections is a paper entitled "Manufacturing Distortions of Curved Composite Panels."

  5. Adaptive, tolerant and efficient composite structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sinapius, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Polymer composites offer the possibility for functional integration since the material is produced simultaneously with the product. The efficiency of composite structures raises through functional integration. The specific production processes of composites offer the possibility to improve and to integrate more functions thus making the structure more valuable. Passive functions can be improved by combination of different materials from nano to macro scale, i.e. strength, toughness, bearing strength, compression after impact properties or production tolerances.  Active functions can be realized by smart materials, i.e. morphing, active vibration control, active structure acoustic control or structure health monitoring. The basis is a comprehensive understanding of materials, simulation, design methods, production technologies and adaptronics. These disciplines together deliver advanced lightweight solutions for applications ranging from mechanical engineering to vehicles, airframe and space structures along ...

  6. Changing the mindset[Lightweight composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLuca, M.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in the use of composite technology are some of the more closely watched in the industry. In the industry all agree that to go deeper systems must get lighter, one way being examined is the replacement of heavy steel systems with lightweight composite structures.Composites offer high strength-to-weight ratio, fatigue, and corrosion-resistance, design flexibility, thermal insulation and stiffness over steel systems. Although generally more expensive on a direct component to component comparison, results in overall lower system cost, especially in the deepwater. Conoco-Phillips are one of the industry's leading advocates of composite technology advancement and this article reports on the discussions the author had with a senior research fellow of the company. Details of the research that has been carried out and how far these developments have reached are covered here.

  7. Damage Modelling For Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Modelling damage in composite materials has played an important role in designing composite structures. Although numerical models for the progressive damage in laminated composites (e.g. transverse cracking, delamination and fibre breakage) have been developed in the literature, there is still a need for further improvement. This thesis aimed at developing damage models suitable for predicting intra-laminar and inter-laminar damage behaviour in fibre-reinforced composite materials. Several ap...

  8. CODSTRAN: Composite durability structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis) is an integrated computer program being developed for the prediction of defect growth and fracture of composite structures subjected to service loads and environments. CODSTRAN is briefly described with respect to organization, capabilities and present status. Application of CODSTRAN current capability to a flat composite laminate with a center slit which was subjected to axial tension loading predicted defect growth which is in good agreement with C-scan ultrasonic test records.

  9. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Repair and Damage Assessment Supporting Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, B. W.; Bodine, J. B.; Dopker, B.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hanson, C. T.; Harris, C. G.; Nelson, K. M.; Walker, T. H.; Kennedy, T. C.; Nahan, M. F.

    1997-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC), Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure. Included in the study is the incorporation of maintainability and repairability requirements of composite primary structure into the design. This contractor report describes activities performed to address maintenance issues in composite fuselage applications. A key aspect of the study was the development of a maintenance philosophy which included consideration of maintenance issues early in the design cycle, multiple repair options, and airline participation in design trades. Fuselage design evaluations considered trade-offs between structural weight, damage resistance/tolerance (repair frequency), and inspection burdens. Analysis methods were developed to assess structural residual strength in the presence of damage, and to evaluate repair design concepts. Repair designs were created with a focus on mechanically fastened concepts for skin/stringer structure and bonded concepts for sandwich structure. Both a large crown (skintstringer) and keel (sandwich) panel were repaired. A compression test of the keel panel indicated the demonstrated repairs recovered ultimate load capability. In conjunction with the design and manufacturing developments, inspection methods were investigated for their potential to evaluate damaged structure and verify the integrity of completed repairs.

  10. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D; Swank, William D.

    2011-08-30

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  11. Advanced composites characterization with x-ray technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaklini, G.Y. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

    1993-12-31

    Recognizing the critical need to advance new composites for the aeronautics and aerospace industries, the author is focusing on advanced test methods that are vital to successful modeling and manufacturing of future generations of high temperature and durable composite materials. These newly developed composites are necessary to reduce propulsion cost and weight, to improve performance and reliability, and to address longer-term national strategic thrusts for sustaining global preeminence in high speed air transport and in high performance military aircraft. Radiography during mechanical testing and intermittent x-ray computed tomography (CT) interrogation were found to be viable nondestructive test methods for understanding damage progression and mechanical behavior of laminated ceramic matrix composite (CMC) systems such as SiC/RBSN and metal matrix composite (MMC) systems such as SiC/Ti based composites. Pretest, in-situ, and post-test radiography provided a greater understanding of CMC mechanical behavior, a verification of related experimental procedures, and validation of related analytical models. CT identified manufacturing problems, guided machining of components to final dimensions, and lead structural and design engineers to realistic component-life-prediction models. The technology needs were defined for the x-ray modalities that were investigated in this paper.

  12. Optimization of Laminated Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Søren Randrup

    Laminated composite materials are widely used in the design of light weight high performance structures like wind turbine blades and aeroplanes due to their superior stiffness and strength-to-weight-ratios compared to their metal counter parts. Furthermore, the use of laminated composite materials...... allows for a higher degree of tailoring of the resulting material. To enable better utilization of the composite materials, optimum design procedures can be used to assist the engineer. This PhD thesis is focused on developing numerical methods for optimization of laminated composite structures...... of the contributions of the PhD project are included in the second part of the thesis. Paper A presents a framework for free material optimization where commercially available finite element analysis software is used as analysis tool. Robust buckling optimization of laminated composite structures by including...

  13. Optimization of Laminated Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Henrichsen, Søren Randrup

    2015-01-01

    Laminated composite materials are widely used in the design of light weight high performance structures like wind turbine blades and aeroplanes due to their superior stiffness and strength-to-weight-ratios compared to their metal counter parts. Furthermore, the use of laminated composite materials allows for a higher degree of tailoring of the resulting material. To enable better utilization of the composite materials, optimum design procedures can be used to assist the engineer. This PhD the...

  14. Quantitative NDE of Composite Structures at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Howell, Patricia A.; Johnston, Patrick H.; Burke, Eric R.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Seebo, Jeffery P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable the use and certification of composites in aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). The rapid, in situ characterization of a wide range of the composite materials and structures has become a critical concern for the industry. In many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over a long time. The quantitative characterization of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking are of particular interest. The research approaches of NASA's Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods, infrared thermography and x-ray computed tomography techniques. The use of simulation tools for optimizing and developing these methods is also an active area of research. This paper will focus on current research activities related to large area NDE for rapidly characterizing aerospace composites.

  15. Cost-efficient manufacturing of composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, W. Tom; Davis, John G.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program is seeking research breakthroughs that will allow structures made of graphite epoxy materials to replace metals in the wings and fuselages of future aircrafts. NASA's goals are to reduce acquisition cost by 20 to 25 percent, structural weight for a resized aircraft by 40 to 50 percent, and the number of parts by half compared to current production aluminum aircraft. The innovative structural concepts, materials, and fabrication techniques emerging from the ACT program are described, and the relationship between aerospace developments and industrial, commercial, and sporting goods applications are discussed.

  16. Cradle-to-Grave Monitoring of Composite Aircraft Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NextGen is proposing a simple yet powerful damage identification technique for advanced composite structures. We propose to develop a damage index based on...

  17. Recent advances in magnetostrictive particulate composite technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Wade J.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.; Carman, Gregory P.

    2002-07-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances in using magnetostrictive particles in a polymer matrix; finding uses in many applications, both as an active transducer and a passive damper. Termed magnetostrictive particulate composites (MPC), the material provides capabilities identical or superior to the monolithic material. Fortis Technologies has been pursuing improvements in the application and fabrication of this innovative material. The MPC technology provides a passive, broadband, large temperature range, high stiffness, dampling material to be used where current technologies fall short. Damping applications of this technology include sporting goods, power/hand tools, space launch and satellite design, noise abatement and vibration isolation. Energy absorption of the composites has been measured and is approaching that of the monolithic material. The material can also be actively controlled by a magnetic field, producing a transducer that can be used for sonar applications. The advantage of this technology over those currently in use is the large power density at relatively low frequencies and the ease of fabrication, allowing less expensive and more effective conformal arrays. Effective strain output and piezomagnetic coefficients have been measured, as have its dynamic properties. The results show significant improvement of the strain output and piezomagnetic coefficients, approaching the monolithic material.

  18. COBSTRAN - COMPOSITE BLADE STRUCTURAL ANALYZER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctural ANalyzer) program is a pre- and post-processor that facilitates the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades, as well as composite wind turbine blades. COBSTRAN combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with a data base of fiber and matrix properties. As a preprocessor for NASTRAN or another Finite Element Method (FEM) program, COBSTRAN generates an FEM model with anisotropic homogeneous material properties. Stress output from the FEM program is provided as input to the COBSTRAN postprocessor. The postprocessor then uses the composite mechanics and laminate theory routines to calculate individual ply stresses, strains, interply stresses, thru-the-thickness stresses and failure margins. COBSTRAN is designed to carry out the many linear analyses required to efficiently model and analyze blade-like structural components made of multilayered angle-plied fiber composites. Components made from isotropic or anisotropic homogeneous materials can also be modeled as a special case of COBSTRAN. NASTRAN MAT1 or MAT2 material cards are generated according to user supplied properties. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77 and was implemented on a CRAY X-MP with a UNICOS 5.0.12 operating system. The program requires either COSMIC NASTRAN or MSC NASTRAN as a structural analysis package. COBSTRAN was developed in 1989, and has a memory requirement of 262,066 64 bit words.

  19. Structural Design of Ares V Interstage Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, David W.; Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Martin, Robert A.; Johnson, Theodore F.

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary and detailed design studies were performed to mature composite structural design concepts for the Ares V Interstage structure as a part of NASA s Advanced Composite Technologies Project. Aluminum honeycomb sandwich and hat-stiffened composite panel structural concepts were considered. The structural design and analysis studies were performed using HyperSizer design sizing software and MSC Nastran finite element analysis software. System-level design trade studies were carried out to predict weight and margins of safety for composite honeycomb-core sandwich and composite hat-stiffened skin design concepts. Details of both preliminary and detailed design studies are presented in the paper. For the range of loads and geometry considered in this work, the hat-stiffened designs were found to be approximately 11-16 percent lighter than the sandwich designs. A down-select process was used to choose the most favorable structural concept based on a set of figures of merit, and the honeycomb sandwich design was selected as the best concept based on advantages in manufacturing cost.

  20. Structure and composition of soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Nenadović

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of soils structure and composition using up to date technique, such as scanning electronic microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, as well as some other characterization methods. It was shown that soil particles have porous structure and dimensions in the range from several millimeters to several hundreds of nanometers and consist of different minerals such as kaolin, quartz and feldspate.

  1. Composite Fan Blade Design for Advanced Engine Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Kuguoglu, Latife H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2004-01-01

    The aerodynamic and structural viability of composite fan blades of the revolutionary Exo-Skeletal engine are assessed for an advanced subsonic mission using the NASA EST/BEST computational simulation system. The Exo-Skeletal Engine (ESE) calls for the elimination of the shafts and disks completely from the engine center and the attachment of the rotor blades in spanwise compression to a rotating casing. The fan rotor overall adiabatic efficiency obtained from aerodynamic analysis is estimated at 91.6 percent. The flow is supersonic near the blade leading edge but quickly transitions into a subsonic flow without any turbulent boundary layer separation on the blade. The structural evaluation of the composite fan blade indicates that the blade would buckle at a rotor speed that is 3.5 times the design speed of 2000 rpm. The progressive damage analysis of the composite fan blade shows that ply damage is initiated at a speed of 4870 rpm while blade fracture takes place at 7640 rpm. This paper describes and discusses the results for the composite blade that are obtained from aerodynamic, displacement, stress, buckling, modal, and progressive damage analyses. It will be demonstrated that a computational simulation capability is readily available to evaluate new and revolutionary technology such as the ESE.

  2. Durability of commercial aircraft and helicopter composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    The development of advanced composite technology during the past decade is discussed. Both secondary and primary components fabricated with boron, graphite, and Kevlar composites are evaluated. Included are spoilers, rudders, and fairings on commercial transports, boron/epoxy reinforced wing structure on C-130 military transports, and doors, fairings, tail rotors, vertical fins, and horizontal stabilizers on commercial helicopters. The development of composite structures resulted in advances in design and manufacturing technology for secondary and primary composite structures for commercial transports. Design concepts and inspection and maintenance results for the components in service are reported. The flight, outdoor ground, and controlled laboratory environmental effects on composites were also determined. Effects of moisture absorption, ultraviolet radiation, aircraft fuels and fluids, and sustained tensile stress are included. Critical parameters affecting the long term durability of composite materials are identified.

  3. An advanced structural analysis/synthesis capability - ACCESS 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, L. A.; Miura, H.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced automated design procedure for minimum weight design of structures (ACCESS 2) is reported. Design variable linking, constraint deletion, and explicit constraint approximation are used to effectively combine finite element and nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The approximation concepts approach to structural synthesis is extended to problems involving fiber composite structure, thermal effects and natural frequency constraints in addition to the usual static stress and displacement limitations. Sample results illustrating these new features are given.

  4. NASTRAN as an analytical research tool for composite mechanics and composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Selected examples are described in which NASTRAN is used as an analysis research tool for composite mechanics and for composite structural components. The examples were selected to illustrate the importance of using NASTRAN as an analysis tool in this rapidly advancing field.

  5. Fiber reinforced polymer composites for bridge structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra CANTORIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in construction materials technology have led to the emergence of new materials with special properties, aiming at safety, economy and functionality of bridges structures. A class of structural materials which was originally developed many years ago, but recently caught the attention of engineers involved in the construction of bridges is fiber reinforced polymer composites. This paper provides an overview of fiber reinforced polymer composites used in bridge structures including types, properties, applications and future trends. The results of this study have revealed that this class of materials presents outstanding properties such as high specific strength, high fatigue and environmental resistance, lightweight, stiffness, magnetic transparency, highly cost-effective, and quick assembly, but in the same time high initial costs, lack of data on long-term field performance, low fire resistance. Fiber reinforced polymer composites were widely used in construction of different bridge structures such as: deck and tower, I-beams, tendons, cable stands and proved to be materials for future in this field.

  6. Factors Affecting Fiber Design and Selection for Advanced Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Structural Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) have the potential for application in the hot sections of a variety of advanced propulsion and power systems. It is therefore necessary to have a general understanding of the key properties of CMC and Reinforcing Fibers. This need is complicated by the wide variety of application conditions and structural requirements for which CMC's will be used, and the proprietary concerns of the design engineers. CMC's, to be successful, must display properties which are competitive with the currently used high temperature structural materials: (i.e., Iron and Nickel based superalloys, tough monolithic ceramics, and carbon/carbon composites.) Structural CMC offers several areas of competition: (1) performance, (i.e., strength and strength retention, creep resistance, and thermal conductivity), (2) reliability (i.e., environmental durability, and damage tolerance) and (3) processing (i.e., capability for varying sizes and shapes, and cost effective fabrication). The presentation further discusses, and illustrates with fiber and CMC data the key fiber properties and processes which strongly affect each CMC area of competition. The presentation further discusses the current knowledge of the important factors which control the key fiber properties. A design guidelines for the optimum fiber characteristics is developed, and the currently available fibers are compared against those guidelines.

  7. On composites with periodic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemat-Nasser, S.; Iwakuma, T.; Hejazi, M.

    1982-01-01

    The overall moduli of a composite with an isotropic elastic matrix containing periodically distributed (anisotropic) inclusions or voids, can be expressed in terms of several infinite series which only depend on the geometry of the inclusions or voids, and hence can be computed once and for all for given geometries. For solids with periodic structures these infinite series play exactly the same role as does Eshelby's tensor for a single inclusion or void in an unbounded elastic medium. For spherical and circular-cylindrical geometries, the required infinite series are calculated and the results are tabulated. These are then used to estimate the overall elastic moduli when either the overall strains or the overall stresses are prescribed, obtaining the same results. These results are compared with other estimates and with experimental data. It is found that the model of composites with periodic structure yields estimates in excellent agreement with the experimental observations.

  8. Research advance in wood composites in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Wood composites can generally be classified in three parts: laminated composites, mixed composites and penetrated composites. Every part has its own characteristic and can be further divided. This paper introduces the history and the state of development of wood composites in China. The research about glue-laminated timber is rare and the industry hardly comes to being. A great of achievements have been obtained in mixed composites and it is well industrialized. Many studies on scrimber have been done and the Chinese researchers are looking for a feasible way to develop the scrimber industry in China. Chinese researchers also spent so much energy in studying wood plastic composites (WPC), but it has not been industrialized due to the high cost.

  9. Electron Beam Curing of Advanced Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The fundamental concept of electron beam method and the application in cure of composites are elaborated in this paper. The components of electron beam curing system are introduced. The mechanisms of interaction between electron beam and polymer matrix composites are presented. Recent studies reported including work of authors themselves on electron beam curing of composites are also discussed. Moreover, the authors believe that it is necessary to do the basic research about understanding how electron beam affects cured network and the mechanical/physical properties of the composites, for establishing a quantitative or semi-quantitative formulation.

  10. Micromechanics Based Design/Analysis Codes for Advanced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced high temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) hold an enormous potential for use in aero and space related applications specifically for propulsion system components. Consequently, this has led to a multitude of research activities pertaining to fabrication, testing and modeling of these materials. The efforts directed at the development of ceramic matrix composites have focused primarily on improving the properties of the constituents as individual phases. It has, however, become increasingly clear that for CMC to be successfully employed in high temperature applications, research and development efforts should also focus on optimizing the synergistic performance of the constituent phases within the as-produced microstructure of the complex shaped CMC part. Despite their attractive features, the introduction of these materials in a wide spectrum of applications has been excruciatingly slow. The reasons are the high costs associated with the manufacturing and a complete experimental testing and characterization of these materials. Often designers/analysts do not have a consistent set of necessary properties and design allowables to be able to confidently design and analyze structural components made from these composites. Furthermore, the anisotropy of these materials accentuates the burden both on the test engineers and the designers by requiring a vastly increased amount of data/characterization compared to conventional materials.

  11. Open-Lattice Composite Design Strengthens Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Advanced composite materials and designs could eventually be applied as the framework for spacecraft or extraterrestrial constructions for long-term space habitation. One such structure in which NASA has made an investment is the IsoTruss grid structure, an extension of a two-dimensional "isogrid" concept originally developed at McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, under contract to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in the early 1970s. IsoTruss is a lightweight and efficient alternative to monocoque composite structures, and can be produced in a manner that involves fairly simple techniques. The technology was developed with support from NASA to explore space applications, and is garnering global attention because it is extremely lightweight; as much as 12 times stronger than steel; inexpensive to manufacture, transport, and install; low-maintenance; and is fully recyclable. IsoTruss is expected to see application as utility poles and meteorological towers, for the aforementioned reasons and because its design offers superior wind resistance and is less susceptible to breaking and woodpeckers. Other applications, such as reinforcement for concrete structures, stand-alone towers, sign supports, prostheses, irrigation equipment, and sporting goods are being explored

  12. Advanced composites: Design and application. Proceedings of the meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shives, T. R.; Willard, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The design and application of advanced composites is discussed with emphasis on aerospace, aircraft, automotive, marine, and industrial applications. Failure modes in advanced composites are also discussed.

  13. Structural bioinformatics: advances and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray crystallography is the most used and effective technique for obtaining the structure of proteins and protein complexes. As of today, the x-ray structure of tens of thousand proteins is known and this number is continuously increasing, also thanks to the efforts of structural genomics projects aimed at providing representative examples of the protein structural space. In an x-ray diffraction experiment, crystals of the protein of interest are irradiated with x-ray, and interference effects give rise to a characteristic diffraction pattern. The amplitudes and phases of each reflection can be used to compute the electron density. However only, the intensity of the reflected waves can be measured, while their phase needs to be obtained by other means. One way to obtain the phase information is to use prior knowledge of the protein structure (search model). In some cases, the structure of a homologous protein or a model of the target protein can be sufficient to approximate the relative position of the atoms in the structure and allow the phases to be computed. This strategy is known under the name of molecular replacement. We have extensively investigated the relationship between the quality of a model and its usefulness as a search model in MR and discuss here our results

  14. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  15. Preliminary weight and cost estimates for transport aircraft composite structural design concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary weight and cost estimates have been prepared for design concepts utilized for a transonic long range transport airframe with extensive applications of advanced composite materials. The design concepts, manufacturing approach, and anticipated details of manufacturing cost reflected in the composite airframe are substantially different from those found in conventional metal structure and offer further evidence of the advantages of advanced composite materials.

  16. Advances in the history of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguez, Nieves; Ellacuria, Joseba; Soler, José Ignacio; Triana, Rodrigo; Ibaseta, Guillermo

    2003-11-01

    The use of composite resins as direct restoration material in posterior teeth has demonstrated a great increase, due to esthetic requirements and the controversy regarding the mercury content in silver amalgams. In this article, we have reviewed the composition modifications which have occurred in materials based on resins since their introduction over a half a century ago which have enabled great improvements in their physical and mechanical properties. Likewise, we have highlighted current lines of research, centered on finding the ideal material for replacing silver amalgam as a direct filling material.

  17. Electron processing of fibre-reinforced advanced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajit; Saunders, Chris B.; Barnard, John W.; Lopata, Vince J.; Kremers, Walter; McDougall, Tom E.; Chung, Minda; Tateishi, Miyoko

    1996-08-01

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fibre-reinforced epoxies, are used in the aircraft, aerospace, sporting goods, and transportation industries. Though thermal curing is the dominant industrial process for advanced composites, electron curing of similar composites containing acrylated epoxy matrices has been demonstrated by our work. The main attraction of electron processing technology over thermal technology is the advantages it offers which include ambient temperature curing, reduced curing times, reduced volatile emissions, better material handling, and reduced costs. Electron curing technology allows for the curing of many types of products, such as complex shaped, those containing different types of fibres, and up to 15 cm thick. Our work has been done principally with the AECL's 10 MeV, 1 kW electron accelerator; we have also done some comparative work with an AECL Gammacell 220. In this paper we briefly review our work on the various aspects of electron curing of advanced composites and their properties.

  18. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  19. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT): Composites Integrated Modeling Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CIM encompassed computational methods, tools and processes that go into the materials, design, manufacturing and qualification of composite aerospace structures....

  20. Flight-service evaluation of composite structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. B.

    1973-01-01

    A review of programs aimed at flight-service evaluation of composite materials in various applications is presented. These flight-service programs are expected to continue for up to 5 years and include selective reinforcement of an airplane center wing box a helicopter tail cone, and composite replacements for commercial aircraft spoilers and fairings. These longtime flight-service programs will help provide the necessary information required by commercial airlines to commit advanced composites to aircraft structures with confidence. Results of these programs will provide information concerning the stability of composite materials when subjected to various flight environments.

  1. Flight service environmental effects on composite materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Baker, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley and the U.S. Army have jointly sponsored programs to assess the effects of realistic flight environments and ground-based exposure on advanced composite materials and structures. Composite secondary structural components were initially installed on commercial transport aircraft in 1973; secondary and primary structural components were installed on commercial helicopters in 1979; and primary structural components were installed on commercial aircraft in the mid-to-late 1980's. Service performance, maintenance characteristics, and residual strength of numerous components are reported. In addition to data on flight components, 10 year ground exposure test results on material coupons are reported. Comparison between ground and flight environmental effects for several composite material systems are also presented. Test results indicate excellent in-service performance with the composite components during the 15 year period. Good correlation between ground-based material performance and operational structural performance has been achieved.

  2. Combustion synthesis of advanced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John J.

    1993-01-01

    Self-propagating high temperature (combustion) synthesis (SHS), has been investigated as a means of producing both dense and expanded (foamed) ceramic and ceramic-metal composites, ceramic powders and whiskers. Several model exothermic combustion synthesis reactions were used to establish the importance of certain reaction parameters, e.g., stoichiometry, green density, combustion mode, particle size, etc. on the control of the synthesis reaction, product morphology and properties. The use of an in situ liquid infiltration technique and the effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e., solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g., volatility and thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized composite materials is discussed. Conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment to take advantage of the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport is also examined.

  3. Conceptual design study of advanced acoustic-composite nacelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, K. E.; Marsh, A. H.; Sargisson, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual studies were conducted to assess the impact of incorporating advanced technologies in the nacelles of a current wide-bodied transport and an advanced technology transport. The improvement possible in the areas of fuel consumption, flyover noise levels, airplane weight, manufacturing costs, and airplane operating cost were evaluated for short and long-duct nacelles. Use of composite structures for acoustic duct linings in the fan inlet and exhaust ducts was considered as well as for other nacelle components. For the wide-bodied transport, the use of a long-duct nacelle with an internal mixer nozzle in the primary exhaust showed significant improvement in installed specific fuel consumption and airplane direct operating costs compared to the current short-duct nacelle. The long-duct mixed-flow nacelle is expected to achieve significant reductions in jet noise during takeoff and in turbo-machinery noise during landing approach. Recommendations were made of the technology development needed to achieve the potential fuel conservation and noise reduction benefits.

  4. Single crystal piezoelectric composites for advanced NDT ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Snook, Kevin; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Geng, Xuecang

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, the design, fabrication and characterization of PMN-PT single crystal/epoxy composites are reported for NDT ultrasound transducers. Specifically, 1-3 PMN-PT/epoxy composites with center frequencies of 5 MHz - 40 MHz were designed and fabricated using either the dice-and-fill method or a photolithography based micromachining process. The measured electromechanical coefficients for composites with frequency of 5 MHz - 15 MHz were about 0.78-0.83, and the coupling coefficients for composites with frequencies of 25 MHz- 40 MHz were about 0.71-0.72. The dielectric loss remains low (advanced NDT ultrasound applications.

  5. Multiscale Multifunctional Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells. Global fracture is enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads. The old reference denotes that nothing has been added to this comprehensive report since then.

  6. Process simulation for advanced composites production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, M.D.; Ferko, S.M.; Griffiths, S. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency and lower the cost of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes used to manufacture advanced ceramics by providing the physical and chemical understanding necessary to optimize and control these processes. Project deliverables include: numerical process models; databases of thermodynamic and kinetic information related to the deposition process; and process sensors and software algorithms that can be used for process control. Target manufacturing techniques include CVD fiber coating technologies (used to deposit interfacial coatings on continuous fiber ceramic preforms), chemical vapor infiltration, thin-film deposition processes used in the glass industry, and coating techniques used to deposit wear-, abrasion-, and corrosion-resistant coatings for use in the pulp and paper, metals processing, and aluminum industries.

  7. Advances and trends in computational structures technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.; Venneri, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The major goals of computational structures technology (CST) are outlined, and recent advances in CST are examined. These include computational material modeling, stochastic-based modeling, computational methods for articulated structural dynamics, strategies and numerical algorithms for new computing systems, multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. The role of CST in the future development of structures technology and the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles is addressed, and the future directions of CST research in the prediction of failures of structural components, the solution of large-scale structural problems, and quality assessment and control of numerical simulations are discussed.

  8. Lamb Wave Propagation in Laminated Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Damage detection using guided Lamb waves is an important tool in Structural health Monitoring. In this paper, we outline a method of obtaining Lamb wave modes in composite structures using two dimensional Spectral Finite Elements. Using this approach, Lamb wave dispersion curves are obtained for laminated composite structures with different fibre orientation. These propagating Lamb wave modes are pictorially captured using tone burst signal.

  9. Beam structures classical and advanced theories

    CERN Document Server

    Carrera, Erasmo; Petrolo, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Beam theories are exploited worldwide to analyze civil, mechanical, automotive, and aerospace structures. Many beam approaches have been proposed during the last centuries by eminent scientists such as Euler, Bernoulli, Navier, Timoshenko, Vlasov, etc.  Most of these models are problem dependent: they provide reliable results for a given problem, for instance a given section and cannot be applied to a different one. Beam Structures: Classical and Advanced Theories proposes a new original unified approach to beam theory that includes practically all classical and advanced models for be

  10. Advances in structure research by diffraction methods

    CERN Document Server

    Brill, R

    1970-01-01

    Advances in Structure Research by Diffraction Methods reviews advances in the use of diffraction methods in structure research. Topics covered include the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, with emphasis on Ewald waves in theory and experiment; dynamical theory of electron diffraction; small angle scattering; and molecular packing. This book is comprised of four chapters and begins with an overview of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, especially in terms of how it explains all the absorption and propagation properties of X-rays at the Bragg setting in a perfect crystal. The next

  11. Processamento de laminados de compósitos poliméricos avançados com bordas moldadas Processing of advanced structural polymeric composite laminates with molded edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo M. Cândido

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Técnicas que contribuem para melhorar a qualidade dos compósitos produzidos por laminação manual e cura em autoclave e/ou visando à redução no custo de processamento têm sido intensamente pesquisadas. Uma das maneiras de se obter esse ganho de produtividade é eliminar operações de usinagem da borda por meio da técnica de fabricação de laminados com bordas moldadas. Neste trabalho é apresentada uma revisão da tecnologia de fabricação de peças estruturais de compósitos poliméricos avançados, com ênfase na produção de laminados com bordas moldadas. Exemplos deste tipo de acabamento são mostrados utilizando laminados cruzados simétricos [(0,90/0]s e [(0,90/90]s, fabricados com fita unidirecional contínua e tecido bidirecional de carbono, pré-impregnados com resina epóxi. O arranjo de fibras e resina na região da borda livre de todos os corpos-de-prova foi analisado usando um microscópio óptico. Foi observado que as fibras longitudinais (a 0° podem se mover lateralmente na direção da borda moldada sob ação da pressão aplicada durante a cura. Bolsas de resina pura podem ser formadas nessa região dependendo da seqüência de empilhamento do laminado.Manufacturing techniques that improve the quality and/or reduce the cost of advanced composites structures produced by vacuum bag and cure in autoclave have been intensely investigated. One way to obtain a gain in productivity is to produce laminates with molded edges. This work presents a literature review of the fabrication process of structural parts of advanced polymeric composites, with emphasis in the manufacturing of laminates with molded edges. As an example of this type of edge finishing, symmetric cross ply laminates [(0,90/0]s and [(0,90/90]s were manufactured with pre-impregnated unidirectional tape and fabric. The arrangement of fibers and resin near the free edge of all specimens were analyzed using an optical microscope. It was observed that

  12. Modelling the Crash Response of Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, A.; Kohlgrüber, D.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes recent progress on the materials modelling and numerical simulation of the dynamic crash response of fibre reinforced composite structures. The work is based on the application of explicit finite element analysis codes to composite aircraft structures and structural elements under low velocity impact conditions (up to 15 m/s). Structures studied are designed to absorb crash energy and reduce seat deceleration pulses in aircraft subfloor structures, and consist of an aircra...

  13. Advances in very lightweight composite mirror technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter C.; Bowers, Charles W.; Content, David A.; Marzouk, Marzouk; Romeo, Robert C.

    2000-09-01

    We report progress in the development of very lightweight (roll off and several waves (rms optical) of astigmatism, coma, and third-order spherical aberration. These are indications of thermal contraction in an inhomogeneous medium. This inhomogeneity is due to a systematic radial variation in density and fiber/resin ratio induced in composite plies when draped around a small and highly curved mandrel. The figure accuracy is expected to improve with larger size optics and in mirrors with longer radii of curvature. Nevertheless, the present accuracy figure is sufficient for using postfiguring techniques such as ion milling to achieve diffraction-limited performances at optical and UV wavelengths. We demonstrate active figure control using a simple apparatus of low-mass, low-force actuators to correct astigmatism. The optimized replication technique is applied to the fabrication of a 0.6-m-diam mirror with an areal density of 3.2 kg/m2. Our result demonstrates that the very lightweight, large-aperture construction used in radio telescopes can now be applied to optical telescopes.

  14. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  15. Advanced structural equation modeling issues and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Marcoulides, George A

    2013-01-01

    By focusing primarily on the application of structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques in example cases and situations, this book provides an understanding and working knowledge of advanced SEM techniques with a minimum of mathematical derivations. The book was written for a broad audience crossing many disciplines, assumes an understanding of graduate level multivariate statistics, including an introduction to SEM.

  16. Structural health monitoring: numerical damage predictor for composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Lannamann, Daniel L.

    2001-01-01

    The use of composite materials in both civil and military applications is increasing as composites potentially offer many advantages over traditional structural materials. Composites typically provide superior strength to weight ratio, better resistance to corrosion, and especially for military applications, greater ballistic protection. Wide use of composites is found in aircraft, armored vehicles, ships and civil structures This present research demonstrates the ability to numerically detec...

  17. Heterogeneity in mechanics of composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak, Czeslaw

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this contribution is to establish the theoretical basis for calculations and design of macroscopically heterogeneous composite structure. The "apparent" properties of such structures depend on position in the body. The considerations are carried out for deterministic description of linearly elastic composites with perfect bonding between material constituents.

  18. Multifunctional Weft-knitted Flexible Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, S.; Fernando, A.; Potluri, P.;Gresil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional composite structures offer unique features such as the ability to sense and respond to external stimuli that can be force, pressure or temperature. Knitted preforms are popular due their excellent properties like flexibility and impact resistance. So far, most of the research is focused on mechanical properties of rigid knitted composites structures. In this research, a preform for a composite is produced having a knitted functional sensing layer constructed using stainless st...

  19. Development of Textile Reinforced Composites for Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1998-01-01

    NASA has been a leader in development of composite materials for aircraft applications during the past 25 years. In the early 1980's NASA and others conducted research to improve damage tolerance of composite structures through the use of toughened resins but these resins were not cost-effective. The aircraft industry wanted affordable, robust structures that could withstand the rigors of flight service with minimal damage. The cost and damage tolerance barriers of conventional laminated composites led NASA to focus on new concepts in composites which would incorporate the automated manufacturing methods of the textiles industry and which would incorporate through-the-thickness reinforcements. The NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program provided the resources to extensively investigate the application of textile processes to next generation aircraft wing and fuselage structures. This paper discusses advanced textile material forms that have been developed, innovative machine concepts and key technology advancements required for future application of textile reinforced composites in commercial transport aircraft. Multiaxial warp knitting, triaxial braiding and through-the-thickness stitching are the three textile processes that have surfaced as the most promising for further development. Textile reinforced composite structural elements that have been developed in the NASA ACT Program are discussed. Included are braided fuselage frames and window-belt reinforcements, woven/stitched lower fuselage side panels, stitched multiaxial warp knit wing skins, and braided wing stiffeners. In addition, low-cost processing concepts such as resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI), and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are discussed. Process modeling concepts to predict resin flow and cure in textile preforms are also discussed.

  20. Development of stitched/RTM composite primary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullerd, Susan M.; Dow, Marvin B.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program is to provide the technology required to gain the full benefit of weight savings and performance offered by composite primary structures. Achieving the goal is dependent on developing composite materials and structures which are damage tolerant and economical to manufacture. Researchers at NASA LaRC and Douglas Aircraft Company are investigating stitching reinforcement combined with resin transfer molding (RTM) to create structures meeting the ACT program goals. The Douglas work is being performed under a NASA contract entitled Innovative Composites Aircraft Primary Structures (ICAPS). The research is aimed at materials, processes and structural concepts for application in both transport wings and fuselages. Empirical guidelines are being established for stitching reinforcement in primary structures. New data are presented in this paper for evaluation tests of thick (90-ply) and thin (16-ply) stitched laminates, and from selection tests of RTM composite resins. Tension strength, compression strength and post-impact compression strength data are reported. Elements of a NASA LaRC program to expand the science base for stitched/RTM composites are discussed.

  1. Hydrodynamic forces on composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Millhouse, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Using a tow tank environment an experiment was set up to measure for response of composite samples of varying stiffness to a geometrically comparable more rigid aluminum sample which was tested at increasing speeds. Also, a square composite shape was tested in a frame providing clamped boundary conditions. Testing of this sample over varying speeds was also performed at varying position angles and was analyzed for force, strain and flo...

  2. Thermomechanics of composite structures under high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrienko, Yu I

    2016-01-01

    This pioneering book presents new models for the thermomechanical behavior of composite materials and structures taking into account internal physico-chemical transformations such as thermodecomposition, sublimation and melting at high temperatures (up to 3000 K). It is of great importance for the design of new thermostable materials and for the investigation of reliability and fire safety of composite structures. It also supports the investigation of interaction of composites with laser irradiation and the design of heat-shield systems. Structural methods are presented for calculating the effective mechanical and thermal properties of matrices, fibres and unidirectional, reinforced by dispersed particles and textile composites, in terms of properties of their constituent phases. Useful calculation methods are developed for characteristics such as the rate of thermomechanical erosion of composites under high-speed flow and the heat deformation of composites with account of chemical shrinkage. The author expan...

  3. 76 FR 74655 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ...-structural elements through a new rulemaking task, in coordination with the European Aviation Safety Agency... composite structural elements or components, ] detail design points, and fabrication techniques and will be... certification process, to address advances in composite structural fatigue substantiation technology. It...

  4. Multi-functional composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  5. Multi-functional composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  6. Conceptual study on a new generation of the high-innovative advanced porous and composite nanostructural functional materials with nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; M. Pawlyta; A. Hudecki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to analyse theoretically the possibilities of the development of a new generation of the high-innovative advanced porous and composite nanostructural functional materials with nanofibers and to study into the material science grounds of synthesis and/or production and formulation of such materials’ structure and properties and to characterise and model their structure and properties depending on the compositional, phase and chemical composition and the app...

  7. Advances in soil-structure interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is utmost important that lifeline infrastructures (such as bridges, hospitals, power plants, dams etc.) are safe and functional during earthquakes as damage or collapse of these structures may have far reaching implications. A lifeline's failure may hamper relief and rescue operations required just after an earthquake and secondly its indirect economical losses may be very severe. Therefore, safety of these structures during earthquakes is vital. Further, damage to nuclear facilities during earthquake may lead to disaster. These structures should be designed adequately taking into account all the important issues. Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) is one of the design issues, which is often overlooked and even in some cases ignored. The effects of dynamic SSI are well understood and practiced in the nuclear power industry (for large foundations of the nuclear containment structures) since sixties. However, in last decade, there are many advances in techniques of SSI and those need to be incorporated in practice. Failures of many structures occurred during the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge, California earthquakes and the 1995 Kobe, Japan earthquake due to SSI or a related issue. Many jetties had failed in Andaman and Nicobar islands due to Sumatra earthquake and ensuing tsunamis. It is because of this recent experience that the importance of SSI on dynamic response of structures during earthquakes has been fully realized. General belief that the SSI effects are always beneficial for the structure is not correct. Some cases have been presented where it is shown that SSI effects are detrimental for the stability of the structure. This paper addresses the effects of dynamic SSI on the response of the structures and explains its importance. Further advances in SSI studies have been discussed

  8. Dynamic response of composite structures underwater

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jacob E.

    2013-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This paper presents a comparison of the dynamic response of composite structures that are subjected to low velocity impacts while being suspended both in air, and submerged in water. As the U.S. Navy continues to use larger composite components in the construction of their ships, an understanding of the effect of submergence in water (i.e., fluid-structure interaction) on various locations of the structures can be instrumental in the d...

  9. NASA service experience with composite components. [for aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. B.; Chapman, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    NASA Langley has been active in sponsoring flight service programs with advanced composites during the past decade. A broad data base and confidence in the durability of composite structures are being developed. Flight service experience is reported for more than 140 composite aircraft components with up to 8 years service and almost two million successful component flight hours. Composite components are being evaluated on Boeing, Douglas, and Lockheed transport aircraft. Components are currently under development for service evaluation on Bell and Sikorsky helicopters. Design concepts and inspection and maintenance results are reported for components currently in service. Components under development in the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program are discussed. Results of flight, outdoor ground, and controlled laboratory environmental tests on composite materials used in the flight service programs are also presented.

  10. Overview of bacterial cellulose composites: a multipurpose advanced material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nasrullah; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khattak, Waleed Ahmad; Park, Joong Kon

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has received substantial interest owing to its unique structural features and impressive physico-mechanical properties. BC has a variety of applications in biomedical fields, including use as biomaterial for artificial skin, artificial blood vessels, vascular grafts, scaffolds for tissue engineering, and wound dressing. However, pristine BC lacks certain properties, which limits its applications in various fields; therefore, synthesis of BC composites has been conducted to address these limitations. A variety of BC composite synthetic strategies have been developed based on the nature and relevant applications of the combined materials. BC composites are primarily synthesized through in situ addition of reinforcement materials to BC synthetic media or the ex situ penetration of such materials into BC microfibrils. Polymer blending and solution mixing are less frequently used synthetic approaches. BC composites have been synthesized using numerous materials ranging from organic polymers to inorganic nanoparticles. In medical fields, these composites are used for tissue regeneration, healing of deep wounds, enzyme immobilization, and synthesis of medical devices that could replace cardiovascular and other connective tissues. Various electrical products, including biosensors, biocatalysts, E-papers, display devices, electrical instruments, and optoelectronic devices, are prepared from BC composites with conductive materials. In this review, we compiled various synthetic approaches for BC composite synthesis, classes of BC composites, and applications of BC composites. This study will increase interest in BC composites and the development of new ideas in this field.

  11. Recent advances in lightweight, filament-wound composite pressure vessel technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A review of recent advances is presented for lightweight, high performance composite pressure vessel technology that covers the areas of design concepts, fabrication procedures, applications, and performance of vessels subjected to single cycle burst and cyclic fatigue loading. Filament wound fiber/epoxy composite vessels were made from S glass, graphite, and Kevlar 49 fibers and were equipped with both structural and nonstructural liners. Pressure vessels structural efficiencies were attained which represented weight savings, using different liners, of 40 to 60 percent over all titanium pressure vessels. Significant findings in each area are summarized.

  12. Forming of shape memory composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    A new forming procedure was developed to produce shape memory composite structures having structural composite skins over a shape memory polymer core. Core material was obtained by solid state foaming of an epoxy polyester resin with remarkably shape memory properties. The composite skin consisted...... tomography. Final shape memory composite panels were mechanically tested by three point bending before and after a shape memory step. This step consisted of a compression to reduce the panel thickness up to 60%. At the end of the bending test the panel shape was recovered by heating and a new memory step...... was performed with a higher thickness reduction. Memory steps were performed at room temperature and 120 °C so as to test the foam core in the glassy and rubbery state, respectively. Shape memory tests revealed the ability of the shape memory composite structures to recover the initial shape also after severe...

  13. Hybrid Composite Structures: Multifunctionality through Metal Fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, T

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of fibre reinforced polymer composites into the wings and fuselages of the newest aircraft are changing the design and manufacturing approach. Composites provide greater freedom to designers who want to improve aircraft performance in an affordable way. In this quest, researchers are looking to the area of multifunctional structures, which represents a new manufacturing and integration methodology. Composite materials are ideally suited to achieve multifunctionality because t...

  14. Progressive failure analysis of laminated composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Moas, Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    Laminated composite structures have started to play a very significant role in today's aircraft industry. The application of composite materials has now gone beyond the borders of aircraft design and has entered into such fields as automotive, athletics and recreational equipment, etc. The light weight and high specific strength of composite material helps design vehicles with higher fuel efficiency and longevity. In order to understand the influence of design parameters related to the use o...

  15. A Science Center for the Advanced Composition Explorer

    OpenAIRE

    Garrard, T. L.; Hammond, J S

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission is supported by an ACE Science Center for the purposes of facilitating collaborative work. It is intended that coordinated use of a centralized science facility by the ACE team will ensure appropriate use of data formatting standards, thus easing access to the data; will improve communications within and to the ACE science working team; and will reduce redundant effort in data processing.

  16. Teaching Advanced ESL Composition with an Internet Courseware

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James J. Kohn

    2001-01-01

    In the Spring of 1999, this writer experimented in the use of a software program as an adjunct to an advanced-level English composition class for international students at San Francisco State University. In this paper, he presents a summary of the results of the experiment, including a description of the courseware program which was used, some samples of the activities, and an evaluation of the class based in part on the students' own assessment of the program.

  17. Imperfection insensitivity analyses of advanced composite tow-steered shells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kin C; Farrokh, Babak; Stanford, Bret K.; Weaver, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Two advanced composite tow-steered shells, one with tow overlaps and another without overlaps, were previously designed, fabricated and tested in end compression, both without cutouts, and with small and large cutouts. In each case, good agreement was observed between experimental buckling loads and supporting linear bifurcation buckling analyses. However, previous buckling tests and analyses have shown historically poor correlation, perhaps due to the presence of geometric imperfections that...

  18. Future design of composite launcher structures

    OpenAIRE

    Degenhardt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The Space industry demand for lighter and cheaper launcher transport systems. The running EU project DESICOS (New Robust DESIgn Guideline for Imperfection Sensitive COmposite Launcher Structures, cf. [1]), which started in February 2012, contributes to these aims by a new design procedure for imperfection sensitive composite launcher structures, exploiting the worst imperfection approach efficiently by implementation of the Single Perturbation Load Approach [2]. Currently, imperfection sensit...

  19. Surface structured bonded composite-metal joint

    OpenAIRE

    Di Giandomenico, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The design of structural joints is one of the critical challenges for the development of composite lightweight aircraft and motorsport structures. Despite the universal reliance upon mechanical fastening and adhesive bonding, the disadvantages of both when applied to high stiffness composites are considerable. For bolting and riveting these include added weight as laminates are thickened to account for stress concentrations. For bonding these include chemical uncertainties o...

  20. Flutter study of an advanced composite wing with external stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Nagaraja, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    A flutter test using a scaled model of an advanced composite wing for a Navy attack aircraft has been conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The model was a wall-mounted half-span wing with a semi-span of 6.63 ft. The wing had an aspect ratio of 5.31, taper ratio of 0.312, and quarter-chord sweep of 25 degrees. The model was supported in a manner that simulated the load path in the carry-through structure of the aircraft and the symmetric boundary condition at the fuselage centerline. The model was capable of carrying external stores from three pylon locations on the wing. Flutter tests were conducted for the wing with and without external stores. No flutter was encountered for the clean wing at test conditions which simulated the scaled airplane operating envelope. Flutter boundaries were obtained for several external store configurations. The flutter boundaries for the fuel tanks were nearly Mach number independent (occurring at constant dynamic pressure). To study the aerodynamic effect of the fuel tank stores, pencil stores (slender cylindrical rods) which had the same mass and pitch and yaw inertia as the fuel tanks were tested on the model. These pencil store configurations exhibited a transonic dip in the flutter dynamic pressure, indicating that the aerodynamic effect of the actual fuel tanks on flutter was significant. Several flutter analyses methods were used in an attempt to predict the flutter phenomenon exhibited during the wind-tunnel test. The analysis gave satisfactory predictions of flutter for the pencil store configurations, but unsatisfactory correlation for the actual fuel tank configurations.

  1. Optimum lay-up design of variable stiffness composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Van Campen, J.M.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in automated fibre-placement (AFP) technology make it possible to take laminate tailoring further than just stacking sequence optimisation; they enable the designer to vary the fibre orientation angle spatially within each ply. Spatial variation of fibre orientation angles results in a variable stiffness (VS) laminate. The work presented in this thesis constitutes a possible second step of a two-step design process for VS composite structures. The first step is to optimise a VS c...

  2. Composite curved frames for helicopter fuselage structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, M. J.; Lowry, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the results of analysis and testing of composite curved frames. A major frame was selected from the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter and designed as a composite structure. The curved beam effects were expected to increase flange axial stresses and induce transverse bending. A NASTRAN finite element analysis was conducted and the results were used in the design of composite curved frame specimens. Three specimens were fabricated and five static tests were conducted. The NASTRAN analysis and test results are compared for axial, transverse, and Web strains. Results show the curved beam effects are closely predicted by a NASTRAN analysis and the effects increase with loading on the composite frames.

  3. Voids' System in the Woven Composite Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavla VOZKOVA

    2006-01-01

    Composites are common material constructions for high-tech use now. Mechanical properties of woven reinforced composites are influenced by voids inside the structure.Voids could be classified to the two sections. Long and thin cracks are more dangerous than pores. It is important to find relations between preparation and place of occurrence of voids. This paper classifies defects according to rise mechanism, point of occurrence, orientation, size and affect to the properties. Image analysis was used for observing samples. Future work would be oriented not only to observing real samples, but also to calculate mechanical properties from real and ideal structures in 3D woven reinforced composites.

  4. Anisotropic magnetism in field-structured composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic field-structured composites (FSCs) are made by structuring magnetic particle suspensions in uniaxial or biaxial (e.g., rotating) magnetic fields, while polymerizing the suspending resin. A uniaxial field produces chainlike particle structures, and a biaxial field produces sheetlike particle structures. In either case, these anisotropic structures affect the measured magnetic hysteresis loops, with the magnetic remanence and susceptibility increased significantly along the axis of the structuring field, and decreased slightly orthogonal to the structuring field, relative to the unstructured particle composite. The coercivity is essentially unaffected by structuring. We present data for FSCs of magnetically soft particles, and demonstrate that the altered magnetism can be accounted for by considering the large local fields that occur in FSCs. FSCs of magnetically hard particles show unexpectedly large anisotropies in the remanence, and this is due to the local field effects in combination with the large crystalline anisotropy of this material. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. Ultrasonic Verification of Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Pelt, Maurice; Boer, Robert Jan,; Schoemaker, Christiaan; Sprik, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    International audience Ultrasonic Verification is a new method for the monitoring large surface areas of CFRP by ultrasound with few sensors. The echo response of a transmitted pulse through the structure is compared with the response of an earlier obtained reference signal to calculate a fidelity parameter. A change in fidelity over time is indicative for a new defect in the structure. This paper presents an experimental assessment of the effectiveness and reproducibility of the method.

  6. Composite blade structural analyzer (COBSTRAN) user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The installation and use of a computer code, COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctrual ANalyzer), developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and also for composite wind turbine blades was described. This code combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with an internal data base of fiber and matrix properties. Inputs to the code are constituent fiber and matrix material properties, factors reflecting the fabrication process, composite geometry and blade geometry. COBSTRAN performs the micromechanics, macromechanics and laminate analyses of these fiber composites. COBSTRAN generates a NASTRAN model with equivalent anisotropic homogeneous material properties. Stress output from NASTRAN is used to calculate individual ply stresses, strains, interply stresses, thru-the-thickness stresses and failure margins. Curved panel structures may be modeled providing the curvature of a cross-section is defined by a single value function. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77.

  7. Impact Loading of Composite and Sandwich Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemahvazi, Sohrab

    2010-01-01

    Low weight is one of the most important factors in the design process of high speed naval ships, road vehicles and aircrafts. Lower structural weight enables the possibility of down-sizing the propulsion system and thus decrease manufacturing and operating costs as well as reducing the environmental impact. Two efficient ways of reducing the structural weight of a structure is by using high performance composite materials and by using geometrically efficient structures such as the sandwich co...

  8. Production defects in marine composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayman, Brian; Berggreen, Christian; Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.

    2007-01-01

    Composite structures are often used when there is a requirement for low weight. Then a key aspect is to be able to take full advantage of the material and utilise it to its limits. To do this it is important to achieve as low a variability as possible in the manufacture of such structures...

  9. Composites on the way to structural automotive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, H.; Kopp, J.; Stieg, J. [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Against the background of a steady increase of the standards on comfort, passive safety and driving performance of vehicles as well as the commitment to reduce fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions, the demand for lightweight construction attains paramount importance. The use of aluminum, magnesium or new steel alloys in the body structure can lead to significant weight reduction compared with conventional steel concepts. Furthermore, maximum weight reduction will require an intensive use of advanced composites in primary structures. The paper deals with the potentials and the challenges coming along with the introduction of advanced composites into automotive series production. Presently, liquid composite molding and compression molding of high-performance SMC are the most promising technologies to achieve demanding composite parts with high fiber volume fraction, good surface quality and controlled mechanical properties. The performance of specific automotive application processed in these techniques is presented and discussed. On principle, the cost/benefit aspect is of decisive importance for larger volume applications. Considerable efforts are necessary to reduce material and semi-finished product costs and to provide manufacturing technologies which are capable of allowing large-volume automotive production of composite components. Especially concepts are desirable which do not only provide a basic material substitution but rather an intelligent design based on component and functional integration as one of the most effective strategies to exploit the advantages of advanced composites. These aspects will be regarded and a brief summary on some other remaining challenges like recycling, crash simulation or joining and assembly technologies for mixed material concepts will be given. (orig.)

  10. Self-assembled hierarchically structured organic-inorganic composite systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritschler, Ulrich; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Designing bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composite materials is one of the most popular current research objectives. Due to the high complexity of biocomposite structures found in nacre and bone, for example, a one-pot scalable and versatile synthesis approach addressing structural key features of biominerals and affording bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composites with advanced physical properties is highly challenging. This article reviews recent progress in synthesizing organic-inorganic composite materials via various self-assembly techniques and in this context highlights a recently developed bio-inspired synthesis concept for the fabrication of hierarchically structured, organic-inorganic composite materials. This one-step self-organization concept based on simultaneous liquid crystal formation of anisotropic inorganic nanoparticles and a functional liquid crystalline polymer turned out to be simple, fast, scalable and versatile, leading to various (multi-)functional composite materials, which exhibit hierarchical structuring over several length scales. Consequently, this synthesis approach is relevant for further progress and scientific breakthrough in the research field of bio-inspired and biomimetic materials. PMID:27175790

  11. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  12. Integrated Design for Manufacturing of Braided Preforms for Advanced Composites Part I: 2D Braiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan Tao; Ko, Frank K.; Hu, Hong

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a 2D braiding design system for advanced textile structural composites was based on dynamic models. A software package to assist in the design of braided preform manufacturing has been developed. The package allows design parameters (machine speeds, fiber volume fraction, tightness factor, etc.) to be easily obtained and the relationships between said parameters to be demonstrated graphically. The fabirc geometry model (FGM) method was adopted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the composites. Experimental evidence demonstrates the success of the use of dynamic models in the design software for the manufacture of braided fabric preforms.

  13. The homes of tomorrow: service composition and advanced user interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Di Ciccio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Home automation represents a growing market in the industrialized world. Today’s systems are mainly based on ad hoc and proprietary solutions, with little to no interoperability and smart integration. However, in a not so distant future, our homes will be equipped with many sensors, actuators and devices, which will collectively expose services, able to smartly interact and integrate, in order to offer complex services providing even richer functionalities. In this paper we present the approach and results of SM4ALL- Smart hoMes for All, a project investigating automatic service composition and advanced user interfaces applied to domotics.

  14. Studies of Impefection Sensitive Conical Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Khakimova, Regina; Castro, Saullo; Arbelo, Mariano; Degenhardt, Richard; Rohwer, Zimmermann; Zimmermann, Klaus; Quappen, Gerrit; Hinsch, Svend

    2013-01-01

    The stability of shell structures has been an object of studies for more than a century. Thin walled cylindrical and conical structures are widely used in aerospace, offshore, marine, civil and other industries. Nowadays, with the growing application of composite materials a deep understanding of the influence of their properties and the laminate stacking sequence on the mechanical behaviour of shell structures is increasingly more important. As it is already known, one of the most significa...

  15. Thick composite structures under a load pinch

    OpenAIRE

    Karama, Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Thick composites are increasingly used in the design of mechanical structures. Combined with low weight, they are generally resistant structures, which can support importante loads. In addition, depending on the number and nature of the materials used, it is possible to adapt properties for specific applications (damping structures).This work proposes the establishment of a new theoretical model of multilayer beam. The model, which is simple and easy handling, is intended for the subsequent e...

  16. The Compositional Structure of the Asteroid Belt

    CERN Document Server

    DeMeo, Francesca E; Walsh, Kevin J; Chapman, Clark R; Binzel, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has brought major improvements in large-scale asteroid discovery and characterization with over half a million known asteroids and over 100,000 with some measurement of physical characterization. This explosion of data has allowed us to create a new global picture of the Main Asteroid Belt. Put in context with meteorite measurements and dynamical models, a new and more complete picture of Solar System evolution has emerged. The question has changed from "What was the original compositional gradient of the Asteroid Belt?" to "What was the original compositional gradient of small bodies across the entire Solar System?" No longer is the leading theory that two belts of planetesimals are primordial, but instead those belts were formed and sculpted through evolutionary processes after Solar System formation. This article reviews the advancements on the fronts of asteroid compositional characterization, meteorite measurements, and dynamical theories in the context of the heliocentric distribution of...

  17. Ownership Structure, Board Composition and Investment Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Palmberg, Johanna; Eklund, Johan; Wiberg, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the relation between ownership structure, board composition and firm performance is explored. A panel of Swedish listed firms is used to investigate how board composition affects firm performance. Board heterogeneity is measured as board size, age and gender diversity. The results show that Swedish board of directors have become more diversified in terms of gender. Also, fewer firms have the CEO on the board which can be interpreted as a sign of increased independency. The regre...

  18. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity. PMID:17326671

  19. Advanced Smart Structures Flight Experiments for Precision Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoyer, Keith K.; Erwin, R. Scott; Ninneman, R. Rory

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents an overview as well as data from four smart structures flight experiments directed by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Middeck Active Control Experiment $¯Flight II (MACE II) is a space shuttle flight experiment designed to investigate modeling and control issues for achieving high precision pointing and vibration control of future spacecraft. The Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX-I) is an experiment that has demonstrated active vibration suppression using smart composite structures with embedded piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The Satellite Ultraquiet Isolation Technology Experiment (SUITE) is an isolation platform that uses active piezoelectric actuators as well as damped mechanical flexures to achieve hybrid passive/active isolation. The Vibration Isolation, Suppression, and Steering Experiment (VISS) is another isolation platform that uses viscous dampers in conjunction with electromagnetic voice coil actuators to achieve isolation as well as a steering capability for an infra-red telescope.

  20. Silver Matrix Composites - Structure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase compositions of composite materials determine their performance as well as physical and mechanical properties. Depending on the type of applied matrix and the kind, amount and morphology of the matrix reinforcement, it is possible to shape the material properties so that they meet specific operational requirements. In the paper, results of investigations on silver alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles are presented. The investigations enabled evaluation of hardness, tribological and mechanical properties as well as the structure of produced materials. The matrix of composite material was an alloy of silver and aluminium, magnesium and silicon. As the reinforcing phase, 20-60 μm ceramic particles (SiC, SiO2, Al2O3 and Cs were applied. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phase in the composites was 10%. The composites were produced using the liquid phase (casting technology, followed by plastic work (the KOBO method. The mechanical and tribological properties were analysed for plastic work-subjected composites. The mechanical properties were assessed based on a static tensile and hardness tests. The tribological properties were investigated under dry sliding conditions. The analysis of results led to determination of effects of the composite production technology on their performance. Moreover, a relationship between the type of reinforcing phase and the mechanical and tribological properties was established.

  1. The use of damage as a design parameter for postbuckling composite aerospace structures

    OpenAIRE

    Orifici, Adrian; Thomson, Rodney; Degenhardt, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Advanced fibre-reinforced polymer composites have seen a rapid increase in use in aircraft structures in recent years due their high specific strength and stiffness, amongst other properties. The use of postbuckling design, where lightweight structures are designed to operate safely at loads in excess of buckling loads, has been applied to metals for decades to design highly efficient structures. However, to date, the application of postbuckling design in composite structures has been limited...

  2. Advances in SiC/SiC Composites for Aero-Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the development and application of ceramic matrix composites consisting of silicon carbide (SiC) based matrices reinforced by small-diameter continuous-length SiC-based fibers. For example, these SiC/SiC composites are now in the early stages of implementation into hot-section components of civil aero-propulsion gas turbine engines, where in comparison to current metallic components they offer multiple advantages due to their lighter weight and higher temperature structural capability. For current production-ready SiC/SiC, this temperature capability for long time structural applications is 1250 degC, which is better than 1100 degC for the best metallic superalloys. Foreseeing that even higher structural reliability and temperature capability would continue to increase the advantages of SiC/SiC composites, progress in recent years has also been made at NASA toward improving the properties of SiC/SiC composites by optimizing the various constituent materials and geometries within composite microstructures. The primary objective of this chapter is to detail this latter progress, both fundamentally and practically, with particular emphasis on recent advancements in the materials and processes for the fiber, fiber coating, fiber architecture, and matrix, and in the design methods for incorporating these constituents into SiC/SiC microstructures with improved thermo-structural performance.

  3. Multifunctional composites and structures with integrated mechanical and electromagnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhizi, Alireza Vakil

    Composite materials are used for their excellent structural performance. Load-bearing properties are traditionally the only aspects for which a composite structure is designed. Recent technological advances have made it possible to reach beyond this limited view. Inspired by biological systems, we seek to develop engineering materials that exhibit multiple functionalities in addition to providing structural integrity. Composites are a natural host for embedding elements that can enhance their nonstructural response. The present work is focused on embedding periodic arrays of scattering elements within composites to modify and tune their overall electromagnetic properties. A number of techniques for numerical and analytical modeling of the periodic media are discussed. Based on these methods we have designed and fabricated composites with tuned electromagnetic properties. Examples include fiber-reinforced polymer composites with embedded arrays of straight wires or coils. In both cases, the overall dielectric constant of the medium is reduced and can even be rendered negative within microwave frequencies. The coil medium can exhibit chiral response. Solutions for eliminating this behavior as well as a method for calculation of the bianisotropic material parameters are presented. One can achieve similar response at higher frequencies by reducing the length scale. For example, we show that a polymer film with embedded nano-strips of gold can demonstrate negative dielectric constant in infrared regime. An example of a structural composite is presented for which the magnetic permeability is altered and is turned negative within a microwave band. Finally, a general method for homogenization of the electromagnetic properties of periodic media based on the microstructure is developed. Two independent chapters complete this dissertation. In Chapter 8 the response of a soft hypo-elastic material in a pressure---shear experiment is studied. A nonlinear pressure- and

  4. Design of a robust SHM system for composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Shawn; Liu, Ching-Chao; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2007-04-01

    Composites are becoming increasingly popular materials used in a wide range of applications on large-scale structures such as windmill blades, rocket motor cases, and aircraft fuselage and wings. For these large structures, using composites greatly enhances the operation and performance of the application, but also introduces extraordinary inspection challenges that push the limits of traditional NDE in terms of time and cost. Recent advances in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technologies offer a promising solution to these inspection challenges. But efficient design methodologies and implementation procedures are needed to ensure the reliability and robustness of SHM technologies for use in real-world applications. This paper introduces the essential elements of the design and implementation process by way of example. State-of-the-art techniques to optimize sensor placement, perform self-diagnostics, compensate for environmental conditions, and generate probability of detection (POD) curves for any application are discussed. The techniques are presented in relation to Acellent's recently developed SmartComposite System that is used to monitor the integrity of large composite structures. The system builds on the active sensor network technology of Acellent that is analogous to a built-in acousto-ultrasonic NDE system. Key features of the system include new miniaturized lightweight hardware, self-diagnostics and adaptive algorithm to automatically compensate for damaged sensors, reliable damage detection under different environmental conditions, and generation of POD curves. This paper will provide an overview of the system and demonstrate its key features.

  5. Enhanced Composites Integrity Through Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Soutis, Constantinos

    2012-10-01

    This paper discusses the topic of how the integrity of safety-critical structural composites can be enhanced by the use of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques. The paper starts with a presentation of how the certification of flight-critical composite structures can be achieved within the framework of civil aviation safety authority requirements. Typical composites damage mechanisms, which make this process substantially different from that for metallic materials are discussed. The opportunities presented by the use of SHM techniques in future civil aircraft developments are explained. The paper then focuses on active SHM with piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS). After reviewing the PWAS-based SHM options, the paper follows with a discussion of the specifics of guided wave propagation in composites and PWAS-tuning effects. The paper presents a number of experimental results for damage detection in simple flat unidirectional and quasi-isotropic composite specimens. Calibrated through holes of increasing diameter and impact damage of various energies and velocities are considered. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  6. Advanced Metal Foam Structures for Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, Jay; Johnson, William; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use advanced materials especially bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams in structural components of spacecraft, lunar habitats, and the like. BMG foams, which are already used on Earth in some consumer products, are superior to conventional metal foams: BMG foams have exceptionally low mass densities and high strength-to-weight ratios and are more readily processable into strong, lightweight objects of various sizes and shapes. These and other attractive properties of BMG foams would be exploited, according to the proposal, to enable in situ processing of BMG foams for erecting and repairing panels, shells, containers, and other objects. The in situ processing could include (1) generation of BMG foams inside prefabricated deployable skins that would define the sizes and shapes of the objects thus formed and (2) thermoplastic deformation of BMG foams. Typically, the generation of BMG foams would involve mixtures of precursor chemicals that would be subjected to suitable pressure and temperature schedules. In addition to serving as structural components, objects containing or consisting of BMG foams could perform such functions as thermal management, shielding against radiation, and shielding against hypervelocity impacts of micrometeors and small debris particles.

  7. Recent advances in ionic polymer conductor composite materials as distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, and artificial muscles (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2005-05-01

    Recent advances in ionic polymer conductor composites (IPCC) and ionic polymer metal composites (IPMC) as biomimetic distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, nanotransducers and artificial muscles are briefly discussed in this paper. These advances include brief reproduction of some of these advances that appeared in a new book and a recent set of 4 review articles published in the International Journal of Smart Materials and Structures, advances in manufacturing, force optimization, modeling and simulation and new products developed by Environmental Robots Incorporated, as well as numerous potential applications using Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMC's) as distributed nanosensors, nanotransducers, nanoactuators and artificial muscles. It is certainly clear that the extent of applications of IPCC's and IPMC's go beyond the scope of this paper or the space allocated to this paper. However, this paper will present the breadth and the depth of all such applications of IPCC's and IPMC's as biomimetic robotic distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, nanotransducers and artificial/synthetic muscles.

  8. Bonded repair of composite aircraft structures: A review of scientific challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katnam, K. B.; Da Silva, L. F. M.; Young, T. M.

    2013-08-01

    Advanced composite materials have gained popularity in high-performance structural designs such as aerospace applications that require lightweight components with superior mechanical properties in order to perform in demanding service conditions as well as provide energy efficiency. However, one of the major challenges that the aerospace industry faces with advanced composites - because of their inherent complex damage behaviour - is structural repair. Composite materials are primarily damaged by mechanical loads and/or environmental conditions. If material damage is not extensive, structural repair is the only feasible solution as replacing the entire component is not cost-effective in many cases. Bonded composite repairs (e.g. scarf patches) are generally preferred as they provide enhanced stress transfer mechanisms, joint efficiencies and aerodynamic performance. With an increased usage of advanced composites in primary and secondary aerospace structural components, it is thus essential to have robust, reliable and repeatable structural bonded repair procedures to restore damaged composite components. But structural bonded repairs, especially with primary structures, pose several scientific challenges with the current existing repair technologies. In this regard, the area of structural bonded repair of composites is broadly reviewed - starting from damage assessment to automation - to identify current scientific challenges and future opportunities.

  9. Structure and compositeness of hadron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Hyodo, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the hadron resonances attracts much attention, in association with the recent observations of various exotic hadrons which do not fit well in the conventional picture. These findings urge us to consider various new configurations such as the multiquark states and the hadronic molecules. However, it is a subtle problem to define a proper classification scheme for the hadron structure, and the nonzero decay width of the hadron resonances makes the analysis complicated. In this article, we summarize the recent developments in the studies of the structure of the hadron resonances, focusing on the notion of the compositeness in terms of the hadronic degrees of freedom.

  10. A Nonlinear Theory for Smart Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2002-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: (1) Development of a completely coupled thermo-piezoelectric-mechanical theory for the analysis of composite shells with segmented and distributed piezoelectric sensor/actuators and shape memory alloys. The higher order displacement theory will be used to capture the transverse shear effects in anisotropic composites. The original theory will be modified to satisfy the stress continuity at ply interfaces. (2) Development of a finite element technique to implement the mathematical model. (3) Investigation of the coupled structures/controls interaction problem to study the complex trade-offs associated with the coupled problem.

  11. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  12. Dynamic Failure of Composite and Sandwich Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Abrate, Serge; Rajapakse, Yapa D S

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a broad view of the current state of the art regarding the dynamic response of composite and sandwich structures subjected to impacts and explosions. Each chapter combines a thorough assessment of the literature with original contributions made by the authors.  The first section deals with fluid-structure interactions in marine structures.  The first chapter focuses on hull slamming and particularly cases in which the deformation of the structure affects the motion of the fluid during the water entry of flexible hulls. Chapter 2 presents an extensive series of tests underwater and in the air to determine the effects of explosions on composite and sandwich structures.  Full-scale structures were subjected to significant explosive charges, and such results are extremely rare in the open literature.  Chapter 3 describes a simple geometrical theory of diffraction for describing the interaction of an underwater blast wave with submerged structures. The second section addresses the problem of...

  13. Structural CNT Composites Part II: Assessment of CNT Yarns as Reinforcement for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one-dimensional nanomaterials with outstanding electrical and thermal conductivities and mechanical properties. This combination of properties offers routes to enable lightweight structural aerospace components. Recent advances in the manufacturing of CNTs have made bulk forms such as yarns, tapes and sheets available in commercial quantities to permit the evaluation of these materials for aerospace use, where the superior tensile properties of CNT composites can be exploited in tension dominated applications such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). To investigate their utility in this application, aluminum rings were overwrapped with thermoset/CNT yarn composite and their mechanical properties measured. CNT composite overwrap characteristics such as processing method, CNT/resin ratio, and applied tension during CNT yarn winding were varied to determine their effects on the mechanical performance of the CNT composite overwrapped Al rings (CCOARs). Mechanical properties of the CCOARs were measured under static and cyclic loads at room, elevated, and cryogenic temperatures to evaluate their mechanical performance relative to bare Al rings. At room temperature, the breaking load of CCOARs with a 10.8% additional weight due to the CNT yarn/thermoset overwrap increased by over 200% compared to the bare Al ring. The quality of the wound CNT composites was also investigated using x-ray computed tomography.

  14. Atmosphere composition monitor for space station and advanced missions application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term human occupation of extraterrestrial locations may soon become a reality. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently completed the definition and preliminary design of the low earth orbit (LEO) space station. They are now currently moving into the detailed design and fabrication phase of this space station and are also beginning to analyze the requirements of several future missions that have been identified. These missions include, for example, Lunar and Mars sorties, outposts, bases, and settlements. A requirement of both the LEO space station and future missions are environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS), which provide a comfortable environment for humans to live and work. The ECLSS consists of several major systems, including atmosphere revitalization system (ARS), atmosphere pressure and composition control system, temperature and humidity control system, water reclamation system, and waste management system. Each of these major systems is broken down into subsystems, assemblies, units, and instruments. Many requirements and design drivers are different for the ECLSS of the LEO space station and the identified advanced missions (e.g., longer mission duration). This paper discusses one of the ARS assemblies, the atmosphere composition monitor assembly (ACMA), being developed for the LEO space station and addresses differences that will exist for the ACMA of future missions

  15. Composite Blade Structural Analyzer (COBSTRAN) demonstration manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The input deck setup is described for a computer code, composite blade structural analyzer (COBSTRAN) which was developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and also for composite wind turbine blades. This manual is intended for use in conjunction with the COBSTRAN user's manual. Seven demonstration problems are described with pre- and postprocessing input decks. Modeling of blades which are solid thru-the-thickness and also aircraft wing airfoils with internal spars is shown. Corresponding NASTRAN and databank input decks are also shown. Detail descriptions of each line of the pre- and post-processing decks is provided with reference to the Card Groups defined in the user's manual. A dictionary of all program variables and terms used in this manual may be found in Section 6 of the user's manual.

  16. Global Failure Modes in Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, W. G.; Gonzalez, Luis

    2001-01-01

    Composite materials provide well-known advantages for space and aeronautical applications in terms of strength and rigidity to weight ratios and other mechanical properties. As a consequence, their use has experienced a constant increase in the past decades and it is anticipated that this trend will be maintained in the near future. At the same time, being these materials relatively new compared to metals, and having failure characteristics completely different from them, their damage growth and their failure mechanisms are not as well understood in a predictive sense. For example, while in metals fracture produces "clean" cracks with their well defined analytically stress fields at the crack tip, composite fracture is a more complex phenomenon. Instead of a crack, we confront a "damage zone" that may include fiber breakage, fiber microbuckling, fiber pullout, matrix cracking, delamination, debonding or any combination of all these different mechanisms. These phenomena are prevalent in any failure process through an aircraft structure, whether one addresses a global failure such as the ripping of a fuselage or wing section, or whether one is concerned with the failure initiation near a thickness change at stringers or other reinforcement. Thus the topic that has been under consideration has wide application in any real structure and is considered an essential contribution to the predictive failure analysis capability for aircraft containing composite components. The heterogeneity and the anisotropy of composites are not only advantageous but essential characteristics, yet these same features provide complex stress fields, especially in the presence of geometrical discontinuities such as notches, holes or cutouts or structural elements such as stiffeners, stringers, etc. To properly address the interaction between a damage/crack front and a hole with a stringer it is imperative that the stress and deformation fields of the former be (sufficiently well) characterized

  17. Solidification curves and structure of heterophase composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dolata-Grosz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper presents results of solidification tests for homo- and heterophase composites. Researchesconcerned influence of reinforcement particle for solidification process of composite materials . Curves ofsolidification composite reinforced with (Al2O3 and heterophase reinforcement (mixture of Al2O3 particles +glassy carbon were compared with aluminium alloy matrix (AlSi12CuNiMg2. Based casting spiral test thecastability of composite were put to the test. Also macro and microstructure ingots after solidification on equalthermal conditions were presented.Design/methodology/approach: Solidification process was recorded with 0.4 sec. period by analog-digitalconverter connected to PC. Temperature was controlled by K thermocouple (NiCr-Ni installed in standardizedthermoelectric cup core QC4080. That equipment made possible to realised solidification tests on the equal thermalconditions. The castability was tested on standard spiral duct formed at self hardening phosphate mould.Findings: Results of researches confirm influence of glassy carbon on solidification of composite suspension.Compared to aluminium oxide particles (Al2O3 glassy carbon accelerate solidification process of compositematerial. Probably, it results from disparate properties of glassy carbon.Practical implications: Glassy carbon particles change characteristics of composite crystallization and decreaseshrinkage of the casting. Moreover application of mixture of Al2O3 and glassy carbon as heterophase reinforcementallows to segregation and sedimentation particles in the matrix and it guides in results of solidification to gradientstructure of composite material.Originality/value: Employment of heterophase reinforcement allows to get segregation and sedimentation in thematrix, which results in the occurrence of a gradient structure.

  18. Structural response of fiber composite fan blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minich, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A fiber composite airfoil, typical for high-tip speed compressor applications, is subjected to load conditions anticipated to be encountered in such applications, and its structural response is theoretically investigated. The analysis method used consists of composite mechanics embedded in pre- and post-processors and coupled with NASTRAN. The load conditions examined include thermal due to aerodynamic heating, pressure due to aerodynamic forces, centrifugal, and combinations of these. The various responses investigated include root reactions due to various load conditions, average composite and ply stresses, ply delaminations, and the fundamental modes and the corresponding reactions. The results show that the thermal and pressure stresses are negligible compared to those caused by the centrifugal forces. Also, the core-shell concept for composite blades is an inefficient design (core plies not highly stressed) and appears to be sensitive to interply delaminations. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms to illustrate the types and amount of data required for such an analysis, and to provide quantitative data of the various responses which can be helpful in designing such composite blades.

  19. Thermal inspection of composite honeycomb structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-05-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  20. Recent advances on polyoxometalate-based molecular and composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu-Fei; Tsunashima, Ryo

    2012-11-21

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) are a subset of metal oxides with unique physical and chemical properties, which can be reliably modified through various techniques and methods to develop sophisticated materials and devices. In parallel with the large number of new crystal structures reported in the literature, the application of these POMs towards multifunctional materials has attracted considerable attention. This critical review summarizes recent progress on POM-based molecular and composite materials, and particularly highlights the emerging areas that are closely related to surface, electronic, energy, environment, life science, etc. (171 references). PMID:22850732

  1. Advanced carbon materials/olivine LiFePO4 composites cathode for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chunli; Xue, Zhigang; Wen, Sheng; Ye, Yunsheng; Xie, Xiaolin

    2016-06-01

    In the past two decades, LiFePO4 has undoubtly become a competitive candidate for the cathode material of the next-generation LIBs due to its abundant resources, low toxicity and excellent thermal stability, etc. However, the poor electronic conductivity as well as low lithium ion diffusion rate are the two major drawbacks for the commercial applications of LiFePO4 especially in the power energy field. The introduction of highly graphitized advanced carbon materials, which also possess high electronic conductivity, superior specific surface area and excellent structural stability, into LiFePO4 offers a better way to resolve the issue of limited rate performance caused by the two obstacles when compared with traditional carbon materials. In this review, we focus on advanced carbon materials such as one-dimensional (1D) carbon (carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers), two-dimensional (2D) carbon (graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide) and three-dimensional (3D) carbon (carbon nanotubes array and 3D graphene skeleton), modified LiFePO4 for high power lithium ion batteries. The preparation strategies, structure, and electrochemical performance of advanced carbon/LiFePO4 composite are summarized and discussed in detail. The problems encountered in its application and the future development of this composite are also discussed.

  2. Integrating electrostatic adhesion to composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Heath, Callum; Bond, Ian; Potter, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Additional functionality within load bearing components holds potential for adding value to a structure, design or product. We consider the adaptation of an established technology, electrostatic adhesion or electroadhesion, for application in glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials. Electroadhesion uses high potential difference (~2-3 kV) between co-planar electrodes to generate temporary holding forces to both electrically conductive and nonconductive contact surfaces. Usin...

  3. Design selection methodology for composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Monroy, Aceves C.; Skordos, Alexandros A.; Sutcliffe, Michael P.F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to help designers select a shortlist or optimum design of composite structure from a large number of alternatives, taking into account conflicting design objectives or constraints (e.g. weight and cost). The methodology is based on creating a database containing results from an exhaustive search of a wide range of possible solutions. These results can be viewed using a commercial software selection package, originally written for materials s...

  4. Transmission resonance in a composite plasmonic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiao-gang; Wang, Qian-jin; Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Yong-yuan

    2009-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and optical properties of a composite plasmonic structure, a two-dimentional array of split-ring resonators inserted into periodic square holes of a metal film, have been reported. A new type of transmission resonance, which makes a significant difference from the conventional peaks, has been suggested both theoretically and experimentally. To understand this effect, a mechanism of ring- resonance induced dipole emission is proposed.

  5. Shear Behavior of Rectangular Composite Lattice Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hinds, Kirsten; Jensen, David

    2014-01-01

    The IsoBeam is a rectangular, unidirectional, composite lattice structure designed for beam applications. Three carbon fiber specimens each 2 ft (0.61 m) long, 6 in. (152.4 mm) tall and 3 in. (76.2 mm) wide with four 6 in. (152.4 mm) bays were hand-woven and tested in bending. The beams each weighed between 1.82-1.86 lbs (8.09-8.27 N). A low maximum strength was achieved, primarily due to insufficient consolidation and inadequate manufacturing quality but the structure is seen to be very duct...

  6. Track Based Alignment of Composite Detector Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Karimäki, V; Schilling, F P

    2006-01-01

    An iterative algorithm for track based alignment is presented. The algorithm can be applied to rigid composite detector structures or to individual modules. The iterative process involves track reconstruction and alignment, in which the chi-2 function of the hit residuals of each alignable object is minimized. Six alignment parameters per structure or per module, three for location and three for orientation, can be computed. The method is computationally light and easily parallelizable. The performance of the method is demonstrated with simulated tracks in the CMS pixel detector and tracks reconstructed from experimental data recorded with a test beam setup.

  7. Fire safety design of composite slim floor structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Zhongcheng

    2000-01-01

    A structural fire safety design method for composite steel-concrete slim floor structures was developed, including the characterization of fully-developed compartment fire curves and the equivalent fire exposure, temperature analysis of the composite structures, and the structural response analysis of composite slim floor structures subjected to fire. Special interest was given to the structural responses of the slim floor beam both as an isolated member and a part of the frame structure. The...

  8. Imperfection Insensitivity Analyses of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Farrokh, Babak; Stanford, Bret K.; Weaver, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Two advanced composite tow-steered shells, one with tow overlaps and another without overlaps, were previously designed, fabricated and tested in end compression, both without cutouts, and with small and large cutouts. In each case, good agreement was observed between experimental buckling loads and supporting linear bifurcation buckling analyses. However, previous buckling tests and analyses have shown historically poor correlation, perhaps due to the presence of geometric imperfections that serve as failure initiators. For the tow-steered shells, their circumferential variation in axial stiffness may have suppressed this sensitivity to imperfections, leading to the agreement noted between tests and analyses. To investigate this further, a numerical investigation was performed in this study using geometric imperfections measured from both shells. Finite element models of both shells were analyzed first without, and then, with measured imperfections that were then, superposed in different orientations around the shell longitudinal axis. Small variations in both the axial prebuckling stiffness and global buckling load were observed for the range of imperfections studied here, which suggests that the tow steering, and resulting circumferentially varying axial stiffness, may result in the test-analysis correlation observed for these shells.

  9. Novel farnesylthiosalicylate (FTS)-eluting composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraitzer, Amir; Kloog, Yoel; Zilberman, Meital

    2009-06-28

    Farnesylthiosalicylate (FTS) is a new specific nontoxic drug with a mild hydrophobic nature, which acts as a Ras antagonist and can therefore be used for stent applications as well as for local cancer treatment. FTS-loaded bioresorbable core/shell fiber structures were developed and studied in order to investigate the FTS release mechanism. These structures were composed of a polyglyconate core and a porous poly(d,l-lactic-glycolic acid) shell loaded with FTS, prepared using freeze drying of inverted emulsions. The effects of the emulsion's composition (formulation) and process kinetics on the FTS release from the coatings were studied with reference to the shell morphology and degradation profile. The FTS release profiles exhibited a burst effect accompanied by a release rate which decreased with time and lasted for 15-40 days. The process was found to affect the drug release profile via two routes: (1) Direct, through water uptake and swelling of the structure, leading to a FTS burst release. Degradation of the host polymer affects the FTS release rate at a later stage. (2) Indirect effect of the microstructure on the release profile, which occurs via an emulsion stability mechanism. The copolymer composition is the most important parameter affecting the release behavior in our system. Other parameters, including polymer content, O:A phase ratio and homogenization rate exhibited only minor effects on the FTS release profile. The controlled release of the new drug FTS is reported here for the first time. PMID:19491026

  10. Biomimetic Composite Structural T-joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vimal Kumar Thummalapalli; Steven L.Donaldson

    2012-01-01

    Biological structural fixed joints exhibit unique attributes,including highly optimized fiber paths which minimize stress concentrations.In addition,since the joints consist of continuous,uncut fiber architectures,the joints enable the organism to transport information and chemicals from one part of the body to the other.To the contrary,sections of man-made composite material structures are often joined using bolted or bonded joints,which involve low strength and high stress concentrations.These methods are also expensive to achieve.Additional functions such as fluid transport,electrical signal delivery,and thermal conductivity across the joints typically require parasitic tubes,wires,and attachment clips.By using the biomimetic methods,we seek to overcome the limitations which are present in the conventional methods. In the present work,biomimetic co-cured composite sandwich T-joints were constructed using unidirectional glass fiber,epoxy resin,and structural foam.The joints were fabricated using the wet lay-up vacuum bag resin infusion method.Foam sandwich T-joints with multiple continuous fiber architectures and sandwich foam thickness were prepared.The designs were tested in quasi-static bending using a mechanical load frame.The significantweight savings using the biomimetic approaches is discussed,as well as a comparison of failure modes versus architecture is described.

  11. Development of a metal-clad advanced composite shear web design concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced composite web concept was developed for potential application to the Space Shuttle Orbiter main engine thrust structure. The program consisted of design synthesis, analysis, detail design, element testing, and large scale component testing. A concept was sought that offered significant weight saving by the use of Boron/Epoxy (B/E) reinforced titanium plate structure. The desired concept was one that was practical and that utilized metal to efficiently improve structural reliability. The resulting development of a unique titanium-clad B/E shear web design concept is described. Three large scale components were fabricated and tested to demonstrate the performance of the concept: a titanium-clad plus or minus 45 deg B/E web laminate stiffened with vertical B/E reinforced aluminum stiffeners.

  12. Manufacturing and NDE of Large Composite Aerospace Structures at MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Ann

    2000-01-01

    NASA's vision for transportation to orbit calls for new vehicles built with new materials technology. The goals of this new launch system development are to improve safety, dramatically reduce cost to orbit, and improve vehicle turn around time. Planned Space Shuttle upgrades include new reusable liquid propellant boosters to replace the solid propellant boosters. These boosters are to have wings and return to the launch site for a horizontal landing on an airport runway. New single and two stages to orbit concepts are being investigated. To reduce weight and improve performance composite materials are proposed for fuel and oxidizer tanks, fuel feedlines, valve bodies, aerostructures, turbomachinery components. For large composite structures new methods of fabrication are being proposed and developed. Containment of cryogenic fuel or oxidizer requires emphases on composite material densification and chemical compatibility. Ceramic matrix and fiber composites for hot rotating turbomachinery have been developed with new fabrication processes. The new requirements on the materials for launcher components are requiring development of new manufacturing and inspection methods. This talk will examine new and proposed manufacturing methods to fabricate the revolutionary components. New NDE methods under consideration include alternative X-ray methods, X-ray laminagraphy, advanced CT, Thermography, new ultrasonic methods, and imbedded sensors. The sizes, complexity, use environment, and contamination restrictions will challenge the inspection process. In flight self-diagnosis and rapid depot inspection are also goals of the NDE development.

  13. Predicting Career Advancement with Structural Equation Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimler, Ronald; Rosenberg, Stuart; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the authors' prior findings concerning basic employability skills in order to determine which skills best predict career advancement potential. Design/methodology/approach: Utilizing survey responses of human resource managers, the employability skills showing the largest relationships to career…

  14. Composition, structure, and chemistry of interstellar dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    Different dust components present in the interstellar medium (IM) such as amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and those IM components which are organic refractory grains and icy grain mantles are discussed as well as their relative importance. The physical properties of grain surface chemistry are discussed with attention given to the surface structure of materials, the adsorption energy and residence time of species on a grain surface, and the sticking probability. Consideration is also given to the contribution of grains to the gas-phase composition of molecular clouds.

  15. Dynamic Probabilistic Instability of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    A computationally effective method is described to evaluate the non-deterministic dynamic instability (probabilistic dynamic buckling) of thin composite shells. The method is a judicious combination of available computer codes for finite element, composite mechanics and probabilistic structural analysis. The solution method is incrementally updated Lagrangian. It is illustrated by applying it to thin composite cylindrical shell subjected to dynamic loads. Both deterministic and probabilistic buckling loads are evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. A universal plot is obtained for the specific shell that can be used to approximate buckling loads for different load rates and different probability levels. Results from this plot show that the faster the rate, the higher the buckling load and the shorter the time. The lower the probability, the lower is the buckling load for a specific time. Probabilistic sensitivity results show that the ply thickness, the fiber volume ratio and the fiber longitudinal modulus, dynamic load and loading rate are the dominant uncertainties in that order.

  16. The compositional structure of multipartite quantum entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Coecke, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Multipartite quantum states constitute a (if not the) key resource for quantum computations and protocols. However obtaining a generic, structural understanding of entanglement in N-qubit systems is a long-standing open problem in quantum computer science. Here we show that multipartite quantum entanglement admits a compositional structure, and hence is subject to modern computer science methods. We consider N-qubit states to be equivalent as computational resources if they can be inter-converted by stochastic local (quantum) operations and classical communication (SLOCC). There are only two SLOCC-classes of genuinely entangled 3-qubit states, the GHZ-class and the W-class, and we show that these exactly correspond with two kinds of internal commutative Frobenius algebras over qubits in the symmetric monoidal category of Hilbert spaces and linear maps, namely 'special' ones and 'anti-special' ones. Within the graphical language of symmetric monoidal categories, the distinction between 'special' and 'anti-spec...

  17. Detection of Defects in Composite Structures by using ESPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Suk; Chang, Ho Seob [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Seong Kyun; Kang, Jin Shik [Seoul National University of Technolog, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-15

    In this paper, artificial and real defects(delamination and debond) in composite structures were detected by using ESPI system. Three types of specimens, that is, composite laminates, honeycomb structures, and adhesive joints, were used to study the applicability of ESPI to composite structures. To detect defects in specimens, we selected thermal loading method that can easily induce the surface deformation of specimen. Experimental results show that defects in composite structures could be easily detected by ESPI. Moreover, it shows that ESPI could be usefully applied to the detection of defects in various composite structures

  18. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond (Purdue); Doug Adams (Purdue)

    2014-08-01

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the

  19. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  20. Aromatic/aliphatic diamine derivatives for advanced compositions and polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delozier, Donovan M. (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Novel compositions of matter comprise certain derivatives of 9,9-dialkyl fluorene diamine (AFDA). The resultant compositions, whether compositions of matter or monomers that are subsequently incorporated into a polymer, are unique and useful in a variety of applications. Useful applications of AFDA-based material include heavy ion radiation shielding components and components of optical and electronic devices.

  1. C-SiC Honeycomb for Advanced Flight Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project is to manufacture a C-SiC honeycomb structure to use as a high temperature material in advanced aircraft, spacecraft and industrial...

  2. Recent advances in high density tungsten composite processing. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cytron, S.

    1993-10-01

    Conventional liquid phase sintering has been the mainstay for processing tungsten alloy composites for the past several decades. New application demands being placed on these high density composites have resulted in the emergence of new processing approaches aimed at developing a new generation of high density tungsten composite materials. Recent investigative studies into rapid solidification technology, solid state sintering, mechanical alloying, and explosive compaction are reported here to highlight these recent processing trends. Tungsten heavy alloys, Tungsten alloy composite, Solid state sintering, Mechanical alloying, Explosive composition, Rapid solidification technology.

  3. Advanced finite element method in structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Yu-Qiu; Long, Zhi-Fei

    2009-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the research work on the Finite Element Method completed over the past 25 years. Original theoretical achievements and their applications in the fields of structural engineering and computational mechanics are discussed.

  4. Multi scale analysis of composite structures behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Lachaud, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    This research activity report is mainly based on the last 14 years work for understanding and modeling the nonlinear mechanical behavior of aeronautical composite materials. Being initiated during my PhD, this work is an extent of it, oriented to the analysis of damage phenomena (initiation and propagation) under static or rapid dynamic loadings for a broad range of composite materials such as short fibers composites, unidirectional composites, and woven composites, with thermoplastic or t...

  5. Advances in Composite Reflectors: From X-Ray to Radio Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, S. J.; Abusafieh, A. A.; Mehle, G. V.; Sheikh, D. A.; Giles, D. C.

    2000-12-01

    In recent years, Composite Optics, Inc. (COI) has made significant advances in the use of graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) materials for astronomical instrument applications. The inherent low density, high stiffness, and thermal stability makes GFRC a natural candidate for many astronomy applications. In order to reap these inherent benefits in astronomical applications, basic research has focused on material and process improvement. This has been accompanied by the design, fabrication, and test of several prototype reflectors that cover a broad wavelength spectrum of astronomical interests. The results of, and applications for, these efforts are summarized in the following list. X-Ray Carrier Shell: Innovative composite process yields accuracy and moisture stability. Demonstrated by vacuum optical test of 6" Wolter-I shell. Applicable to Con-X, etc. Lightweight Mirror Substrate for Visible Astronomy: Composite/glass hybrid design. Areal density Glass-like coating applied to composite. Polishable by conventional methods. Multiple six-inch substrates polished to 20 angstroms. Technology will enable future 5 kg/m2 visible to UV optics. 10 kg/m2 Submillimeter Reflector: Apertures to 5m possible with economical, all-composite mirror design, diffraction limited at 80 microns. Demonstrated with cryo-optical test (to 70K) of FIRST 2-meter prototype mirror. Applicable to FIRST and other IR astronomy. Large, Ultra-Stable Optical Support Structure: Uniform and near-zero CTE over broad dimensions. Demonstrated with cryo-optical test of 2-meter FIRST prototype. Applicable to NGST, SIM, LISSA. Ground Based Radio Telescope Reflector: Low-cost, accurate, stable, durable all-composite design for support structure & reflective surface. Demonstrated via fab & test of 3m adjustable and 5m static prototypes. Applicable to LMT, ALMA, etc. These recent accomplishments represent new enabling technologies to meet the needs of numerous astronomical instrument concepts. COI will

  6. Recent advances in high density tungsten composite processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cytron, S. [Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, Dover, NJ (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Conventional liquid phase sintering has been the mainstay for processing tungsten alloy composites for the past several decades. New application demands being placed on these high density composites has resulted in the emergence of new processing approaches aimed at developing a new generation of high density tungsten composite materials. Recent investigative studies into rapid solidification technology, solid state sintering, mechanical alloying and explosive compaction are reported here to highlight these recent processing trends.

  7. Advanced Structural Characterization of Organic Thin Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Yun

    In this thesis, the structural characterizations of three organic film systems are described. Several X-ray based techniques have been utilized for the characterizations for different research goals. The structures of N,N',N-trioctyltriazatriangulenium (Oct3-TATA+) salts have been investigated...... by optical, surface and X-ray method. We describe the production of Langmuir-Blodgett film and how the absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool to identify layer of monomer and dimer. X-ray refelctometry has been applied as a method for the study of the multilayer film and interface structure. A separation...... of small molecule and polymer layers is indicated by Flory- Huggins theory for the triisopropylsilylethynl pentacene (TIPS-PEN) and polystyrene blend films. In order to investigate the phase separated layers in the ink-jet printed films, we propose a method to measure diraction Bragg peaks by X...

  8. Linking advanced fracture models to structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiesa, Matteo

    2001-07-01

    Shell structures with defects occur in many situations. The defects are usually introduced during the welding process necessary for joining different parts of the structure. Higher utilization of structural materials leads to a need for accurate numerical tools for reliable prediction of structural response. The direct discretization of the cracked shell structure with solid finite elements in order to perform an integrity assessment of the structure in question leads to large size problems, and makes such analysis infeasible in structural application. In this study a link between local material models and structural analysis is outlined. An ''ad hoc'' element formulation is used in order to connect complex material models to the finite element framework used for structural analysis. An improved elasto-plastic line spring finite element formulation, used in order to take cracks into account, is linked to shell elements which are further linked to beam elements. In this way one obtain a global model of the shell structure that also accounts for local flexibilities and fractures due to defects. An important advantage with such an approach is a direct fracture mechanics assessment e.g. via computed J-integral or CTOD. A recent development in this approach is the notion of two-parameter fracture assessment. This means that the crack tip stress tri-axiality (constraint) is employed in determining the corresponding fracture toughness, giving a much more realistic capacity of cracked structures. The present thesis is organized in six research articles and an introductory chapter that reviews important background literature related to this work. Paper I and II address the performance of shell and line spring finite elements as a cost effective tool for performing the numerical calculation needed to perform a fracture assessment. In Paper II a failure assessment, based on the testing of a constraint-corrected fracture mechanics specimen under tension, is

  9. Advances on surface structural determination by LEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Edmar A; De Carvalho, Vagner E [Departamento de Fisica, ICEX, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-090, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); De Castilho, Caio M C, E-mail: edmar@fisica.ufmg.br [Grupo de Fisica de SuperfIcies e Materiais, Instituto de Fisica and Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia em Energia e Ambiente (CIENAM)INCT-E and A, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario da Federacao, 40170-115, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2011-08-03

    In the last 40 years, low energy electron diffraction (LEED) has proved to be the most reliable quantitative technique for surface structural determination. In this review, recent developments related to the theory that gives support to LEED structural determination are discussed under a critical analysis of the main theoretical approximation-the muffin-tin calculation. The search methodologies aimed at identifying the best matches between theoretical and experimental intensity versus voltage curves are also considered, with the most recent procedures being reviewed in detail. (topical review)

  10. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2012-04-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  11. Comparative Study of Structure Using Composite Members And Conventional Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charuhas K. Karalkar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There are different methods of construction for building structure. The most popular conventional structures used are reinforced cement concrete structures, pure steel structures and Timber Structures. In the modern age the rapid growth in population and continuous influx of people from rural to metros; buildings are constructed on a large scale and with great Architectural requirement. In this paper a new type of structure is introduced which involves use of composite members. To reduce the construction time, material quantity and cost the composite members are used. The composite members here mean use of steel sections as structural steel along with timber. Here by using composite members for miscellaneous Architectural building, lot of saving has been done in material, construction time and cost. It saves approximately 20-25% cost of structure if conventional type is used. Composite members used are Structural steel and solid timber compare to conventional steel or RCC members.

  12. Advanced glucose biosensing and nano-composite research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uba, Humphreys Douglas I.

    The fascinating and enhanced properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been of intense interest since their discovery. This is primarily due to their exceptional mechanical , electrical, and thermal properties , as well as their many and varied applications in modern industries such as in fuel cells, sensors, reinforced composites, electromagnetic interference shielding applications, actuators and fabrication of sophisticated nanostructures. During the production of CNTs, there are associated impurities such as metal nanoparticle and carbonaceous impurities. There are different types of CNTs such as single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), double-walled nanotubes (DWNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs). In this study, XD-grade CNTs (XD) was used. XD is a mixture of SWNTs, DWNTs and MWNTs. The focus of this study was primarily geared toward the purification and application of CNTs. Two generally accepted cycles of purification were followed, purification under oxygen environment and purification under oxygen/argon mixture environment. XD was purified to different extents by oxidation and acid wash. The raw and purified CNTs were compounded into Epikote 862 and Epikure W epoxy resin to prepare composite materials and also in the biosensor studies. The CNTs and composite materials were characterized by means of thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transimssion electron microscopy (TEM). It was discovered that, excessive purification would not lead to further removal of metal residues; instead, it could result in disruption of the structure and property of CNTs. The use of CNTs as fillers was found to hinder the epoxy curing in general, and the removal of metal impurities seemed to worsen the situation. This would imply that the metal residue might catalyze the epoxy curing to a certain degree while the increased viscosity should be the primary reason for the slowed curing. An electrochemical

  13. Advancement of Multifunctional support structure technologies (AMFSST)

    CERN Document Server

    John, R; Frerker, H J; Newerla, A

    2008-01-01

    The multifunctional support structure (MFSS) technology is promising a reduction of overall mass and packing volume for spacecraft (S/C) electronic components. This technology eliminates the electronic box chassis and the cabling between the boxes by integrating the electronics, thermal control and the structural support into one single element. The ultimate goal of the MFSS technology is to reduce size, weight, power consumption, cost and production time for future spacecraft components. The paper focus on the main challenges and solutions related to the thermal management within the MFSS technology based on the selected charge regulator (CR) application. Starting with the main set of thermal requirements for the CR the paper will include, conceptual and detailed design based on highconductivity carbon fibre CFRP, description and results of the thermal material sample test program ; parameter and results for the performed first thermal simulation

  14. Recent advances in research on carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michele T; Gun'ko, Yurii K

    2010-04-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) demonstrate remarkable electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties, which allow a number of exciting potential applications. In this article, we review the most recent progress in research on the development of CNT-polymer composites, with particular attention to their mechanical and electrical (conductive) properties. Various functionalization and fabrication approaches and their role in the preparation of CNT-polymer composites with improved mechanical and electrical properties are discussed. We tabulate the most recent values of Young's modulus and electrical conductivities for various CNT-polymer composites and compare the effectiveness of different processing techniques. Finally, we give a future outlook for the development of CNT-polymer composites as potential alternative materials for various applications, including flexible electrodes in displays, electronic paper, antistatic coatings, bullet-proof vests, protective clothing, and high-performance composites for aircraft and automotive industries. PMID:20496401

  15. Advanced Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of an advanced composite bipolar plate is proposed for a unitized regenerative fuel cell and electrolyzer system that operates on pure feed streams...

  16. Advanced SiC-Matrix Composites with Improved Oxidation Resistance and Life Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposed effort is to demonstrate the promise of advanced C/SiC and SiC/SiC composites having improved environmental durability and longer...

  17. Low-Cost Innovative Hi-Temp Fiber Coating Process for Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MATECH GSM (MG) proposes 1) to demonstrate a low-cost innovative Hi-Temp Si-doped in-situ BN fiber coating process for advanced ceramic matrix composites in order...

  18. AVHRR Composites = Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer U.S. Alaska: 1989 - Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) Composites are produced from multiple Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) daily observations that have...

  19. Advanced Structural Mechanics Design of 500 MWe Commercial SFRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    • PFBR design, manufacture, construction and safety review have given rich experience. • Comprehensive roadmap has been drawn to design and develop future FBRs with focus on economy and standardisation. • Advance detailed Structural analysis for various structure were carried out to understand the behaviour of the components

  20. Advanced Sprayable Composite Coating for Cryogenic Insulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the NASA solicitation X10 "Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer" under subtopic X.01 "Cryogenic Fluid...

  1. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, +/-60deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  2. A bioinspired micro-composite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li

    2005-11-01

    This thesis involves the design, fabrication and mechanical testing of a bioinspired composite structure with characteristic dimensions of the order of tens of microns. The particular microarchitecture, designed and fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, involves two distinct length scales and represents a first attempt at mimicking the crossed-lamellar microstructure of the shell of the Giant Queen Conch Strombus gigas , which contains features the dimensions of which span five distinct length scales. After giving a review of the mechanical properties of mollusks, the detailed design of the microstructure, which approximates the crossed-lamellar arrangement of Strombus gigas, is presented. Fabrication of the microstructure using multi-microfabrication methods is conducted in terms of the designed fabrication flow. The problems encountered during the processes are discussed. The measurements of the flexural strength and toughening of the fabricated microstructure are conducted using a commercially available nanoindenter. Testing results are discussed and conclusions about the mechanical behaviors of the microstructure are drawn to summarize the achievement of this thesis. Finally, future work is outlined to point out the possible directions for improving the mechanical performance of the bioinspired composite. In parallel with my thesis research, I have developed a theoretical model for the experimentally observed cyclic loading-induced strengthening in MEMS polycrystalline silicon. The model relies on atomistic calculations that predict plastic-like behavior of amorphous silicon, which depending on initial density, is associated with dilatancy or compaction. The amorphous silicon is approximated as a Drucker-Prager plastic material, whose parameters are chosen to match the predictions of the atomistic calculations. The constitutive model is used to simulate the mechanical response to cyclic loads of notched polysilicon MEMS specimens

  3. Advanced structural integrity assessment procedures. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for discussion on recent results in research and utility practice in the field of methodology for the structural integrity assessment of components including relevant non-codified procedures. The scope of the meeting included deterministic and probabilistic approaches. The papers covered the following topics: Leak-before-break concepts; non-destructive examination (NDE) and surveillance results; statistical evaluation of non-destructive examination data; pressurized thermal shock evaluation; fatigue effects (including vibration); and verification qualification. The meeting was attended by 32 specialists from 8 countries. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Manufacturing Aspects of Advanced Polymer Composites for Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Klaus; Almajid, Abdulhakim A.

    2013-04-01

    Composite materials, in most cases fiber reinforced polymers, are nowadays used in many applications in which light weight and high specific modulus and strength are critical issues. The constituents of these materials and their special advantages relative to traditional materials are described in this paper. Further details are outlined regarding the present markets of polymer composites in Europe, and their special application in the automotive industry. In particular, the manufacturing of parts from thermoplastic as well as thermosetting, short and continuous fiber reinforced composites is emphasized.

  5. Modeling Bistable Composite Laminates for Piezoelectric Morphing Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Darryl V.; Oliver J. Myers

    2013-01-01

    A sequential modeling effort for bistable composite laminates for piezoelectric morphing structures is presented. Thin unsymmetric carbon fiber composite laminates are examined for use of morphing structures using piezoelectric actuation. When cooling from the elevated cure temperature to room temperature, these unsymmetric composite laminates will deform. These postcure room temperature deformation shapes can be used as morphing structures. Applying a force to these deformed laminates will c...

  6. Well-formedness and typing rules for UML Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Dragomir, Iulia; Ober, Iulian

    2010-01-01

    Starting from version 2.0, UML introduced hierarchical composite structures, which are an expressive way of defining complex software architectures, but which have a very loosely defined semantics in the standard. In this paper we propose a set of consistency rules that disambiguate the meaning of UML composite structures. Our primary goal was to have an operational model of composite structures for the OMEGA UML profile, an executable profile dedicated to the formal specification and validat...

  7. Damage Assessment of Composite Plate Structures with Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    M, Chandrashekhar; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    International audience Uncertainties associated with a structural model and measured vibration data may lead to unreliable damage detection. Two similar structures made from composite materials can display very different dynamic behavior due to large uncertainties associated with composite material properties. In this paper, we show that material uncertainties in composite structures cause considerable problem in damage assessment which can be alleviated by using a fuzzy logic-based approa...

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Advanced Materials for Damage Prediction and Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Luke

    Advanced aerospace materials, including fiber reinforced polymer and ceramic matrix composites, are increasingly being used in critical and demanding applications, challenging the current damage prediction, detection, and quantification methodologies. Multiscale computational models offer key advantages over traditional analysis techniques and can provide the necessary capabilities for the development of a comprehensive virtual structural health monitoring (SHM) framework. Virtual SHM has the potential to drastically improve the design and analysis of aerospace components through coupling the complementary capabilities of models able to predict the initiation and propagation of damage under a wide range of loading and environmental scenarios, simulate interrogation methods for damage detection and quantification, and assess the health of a structure. A major component of the virtual SHM framework involves having micromechanics-based multiscale composite models that can provide the elastic, inelastic, and damage behavior of composite material systems under mechanical and thermal loading conditions and in the presence of microstructural complexity and variability. Quantification of the role geometric and architectural variability in the composite microstructure plays in the local and global composite behavior is essential to the development of appropriate scale-dependent unit cells and boundary conditions for the multiscale model. Once the composite behavior is predicted and variability effects assessed, wave-based SHM simulation models serve to provide knowledge on the probability of detection and characterization accuracy of damage present in the composite. The research presented in this dissertation provides the foundation for a comprehensive SHM framework for advanced aerospace materials. The developed models enhance the prediction of damage formation as a result of ceramic matrix composite processing, improve the understanding of the effects of architectural and

  9. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eberle, Cliff C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pastore, Christopher M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sudbury, Thomas Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Fue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hartman, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  10. Predictive Modeling of Complex Contoured Composite Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The existing HDWLT (pictured) contoured composite structure design, its analyses and manufacturing tools, will be used to validate key analyses inputs through...

  11. Metal Matrix Composite Feedstock for Advanced Fiber Placement Process Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research pursues a path for reducing structural weight, increasing structural performance, and reducing fabrication cost while also minimizing...

  12. Industrialization of Advanced SiC/SiC Composites and SiC Based Composites; Intensive activities at Muroran Institute of Technology under OASIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organization of Advanced Sustainability Initiative for Energy System/Material (OASIS), at Muroran Institute of Technology is now intensively enforcing its efforts for industrialization of advanced SiC/SiC composites and SiC based composites by fabrication system integration of NITE method. This paper provides the brief review of the activities at OASIS, where prototype production line of green sheets and prepreg sheets are under installation. The near-net shaped preforms with the NITE green-sheets and prepreg-sheets are made into near-net shape components for potential applications under consideration by HIP and Pseudo-HIP. Aiming at the near term utilization, SiC/SiC hybrid structures with metallic materials, such as steels and other refractory metals, were fabricated with promising results. Trial to reduce the production cost has been continued.

  13. Influence of aromatic amine hardeners in the cure kinetics of an epoxy resin used in advanced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Leali Costa

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Composite structures for aerospace applications are mainly made by the well-known prepreg technology. In order to achieve adequate prepreg processing schedules, and consequently maximum fiber strength utilization, one has to know in deep the cure kinetics of matrix, which held the fibers together. This work describes a procedure to study the cure kinetic and has as example how aromatic amine hardeners influence the cure kinetics of an epoxy resin used in advanced composites. The investigation was carried out by using the DSC technique and it was found that depending on the system used the cure kinetics of the formulation obeys order n or autocatalytic order.

  14. ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

    2012-02-16

    ). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relationships obtained from testing of the blade with baseline neat material were compared to the ones from analytical simulation using neat resin and using silica nanoparticles in the resin. Multi-scale PFA results for the neat material construction matched closely those from test for both load displacement and location and type of damage and failure. AlphaSTAR demonstrated that wind blade structures made from advanced composite materials can be certified with multi-scale progressive failure analysis by following building block verification approach.

  15. Piezoelectric and mechanical properties of structured PZT-epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, N.K.; Ende, D.A. van den; Lafont, U.; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Structured lead zirconium titanate (PZT)-epoxy composites are prepared by dielectrophoresis. The piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites as a function of PZT volume fraction are investigated and compared with the corresponding unstructured composites. The effect of poling voltage o

  16. Piezoelectric and mechanical properties of structured PZT–epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnamkuzhakkal James, N.; Van den Ende, D.; Lafont, U.; Van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Structured lead zirconium titanate (PZT)–epoxy composites are prepared by dielectrophoresis. The piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites as a function of PZT volume fraction are investigated and compared with the corresponding unstructured composites. The effect of poling voltage o

  17. Recent advances in bonded composite repair technology for metallic aircraft components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, A.A.; Chester, R.J. [DSTO, Melbourne (Australia). Aeronautical Research Lab.

    1993-12-31

    Advanced fiber composites such as boron/epoxy can be employed as adhesively bonded patches to repair or to reinforce metallic aerospace components. This approach provides many advantages over conventional mechanically fastened metallic patches, including improved fatigue behavior, reduced corrosion and easy conformance to complex aerodynamic contours. Bonded composite repairs have been shown to provide high levels of bond durability under aircraft operating conditions. The recent application of bonded composite repairs to military and civil aircraft is described.

  18. Fatigue behaviour of impacted composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Garnier, Christian; Pastor, Marie-Laetitia; Lorrain, Bernard; Pantalé, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    International audience The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical behavior of different impact-damaged composite materials. Three composite materials were realized using the Liquid Resin Infusion process (LRI) accord- ing to three different cycles of polymerization. Thus the temperature of the glass transition of the resin was controlled and the influence of this parameter was then determined. In accordance with the aeronautical use of composite materials, the plates were subjecte...

  19. Assessment of the State-of-the-Art in the Design and Manufacturing of Large Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an assessment of the state-of-the-art in the design and manufacturing of large component structures, including details on the use of continuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) in commercial and military aircraft and in space launch vehicles. Project risk mitigation plans must include a building-block test approach to structural design development, manufacturing process scale-up development tests, and pre-flight ground tests to verify structural integrity. The potential benefits of composite structures justifies NASA's investment in developing the technology. Advanced composite structures technology is enabling to virtually every Aero-Space Technology Enterprise Goal.

  20. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departament of Materials Engineering - Rd. Washington Luis, Km 235, 13565-905, São Carlos-SP (Brazil); Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario, E-mail: bretas@ufscar.br [Université de Strasbourg, ECPM-LIPHT - 25 rue Becquerel, 67087, Strasbourg (France)

    2015-05-22

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  1. Summary of recent design studies of advanced acoustic-composite nacelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, H.T. Jr.

    1975-09-10

    The results are summarized of recent NASA-sponsored studies of advanced acoustic-composite nacelles. Conceptual nacelle designs for current wide-bodied transports and for advanced technology transports, intended for operational use in the mid-1980's, were studied by Lockheed-California Company and the Douglas Aircraft Company. These studies were conducted with the objective of achieving significant reductions in community noise and/or fuel consumption with minimum penalties in airplane weights, cost, and operating expense. The results indicate that the use of advanced composite materials offer significant potential weight and cost savings and result in reduced fuel consumption and noise when applied to nacelles. The most promising concept for realizing all of these benefits was a long duct, mixed flow acoustic composite nacelle with advanced acoustic liners. (GRA)

  2. Summary of recent design studies of advanced acoustic-composite nacelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, H. T., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The results are summarized of recent NASA-sponsored studies of advanced acoustic-composite nacelles. Conceptual nacelle designs for current wide-bodied transports and for advanced technology transports, intended for operational use in the mid-1980's, were studied by Lockheed-California Company and the Douglas Aircraft Company. These studies were conducted with the objective of achieving significant reductions in community noise and/or fuel consumption with minimum penalties in airplane weights, cost, and operating expense. The results indicate that the use of advanced composite materials offer significant potential weight and cost savings and result in reduced fuel consumption and noise when applied to nacelles. The most promising concept for realizing all of these benefits was a long duct, mixed flow acoustic composite nacelle with advanced acoustic liners.

  3. Effect of Structure on the Mechanical Behaviors of Three-Dimensional Spacer Fabric Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang; Wu, Boming

    2009-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) spacer fabric composite is a newly developed sandwich structure, the reinforcement of which is integrally woven by advanced textile technique. Two facesheets of 3-D spacer fabric are connected by continuous fibers, named pile in the core, providing excellent properties like outstanding integrity, debonding resistance, light weight, good designability and so on. Usually the 3-D spacer fabric composite without extra reinforcement is a kind of core material. In comparison with the facesheet reinforced spacer fabric composite, here the composite without additional weaves is called mono-spacer fabric composite. In this paper, two kinds of mono-spacer fabric composites with integrated hollow cores have been developed, one with 8-shaped piles and the other with corrugated piles. The mechanical characteristics and the damage modes of these mono-spacer fabric composites under different load conditions have been investigated. Besides, effects of pile height, pile distribution density and pile structure on the composites mechanical performances were analyzed. It is shown that the mechanical performances of mono-spacer fabric composites can be widely adapted to the respective requirements through the choice of the structural factors.

  4. 15th annual conference on composites and advanced ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaklini, G.Y.; Bhatt, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The room-temperature tensile testing of silicon carbide fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) composite specimens was monitored by using in-situ x ray film radiography. Radiographic evaluation before, during, and after loading provided data on the effect of preexisting volume flaws (high density impurities, and local density variations) on the fracture behavior of composites. Results from (0)1, (0)3, (0)5, and (0)8 composite specimens, showed that x ray film radiography can monitor damage accumulations during tensile loading. Matrix cracking, fiber-matrix debonding, and fiber pullout were imaged throughout the tensile loading history of the specimens. Further, in-situ film radiography was found to be a helpful and practical technique for estimating interfacial shear strength between the SiC fiber and the RBSN matrix by the matrix crack spacing method. It is concluded that pretest, in-situ, and post-test radiography can provide for a greater understanding of ceramic matrix composite mechanical behavior, a verification of related experimental procedures, and a validation and development of related analytical models.

  5. Hybrid Composite Structures: Multifunctionality through Metal Fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, T.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of fibre reinforced polymer composites into the wings and fuselages of the newest aircraft are changing the design and manufacturing approach. Composites provide greater freedom to designers who want to improve aircraft performance in an affordable way. In this quest, researchers ar

  6. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP

  7. Multilevel design optimization of composite structures with blended laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seresta, O.

    2007-01-01

    This research work deals with the design and optimization of a large composite structure. In design of large structural systems, it is customary to divide the problem into many smaller independent/semi-independent local design problems. The use of composite necessitates the inclusion of ply angles a

  8. The structural damping of composite beams with tapered boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coni, M.; Benchekchou, B.; White, R. G.

    1994-11-01

    Most metallic and composite structures of conventional construction are lightly damped. It is obviously advantageous, in terms of response to in-service dynamic loading, if damping can be increased with minimal weight addition. This report describes finite element analyses and complementary experiments carried out on composite, carbon fiber reinforced plastic, beams with tapered boundaries composed of layers of highly damped composite material. It is shown that modal damping of the structure may be significantly increased by this method.

  9. Polymer composite material structures comprising carbon based conductive loads

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme, Robert; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Detrembleur, Christophe; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Huynen, Isabelle; Bailly, Christian; Bednarz, Luikasz; Daussin, Raphaël; Saib, Aimad; Baudouin, Anne-Christine; Laloyaux, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a polymer composite material structure comprising at least one layer of a foamed polymer composite material comprising a foamed polymer matrix and 0.1 wt % to 6 wt % carbon based conductive loads, such as e.g. carbon nanotubes, dispersed in the foamed polymer matrix. The polymer composite material structure according to embodiments of the present invention shows good shielding and absorbing properties notwithstanding the low amount of carbon based conductive loa...

  10. Polymer composite material structures comprising carbon based conductive loads

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme, Robert; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Detrembleur, Christophe; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Huynen, Isabelle; Bailly, Christian; Bednarz, Lucasz; Daussin, Raphaël; Saib, Aimad

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a polymer composite material structure comprising at least one layer of a foamed polymer composite material comprising a foamed polymer matrix and 0.1 to 6 wt% carbon based conductive loads, such as e.g. carbon nanotubes, dispersed in the foamed polymer matrix. The polymer composite material structure according to embodiments of the present invention shows good shielding and absorbing properties notwithstanding the low amount of carbon based conductive loads. Th...

  11. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

  12. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase 2 effort will be used to advance the material and design technologies that were explored in the Phase 1 study of hybrid gears. In this hybrid approach,...

  13. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed program will focus on the development of a new generation of advanced technology for rotorcraft transmission systems. This program will evaluate the...

  14. Advances in Seabed Liquefaction and its Implications for Marine Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    A review is presented of recent advances in seabed liquefaction and its implications for marine structures. The review is organized in seven sections: Residual liquefaction, including the sequence of liquefaction, mathematical modelling, centrifuge modelling and comparison with standard wave......-flume results; Momentary liquefaction; Floatation of buried pipelines; Sinking of pipelines and marine objects; Liquefaction at gravity structures; Stability of rock berms in liquefied soils; and Impact of seismic-induced liquefaction....

  15. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance. PMID:20924063

  16. Recent advances in composite flywheel containment design technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppa, A.P.; Kulkarni, S.V.

    1982-08-01

    Analytical correlation of composite rotor burst tests have led to the development of preliminary methods for designing containment rings and housings. A novel analysis that made the correlation possible is briefly described. This characterizes a fragmented composite rotor in terms of a constant parameter, called the apparent fragment crushing strength, which is the ability of initially released fragmentation to resist progressive breakdown under the applied containment forces. Burst-containment weight estimates based on the analysis are presented for a .25 kwh laminated glass/epoxy rotor design and several containment ring materials. Containment aspects of a loose running, intact rotor and general flywheel housing design requirements are also discussed and a pertinent housing design concept is presented.

  17. Recent Advances and Developments in Composite Dental Restorative Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, N.B.; Stansbury, J.W.; Bowman, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with t...

  18. Advances and trends in structural and solid mechanics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Washington, DC, October 4-7, 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K. (Editor); Housner, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanics of materials and material characterization are considered, taking into account micromechanics, the behavior of steel structures at elevated temperatures, and an anisotropic plasticity model for inelastic multiaxial cyclic deformation. Other topics explored are related to advances and trends in finite element technology, classical analytical techniques and their computer implementation, interactive computing and computational strategies for nonlinear problems, advances and trends in numerical analysis, database management systems and CAD/CAM, space structures and vehicle crashworthiness, beams, plates and fibrous composite structures, design-oriented analysis, artificial intelligence and optimization, contact problems, random waves, and lifetime prediction. Earthquake-resistant structures and other advanced structural applications are also discussed, giving attention to cumulative damage in steel structures subjected to earthquake ground motions, and a mixed domain analysis of nuclear containment structures using impulse functions.

  19. Advanced analysis and design for fire safety of steel structures

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Analysis and Design for Fire Safety of Steel Structures systematically presents the latest findings on behaviours of steel structural components in a fire, such as the catenary actions of restrained steel beams, the design methods for restrained steel columns, and the membrane actions of concrete floor slabs with steel decks. Using a systematic description of structural fire safety engineering principles, the authors illustrate the important difference between behaviours of an isolated structural element and the restrained component in a complete structure under fire conditions. The book will be an essential resource for structural engineers who wish to improve their understanding of steel buildings exposed to fires. It is also an ideal textbook for introductory courses in fire safety for master’s degree programs in structural engineering, and is excellent reading material for final-year undergraduate students in civil engineering and fire safety engineering. Furthermore, it successfully bridges th...

  20. Active vibration control of basic structures using macro fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Guo; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-03-01

    In the modern naval battle, as the anti-detection technique developing fleetly, enhancing submarine's hidden ability is becoming more and more important. However, in view of the worse control effect at low-frequency and weak adjustability to external influence, conventional passive vibration control can't satisfy the modern naval rigorous demands. Fortunately, active vibration control technology not only monitors the structure's real-time vibration, but also has more remarkable control effects and superior suitability. At the present time, it has a primary application in the vibration damping of ship engineering. In addition, due to functional materials rapidly developing, with the coming of piezoelectric composite materials, the advanced active control techniques have more applicability, lager damp amplitude and wider applied field, which basing on the piezoelectric-effect and inverse- piezoelectric-effect of piezoelectric materials. Especially, in the end of nineties, NASA had successfully manufactured the excellent macro fiber composite (MFC), which assembles actuating and sensing abilities. Comparing with the conventional piezoelectric ceramic materials, it provides the required durability, excellent flexibility, higher electromechanical coupling factors and stronger longitudinal actuating force by using interdigital electrodes. On the basis of the application of cantilever beam' active vibration control by using MFC actuators, this paper started with the mechanical characteristics of its actuating and sensing equations, and then investigated its piezoelectric feedback scale factor when equipped on the honeycomb aluminous panel. Finally, in order to validate the theoretical analysis method, the vibration control experiment of cantilever beam and honeycomb aluminous panel are built and tested with different activating force. The experimental results verify that MFC used in submarine structures' active vibration control are feasible and effective.

  1. Lightweight, Composite Cryogenic Tank Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm has developed and qualified strong, all-composite LOX tanks for launch vehicles. Our new 42-inch diameter tank design weighs 486 lbs and burst without...

  2. Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-07-09

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the

  3. Advancing the Use of Secondary Inputs in Geopolymer Binders for Sustainable Cementitious Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Obonyo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Because of concerns over the construction industry‘s heavy use of cement and the general dissatisfaction with the performance of building envelopes with respect to durability, there is a growing demand for a novel class of ―green‖ binders. Geopolymer binders have re-emerged as binders that can be used as a replacement for Portland cement given their numerous advantages over the latter including lower carbon dioxide emissions, greater chemical and thermal resistance, combined with enhanced mechanical properties at both normal and extreme exposure conditions. The paper focuses on the use of geopolymer binders in building applications. It discusses the various options for starting materials and describes key engineering properties associated with geopolymer compositions that are ideal for structural applications. Specific properties, such as compressive strength, density, pore size distribution, cumulative water absorption, and acid resistance, are comparable to the specifications for structures incorporating conventional binders. This paper presents geopolymer binders, with their three dimensional microstructure, as material for structural elements that can be used to advance the realization of sustainable building systems.

  4. Development, Implementation and Application of Micromechanical Analysis Tools for Advanced High Temperature Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the final report to the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the research project entitled Development, Implementation, and Application of Micromechanical Analysis Tools for Advanced High-Temperature Composites. The research supporting this initiative has been conducted by Dr. Brett A. Bednarcyk, a Senior Scientist at OM in Brookpark, Ohio from the period of August 1998 to March 2005. Most of the work summarized herein involved development, implementation, and application of enhancements and new capabilities for NASA GRC's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) software package. When the project began, this software was at a low TRL (3-4) and at release version 2.0. Due to this project, the TRL of MAC/GMC has been raised to 7 and two new versions (3.0 and 4.0) have been released. The most important accomplishments with respect to MAC/GMC are: (1) A multi-scale framework has been built around the software, enabling coupled design and analysis from the global structure scale down to the micro fiber-matrix scale; (2) The software has been expanded to analyze smart materials; (3) State-of-the-art micromechanics theories have been implemented and validated within the code; (4) The damage, failure, and lifing capabilities of the code have been expanded from a very limited state to a vast degree of functionality and utility; and (5) The user flexibility of the code has been significantly enhanced. MAC/GMC is now the premier code for design and analysis of advanced composite and smart materials. It is a candidate for the 2005 NASA Software of the Year Award. The work completed over the course of the project is summarized below on a year by year basis. All publications resulting from the project are listed at the end of this report.

  5. Advances in the Lightweight Air-Liquid Composite Heat Exchanger Development for Space Exploration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Johnston, J. Chris; Haas, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    An advanced, lightweight composite modular Air/Liquid (A/L) Heat Exchanger (HX) Prototype for potential space exploration thermal management applications was successfully designed, manufactured, and tested. This full-scale Prototype consisting of 19 modules, based on recommendations from its predecessor Engineering Development unit (EDU) but with improved thermal characteristics and manufacturability, was 11.2 % lighter than the EDU and achieves potentially a 42.7% weight reduction from the existing state-of-the-art metallic HX demonstrator. However, its higher pressure drop (0.58 psid vs. 0.16 psid of the metal HX) has to be mitigated by foam material optimizations and design modifications including a more systematic air channel design. Scalability of the Prototype design was validated experimentally by comparing manufacturability and performance between the 2-module coupon and the 19-module Prototype. The Prototype utilized the thermally conductive open-cell carbon foam material but with lower density and adopted a novel high-efficiency cooling system with significantly increased heat transfer contact surface areas, improved fabricability and manufacturability compared to the EDU. Even though the Prototype was required to meet both the thermal and the structural specifications, accomplishing the thermal requirement was a higher priority goal for this first version. Overall, the Prototype outperformed both the EDU and the corresponding metal HX, particularly in terms of specific heat transfer, but achieved 93.4% of the target. The next generation Prototype to achieve the specification target, 3,450W would need 24 core modules based on the simple scaling factor. The scale-up Prototype will weigh about 14.7 Kg vs. 21.6 Kg for the metal counterpart. The advancement of this lightweight composite HX development from the original feasibility test coupons to EDU to Prototype is discussed in this paper.

  6. Up Asymmetries From Exhilarated Composite Flavor Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Da Rold, Leandro; Delaunay, Cédric; Grojean, Christophe; Perez, Gilad

    2012-01-01

    We present a class of warped extra dimension (composite Higgs) models which conjointly accommodates the t\\bar t forward-backward asymmetry observed at the Tevatron and the direct CP asymmetry in singly Cabibbo suppressed D decays first reported by the LHCb collaboration. We argue that both asymmetries, if arising dominantly from new physics beyond the Standard Model, hint for a flavor paradigm within partial compositeness models in which the right-handed quarks of the first two generations ar...

  7. Optimization of composite structures by genetic algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Le Riche, Rodolphe

    1994-01-01

    The design of composite laminated panels is a combinatorial problem when the orientation of the fibers in each layer is restricted to a discrete pool of angles. Additionally, composite laminates often have many optimal and near-optimal designs, and the designer may benefit by knowing many of those designs. Genetic algorithms are well suited for laminate design because they can handle the combinatorial nature of the problem and they permit the designer to obtain many near-optimal ...

  8. Application of a design-build-team approach to low cost and weight composite fuselage structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Willden, K. S.; Swanson, G. D.; Truslove, G.; Metschan, S. L.; Pfahl, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between manufacturing costs and design details must be understood to promote the application of advanced composite technologies to transport fuselage structures. A team approach, integrating the disciplines responsible for aircraft structural design and manufacturing, was developed to perform cost and weight trade studies for a twenty-foot diameter aft fuselage section. Baseline composite design and manufacturing concepts were selected for large quadrant panels in crown, side, and keel areas of the fuselage section. The associated technical issues were also identified. Detailed evaluation of crown panels indicated the potential for large weight savings and costs competitive with aluminum technology in the 1995 timeframe. Different processes and material forms were selected for the various elements that comprise the fuselage structure. Additional cost and weight savings potential was estimated for future advancements.

  9. Photo-excited terahertz switch based on composite metamaterial structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guocui; Zhang, Jianna; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; He, Yanan; Shen, Jingling

    2016-09-01

    A photo-excited terahertz switch based on a composite metamaterial structure was designed by integration of photoconductive silicon into the gaps of split-ring resonators. The conductivity of the silicon that was used to fill the gaps in the split-ring resonators was tuned dynamically as a function of the incident pump power using laser excitation, leading to a change in the composite metamaterial structure's properties. We studied the transmission characteristics of the composite metamaterial structure for various silicon conductivities, and the results indicated that this type of composite metamaterial structure could be used as a resonance frequency tunable terahertz metamaterial switch. We also designed other structures by filling different gaps with silicon, and proved that these structures could be used as terahertz metamaterial switches can change the working mode from a single frequency to multiple frequencies.

  10. Conceptual study on a new generation of the high-innovative advanced porous and composite nanostructural functional materials with nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to analyse theoretically the possibilities of the development of a new generation of the high-innovative advanced porous and composite nanostructural functional materials with nanofibers and to study into the material science grounds of synthesis and/or production and formulation of such materials’ structure and properties and to characterise and model their structure and properties depending on the compositional, phase and chemical composition and the applied synthesis and/or production and/or processing processes, without the attitude towards any direct practical application or use, but with confirming the highly probable future application areas, using the unexpected effects of formulating such materials’ functional properties.Design/methodology/approach: In general, the study is of priority cognitive importance as theoretical considerations and the author’s initial analyses related to technology foresight concerning this group of issues as well as sporadical results of research provided in the literature, usually in its incipient phase, indicating a great need to intensify scientific research, to develop the new groups of materials with quite unexpected predictable effects, resulting from the use of nanofibers for fabricating super advanced composite and porous materials.Findings: The description of the state of the art for the subject of the study has been limited to the issues initially selected with an analysis with the method of weighted scores.Practical implications: The outcoming materials may have direct influence on the development of electronics and photonics, medicine and pharmacy, environmental protection, automotive industry, space industry, machine industry, textile and clothing industry, cosmetic industry, agriculture and food sector.Originality/value: The value of this paper lies in the fact that it proposes a new generation of the high-innovative advanced porous and composite

  11. Advances in PAS-2 thermoplastic prepregs and composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.M.; Register, D.F.; Lindstrom, M.R.; Campbell, R.W.

    1988-04-01

    A family of polyarylene sulfide polymers is being developed as thermoplastic engineering resins. These resins have high temperature mechanical performance, good mechanical strength, and good solvent resistance. The newest member of this family of resins is PAS-2 amorphous polyarylene sulfide. One potential application for this amorphous resin is as a matrix for high performance composites. The amorphous polyarylene sulfide resin has been formed into unidirectional prepreg tapes. These tapes have been molded into laminates of excellent quality. Recently, new levels of performance in mechanical properties and processing have been achieved.

  12. Development of an Advanced Polymeric Composite (ALIX) for separation of cesium from nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    137Cs is one of the major isotopes present in high level radioactive waste (HLW). Its presence makes nuclear waste handling difficult. A new composite (ALIX) containing Ammonium molybdophosphate and a derivative of Bisphenol was developed for column operations to selectively remove cesium from acidic high level nuclear waste. The composite is stable in nitric acid, radiation field and exhibits fast kinetics for uptake. The properties of the composite are attributed to molecular structure of the polymer and morphology of the composite. (author)

  13. The use of advanced computer simulation in structural design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, C.J.; Mole, A. [Arup, San Fransisco, CA (United States); Arkinstall, M. [Arup, Sydney (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    The benefits that can be gained from the application of advanced numerical simulation in building design were discussed. A review of current practices in structural engineering was presented along with an illustration of a range of international project case studies. Structural engineers use analytical methods to evaluate both static and dynamic loads. Structural design is prescribed by a range of building codes, depending on location, building type and loading, but often, buildings do not fit well within the codes, particularly if one wants to take advantage of new technologies and developments in design that are not covered by the code. Advanced simulation refers to the use of mathematical modeling to complex problems to allow a wider consideration of building types and conditions that can be designed reliably using standard practices. Advanced simulation is used to address virtual testing and prototyping, verifying innovative design ideas, forensic engineering, and design optimization. The benefits of advanced simulation include enhanced creativity, improved performance, cost savings, risk management, sustainable design solutions, and better communication. The following 5 case studies illustrated the value gained by using advanced simulation as an integral part of the design process: the earthquake resistant Maison Hermes in Tokyo; the seismic resistant braces known as the Unbonded Brace for use in the United States; a simulation of the existing Disney Museum to evaluate its capacity to resist earthquakes; simulation of the MIT Brain and Cognitive Science Project to evaluate the effect of different foundation types on the vibration entering the building; and, the Beijing Aquatic Center whose design was streamlined by optimized structural analysis. It was suggested that industry should encourage the transfer of technology from other professions and should try to collaborate towards a global building model to construct buildings in a more efficient manner. 7 refs

  14. Preparation and Structural Analysis of Montmorillonite Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Guizhen; GONG Wenqi; LIU Gangwei

    2009-01-01

    Calcium montmorillonite from Liao-ning was organically intercalated by using cety1 trimethy1 ammonium bromide after it was treated with sodium carbonate.The optimal dosage of intercalating agent was tested.The organically intercalated montmorillonite composites were characterized by the methods of XRD,FTIR and DTA/TG.The results show that the intercalating ef-fect of the organically intercalated montmorillonite composite is the best when the amount of inter-calating agent reached 120%cation exchange capacity(CEC)

  15. Recent advances in computational structural reliability analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Ben H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, Harry R.; Torng, Tony Y.; Riha, David S.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of structural reliability analysis is to determine the probability that the structure will adequately perform its intended function when operating under the given environmental conditions. Thus, the notion of reliability admits the possibility of failure. Given the fact that many different modes of failure are usually possible, achievement of this goal is a formidable task, especially for large, complex structural systems. The traditional (deterministic) design methodology attempts to assure reliability by the application of safety factors and conservative assumptions. However, the safety factor approach lacks a quantitative basis in that the level of reliability is never known and usually results in overly conservative designs because of compounding conservatisms. Furthermore, problem parameters that control the reliability are not identified, nor their importance evaluated. A summary of recent advances in computational structural reliability assessment is presented. A significant level of activity in the research and development community was seen recently, much of which was directed towards the prediction of failure probabilities for single mode failures. The focus is to present some early results and demonstrations of advanced reliability methods applied to structural system problems. This includes structures that can fail as a result of multiple component failures (e.g., a redundant truss), or structural components that may fail due to multiple interacting failure modes (e.g., excessive deflection, resonate vibration, or creep rupture). From these results, some observations and recommendations are made with regard to future research needs.

  16. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  17. Ultra-light photovoltaic composite sandwich structures

    OpenAIRE

    Rion, Julien

    2008-01-01

    The ultra-light photovoltaic sandwich structure is a new multifunctional structure concept enabling weight and thus energy to be saved in high-tech solutions such as solar cars, solar planes or satellites. The novelty of this approach is to use solar cells as a load carrying element in the structure. The aim of this work was to investigate the failure mechanisms of such ultra-light sandwich structure and their correlation with microstructure, processing pressure, and strength in order to obta...

  18. Blast Testing and Modelling of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giversen, Søren

    , affecting for example the manoeuvrability and top speed negatively, which ultimately affects the safety of the personal in the vehicle. Strong and light materials, such as fibre reinforced composites, could therefore act as substitutes for the high strength steel, and minimize the impact on the vehicle...

  19. Advanced SiC fibers and SiC/SiC composites toward industrialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish the industrialization basis of advanced SiC fibers and SiC/SiC composites to be used in nuclear fusion reactors, R and D of Tyranno-SA grade fibers (Cef-NITETM) and NITE-SiC/SiC with sufficient quality control has been carried out. The important elements in this effort are fiber structure control and matrix density and homogeneity control. From the continuous heat treatments of pre-crystallized SiC fibers, the improved uniformity of grain size for radial position in 7-10 μm diameter SiC fibers has been confirmed with the fiber strength over 2.0 GPa. In order to establish stable mass production of NITE-SiC/SiC (Cera-NITETM), with sufficient quality control, efforts on production of mid-products, such as green sheets, prepreg sheets and preforms, have been extensively carried out. The important elements were to improve the homogeneity and density of preform so that the following sintering process has been modified for improving structure control.

  20. Fatigue damage modeling of composite structures: the onera viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, M.; Laurin, F.; Maire, J.F.; Rakotoarisoa, C.; Hémon, E.

    2015-01-01

    International audience The aim of this paper is to present the fatigue damage modeling approach developed at ONERA for the fatigue life prediction of composite materials and structures. This paper is divided into five sections. The first one explains why the already developed and validated methods for fatigue life modeling of metals and alloys cannot be directly applied to composite materials. Thus, the proposal of an efficient fatigue model for composite materials necessitates a good unde...

  1. Energy absorbtion capability of damage affected composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeaux, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this project is to consider the effect of damage on the energy absorption potential of continuous filament random mat (CoFRM) E-glass / polyester composite tubes. Composite materials have been shown to absorb significantly higher specific energy levels than metals under axial crushing conditions. This property can be exploited in automotive crashworthiness applications. Replacing steel crash structures with composites can lead to significant weight reductions. However, damage in co...

  2. Structural Behavior of R-UHPFRC - RC Composite Slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Bastien Masse, Maléna

    2015-01-01

    The application on existing Reinforced Concrete (RC) slabs of cast-on-site Ultra-High Performance Fiber Reinforced cement-based Composite (UHPFRC) layers is an efficient reinforcement technique, currently spreading. The thin layer of UHPFRC, with or without steel rebars, serves as a tensile reinforcement for the RC slab, creating a composite element. This thesis combines material and structural engineering to study the behavior and resistance of two-way spanning composite slabs, with a certai...

  3. Nano-structured polymer composites and process for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmyer, Marc; Chen, Liang

    2013-04-16

    A process for preparing a polymer composite that includes reacting (a) a multi-functional monomer and (b) a block copolymer comprising (i) a first block and (ii) a second block that includes a functional group capable of reacting with the multi-functional monomer, to form a crosslinked, nano-structured, bi-continuous composite. The composite includes a continuous matrix phase and a second continuous phase comprising the first block of the block copolymer.

  4. Impact of leachate composition on the advanced oxidation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are gaining importance as an alternative to the biological or physicochemical treatments for the management of leachates. In this work, it has been studied the effect of the characteristics of the leachate (content in humic acids, landfill age and degree of stabilization) on the wet oxidation process and final quality of the treated effluent. A high concentration of humic acids in the leachate had a positive effect on the COD removal because this fraction is more easily oxidizable. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that the simultaneous presence of humic acid and the intermediates generated during the oxidation process improved the degradation of this acid, since such intermediates are stronger initiators of free radicals than the humic acid itself. Similar values of COD removals (49% and 51%) and biodegradability indices (0.30 and 0.35) were observed, after 8 h of wet oxidation, for the stabilised leachate (biologically pretreated) and the raw one, respectively. Nevertheless, final colour removal was much higher for the stabilised leachate, achieving values up to 91%, whereas for the raw one only 56% removal was attained for the same reaction time. Besides, wet oxidation treatment was more efficient for the young leachate than for the old one, with final COD conversions of 60% and 37%, respectively. Eventually, a triangular "three-lump" kinetic model, which considered direct oxidation to CO2 and partial oxidation through intermediate compounds, was here proposed. PMID:26517790

  5. Impact of leachate composition on the advanced oxidation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are gaining importance as an alternative to the biological or physicochemical treatments for the management of leachates. In this work, it has been studied the effect of the characteristics of the leachate (content in humic acids, landfill age and degree of stabilization) on the wet oxidation process and final quality of the treated effluent. A high concentration of humic acids in the leachate had a positive effect on the COD removal because this fraction is more easily oxidizable. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that the simultaneous presence of humic acid and the intermediates generated during the oxidation process improved the degradation of this acid, since such intermediates are stronger initiators of free radicals than the humic acid itself. Similar values of COD removals (49% and 51%) and biodegradability indices (0.30 and 0.35) were observed, after 8 h of wet oxidation, for the stabilised leachate (biologically pretreated) and the raw one, respectively. Nevertheless, final colour removal was much higher for the stabilised leachate, achieving values up to 91%, whereas for the raw one only 56% removal was attained for the same reaction time. Besides, wet oxidation treatment was more efficient for the young leachate than for the old one, with final COD conversions of 60% and 37%, respectively. Eventually, a triangular "three-lump" kinetic model, which considered direct oxidation to CO2 and partial oxidation through intermediate compounds, was here proposed.

  6. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Vectorization of Advanced Methods for Molecular Electronic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    That there have been remarkable advances in the field of molecular electronic structure during the last decade is clear not only to those working in the field but also to anyone else who has used quantum chemical results to guide their own investiga­ tions. The progress in calculating the electronic structures of molecules has occurred through the truly ingenious theoretical and methodological developments that have made computationally tractable the underlying physics of electron distributions around a collection of nuclei. At the same time there has been consider­ able benefit from the great advances in computer technology. The growing sophistication, declining costs and increasing accessibi­ lity of computers have let theorists apply their methods to prob­ lems in virtually all areas of molecular science. Consequently, each year witnesses calculations on larger molecules than in the year before and calculations with greater accuracy and more com­ plete information on molecular properties. We can surel...

  7. Metallic Functionally Graded Materials: A Specific Class of Advanced Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jerzy J.Sobczak; Ludmil Drenchev

    2013-01-01

    Functionally graded materials,including their characterization,properties and production methods are a new rapidly developing field of materials science.The aims of this review are to systematize the basic production techniques for manufacturing functionally graded materials.Attention is paid to the principles for obtaining graded structure mainly in the metal based functionally graded materials.Several unpublished results obtained by the authors have been discussed briefly.Experimental methods and theoretical analysis for qualitative and quantitative estimation of graded properties have also been presented.The article can be useful for people who work in the field of functionally graded structures and materials,and who need a compact informative review of recent experimental and theoretical activity in this area.

  8. Advanced composite elevator for Boeing 727 aircraft, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovil, D. V.; Grant, W. D.; Jamison, E. S.; Syder, H.; Desper, O. E.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary design activity consisted of developing and analyzing alternate design concepts and selecting the optimum elevator configuration. This included trade studies in which durability, inspectability, producibility, repairability, and customer acceptance were evaluated. Preliminary development efforts consisted of evaluating and selecting material, identifying ancillary structural development test requirements, and defining full scale ground and flight test requirements necessary to obtain Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification. After selection of the optimum elevator configuration, detail design was begun and included basic configuration design improvements resulting from manufacturing verification hardware, the ancillary test program, weight analysis, and structural analysis. Detail and assembly tools were designed and fabricated to support a full-scope production program, rather than a limited run. The producibility development programs were used to verify tooling approaches, fabrication processes, and inspection methods for the production mode. Quality parts were readily fabricated and assembled with a minimum rejection rate, using prior inspection methods.

  9. Properties of fiber composites for advanced flywheel energy storage devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E

    2001-01-12

    The performance of commercial high-performance fibers is examined for application to flywheel power supplies. It is shown that actual delivered performance depends on multiple factors such as inherent fiber strength, strength translation and stress-rupture lifetime. Experimental results for recent stress-rupture studies of carbon fibers will be presented and compared with other candidate reinforcement materials. Based on an evaluation of all of the performance factors, it is concluded that carbon fibers are preferred for highest performance and E-glass fibers for lowest cost. The inferior performance of the low-cost E-glass fibers can be improved to some extent by retarding the stress-corrosion of the material due to moisture and practical approaches to mitigating this corrosion are discussed. Many flywheel designs are limited not by fiber failure, but by matrix-dominated failure modes. Unfortunately, very few experimental results for stress-rupture under transverse tensile loading are available. As a consequence, significant efforts are made in flywheel design to avoid generating any transverse tensile stresses. Recent results for stress-rupture of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite under transverse tensile load reveal that these materials are surprisingly durable under the transverse loading condition and that some radial tensile stress could be tolerated in flywheel applications.

  10. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 degree C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included uni-directional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed

  11. Fluid and structural measurements to advance gas turbine technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, the current status of fluid and structural measurements is reviewed, and some potential improvements in gas turbine machinery, directly associated with the new measuring capability are discussed. Some considerations concerning the impact of the new capability on the methods and approaches that will be used in the further development of advanced technology, in general, and to aeropropulsion gas turbine machinery, in particular, are presented.

  12. Buckling of foam stabilised composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Rivallant, Samuel; Ferrero, Jean-François; Barrau, Jean-Jacques

    2003-01-01

    An analytical modelling of the symmetrical wrinkling is proposed : from original assumptions on displacements within the core, and from an energy minimisation method, it is possible to predict critical loads and buckling modes better than traditional models do, and to distinguish the influence of each structure component. Compression tests were carried out on sandwich structures to validate the model. Little curved structures were also tested to estimate the influence of skin curvature on rup...

  13. Robustness of steel and composite building structures

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspart, Jean-Pierre; Demonceau, Jean-François; Coméliau, Ludivine

    2011-01-01

    Recent events such as natural catastrophes or terrorism attacks have highlighted the necessity to ensure the structural integrity of buildings under an exceptional event. According to the Eurocodes and some different other national design codes, the structural integrity of civil engineering structures should be ensured through appropriate measures but, in most cases, no precise practical guidelines on how to achieve this goal are provided. At Liège University, the robustness of building f...

  14. Snap Joint Technology for Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    The optimum composite joint design is the one capable of distributing stresses over a wide area rather than to concentrate them at a point. Adhesively bonded joints can satisfy these requirements, however, most of the adhesives are brittle, and brittle failure is unavoidable. This was the motivation of developing what is called the SNAP joint. The snap joint technology developed by W. Brandt Goldworthy & Associates, Inc. The concept is based on similar joining technology used for connecting w...

  15. Numerical characterization of imperfection sensitive composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Arbelo, Mariano; Degenhardt, Richard; Castro, Saullo; Zimmermann, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The need to take the imperfection sensitivity of thin-walled unstiffened cylinders into account during the early design phases motivated the development of the NASA SP-8007 guideline, which brings an empirically based lower-bound curve that gives the knock-down factor (KDF) as a function of the cylinder’s radius and thickness. This guideline is still used also for composites, using correction. The conservativeness of these guidelines has been proved both stochastically by Arbocz, Starnes Jr.,...

  16. Composite Structures Damage Tolerance Analysis Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, James B.; Goyal, Vinay K.; Klug, John C.; Rome, Jacob I.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the results of a literature review as part of the development of composite hardware fracture control guidelines funded by NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) under contract NNL04AA09B. The objectives of the overall development tasks are to provide a broad information and database to the designers, analysts, and testing personnel who are engaged in space flight hardware production.

  17. Structural Composites with Intrinsic Multifunctionality Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a multifunctional, structural material for applications in terrestrial and space-based platforms used for instrumentation in earth observation is...

  18. Structural Composites with Intrinsic Multifunctionality Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of multifunctional, structural materials for applications in terrestrial and space-based platforms is proposed. The principle innovation is the...

  19. Up Asymmetries From Exhilarated Composite Flavor Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rold, Leandro; Grojean, Christophe; Perez, Gilad

    2013-01-01

    We present a class of warped extra dimension (composite Higgs) models which conjointly accommodates the t\\bar t forward-backward asymmetry observed at the Tevatron and the direct CP asymmetry in singly Cabibbo suppressed D decays first reported by the LHCb collaboration. We argue that both asymmetries, if arising dominantly from new physics beyond the Standard Model, hint for a flavor paradigm within partial compositeness models in which the right-handed quarks of the first two generations are not elementary fields but rather composite objects. We show that this class of models is consistent with current data on flavor and CP violating physics, electroweak precision observables, dijet and top pair resonance searches at hadron colliders. These models have several predictions which will be tested in forthcoming experiments. The CP asymmetry in D decays is induced through an effective operator of the form (\\bar u c)_{V+A}(\\bar s s)_{V+A} at the charm scale, which implies a larger CP asymmetry in the D^0\\to K^+K^...

  20. Nonlinear and Failure Analysis of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this research is to assess the effect of discontinuities and uncertainties on the nonlinear response and failure of stiffened composite panels subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads. The key elements of the study are: (a) study of the effects of stiffener geometry and of transverse stresses on the response, damage initiation and propagation in stiffened composite panels; (b) use of hierarchical sensitivity coefficients to identify the major parameters that affect the response and damage in each of the different levels in the hierarchy (micromechanical, layer, panel, subcomponent and component levels); and, (c) application of fuzzy set techniques to identify the range and variation of possible responses. The computational models developed are used in conjunction with experiments to understand the physical phenomena associated with the nonlinear response and failure of stiffened composite panels. A toolkit is developed for use in conjunction with deterministic analysis programs to help the designer in assessing the effect of uncertainties in the different computational model parameters on the variability of the response quantities.

  1. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  2. Composite Structure Monitoring using Direct Write Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II project seeks to develop and demonstrate a suite of sensor products to monitor the health of composite structures. Sensors will be made...

  3. Structural arrangement trade study. Volume 3: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the third of a 3 volume set that addresses the structural trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The most suitable Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Tank System (GCPS) composite materials for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. Vehicle resizing charts, selection criteria and back-up charts, parametric costing approach and the finite element method analysis are discussed.

  4. Preface: Advanced Thin Film Developments and Nano Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ray Y.Lin

    2005-01-01

    @@ In this special issue, we invited a few leading materials researchers to present topics in thin films, coatings, and nano structures. Readers will find most recent developments in topics, including recent advances in hard, tough, and low friction nanocomposite coatings; thin films for coating nanomaterials; electroless plating of silver thin films on porous Al2O3 substrate; CrN/Nano Cr interlayer coatings; nano-structured carbide derived carbon (CDC) films and their tribology; predicting interdiffusion in high-temperature coatings; gallium-catalyzed silica nanowire growth; and corrosion protection properties of organofunctional silanes. Authors are from both national laboratories and academia.

  5. Multi-Material Design Optimization of Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hvejsel, Christian Frier

    2011-01-01

    This PhD thesis entitled “Multi-Material Design Optimization of Composite Structures” addresses the design problem of choosing materials in an optimal manner under a resource constraint so as to maximize the integral stiffness of a structure under static loading conditions. In particular stiffness design of laminated composite structures is studied including the problem of orienting orthotropic material optimally. The approach taken in this work is to consider this multi-material design probl...

  6. Multilevel design optimization of composite structures with blended laminates

    OpenAIRE

    Seresta, O.

    2007-01-01

    This research work deals with the design and optimization of a large composite structure. In design of large structural systems, it is customary to divide the problem into many smaller independent/semi-independent local design problems. The use of composite necessitates the inclusion of ply angles as design variables. These design variables are discrete in nature because of manufacturing constraint, which directly affect the lay up cost. The multilevel approach results into a nonblended solut...

  7. Use of Modal Synthesis for Composite Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musil Miloš

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A common occurrence in engineering practice is undesirable levels of vibration in the structures of machinery, which decrease their functionality, safety, reliability and service life. Current trends in the dynamic operation of machinery inherently generate such undesirable effects. That is to say, increasing the operational capacity of a machine (higher speeds, higher loads, more changes in operational regimes, etc... is financially counterproductive to any desired savings in the material/technological realization of such structures. One possible approach to modify the dynamic properties of the structure is through modal synthesis. This approach combines the modal properties of the real structure obtained through measurements with the modal properties of additional components obtained computationally. This approach is particularly effective if the computational model of the built structure is incorrect.

  8. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  9. Improving the vacuum-infusion process to manufacture high quality structural composite for the aeronautic market

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Luís; Nunes, J. P.; F. Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    In last years, the vacuum-infusion processing method is being replacing successfully autoclave technologies to manufacture advanced composite structures, namely, the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) ones, for aeronautical and aerospace applications. The high investment associated with autoclave “prepreg” manufacturing has prompted interest in the use of alternative vacuum-infusion technologies that proven to be much more cost-effective processing methods. The present work presents, desc...

  10. Structural analysis of low-speed composite propfan blades for the LRCSW wind tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    The Naval Weapons Center at China Lake, CA, is currently in the process of evaluating propulsion systems for the Long Range Conventional Standoff Weapons (LRCSW). At present, the Advanced Counter-Rotating Propfan system is being considered. The methodologies are documented which were used to structurally analyze the 0.55 scale CM1 composite propfan blades for the LRCSW with COBSTRAN and MSC/NASTRAN. Significant results are also reported.

  11. CFRP composites for optics and structures in telescope applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Robert C.

    1995-10-01

    The use of continuous fiber reinforced plastic, CFRP, composite materials is introduced here as a viable material for optical telescopes. The thermal characteristics of CFRPs make them attractive as dimensionally stable materials for all-composite telescope structures and mirrors. Composite mirrors have only recently shown promise as replacements for heavier and more fragile glass mirrors. The areal density of a CFRP mirror can be as much as 10 times less than that of a glass mirror. Optical test results show CFRP composite mirrors can be fabricated with an average surface roughness of less than 10 angstroms. Concept models of scope and CFRP optics with associated figure and roughness data are presented.

  12. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF UNDERGROUND COMPOSITE STRUCTURES UNDER EXPLOSION LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓兵; 薛大为; 赵玉祥

    2004-01-01

    In selecting rational types of underground structures resisting explosion, in order to improve stress states of the structural section and make full use of material strength of each part of the section, the research method of composite structures is presented. Adopting the analysis method of micro-section free body, equilibrium equations, constraint equations and deformation coordination equations are given. Making use of the concept of generalized work and directly introducing Lagrange multiplier specific in physical meaning, the validity of the constructed generalized functional is proved by using variation method. The rational rigidity matching relationship of composite structure section is presented through example calculations.

  13. Variation in Content Coverage by Classroom Composition: An Analysis of Advanced Math Course Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covay, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Everyone knows that there is racial inequality in achievement returns from advanced math; however, they do not know why black students and white students taking the same level of math courses are not leaving with the same or comparable skill levels. To find out, the author examines variation in course coverage by the racial composition of the…

  14. Advanced modeling of thermal NDT problems: from buried landmines to defects in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilov, Vladimir P.; Burleigh, Douglas D.; Klimov, Alexey G.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced thermal models that can be used in the detection of buried landmines and the TNDT (thermographic nondestructive testing) of composites are discussed. The interdependence between surface temperature signals and various complex parameters, such as surface and volumetric moisture, the shape of a heat pulse, material anisotropy, etc., is demonstrated.

  15. The Irony and the Ecstasy: How Holden Caulfield Helped My Advanced Composition Students Find Their Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Linda

    An instructor of an advanced composition course (adapted from one taught by James Seitz at the University of Pittsburgh) at the University of California Riverside took her students through a series of reading and writing assignments that asked them to "engage in a wide variety of prose styles and...consider what style suggests about language,…

  16. Mould Design for Composite Body Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Maksimainen, Aki

    2012-01-01

    This Bachelor’s Thesis was done for the Metropolia University of Applied Science’s Concept City Car Project, funded and initiated by TEKES, the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation, in the aim of designing and producing a lightweight vehicle for urban environments using bio composites in the body of the vehicle and having an engine that uses the next generation biodiesel as its fuel. This graduate study is but one of many done for this project, one of them being the foundation...

  17. Composite timber-concrete road bridge structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojić Dragoslav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents preliminary design of the road bridge made of laminated timber. The supporting system of the main bearing elements is made of the laminated timber in the system of arch with three joints; the bridge slab is designed as continuous slab, made of nine equal fields; each pair is made as composite timber-concrete beam, where the road slab is made of concrete and the needle pieces are made of timber. Fundament is based on HW piles. All the elements are designed to Eurocode.

  18. Flexible ultrasonic array system for inspecting thick composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankle, Robert S.; Rose, Douglas N.

    1995-06-01

    Composite materials, which have commonly been used in recreational boats, are now being applied to more challenging marine applications. The high specific stiffness and strength of composites translates into increased range and payload. Composites offer the added benefits of corrosion and erosion resistance, fatigue and wear resistance, reduced signature, and reduced maintenance and life cycle costs as compared to traditional metallic structures. Although ultrasonic techniques are typically used to inspect composite structures, thick composites, such as those used in marine applications, are difficult to inspect with ordinary ultrasonic methods. An ultrasonic inspection system is being developed for the US Army to inspect thick composite materials for future armored vehicles. This system is an extension of the existing PARIS flexible array ultrasonic inspection system, which was originally developed for inspecting thin composite aircraft structures. The extension is designed to increase ultrasonic penetration by 1) fabricating an array that operates at lower frequency and higher voltage, and 2) employing a synthetic pulse technique. The flexible array can rapidly inspect large areas and produce images of the inspection results that are easy to interpret. This paper describes the ultrasonic inspection system and presents examples of inspection results from both thick and thin composite materials.

  19. Multi-axial load application and DIC measurement of advanced composite beam deformation behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berggreen C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available For the validation of a new beam element formulation, a wide set of experimental data consisting of deformation patterns obtained for a number of specially designed composite beam elements, have been obtained. The composite materials applied in the beams consist of glass-fiber reinforced plastic with specially designed layup configurations promoting advanced coupling behavior. Furthermore, the beams are designed with different cross-section shapes. The data obtained from the experiments are also used in order to improve the general understanding related to practical implementation of mechanisms of elastic couplings due to anisotropic properties of composite materials. The knowledge gained from these experiments is therefore essential in order to facilitate an implementation of passive control in future large wind turbine blades. A test setup based on a four-column MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a maximum capacity of 100 kN was developed, see Figure 1. The setup allows installing and testing beams of different cross-sections applying load cases such as axial extension, shear force bending, pure bending in two principal directions as well as pure torsion, see Figure 2. In order to apply multi-axial loading, a load application system consisting of three hydraulic actuators were mounted in two planes using multi-axial servo-hydraulic control. The actuator setup consists of the main actuator on the servo-hydraulic test machine working in the vertical axis (depicted on Figure 1 placed at the testing machine crosshead and used for application of vertical forces to the specimens. Two extra actuators are placed in a horizontal plane on the T-slot table of the test machine in different positions in order to apply loading at the tip of the specimen in various configurations. In order to precisely characterize the global as well as surface deformations of the beam specimens tested, a combination of different measurement systems were used during

  20. Structural Abort Trigger for Ares Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Structural health monitoring (SHM) methods have been limited for wide-area applications due to the implied infrastructure, including sensors, power/communication...

  1. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP

  2. Development of Zero Coefficient of Thermal Expansion composite tubes for stable space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, John D.

    1992-09-01

    Advanced composite materials are well suited for stable space structures due to their low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE), high stiffness and light weight. For a given design application, composite hardware can be tailored for strength, stiffness, CTE, and Coefficient of Moisture Expansion (CME). Computer modeling and laminate testing of high modulus graphite/epoxy tubes were evaluated for compressive strength, stiffness, CTE, CME and microcracking. Thermal cycling and microcracking effects on CTE were evaluated. Thin graphite/epoxy plies exhibited reduced microcracking. A zero CTE thin wall tube design resulted from the development program. Recent work on low moisture absorption resin systems is also discussed.

  3. Composite chronicles: A study of the lessons learned in the development, production, and service of composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosteen, Louis F.; Hadcock, Richard N.

    1994-01-01

    A study of past composite aircraft structures programs was conducted to determine the lessons learned during the programs. The study focused on finding major underlying principles and practices that experience showed have significant effects on the development process and should be recognized and understood by those responsible for using of composites. Published information on programs was reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel associated with current and past major development programs. In all, interviews were conducted with about 56 people representing 32 organizations. Most of the people interviewed have been involved in the engineering and manufacturing development of composites for the past 20 to 25 years. Although composites technology has made great advances over the past 30 years, the effective application of composites to aircraft is still a complex problem that requires experienced personnel with special knowledge. All disciplines involved in the development process must work together in real time to minimize risk and assure total product quality and performance at acceptable costs. The most successful programs have made effective use of integrated, collocated, concurrent engineering teams, and most often used well-planned, systematic development efforts wherein the design and manufacturing processes are validated in a step-by-step or 'building block' approach. Such approaches reduce program risk and are cost effective.

  4. Modeling of composite piezoelectric structures with the finite volume method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolborici, Valentin; Dawson, Francis P; Pugh, Mary C

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric devices, such as piezoelectric traveling- wave rotary ultrasonic motors, have composite piezoelectric structures. A composite piezoelectric structure consists of a combination of two or more bonded materials, at least one of which is a piezoelectric transducer. Piezoelectric structures have mainly been numerically modeled using the finite element method. An alternative approach based on the finite volume method offers the following advantages: 1) the ordinary differential equations resulting from the discretization process can be interpreted directly as corresponding circuits; and 2) phenomena occurring at boundaries can be treated exactly. This paper presents a method for implementing the boundary conditions between the bonded materials in composite piezoelectric structures modeled with the finite volume method. The paper concludes with a modeling example of a unimorph structure. PMID:22293746

  5. Composite Blade Structural Analyzer (COBSTRAN) theoretical/programmer's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    This manual describes the organization and flow of data and analysis in the computer code, COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctural ANalyzer). This code combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with an internal data base of fiber and matrix properties and was developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and composite wind turbine blades. Inputs to the code are constituent fiber and matrix material properties, factors reflecting the fabrication process, composite geometry and blade geometry. COBSTRAN performs the micromechanics and laminate analyses of these fiber composites and generates a NASTRAN finite element model of the blade. This manual describes the equations formulated and solved in the code and the function of each of the seventy-two subroutines. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77.

  6. Modelling Impact Damage in Sandwich Structures with Folded Composite Cores

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Alastair; Kilchert, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes FE simulation methods for novel folded structural composite cores being developed for sandwich structures with enhanced performance for use in aircraft fuselage and wing primary structures. To support these materials and structural developments, computational methods were developed in the EU project CELPACT based on micromechanics cell models of the core with multiscale FE modelling techniques for understanding progressive damage and collapse mechanisms. The paper discusse...

  7. Processing, structure and flexural strength of CNT and carbon fibre reinforced, epoxy-matrix hybrid composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Chandra Shekar; M Sai Priya; P K Subramanian; Anil Kumar; B Anjaneya Prasad; N Eswara Prasad

    2014-05-01

    Advanced materials such as continuous fibre-reinforced polymer matrix composites offer significant enhancements in variety of properties, as compared to their bulk, monolithic counterparts. These properties include primarily the tensile stress, flexural stress and fracture parameters. However, till date, there are hardly any scientific studies reported on carbon fibre (Cf) and carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced hybrid epoxy matrix composites (unidirectional). The present work is an attempt to bring out the flexural strength properties along with a detailed investigation in the synthesis of reinforced hybrid composite. In this present study, the importance of alignment of fibre is comprehensively evaluated and reported. The results obtained are discussed in terms of material characteristics, microstructure and mode of failure under flexural (3-point bend) loading. The study reveals the material exhibiting exceptionally high strength values and declaring itself as a material with high strength to weight ratio when compared to other competing polymer matrix composites (PMCs); as a novel structural material for aeronautical and aerospace applications.

  8. Freshman Students‟ Attitudes and Behavior towards Advanced Grammar and Composition Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romel M. Aceron

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Teaching English advanced grammar and composition to college students is important as it provides them with high level of understanding and competence in the language. It guides them in putting words together into sentences and makes them orally produce sounds clearly and effectively. This paper aims to determine the attitudes and behavior towards advanced grammar and composition teaching among freshman college students of Batangas State University. Descriptive method of research has been used to analyze and interpret data. The following instruments such as self-made questionnaire, focus group discussion, data analysis, interview guide, have been utilized to gather data. To analyze and interpret data, mean scores have been used. Pearson’s (r Product Moment Correlation Method has been utilized to treat the null hypothesis with regard to the attitudes and behavior of the students towards advanced grammar and composition teaching. Based on the findings of the study, the students sometimes understand and feel the subject matters, i.e., morphology, phonology, grammar and usage, and mechanics and composition writing. They are also sometimes ready in particular lesson and activity which are given to them in class. The study also reveals that there is no significant relationship between the students’ attitudes and behavior towards AGCT. In this regard, college students taking advanced grammar and composition course must be well-motivated to understand, and must have the readiness to perform the activities entail in the subject areas of morphology, phonology, grammar and usage, and mechanics and composition writing through teacher’s varied approaches, strategies, researches, and integration.

  9. Research Developments in Nondestructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring for the Sustainment of Composite Aerospace Structures at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott

    2016-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable both the use and sustainment of composites in commercial aircraft structures. One key to the sustainment of these large composite structures is the rapid, in-situ characterization of a wide range of potential defects that may occur during the vehicle's life. Additionally, in many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over their lifetime. Quantitative characterization through Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of defects such as reduced bond strength, microcracking, and delamination damage due to impact, are of particular interest. This paper will present an overview of NASA's applications of NDE technologies being developed for the characterization and sustainment of advanced aerospace composites. The approaches presented include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods and infrared thermography techniques for NDE. Finally, the use of simulation tools for optimizing and validating these techniques will also be discussed.

  10. Computational modeling and impact analysis of textile composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Hae-Kyu

    This study is devoted to the development of an integrated numerical modeling enabling one to investigate the static and the dynamic behaviors and failures of 2-D textile composite as well as 3-D orthogonal woven composite structures weakened by cracks and subjected to static-, impact- and ballistic-type loads. As more complicated modeling about textile composite structures is introduced, some of homogenization schemes, geometrical modeling and crack propagations become more difficult problems to solve. To overcome these problems, this study presents effective mesh-generation schemes, homogenization modeling based on a repeating unit cell and sinusoidal functions, and also a cohesive element to study micro-crack shapes. This proposed research has two: (1) studying behavior of textile composites under static loads, (2) studying dynamic responses of these textile composite structures subjected to the transient/ballistic loading. In the first part, efficient homogenization schemes are suggested to show the influence of textile architectures on mechanical characteristics considering the micro modeling of repeating unit cell. Furthermore, the structures of multi-layered or multi-phase composites combined with different laminar such as a sub-laminate, are considered to find the mechanical characteristics. A simple progressive failure mechanism for the textile composites is also presented. In the second part, this study focuses on three main phenomena to solve the dynamic problems: micro-crack shapes, textile architectures and textile effective moduli. To obtain a good solutions of the dynamic problems, this research attempts to use four approaches: (I) determination of governing equations via a three-level hierarchy: micro-mechanical unit cell analysis, layer-wise analysis accounting for transverse strains and stresses, and structural analysis based on anisotropic plate layers, (II) development of an efficient computational approach enabling one to perform transient

  11. Composite S-layer lipid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2009-10-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state of the art survey how S-layer proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas for application of composite S-layer membrane systems concern sensor systems involving specific membrane functions. PMID:19303933

  12. Composite material structures for thermophotovoltaic conversion radiator. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guazzoni, G.; Kittl, E.

    1975-09-01

    This report covers the experimental work on the testing and evaluation of disk-shaped erbium oxide radiator samples fabricated by die pressing and plasma spray coating techniques. This investigation was performed to provide performance parameters on the utilization of these specimen structure compositions as improved radiator structures for thermophotovoltaic energy conversion applications.

  13. Recent developments of discrete material optimization of laminated composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Erik; Sørensen, Rene

    2015-01-01

    This work will give a quick summary of recent developments of the Discrete Material Optimization approach for structural optimization of laminated composite structures. This approach can be seen as a multi-material topology optimization approach for selecting the best ply material and number...

  14. Improved Joining of Metal Components to Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmes, Edmund

    2009-01-01

    Systems requirements for complex spacecraft drive design requirements that lead to structures, components, and/or enclosures of a multi-material and multifunctional design. The varying physical properties of aluminum, tungsten, Invar, or other high-grade aerospace metals when utilized in conjunction with lightweight composites multiply system level solutions. These multi-material designs are largely dependent upon effective joining techAn improved method of joining metal components to matrix/fiber composite material structures has been invented. The method is particularly applicable to equipping such thin-wall polymer-matrix composite (PMC) structures as tanks with flanges, ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liners for high heat engine nozzles, and other metallic-to-composite attachments. The method is oriented toward new architectures and distributing mechanical loads as widely as possible in the vicinities of attachment locations to prevent excessive concentrations of stresses that could give rise to delaminations, debonds, leaks, and other failures. The method in its most basic form can be summarized as follows: A metal component is to be joined to a designated attachment area on a composite-material structure. In preparation for joining, the metal component is fabricated to include multiple studs projecting from the aforementioned face. Also in preparation for joining, holes just wide enough to accept the studs are molded into, drilled, or otherwise formed in the corresponding locations in the designated attachment area of the uncured ("wet') composite structure. The metal component is brought together with the uncured composite structure so that the studs become firmly seated in the holes, thereby causing the composite material to become intertwined with the metal component in the joining area. Alternately, it is proposed to utilize other mechanical attachment schemes whereby the uncured composite and metallic parts are joined with "z-direction" fasteners. The

  15. Structural optimization study of composite wind turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Shen, Wen Zhong; Wang, Quan;

    2013-01-01

    -way fluid-structure interaction method is introduced. A procedure combining finite element analysis and particle swarm algorithm to optimize composite structures of the wind turbine blade is developed. The procedure proposed not only allows thickness variation but also permits the spar cap location...... for the structural design and optimization of wind turbine blades. © 2012.......In this paper the initial layout of a 2. MW composite wind turbine blade is designed first. The new airfoils families are selected to design a 2. MW wind turbine blade. The finite element parametric model for the blade is established. Based on the modified Blade Element Momentum theory, a new one...

  16. Response Surface Stochastic Finite Element Method of Composite Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Deyong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Response Surface Method (RSM has been applied to structural reliability problems successfully in many areas. Finite Element Method (FEM is one of the most widely used computational methods, which permit the analysis and design of large-scale engineering systems. In order to obtain a reliability analysis method of composite structure with satisfactory accuracy and computational efficiency, RSM and FEM were combined by secondary development of ABAQUS. Response Surface Stochastic Finite Element Method (RSSFEM which can solve the reliability problems of composite structure was developed. The numerical accuracy and the computational efficiency of the developed method were demonstrated by comparison with Monte-Carlo Stochastic Finite Element Method (MCSFEM.

  17. Chemical composition in relation with biomass ash structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubcik, Michal; Jandacka, Jozef

    2014-08-01

    Biomass combustion can be more complicated like combustion of fossil fuels because it is necessary to solve problems with lower ash melting temperature. It can cause a lot of problems during combustion process. Chemical composition of biomass ash has great impact on sinters and slags creation in ash because it affects structure of heated ash. In this paper was solved relation between chemical composition and structure of heated ash from three types of biomass (spruce wood, miscanthus giganteus and wheat straw). Amount of SiO2, CaO, MgO, Al2O3 and K2O was determined. Structure of heated ash was optically determined after heating to 1000 °C or 1200 °C. Results demonstrated that chemical composition has strong effect on structure and color of heated ash.

  18. Ink composition for making a conductive silver structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Steven B.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-10-18

    An ink composition for making a conductive silver structure comprises a silver salt and a complex of (a) a complexing agent and a short chain carboxylic acid or (b) a complexing agent and a salt of a short chain carboxylic acid, according to one embodiment. A method for making a silver structure entails combining a silver salt and a complexing agent, and then adding a short chain carboxylic acid or a salt of the short chain carboxylic acid to the combined silver salt and a complexing agent to form an ink composition. A concentration of the complexing agent in the ink composition is reduced to form a concentrated formulation, and the silver salt is reduced to form a conductive silver structure, where the concentrated formulation and the conductive silver structure are formed at a temperature of about 120.degree. C. or less.

  19. Advances and trends in structures and dynamics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Washington, DC, October 22-25, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K. (Editor); Hayduk, R. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are developments in structural engineering hardware and software, computation for fracture mechanics, trends in numerical analysis and parallel algorithms, mechanics of materials, advances in finite element methods, composite materials and structures, determinations of random motion and dynamic response, optimization theory, automotive tire modeling methods and contact problems, the damping and control of aircraft structures, and advanced structural applications. Specific topics covered include structural design expert systems, the evaluation of finite element system architectures, systolic arrays for finite element analyses, nonlinear finite element computations, hierarchical boundary elements, adaptive substructuring techniques in elastoplastic finite element analyses, automatic tracking of crack propagation, a theory of rate-dependent plasticity, the torsional stability of nonlinear eccentric structures, a computation method for fluid-structure interaction, the seismic analysis of three-dimensional soil-structure interaction, a stress analysis for a composite sandwich panel, toughness criterion identification for unidirectional composite laminates, the modeling of submerged cable dynamics, and damping synthesis for flexible spacecraft structures.

  20. Smart EMI monitoring of thin composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Selva, Pierre; Cherrier, Olivier; Pommier-Budinger, Valérie; Lachaud, Frédéric; MORLIER, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a structural health monitoring (SHM) method for in-situ damage detection and localization in carbon fibre reinforced plates (CFRP). The detection is achieved using the electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique employing piezoelectric transducers as high-frequency modal sensors. Numerical simulations based on the finite element method are carried out so as to simulate more than a hundred damage scenarios. Damage metrics are then used to quantify and detect changes betw...

  1. Design and Realisation of Composite Gridshell Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Tayeb, Frédéric; Lefevre, Baptiste; Baverel, Olivier; Caron, Jean-François; du Peloux, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the gridshells built by the Navier laboratory in the last ten years. The numerical conception is developed, from the draft made by architects up to the final structure. Several numerical tasks are performed to design a gridshell. The geometry of the gridshell is first considered. Then, an important iterative step mixing geometry and mechanical considerations is carried out. In particular, it is explained how the naturally straight beams are bent together during a very qu...

  2. Use of Modal Synthesis for Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Musil Miloš; Chlebo Ondrej

    2014-01-01

    A common occurrence in engineering practice is undesirable levels of vibration in the structures of machinery, which decrease their functionality, safety, reliability and service life. Current trends in the dynamic operation of machinery inherently generate such undesirable effects. That is to say, increasing the operational capacity of a machine (higher speeds, higher loads, more changes in operational regimes, etc...) is financially counterproductive to any desired savings in the material/t...

  3. Analytical crashworthiness methods applied to composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Lehnhardt, Keith W.

    1999-01-01

    CIVINS Several shell deformation models are developed for use in crashworthiness analysis of rotationally symmetric structures. These models use analytical techniques to predict the crushing force versus axial crush distance characteristics of both a rigid-plastic, hemispherical shell and an elastic, cylindrical shell loaded axially by a rigid flat plate. Additional methods are proposed to determine the effects of cutout sections and internal stiffening members on the crushing force capaci...

  4. Nonlinear Vibrations of Metallic and Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Tony J.

    1993-01-01

    In this work, several studies into the dynamic response of structures are made. In all the studies there is an interaction between the theoretical and experimental work that lead to important results. In the first study, previous theoretical results for the single-mode response of a parametrically excited cantilever beam are validated. Of special interest is that the often ignored nonlinear curvature is stronger than the nonlinear inertia for the first mode. Also, the addition ...

  5. Composite repetition-aware data structures

    OpenAIRE

    Belazzougui, Djamal; Cunial, Fabio; Gagie, Travis; Prezza, Nicola; Raffinot, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In highly repetitive strings, like collections of genomes from the same species, distinct measures of repetition all grow sublinearly in the length of the text, and indexes targeted to such strings typically depend only on one of these measures. We describe two data structures whose size depends on multiple measures of repetition at once, and that provide competitive tradeoffs between the time for counting and reporting all the exact occurrences of a pattern, and the space taken by the struct...

  6. Cellulose composite structures – by design

    OpenAIRE

    Winkworth-Smith, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this thesis was to investigate different mechanical and chemical pre-treatments which can dramatically change the properties of native cellulose and add alternative routes to structure formation. Ball milled cellulose, which had a reduced crystallinity, degree of polymerisation and degradation temperature, was rehydrated in excess water resulting in recrystallisation. Fully amorphous samples recrystallised to the more thermodynamically stable type II polymorph...

  7. Survivability characteristics of composite compression structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, John G.; Allen, M. R.; Sawdy, D.; Avery, S.

    1990-01-01

    Test and evaluation was performed to determine the compression residual capability of graphite reinforced composite panels following perforation by high-velocity fragments representative of combat threats. Assessments were made of the size of the ballistic damage, the effect of applied compression load at impact, damage growth during cyclic loading and residual static strength. Several fiber/matrix systems were investigated including high-strain fibers, tough epoxies, and APC-2 thermoplastic. Additionally, several laminate configurations were evaluated including hard and soft laminates and the incorporation of buffer strips and stitching for improved damage resistance of tolerance. Both panels (12 x 20-inches) and full scale box-beam components were tested to assure scalability of results. The evaluation generally showed small differences in the responses of the material systems tested. The soft laminate configurations with concentrated reinforcement exhibited the highest residual strength. Ballistic damage did not grow or increase in severity as a result of cyclic loading, and the effects of applied load at impact were not significant under the conditions tested.

  8. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 3: Major component development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, L. L.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations, performed to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites, are reported. Aluminum-boron-epoxy and titanium-boron-epoxy were used in the design and manufacture of three major structural components. The components were representative of subsonic aircraft fuselage and window belt panels and supersonic aircraft compression panels. Both unidirectional and multidirectional reinforcement concepts were employed. Blade penetration, axial compression, and inplane shear tests were conducted. Composite reinforced structural components designed to realistic airframe structural criteria demonstrated the potential for significant weight savings while maintaining strength, stability, and damage containment properties of all metal components designed to meet the same criteria.

  9. Summer Support of the Advanced Structures and Measurements Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Alexander Lee

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is my exit presentation summarizing the work that I did this summer during my 10 week summer internship. It is primarily focused on tensile testing of composite coupons including the use of the ARAMIS optical strain measurement system, but it also includes some discussion of other support that I provided for the Dryden composites working group effort. My main efforts in that area were focused on T-joint design for an upcoming hands-on-workshop as well as design of a fixture to test joint coupons. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the other small projects that I worked on, including support of structurally integrated thermal protection system (STIPS) research and the Global Observer wing loads test.

  10. Recent advances and issues in development of silicon carbide composites for fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, T.; Hinoki, T.; Hasegawa, A.; Kohyama, A.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Henager, C. H., Jr.; Hegeman, J. B. J.

    2009-04-01

    Radiation-resistant advanced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) composites have been developed as a promising candidate of the high-temperature operating advanced fusion reactor. With the completion of the 'proof-of-principle' phase in development of 'nuclear-grade' SiC/SiC composites, the R&D on SiC/SiC composites is shifting toward the more pragmatic phase, i.e., industrialization of component manufactures and data-basing. In this paper, recent advances and issues in (1) development of component fabrication technology including joining and functional coating, e.g., a tungsten overcoat as a plasma facing barrier, (2) recent updates in characterization of non-irradiated properties, e.g., strength anisotropy and chemical compatibility with solid lithium-based ceramics and lead-lithium liquid metal breeders, and (3) irradiation effects are specifically reviewed. Importantly high-temperature neutron irradiation effects on microstructural evolution, thermal and electrical conductivities and mechanical properties including the fiber/matrix interfacial strength are specified under various irradiation conditions, indicating seemingly very minor influence on the composite performance in the design temperature range.

  11. CISM International Advanced School on Stability Problems of Steel Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Skaloud, M

    1992-01-01

    This volume strives to give complete information about the main aspect of the stability behaviour of steel structures and their members. In following this objective, the volume presents a complete scientific background (profiting from the fact that the authors of the individual parts of the publication have personally been very active in the corresponding field of research for an extended period of time now), but also establishes recommendations, procedures and formulae for practical design. The significance of the volume may be seen in its challenging current concepts of stability analysis, encouraging progress in the field and thereby establishing an advanced basis for more reliable and economical design.

  12. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    The linear elastic response is determined for an internally pressurized, long circular cylindrical shell stiffened on the inside by a regular arrangement of identical stringers and identical rings. Periodicity of this configuration permits the analysis of a portion of the shell wall centered over a generic stringer-ring joint; i.e., a unit cell model. The stiffeners are modeled as discrete beams, and the stringer is assumed to have a symmetrical cross section and the ring an asymmetrical section. Asymmetery causes out-of-plane bending and torsion of the ring. Displacements are assumed as truncated double Fourier series plus simple terms in the axial coordinate to account for the closed and pressure vessel effect (a non-periodic effect). The interacting line loads between the stiffeners and the inside shell wall are Lagrange multipliers in the formulation, and they are also assumed as truncated Fourier series. Displacement continuity constraints between the stiffeners and shell along the contact lines are satisfied point-wise. Equilibrium is imposed by the principle of virtual work. A composite material crown panel from the fuselage of a large transport aircraft is the numerical example. The distributions of the interacting line loads, and the out-of-plane bending moment and torque in the ring, are strongly dependent on modeling the deformations due to transverse shear and cross-sectional warping of the ring in torsion. This paper contains the results from the semiannual report on research on 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. The results of the new work are illustrated in the included appendix.

  13. Influence of particle structure on electrochemical character of composite graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The natural graphite has been used as the anode material for Lithium-Ion batteries, because of its low cost, chemical stability and excellent reversibility for Li+ insertion. However, the slow diffusion rate of lithium ion and poor compatibility with electrolyte solutions make it difficult to use in some conditions. In order to solve these problems, an epoxy-coke/graphite composite has been manufactured. The particle of composite carbonaceous material coated on non-graphitizable (hard) carbon matrix. Due to the disordered structure,the diffusion rate of lithium species in the non-graphitzable carbon is remarkably fast and less anisotropic. The process for preparing a composite carbon powder provides a promising new anode material with superior electrochemical properties for Li-ion batteries. The unique structure of epoxy-coke/graphite composite electrodes results in much better kinetics, also better recharge ability and initial charge/discharge efficiency.

  14. Structural and functional characterization of barium zirconium titanate / epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto González Garcia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric behavior of composite materials (barium zirconium titanate / epoxy system was analyzed as a function of ceramic concentration. Structure and morphologic behavior of the composites was investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analyses. Composites were prepared by mixing the components and pouring them into suitable moulds. It was demonstrated that the amount of inorganic phase affects the morphology of the presented composites. XRD revealed the presence of a single phase while Raman scattering confirmed structural transitions as a function of ceramic concentration. Changes in the ceramic concentration affected Raman modes and the distribution of particles along into in epoxy matrix. Dielectric permittivity and dielectric losses were influenced by filler concentration.

  15. Edge impact modeling on stiffened composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ostré, Benjamin; Bouvet, Christophe; Minot, Clément; Aboissière, Jacky

    2015-01-01

    Finite Element Analysis of low velocity/low energy edge impact has been carried out on carbon fiber reinforced plastic structure. Edge impact experimental results were then compared to the numerical ‘‘Discrete Ply Model’’ in order to simulate the edge impact damage. This edge impact model is inspired to out-of-plan impact model on a laminate plate with addition of new friction and crushing behaviors. From a qualitative and quantitative point of view, this edge impact model reveals a relati...

  16. Structural Analysis and Design of the Composite Wind Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Hsiang; Young, Wen-Bin

    2012-06-01

    The wind turbine blade sustains various kinds of loadings during the operation and parking state. Due to the increasing size of the wind turbine blade, it is important to arrange the composite materials in a sufficient way to reach the optimal utilization of the material strength. Most of the composite blades are made of glass fibers composites while carbon fibers are also employed in recent years. Composite materials have the advantages of high specific strength and stress. This study develops a GUI interface to construct the blade model for the stress analysis using ANSYS. With the aid of visualization interface, the geometric model of the blade can be constructed by only a few data inputs. Based on the numerical stress analysis of the turbine blade, a simple iterative method was proposed to design the structure of the composite blade.

  17. Composition Structure of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections From Multispacecraft Observations, Modeling, and Comparison with Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Reinard, Alysha; Mulligan, Tamitha

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the ionic composition of iron for two interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed in May 21-23 2007 by the ACE and STEREO spacecraft in the context of the magnetic structure of the ejecta flux rope, sheath region, and surrounding solar wind flow. This analysis is made possible due to recent advances in multispacecraft data interpolation, reconstruction, and visualization as well as results from recent modeling of ionic charge states in MHD simulations of magnetic breakout and flux cancellation CME initiation. We use these advances to interpret specific features of the ICME plasma composition resulting from the magnetic topology and evolution of the CME. We find that in both the data and our MHD simulations, the flux ropes centers are relatively cool, while charge state enhancements surround and trail the flux ropes. The magnetic orientation of the ICMEs are suggestive of magnetic breakout-like reconnection during the eruption process which could explain the spatial location of the...

  18. Use of microfasteners to produce damage tolerant composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Partridge, Ivana K.; HALLETT, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns the mechanical performance of continuous fibre/thermosetting polymer matrix composites reinforced in the through-thickness direction with fibrous or metallic rods or threads in order to mitigate against low delamination resistance. Specific illustrations of the effects of microfasteners in reducing delamination crack growth are made for Z-pinned and tufted composites. Response to loading in such 'structured materials' is subject to multiple parameters defining their in-plan...

  19. Porosity Distribution in Composite Structures with Infrared Thermography

    OpenAIRE

    Cinzia Toscano; Carosena Meola; Giovanni Maria Carlomagno

    2013-01-01

    Composite structures are increasingly used in the transport industry especially in the aeronautical sector thanks to their favorable strength-to-weight ratio with respect to metals. However, this is true if the final part is defects free and complies with quality requirements. A main weakness in composites is porosity, which is likely to be introduced during manufacturing processes and which may knock down the material characteristics affecting its performance in service. Porosity plays a key...

  20. Non-linear analysis of multilayer composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kroflič, Aleš

    2012-01-01

    A new mathematical model for non-linear static analysis of multilayer composite structures with deformable connection is presented. Doctoral thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part a new mathematical model for analysis of plane multilayer frames is presented. Each layer of composite frame is modelled with geometrically exact Reissner model of plane beam. An important novelty of the model is the introduction of a new constitutive law for connection. Arbitrary non-linear relationshi...

  1. Low velocity blunt impacts on composite aircraft structures

    OpenAIRE

    Whisler, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    As composites are increasingly used for primary structures in commercial aircrafts, it is necessary to understand damage initiation for composites subject to low velocity impacts from service conditions, maintenance, and other ground equipment mishaps. In particular, collisions with ground vehicles can present a wide area, blunt impact. Therefore, the effects of bluntness of an impactor are of interest as this is related to both the external visual detectability of an impact event, as well as...

  2. Food Composition Database Format and Structure: A User Focused Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Clancy, Annabel K.; Woods, Kaitlyn; McMahon, Anne; Probst, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the needs of Australian food composition database user’s regarding database format and relate this to the format of databases available globally. Three semi structured synchronous online focus groups (M = 3, F = 11) and n = 6 female key informant interviews were recorded. Beliefs surrounding the use, training, understanding, benefits and limitations of food composition data and databases were explored. Verbatim transcriptions underwent preliminary coding follow...

  3. Nondestructive evaluation and underwater repair of composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hagan, William L.

    2008-01-01

    CIVINS Composite materials are gaining popularity in U.S. Naval applications because of their unparalleled strength, stiffness, and manufacturing simplicity. A better understanding of the structural integrity of these materials has the potential to reduce overdesign, decrease manufacturing cost, and simplify repairs. Though underwater nondestructive evaluation of composites has not been well documented, this thesis illustrates the available technologies for underwater evaluation and repai...

  4. Food Composition Database Format and Structure: A User Focused Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Annabel K Clancy; Kaitlyn Woods; Anne McMahon; Yasmine Probst

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the needs of Australian food composition database user's regarding database format and relate this to the format of databases available globally. Three semi structured synchronous online focus groups (M = 3, F = 11) and n = 6 female key informant interviews were recorded. Beliefs surrounding the use, training, understanding, benefits and limitations of food composition data and databases were explored. Verbatim transcriptions underwent preliminary coding follow...

  5. Fracture Control Requirements for Composite and Bonded Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faile, Gwyn C.

    2004-01-01

    Current new requirements document are top level or specific to shuttle payloads. NASA-STD-5007 top level requirement that imposes fracture control on all manned spacecraft hardware. Composites addressed at very top level. NASA_SDT-5003 imposes fracture control on payloads for the space shuttle. Imposes fracture control on composite and bonded structures. Silent on many important issues such as post proof NDE, residual strength, and reuse. Not adequate for or directly applicable to next generation of spacecraft.

  6. Structural Arrangement Trade Study. Volume 1: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the first of a three volume set that discusses the structural arrangement trade study plan that will identify the most suitable configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Primary Structures most suitable for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. This executive summary presents the trade study process, the selection process, requirements used, analysis performed and data generated. Conclusions and recommendations are also presented.

  7. Interface Electron Structure of TiC-NiAl Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, X.-F.; Zhang, W.-K.; Qi, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles such as TiC have received increasing attention in recent years due to the combined potential of ceramics and intermetallics to give a desirable balance of properties. But an understanding of some experimental results presented elsewhere has remained elusive. In this communication, interface valence electron structure of TiC-NiAl composites was set up on the basis of Pauling's nature of the chemical bond, and valence electron density ρ of different atomic states TiC and NiAl composites in various planes was determined. From the viewpoint of biphase interface electron density continuing, the corresponding experimental phenomena are explained.

  8. Thermosetting polymer-matrix composites for structural repair applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, William Kirby

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporation of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  9. Advanced Authentication Scheme Using a Predefined Keystroke Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulameer K. Hussain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an advanced keystroke authenticatio n model improving users’ validation strength. The proposed system is based on defining a keystroke structure for each authorized user, to be used in t he user login attempts. This structure is composed based on two components; the user’s typing time deviati on thresholds; and a unique user secret code which is distributed between password's characters based on time distances. The strength of the proposed method depends primarily on the amount of information distributed among typing time, and on reducing the d eviation of these times. During the preliminary evaluation, it was confirmed that the proposed system has achieved an improved authentication level, and the system model was highly accepted between participating us

  10. Structure Change of the Insulating Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Mentlik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern power electric drives brought advantages in induction motor control. In the same time appeared problems with high frequency square waveform voltage (pulse stress produced by the voltage converters. Voltage converters produce repetitive pulses with high level of voltage rise fronts (slew rates. Rise fronts attained values of up to tens kilovolts per microsecond and voltage pulse repetition frequency up to some tens of kilohertz. This technology is an advantage for a drive control. Significant is the impact of these voltage waveforms on the motor insulations. Degradation of the main wall insulation can reduce the reliability of the electric motor and whole drive. In this paper is discussed one possible solution. The promising modification in the insulation material structure is presented in the paper.

  11. Fiber optic system for the real time detection, localization, and classification of damage in composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Prohaska, John; Kempen, Connie; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2014-05-01

    Acoustic emission is the leading structural health monitoring technique use for the early warning detection of structural damage in advanced composite structures associated with impacts, cracks, fracture, and delaminations. This paper describes progress towards the development of a fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense™) system based on the use of a novel two-wave mixing interferometer produced on a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) microchip.

  12. Local Area Damage Detection in Composite Structures Using Piezoelectric Transducers

    CERN Document Server

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F

    1998-01-01

    An integrated and automated smart structures approach for structural health monitoring is presented, utilizing an array of piezoelectric transducers attached to or embedded within the structure for both actuation and sensing. The system actively interrogates the structure via broadband excitation of multiple actuators across a desired frequency range. The structure's vibration signature is then characterized by computing the transfer functions between each actuator/sensor pair, and compared to the baseline signature. Experimental results applying the system to local area damage detection in a MD Explorer rotorcraft composite flexbeam are presented.

  13. Displaying Composite and Archived Soundings in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Volkmer, Matthew R.; Blottman, Peter F.; Sharp, David W.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to add composite soundings to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This allows National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters to compare the current atmospheric state with climatology. In a previous task, the AMU created composite soundings for four rawinsonde observation stations in Florida, for each of eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the NWS Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the NSHARP software program. NWS MLB requested that the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in AWIPS. The AMU first created a procedure to customize AWIPS so composite soundings could be displayed. A unique four-character identifier was created for each of the 32 composite soundings. The AMIU wrote a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (TclITk) software program to convert the composite soundings from NSHARP to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format. The NetCDF files were then displayable by AWIPS.

  14. Structural evaluation of Siemens advanced fuel channel under accident loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of an effort to develop an advanced BWR fuel channel design, Siemens Power Corporation (SPC) and the Siemens AG Power Generation Group (KWU) performed structural analyses to verify the acceptability of the fuel channel design under combined seismic/LOCA (Loss Of. Coolant Accident) loadings. The results of the analyses give some interesting insights into the problem: 1) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) effects are significant and should be considered, 2) the problem may simplified by using a linear analysis despite non-linear features (gaps) between interfacing components, and 3) sufficient accuracy may be obtained by using only the first mode of vibration. The channeled fuel assembly can be considered to be a beam where the flexural stiffness is primarily determined by the fuel channel and the mass is given by the fuel assembly. The results from the analyses show the advanced fuel channel design meets applicable design criteria with adequate margins while at the same time exhibiting superior nuclear performance compared to a conventional BWR fuel channel. (author)

  15. Composition-structure-property relation of oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian

    also increases such properties. Yet, these rules are not strictly followed even for the simplest binary oxide glasses, such as alkali silicates, borates and phosphates. In this thesis it is argued that the missing link between composition and properties is the glass structure. Structural models are......The composition of glass can be varied continuously within their glass-forming regions. This compositional flexibility makes it possible to tailor the properties of a glass for a variety of specific uses. In the industry such tailoring is done on a trial-and-error basis with only the intuition of a...... proposed based on topological selection rules and experimentally verified. The relation between structure and properties is evaluated using topological constraint theory, which in its essence is a theory that quantifies the two intuitions of the glass scientist. The end result is a quantitative model...

  16. Topologically ordered magnesium-biopolymer hybrid composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterbeek, Reece N; Seal, Christopher K; Staiger, Mark P; Hyland, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are intriguing as possible biodegradable biomaterials due to their unique combination of biodegradability and high specific mechanical properties. However, uncontrolled biodegradation of magnesium during implantation remains a major challenge in spite of the use of alloying and protective coatings. In this study, a hybrid composite structure of magnesium metal and a biopolymer was fabricated as an alternative approach to control the corrosion rate of magnesium. A multistep process that combines metal foam production and injection molding was developed to create a hybrid composite structure that is topologically ordered in all three dimensions. Preliminary investigations of the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior exhibited by the hybrid Mg-polymer composite structures suggest a new potential approach to the development of Mg-based biomedical devices. PMID:24659540

  17. Well-formedness and typing rules for UML Composite Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dragomir, Iulia

    2010-01-01

    Starting from version 2.0, UML introduced hierarchical composite structures, which are an expressive way of defining complex software architectures, but which have a very loosely defined semantics in the standard. In this paper we propose a set of consistency rules that disambiguate the meaning of UML composite structures. Our primary goal was to have an operational model of composite structures for the OMEGA UML profile, an executable profile dedicated to the formal specification and validation of real-time systems, developed in a past project to which we contributed. However, the rules and principles stated here are applicable to other hierarchical component models based on the same concepts, such as SysML. The presented ruleset is supported by an OCL formalization which is described in this report. This formalization was applied on different complex models for the evaluation and validation of the proposed principles.

  18. Structure formation and properties of molybdenum-base powder composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minakova, R.V.; Kresanova, A.P.; Lesnik, N.D.; Malyshenko, A.A.; Antonov, S.O.

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate physicochemical conditions of formation and features of structure formation of molybdenum-base composites and, in particular, to study the adhesion characteristics and features of contact interaction in Mo-Cu-Ni(Co) systems, to investigate the distribution of the basic elements and impurities, the phase composition, the structure, and certain properties of the materials and parts. A combination of methods was used including x-ray spectral microanalysis, Auger spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction phase and structure analysis, microhardness and hot hardness methods, scanning electron microscopy, and metallography by optical microscopy. The influence of hot hardness of the composite was selected as the criterion of evaluation and it was found that increases in hot hardness and in high-temperature oxidation increased the life and service properties of electrodes used for spot welding and brazing in production.

  19. Design and analysis of composite structures with applications to aerospace structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kassapoglou, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Design and Analysis of Composite Structures enables graduate students and engineers to generate meaningful and robust designs of complex composite structures. Combining analysis and design methods for structural components, the book begins with simple topics such as skins and stiffeners and progresses through to entire components of fuselages and wings. Starting with basic mathematical derivation followed by simplifications used in real-world design, Design and Analysis of Composite Structures presents the level of accuracy and range of applicability of each method. Examples taken from ac

  20. Cryogenic fatigue behaviour of steel-concrete composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Wenqi; Ye Meixin; Zhang Yezhi, E-mail: 40951515@qq.com [School of Civil Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410075 (China)

    2011-07-19

    Aiming to the application of steel-concrete composite structures in extremely cold zones, a special cryogenic test equipment was developed to simulate the temperature environment along Qinghai-Tibet railway, and cryogenic fatigue tests were carried out on 10 specimens composed of 14MnNbq steel, {Phi}22 studs and C50 concrete. Taking temperature variation and steel rolling direction into consideration, fatigue failure mode and fatigue behaviour of the composite structures under low-temperature were well studied. Test results were compared with that under normal temperature. Results showed that composite structures performed better cryogenic fatigue performance with temperature ranging from 0 deg. C to -50 deg. C, the lower the temperature is, the longer the fatigue life tends to be. This is due to the excellent cryogenic fatigue performance of 14MnNbq steel. Steel rolling direction has important influence on the fatigue behaviour of composite structures, specimens with along rolling steel girders showed longer fatigue life than those with transverse rolling steel girders. Welding {Phi}22 studs on 14MnNbq steel girders showed no influence on the material quality of 14MnNbq steel. For safety purpose, fatigue bearing capacity of {Phi}22 studs in Qinghai-Tibet railway composite bridges was suggested to be 80% of that under normal temperature.

  1. Cryogenic fatigue behaviour of steel-concrete composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming to the application of steel-concrete composite structures in extremely cold zones, a special cryogenic test equipment was developed to simulate the temperature environment along Qinghai-Tibet railway, and cryogenic fatigue tests were carried out on 10 specimens composed of 14MnNbq steel, Φ22 studs and C50 concrete. Taking temperature variation and steel rolling direction into consideration, fatigue failure mode and fatigue behaviour of the composite structures under low-temperature were well studied. Test results were compared with that under normal temperature. Results showed that composite structures performed better cryogenic fatigue performance with temperature ranging from 0 deg. C to -50 deg. C, the lower the temperature is, the longer the fatigue life tends to be. This is due to the excellent cryogenic fatigue performance of 14MnNbq steel. Steel rolling direction has important influence on the fatigue behaviour of composite structures, specimens with along rolling steel girders showed longer fatigue life than those with transverse rolling steel girders. Welding Φ22 studs on 14MnNbq steel girders showed no influence on the material quality of 14MnNbq steel. For safety purpose, fatigue bearing capacity of Φ22 studs in Qinghai-Tibet railway composite bridges was suggested to be 80% of that under normal temperature.

  2. Boreal Forests of Kamchatka: Structure and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus P. Eichhorn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Central Kamchatka abounds in virgin old-growth boreal forest, formed primarily by Larix cajanderi and Betula platyphylla in varying proportions. A series of eight 0.25–0.30 ha plots captured the range of forests present in this region and their structure is described. Overall trends in both uplands and lowlands are for higher sites to be dominated by L. cajanderi with an increasing component of B. platyphylla with decreasing altitude. The tree line on wet sites is commonly formed by mono-dominant B. ermanii forests. Basal area ranged from 7.8–38.1 m2/ha and average tree height from 8.3–24.7 m, both being greater in lowland forests. Size distributions varied considerably among plots, though they were consistently more even for L. cajanderi than B. platyphylla. Upland sites also contained a dense subcanopy of Pinus pumila averaging 38% of ground area. Soil characteristics differed among plots, with upland soils being of lower pH and containing more carbon. Comparisons are drawn with boreal forests elsewhere and the main current threats assessed. These forests provide a potential baseline to contrast with more disturbed regions elsewhere in the world and therefore may be used as a target for restoration efforts or to assess the effects of climate change independent of human impacts.

  3. Chemical composition and structure of sapropelitic coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodoev, N.V. [Inst. of Carbon Material Chemistry, RAS, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Guet, J.M. [Centre de Recherche sur la Matiere Divisee, Orleans (France); Gruber, R. [Lab. de Thermodynamique et d`Analyse Chimique, Univ. de Metz (France)

    1997-12-31

    Sapropelitic coals of low rank coalification stages were examined using solid state {sup 13}C n.m.r. with cross polarization and magic angle spinning techniques, FT-i.r. spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The FT-i.r., and using solid state {sup 13}C n.m.r. spectra showed that the main constituents of low rank sapropelitic coals are aliphatic chains with carbonyl and carboxylic groups. The XRD analysis of low rank sapropelitic coals has shown very great differences from humic coals. The method of function of radial distribution of atoms (FRDA) was applied to low rank sapropelitic coals. The maxima at 0.5 and 1 nm of FRDA curves of these coals were established, indicating the parallel orientation of aliphatic chains in sapropelitic coals. The sapropelitic structure is probably determined by preservation of microorganisms and algal cell membranes, because it is known that the aliphatic parts of fatty acids of cell membranes have a parallel orientation. (orig.)

  4. Launch vehicle flight control augmentation using smart materials and advanced composites (CDDF Project 93-05)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a rich heritage of launch vehicles that have used aerodynamic surfaces for flight stability such as the Saturn vehicles and flight control such as on the Redstone. Recently, due to aft center-of-gravity locations on launch vehicles currently being studied, the need has arisen for the vehicle control augmentation that is provided by these flight controls. Aerodynamic flight control can also reduce engine gimbaling requirements, provide actuator failure protection, enhance crew safety, and increase vehicle reliability, and payload capability. In the Saturn era, NASA went to the Moon with 300 sq ft of aerodynamic surfaces on the Saturn V. Since those days, the wealth of smart materials and advanced composites that have been developed allow for the design of very lightweight, strong, and innovative launch vehicle flight control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the advanced composites and smart materials that are directly applicable to launch vehicle control surfaces.

  5. Composition-Structure-Property Relationships in Boroaluminosilicate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Potuzak, M.; Mauro, J.C.;

    2012-01-01

    The complicated structural speciation in boroaluminosilicate glasses leads to a mixed network former effect yielding nonlinear variation in many macroscopic properties as a function of chemical composition. Here we study the composition–structure–property relationships in a series of sodium...... boroaluminosilicate glasses from peralkaline to peraluminous compositions by substituting Al2O3 for SiO2. Our results reveal a pronounced change in all the measured physical properties (density, elastic moduli, hardness, glass transition temperature, and liquid fragility) around [Al2O3]–[Na2O]=0. The structural...

  6. High efficiency tantalum-based ceramic composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); DiFiore, Robert R. (Inventor); Katvala, Victor W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum-based ceramics are suitable for use in thermal protection systems. These composite structures have high efficiency surfaces (low catalytic efficiency and high emittance), thereby reducing heat flux to a spacecraft during planetary re-entry. These ceramics contain tantalum disilicide, molybdenum disilicide and borosilicate glass. The components are milled, along with a processing aid, then applied to a surface of a porous substrate, such as a fibrous silica or carbon substrate. Following application, the coating is then sintered on the substrate. The composite structure is substantially impervious to hot gas penetration and capable of surviving high heat fluxes at temperatures approaching 3000.degree. F. and above.

  7. Advanced composite elevator for Boeing 727 aircraft. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovil, D. V.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.; Desper, O. E.; Jamison, E. S.; Syder, H.

    1981-01-01

    The design, development, analysis, and testing activities and results that were required to produce five and one-half shipsets of advanced composite elevators for Boeing 727 aircraft are summarized. During the preliminary design period, alternative concepts were developed. After selection of the best design, detail design and basic configuration improvements were evaluated. Five and one-half shipsets were manufactured. All program goals (except competitive cost demonstration) were accomplished when our design met or exceeded all requirements, criteria, and objectives.

  8. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner For Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, David; Singh, Jogender

    2014-01-01

    Advanced high thermal conductivity materials research conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with state of the art combustion chamber liner material NARloy-Z showed that its thermal conductivity can be increased significantly by adding diamond particles and sintering it at high temperatures. For instance, NARloy-Z containing 40 vol. percent diamond particles, sintered at 975C to full density by using the Field assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) showed 69 percent higher thermal conductivity than baseline NARloy-Z. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40vol. percent D is 30 percent lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 140 percent better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. By one estimate, increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power up to 2X and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and ISP, resulting in an expected 20 percent improvement in engine performance. Follow on research is now being conducted to demonstrate the benefits of this high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite for combustion chamber liner applications in advanced rocket engines. The work consists of a) Optimizing the chemistry and heat treatment for NARloy-Z-D composite, b) Developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) for the optimized NARloy-Z-D, c) Fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and d) Hot fire testing of the liner for performance. FAST is used for consolidating and sintering NARlo-Z-D. The subscale cylindrical liner with built in channels for coolant flow is also fabricated near net shape using the FAST process. The liner will be assembled into a test rig and hot fire tested in the MSFC test facility to determine performance. This paper describes the development of this novel high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite material, and the advanced net shape technology to fabricate the combustion

  9. Stress analysis of advanced attack helicopter composite main rotor blade root end lug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Stress analysis of the Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) composite main rotor blade root end lug is described. The stress concentration factor determined from a finite element analysis is compared to an empirical value used in the lug design. The analysis and test data indicate that the stress concentration is primarily a function of configuration and independent of the range of material properties typical of Kevlar-49/epoxy and glass epoxy.

  10. COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CZECHOWICZ, DG; CASTILLO, ER; NIKROO, A

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS. An investigation of the chemical composition and structure of strong glow discharge (GDP) polymer shells made for cryogenic experiments at OMEGA is described. The investigation was carried out using combustion and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The strongest coatings were observed to have the lowest hydrogen content or hydrogen/carbon H/C ratio, whereas the weakest coatings had the highest hydrogen content or H/C ratio. Chemical composition results from combustion were used to complement FTIR analysis to determine the relative hydrogen content of as-fabricated coatings. Good agreement was observed between composition results obtained from combustion and FTIR analysis. FTIR analysis of coating structures showed the strongest coatings to have less terminal methyl groups and a more double bond or olefinic structure. Strong GDP coatings that were aged in air react more with oxygen and moisture than standard GDP coatings. In addition to a more olefinic structure, there may also be more free-radial sites present in strong GDP coatings, which leads to greater oxygen uptake.

  11. Performance analysis of bonded composite doublers on aircraft structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.

    1995-08-01

    Researchers contend that composite repairs (or structural reinforcement doublers) offer numerous advantages over metallic patches including corrosion resistance, light weight, high strength, elimination of rivets, and time savings in installation. Their use in commercial aviation has been stifled by uncertainties surrounding their application, subsequent inspection and long-term endurance. The process of repairing or reinforcing airplane structures is time consuming and the design is dependent upon an accompanying stress and fatigue analysis. A repair that is too stiff may result in a loss of fatigue life, continued growth of the crack being repaired, and the initiation of a new flaw in the undesirable high stress field around the patch. Uncertainties in load spectrums used to design repairs exacerbates these problems as does the use of rivets to apply conventional doublers. Many of these repair or structural reinforcement difficulties can be addressed through the use of composite doublers. Primary among unknown entities are the effects of non-optimum installations and the certification of adequate inspection procedures. This paper presents on overview of a program intended to introduce composite doubler technology to the US commercial aircraft fleet. In this project, a specific composite application has been chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Through the use of laboratory test structures and flight demonstrations on an in-service L-1011 airplane, this study is investigating composite doubler design, fabrication, installation, structural integrity, and non-destructive evaluation. In addition to providing an overview of the L-1011 project, this paper focuses on a series of fatigue and strength tests which have been conducted in order to study the damage tolerance of composite doublers. Test results to-date are presented.

  12. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binette, P.; Dano, M.-L.; Gendron, G.

    2009-02-01

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon-epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC™) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC™ actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC™ actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC™ actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology.

  13. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon–epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC(TM)) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC(TM) actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC(TM) actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC(TM) actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology

  14. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  15. Sensitivity and optimization of composite structures using MSC/NASTRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Fleury, Claude

    1987-01-01

    Design sensitivity analysis for composites will soon be available in MSC/NASTRAN. The design variables for composites can be lamina thicknesses, orientation angles, material properties or a combination of all three. With the increasing use of composites in aerospace and automotive industries, this general capability can be used in its own right for carrying out sensitivity analysis of complicated real-life structures. As part of a research effort, the sensitivity analysis was coupled with a general purpose optimizer. This preliminary version of the optimizer is capable of dealing with minimum weight structural design with a rather general design variable linking capability at the element level or system level. Only sizing type of design variables (i.e., lamina thicknesses) can be handled by the optimizer. Test cases were run and validated by comparison with independent finite element packages. The linking of design sensitivity capability for composites in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful automated tool to carry out practical opitmization design of real-life complicated composite structures.

  16. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  17. Study of the costs and benefits of composite materials in advanced turbofan engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhagen, C. A.; Stotler, C. L.; Neitzel, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Composite component designs were developed for a number of applicable engine parts and functions. The cost and weight of each detail component was determined and its effect on the total engine cost to the aircraft manufacturer was ascertained. The economic benefits of engine or nacelle composite or eutectic turbine alloy substitutions was then calculated. Two time periods of engine certification were considered for this investigation, namely 1979 and 1985. Two methods of applying composites to these engines were employed. The first method just considered replacing an existing metal part with a composite part with no other change to the engine. The other method involved major engine redesign so that more efficient composite designs could be employed. Utilization of polymeric composites wherever payoffs were available indicated that a total improvement in Direct Operating Cost (DOC) of 2.82 to 4.64 percent, depending on the engine considered, could be attained. In addition, the percent fuel saving ranged from 1.91 to 3.53 percent. The advantages of using advanced materials in the turbine are more difficult to quantify but could go as high as an improvement in DOC of 2.33 percent and a fuel savings of 2.62 percent. Typically, based on a fleet of one hundred aircraft, a percent savings in DOC represents a savings of four million dollars per year and a percent of fuel savings equals 23,000 cu m (7,000,000 gallons) per year.

  18. Automated web service composition supporting conditional branch structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengwei; Ding, Zhijun; Jiang, Changjun; Zhou, Mengchu

    2014-01-01

    The creation of value-added services by automatic composition of existing ones is gaining a significant momentum as the potential silver bullet in service-oriented architecture. However, service composition faces two aspects of difficulties. First, users' needs present such characteristics as diversity, uncertainty and personalisation; second, the existing services run in a real-world environment that is highly complex and dynamically changing. These difficulties may cause the emergence of nondeterministic choices in the process of service composition, which has gone beyond what the existing automated service composition techniques can handle. According to most of the existing methods, the process model of composite service includes sequence constructs only. This article presents a method to introduce conditional branch structures into the process model of composite service when needed, in order to satisfy users' diverse and personalised needs and adapt to the dynamic changes of real-world environment. UML activity diagrams are used to represent dependencies in composite service. Two types of user preferences are considered in this article, which have been ignored by the previous work and a simple programming language style expression is adopted to describe them. Two different algorithms are presented to deal with different situations. A real-life case is provided to illustrate the proposed concepts and methods.

  19. Application of the self-diagnosis composite into concrete structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Hideaki; Shin, Soon-Gi; Okuhara, Yoshiki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Hiroaki

    2001-04-01

    The function and performance of the self-diagnosis composites embedded in mortar/concrete blocks and concrete piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurements. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced in glass fiber reinforced plastics composites to obtain electrical conductivity. The CP composite has commonly good performances in various bending tests of block and pile specimens, comparing to the CF composite. The electrical resistance of the CP composite increases in a small strain to response remarkably micro-crack formation at about 200 (mu) strain and to detect well to smaller deformations before the crack formation. The CP composite possesses a continuous resistance change up to a large strain level near the final fracture of concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. The cyclic bending tests showed that the micro crack closed at unloading state was able to be evaluated from the measurement of residual resistance. It has been concluded that the self- diagnosis composite is fairly useful for the measurement of damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  20. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Manpreet, E-mail: manpreetchem@pau.edu; Singh, Mandeep [Department of Chemistry, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141004 (India); Jeet, Kiran, E-mail: kiranjeet@pau.edu; Kaur, Rajdeep [Electron Microscopy and Nanoscience Laboratory, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141004 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m{sup 2}/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  1. Thermal Shadows and Compositional Structure in Comet Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, A

    2011-01-01

    We use a fully 3-dimensional thermal evolution model to examine the effects of a non-uniform surface albedo on the subsurface thermal structure of comets. Surface albedo markings cast "thermal shadows", with strong lateral thermal gradients. Corresponding compositional gradients can be strong, especially if the crystallization of amorphous water ice is triggered in the hottest regions. We show that the spatial extent of the structure depends mainly on the obliquity, ther- mal conductivity and heliocentric distance. In some circumstances, subsurface structure caused by the thermal shadows of surface features can be maintained for more than 10 Myr, the median transport time from the Kuiper Belt to the inner solar system. Non-uniform compositional structure can be an evolutionary product and does not necessarily imply that comets consist of building blocks accumulated in different regions of the protoplanetary disk.

  2. Structure-Composition-Property Relationships in Polymeric Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Based Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Skrtic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our studies of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP-based materials over the last decade have yielded bioactive polymeric composites capable of protecting teeth from demineralization or even regenerating lost tooth mineral. The anti-cariogenic/remineralizing potential of these ACP composites originates from their propensity, when exposed to the oral environment, to release in a sustained manner sufficient levels of mineral-forming calcium and phosphate ions to promote formation of stable apatitic tooth mineral. However, the less than optimal ACP filler/resin matrix cohesion, excessive polymerization shrinkage and water sorption of these experimental materials can adversely affect their physicochemical and mechanical properties, and, ultimately, limit their lifespan. This study demonstrates the effects of chemical structure and composition of the methacrylate monomers used to form the matrix phase of composites on degree of vinyl conversion (DVC and water sorption of both copolymers and composites and the release of mineral ions from the composites. Modification of ACP surface via introducing cations and/or polymers ab initio during filler synthesis failed to yield mechanically improved composites. However, moderate improvement in composite’s mechanical stability without compromising its remineralization potential was achieved by silanization and/or milling of ACP filler. Using ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate or urethane dimethacrylate as base monomers and adding moderate amounts of hydrophilic 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate or its isomer ethyl-α-hydroxymethacrylate appears to be a promising route to maximize the remineralizing ability of the filler while maintaining high DVC. Exploration of the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP fillers and polymer matrices is complex but essential for achieving a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern dissolution/re-precipitation of bioactive ACP fillers, and

  3. Mechanical properties of Composite Engineering Structures by Multivolume Micromechanical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Novotný

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering structures often consist of elements having the character of a periodically repeated composite structure. A multivolume micromechanical model based on a representative cell division into r1 × r2 × r3 subcells with different elastic material properties has been used in this paper to derive macromechanical characteristics of the composite construction response to applied load and temperature changes. The multivolume method is based on ensuring the equilibrium of the considered volume on an average basis. In the same (average way, the continuity conditions of displacements and tractions at the interfaces between subcells and between neighboring representative elements are imposed, resulting in a homogenization procedure that eliminates the discrete nature of the composite model. The details of the method are shown for the case of a concrete block pavement. A parametric study is presented illustrating the influence of joint thickness, joint filling material properties and the quality of bonding between block and filler elements.

  4. Magnetoelectric effects of laminated structures with particulate composite layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C K; Shin, F G [Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: wongck.ap@polyu.edu.hk

    2008-07-07

    We have investigated the magnetoelectric (ME) properties of laminated structures with piezoelectric and magnetostrictive particulate composite layers. Simple explicit expressions for the ME coefficients {alpha}{sub 33} and {alpha}{sub 31} of a bilayer comprising uniform piezoelectric and magnetostrictive lamina are first derived. They are then combined with our previously developed models for piezoelectricity (Wong et al 2001 J. Appl. Phys. 90 4690) and magnetostriction (Zhou and Shin 2005 IEEE Trans. Magn. 41 2071) of particulate composites, to obtain expressions for the ME effects of the final 'laminated particulate composites'. Theoretical calculations are discussed in relation to the published experimental data. Effects of the longitudinal and transverse magnetostrictions of the particles of the magnetostrictive layer on the ME responses of the overall structure are also examined.

  5. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Inspection of Composite Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures are widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Flash thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Flash thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are discussed. Limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. In addition to flash thermography, X-ray computed tomography is used. The aluminum honeycomb core provides excellent X-ray contrast compared to the composite face sheet. The X-ray CT technique was used to detect impact damage, core crushing, and skin to core disbonds. Additionally, the X-ray CT technique is used to validate the thermography results.

  6. Adhesive bonding of composite aircraft structures: Challenges and recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelakis, Sp.; Tserpes, K. I.

    2014-01-01

    In this review paper, the challenges and some recent developments of adhesive bonding technology in composite aircraft structures are discussed. The durability of bonded joints is defined and presented for parameters that may influence bonding quality. Presented is also, a numerical design approach for composite joining profiles used to realize adhesive bonding. It is shown that environmental ageing and pre-bond contamination of bonding surfaces may degrade significantly fracture toughness of bonded joints. Moreover, it is obvious that additional research is needed in order to design joining profiles that will enable load transfer through shearing of the bondline. These findings, together with the limited capabilities of existing non-destructive testing techniques, can partially explain the confined use of adhesive bonding in primary composite aircraft structural parts.

  7. Cost and weight effective composite design of automotive body structures

    OpenAIRE

    Mårtensson, Per

    2014-01-01

    The automotive industry stands in front of a great challenge, to decrease its impact on the environment. One important part in succeeding with this is to decrease the structural weight of the body structure and by that the fuel consumption or the required battery power. Carbon fibre composites are by many seen as the only real option when traditional engineering materials are running out of potential for further weight reduction. However, the automotive industry lacks experience working with ...

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of critical composite material structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, John C., Jr.; Lesko, John J.; Weyers, R.

    1996-11-01

    A small span bridge that has suffered corrosive deterioration of a number of the steel structural members is in the process of being rehabilitated with glass and carbon fiber reinforced, pultruded polymer structural beams. As part of a comprehensive research program to develop methods for modeling long term durability of the composite material, nondestructive evaluation if being used to provide a preliminary assessment of the initial condition of the beams as well as to monitor the deterioration of the beams during service.

  9. Characterization of the structure and composition of gecko adhesive setae

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo, N. W.; Gardner, K.H.; Walls, D.J; Keiper-Hrynko, N.M; Ganzke, T.S; Hallahan, D.L

    2005-01-01

    The ability of certain reptiles to adhere to vertical (and hang from horizontal) surfaces has been attributed to the presence of specialized adhesive setae on their feet. Structural and compositional studies of such adhesive setae will contribute significantly towards the design of biomimetic fibrillar adhesive materials. The results of electron microscopy analyses of the structure of such setae are presented, indicating their formation from aggregates of proteinaceous fibrils held together b...

  10. Modelling of advanced structural materials for GEN IV reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, M.; Hoffelner, W.; Victoria, M.

    2007-09-01

    The choice of suitable materials and the assessment of long-term materials damage are key issues that need to be addressed for the safe and reliable performance of nuclear power plants. Operating conditions such as high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment degrade materials properties, posing the risk of very expensive or even catastrophic plant damage. Materials scientists are faced with the scientific challenge to determine the long-term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To overcome lengthy and expensive trial-and-error experiments, the multiscale modelling of materials behaviour is a promising tool, bringing new insights into the fundamental understanding of basic mechanisms. This paper presents the multiscale modelling methodology which is taking root internationally to address the issues of advanced structural materials for Gen IV reactors.

  11. Modelling of advanced structural materials for GEN IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choice of suitable materials and the assessment of long-term materials damage are key issues that need to be addressed for the safe and reliable performance of nuclear power plants. Operating conditions such as high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment degrade materials properties, posing the risk of very expensive or even catastrophic plant damage. Materials scientists are faced with the scientific challenge to determine the long-term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To overcome lengthy and expensive trial-and-error experiments, the multiscale modelling of materials behaviour is a promising tool, bringing new insights into the fundamental understanding of basic mechanisms. This paper presents the multiscale modelling methodology which is taking root internationally to address the issues of advanced structural materials for Gen IV reactors

  12. Advances in biomimetic regeneration of elastic matrix structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Bashur, Chris A; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2012-10-01

    Elastin is a vital component of the extracellular matrix, providing soft connective tissues with the property of elastic recoil following deformation and regulating the cellular response via biomechanical transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. The limited ability of most adult cells to synthesize elastin precursors and assemble them into mature crosslinked structures has hindered the development of functional tissue-engineered constructs that exhibit the structure and biomechanics of normal native elastic tissues in the body. In diseased tissues, the chronic overexpression of proteolytic enzymes can cause significant matrix degradation, to further limit the accumulation and quality (e.g., fiber formation) of newly deposited elastic matrix. This review provides an overview of the role and importance of elastin and elastic matrix in soft tissues, the challenges to elastic matrix generation in vitro and to regenerative elastic matrix repair in vivo, current biomolecular strategies to enhance elastin deposition and matrix assembly, and the need to concurrently inhibit proteolytic matrix disruption for improving the quantity and quality of elastogenesis. The review further presents biomaterial-based options using scaffolds and nanocarriers for spatio-temporal control over the presentation and release of these biomolecules, to enable biomimetic assembly of clinically relevant native elastic matrix-like superstructures. Finally, this review provides an overview of recent advances and prospects for the application of these strategies to regenerating tissue-type specific elastic matrix structures and superstructures.

  13. Extended propagation model for interfacial crack in composite material structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫相桥; 冯希金

    2002-01-01

    An interfacial crack is a common damage in a composite material structure . An extended propaga-tion model has been established for an interfacial crack to study the dependence of crack growth on the relativesizes of energy release rates at left and right crack tips and the properties of interfacial material characterize thegrowth of interfacial crack better.

  14. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  15. Advanced Structural Mechanics Design of 500MWe Commercial SFRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In future 500 MWe SFRs, innovative design features have been incorporated in the reactor assembly components, to achieve improved economy and enhanced safety. The major design changes are: (1) innovative configuration of main vessel bottom dished head, (2) dome shaped roof slab with conical support, (3) thick plate for the rotatable plugs instead of box type structure, (4) welded grid plate with reduced number of sleeves, reduced diameter of intermediate shell and reduced height, (5) increased number of seamless primary pipes, (6) inner vessel with single radius torus welded with the grid plate, (7) integrated liner and safety vessel with thermal insulation arrangement, (8) innovative core support structure, (9) introducing in-vessel purification (10) integration of control plug and small rotatable plug and (11) straight pull fuel handling system. These features also help to shorten the construction time significantly. To validate the innovative design features, structural analysis for the geometrical optimization, investigation of buckling of thin shells, integrity assessment of integrated reactor assembly components were carried out. Further, to demonstrate the manufacturing feasibility of the new designs, technology development activities have been completed successfully. These developments are (i) thick tri junction forging for dome shape roof slab, (ii) welded grid plate, (iii) thick plate narrow gap welding for rotatable plugs, (iv) doubly curvature inner vessel sector, (v) embedded safety vessel with thermal insulation panel and (vi) large diameter bearing. The presentation brings out clearly the main structural features of the innovative concepts, which have been incorporated in future designs, application of advanced structural mechanics analyses carried out to comply the RCC-MR (2010), design requirements, challenges and achievements of technology development exercises completed. (author)

  16. Novel 3D C-SiC Composites for Hot Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA hypersonic vehicles offer a potential to incorporate advanced ceramic matrix composites (CMC). The key characteristics include excellent mechanical...

  17. Low-Activation structural ceramic composites for fusion power reactors: materials development and main design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is devoted to the development of advanced Low-Activation Materials (LAMs) with favourable short-term activation characteristics for the use as structural materials in a fusion power reactor (in order to reduce the risk associated with a major accident, in particular those related with radio-isotopes release in the environment), and to try to approach the concept of an inherently safe reactor. LA Ceramics Composites (LACCs) are the most promising LAMs because of their relatively good thermo-mechanical properties. At present, SiC/SiC composite is the only LACC considered by the fusion community, and therefore is the one having the most complete data base. The preliminary design of a breeding blanket using SiC/SiC as structural material indicated that significant improvement of its thermal conductivity is required. (orig.)

  18. Creative structures or structured creativity. Examining algorithmic composition as a learning tool

    OpenAIRE

    Falthin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    How do student composers develop and structure creative resources aided by algorithmic methods? This empirical study draws from cultural-historical theory and cognitive psychology, concerning internalization and the concept-development process in the context of learning music composition: It focuses on cognitive processes of student composers working to integrate the outcome of composition algorithms with their subjective compositional aim and modus operandi. However, in most cases the compos...

  19. Development of Stitched, Braided and Woven Composite Structures in the ACT Program and at Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Marvin B.; Dexter, H. Benson

    1997-01-01

    Summary results are presented from the research conducted on woven, braided, knitted and stitched (textile) composites at the Langley Research Center and under the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program in the period from 1985 to 1997. The report also includes an annotated bibliography of 270 U.S. publications on textile composites (with their abstracts). Two major research areas are discussed: (1) the general research in textile composites performed throughout the period under the direction of the Langley Research Center and (2) the development of textile composite aircraft structures by industry under the NASA ACT Program. The annotated bibliography is organized in three subsections: (1) general textiles R&D under the auspices of Langley, (2) ACT Program development of textile structural components, and (3) textiles research by individuals and organizations not associated with the ACT Program. An author index is provided for the reports and documents.

  20. Smart Manufacture Process and Structure for Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is difficult to ensure the manufacturing process of composites for the reason that there are complicated processes during curing process of composites. The cure cycle has a significant effect on the quality of the finished part. The traditional cure cycle based on empirical approach could not ensure the quality of cured products because of unstabilized performance, high cost of production and low efficiency. As complex intelligent manufacturing systems are developed increasingly in industry, the necessity of more userfriendly operation system is becoming progressively importance for their utilization and market value. This paper introduces some of the recent technological advances in the intelligent manufacturing systems that will influence the design and development of relevant industry.

  1. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  2. Structural efficiency study of composite wing rib structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Gary D.; Gurdal, Zafer; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A series of short stiffened panel designs which may be applied to a preliminary design assessment of an aircraft wing rib is presented. The computer program PASCO is used as the primary design and analysis tool to assess the structural efficiency and geometry of a tailored corrugated panel, a corrugated panel with a continuous laminate, a hat stiffened panel, a blade stiffened panel, and an unstiffened flat plate. To correct some of the shortcomings in the PASCO analysis when shear is present, a two step iterative process using the computer program VICON is used. The loadings considered include combinations of axial compression, shear, and lateral pressure. The loading ranges considered are broad enough such that the designs presented may be applied to other stiffened panel applications. An assessment is made of laminate variations, increased spacing, and nonoptimum geometric variations, including a beaded panel, on the design of the panels.

  3. An Efficient Analysis Methodology for Fluted-Core Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremont, Leonard; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    The primary loading condition in launch-vehicle barrel sections is axial compression, and it is therefore important to understand the compression behavior of any structures, structural concepts, and materials considered in launch-vehicle designs. This understanding will necessarily come from a combination of test and analysis. However, certain potentially beneficial structures and structural concepts do not lend themselves to commonly used simplified analysis methods, and therefore innovative analysis methodologies must be developed if these structures and structural concepts are to be considered. This paper discusses such an analysis technique for the fluted-core sandwich composite structural concept. The presented technique is based on commercially available finite-element codes, and uses shell elements to capture behavior that would normally require solid elements to capture the detailed mechanical response of the structure. The shell thicknesses and offsets using this analysis technique are parameterized, and the parameters are adjusted through a heuristic procedure until this model matches the mechanical behavior of a more detailed shell-and-solid model. Additionally, the detailed shell-and-solid model can be strategically placed in a larger, global shell-only model to capture important local behavior. Comparisons between shell-only models, experiments, and more detailed shell-and-solid models show excellent agreement. The discussed analysis methodology, though only discussed in the context of fluted-core composites, is widely applicable to other concepts.

  4. A Study of Flexible Composites for Expandable Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Payload volume for launch vehicles is a critical constraint that impacts spacecraft design. Deployment mechanisms, such as those used for solar arrays and antennas, are approaches that have successfully accommodated this constraint, however, providing pressurized volumes that can be packaged compactly at launch and expanded in space is still a challenge. One approach that has been under development for many years is to utilize softgoods - woven fabric for straps, cloth, and with appropriate coatings, bladders - to provide this expandable pressure vessel capability. The mechanics of woven structure is complicated by a response that is nonlinear and often nonrepeatable due to the discrete nature of the woven fiber architecture. This complexity reduces engineering confidence to reliably design and certify these structures, which increases costs due to increased requirements for system testing. The present study explores flexible composite materials systems as an alternative to the heritage softgoods approach. Materials were obtained from vendors who utilize flexible composites for non-aerospace products to determine some initial physical and mechanical properties of the materials. Uniaxial mechanical testing was performed to obtain the stress-strain response of the flexible composites and the failure behavior. A failure criterion was developed from the data, and a space habitat application was used to provide an estimate of the relative performance of flexible composites compared to the heritage softgoods approach. Initial results are promising with a 25% mass savings estimated for the flexible composite solution.

  5. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  6. An Overview of Combustion Mechanisms and Flame Structures for Advanced Solid Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, M. W.

    2000-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) and cyclotretamethylenetetranitramine (HMX) are two solid ingredients often used in modern solid propellants. Although these two ingredients have very similar burning rates as monopropellants, they lead to significantly different characteristics when combined with binders to form propellants. Part of the purpose of this paper is to relate the observed combustion characteristics to the postulated flame structures and mechanisms for AP and HMX propellants that apparently lead to these similarities and differences. For AP composite, the primary diffusion flame is more energetic than the monopropellant flame, leading to an increase in burning rate over the monopropellant rate. In contrast the HMX primary diffusion flame is less energetic than the HMX monopropellant flame and ultimately leads to a propellant rate significantly less than the monopropellant rate in composite propellants. During the past decade the search for more energetic propellants and more environmentally acceptable propellants is leading to the development of propellants based on ingredients other than AP and HMX. The objective of this paper is to utilize the more familiar combustion characteristics of AP and HMX containing propellants to project the combustion characteristics of propellants made up of more advanced ingredients. The principal conclusion reached is that most advanced ingredients appear to burn by combustion mechanisms similar to HMX containing propellants rather than AP propellants.

  7. Noise transmission properties and control strategies for composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Beyer, Todd B.; Lester, Harold C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of several component technologies required to apply active control techniques to reduce interior noise in composite aircraft structures is described. The mechanisms of noise transmission in an all composite, large-scale, fuselage model are studied in an experimental program and found similar to mechanisms found in conventional aircraft construction. Two primary conditions of structural acoustic response are found to account for the dominant interior acoustic response. A preliminary study of active noise control in cylinders used piezoceramic actuators as force inputs for a simple aluminum fuselage model. These actuators provided effective control for the same two conditions of noise transmission found in the composite fuselage structure. The use of piezoceramic actuators to apply force inputs overcomes the weight and structural requirements of conventional shaker actuators. Finally, in order to accurately simulate these types of actuators in a cylindrical shell, two analytical models are investigated that apply either in-plane forces or bending moments along the boundaries of a finite patch. It is shown that the bending model may not be as effective as the force model for exciting the low order azimuthal modes that typically dominate the structural acoustic response in these systems. This result will affect the arrangement and distribution of actuators required for effective active control systems.

  8. Superelastic SMA–FRP composite reinforcement for concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years there has been interest in using fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs) as reinforcement in concrete structures. Unfortunately, due to their linear elastic behavior, FRP reinforcing bars are never considered for structural damping or dynamic applications. With the aim of improving the ductility and damping capability of concrete structures reinforced with FRP reinforcement, this paper studies the application of SMA–FRP, a relatively novel type of composite reinforced with superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) wires. The cyclic tensile behavior of SMA–FRP composites are studied experimentally and analytically. Tests of SMA–FRP composite coupons are conducted to determine their constitutive behavior. The experimental results are used to develop and calibrate a uniaxial SMA–FRP analytical model. Parametric and case studies are performed to determine the efficacy of the SMA–FRP reinforcement in concrete structures and the key factors governing its behavior. The results show significant potential for SMA–FRP reinforcement to improve the ductility and damping of concrete structures while still maintaining its elastic characteristic, typical of FRP reinforcement

  9. Composites for Cryotank Structures. Present and Future: MSFC Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Timothy P.

    1999-01-01

    The development of reusable launch vehicle systems for a single stage to orbit vehicle requires vehicles at liftoff with 85% to 94% of its mass consisting exclusively of propellants. These dry mass requirements drive designs to utilize stronger, lighter weight materials for structures. This technology development focus has allowed the introduction of composite materials in lieu of conventional metallic materials due to their higher specific strengths. Composite materials were successfully used for the liquid hydrogen tanks for the DC-XA, and a multi-lobed liquid hydrogen tank will be employed for the X-33. Another potential non-traditional application for composite materials is for liquid oxygen tanks, which is still being investigated. Traditionally, organic materials have been avoided wherever possible, due the potential fire hazard and the fact that composites fail conventional oxygen compatibility requirements. However, the potential weight savings warrant the investigation of the use of polymeric composite materials in oxygen environments. Since composites fail the conventional, time-proven test methods because they are considered flammable by test, we have embarked on an innovative approach to oxygen compatibility testing and evaluation focused on the use environments and attempts to eliminate or "design away" all potential ignition sources. Oxygen compatibility is defined as the ability of a material to coexist with oxygen and potential ignition sources with an acceptable, manageable degree of risk.

  10. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase "composite nanoglass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Kelly, S. D.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Balasubramanian, M.; Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Ayyub, Pushan

    2016-02-01

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu55Nb45. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  11. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase “composite nanoglass”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro [CSRRI-IIT, MRCAT, Sector 10, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 (United States); Balasubramanian, M. [Sector 20 XOR, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States); Ayyub, Pushan, E-mail: pushan@tifr.res.in [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2016-02-14

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu{sub 55}Nb{sub 45}. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  12. Strengthening of building structures using carbon composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Paranicheva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the question of ensuring the reliability of various building structures both at the stage of their construction and during operation is very urgent. There are a lot of different ways and constructive methods of structures strengthening. Аt the same time, traditional ways of concrete structures strengthening with steel reinforcement are such expensive, time consuming and in some cases require to interrupt the building operation. As an alternative, it is proposed to use composite materials based on high-strength carbon fibers.The authors consider the properties, advantages, disadvantages and the methods of application of these materials. This article presents results of a technical survey carried out in a public building in 2009. In this building the CFRP was used to strengthen concrete slabs, resting on the crossbar consoles. The calculation of the strength is adduced and the section selection is made. The authors demonstrate their conclusions about the feasibility of using carbon composite materials.

  13. A novel combinatorial approach for the realization of advanced cBN composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports a novel coating process for the synthesis of hard material composite coatings. It consists of electrostatic spray coating (ESC) of powder particles (of micron-nanometer size) followed by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of a suitable binder phase. This novel approach enables fabrication of unique compositions such as cubic boron nitride (cBN) and titanium nitride (TiN) in a coating form. Recently, we have demonstrated the success of this technology by first coating a uniform over-layer (in excess of ∼ 10 μm) of cBN particles an carbide cutting tool inserts using ESC, followed by infiltration of particulate cBN matrix with TiN from its vapor phase using CVI to synthesize cBN-TiN a composite coating. The composite has shown excellent cBN-to-TiN and composite coating-to-carbide substrate adhesion. One of the main emphases of the paper is to discuss optimization and scale up of the ESC technology to achieve the desired microstructure and tailor the thickness across the cutting tool for better performance. Further, the cutting tools have been successfully tested for advanced machining applications. (author)

  14. Structures tubulaires minces en matériaux composites. Principes de calcul Thin-Walled Composite Tubular Structures. Calculation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odru P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article présente une méthode de calcul des structures composites fibres-résine appliquée aux cas des tubes minces. Outre l'établissement des relations contraintes - déformations généralisées des tubes à partir des caractéristiques des matériaux de base et de leur orientation, on pose les relations permettant de calculer leur comportement et leur dimensionnement sous des charges axisymétriques combinées de traction, pression et flexion. Une méthode simplifiée applicable au cas des composites microfissurés est aussi présentée. On montre ensuite, à travers quelques exemples concrets d'applications, les propriétés intéressantes ou inhabituelles que le matériau permet de conférer aux structures. This article presents a method of calculation of composite structures applied to thin-walled tubes. Starting from the characteristics and orientation of the basic materials, the generalized stress-strain equations of the tubes are determined ; then the relationship allowing the calculation of their design and behavior under combined axisymmetrical loads of tension, pressure and bending are established. A simplified method applicable to microcracked composite materials is also described. Several complete examples of applications illustrate the interesting or unusual properties that this material can impart to structures

  15. High Velocity Impact Response of Composite Lattice Core Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Zhang, Guoqi; Wang, Shixun; Ma, Li; Wu, Linzhi

    2014-04-01

    In this research, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite sandwich structures with pyramidal lattice core subjected to high velocity impact ranging from 180 to 2,000 m/s have been investigated by experimental and numerical methods. Experiments using a two-stage light gas gun are conducted to investigate the impact process and to validate the finite element (FE) model. The energy absorption efficiency (EAE) in carbon fiber composite sandwich panels is compared with that of 304 stainless-steel and aluminum alloy lattice core sandwich structures. In a specific impact energy range, energy absorption efficiency in carbon fiber composite sandwich panels is higher than that of 304 stainless-steel sandwich panels and aluminum alloy sandwich panels owing to the big density of metal materials. Therefore, in addition to the multi-functional applications, carbon fiber composite sandwich panels have a potential advantage to substitute the metal sandwich panels as high velocity impact resistance structures under a specific impact energy range.

  16. Full-scale testing, production and cost analysis data for the advanced composite stabilizer for Boeing 737 aircraft, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniversario, R. B.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.; Parson, J. T.; Peterson, D. C.; Pritchett, L. D.; Wilson, D. R.; Wogulis, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    The development, testing, production activities, and associated costs that were required to produce five-and-one-half advanced-composite stabilizer shipsets for Boeing 737 aircraft are defined and discussed.

  17. Optimization of SMA layers in composite structures to enhance damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghdoust, P.; Cinquemani, S.; Lecis, N.; Bassani, P.

    2016-04-01

    The performance of lightweight structures can be severely affected by vibration. New design concepts leading to lightweight, slender structural components can increase the vulnerability of the components to failure due to excessive vibration. The intelligent approach to address the problem would be the use of materials which are more capable in dissipating the energy due to their high value of loss factor. Among the different materials available to achieve damping, much attention has been attached to the use of shape memory alloys (SMAs) because of their unique microstructure, leading to good damping capacity. This work describes the design and optimization of a hybrid layered composite structure for the passive suppression of flexural vibrations in slender and light structures. Embedding the SMA layers in composite structure allows to combine different properties: the lightness of the base composite (e.g. fiber glass), the mechanical strength of the insert of metallic material and the relevant damping properties of SMA, in the martensitic phase. In particular, we put our attention on embedding the CuZnAl in the form of thin sheet in a layered composite made by glass fiber reinforced epoxy. By appropriately positioning of the SMA sheets so that they are subjected to the maximum curvature, the damping of the hybrid system can be considerably enhanced. Accordingly analytical method for evaluating the energy dissipation of the thin sheets with different shapes and patterns is developed and is followed by a shape optimization based on genetic algorithm. Eventually different configurations of the hybrid beam structure with different patterns of SMA layer are proposed and compared in the term of damping capacity.

  18. Vanadium-spinel composites for structural applications in hostile environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, R.B.; Wetteland, C.J.; Shen, T.D. [and others

    1997-05-01

    Vanadium-spinel composites are promising materials for structural applications in radiation environments. Powders of two Vanadium-spinel composites, 20/80 vol. %, were prepared by (a) ball milling mixtures of vanadium and spinel powders (alloy VSLP) and (b) through a self-sustained reaction synthesis of vanadium, MgO, and Al powders (alloy VSHP). These powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing. Most of the V and spinel domains in the the compacts are sub-micron in size. The compacts have K{sub c} toughness values of 3.9, about three times the toughness obtained by hipping mixtures of commercial powders.

  19. Fracture toughness of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites used for cutting tool edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Szutkowska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Specific characteristics in fracture toughness measurements of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites with particular reference to α-Al2O3, Al2O3-ZrO2, Al2O3-ZrO2-TiC and Al2O3-Ti(C,N has been presented.Design/methodology/approach: The present study reports fracture toughness obtained by means of the conventional method and direct measurements of the Vickers crack length (DCM method of selected tool ceramics based on alumina: pure alumina, alumina-zirconia composite with unstabilized and stabilized zirconia, alumina–zirconia composite with addition of TiC and alumina–nitride-carbide titanium composite with 2wt% of zirconia. Specimens were prepared from submicro-scale trade powders. Vicker’s hardness (HV1, fracture toughness (KIC at room temperature, the indentation fracture toughness, Young’s modulus and apparent density were also evaluated. The microstructure was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Findings: The lowest value of KIC is revealed by pure alumina ceramics. The addition of (10 wt% unstabilized zirconia to alumina or a small amount (5 wt% of TiC to alumina–zirconia composite improve fracture toughness of these ceramics in comparison to alumina ceramics. Alumina ceramics and alumina-zirconia ceramics reveal the pronounced character of R-curve because of an increasing dependence on crack growth resistance with crack extension as opposed to the titanium carbide-nitride reinforced composite based on alumina. R-curve has not been observed for this composite.Practical implications: The results show the method of fracture toughness improvement of alumina tool ceramics.Originality/value: Taking into account the values of fracture toughness a rational use of existing ceramic tools should be expected.

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Seismic Soil Structure Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. Specifically, seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in some instances the current SPRA approach has large uncertainties, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it was not the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility). SPRA’s are performed by convolving the seismic hazard (this is the estimate of all likely damaging earthquakes at the site of interest) with the seismic fragility (the conditional probability of failure of a structure, system, or component given the occurrence of earthquake ground motion). In this calculation, there are three main pieces to seismic risk quantification, 1) seismic hazard and nuclear power plants (NPPs) response to the hazard, 2) fragility or capacity of structures, systems and components (SSC), and 3) systems analysis. Two areas where NLSSI effects may be important in SPRA calculations are, 1) when calculating in-structure response at the area of interest, and 2) calculation of seismic fragilities (current fragility calculations assume a lognormal distribution for probability of failure of components). Some important effects when using NLSSI in the SPRA calculation process include, 1) gapping and sliding, 2) inclined seismic waves coupled with gapping and sliding of foundations atop soil, 3) inclined seismic waves coupled with gapping and sliding of deeply embedded structures, 4) soil dilatancy, 5) soil liquefaction, 6) surface waves, 7) buoyancy, 8) concrete cracking and 9) seismic isolation The focus of the research task presented here-in is on implementation of NLSSI into the SPRA calculation process when calculating in-structure response at the area

  1. Ordered ferrimagnetic form of ferrihydrite reveals links among structure, composition, and magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, F. Marc; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José; Morales, María P.; Serna, Carlos J.; Boily, Jean-François; Liu, Qingsong; Ambrosini, Andrea; Cismasu, A. Cristina; Brown, Jr., Gordon E. (CSIC-Spain); (Stanford); (Sandia); (Cordoba); (Umea); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-11-19

    The natural nanomineral ferrihydrite is an important component of many environmental and soil systems and has been implicated as the inorganic core of ferritin in biological systems. Knowledge of its basic structure, composition, and extent of structural disorder is essential for understanding its reactivity, stability, and magnetic behavior, as well as changes in these properties during aging. Here we investigate compositional, structural, and magnetic changes that occur upon aging of '2-line' ferrihydrite in the presence of adsorbed citrate at elevated temperature. Whereas aging under these conditions ultimately results in the formation of hematite, analysis of the atomic pair distribution function and complementary physicochemical and magnetic data indicate formation of an intermediate ferrihydrite phase of larger particle size with few defects, more structural relaxation and electron spin ordering, and pronounced ferrimagnetism relative to its disordered ferrihydrite precursor. Our results represent an important conceptual advance in understanding the nature of structural disorder in ferrihydrite and its relation to the magnetic structure and also serve to validate a controversial, recently proposed structural model for this phase. In addition, the pathway we identify for forming ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite potentially explains the magnetic enhancement that typically precedes formation of hematite in aerobic soil and weathering environments. Such magnetic enhancement has been attributed to the formation of poorly understood, nano-sized ferrimagnets from a ferrihydrite precursor. Whereas elevated temperatures drive the transformation on timescales feasible for laboratory studies, our results also suggest that ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite could form naturally at ambient temperature given sufficient time.

  2. Uncertainty Quantification in Experimental Structural Dynamics Identification of Composite Material Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, Marcin; Peeters, Bart; Kahsin, Maciej;

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace and wind energy structures are extensively using components made of composite materials. Since these structures are subjected to dynamic environments with time-varying loading conditions, it is important to model their dynamic behavior and validate these models by means of vibration...... for uncertainty evaluation in experimentally estimated models. Investigated structures are plates, fuselage panels and helicopter main rotor blades as they represent different complexity levels ranging from coupon, through sub-component up to fully assembled structures made of composite materials. To evaluate...

  3. Galerkin finite element scheme for magnetostrictive structures and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Kidambi Srinivasan

    The ever increasing-role of magnetostrictives in actuation and sensing applications is an indication of their importance in the emerging field of smart structures technology. As newer, and more complex, applications are developed, there is a growing need for a reliable computational tool that can effectively address the magneto-mechanical interactions and other nonlinearities in these materials and in structures incorporating them. This thesis presents a continuum level quasi-static, three-dimensional finite element computational scheme for modeling the nonlinear behavior of bulk magnetostrictive materials and particulate magnetostrictive composites. Models for magnetostriction must deal with two sources of nonlinearities-nonlinear body forces/moments in equilibrium equations governing magneto-mechanical interactions in deformable and magnetized bodies; and nonlinear coupled magneto-mechanical constitutive models for the material of interest. In the present work, classical differential formulations for nonlinear magneto-mechanical interactions are recast in integral form using the weighted-residual method. A discretized finite element form is obtained by applying the Galerkin technique. The finite element formulation is based upon three dimensional eight-noded (isoparametric) brick element interpolation functions and magnetostatic infinite elements at the boundary. Two alternative possibilities are explored for establishing the nonlinear incremental constitutive model-characterization in terms of magnetic field or in terms of magnetization. The former methodology is the one most commonly used in the literature. In this work, a detailed comparative study of both methodologies is carried out. The computational scheme is validated, qualitatively and quantitatively, against experimental measurements published in the literature on structures incorporating the magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D. The influence of nonlinear body forces and body moments of magnetic origin

  4. Structure - property relations of high-temperature composite polymer matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, R.J.; Jurek, R.J.; Larive, D.E. [Michigan Molecular Institute, Midland, MI (United States); Tung, C.M. [Northrop Corp., Hawthorne, CA (United States); Donnellan, T. [Naval Air Development Center, Warminster, PA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The structure-deformation-failure mode-mechanical property relations of high-temperature thermoplastic polyimide and thermoset bismaleimide (BMI) polymeric matrices and their composites will be discussed. In the case of polyimides, the effects of test temperature, thermal history, strain rate, type of filler, and filler volume fraction on structure - property relations will be discussed. For BMIs we report systematic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry studies of the cure reactions as a function of chemical composition and time - temperature cure conditions and then describe the resultant cross-linked network structure based on our understanding of the cure reactions. The optimization of the BMI matrix toughness will be considered in terms of network structure and process-induced matrix microcracking. We also describe optimization of composite prepreg, lamination and postcure conditions based on cure kinetics, and their relationship to the BMI viscosity-time-temperature profiles. The critical processing-performance limitations of high-temperature polymer matrices will be critically discussed, and toughening approaches to address these limitations, such as toughness over a wide temperature range, will be presented. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Design of connections in composite timber-concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojić Dragoslav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with composite timber concrete structures. By combining timber and concrete in new type of composite material and using the best properties both materials, the high tensile strength of a timber and the high compressive strength of a concrete, depending of different building conditions we can find a lot o reasons for decision to apply this type of the structure in comparison to concrete or steel structure. Here, design methods and procedures for determination of load bearing capacity bar shaped connectors (fasteners very often used as element connecting timber and concrete in composite structures will be given. The procedure will be exposed and explained according to the new fashioned methods collected as set of Euro-norms in Eurocode 5. The design equations in Eurocode 5 derived from Johansen's work are based on a rigid plastic behavior of the fastener under bending moments and the timber under embedding stresses and take into account the plastic moment capacity of the fastener.

  6. Use of microfasteners to produce damage tolerant composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Ivana K; Hallett, Stephen R

    2016-07-13

    The paper concerns the mechanical performance of continuous fibre/thermosetting polymer matrix composites reinforced in the through-thickness direction with fibrous or metallic rods or threads in order to mitigate against low delamination resistance. Specific illustrations of the effects of microfasteners in reducing delamination crack growth are made for Z-pinned and tufted composites. Response to loading in such 'structured materials' is subject to multiple parameters defining their in-plane and out-of-plane properties. Single microfastener mechanical tests are well suited to establish the crack bridging laws under a range of loading modes, from simple delamination crack opening to shear, and provide the basis for predicting the corresponding response of microfastener arrays, within a given material environment. The fundamental experiments on microfasteners can be used to derive analytical expressions to describe the crack bridging behaviour in a general sense, to cover all possible loadings. These expressions can be built into cohesive element constitutive laws in a finite-element framework for modelling the effects of microfastener arrays on the out-of-plane mechanical response of reinforced structural elements, including the effects of known manufacturing imperfections. Such predictive behaviour can then be used to assess structural integrity under complex loading, as part of the component design process. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242299

  7. Use of microfasteners to produce damage tolerant composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns the mechanical performance of continuous fibre/thermosetting polymer matrix composites reinforced in the through-thickness direction with fibrous or metallic rods or threads in order to mitigate against low delamination resistance. Specific illustrations of the effects of microfasteners in reducing delamination crack growth are made for Z-pinned and tufted composites. Response to loading in such ‘structured materials’ is subject to multiple parameters defining their in-plane and out-of-plane properties. Single microfastener mechanical tests are well suited to establish the crack bridging laws under a range of loading modes, from simple delamination crack opening to shear, and provide the basis for predicting the corresponding response of microfastener arrays, within a given material environment. The fundamental experiments on microfasteners can be used to derive analytical expressions to describe the crack bridging behaviour in a general sense, to cover all possible loadings. These expressions can be built into cohesive element constitutive laws in a finite-element framework for modelling the effects of microfastener arrays on the out-of-plane mechanical response of reinforced structural elements, including the effects of known manufacturing imperfections. Such predictive behaviour can then be used to assess structural integrity under complex loading, as part of the component design process. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242299

  8. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  9. Composite Panel Postbuckling Behavior and General Model of Joints in Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamula, G. N.; Kutinov, V. F.; Vasilyev, V. V.; Grishin, V. I.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Azikov, N. S.; Begeyev, T. K.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper is a final technical report on the research programme NCCW-73 accomplished within co-operation between NASA of the USA and GOSKOMOBORONPROM of Russia in the field of aeronautics. The report contains basic results of studies in two areas, 'Analysis of postbuckling behavior of composite panels' and 'Development of general model of joints in composite structures'; these results were obtained in conformity with requirements of NCCW-73. In addition, consideration is given to some related issues, and proposals for further studies are formulated.

  10. Capacitance-based damage detection sensing for aerospace structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, P.; Yamamoto, N.; Chen, Y.; Manohara, H.

    2014-04-01

    Damage detection technology needs improvement for aerospace engineering application because detection within complex composite structures is difficult yet critical to avoid catastrophic failure. Damage detection is challenging in aerospace structures because not all the damage detection technology can cover the various defect types (delamination, fiber fracture, matrix crack etc.), or conditions (visibility, crack length size, etc.). These defect states are expected to become even more complex with future introduction of novel composites including nano-/microparticle reinforcement. Currently, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods with X-ray, ultrasound, or eddy current have good resolutions (analysis currently requires excessive wiring and complex signal analysis. Here, we present a capacitance sensor-based, structural defect detection technology with improved sensing capability. Thin dielectric polymer layer is integrated as part of the structure; the defect in the structure directly alters the sensing layer's capacitance, allowing full-coverage sensing capability independent of defect size, orientation or location. In this work, capacitance-based sensing capability was experimentally demonstrated with a 2D sensing layer consisting of a dielectric layer sandwiched by electrodes. These sensing layers were applied on substrate surfaces. Surface indentation damage (~1mm diameter) and its location were detected through measured capacitance changes: 1 to 250 % depending on the substrates. The damage detection sensors are light weight, and they can be conformably coated and can be part of the composite structure. Therefore it is suitable for aerospace structures such as cryogenic tanks and rocket fairings for example. The sensors can also be operating in space and harsh environment such as high temperature and vacuum.

  11. Polyurethane structural adhesives applied in automotive composite joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josue Garcia Quini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years structural adhesives technology has demonstrated great potential for application due to its capacity to transform complex structures into solid unitary and monolithic assemblies using different materials. Thus, seams or joints integrate these structures providing, besides a reduction in weight, a considerable increase in the mechanical resistance and stiffness. The increase in the industrial use of structural adhesives is mainly due to their ability to efficiently bond different materials in an irreversible manner, even replacing systems involving mechanical joints. In the automobile industry structural adhesives have been widely used for the bonding of metal substrates, thermoplastics and composites, frequently employing these in combination, particularly glass fiber and polyester resin composites molded using RTM and SMC processes. However, the use of urethane structural adhesives in applications involving composites and thermoplastics has been the subject of few investigations. In this study the effects of temperature and time on the shear strength of RTM, SMC and ABS joints, applying temperatures of -40, 25, 80, 120 and 177 °C and times of 20 minutes and 500 hours, were determined. The objective was to evaluate the performance under extreme conditions of use in order to assess whether these joints could be used in passenger or off-road vehicles. The results showed that the urethane structural adhesive promoted the efficient bonding of these materials, considering that due to the high adhesive strength the failures occurred in the substrates without adversely affecting the bonded area. For each test condition the joint failure modes were also determined.

  12. Structural level characterization of base oils using advanced analytical techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Hourani, Nadim

    2015-05-21

    Base oils, blended for finished lubricant formulations, are classified by the American Petroleum Institute into five groups, viz., groups I-V. Groups I-III consist of petroleum based hydrocarbons whereas groups IV and V are made of synthetic polymers. In the present study, five base oil samples belonging to groups I and III were extensively characterized using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC), and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) equipped with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) sources. First, the capabilities and limitations of each analytical technique were evaluated, and then the availed information was combined to reveal compositional details on the base oil samples studied. HPLC showed the overwhelming presence of saturated over aromatic compounds in all five base oils. A similar trend was further corroborated using GC×GC, which yielded semiquantitative information on the compound classes present in the samples and provided further details on the carbon number distributions within these classes. In addition to chromatography methods, FT-ICR MS supplemented the compositional information on the base oil samples by resolving the aromatics compounds into alkyl- and naphtheno-subtituted families. APCI proved more effective for the ionization of the highly saturated base oil components compared to APPI. Furthermore, for the detailed information on hydrocarbon molecules FT-ICR MS revealed the presence of saturated and aromatic sulfur species in all base oil samples. The results presented herein offer a unique perspective into the detailed molecular structure of base oils typically used to formulate lubricants. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  13. Microscopic structure and properties of wood-based foaming composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng WANG; Li GAO; Guilan ZHANG; Liang CHANG

    2008-01-01

    In order to reduce the density of wood-based composites without causing a deterioration of their mech-anical properties, we studied the process of manufacturing wood-based composites. A combination of polymer foaming technology and flat hot-pressing technology was used. The microscopic structure of the various wood-based composites was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), impact strength, and thickness expansion rate of water sorption (TS) were all measured. The results showed that fibers loosely inter-weave, and fibers had been connected by micropore. They also showed that spaces between fibers had big micropore structure. MOR, MOE and impact strength were the high-est among three levels of ratio. When the total content of resin and foaming agent were 20% by weight, TS was higher. A hot-pressing temperature of 120℃ was optimal. At the low temperatures of 80℃, the foaming process was uncompleted. At a higher temperature, micropores burst at a certain pressure. Based on the variance analysis and maximum difference analysis, a significance test shows that the optimum conditions for the total content of resin and foaming agent is 20% by weight, with a hot pressing temperature of 120℃ for 15 min. Under these conditions, the properties of wood-based foaming composites all achieved the industry standard.

  14. Porosity Distribution in Composite Structures with Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Toscano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite structures are increasingly used in the transport industry especially in the aeronautical sector thanks to their favorable strength-to-weight ratio with respect to metals. However, this is true if the final part is defects free and complies with quality requirements. A main weakness in composites is porosity, which is likely to be introduced during manufacturing processes and which may knock down the material characteristics affecting its performance in service. Porosity plays a key role in sandwich structures, which involve novel metal foams as core, since the foam performance strongly depends on size and distribution of pores. The determination of porosity is mostly attained by destructive methods, which supply only a general indication linked to the production part number. Conversely, composites may entail local significant variation of porosity, which may be discovered only with effective nondestructive techniques. The attention of the present work is focused on the possibility to use infrared thermography to get information about the amount and distribution of porosity. In particular, two techniques: flash thermography and lock-in thermography are used to comply with requirements of both monolithic composites and metal foams.

  15. Characterisation of Damage in Composite Structures using Acoustic Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, M; Featherston, C; Holford, K; Pullin, R [Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, Newport Road, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); May, M [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Kurzzeitdynamik, Ernst-Mach-Institut, Eckerstr. 4, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Hallet, S, E-mail: eatonm@cf.ac.uk, E-mail: michael.may@emi.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: featherstoncaf@cardiff.ac.uk, E-mail: holford@cardiff.ac.uk, E-mail: stephen.hallett@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: pullinr@cf.ac.uk [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Bristol, Queens Building, University Walk, Bristol, BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-19

    Detection and characterisation of damage in composite structures during in-service loading is highly desirable. Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of composite components offers a highly sensitive method for detecting matrix cracking and delamination damage mechanisms in composites. AE relies on the detection of stress waves that are released during damage propagation and using an array of sensors, damage location may be determined. A methodology for damage characterisation based on measuring the amplitude ratio (MAR) of the two primary lamb wave modes; symmetric (in-plane) and asymmetric (out-of-plane) that propagate in plate like structures has been developed. This paper presents the findings of a series of tensile tests in composite coupons with large central ply blocks. The specimens were monitored using AE sensors throughout loading and once significant AE signals were observed the loading process was stopped. The specimens were removed and subjected to x-ray inspection to assess for any damage. The onset of damage was successfully detected using AE and was identified as being matrix cracking using the MAR methodology. The results were validated with x-ray inspection and a strong correlation was observed between the number of significant AE signals recorded and the number of identified matrix cracks.

  16. NDE of composite structures using microwave time reversal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Tamburrino, Antonello; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish

    2016-02-01

    Composite materials are being increasingly used to replace metals, partially or completely, in aerospace, shipping and automotive industries because of their light weight, corrosion resistance, and mechanical strength. Integrity of these materials may be compromised during manufacturing or due to impact damage during usage, resulting in defects such as porosity, delamination, cracks and disbonds. Microwave NDE techniques have the ability to propagate through composite materials, without suffering much attenuation. The scattered fields depend on the dielectric properties of the medium, and hence provide information about the structural integrity of these materials. Time Reversal focusing is based on the fact that when a wave solution is reversed in time and back propagated it refocuses back at the source. This paper presents a model based parametric study of time reversal principles with microwave data in composite materials. A two dimensional FDTD model is developed to implement the forward and time reversed electromagnetic wave propagation in a test geometry comprising metal-composite structures. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach to detect and characterize different defects.

  17. Large Area Nondestructive Evaluation of a Fatigue Loaded Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Large area nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are required for fatigue testing of composite structures to track damage initiation and growth. Of particular interest is the progression of damage leading to ultimate failure to validate damage progression models. In this work, passive thermography and acoustic emission NDE were used to track damage growth up to failure of a composite three-stringer panel. Fourteen acoustic emission sensors were placed on the composite panel. The signals from the array were acquired simultaneously and allowed for acoustic emission location. In addition, real time thermal data of the composite structure were acquired during loading. Details are presented on the mapping of the acoustic emission locations directly onto the thermal imagery to confirm areas of damage growth leading to ultimate failure. This required synchronizing the acoustic emission and thermal data with the applied loading. In addition, processing of the thermal imagery which included contrast enhancement, removal of optical barrel distortion and correction of angular rotation before mapping the acoustic event locations are discussed.

  18. Structural and biological properties of carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Roger J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)]. E-mail: roger.narayan@mse.gatech.edu; Berry, C.J. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brigmon, R.L. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2005-11-20

    Carbon nanotube composite films have been developed that exhibit unusual structural and biological properties. These novel materials have been created by pulsed laser ablation of graphite and bombardment of nitrogen ions at temperatures between 600 and 700 deg. C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and radial distribution function analysis demonstrate that this material consists of sp{sup 2}-bonded concentric ribbons that are wrapped approximately 15 deg. normal to the silicon substrate. The interlayer order in this material extends to approximately 15-30 A. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy data suggest that this material is predominantly trigonally coordinated. The carbon nanotube composite structure results from the use of energetic ions, which allow for non-equilibrium growth of graphitic planes. In vitro testing has revealed significant antimicrobial activity of carbon nanotube composite films against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus warneri colonization. Carbon nanotube composite films may be useful for inhibiting microorganism attachment and biofilm formation in hemodialysis catheters and other medical devices.

  19. Composite failure prediction of π-joint structures under bending

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hong-me; YUAN Shen-fang

    2012-01-01

    In this article,the composite π-joint is investigated under bending loads.The "L" preform is the critical component regarding composite π-joint failure.The study is presented in the failure detection of a carbon fiber composite π-joint structure under bending loads using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor.Firstly,based on the general finite element method (FEM)software,the 3-D finite element (FE) model of composite π-joint is established,and the failure process and every lamina failure load of composite π-joint are investigated by maximum stress criteria.Then,strain distributions along the length of FBG are extracted,and the reflection spectra of FBG are calculated according to the strain distribution.Finally,to verify the numerical results,a test scheme is performed and the experimental spectra of FBG are recorded.The experimental results indicate that the failure sequence and the corresponding critical loads of failure are consistent with the numerical predictions,and the computational error of failure load is less than 6.4%.Furthermore,it also verifies the feasibility of the damage detection system.

  20. Composite failure prediction of π-joint structures under bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong-mei; Yuan, Shen-fang

    2012-03-01

    In this article, the composite -joint is investigated under bending loads. The "L" preform is the critical component regarding composite -joint failure. The study is presented in the failure detection of a carbon fiber composite -joint structure under bending loads using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. Firstly, based on the general finite element method (FEM) software, the 3-D finite element (FE) model of composite -joint is established, and the failure process and every lamina failure load of composite -joint are investigated by maximum stress criteria. Then, strain distributions along the length of FBG are extracted, and the reflection spectra of FBG are calculated according to the strain distribution. Finally, to verify the numerical results, a test scheme is performed and the experimental spectra of FBG are recorded. The experimental results indicate that the failure sequence and the corresponding critical loads of failure are consistent with the numerical predictions, and the computational error of failure load is less than 6.4%. Furthermore, it also verifies the feasibility of the damage detection system.

  1. Structural response of a fiber composite compressor fan blade airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minich, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was performed to determine the structural response of a fiber composite airfoil typical of those encountered in high-tip speed compressor fan blades when subjected to load conditions anticipated in such applications. The analysis method consisted of composite mechanics embedded in pre- and post-processors coupled with NASTRAN. The load conditions examined include thermal due to aerodynamic heating, pressure due to aerodynamic forces, and centrifugal. Root reactions due to various load conditions, average composite and ply stresses, ply delaminations, and the fundamental modes and the corresponding reactions were investigated. The results show that the thermal and pressure stresses are negligible compared to those caused by the centrifugal forces. The core-shell concept for composite blades is an inefficient design and is sensitive to interply delaminations. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms to illustrate the types and amount of data required for the analysis, and to provide quantitative data associated with the various responses which can be helpful in designing composite blades.

  2. Residual thermal stress control in composite reinforced metal structures. [by mechanical loading of metal component prior to bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced composite materials, composed of boron or graphite fibers and a supporting matrix, make significant structural efficiency improvements available to aircraft and aerospace designers. Residual stress induced during bonding of composite reinforcement to metal structural elements can be reduced or eliminated through suitable modification to the manufacturing processes. The most successful method employed during this program used a steel tool capable of mechanically loading the metal component in compression prior to the adhesive bonding cycle. Compression loading combined with heating to 350 F during the bond cycle can result in creep deformation in aluminum components. The magnitude of the deformation increases with increasing stress level during exposure to 350 F.

  3. Properties and Structure of Microcrystal Muscovite Composite Superabsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Tao; XIONG Lei; HUANG Runqiu; SUN Mengmeng; QIN Lili; TAN Xuemei; HU Junyan

    2014-01-01

    Microcrystal muscovite composite superabsorbents (MMCSA) were prepared by water solution polymerization using acrylic acid, acrylamide and itaconic acid as comonomers and microcrystal muscovite as an inorganic additive. Properties, such as water absorbency, salt absorbency, gel strength, water retention capacity and structure of MMCSA characterized by SEM and XRD, were investigated. Water absorbency, salt absorbency, gel strength, water retention capacity and thermostability were enhanced by incorporation of suitable amount of microcrystal muscovite. Water absorption of MMCSA was rapid, requiring 24.55 min to reach 63% of equilibrium absorbency (1218 g/g). Microcrystal muscovite was physically combined into the polymeric network without destroying its polycrystalline structure and microcrystal muscovite composite superabsorbent had some irregular, undulant, and small microporous holes with sheet-like microcrystal muscovite distributed in the polymeric matrix.

  4. Freeform fabrication of polymer-matrix composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, S.G.; Spletzer, B.L.; Guess, T.L.

    1997-05-01

    The authors have developed, prototyped, and demonstrated the feasibility of a novel robotic technique for rapid fabrication of composite structures. Its chief innovation is that, unlike all other available fabrication methods, it does not require a mold. Instead, the structure is built patch by patch, using a rapidly reconfigurable forming surface, and a robot to position the evolving part. Both of these components are programmable, so only the control software needs to be changed to produce a new shape. Hence it should be possible to automatically program the system to produce a shape directly from an electronic model of it. It is therefore likely that the method will enable faster and less expensive fabrication of composites.

  5. Structural Intensity Characterization of Composite Laminates Subjected to Impact Load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong-fang; HE Peng-fei; LIU Zi-shun

    2008-01-01

    Structural intensity (SI) characterization of composite laminates subjected to impact load was dis-cussed. The SI pattern of the laminates which have different fiber orientations and boundary conditions wasanalyzed. The resultant forces and velocities of the laminates were calculated, and the structural intensity wasevaluated. The SI streamlines of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminates and the steel plates werediscussed. The results show that the SI streamlines of the graphite/epoxy laminates are different from that ofthe steel plates, and the SI streamlines are influenced by the boundaries, the stacking sequence of the compositelaminates. The change of the historical central displacement of the graphite/epoxy laminates is fasten thanthat of the steel plates.

  6. Intercalated graphite fiber composites as EMI shields in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding in aerospace structures are more complicated than those for ground structures because of their weight limitations. As a result, the best EMI shielding materials must combine low density, high strength, and high elastic modulus with high shielding ability. EMI shielding characteristics were calculated for shields formed from pristine and intercalated graphite fiber/epoxy composites and compare to preliminary experimental results for these materials and to the characteristics of shields made from aluminum. Calculations indicate that effective EMI shields could be fabricated from intercalated graphite composites which would have less than 12 percent of the mass of conventional aluminum shields, based on mechanical properties and shielding characteristics alone.

  7. Oxidation resistance coating for niobium base structural composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidation behavior of Al-rich Mo(Si,Al)2 base alloys, which is a candidate material for the oxidation resistance coating on Nb base structural composites, were investigated by thermogravimetry. The Mo(Si,Al)2 base alloys containing Mo5(Si,Al)3 up to about 10 vol% exhibits excellent oxidation resistance at temperatures ranging from 780 to 1580 K, particularly at 1580 K due to continuous Al2O3 layer development. To evaluate the applicability of the Mo(Si,Al)2 base coating, plasma spraying on Nb base composites were undertaken. However, interface reaction layer was found to form during the following heat treatment. Preparation of Mo(Si,Al)2/Al2O3/Nb layered structures via powder metallurgical process was attempted to preclude diffusion reaction between coating and substrate. (orig.)

  8. Energy absorption characteristics of nano-composite conical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F.; Sachse, S.; Njuguna, J.

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the filler material on the energy absorption capabilities of polyamide 6 composite structures is studied in details in the present paper. The axial dynamic and quasi-static collapse of conical structures was conducted using a high energy drop tower, as well as Instron 5500R electro-mechanical testing machine. The impact event was recorded using a high-speed camera and the fracture surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The obtained results indicate an important influence of filler material on the energy absorption capabilities of the polymer composites. A significant increase in specific energy absorption (SEA) is observed in polyamide 6 (PA6) reinforced with nano-silica particles (SiO2) and glass-spheres (GS), whereas addition of montmorillonite (MMT) did not change the SEA parameter.

  9. Biomechanical properties of an advanced new carbon/flax/epoxy composite material for bone plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Zahra S; El Sawi, Ihab; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad; Bougherara, Habiba

    2013-04-01

    This work is part of an ongoing program to develop a new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy (CF/flax/epoxy) hybrid composite material for use as an orthopaedic long bone fracture plate, instead of a metal plate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of this new novel composite material. The composite material had a "sandwich structure", in which two thin sheets of CF/epoxy were attached to each outer surface of the flax/epoxy core, which resulted in a unique structure compared to other composite plates for bone plate applications. Mechanical properties were determined using tension, three-point bending, and Rockwell hardness tests. Also, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the failure mechanism of specimens in tension and three-point bending tests. The results of mechanical tests revealed a considerably high ultimate strength in both tension (399.8MPa) and flexural loading (510.6MPa), with a higher elastic modulus in bending tests (57.4GPa) compared to tension tests (41.7GPa). The composite material experienced brittle catastrophic failure in both tension and bending tests. The SEM images, consistent with brittle failure, showed mostly fiber breakage and fiber pull-out at the fractured surfaces with perfect bonding at carbon fibers and flax plies. Compared to clinically-used orthopaedic metal plates, current CF/flax/epoxy results were closer to human cortical bone, making the material a potential candidate for use in long bone fracture fixation.

  10. Biomechanical properties of an advanced new carbon/flax/epoxy composite material for bone plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Zahra S; El Sawi, Ihab; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad; Bougherara, Habiba

    2013-04-01

    This work is part of an ongoing program to develop a new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy (CF/flax/epoxy) hybrid composite material for use as an orthopaedic long bone fracture plate, instead of a metal plate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of this new novel composite material. The composite material had a "sandwich structure", in which two thin sheets of CF/epoxy were attached to each outer surface of the flax/epoxy core, which resulted in a unique structure compared to other composite plates for bone plate applications. Mechanical properties were determined using tension, three-point bending, and Rockwell hardness tests. Also, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the failure mechanism of specimens in tension and three-point bending tests. The results of mechanical tests revealed a considerably high ultimate strength in both tension (399.8MPa) and flexural loading (510.6MPa), with a higher elastic modulus in bending tests (57.4GPa) compared to tension tests (41.7GPa). The composite material experienced brittle catastrophic failure in both tension and bending tests. The SEM images, consistent with brittle failure, showed mostly fiber breakage and fiber pull-out at the fractured surfaces with perfect bonding at carbon fibers and flax plies. Compared to clinically-used orthopaedic metal plates, current CF/flax/epoxy results were closer to human cortical bone, making the material a potential candidate for use in long bone fracture fixation. PMID:23499250

  11. Interface modes of two-dimensional composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Pitarke, J. M.; F. J. Garcia-Vidal; J. B. Pendry

    1998-01-01

    The surface modes of a composite consisting of aligned metallic wires with square cross sections are investigated, on the basis of photonic band structure calculations. The effective long-wavelength dielectric response function is computed, as a function of the filling fraction. The dependence of the optical absorption on the shape of the wires and the polarization of light is discussed, and the effect of sharp corners analyzed. The effect of the interaction between the wires on the localizat...

  12. Modern Approaches on the Optimization of Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Axinte, Andrei; Bejan, Liliana; Ţăranu, Nicolae; Ciobanu, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A laminated fibre reinforced composite structure is usually tailored, according to the design objectives, by choosing the individual constituents and of their volume fractions, the fiber orientation, the laminae thicknesses and orientation of the plies, their number and stacking sequences, as well as the fabrication procedure. To achieve the best results, optimization techniques have been developed. In recent years, some optimization methods, that are conceptually different from the traditio...

  13. Green design and multidisciplinary optimization of carbon nanotube composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Morillo, Carlos; Bugeda Castelltort, Gabriel; Lee, D.S.; Oller Martínez, Sergio Horacio

    2013-01-01

    This work develops a multi-objective design optimisation method for Carbon Nanotube Composite Structures (CNTCSs) using Genetic Algorithm and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Two design problems are considered: the first is an optimisation problem to improve the mechanical properties (weight-displacement) of the CNTCSs, minimizing the Not Adherence Green Design Principles (NoAGDP); the second is an optimisation problem to improve the same mechanical properties also minimizing the cost of the C...

  14. Combined structural and manufacturing optimization of stiffened composite panels

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Joseph Lynn

    1996-01-01

    Manufacturing considerations have been incorporated into the design optimization of a blade-stiffened composite panel. For the manufacturing analysis, a one-dimensional resin film infusion model is developed to compute the infiltration time of the resin into a fabric preform of the panel. Results are presented showing the effects of structurally important design variables, such as cross-sectional geometry and material properties, on the manufacturing performance of the panel. I...

  15. Nanomembrane structures having mixed crystalline orientations and compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max G.; Scott, Shelley A.; Savage, Donald E.

    2014-08-12

    The present nanomembrane structures include a multilayer film comprising a single-crystalline layer of semiconductor material disposed between two other single-crystalline layers of semiconductor material. A plurality of holes extending through the nanomembrane are at least partially, and preferably entirely, filled with a filler material which is also a semiconductor, but which differs from the nanomembrane semiconductor materials in composition, crystal orientation, or both.

  16. Spines of the Porcupine Fish: Structure, Composition, and Mechanical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Frances Yenan

    2015-01-01

    This thesis explores the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of the porcupine fish spine for the first time. The spine was found to be composed of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and protein that is most likely mainly type I collagen using X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. Microstructure that includes mineralized fiber sheets in the longitudinal direction and radial orientation of the sheets in the transverse direction were o...

  17. Validation of Design and Analysis Techniques of Tailored Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor); Wijayratne, Dulnath D.

    2004-01-01

    Aeroelasticity is the relationship between the elasticity of an aircraft structure and its aerodynamics. This relationship can cause instabilities such as flutter in a wing. Engineers have long studied aeroelasticity to ensure such instabilities do not become a problem within normal operating conditions. In recent decades structural tailoring has been used to take advantage of aeroelasticity. It is possible to tailor an aircraft structure to respond favorably to multiple different flight regimes such as takeoff, landing, cruise, 2-g pull up, etc. Structures can be designed so that these responses provide an aerodynamic advantage. This research investigates the ability to design and analyze tailored structures made from filamentary composites. Specifically the accuracy of tailored composite analysis must be verified if this design technique is to become feasible. To pursue this idea, a validation experiment has been performed on a small-scale filamentary composite wing box. The box is tailored such that its cover panels induce a global bend-twist coupling under an applied load. Two types of analysis were chosen for the experiment. The first is a closed form analysis based on a theoretical model of a single cell tailored box beam and the second is a finite element analysis. The predicted results are compared with the measured data to validate the analyses. The comparison of results show that the finite element analysis is capable of predicting displacements and strains to within 10% on the small-scale structure. The closed form code is consistently able to predict the wing box bending to 25% of the measured value. This error is expected due to simplifying assumptions in the closed form analysis. Differences between the closed form code representation and the wing box specimen caused large errors in the twist prediction. The closed form analysis prediction of twist has not been validated from this test.

  18. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.59 dpa at 600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes, thermal conductivity and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-Carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models

  19. Mechanistic Studies of Combustion and Structure Formation During Synthesis of Advanced Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, A.; Lau, C.; Mukasyan, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Combustion in a variety of heterogeneous systems, leading to the synthesis of advanced materials, is characterized by high temperatures (2000-3500 K) and heating rates (up to 10(exp 6) K/s) at and ahead of the reaction front. These high temperatures generate liquids and gases which are subject to gravity-driven flow. The removal of such gravitational effects is likely to provide increased control of the reaction front, with a consequent improvement in control of the microstructure of the synthesized products. Thus, microgravity (mu-g) experiments lead to major advances in the understanding of fundamental aspects of combustion and structure formation under the extreme conditions of the combustion synthesis (CS) wave. In addition, the specific features of microgravity environment allow one to produce unique materials, which cannot be obtained under terrestrial conditions. The current research is a logic continuation of our previous work on investigations of the fundamental phenomena of combustion and structure formation that occur at the high temperatures achieved in a CS wave. Our research is being conducted in three main directions: 1) Microstructural Transformations during Combustion Synthesis of Metal-Ceramic Composites. The studies are devoted to the investigation of particle growth during CS of intermetallic-ceramic composites, synthesized from nickel, aluminum, titanium, and boron metal reactants. To determine the mechanisms of particle growth, the investigation varies the relative amount of components in the initial mixture to yield combustion wave products with different ratios of solid and liquid phases, under 1g and mu-g conditions; 2) Mechanisms of Heat Transfer during Reactions in Heterogeneous Media. Specifically, new phenomena of gasless combustion wave propagation in heterogeneous media with porosity higher than that achievable in normal gravity conditions, are being studied. Two types of mixtures are investigated: clad powders, where contact between

  20. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.