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Sample records for advanced clinical decision

  1. Advancing clinical decision support using lessons from outside of healthcare: an interdisciplinary systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Helen W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Greater use of computerized decision support (DS systems could address continuing safety and quality problems in healthcare, but the healthcare field has struggled to implement DS technology. This study surveys DS experience across multiple non-healthcare disciplines for new insights that are generalizable to healthcare provider decisions. In particular, it sought design principles and lessons learned from the other disciplines that could inform efforts to accelerate the adoption of clinical decision support (CDS. Methods Our systematic review drew broadly from non-healthcare databases in the basic sciences, social sciences, humanities, engineering, business, and defense: PsychINFO, BusinessSource Premier, Social Sciences Abstracts, Web of Science, and Defense Technical Information Center. Because our interest was in DS that could apply to clinical decisions, we selected articles that (1 provided a review, overview, discussion of lessons learned, or an evaluation of design or implementation aspects of DS within a non-healthcare discipline and (2 involved an element of human judgment at the individual level, as opposed to decisions that can be fully automated or that are made at the organizational level. Results Clinical decisions share some similarities with decisions made by military commanders, business managers, and other leaders: they involve assessing new situations and choosing courses of action with major consequences, under time pressure, and with incomplete information. We identified seven high-level DS system design features from the non-healthcare literature that could be applied to CDS: providing broad, system-level perspectives; customizing interfaces to specific users and roles; making the DS reasoning transparent; presenting data effectively; generating multiple scenarios covering disparate outcomes (e.g., effective; effective with side effects; ineffective; allowing for contingent adaptations; and facilitating

  2. Shared clinical decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHaqwi, Ali I.; AlDrees, Turki M.; AlRumayyan, Ahmad; AlFarhan, Ali I.; Alotaibi, Sultan S.; AlKhashan, Hesham I.; Badri, Motasim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine preferences of patients regarding their involvement in the clinical decision making process and the related factors in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a major family practice center in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March and May 2012. Multivariate multinomial regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with patients preferences. Results: The study included 236 participants. The most preferred decision-making style was shared decision-making (57%), followed by paternalistic (28%), and informed consumerism (14%). The preference for shared clinical decision making was significantly higher among male patients and those with higher level of education, whereas paternalism was significantly higher among older patients and those with chronic health conditions, and consumerism was significantly higher in younger age groups. In multivariate multinomial regression analysis, compared with the shared group, the consumerism group were more likely to be female [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) =2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-6.27, p=0.008] and non-dyslipidemic (AOR=2.90, 95% CI: 1.03-8.09, p=0.04), and the paternalism group were more likely to be older (AOR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05, p=0.04), and female (AOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.32-4.06, p=0.008). Conclusion: Preferences of patients for involvement in the clinical decision-making varied considerably. In our setting, underlying factors that influence these preferences identified in this study should be considered and tailored individually to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. PMID:26620990

  3. Clinical Impact of Education Provision on Determining Advance Care Planning Decisions among End Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Regular Hemodialysis in University Malaya Medical Centre

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    Hing (Wong), Albert; Chin, Loh Ee; Ping, Tan Li; Peng, Ng Kok; Kun, Lim Soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Advance care planning (ACP) is a process of shared decision-making about future health-care plans between patients, health care providers, and family members, should patients becomes incapable of participating in medical treatment decisions. ACP discussions enhance patient's autonomy, focus on patient's values and treatment preferences, and promote patient-centered care. ACP is integrated as part of clinical practice in Singapore and the United States. Aim: To assess the clinical impact of education provision on determining ACP decisions among end-stage renal disease patients on regular hemodialysis at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). To study the knowledge and attitude of patients toward ACP and end-of-life issues. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six patients were recruited from UMMC. About 43 questions pretest survey adapted from Lyon's ACP survey and Moss's cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attitude survey was given to patients to answer. An educational brochure is then introduced to these patients, and a posttest survey carried out after that. The results were analyzed using SPSS version 22.0. Results: Opinion on ACP, including CPR decisions, showed an upward trend on the importance percentage after the educational brochure exposure, but this was statistically not significant. Seventy-five percent of participants had never heard of ACP before, and only 3.6% had actually prepared a written advanced directive. Conclusion: The ACP educational brochure clinically impacts patients’ preferences and decisions toward end-of-life care; however, this is statistically not significant. Majority of patients have poor knowledge on ACP. This study lays the foundation for execution of future larger scale clinical trials, and ultimately, the incorporation of ACP into clinical practice in Malaysia.

  4. Clinical Decision Support (CDS) Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Clinical Decision Support (CDS) Inventory contains descriptions of past and present CDS projects across the Federal Government. It includes Federal projects,...

  5. Pre-Operative Prediction of Advanced Prostatic Cancer Using Clinical Decision Support Systems: Accuracy Comparison between Support Vector Machine and Artificial Neural Network

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    Kim, Sang Youn; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Hwang, Sung Il; Sung, Chang Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Lee, Hak Jong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Dae Chul [National Cancer Center, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji Won [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of the current study was to develop support vector machine (SVM) and artificial neural network (ANN) models for the pre-operative prediction of advanced prostate cancer by using the parameters acquired from transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies, and to compare the accuracies between the two models. Five hundred thirty-two consecutive patients who underwent prostate biopsies and prostatectomies for prostate cancer were divided into the training and test groups (n = 300 versus n 232). From the data in the training group, two clinical decision support systems (CDSSs-[SVM and ANN]) were constructed with input (age, prostate specific antigen level, digital rectal examination, and five biopsy parameters) and output data (the probability for advanced prostate cancer [> pT3a]). From the data of the test group, the accuracy of output data was evaluated. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) were calculated to summarize the overall performances, and a comparison of the ROC curves was performed (p < 0.05). The AUC of SVM and ANN is 0.805 and 0.719, respectively (p = 0.020), in the pre-operative prediction of advanced prostate cancer. Te performance of SVM is superior to ANN in the pre-operative prediction of advanced prostate cancer.

  6. Integrating clinical research into clinical decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Tonelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine has placed a general priority on knowledge gained from clinical research for clinical decision making. However, knowledge derived from empiric, population-based research, while valued for its ability to limit bias, is not directly applicable to the care of individual patients. The gap between clinical research and individual patient care centers on the fact that empiric research is not generally designed to answer questions of direct relevance to individual patients. Clinicians must utilize other forms of medical knowledge, including pathophysiologic rationale and clinical experience, in order to arrive at the best medical decision for a particular patient. In addition, clinicians must also elucidate and account for the goals and values of individual patients as well as barriers and facilitators of care inherent in the system in which they practice. Evidence-based guidelines and protocols, then, can never be prescriptive. Clinicians must continue to rely on clinical judgment, negotiating potentially conflicting warrants for action, in an effort to arrive at the best decision for a particular patient.

  7. Legal Considerations in Clinical Decision Making.

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    Ursu, Samuel C.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of legal issues in dental clinical decision making looks at the nature and elements of applicable law, especially malpractice, locus of responsibility, and standards of care. Greater use of formal decision analysis in clinical dentistry and better research on diagnosis and treatment are recommended, particularly in light of increasing…

  8. ClinicalAccess: a clinical decision support tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Karen; Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    ClinicalAccess is a new clinical decision support tool that uses a question-and-answer format to mirror clinical decision-making strategies. The unique format of ClinicalAccess delivers concise, authoritative answers to more than 120,000 clinical questions. This column presents a review of the product, a sample search, and a comparison with other point-of-care search engines. PMID:25927513

  9. Decision support for clinical laboratory capacity planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Merode, G G; Hasman, A; Derks, J; Goldschmidt, H M; Schoenmaker, B; Oosten, M

    1995-01-01

    The design of a decision support system for capacity planning in clinical laboratories is discussed. The DSS supports decisions concerning the following questions: how should the laboratory be divided into job shops (departments/sections), how should staff be assigned to workstations and how should samples be assigned to workstations for testing. The decision support system contains modules for supporting decisions at the overall laboratory level (concerning the division of the laboratory into job shops) and for supporting decisions at the job shop level (assignment of staff to workstations and sample scheduling). Experiments with these modules are described showing both the functionality and the validity.

  10. Personalized Clinical Decision Making in Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Pfeiffer, Per;

    2016-01-01

    and initial stages. This article outlines the potential use of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in clinical decision making with special regard to preoperative evaluation and response assessment in gastric cancer (including the gastroesophageal junction), pancreatic cancer (excluding neuroendocrine tumors...

  11. Clinical Productivity System - A Decision Support Model

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    Bennett, Casey C

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of a data-driven clinical productivity system that leverages Electronic Health Record (EHR) data to provide productivity decision support functionality in a real-world clinical setting. The system was implemented for a large behavioral health care provider seeing over 75,000 distinct clients a year. Design/methodology/approach: The key metric in this system is a "VPU", which simultaneously optimizes multiple aspects of clinical care. The resulting mathematical value of clinical productivity was hypothesized to tightly link the organization's performance to its expectations and, through transparency and decision support tools at the clinician level, affect significant changes in productivity, quality, and consistency relative to traditional models of clinical productivity. Findings: In only 3 months, every single variable integrated into the VPU system showed significant improvement, including a 30% rise in revenue, 10% rise in clinical percentage, a...

  12. Clinical decision making in veterinary practice

    OpenAIRE

    Everitt, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the factors which influence veterinary surgeons’ clinical decision making during routine consultations. Methods The research takes a qualitative approach using video-cued interviews, in which one of the veterinary surgeon’s own consultations is used as the basis of a semi-structured interview exploring decision making in real cases. The research focuses primarily on small animal consultations in first opinion practice, how...

  13. The role of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making.

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    Marcum, James A

    2013-10-01

    What role, if any, should emotions play in clinical reasoning and decision making? Traditionally, emotions have been excluded from clinical reasoning and decision making, but with recent advances in cognitive neuropsychology they are now considered an important component of them. Today, cognition is thought to be a set of complex processes relying on multiple types of intelligences. The role of mathematical logic (hypothetico-deductive thinking) or verbal linguistic intelligence in cognition, for example, is well documented and accepted; however, the role of emotional intelligence has received less attention-especially because its nature and function are not well understood. In this paper, I argue for the inclusion of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making. To that end, developments in contemporary cognitive neuropsychology are initially examined and analyzed, followed by a review of the medical literature discussing the role of emotions in clinical practice. Next, a published clinical case is reconstructed and used to illustrate the recognition and regulation of emotions played during a series of clinical consultations, which resulted in a positive medical outcome. The paper's main thesis is that emotions, particularly in terms of emotional intelligence as a practical form of intelligence, afford clinical practitioners a robust cognitive resource for providing quality medical care.

  14. The role of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, James A

    2013-10-01

    What role, if any, should emotions play in clinical reasoning and decision making? Traditionally, emotions have been excluded from clinical reasoning and decision making, but with recent advances in cognitive neuropsychology they are now considered an important component of them. Today, cognition is thought to be a set of complex processes relying on multiple types of intelligences. The role of mathematical logic (hypothetico-deductive thinking) or verbal linguistic intelligence in cognition, for example, is well documented and accepted; however, the role of emotional intelligence has received less attention-especially because its nature and function are not well understood. In this paper, I argue for the inclusion of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making. To that end, developments in contemporary cognitive neuropsychology are initially examined and analyzed, followed by a review of the medical literature discussing the role of emotions in clinical practice. Next, a published clinical case is reconstructed and used to illustrate the recognition and regulation of emotions played during a series of clinical consultations, which resulted in a positive medical outcome. The paper's main thesis is that emotions, particularly in terms of emotional intelligence as a practical form of intelligence, afford clinical practitioners a robust cognitive resource for providing quality medical care. PMID:23975905

  15. Clinical decision support system in dental implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Polášková

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Implantology is rapidly developing interdisciplinary field providing enormous amounts of data to be classified, evaluated and interpreted. The analysis of clinical data remains a big challenge, because each new system has specific requirements. The aim of study was prepare specific tool for treatment planning. Decision support system is built on Expert system. It is interactive software which provides clinical recommendations and treatment planning. Expert systems are knowledge-based computer programs designed to provide assistance in diagnosis and treatment planning. These systems are used for health care (dentistry, medicine, pharmacy etc.. The application contained the medical history analysis to obtaining information useful in formulating a diagnosis and providing implant insertion and prosthetic reconstruction to the patient; the diagnostic examination of dental implant procedure; implant positioning diagnosis – 3-D measurement; diagnostic information for treatment planning; treatment plan in the form of objective measurement of implant placement that helps surgeon and prosthodontics. The decision algorithm implemented by programming language is used. Core of program is an expert knowledge programming like a decision tree. The analysis of the decision-making process for implant treatment in general practice is prepared and analyzed.

  16. Probability, clinical decision making and hypothesis testing

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    A Banerjee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Few clinicians grasp the true concept of probability expressed in the ′P value.′ For most, a statistically significant P value is the end of the search for truth. In fact, the opposite is the case. The present paper attempts to put the P value in proper perspective by explaining different types of probabilities, their role in clinical decision making, medical research and hypothesis testing.

  17. Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Useful Tool in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolostoumpis G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of supporting in decision – making shows an increase in recent years. Based on mathematic simulation tools, knowledge databases, processing methods, medical data and methods, artificial intelligence for coding of the available knowledge and for resolving complex problems arising into clinical practice. Aim: the aim of this review is to present the development of new methods and modern services, in clinical practice and the emergence in their implementation. Data and methods: the methodology that was followed included research of articles that referred to health sector and modern technologies, at the electronic data bases “pubmed” and “medline”. Results: Is a useful tool for medical experts using characteristics and medical data used by the doctors. Constitute innovation for the medical community, and ensure the support of clinical decisions with an overall way by providing a comprehensive solution in the light of the integration of computational decision support systems into clinical practice. Conclusions: Decision Support Systems contribute to improving the quality of health services with simultaneous impoundment of costs (i.e. avoid medical errors

  18. Nurses' Clinical Decision Making on Adopting a Wound Clinical Decision Support System.

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    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Hoi, Shu Yin; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare information technology systems are considered the ideal tool to inculcate evidence-based nursing practices. The wound clinical decision support system was built locally to support nurses to manage pressure ulcer wounds in their daily practice. However, its adoption rate is not optimal. The study's objective was to discover the concepts that informed the RNs' decisions to adopt the wound clinical decision support system as an evidence-based technology in their nursing practice. This was an exploratory, descriptive, and qualitative design using face-to-face interviews, individual interviews, and active participatory observation. A purposive, theoretical sample of 14 RNs was recruited from one of the largest public tertiary hospitals in Singapore after obtaining ethics approval. After consenting, the nurses were interviewed and observed separately. Recruitment stopped when data saturation was reached. All transcribed interview data underwent a concurrent thematic analysis, whereas observational data were content analyzed independently and subsequently triangulated with the interview data. Eight emerging themes were identified, namely, use of the wound clinical decision support system, beliefs in the wound clinical decision support system, influences of the workplace culture, extent of the benefits, professional control over nursing practices, use of knowledge, gut feelings, and emotions (fear, doubt, and frustration). These themes represented the nurses' mental outlook as they made decisions on adopting the wound clinical decision support system in light of the complexities of their roles and workloads. This research has provided insight on the nurses' thoughts regarding their decision to interact with the computer environment in a Singapore context. It captured the nurses' complex thoughts when deciding whether to adopt or reject information technology as they practice in a clinical setting. PMID:26066306

  19. [Clinical decisions in a philosophical perspective].

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    Wulff, H R

    1993-09-20

    Medicine is both a scientific and a humanistic discipline. The foundation for clinical decisions has four components (two scientific and two humanistic). 1) The biological component (reasoning based on biological theory). Biological thinking is currently being revolutionised, partly through the development of systems theory. 2) The empirical component (reasoning based on experience from earlier patients), which comprises both uncontrolled and controlled experience. 3) The empathic-hermeneutic component (reasoning based on an understanding of the patient as a fellow human being). Empathy requires hermeneutic knowledge which can be acquired through personal experience and by qualitative research. 4) The ethical component which comprises both utilitarian and deontological considerations. PMID:8211903

  20. [Clinical trials with advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler-Lenz, M; Schneider, C K

    2010-01-01

    For advanced therapies, the same basic principles for assessment apply as for any other biotechnological medicinal product. Nevertheless, the extent of data for quality, safety, and efficacy can be highly specific. Until recently, advanced therapies were not uniformly regulated across Europe, e.g., tissue engineered products were regulated either as medicinal products or medical devices. Thus, for some products no data from clinical studies are available, e.g., for autologous chondrocyte products. The draft guideline on Good Clinical Practice for clinical trials with advanced therapies describes specific additional requirements, e.g., ensuring traceability. Most clinical studies with advanced therapies in Germany are still in early phase I or II trials with highly divergent types of products and clinical indications. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) has been established to meet the scientific and regulatory challenges with advanced therapies.

  1. Decision support tools for advanced energy management

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    Marik, Karel; Schindler, Zdenek; Stluka, Petr [Honeywell Prague Laboratory, Pod vodarenskou vezi 4, 182 08 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2008-06-15

    Rising fuel costs boost energy prices, which is a driving force for improving efficiency of operation of any energy generation facility. This paper focuses on enhancing the operation of distributed integrated energy systems (IES), system that bring together all forms of cooling, heating and power (CCHP) technologies. Described methodology can be applied in power generation and district heating companies, as well as in small-scale systems that supply multiple types of utilities to consumers in industrial, commercial, residential and governmental spheres. Dispatching of such system in an optimal way needs to assess large number of production and purchasing schemes in conditions of continually changing market and variable utility demands influenced by many external factors, very often by weather conditions. The paper describes a combination of forecasting and optimization methods that supports effective decisions in IES system management. The forecaster generates the future most probable utility demand several hours or days ahead, derived from the past energy consumer behaviour. The optimizer generates economically most efficient operating schedule for the IES system that matches these forecasted energy demands and respects expected purchased energy prices. (author)

  2. Outpatient diabetes clinical decision support: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, P J; Sperl-Hillen, J M; Fazio, C J; Averbeck, B M; Rank, B H; Margolis, K L

    2016-06-01

    Outpatient clinical decision support systems have had an inconsistent impact on key aspects of diabetes care. A principal barrier to success has been low use rates in many settings. Here, we identify key aspects of clinical decision support system design, content and implementation that are related to sustained high use rates and positive impacts on glucose, blood pressure and lipid management. Current diabetes clinical decision support systems may be improved by prioritizing care recommendations, improving communication of treatment-relevant information to patients, using such systems for care coordination and case management and integrating patient-reported information and data from remote devices into clinical decision algorithms and interfaces. PMID:27194173

  3. A systematic review of clinical decision rules for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Colin B; Sandy, Sherry; Jette, Nathalie; Sajobi, Tolulope T; Marshall, Deborah; Wiebe, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Clinical decision rules (CDRs) have been empirically demonstrated to improve patient satisfaction and enhance cost-effective care. The use of CDRs has not yet been robustly explored for epilepsy. We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE (from 1946) and Embase (from 1947) using Medical Subject Headings and keywords related to CDRs and epilepsy. We included original research of any language deriving, validating, or implementing a CDR using standardized definitions. Study quality was determined using a modified version of previously published criteria. A bivariate model was used to meta-analyze studies undergoing sequential derivation and validation studies. Of 2445 unique articles, 5 were determined to be relevant to this review. Three were derivation studies (three diagnostic and one therapeutic), one validation study, and one combined derivation and validation study. No implementation studies were identified. Study quality varied but was primarily of a moderate level. Two CDRs were validated and, thus, able to be meta-analyzed. Although initial measures of accuracy were high (sensitivity ~80% or above), they tended to diminish significantly in the validation studies. The pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity both exhibited wide 95% confidence and prediction intervals that may limit their utility in routine practice. Despite the advances in therapeutic and diagnostic interventions for epilepsy, few CDRs have been developed to guide their use. Future CDRs should address common clinical scenarios such as efficient use of diagnostic tools and optimal clinical treatment decisions. Given their potential for advancing efficient, evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare, CDR development should be a priority in epilepsy. PMID:26922491

  4. Clinical practice guidelines and patient decision aids. An inevitable relationship.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijden, T. van der; Boivin, A.; Burgers, J.S.; Schunemann, H.J.; Elwyn, G.

    2012-01-01

    As health professionals and patients are moving toward shared models of decision making, there is a growing need for integrated decision support tools that facilitate uptake of best evidence in routine clinical practice in a patient-centered manner. This article charts the landscape of clinical prac

  5. Advance directives, preemptive suicide and emergency medicine decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Richard L; Morgan, Marshall T; Rottman, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    As the United States population ages, there is a growing group of aging, elderly, individuals who may consider "preemptive suicide"(Prado, 1998). Healthy aging patients who preemptively attempt to end their life by suicide and who have clearly expressed a desire not to have life -sustaining treatment present a clinical and public policy challenge. We describe the clinical, ethical, and medical-legal decision making issues that were raised in such a case that presented to an academic emergency department. We also review and evaluate a decision making process that emergency physicians confront when faced with such a challenging and unusual situation .

  6. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Torunn Bjørk; Hamilton, Glenys A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with d...

  7. End-of-Life Decisions and Advanced Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoyles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that most people die in advanced old age, little attention is given to cases involving older people in debates about the moral and legal dimensions of end-of-life decision making. The purpose of this paper is to establish some of the ways our discussions should change as we pay attention to important factors influencing end-of-life decisions for people in advanced old age. Focusing on the prevalence of comorbidities and the likelihood that people in advanced old age will experience an extended period of declining function before death, I argue that our debates should be expanded to include greater consideration of how we want to live in the final stages of life. With this, I am arguing against the tendency to think that “end-of-life” decision making concerns only making decisions about when and how it is appropriate to terminate a person’s life. I argue, further, that we should move away from the medicalization of dying.

  8. Towards advanced OCT clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillin, Mikhail; Panteleeva, Olga; Agrba, Pavel; Pasukhin, Mikhail; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Plankina, Elena; Dudenkova, Varvara; Gubarkova, Ekaterina; Kiseleva, Elena; Gladkova, Natalia; Shakhova, Natalia; Vitkin, Alex

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we report on our recent achievement in application of conventional and cross-polarization OCT (CP OCT) modalities for in vivo clinical diagnostics in different medical areas including gynecology, dermatology, and stomatology. In gynecology, CP OCT was employed for diagnosing fallopian tubes and cervix; in dermatology OCT for monitoring of treatment of psoriasis, scleroderma and atopic dermatitis; and in stomatology for diagnosis of oral diseases. For all considered application, we propose and develop different image processing methods which enhance the diagnostic value of the technique. In particular, we use histogram analysis, Fourier analysis and neural networks, thus calculating different tissue characteristics as revealed by OCT's polarization evolution. These approaches enable improved OCT image quantification and increase its resultant diagnostic accuracy.

  9. Clinical Decision Making among Dental Students and General Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembowski, David; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Senior dental students and family dental practitioners were surveyed concerning their choice of pairs of alternative treatments and the technical and patient factors influencing their decisions. Greater agreement in clinical decision-making was found among dentists than among students for all four pairs of alternative services. (MSE)

  10. Clinical decision-making: physicians' preferences and experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Martha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared decision-making has been advocated; however there are relatively few studies on physician preferences for, and experiences of, different styles of clinical decision-making as most research has focused on patient preferences and experiences. The objectives of this study were to determine 1 physician preferences for different styles of clinical decision-making; 2 styles of clinical decision-making physicians perceive themselves as practicing; and 3 the congruence between preferred and perceived style. In addition we sought to determine physician perceptions of the availability of time in visits, and their role in encouraging patients to look for health information. Methods Cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. physicians. Results 1,050 (53% response rate physicians responded to the survey. Of these, 780 (75% preferred to share decision-making with their patients, 142 (14% preferred paternalism, and 118 (11% preferred consumerism. 87% of physicians perceived themselves as practicing their preferred style. Physicians who preferred their patients to play an active role in decision-making were more likely to report encouraging patients to look for information, and to report having enough time in visits. Conclusion Physicians tend to perceive themselves as practicing their preferred role in clinical decision-making. The direction of the association cannot be inferred from these data; however, we suggest that interventions aimed at promoting shared decision-making need to target physicians as well as patients.

  11. Bayesian networks for clinical decision support : a rational approach to dynamic decision-making under uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation deals with decision support in the context of clinical oncology. (Dynamic) Bayesian networks are used as a framework for (dynamic) decision-making under uncertainty and applied to a variety of diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment problems in medicine. It is shown that the proposed

  12. Advanced intelligent computational technologies and decision support systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kountchev, Roumen

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a state of the art collection covering themes related to Advanced Intelligent Computational Technologies and Decision Support Systems which can be applied to fields like healthcare assisting the humans in solving problems. The book brings forward a wealth of ideas, algorithms and case studies in themes like: intelligent predictive diagnosis; intelligent analyzing of medical images; new format for coding of single and sequences of medical images; Medical Decision Support Systems; diagnosis of Down’s syndrome; computational perspectives for electronic fetal monitoring; efficient compression of CT Images; adaptive interpolation and halftoning for medical images; applications of artificial neural networks for real-life problems solving; present and perspectives for Electronic Healthcare Record Systems; adaptive approaches for noise reduction in sequences of CT images etc.

  13. Driving and dementia: a clinical decision pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Kirsty; Monaghan, Sophie; O'Brien, John; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Mosimann, Urs; Taylor, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop a pathway to bring together current UK legislation, good clinical practice and appropriate management strategies that could be applied across a range of healthcare settings. Methods The pathway was constructed by a multidisciplinary clinical team based in a busy Memory Assessment Service. A process of successive iteration was used to develop the pathway, with input and refinement provided via survey and small group meetings with individuals from a wide ra...

  14. Driving and dementia: a clinical decision pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Kirsty; Monaghan, Sophie; O'Brien, John; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Mosimann, Urs Peter; Taylor, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to develop a pathway to bring together current UK legislation, good clinical practice and appropriate management strategies that could be applied across a range of healthcare settings. METHODS The pathway was constructed by a multidisciplinary clinical team based in a busy Memory Assessment Service. A process of successive iteration was used to develop the pathway, with input and refinement provided via survey and small group meetings with individuals fr...

  15. Clinical Decision Making in Renal Pain Management

    OpenAIRE

    Aganovic, Damir; Prcic, Alen; Kulovac, Benjamin; Hadziosmanovic, Osman

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the optimal medication for the treatment of renal colic using evidence based medicine (EBM) parameters (RR, ARR, NNT, NNH, ARI, RRI). Sample and Methodology: During 2010, an ITT study was conducted on 400 outpatients of the Sarajevo University Clinical Center Urology Clinic in order to investigate renal colic pain relief drugs. Each group consisting of 100 patients was administered either Metamizol amp. i.v., or Diclofenac amp. i.m., or Butylscopolamine amp. i.v., whi...

  16. Better clinical decision making and reducing diagnostic error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croskerry, P; Nimmo, G R

    2011-06-01

    A major amount of our time working in clinical practice involves thinking and decision making. Perhaps it is because decision making is such a commonplace activity that it is assumed we can all make effective decisions. However, this is not the case and the example of diagnostic error supports this assertion. Until quite recently there has been a general nihilism about the ability to change the way that we think, but it is now becoming accepted that if we can think about, and understand, our thinking processes we can improve our decision making, including diagnosis. In this paper we review the dual process model of decision making and highlight ways in which decision making can be improved through the application of this model to our day-to-day practice and by the adoption of de-biasing strategies and critical thinking. PMID:21677922

  17. Multi-criteria clinical decision support: A primer on the use of multiple criteria decision making methods to promote evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G

    2010-01-01

    Current models of healthcare quality recommend that patient management decisions be evidence-based and patient-centered. Evidence-based decisions require a thorough understanding of current information regarding the natural history of disease and the anticipated outcomes of different management options. Patient-centered decisions incorporate patient preferences, values, and unique personal circumstances into the decision making process and actively involve both patients along with health care providers as much as possible. Fundamentally, therefore, evidence-based, patient-centered decisions are multi-dimensional and typically involve multiple decision makers.Advances in the decision sciences have led to the development of a number of multiple criteria decision making methods. These multi-criteria methods are designed to help people make better choices when faced with complex decisions involving several dimensions. They are especially helpful when there is a need to combine "hard data" with subjective preferences, to make trade-offs between desired outcomes, and to involve multiple decision makers. Evidence-based, patient-centered clinical decision making has all of these characteristics. This close match suggests that clinical decision support systems based on multi-criteria decision making techniques have the potential to enable patients and providers to carry out the tasks required to implement evidence-based, patient-centered care effectively and efficiently in clinical settings.The goal of this paper is to give readers a general introduction to the range of multi-criteria methods available and show how they could be used to support clinical decision-making. Methods discussed include the balance sheet, the even swap method, ordinal ranking methods, direct weighting methods, multi-attribute decision analysis, and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP).

  18. Extending the horizons advances in computing, optimization, and decision technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Joseph, Anito; Mehrotra, Anuj; Trick, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Computer Science and Operations Research continue to have a synergistic relationship and this book represents the results of cross-fertilization between OR/MS and CS/AI. It is this interface of OR/CS that makes possible advances that could not have been achieved in isolation. Taken collectively, these articles are indicative of the state-of-the-art in the interface between OR/MS and CS/AI and of the high caliber of research being conducted by members of the INFORMS Computing Society. EXTENDING THE HORIZONS: Advances in Computing, Optimization, and Decision Technologies is a volume that presents the latest, leading research in the design and analysis of algorithms, computational optimization, heuristic search and learning, modeling languages, parallel and distributed computing, simulation, computational logic and visualization. This volume also emphasizes a variety of novel applications in the interface of CS, AI, and OR/MS.

  19. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinner Kristin M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Discussion Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures, and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. Summary This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In

  20. Clinical implications of advances in liver regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Yong Jin; Lee, Kyeong Geun; Choi, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    Remarkable advances have been made recently in the area of liver regeneration. Even though liver regeneration after liver resection has been widely researched, new clinical applications have provided a better understanding of the process. Hepatic damage induces a process of regeneration that rarely occurs in normal undamaged liver. Many studies have concentrated on the mechanism of hepatocyte regeneration following liver damage. High mortality is usual in patients with terminal liver failure....

  1. Clinical decision making of nurses working in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Hamilton, Glenys A

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  2. Clinical Decision Support Tools: The Evolution of a Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, D R; D'Haens, G; Upton, R N

    2016-04-01

    Dashboard systems for clinical decision support integrate data from multiple sources. These systems, the newest in a long line of dose calculators and other decision support tools, utilize Bayesian approaches to fully individualize dosing using information gathered through therapeutic drug monitoring. In the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease patients with infliximab, dashboards may reduce therapeutic failures and treatment costs. The history and future development of modern Bayesian dashboard systems is described. PMID:26785109

  3. The thinking doctor: clinical decision making in contemporary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Michael; Hamilton, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic errors are responsible for a significant number of adverse events. Logical reasoning and good decision-making skills are key factors in reducing such errors, but little emphasis has traditionally been placed on how these thought processes occur, and how errors could be minimised. In this article, we explore key cognitive ideas that underpin clinical decision making and suggest that by employing some simple strategies, physicians might be better able to understand how they make decisions and how the process might be optimised. PMID:27481378

  4. Improving clinical decision support using data mining techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn-Thornton, Kath E.; Thorpe, Simon I.

    1999-02-01

    Physicians, in their ever-demanding jobs, are looking to decision support systems for aid in clinical diagnosis. However, clinical decision support systems need to be of sufficiently high accuracy that they help, rather than hinder, the physician in his/her diagnosis. Decision support systems with accuracies, of patient state determination, of greater than 80 percent, are generally perceived to be sufficiently accurate to fulfill the role of helping the physician. We have previously shown that data mining techniques have the potential to provide the underpinning technology for clinical decision support systems. In this paper, an extension of the work in reverence 2, we describe how changes in data mining methodologies, for the analysis of 12-lead ECG data, improve the accuracy by which data mining algorithms determine which patients are suffering from heart disease. We show that the accuracy of patient state prediction, for all the algorithms, which we investigated, can be increased by up to 6 percent, using the combination of appropriate test training ratios and 5-fold cross-validation. The use of cross-validation greater than 5-fold, appears to reduce the improvement in algorithm classification accuracy gained by the use of this validation method. The accuracy of 84 percent in patient state predictions, obtained using the algorithm OCI, suggests that this algorithm will be capable of providing the required accuracy for clinical decision support systems.

  5. Medical Device Data and Modeling for Clinical Decision Making

    CERN Document Server

    Zaleski, John R

    2010-01-01

    This cutting-edge volume is the first book that provides you with practical guidance on the use of medical device data for bioinformatics modeling purposes. You learn how to develop original methods for communicating with medical devices within healthcare enterprises and assisting with bedside clinical decision making. The book guides in the implementation and use of clinical decision support methods within the context of electronic health records in the hospital environment.This highly valuable reference also teaches budding biomedical engineers and bioinformaticists the practical benefits of

  6. Effects of Clinical Decision Topic on Patients' Involvement in and Satisfaction With Decisions and Their Subsequent Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freidl, Marion; Pesola, Francesca; Konrad, Jana;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical decision making is an important aspect of mental health care. Predictors of how patients experience decision making and whether decisions are implemented are underresearched. This study investigated the relationship between decision topic and involvement in the decision......, satisfaction with it, and its subsequent implementation from both staff and patient perspectives. METHODS: As part of the Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People With Severe Mental Illness study, patients (N=588) and their providers (N=213) were recruited from community-based mental...... health services in six European countries. Both completed bimonthly assessments for one year using the Clinical Decision Making in Routine Care Scale to assess the decision topic and implementation; both also completed the Clinical Decision Making Involvement and Satisfaction Scale. RESULTS: Three...

  7. Treatment decisions in advanced disease: A conceptual framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Broeckaert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This English translation, made by a professional translator in close cooperation with the author and kindly proofread by Dr. Phil Larkin, follows the original text as closely as possible. However, though we thought it was wise to maintain the official (but not unproblematic Dutch/Belgian definition of euthanasia in the original text (written for Belgian readers, the English texts offers a new and clearer definition of euthanasia. From the very beginning of the Belgian euthanasia debate in 1999, the Flemish Palliative Care Federation has chosen not to stay on the sideline, but to take an active part in the discussion and formulate recommendations based on our expertise and experience. Time and again we have pointed out that the ethical issues at the end of life are not just restricted to those of euthanasia. We have found that there is still much confusion about, for example, the difference or the boundary between pain control and euthanasia or between euthanasia and withholding life-sustaining treatment. Therefore, we thought it appropriate to put the following conceptual framework with regard to treatment decisions in advanced illness forward.

  8. Mobile clinical decision support systems and applications: a literature and commercial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The latest advances in eHealth and mHealth have propitiated the rapidly creation and expansion of mobile applications for health care. One of these types of applications are the clinical decision support systems, which nowadays are being implemented in mobile apps to facilitate the access to health care professionals in their daily clinical decisions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to make a review of the current systems available in the literature and in commercial stores. Secondly, to analyze a sample of applications in order to obtain some conclusions and recommendations. Two reviews have been done: a literature review on Scopus, IEEE Xplore, Web of Knowledge and PubMed and a commercial review on Google play and the App Store. Five applications from each review have been selected to develop an in-depth analysis and to obtain more information about the mobile clinical decision support systems. Ninety-two relevant papers and 192 commercial apps were found. Forty-four papers were focused only on mobile clinical decision support systems. One hundred seventy-one apps were available on Google play and 21 on the App Store. The apps are designed for general medicine and 37 different specialties, with some features common in all of them despite of the different medical fields objective. The number of mobile clinical decision support applications and their inclusion in clinical practices has risen in the last years. However, developers must be careful with their interface or the easiness of use, which can impoverish the experience of the users.

  9. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Torunn Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  10. DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING CLINICAL PRACTICES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREDICTING MEDICAL DECISIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHEN, JONATHAN H; GOLDSTEIN, MARY K; ASCH, STEVEN M; ALTMAN, RUSS B

    2015-01-01

    Automatically data-mining clinical practice patterns from electronic health records (EHR) can enable prediction of future practices as a form of clinical decision support (CDS). Our objective is to determine the stability of learned clinical practice patterns over time and what implication this has when using varying longitudinal historical data sources towards predicting future decisions. We trained an association rule engine for clinical orders (e.g., labs, imaging, medications) using structured inpatient data from a tertiary academic hospital. Comparing top order associations per admission diagnosis from training data in 2009 vs. 2012, we find practice variability from unstable diagnoses with rank biased overlap (RBO)0.6. Predicting admission orders for future (2013) patients with associations trained on recent (2012) vs. older (2009) data improved accuracy evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) 0.89 to 0.92, precision at ten (positive predictive value of the top ten predictions against actual orders) 30% to 37%, and weighted recall (sensitivity) at ten 2.4% to 13%, (P<10−10). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than only using recent (2012) data. Secular trends in practice patterns likely explain why smaller but more recent training data is more accurate at predicting future practices. PMID:26776186

  11. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  12. Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems in clinical disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, JRBJ

    1996-01-01

    Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems are important for clinical disease management. In this review the most important new systems which have reached clinical application are highlighted. Microbiologically controlled drug delivery is important for gastrointestinal diseases like ulcerative co

  13. Advances in fuzzy decision making theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Skalna, Iwona; Gaweł, Bartłomiej; Basiura, Beata; Duda, Jerzy; Opiła, Janusz; Pełech-Pilichowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    This book shows how common operation management methods and algorithms can be extended to deal with vague or imprecise information in decision-making problems. It describes how to combine decision trees, clustering, multi-attribute decision-making algorithms and Monte Carlo Simulation with the mathematical description of imprecise or vague information, and how to visualize such information. Moreover, it discusses a broad spectrum of real-life management problems including forecasting the apparent consumption of steel products, planning and scheduling of production processes, project portfolio selection and economic-risk estimation. It is a concise, yet comprehensive, reference source for researchers in decision-making and decision-makers in business organizations alike.

  14. Guideline Formalization and Knowledge Representation for Clinical Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago OLIVEIRA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} The prevalence of situations of medical error and defensive medicine in healthcare institutions is a great concern of the medical community. Clinical Practice Guidelines are regarded by most researchers as a way to mitigate theseoccurrences; however, there is a need to make them interactive, easier to update and to deploy. This paper provides a model for Computer-Interpretable Guidelines based on the generic tasks of the clinical process, devised to be included in the framework of a Clinical Decision Support System. Aiming to represent medical recommendations in a simple and intuitive way. Hence, this work proposes a knowledge representation formalism that uses an Extension to Logic Programming to handle incomplete information. This model is used to represent different cases of missing, conflicting and inexact information with the aid of a method to quantify its quality. The integration of the guideline model with the knowledge representation formalism yields a clinical decision model that relies on the development of multiple information scenarios and the exploration of different clinical hypotheses.

  15. Is it the time to rethink clinical decision-making strategies? From a single clinical outcome evaluation to a Clinical Multi-criteria Decision Assessment (CMDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Alberto; Integlia, Davide; Bizzi, Emanuele; Piaggio, Tomaso

    2015-10-01

    There are plenty of different clinical, organizational and economic parameters to consider in order having a complete assessment of the total impact of a pharmaceutical treatment. In the attempt to follow, a holistic approach aimed to provide an evaluation embracing all clinical parameters in order to choose the best treatments, it is necessary to compare and weight multiple criteria. Therefore, a change is required: we need to move from a decision-making context based on the assessment of one single criteria towards a transparent and systematic framework enabling decision makers to assess all relevant parameters simultaneously in order to choose the best treatment to use. In order to apply the MCDA methodology to clinical decision making the best pharmaceutical treatment (or medical devices) to use to treat a specific pathology, we suggest a specific application of the Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis for the purpose, like a Clinical Multi-criteria Decision Assessment CMDA. In CMDA, results from both meta-analysis and observational studies are used by a clinical consensus after attributing weights to specific domains and related parameters. The decision will result from a related comparison of all consequences (i.e., efficacy, safety, adherence, administration route) existing behind the choice to use a specific pharmacological treatment. The match will yield a score (in absolute value) that link each parameter with a specific intervention, and then a final score for each treatment. The higher is the final score; the most appropriate is the intervention to treat disease considering all criteria (domain an parameters). The results will allow the physician to evaluate the best clinical treatment for his patients considering at the same time all relevant criteria such as clinical effectiveness for all parameters and administration route. The use of CMDA model will yield a clear and complete indication of the best pharmaceutical treatment to use for patients

  16. Implications of caries diagnostic strategies for clinical management decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baelum, Vibeke; Hintze, Hanne; Wenzel, Ann;

    2012-01-01

    in a low-caries population. METHODS: Each of four examiners independently examined preselected contacting interproximal surfaces in 53 dental students aged 20-37 years using a visual-tactile examination and bitewing radiography. The visual-tactile examination distinguished between noncavitated......OBJECTIVES: In clinical practice, a visual-tactile caries examination is frequently supplemented by bitewing radiography. This study evaluated strategies for combining visual-tactile and radiographic caries detection methods and determined their implications for clinical management decisions......-specificity) were calculated for each diagnostic strategy. RESULTS: Visual-tactile examination provided a true-positive rate of 34.2% and a false-positive rate of 1.5% for the detection of a cavity. The combination of a visual-tactile and a radiographic examination using the lesion in dentin threshold...

  17. Clinical Decision Support Knowledge Management: Strategies for Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Alswailem, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems have been shown to increase quality of care, patient safety, improve adherence to guidelines for prevention and treatment, and avoid medication errors. Such systems depend mainly on two types of content; the clinical information related to patients and the medical knowledge related to the specialty that informs the system rules and alerts. At King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia, the Health Information Technology Affairs worked on identifying best strategies and recommendations for successful CDSS knowledge management. A review of literature was conducted to identify main areas of challenges and factors of success. A qualitative survey was used over six months' duration to collect opinions, experiences and suggestions from both IT and healthcare professionals. Recommendations were categorized into ten main topics that should be addressed during the development and implementation of CDSS knowledge management tools in the hospital. PMID:26152955

  18. Are patient decision aids the best way to improve clinical decision making? Report of the IPDAS Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Nelson, Wendy L; Pignone, Michael; Elwyn, Glyn; Rovner, David R; O'Connor, Annette M; Coulter, Angela; Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Symposium held in 2006 at the annual meeting of the Society for Medical Decision Making in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The symposium featured a debate regarding the proposition that "decision aids are the best way to improve clinical decision making.'' The formal debate addressed the theoretical problem of the appropriate gold standard for an improved decision, efficacy of decision aids, and prospects for implementation. Audience comments and questions focused on both theory and practice: the often unacknowledged roots of decision aids in expected utility theory and the practical problems of limited patient decision aid implementation in health care. The participants' vote on the proposition was approximately half for and half against. PMID:17873257

  19. Eco-informatics for decision makers advancing a research agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, J.B.; Wilson, T.; Brandt, L.; Gregg, V.; Spengler, S.; Borning, A.; Delcambre, L.; Bowker, G.; Frame, M.; Fulop, J.; Hert, C.; Hovy, E.; Jones, J.; Landis, E.; Schnase, J.L.; Schweik, C.; Sonntag, W.

    2005-01-01

    Resource managers often face significant information technology (IT) problems when integrating ecological or environmental information to make decisions. At a workshop sponsored by the NSF and USGS in December 2004, university researchers, natural resource managers, and information managers met to articulate IT problems facing ecology and environmental decision makers. Decision making IT problems were identified in five areas: 1) policy, 2) data presentation, 3) data gaps, 4) tools, and 5) indicators. To alleviate those problems, workshop participants recommended specific informatics research in modeling and simulation, data quality, information integration and ontologies, and social and human aspects. This paper reports the workshop findings, and briefly compares these with research that traditionally falls under the emerging eco-informatics rubric. ?? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005.

  20. Endodontic retreatment. Aspects of decision making and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, T

    2001-01-01

    regardless of assessment method. Compared with Standard gamble Visual Analogue Scale systematically produced lower ratings. U-values were found to change considerably in both the short and long-term. Any significant correlation between endodontists' U-values and retreatment prescriptions could not be demonstrated. Surgical and nonsurgical retreatment were randomly assigned to 95 "failed" root filled teeth in 92 patients. Cases were followed clinically and radiographically for four years postoperatively. At the 12-month recall a statistically significant higher healing rate was observed for teeth retreated surgically. At the final 48-month recall no systematic difference was detected. Patients were found to be more subject to postoperative discomfort when teeth were retreated surgically compared with nonsurgically. Consequently, surgical retreatment tended to be associated with higher indirect costs than a nonsurgically approach. In the final part of the thesis it is argued that retreatment decision making in everyday clinical practice normally should be based on simple principles. It is suggested that in order to achieve the best overall consequence a periapical lesion in a root filled tooth that is not expected to heal should be retreated. Arguments to withhold retreatment should be based on (i) respect for patient autonomy, (ii) retreatment risks or (iii) retreatment costs. PMID:11288682

  1. Clinical implementation of RNA signatures for pharmacogenomic decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Weihua Tang1, Zhiyuan Hu2, Hind Muallem1, Margaret L Gulley1,21Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 2Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, NC, USAAbstract: RNA profiling is increasingly used to predict drug response, dose, or toxicity based on analysis of drug pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways. Before implementing multiplexed RNA arrays in clinical practice, validation studies are carried out to demonstrate sufficient evidence of analytic and clinical performance, and to establish an assay protocol with quality assurance measures. Pathologists assure quality by selecting input tissue and by interpreting results in the context of the input tissue as well as the technologies that were used and the clinical setting in which the test was ordered. A strength of RNA profiling is the array-based measurement of tens to thousands of RNAs at once, including redundant tests for critical analytes or pathways to promote confidence in test results. Instrument and reagent manufacturers are crucial for supplying reliable components of the test system. Strategies for quality assurance include careful attention to RNA preservation and quality checks at pertinent steps in the assay protocol, beginning with specimen collection and proceeding through the various phases of transport, processing, storage, analysis, interpretation, and reporting. Specimen quality is checked by probing housekeeping transcripts, while spiked and exogenous controls serve as a check on analytic performance of the test system. Software is required to manipulate abundant array data and present it for interpretation by a laboratory physician who reports results in a manner facilitating therapeutic decision-making. Maintenance of the assay requires periodic documentation of personnel competency and laboratory proficiency. These strategies are shepherding genomic arrays into clinical settings to provide added

  2. Cervical spine degenerative diseases: An evaluation of clinical and imaging features in surgical decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soo, M.; Tran-Dinh, H.D.; Quach, T.; Downey, J.; Pohlmann, S. [Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW (Australia). Department of Radiology; Dorsch, N.W.C. [Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW (Australia). Department of Neurosurgery

    1997-11-01

    In clinically severe cervical spondylosis, imaging plays a vital role in surgical decisions. A prime factor is acquired canal stenosis with cord compression. To validate this concept, the clinical and imaging features of 20 patients with spondylitic myelopathy and 24 with radiculopathy were retrospectively reviewed. All had computed tomographic myelography (CTM) as part of their clinical work-up. The patients` clinical severity was graded as mild, moderate and severe; the age, length of illness and a history of eventual surgery or otherwise were recorded. At the level of maximum compression the following parameters were obtained from the axial CTM images: surface area and ratio of the anteroposterior to the transverse diameter of the cord; subarachnoid space and vertebral canal areas. Data were statistically analysed. A significant association exists between surgery and increasing severity of symptoms (P=0.04), and advancing age (P=0.01). These associations hold true for myelopathy and radiculopathy. A strong association is present between surgery and the surface area of the cord (P=0.01), being applicable to myelopathy only. The other parameters show no association with surgical decisions. It is concluded that with myelopathy a narrow cord area at the level of maximum compression, and moderate-severe functional impairment are indicators for surgical intervention. (authors). 22 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  3. Clinical decision support for perioperative information management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2013-12-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems are being used to optimize the increasingly complex care that our health care system delivers. These systems have become increasingly important in the delivery of perioperative care for patients undergoing cardiac, thoracic, and vascular procedures. The adoption of perioperative information management systems (PIMS) has allowed these technologies to enter the operating room and support the clinical work flow of anesthesiologists and operational processes. Constructing effective CDS systems necessitates an understanding of operative work flow and technical considerations as well as achieving integration with existing information systems. In this review, we describe published examples of CDS for PIMS, including support for cardiopulmonary bypass separation physiological alarms, β-blocker guideline adherence, enhanced revenue capture for arterial line placement, and detection of hemodynamic monitoring gaps. Although these and other areas are amenable to CDS systems, the challenges of latency and data reliability represent fundamental limitations on the potential application of these tools to specific types of clinical issues. Ultimately, we expect that CDS will remain an important tool in our efforts to optimize the quality of care delivered.

  4. Optimizing perioperative decision making: improved information for clinical workflow planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebbeling, Bradley N; Burton, Matthew M; Wiebke, Eric A; Miller, Spencer; Baxter, Laurence; Miller, Donald; Alvarez, Jorge; Pekny, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative care is complex and involves multiple interconnected subsystems. Delayed starts, prolonged cases and overtime are common. Surgical procedures account for 40-70% of hospital revenues and 30-40% of total costs. Most planning and scheduling in healthcare is done without modern planning tools, which have potential for improving access by assisting in operations planning support. We identified key planning scenarios of interest to perioperative leaders, in order to examine the feasibility of applying combinatorial optimization software solving some of those planning issues in the operative setting. Perioperative leaders desire a broad range of tools for planning and assessing alternate solutions. Our modeled solutions generated feasible solutions that varied as expected, based on resource and policy assumptions and found better utilization of scarce resources. Combinatorial optimization modeling can effectively evaluate alternatives to support key decisions for planning clinical workflow and improving care efficiency and satisfaction. PMID:23304284

  5. Details of a Successful Clinical Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlin, Jeff; Dexter, Paul R.; Overhage, J. Marc

    2007-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) with clinical decision support (CDS) is regarded as one of the most effective ways to improve the quality of health care and increase patient safety. As electronic medical records become more available, such systems will increasingly become the method of choice to achieve these goals. Creating a CPOE/CDS system is a complex task, and some fail despite time consuming and expensive development. The CPOE system at the Regenstrief Institute incorporates sophisticated CDS and is one of the oldest and most successful in the U.S. Many years in development, it is currently used by hundreds of providers. Our well established, successful system can serve as a template or model for the future development of similar systems. We recently completed a full analysis of our CPOE/CDS system and present details of its structure, functionality and contents. PMID:18693837

  6. Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings: Evidence, Challenges, and the Role of Clinical Decision Support Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Patkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidisciplinary team (MDT model in cancer care was introduced and endorsed to ensure that care delivery is consistent with the best available evidence. Over the last few years, regular MDT meetings have become a standard practice in oncology and gained the status of the key decision-making forum for patient management. Despite the fact that cancer MDT meetings are well accepted by clinicians, concerns are raised over the paucity of good-quality evidence on their overall impact. There are also concerns over lack of the appropriate support for this important but overburdened decision-making platform. The growing acceptance by clinical community of the health information technology in recent years has created new opportunities and possibilities of using advanced clinical decision support (CDS systems to realise full potential of cancer MDT meetings. In this paper, we present targeted summary of the available evidence on the impact of cancer MDT meetings, discuss the reported challenges, and explore the role that a CDS technology could play in addressing some of these challenges.

  7. Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings: Evidence, Challenges, and the Role of Clinical Decision Support Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) model in cancer care was introduced and endorsed to ensure that care delivery is consistent with the best available evidence. Over the last few years, regular MDT meetings have become a standard practice in oncology and gained the status of the key decision-making forum for patient management. Despite the fact that cancer MDT meetings are well accepted by clinicians, concerns are raised over the paucity of good-quality evidence on their overall impact. There are also concerns over lack of the appropriate support for this important but overburdened decision-making platform. The growing acceptance by clinical community of the health information technology in recent years has created new opportunities and possibilities of using advanced clinical decision support (CDS) systems to realise full potential of cancer MDT meetings. In this paper, we present targeted summary of the available evidence on the impact of cancer MDT meetings, discuss the reported challenges, and explore the role that a CDS technology could play in addressing some of these challenges

  8. Exploration Clinical Decision Support System: Medical Data Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Tony; Shetye, Sandeep; Shaw, Tianna (Editor)

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Clinical Decision Support (ECDS) System project is intended to enhance the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element for extended duration, deep-space mission planning in HRP. A major development guideline is the Risk of "Adverse Health Outcomes & Decrements in Performance due to Limitations of In-flight Medical Conditions". ECDS attempts to mitigate that Risk by providing crew-specific health information, actionable insight, crew guidance and advice based on computational algorithmic analysis. The availability of inflight health diagnostic computational methods has been identified as an essential capability for human exploration missions. Inflight electronic health data sources are often heterogeneous, and thus may be isolated or not examined as an aggregate whole. The ECDS System objective provides both a data architecture that collects and manages disparate health data, and an active knowledge system that analyzes health evidence to deliver case-specific advice. A single, cohesive space-ready decision support capability that considers all exploration clinical measurements is not commercially available at present. Hence, this Task is a newly coordinated development effort by which ECDS and its supporting data infrastructure will demonstrate the feasibility of intelligent data mining and predictive modeling as a biomedical diagnostic support mechanism on manned exploration missions. The initial step towards ground and flight demonstrations has been the research and development of both image and clinical text-based computer-aided patient diagnosis. Human anatomical images displaying abnormal/pathological features have been annotated using controlled terminology templates, marked-up, and then stored in compliance with the AIM standard. These images have been filtered and disease characterized based on machine learning of semantic and quantitative feature vectors. The next phase will evaluate disease treatment response via quantitative linear

  9. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Objective Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. Methods We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Results Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. Conclusion No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may

  10. Perspective: The Challenge of Clinical Decision-Making for Drug Treatment in Older People. The Role of Multidimensional Assessment and Prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pilotto, Alberto; Sancarlo, Daniele; Daragjati, Julia; Panza, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A complex decision path with a careful evaluation of the risk–benefit ratio is mandatory for drug treatment in advanced age. Enrollment biases in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) cause an under-representation of older individuals. In high-risk frail older subjects, the lack of RCTs makes clinical decision-making particularly difficult. Frail individuals are markedly susceptible to adverse drug reactions, and frailty may result in reduced treatment efficacy. Life expectancy should be included...

  11. Advanced Agriculture of lsrael Roots in its Decision Making Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei SHl; Liqiong LUO; Chen ZHAO; Yao LUO

    2015-01-01

    ln the past 70 years, lsrael has not only realized the self-sufficiency of agri-cultural products, but also make its way to becoming one of leading exporters of agri-cultural products in the world rapidly. Undoubtedly, there are many reasons for this world famous "Miracle of Negev Desert" [1], but we consider the decision making mechanism as one of the most important reasons, because such a perfect integrat-ed system consisting of researching system, experimental system and extension sys-tem is wel organized and it booms the development of agriculture in lsrael.

  12. Forms of Knowledge Incorporated in Clinical Decision-making among Newly-Graduated Nurses: A Metasynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri; Elgaard Sørensen, Erik; Grønkjær, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    Clinical-decision-making is of decisive importance to how evidence-based practice is put into practice. Schools of Nursing have a responsibility to teach and train nursing students to make clinical decisions within a frame of evidence-based practice. Clinical decision-making among nurses has been...... the knowledge that informs clinical decision-making among newly-graduated nurses. Qualitative studies were retrieved from CINAHL, PubMed, SCOPE, ERIC and GOOGLE-Scholar and subsequently selected by pre-defined inclusion criteria and critically appraised using CASP. Metaphors identified in the analytical process...... will contribute to theory development and have implications for clinical and educational practice regarding the professional development of clinical decision making within a frame of evidence-based practice. The presentation highlights the main findings from the metasynthesis and provides perspectives on future...

  13. The Effects of Advanced 'Glass Cockpit' Displayed Flight Instrumentation on In-flight Pilot Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigerwald, John

    The Cognitive Continuum Theory (CCT) was first proposed 25 years ago to explain the relationship between intuition and analytical decision making processes. In order for aircraft pilots to make these analytical and intuitive decisions, they obtain information from various instruments within the cockpit of the aircraft. Advanced instrumentation is used to provide a broad array of information about the aircraft condition and flight situation to aid the flight crew in making effective decisions. The problem addressed is that advanced instrumentation has not improved the pilot decision making in modern aircraft. Because making a decision is dependent upon the information available, this experimental quantitative study sought to determine how well pilots organize and interpret information obtained from various cockpit instrumentation displays when under time pressure. The population for this study was the students, flight instructors, and aviation faculty at the Middle Georgia State College School of Aviation campus in Eastman, Georgia. The sample was comprised of two groups of 90 individuals (45 in each group) in various stages of pilot licensure from student pilot to airline transport pilot (ATP). The ages ranged from 18 to 55 years old. There was a statistically significant relationship at the p < .05 level in the ability of the participants to organize and interpret information between the advanced glass cockpit instrumentation and the traditional cockpit instrumentation. It is recommended that the industry explore technological solutions toward creating cockpit instrumentation that could match the type of information display to the type of decision making scenario in order to aid pilots in making decisions that will result in better organization of information. Understanding the relationship between the intuitive and analytical decisions that pilots make and the information source they use to make those decisions will aid engineers in the design of instrumentation

  14. Electronic Nose Odor Classification with Advanced Decision Tree Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guney

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Electronic nose (e-nose is an electronic device which can measure chemical compounds in air and consequently classify different odors. In this paper, an e-nose device consisting of 8 different gas sensors was designed and constructed. Using this device, 104 different experiments involving 11 different odor classes (moth, angelica root, rose, mint, polis, lemon, rotten egg, egg, garlic, grass, and acetone were performed. The main contribution of this paper is the finding that using the chemical domain knowledge it is possible to train an accurate odor classification system. The domain knowledge about chemical compounds is represented by a decision tree whose nodes are composed of classifiers such as Support Vector Machines and k-Nearest Neighbor. The overall accuracy achieved with the proposed algorithm and the constructed e-nose device was 97.18 %. Training and testing data sets used in this paper are published online.

  15. Creating and sharing clinical decision support content with Web 2.0: Issues and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Bates, David W; Middleton, Blackford; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Kashyap, Vipul; Thomas, Sean M; Sittig, Dean F

    2009-04-01

    Clinical decision support is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. However, developing a comprehensive package of decision support interventions is costly and difficult. If used well, Web 2.0 methods may make it easier and less costly to develop decision support. Web 2.0 is characterized by online communities, open sharing, interactivity and collaboration. Although most previous attempts at sharing clinical decision support content have worked outside of the Web 2.0 framework, several initiatives are beginning to use Web 2.0 to share and collaborate on decision support content. We present case studies of three efforts: the Clinfowiki, a world-accessible wiki for developing decision support content; Partners Healthcare eRooms, web-based tools for developing decision support within a single organization; and Epic Systems Corporation's Community Library, a repository for sharing decision support content for customers of a single clinical system vendor. We evaluate the potential of Web 2.0 technologies to enable collaborative development and sharing of clinical decision support systems through the lens of three case studies; analyzing technical, legal and organizational issues for developers, consumers and organizers of clinical decision support content in Web 2.0. We believe the case for Web 2.0 as a tool for collaborating on clinical decision support content appears strong, particularly for collaborative content development within an organization.

  16. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  17. AGU governance's decision-making process advances strategic plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael; Finn, Carol; McEntee, Chris

    2012-10-01

    A lot has happened in a little more than 2 years, and we want give AGU members an update on how things are working under AGU's strategic plan and governance model. AGU is an organization committed to its strategic plan (http://www.agu.org/about/strategic_plan.shtml), and if you have not read the plan lately, we encourage you to do so. AGU's vision is to be an organization that "galvanizes a community of Earth and space scientists that collaboratively advances and communicates science and its power to ensure a sustainable future." We are excited about the progress we have made under this plan and the future course we have set for the Union. Everything the Board of Directors, Council, and committees put on their agendas is intended to advance AGU's strategic goals and objectives. Together with headquarters staff, these bodies are working in an integrated, effective manner to carry out this plan. The best way to demonstrate the progress made and each group's role is to walk through a recent example: the creation of a new Union-level award (see Figure 1).

  18. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C M

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 (th) century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 (st) century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  19. Basic principles and clinical advancements of muscle electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille

    2010-01-01

    clinical potential within DNA vaccination, systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and correction of gene defects in muscles. In the recent years, DNA electrotransfer to muscle tissue has reached clinical advancement with 8 on-going clinical trials. In the present review, I will draw on the experiences...... obtained from the clinical studies, in understanding the mechanistic and practical advantages and limits of muscle electrotransfer. The effect of applying electric pulses to muscle tissue will be described in details, while present and future clinical applications are reviewed....

  20. Recent advances in dengue pathogenesis and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Cameron P; McPherson, Kirsty; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Hoai Tam, D T; Young, Paul; Mackenzie, Jason; Wills, Bridget

    2015-12-10

    This review describes and commentates on recent advances in the understanding of dengue pathogenesis and immunity, plus clinical research on vaccines and therapeutics. We expand specifically on the role of the dermis in dengue virus infection, the contribution of cellular and humoral immune responses to pathogenesis and immunity, NS1 and mechanisms of virus immune evasion. Additionally we review a series of therapeutic intervention trials for dengue, as well as recent clinical research aimed at improving clinical diagnosis, risk prediction and disease classification.

  1. Privacy-Preserving Patient-Centric Clinical Decision Support System on Naïve Bayesian Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ximeng; Lu, Rongxing; Ma, Jianfeng; Chen, Le; Qin, Baodong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical decision support system, which uses advanced data mining techniques to help clinician make proper decisions, has received considerable attention recently. The advantages of clinical decision support system include not only improving diagnosis accuracy but also reducing diagnosis time. Specifically, with large amounts of clinical data generated everyday, naïve Bayesian classification can be utilized to excavate valuable information to improve a clinical decision support system. Although the clinical decision support system is quite promising, the flourish of the system still faces many challenges including information security and privacy concerns. In this paper, we propose a new privacy-preserving patient-centric clinical decision support system, which helps clinician complementary to diagnose the risk of patients' disease in a privacy-preserving way. In the proposed system, the past patients' historical data are stored in cloud and can be used to train the naïve Bayesian classifier without leaking any individual patient medical data, and then the trained classifier can be applied to compute the disease risk for new coming patients and also allow these patients to retrieve the top- k disease names according to their own preferences. Specifically, to protect the privacy of past patients' historical data, a new cryptographic tool called additive homomorphic proxy aggregation scheme is designed. Moreover, to leverage the leakage of naïve Bayesian classifier, we introduce a privacy-preserving top- k disease names retrieval protocol in our system. Detailed privacy analysis ensures that patient's information is private and will not be leaked out during the disease diagnosis phase. In addition, performance evaluation via extensive simulations also demonstrates that our system can efficiently calculate patient's disease risk with high accuracy in a privacy-preserving way. PMID:26960216

  2. Advancing cell wall inhibitors towards clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffioli, Sonia I; Cruz, João C S; Monciardini, Paolo; Sosio, Margherita; Donadio, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Natural products represent a major source of approved drugs and still play an important role in supplying chemical diversity. Consistently, 2014 has seen new, natural product-derived antibiotics approved for human use by the US Food and Drug Administration. One of the recently approved second-generation glycopeptides is dalbavancin, a semi-synthetic derivative of the natural product A40,926. This compound inhibits bacterial growth by binding to lipid intermediate II (Lipid II), a key intermediate in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Like other recently approved antibiotics, dalbavancin has a complex history of preclinical and clinical development, with several companies contributing to different steps in different years. While our work on dalbavancin development stopped at the previous company, intriguingly our current pipeline includes two more Lipid II-binding natural products or derivatives thereof. In particular, we will focus on the properties of NAI-107 and related lantibiotics, which originated from recent screening and characterization efforts. PMID:26515981

  3. Using evidence-based algorithms to improve clinical decision making: the case of a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federer, Andrew E; Taylor, Dean C; Mather, Richard C

    2013-09-01

    Decision making in health care has evolved substantially over the last century. Up until the late 1970s, medical decision making was predominantly intuitive and anecdotal. It was based on trial and error and involved high levels of problem solving. The 1980s gave way to empirical medicine, which was evidence based probabilistic, and involved pattern recognition and less problem solving. Although this represented a major advance in the quality of medical decision making, limitations existed. The advantages of the gold standard of the randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) are well-known and this technique is irreplaceable in its ability to answer critical clinical questions. However, the RCT does have drawbacks. RCTs are expensive and can only capture a snapshot in time. As treatments change and new technologies emerge, new expensive clinical trials must be undertaken to reevaluate them. Furthermore, in order to best evaluate a single intervention, other factors must be controlled. In addition, the study population may not match that of another organization or provider. Although evidence-based medicine has provided powerful data for clinicians, effectively and efficiently tailoring it to the individual has not yet evolved. We are now in a period of transition from this evidence-based era to one dominated by the personalization and customization of care. It will be fueled by policy decisions to shift financial responsibility to the patient, creating a powerful and sophisticated consumer, unlike any patient we have known before. The challenge will be to apply medical evidence and personal preferences to medical decisions and deliver it efficiently in the increasingly busy clinical setting. In this article, we provide a robust review of the concepts of customized care and some of techniques to deliver it. We will illustrate this through a personalized decision model for the treatment decision after a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation. PMID:23924748

  4. Pregnancy outcomes in Ghana : Relavance of clinical decision making support tools for frontline providers of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amoakoh-Coleman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghana’s slow progress towards attaining millennium development goal 5 has been associated with gaps in quality of care, particularly quality of clinical decision making for clients. This thesis reviews the relevance and effect of clinical decision making support tools on pregnancy outcomes. Relevanc

  5. Construction of databases: advances and significance in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Erping; Huang, Bingjie; Wang, Liming; Lin, Xiaoyu; Lin, Haotian

    2015-12-01

    Widely used in clinical research, the database is a new type of data management automation technology and the most efficient tool for data management. In this article, we first explain some basic concepts, such as the definition, classification, and establishment of databases. Afterward, the workflow for establishing databases, inputting data, verifying data, and managing databases is presented. Meanwhile, by discussing the application of databases in clinical research, we illuminate the important role of databases in clinical research practice. Lastly, we introduce the reanalysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cloud computing techniques, showing the most recent advancements of databases in clinical research. PMID:27215009

  6. SANDS: a service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. The SANDS architecture for decision support has several significant advantages over other architectures for clinical decision support. The most salient of these are: PMID:18434256

  7. End-of-Life Decisions and Palliative Care in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Deborah E; Goodlin, Sarah J

    2016-09-01

    Advanced heart failure (HF) therapies are focused on extending life and improving function. In contrast, palliative care is a holistic approach that focuses on symptom alleviation and patients' physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. HF clinicians can integrate palliative care strategies by incorporating several important components of planning and decision-making for HF patients. Future care planning (FCP) for HF patients should incorporate the basic tenets of shared decision-making (SDM). These include understanding the patient's perspective and care preferences, articulating what is medically feasible, and integrating these considerations into the overall care plan. Use of defined triggers for FCP can stimulate important patient-caregiver conversations. Guidelines advocate an annual review of HF status and future care preferences. Advance directives are important for any individual with a chronic, life-limiting illness and should be integrated into FCP. Nevertheless, use of advance directives by HF patients is extremely low. Consideration of illness trajectories and risk-scoring tools might facilitate prognostication and delivery of appropriate HF care. Decisions about heart transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation should include planning for potential complications associated with these therapies. Such decisions also should include a discussion of palliative management, as an alternative to intervention and also as an option for managing symptoms or adverse events after intervention. Palliative care, including FCP and SDM, should be integrated into the course of all patients with advanced HF. Clinicians who provide HF care should acquire the skills necessary for conducting FCP and SDM discussions.

  8. End-of-Life Decisions and Palliative Care in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Deborah E; Goodlin, Sarah J

    2016-09-01

    Advanced heart failure (HF) therapies are focused on extending life and improving function. In contrast, palliative care is a holistic approach that focuses on symptom alleviation and patients' physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. HF clinicians can integrate palliative care strategies by incorporating several important components of planning and decision-making for HF patients. Future care planning (FCP) for HF patients should incorporate the basic tenets of shared decision-making (SDM). These include understanding the patient's perspective and care preferences, articulating what is medically feasible, and integrating these considerations into the overall care plan. Use of defined triggers for FCP can stimulate important patient-caregiver conversations. Guidelines advocate an annual review of HF status and future care preferences. Advance directives are important for any individual with a chronic, life-limiting illness and should be integrated into FCP. Nevertheless, use of advance directives by HF patients is extremely low. Consideration of illness trajectories and risk-scoring tools might facilitate prognostication and delivery of appropriate HF care. Decisions about heart transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation should include planning for potential complications associated with these therapies. Such decisions also should include a discussion of palliative management, as an alternative to intervention and also as an option for managing symptoms or adverse events after intervention. Palliative care, including FCP and SDM, should be integrated into the course of all patients with advanced HF. Clinicians who provide HF care should acquire the skills necessary for conducting FCP and SDM discussions. PMID:27568873

  9. Towards Informed Maintenance Decision Making: Guiding the Application of Advanced Maintenance Analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiddens, W.W.; Braaksma, A.J.J.; Tinga, T.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced maintenance techniques (AMTs) are practices that can help practitioners to make better-informed maintenance decisions, such as ensuring just-in-time maintenance, corporate business planning or lifetime extension of physical assets. These techniques take the current, but preferably also the

  10. The Use of Computers for Clinical Care: A Case Series of Advanced U.S. Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolan, David F.; Bates, David W.; James, Brent C.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe advanced clinical information systems in the context in which they have been implemented and are being used. Design: Case series of five U.S. hospitals, including inpatient, ambulatory and emergency units. Descriptive study with data collected from interviews, observations, and document analysis. Measurements: The use of computerized results, notes, orders, and event monitors and the type of decision support; data capture mechanisms and data form; impact on clinician satisfaction and clinical processes and outcomes; and the organizational factors associated with successful implementation. Results: All sites have implemented a wide range of clinical information systems with extensive decision support. The systems had been well accepted by clinicians and have improved clinical processes. Successful implementation required leadership and long-term commitment, a focus on improving clinical processes, and gaining clinician involvement and maintaining productivity. Conclusion: Despite differences in approach there are many similarities between sites in the clinical information systems in use and the factors important to successful implementation. The experience of these sites may provide a valuable guide for others who are yet to start, or are just beginning, the implementation of clinical information systems. PMID:12509360

  11. Accurate Prediction of Advanced Liver Fibrosis Using the Decision Tree Learning Algorithm in Chronic Hepatitis C Egyptian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaya Hashem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Respectively with the prevalence of chronic hepatitis C in the world, using noninvasive methods as an alternative method in staging chronic liver diseases for avoiding the drawbacks of biopsy is significantly increasing. The aim of this study is to combine the serum biomarkers and clinical information to develop a classification model that can predict advanced liver fibrosis. Methods. 39,567 patients with chronic hepatitis C were included and randomly divided into two separate sets. Liver fibrosis was assessed via METAVIR score; patients were categorized as mild to moderate (F0–F2 or advanced (F3-F4 fibrosis stages. Two models were developed using alternating decision tree algorithm. Model 1 uses six parameters, while model 2 uses four, which are similar to FIB-4 features except alpha-fetoprotein instead of alanine aminotransferase. Sensitivity and receiver operating characteristic curve were performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed models. Results. The best model achieved 86.2% negative predictive value and 0.78 ROC with 84.8% accuracy which is better than FIB-4. Conclusions. The risk of advanced liver fibrosis, due to chronic hepatitis C, could be predicted with high accuracy using decision tree learning algorithm that could be used to reduce the need to assess the liver biopsy.

  12. Bayesian Decision Theory and its Applications in Early Phase Clinical Trails

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ying-hui

    2004-01-01

    Bayes'theorem is named after the Reverend Thomas Bayes who proposed the idea in the 18th century[1].It has been adapted by scientists for many different applications.One of the applications is clinical trials,where decisions are guided by clinical expertise as well as by data,especially in early phases.This paper reviews Bayes' theorem,decision theory and their applications in clinical trials.

  13. Introducing Advanced Clinical Reasoning to an Adult Learning Disability Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Jois; Matthews, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The advanced clinical reasoning approach is widely adopted in speech and language therapy practice. This article reports on the introduction of the approach across a multidisciplinary adult learning disability service and staff reports on the impact of this initiative. Staff and team managers reported that the training had a positive impact on…

  14. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberg Ryan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. Results We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language process definition language (XPDL. The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent. We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. Conclusions We

  15. Fuzzy Logic in Clinical Practice Decision Support Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, Jim; Beliakov, Gleb; Zwaag, van der Berend

    2000-01-01

    Computerized clinical guidelines can provide significant benefits to health outcomes and costs, however, their effective implementation presents significant problems. Vagueness and ambiguity inherent in natural (textual) clinical guidelines is not readily amenable to formulating automated alerts or

  16. Integrating first-line treatment options into clinical practice: what's new in advanced melanoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummer, Reinhard; Schadendorf, Dirk; Ascierto, Paolo A; Larkin, James; Lebbé, Celeste; Hauschild, Axel

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma remains a serious form of skin cancer in Europe and worldwide. Localized, early-stage melanomas can usually be treated with surgical excision. However, the prognosis is poorer for patients with advanced disease. Before 2011, treatment for advanced melanoma included palliative surgery and/or radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with or without immunotherapy, such as interleukin-2. As none of these treatments had shown survival benefits in patients with advanced melanoma, European guidelines had recommended that patients be entered into clinical trials. The lack of approved first-line options and varying access to clinical trials meant that European clinicians relied on experimental regimens and chemotherapy-based treatments when no other options were available. Since 2011, ipilimumab, an immuno-oncology therapy, and vemurafenib and dabrafenib, targeted agents that inhibit mutant BRAF, have been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of advanced melanoma. More recently, the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, received European marketing authorization for use in patients with BRAF mutation-positive advanced melanoma. In 2014, the anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab was approved as a first-line therapy in Japan. Whereas nivolumab and another anti-PD-1 antibody, pembrolizumab, were approved as second-line therapies in the USA, their recent approval in Europe are for first-line use based on new clinical trial data in this setting. Together these agents are changing clinical practice and making therapeutic decisions more complex. Here, we discuss current and emerging therapeutic options for the first-line treatment of advanced melanoma, and how these therapies can be optimized to provide the best possible outcomes for patients. PMID:26426764

  17. Risk perception and clinical decision making in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte Marie Lind

    2015-01-01

    doubt. Results from a mixed methods study on doctors’ and midwives’ experiences with traumatic births and how it impacts their personal and professional life. 5. Adrian Edwards, MD, Professor, General Practice, Cardiff University, Wales, UK: Implementing shared decision making Results from a qualitative...

  18. Mental Workload as a Key Factor in Clinical Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    The decision making process is central to the practice of a clinician and has traditionally been described in terms of the hypothetico-deductive model. More recently, models adapted from cognitive psychology, such as the dual process and script theories have proved useful in explaining patterns of practice not consistent with purely cognitive…

  19. USE OF DATA MINING TECHNIQUES IN ADVANCE DECISION MAKING PROCESSES IN A LOCAL FIRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Doğan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In today’s competitive world, organizations need to make the right decisions to prolong their existence. Using non-scientific methods and making emotional decisions gave way to the use of scientific methods in the decision making process in this competitive area. Within this scope, many decision support models are still being developed in order to assist the decision makers and owners of organizations. It is easy to collect massive amount of data for organizations, but generally the problem is using this data to achieve economic advances. There is a critical need for specialization and automation to transform the data into the knowledge in big data sets. Data mining techniques are capable of providing description, estimation, prediction, classification, clustering, and association. Recently, many data mining techniques have been developed in order to find hidden patterns and relations in big data sets. It is important to obtain new correlations, patterns, and trends, which are understandable and useful to the decision makers. There have been many researches and applications focusing on different data mining techniques and methodologies.In this study, we aim to obtain understandable and applicable results from a large volume of record set that belong to a firm, which is active in the meat processing industry, by using data mining techniques. In the application part, firstly, data cleaning and data integration, which are the first steps of data mining process, are performed on the data in the database. With the aid of data cleaning and data integration, the data set was obtained, which is suitable for data mining. Then, various association rule algorithms were applied to this data set. This analysis revealed that finding unexplored patterns in the set of data would be beneficial for the decision makers of the firm. Finally, many association rules are obtained, which are useful for decision makers of the local firm. 

  20. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  1. Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Trine Ammentorp; Birkelund, Regner; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Title: Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology. Authors: Ph.d. student, Trine A. Gregersen. Trine.gregersen@rsyd.dk. Department of Oncology. Health Services Research Unit Lillebaelt Hospital / IRS University of Southern Denmark. Professor, Regner......’, relatives’ and healthcare providers’ experiences with regard to the decision about participating in a clinical trial. Method It is a qualitative study including 20 breast cancer patients, there relatives and healthcare providers. Data will be collected from: 1) Observation of conferences where patient...... are involved in difficult treatment decisions including participation in clinical trials. The literature indicates that the decision is very often based on little knowledge about the treatment and that many patients who have consented to participate in a clinical trial are not always aware...

  2. Do clinical prediction models improve concordance of treatment decisions in reproductive medicine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. van der Steeg; P. Steures; M.J.C. Eijkemans; J.D.F. Habbema; P.M.M. Bossuyt; P.G.A. Hompes; F. van der Veen; B.W.J. Mol

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the use of clinical prediction models improves concordance between gynaecologists with respect to treatment decisions in reproductive medicine. Design We constructed 16 vignettes of subfertile couples by varying fertility history, postcoital test, sperm motility, follicle

  3. [Locator or ball attachment: a guide for clinical decision making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttel, Adrian E; Bühler, Nico M; Marinello, Carlo P

    2009-01-01

    Various attachments are available to retain overdentures on natural roots or implants. Technical aspects, the clinical handling, the capability to adapt or repair and the costs are parameters to be considered when choosing the appropriate attachment. Ball attachments and bars are clinically established and well documented. Ball attachments as prefabricated, unsplinted units are easily replaceable and show hygienic advantages, while bars show favorable stability. The Locator is a newer, popular clinical alternative to these established attachments. The ball attachment and the Locator are compared from a technical and clinical point of view. PMID:19852208

  4. [Locator or ball attachment: a guide for clinical decision making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttel, Adrian E; Bühler, Nico M; Marinello, Carlo P

    2009-01-01

    Various attachments are available to retain overdentures on natural roots or implants. Technical aspects, the clinical handling, the capability to adapt or repair and the costs are parameters to be considered when choosing the appropriate attachment. Ball attachments and bars are clinically established and well documented. Ball attachments as prefabricated, unsplinted units are easily replaceable and show hygienic advantages, while bars show favorable stability. The Locator is a newer, popular clinical alternative to these established attachments. The ball attachment and the Locator are compared from a technical and clinical point of view.

  5. Clinical Decision Analysis and Markov Modeling for Surgeons: An Introductory Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogendoorn, Wouter; Moll, Frans L; Sumpio, Bauer E; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2016-08-01

    This study addresses the use of decision analysis and Markov models to make contemplated decisions for surgical problems. Decision analysis and decision modeling in surgical research are increasing, but many surgeons are unfamiliar with the techniques and are skeptical of the results. The goal of this review is to familiarize surgeons with techniques and terminology used in decision analytic papers, to provide the reader a practical guide to read these papers, and to ensure that surgeons can critically appraise the quality of published clinical decision models and draw well founded conclusions from such reports.First, a brief explanation of decision analysis and Markov models is presented in simple steps, followed by an overview of the components of a decision and Markov model. Subsequently, commonly used terms and definitions are described and explained, including quality-adjusted life-years, disability-adjusted life-years, discounting, half-cycle correction, cycle length, probabilistic sensitivity analysis, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, and the willingness-to-pay threshold.Finally, the advantages and limitations of research with Markov models are described, and new modeling techniques and future perspectives are discussed. It is important that surgeons are able to understand conclusions from decision analytic studies and are familiar with the specific definitions of the terminology used in the field to keep up with surgical research. Decision analysis can guide treatment strategies when complex clinical questions need to be answered and is a necessary and useful addition to the surgical research armamentarium. PMID:26756750

  6. MACVIA Clinical Decision Algorithm in Allergic Rhinitis in adolescents and adults

    OpenAIRE

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, Holger J.; Hellings, Peter W.; Arnavielhe, Sylvie; Bachert, Claus; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brozek, Jan; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, G. Walter; Casale, Thomas B.; Chavannes, Niels H; Cox, Linda; Chrystyn, Henry

    2016-01-01

    International audience The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis depends on several factors, including age, prominent symptoms, symptom severity, control of allergic rhinitis, patient preferences and cost. Allergen exposure and resulting symptoms vary and treatment adjustment is required. Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) may be beneficial for the assessment of disease control. Clinical decision support systems should be based on the best evidence and algo...

  7. A patient with a large pulmonary saddle embolus eluding both clinical gestalt and validated decision rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Adam; Setyono, Devy A; Lau, Wayne Bond; Fields, Jason Matthew

    2012-06-01

    We report a patient with chest pain who was classified as having low risk for pulmonary embolism with clinical gestalt and accepted clinical decision rules. An inadvertently ordered D-dimer and abnormal result, however, led to the identification of a large saddle embolus. This case illustrates the fallibility of even well-validated decision aids and that an embolism missed by these tools is not necessarily low risk or indicative of a low clot burden.

  8. Clinical decision support must be useful, functional is not enough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortteisto, Tiina; Komulainen, Jorma; Mäkelä, Marjukka;

    2012-01-01

    's intention to use eCDS. The decisive reason for using or not using the eCDS is its perceived usefulness. Functional characteristics such as speed and ease of use are important but alone these are not enough. Specific information technology, professional, patient and environment features can help or hinder...... the use. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care professionals have to perceive eCDS guidance useful for their work before they use it....

  9. Technological advances in perioperative monitoring: Current concepts and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilkoti, Geetanjali; Wadhwa, Rachna; Saxena, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Minimal mandatory monitoring in the perioperative period recommended by Association of Anesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and American Society of Anesthesiologists are universally acknowledged and has become an integral part of the anesthesia practice. The technologies in perioperative monitoring have advanced, and the availability and clinical applications have multiplied exponentially. Newer monitoring techniques include depth of anesthesia monitoring, goal-directed fluid therapy, transesophageal echocardiography, advanced neurological monitoring, improved alarm system and technological advancement in objective pain assessment. Various factors that need to be considered with the use of improved monitoring techniques are their validation data, patient outcome, safety profile, cost-effectiveness, awareness of the possible adverse events, knowledge of technical principle and ability of the convenient routine handling. In this review, we will discuss the new monitoring techniques in anesthesia, their advantages, deficiencies, limitations, their comparison to the conventional methods and their effect on patient outcome, if any.

  10. From Value Assessment to Value Cocreation: Informing Clinical Decision-Making with Medical Claims Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven; Varvel, Stephen; Sasinowski, Maciek; Burke, James P

    2016-09-01

    Big data and advances in analytical processes represent an opportunity for the healthcare industry to make better evidence-based decisions on the value generated by various tests, procedures, and interventions. Value-based reimbursement is the process of identifying and compensating healthcare providers based on whether their services improve quality of care without increasing cost of care or maintain quality of care while decreasing costs. In this article, we motivate and illustrate the potential opportunities for payers and providers to collaborate and evaluate the clinical and economic efficacy of different healthcare services. We conduct a case study of a firm that offers advanced biomarker and disease state management services for cardiovascular and cardiometabolic conditions. A value-based analysis that comprised a retrospective case/control cohort design was conducted, and claims data for over 7000 subjects who received these services were compared to a matched control cohort. Study subjects were commercial and Medicare Advantage enrollees with evidence of CHD, diabetes, or a related condition. Analysis of medical claims data showed a lower proportion of patients who received biomarker testing and disease state management services experienced a MI (p < 0.01) or diabetic complications (p < 0.001). No significant increase in cost of care was found between the two cohorts. Our results illustrate the opportunity healthcare payers such as Medicare and commercial insurance companies have in terms of identifying value-creating healthcare interventions. However, payers and providers also need to pursue system integration efforts to further automate the identification and dissemination of clinically and economically efficacious treatment plans to ensure at-risk patients receive the treatments and interventions that will benefit them the most. PMID:27642718

  11. Introducing Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine (ABCmed)

    OpenAIRE

    Samad EJ Golzari; Kamyar Ghabili

    2013-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of the Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine (ABCmed), aninternational open-access, and peer-reviewed journal. Mostly intended to cover all areas of bioscience and medicine, theJournal would provide a unique venue for the scientists from all over the world to publish their scientific works. One ofthe advantages of publishing with us is the rapid yet rigorous review process which is mostly performed by ourdistinguished Editorial and Review Board mem...

  12. Development of a nomogram incorporating serum C-reactive protein level to predict overall survival of patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma and its evaluation by decision curve analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ishioka, J.; Saito, K.; Sakura, M; Yokoyama, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Numao, N; Koga, F; Masuda, H.; Fujii, Y.; S. Kawakami; Kihara, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to investigate the prognostic impact of C-reactive protein (CRP) on patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma and to develop a novel nomogram predicting survival. Methods: A total of 223 consecutive patients were treated at Tokyo Medical and Dental Hospital. A nomogram incorporating V was developed based on the result of a Cox proportional hazards model. Its efficacy and clinical usefulness was evaluated by concordance index (c-index) and decision cu...

  13. Engineering of a Clinical Decision Support Framework for the Point of Care Use

    OpenAIRE

    Wilk, Szymon; Michalowski, Wojtek; O’Sullivan, Dympna; Farion, Ken; Matwin, Stan

    2008-01-01

    Computerized decision support for use at the point of care has to be comprehensive. It means that clinical information stored in electronic health records needs to be integrated with various forms of clinical knowledge (elicited from experts, discovered from data or summarized in systematic reviews of clinical trials). In order to provide such comprehensive support we created the MET-A3Support framework for constructing clinical applications aimed at various medical conditions. We employed th...

  14. Evaluation of a novel electronic genetic screening and clinical decision support tool in prenatal clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Emily A; Lin, Bruce K; Doksum, Teresa; Drohan, Brian; Edelson, Vaughn; Dolan, Siobhan M; Hughes, Kevin; O'Leary, James; Vasquez, Lisa; Copeland, Sara; Galvin, Shelley L; DeGroat, Nicole; Pardanani, Setul; Gregory Feero, W; Adams, Claire; Jones, Renee; Scott, Joan

    2014-07-01

    "The Pregnancy and Health Profile" (PHP) is a free prenatal genetic screening and clinical decision support (CDS) software tool for prenatal providers. PHP collects family health history (FHH) during intake and provides point-of-care risk assessment for providers and education for patients. This pilot study evaluated patient and provider responses to PHP and effects of using PHP in practice. PHP was implemented in four clinics. Surveys assessed provider confidence and knowledge and patient and provider satisfaction with PHP. Data on the implementation process were obtained through semi-structured interviews with administrators. Quantitative survey data were analyzed using Chi square test, Fisher's exact test, paired t tests, and multivariate logistic regression. Open-ended survey questions and interviews were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Of the 83% (513/618) of patients that provided feedback, 97% felt PHP was easy to use and 98% easy to understand. Thirty percent (21/71) of participating physicians completed both pre- and post-implementation feedback surveys [13 obstetricians (OBs) and 8 family medicine physicians (FPs)]. Confidence in managing genetic risks significantly improved for OBs on 2/6 measures (p values ≤0.001) but not for FPs. Physician knowledge did not significantly change. Providers reported value in added patient engagement and reported mixed feedback about the CDS report. We identified key steps, resources, and staff support required to implement PHP in a clinical setting. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report on the integration of patient-completed, electronically captured and CDS-enabled FHH software into primary prenatal practice. PHP is acceptable to patients and providers. Key to successful implementation in the future will be customization options and interoperability with electronic health records.

  15. Classifying clinical decision making: interpreting nursing intuition, heuristics and medical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, C D; Adams, A

    2000-10-01

    This is the second of two linked papers exploring decision making in nursing. The first paper, 'Classifying clinical decision making: a unifying approach' investigated difficulties with applying a range of decision-making theories to nursing practice. This is due to the diversity of terminology and theoretical concepts used, which militate against nurses being able to compare the outcomes of decisions analysed within different frameworks. It is therefore problematic for nurses to assess how good their decisions are, and where improvements can be made. However, despite the range of nomenclature, it was argued that there are underlying similarities between all theories of decision processes and that these should be exposed through integration within a single explanatory framework. A proposed solution was to use a general model of psychological classification to clarify and compare terms, concepts and processes identified across the different theories. The unifying framework of classification was described and this paper operationalizes it to demonstrate how different approaches to clinical decision making can be re-interpreted as classification behaviour. Particular attention is focused on classification in nursing, and on re-evaluating heuristic reasoning, which has been particularly prone to theoretical and terminological confusion. Demonstrating similarities in how different disciplines make decisions should promote improved multidisciplinary collaboration and a weakening of clinical elitism, thereby enhancing organizational effectiveness in health care and nurses' professional status. This is particularly important as nurses' roles continue to expand to embrace elements of managerial, medical and therapeutic work. Analysing nurses' decisions as classification behaviour will also enhance clinical effectiveness, and assist in making nurses' expertise more visible. In addition, the classification framework explodes the myth that intuition, traditionally associated

  16. Mentoring for retention and advancement in the multigenerational clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudicina, R J

    2001-01-01

    Retention of recent graduates and other laboratory practitioners in the workplace will play a key role in addressing current and projected shortages of clinical laboratory scientists (CLS) and technicians (CLT). In addition, with overrepresentation of the aging Baby Boomer generation in laboratory supervisory and management positions, it is crucial not only to retain younger practitioners, but to prepare them for assuming these important functions in the future. Mentoring, a practice commonly employed in other professions, is widely considered to be useful in employee retention and career advancement. Mentoring has probably been used in the clinical laboratory profession, but has not been well documented. In the clinical laboratory environment, potential mentors are in the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations, and new practitioners who could benefit from mentoring are in Generation X. Generational differences among these groups may present challenges to the use of mentoring. This article will attempt to provide a better understanding of generational differences and show how mentoring can be applied in the setting of the clinical laboratory in order to increase retention and promote career advancement of younger practitioners. A panel of five laboratory managers provided examples of mentoring strategies. Definitions, benefits, and examples of mentoring are addressed in the accompanying article, "Passing the Torch: Mentoring the Next Generation of Laboratory Professionals". PMID:15633495

  17. Clinical Trial Results Vary Widely, But Always Advance Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Clinical Trial Results Vary Widely, But Always Advance Research Past ... very emotional." Should You Be Interested in a Clinical Trial People volunteer to take part in clinical trials ...

  18. Coronary Stents: The Impact of Technological Advances on Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennuni, Marco G; Pagnotta, Paolo A; Stefanini, Giulio G

    2016-02-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were proposed in the late 1970s as an alternative to surgical coronary artery bypass grafting for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Important technological progress has been made since. Balloon angioplasty was replaced by bare metal stents, which allowed to permanently scaffold the coronary vessel avoiding acute recoil and abrupt occlusion. Thereafter, the introduction of early generation drug-eluting stents (DES) has significantly improved clinical outcomes, primarily by markedly reducing the risk of restenosis. New generation DES with thinner stent struts, novel durable or biodegradable polymer coatings, and new limus antiproliferative agents, have further improved upon the safety and efficacy profile of early generation DES. The present article aims to review the impact of technological advances on clinical outcomes in the field of PCI with coronary stents, and to provide a brief overview on clinical margins of improvement and unmet needs of available DES.

  19. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods: Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results: Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%, advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS (91.1%, basic life support (BLS (90.0%, interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4% and blood gas (88.7%. Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%, sterile technique (67.2%, BLS (68.9%, ACLS (65.9% and phlebotomy (63.5%. Discussion: Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the

  20. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  1. LERM (Logical Elements Rule Method): A method for assessing and formalizing clinical rules for decision support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Medlock; D. Opondo; S. Eslami; M. Askari; P. Wierenga; S.E. de Rooij; A. Abu-Hanna

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to create a step-by-step method for transforming clinical rules for use in decision support, and to validate this method for usability and reliability. Methods: A sample set of clinical rules was identified from the relevant literature. Using an iterative approach

  2. Clinical-decision support based on medical literature: A complex network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingchi; Zheng, Jichuan; Zhao, Chao; Su, Jia; Guan, Yi; Yu, Qiubin

    2016-10-01

    In making clinical decisions, clinicians often review medical literature to ensure the reliability of diagnosis, test, and treatment because the medical literature can answer clinical questions and assist clinicians making clinical decisions. Therefore, finding the appropriate literature is a critical problem for clinical-decision support (CDS). First, the present study employs search engines to retrieve relevant literature about patient records. However, the result of the traditional method is usually unsatisfactory. To improve the relevance of the retrieval result, a medical literature network (MLN) based on these retrieved papers is constructed. Then, we show that this MLN has small-world and scale-free properties of a complex network. According to the structural characteristics of the MLN, we adopt two methods to further identify the potential relevant literature in addition to the retrieved literature. By integrating these potential papers into the MLN, a more comprehensive MLN is built to answer the question of actual patient records. Furthermore, we propose a re-ranking model to sort all papers by relevance. We experimentally find that the re-ranking model can improve the normalized discounted cumulative gain of the results. As participants of the Text Retrieval Conference 2015, our clinical-decision method based on the MLN also yields higher scores than the medians in most topics and achieves the best scores for topics: #11 and #12. These research results indicate that our study can be used to effectively assist clinicians in making clinical decisions, and the MLN can facilitate the investigation of CDS.

  3. Clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches in osteopathy - a qualitative grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Oliver P; Petty, Nicola J; Moore, Ann P

    2014-02-01

    There is limited understanding of how osteopaths make decisions in relation to clinical practice. The aim of this research was to construct an explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of experienced osteopaths in the UK. Twelve UK registered osteopaths participated in this constructivist grounded theory qualitative study. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used to select participants. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews which were audio-recorded and transcribed. As the study approached theoretical sufficiency, participants were observed and video-recorded during a patient appointment, which was followed by a video-prompted interview. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyse and code data. Data analysis resulted in the construction of three qualitatively different therapeutic approaches which characterised participants and their clinical practice, termed; Treater, Communicator and Educator. Participants' therapeutic approach influenced their approach to clinical decision-making, the level of patient involvement, their interaction with patients, and therapeutic goals. Participants' overall conception of practice lay on a continuum ranging from technical rationality to professional artistry, and contributed to their therapeutic approach. A range of factors were identified which influenced participants' conception of practice. The findings indicate that there is variation in osteopaths' therapeutic approaches to practice and clinical decision-making, which are influenced by their overall conception of practice. This study provides the first explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of osteopaths. PMID:23932101

  4. Clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches in osteopathy - a qualitative grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Oliver P; Petty, Nicola J; Moore, Ann P

    2014-02-01

    There is limited understanding of how osteopaths make decisions in relation to clinical practice. The aim of this research was to construct an explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of experienced osteopaths in the UK. Twelve UK registered osteopaths participated in this constructivist grounded theory qualitative study. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used to select participants. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews which were audio-recorded and transcribed. As the study approached theoretical sufficiency, participants were observed and video-recorded during a patient appointment, which was followed by a video-prompted interview. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyse and code data. Data analysis resulted in the construction of three qualitatively different therapeutic approaches which characterised participants and their clinical practice, termed; Treater, Communicator and Educator. Participants' therapeutic approach influenced their approach to clinical decision-making, the level of patient involvement, their interaction with patients, and therapeutic goals. Participants' overall conception of practice lay on a continuum ranging from technical rationality to professional artistry, and contributed to their therapeutic approach. A range of factors were identified which influenced participants' conception of practice. The findings indicate that there is variation in osteopaths' therapeutic approaches to practice and clinical decision-making, which are influenced by their overall conception of practice. This study provides the first explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of osteopaths.

  5. Detecting fast, online reasoning processes in clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Amanda; Cobos, Pedro L; López, Francisco J; Godoy, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    In an experiment that used the inconsistency paradigm, experienced clinical psychologists and psychology students performed a reading task using clinical reports and a diagnostic judgment task. The clinical reports provided information about the symptoms of hypothetical clients who had been previously diagnosed with a specific mental disorder. Reading times of inconsistent target sentences were slower than those of control sentences, demonstrating an inconsistency effect. The results also showed that experienced clinicians gave different weights to different symptoms according to their relevance when fluently reading the clinical reports provided, despite the fact that all the symptoms were of equal diagnostic value according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). The diagnostic judgment task yielded a similar pattern of results. In contrast to previous findings, the results of the reading task may be taken as direct evidence of the intervention of reasoning processes that occur very early, rapidly, and online. We suggest that these processes are based on the representation of mental disorders and that these representations are particularly suited to fast retrieval from memory and to making inferences. They may also be related to the clinicians' causal reasoning. The implications of these results for clinician training are also discussed. PMID:24274045

  6. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support

  7. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support.

  8. Role of Advance Care Planning in Proxy Decision Making Among Individuals With Dementia and Their Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jung; De Larwelle, Jessica A; Valuch, Katharine O'Connell; Kesler, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Health care proxies make important end-of-life decisions for individuals with dementia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to examine the role of advance care planning in proxy decision making for 141 individuals with cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, or other types of dementia. Proxies who did not know the preferences of individuals with dementia for life support treatments reported greater understanding of their values. Proxies of individuals with dementia who did not want life support treatments anticipated receiving less support and were more uncertain in decision making. The greater knowledge proxies had about dementia trajectory, family support, and trust of physicians, the more informed, clearer, and less uncertain they were in decision making. In addition to advance care planning, multiple factors influence proxy decision making, which should be considered in developing interventions and future research to support informed decision making for individuals with dementia and their families.

  9. Feasibility of incorporating genomic knowledge into electronic medical records for pharmacogenomic clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoath James I

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In pursuing personalized medicine, pharmacogenomic (PGx knowledge may help guide prescribing drugs based on a person’s genotype. Here we evaluate the feasibility of incorporating PGx knowledge, combined with clinical data, to support clinical decision-making by: 1 analyzing clinically relevant knowledge contained in PGx knowledge resources; 2 evaluating the feasibility of a rule-based framework to support formal representation of clinically relevant knowledge contained in PGx knowledge resources; and, 3 evaluating the ability of an electronic medical record/electronic health record (EMR/EHR to provide computable forms of clinical data needed for PGx clinical decision support. Findings suggest that the PharmGKB is a good source for PGx knowledge to supplement information contained in FDA approved drug labels. Furthermore, we found that with supporting knowledge (e.g. IF age

  10. Critical decisions for older people with advanced dementia: a prospective study in long-term institutions and district home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toscani, F.; Steen, J.T. van der; Finetti, S.; Giunco, F.; Pettenati, F.; Villani, D.; Monti, M.; Gentile, S.; Charrier, L.; Giulio, P. Di

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare the decisions critical for survival or quality of life [critical decisions (CDs)] made for patients with advanced dementia in nursing homes (NHs) and home care (HC) services. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with a follow-up of 6 months. SETTING: Lombardy Region (N

  11. Adolescent Depression: An Update and Guide to Clinical Decision Making

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Mary N.; Peterson, John; Sheldon, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Depression in adolescence and adulthood is common, afflicting up to 20 percent of these populations. It represents a significant public health concern and is associated with considerable suffering and functional impairment. Adolescent-onset depression tends to be a particularly malignant and recalcitrant condition, increasing the likelihood of recurrence and chronicity in adulthood. Clinical presentations for various medical and psychiatric conditions, as well as reactions to psychosocial str...

  12. Physician perspectives and compliance with patient advance directives: the role external factors play on physician decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkle Christopher M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following passage of the Patient Self Determination Act in 1990, health care institutions that receive Medicare and Medicaid funding are required to inform patients of their right to make their health care preferences known through execution of a living will and/or to appoint a surrogate-decision maker. We evaluated the impact of external factors and perceived patient preferences on physicians’ decisions to honor or forgo previously established advance directives (ADs. In addition, physician views regarding legal risk, patients’ ability to comprehend complexities involved with their care, and impact of medical costs related to end-of-life care decisions were explored. Methods Attendees of two Mayo Clinic continuing medical education courses were surveyed. Three scenarios based in part on previously court-litigated matters assessed impact of external factors and perceived patient preferences on physician compliance with patient-articulated wishes regarding resuscitation. General questions measured respondents’ perception of legal risk, concerns over patient knowledge of idiosyncrasies involved with their care, and impact medical costs may have on compliance with patient preferences. Responses indicating strength of agreement or disagreement with statements were treated as ordinal data and analyzed using the Cochran Armitage trend test. Results Three hundred eighty-eight of 951 surveys were completed (41% response rate. Eighty percent reported they were likely to honor a patient’s AD despite its 5 year age. Fewer than half (41% would honor the AD of a patient in ventricular fibrillation who had expressed a desire to “pass away in peace.” Few (17% would forgo an AD following a family’s request for continued resuscitative treatment. A majority (52% considered risk of liability to be lower when maintaining someone alive against their wishes than mistakenly failing to provide resuscitative efforts. A large percentage

  13. A CLINICAL STUDY OF LOCALLY ADVANCED CARCINOMA OF BREAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinalini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : In India it is observed that most of the patients of breast cancer clinically present in late stage due to their ignorance of disease despite so much advancement in its detection and management. Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC accounts for 30 - 35% of all cases of breast cancers in India. This study aims to evaluate C linical features, Investigations, various Treatment modalities and the Clinico - pathological correlation & outcome of various treatment modalities of LABC, with special emphasis on Neo - adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT in Indian setting. MATERIAL AND METHOD : This was a non - randomised prospective observational study. We analyzed 57 patients of LABC Stage IIIB & IIIC presenting at Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, a tertiary care C entre from September 2012 to November 2014. RESULTS : Stage IIIB comprised 84.21% patients while remaining 15.79% were having Stage IIIC disease. Skin involvement was observed in 91.23% patients. 15.79% showed supraclavicular lymph node involvement. 32 patients received NACT (2 to 6 cycles. Out of these 32, complete clinical response (cCR was 12.5%, partial response (cPR was 68.75% and pathological CR (pCR was 6.25% with Total Objective response (cCR+cPR 81.25%. Feasibility of Breast Conserving Surgery (BCS was observed in 12.5% patients. 25 patients underwent primary surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Modified Radical Mastectomy was performed in 89.48% patients. CONCLUSIONS : With overall clinical response of 81.25%, n eoadjuvant chemotherapy is the best treatment option for patients with Locally Advanced Breast Cancer with added advantage of in vivo testing the sensitivity of chemotherapeutic agents, early management of micrometastasis and down staging the primary tumour with feasibility of BCS. Patients presenting LABC constitute a diverse group for whic h a variety of treatment modalities should be instituted with co o rdinated treatment planning among surgeons

  14. Framework for securing personal health data in clinical decision support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Protik

    2007-01-01

    If appropriate security mechanisms aren't in place, individuals and groups can get unauthorized access to personal health data residing in clinical decision support systems (CDSS). These concerns are well founded; there has been a dramatic increase in reports of security incidents. The paper provides a framework for securing personal health data in CDSS. The framework breaks down CDSS into data gathering, data management and data delivery functions. It then provides the vulnerabilities that can occur in clinical decision support activities and the measures that need to be taken to protect the data. The framework is applied to protect the confidentiality, integrity and availability of personal health data in a decision support system. Using the framework, project managers and architects can assess the potential risk of unauthorized data access in their decision support system. Moreover they can design systems and procedures to effectively secure personal health data.

  15. Polymeric nanotherapeutics: clinical development and advances in stealth functionalization strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Che-Ming J.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Luk, Brian T.; Zhang, Liangfang

    2013-12-01

    Long-circulating polymeric nanotherapeutics have garnered increasing interest in research and in the clinic owing to their ability to improve the solubility and pharmacokinetics of therapeutic cargoes. Modulation of carrier properties promises more effective drug localization at the disease sites and can lead to enhanced drug safety and efficacy. In the present review, we highlight the current development of polymeric nanotherapeutics in the clinic. In light of the importance of stealth properties in therapeutic nanoparticles, we also review the advances in stealth functionalization strategies and examine the performance of different stealth polymers in the literature. In addition, we discuss the recent development of biologically inspired ``self'' nanoparticles, which present a differing stealth concept from conventional approaches.

  16. Teleconsultation and Clinical Decision Making: a Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deldar, Kolsoum; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz; Tara, Seyed Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Background: The goal of teleconsultation is to omit geographical and functional distance between two or more geographically separated health care providers. The purpose of present study is to review and analyze physician-physician teleconsultations. Method: The PubMed electronic database was searched. The primary search was done on January 2015 and was updated on December 2015. A fetch and tag plan was designed by the researchers using an online Zotero library. Results: 174 full-text articles of 1702 records met inclusion criteria. Teleconsultation for pediatric patients accounts for 14.36 percent of accepted articles. Surgery and general medicine were the most prevalent medical fields in the adults and pediatrics, respectively. Most teleconsultations were inland experiences (no=135), and the USA, Italy and Australia were the three top countries in this group. Non-specialists health care providers/centers were the dominant group who requested teleconsultation (no=130). Real time, store and forward, and hybrid technologies were used in 50, 31, and 16.7 percent of articles, respectively. The teleconsultation were reported to result in change in treatment plan, referral or evacuation rate, change in diagnosis, educational effects, and rapid decision making. Use of structured or semi-structured template had been noticed only in a very few articles. Conclusion: The present study focused on the recent ten years of published articles on physician-physician teleconsultations. Our findings showed that although there are positive impacts of teleconsultation as improving patient management, still have gaps that need to be repaired. PMID:27708494

  17. Clinical Decision Support Tools for Selecting Interventions for Patients with Disabling Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Douglas P; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Shaw, William S; Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Shaw, Nicola T; Hartvigsen, Jan; Qin, Ziling; Ha, Christine; Woodhouse, Linda J; Steenstra, Ivan A

    2016-09-01

    Purpose We aimed to identify and inventory clinical decision support (CDS) tools for helping front-line staff select interventions for patients with musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders. Methods We used Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review framework which progresses through five stages: (1) identifying the research question; (2) identifying relevant studies; (3) selecting studies for analysis; (4) charting the data; and (5) collating, summarizing and reporting results. We considered computer-based, and other available tools, such as algorithms, care pathways, rules and models. Since this research crosses multiple disciplines, we searched health care, computing science and business databases. Results Our search resulted in 4605 manuscripts. Titles and abstracts were screened for relevance. The reliability of the screening process was high with an average percentage of agreement of 92.3 %. Of the located articles, 123 were considered relevant. Within this literature, there were 43 CDS tools located. These were classified into 3 main areas: computer-based tools/questionnaires (n = 8, 19 %), treatment algorithms/models (n = 14, 33 %), and clinical prediction rules/classification systems (n = 21, 49 %). Each of these areas and the associated evidence are described. The state of evidentiary support for CDS tools is still preliminary and lacks external validation, head-to-head comparisons, or evidence of generalizability across different populations and settings. Conclusions CDS tools, especially those employing rapidly advancing computer technologies, are under development and of potential interest to health care providers, case management organizations and funders of care. Based on the results of this scoping review, we conclude that these tools, models and systems should be subjected to further validation before they can be recommended for large-scale implementation for managing patients with MSK disorders. PMID:26667939

  18. Implementing an integrative multi-agent clinical decision support system with open source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyad Shirabad, Jelber; Wilk, Szymon; Michalowski, Wojtek; Farion, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Clinical decision making is a complex multi-stage process. Decision support can play an important role at each stage of this process. At present, the majority of clinical decision support systems have been focused on supporting only certain stages. In this paper we present the design and implementation of MET3-a prototype multi-agent system providing an integrative decision support that spans over the entire decision making process. The system helps physicians with data collection, diagnosis formulation, treatment planning and finding supporting evidence. MET3 integrates with external hospital information systems via HL7 messages and runs on various computing platforms available at the point of care (e.g., tablet computers, mobile phones). Building MET3 required sophisticated and reliable software technologies. In the past decade the open source software movement has produced mature, stable, industrial strength software systems with a large user base. Therefore, one of the decisions that should be considered before developing or acquiring a decision support system is whether or not one could use open source technologies instead of proprietary ones. We believe MET3 shows that the answer to this question is positive.

  19. Advance in clinical research of radiation-induced heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is one of common late side effects derived by thoracic radiotherapy. RIHD is often subclinical and there is an extremely long clinical latent period between radiation therapy and the first clinical presentation of radiation injury, and it did not cause clinical attention for a long time. Until the 1990s, epidemiologic investigations demonstrate that thoracic cancer radiotherapy increased rates of cardiac mortality, RIHD has partly offset the survival benefit provided by adjuvant RT. Radiotherapy techniques has undergone many improvements over the last decades, these improvements decreased both the volume and dose of radiation delivered to the heart, seem to have decreased the incidence of RIHD. Nonetheless, recent studies indicate that the problem of RIHD may persist. For instance, patients with Hodgkin's Disease, lung cancer, and esophageal may still receive either a high dose of radiation to a small part of the heart or a lower dose to the whole heart in radiotherapy. Therefore, long-term cardiac followup of these patients is essential. This article briefly review the clinical presentations, influence factors, prevention and managements, diagnosis and study advances of RIHD. (authors)

  20. Designing an automated clinical decision support system to match clinical practice guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Michael E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid prescribing for chronic pain is common and controversial, but recommended clinical practices are followed inconsistently in many clinical settings. Strategies for increasing adherence to clinical practice guideline recommendations are needed to increase effectiveness and reduce negative consequences of opioid prescribing in chronic pain patients. Methods Here we describe the process and outcomes of a project to operationalize the 2003 VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for Opioid Therapy for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain into a computerized decision support system (DSS to encourage good opioid prescribing practices during primary care visits. We based the DSS on the existing ATHENA-DSS. We used an iterative process of design, testing, and revision of the DSS by a diverse team including guideline authors, medical informatics experts, clinical content experts, and end-users to convert the written clinical practice guideline into a computable algorithm to generate patient-specific recommendations for care based upon existing information in the electronic medical record (EMR, and a set of clinical tools. Results The iterative revision process identified numerous and varied problems with the initially designed system despite diverse expert participation in the design process. The process of operationalizing the guideline identified areas in which the guideline was vague, left decisions to clinical judgment, or required clarification of detail to insure safe clinical implementation. The revisions led to workable solutions to problems, defined the limits of the DSS and its utility in clinical practice, improved integration into clinical workflow, and improved the clarity and accuracy of system recommendations and tools. Conclusions Use of this iterative process led to development of a multifunctional DSS that met the approval of the clinical practice guideline authors, content experts, and clinicians involved in testing. The

  1. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  2. A service oriented approach for guidelines-based clinical decision support using BPMN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medical practice requires that clinical guidelines need to be documented in such a way that they represent a clinical workflow in its most accessible form. In order to optimize clinical processes to improve clinical outcomes, we propose a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) based approach for implementing clinical guidelines that can be accessed from an Electronic Health Record (EHR) application with a Web Services enabled communication mechanism with the Enterprise Service Bus. We have used Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) for modelling and presenting the clinical pathway in the form of a workflow. The aim of this study is to produce spontaneous alerts in the healthcare workflow in the diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The use of BPMN as a tool to automate clinical guidelines has not been previously employed for providing Clinical Decision Support (CDS). PMID:25160142

  3. Decisiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Junichiro Ishida

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates how the presence of strong leadership influences an organization's ability to acquire and process information. The key concept is the leader's decisiveness. A decisive leader can make a bold move in response to a large change in the underlying landscape, whereas an indecisive leader biases her position excessively towards the status quo. An organization led by an indecisive leader needs to accumulate unrealistically strong evidence before it changes the course of actio...

  4. New Era of Muslim Women in Malay World: The Contested Women's Advancement in Decision Making Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erni Haryanti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Malay world has been experiencing the conflicting and converging international influences of globalization and rapid Islamisation in many significant aspects of the countries. One of the issues is that the impact of the agenda of advancement of women‟s life to achieve gender equality promoted by international agencies. Among other women‟s improvement agenda is that woman in decision making bodies. On the other hand, the growing visible Islamic movement (and/or Islamic fundamentalism - Islamism which may significantly grow among Malay societies would unavoidably create different ideas, attitudes and practices compared to other Muslim world. This paper explores myriad aspects of women‟s empowerment transforming into decision making bodies in the nuances of an affirmative action a recommendation of series of international conference on women. Through finding similarities and differences between the two Muslim majority countries, the support toward Muslim women‟s empowerment in decision making bodies is formally acknowledged in state regulations. Although women of Southeast Asian region are culturally recognized to have a high status and well engagement with public sphere, in the implementation of women representing themselves in political sphere has a little difference. In term of discourses Indonesia has much flourished ideas and closer to the ideas of international agenda than that of Malaysia. In the overall Malay world would gradually show its openness, tolerance and positive adaptation as a part of world society, although it cannot avoidably be departed from international agenda of both carrying Islamic and non-Islamic values.

  5. Advances and applications of molecular cloning in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kamal; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Mehraj, Vikram; Duraisamy, Ganesh Selvaraj

    2014-10-01

    Molecular cloning is based on isolation of a DNA sequence of interest to obtain multiple copies of it in vitro. Application of this technique has become an increasingly important tool in clinical microbiology due to its simplicity, cost effectiveness, rapidity, and reliability. This review entails the recent advances in molecular cloning and its application in the clinical microbiology in the context of polymicrobial infections, recombinant antigens, recombinant vaccines, diagnostic probes, antimicrobial peptides, and recombinant cytokines. Culture-based methods in polymicrobial infection have many limitation, which has been overcome by cloning techniques and provide gold standard technique. Recombinant antigens produced by cloning technique are now being used for screening of HIV, HCV, HBV, CMV, Treponema pallidum, and other clinical infectious agents. Recombinant vaccines for hepatitis B, cholera, influenza A, and other diseases also use recombinant antigens which have replaced the use of live vaccines and thus reduce the risk for adverse effects. Gene probes developed by gene cloning have many applications including in early diagnosis of hereditary diseases, forensic investigations, and routine diagnosis. Industrial application of this technology produces new antibiotics in the form of antimicrobial peptides and recombinant cytokines that can be used as therapeutic agents. PMID:25023463

  6. Advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging: technology and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Bradford C

    2007-07-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a valuable method for use by clinical investigators to study task-related brain activation in patients with neurological or neuropsychiatric illness. Despite the relative infancy of the field, the rapid adoption of this functional neuroimaging technology has resulted from, among other factors, its ready availability, its relatively high spatial and temporal resolution, and its safety as a noninvasive imaging tool that enables multiple repeated scans over the course of a longitudinal study, and thus may lend itself well as a measure in clinical drug trials. Investigators have used fMRI to identify abnormal functional brain activity during task performance in a variety of patient populations, including those with neurodegenerative, demyelinating, cerebrovascular, and other neurological disorders that highlight the potential utility of fMRI in both basic and clinical spheres of research. In addition, fMRI studies reveal processes related to neuroplasticity, including compensatory hyperactivation, which may be a universally-occurring, adaptive neural response to insult. Functional MRI is being used to study the modulatory effects of genetic risk factors for neurological disease on brain activation; it is being applied to differential diagnosis, as a predictive biomarker of disease course, and as a means to identify neural correlates of neurotherapeutic interventions. Technological advances are rapidly occurring that should provide new applications for fMRI, including improved spatial resolution, which promises to reveal novel insights into the function of fine-scale neural circuitry of the human brain in health and disease.

  7. A programmable rules engine to provide clinical decision support using HTML forms.

    OpenAIRE

    Heusinkveld, J.; Geissbuhler, A.; Sheshelidze, D.; Miller, R.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple method for specifying rules to be applied to information on HTML forms. This approach allows clinical experts, who lack the programming expertise needed to write CGI scripts, to construct and maintain domain-specific knowledge and ordering capabilities within WizOrder, the order-entry and decision support system used at Vanderbilt Hospital. The clinical knowledge base maintainers use HTML editors to create forms and spreadsheet programs for rule entry. A te...

  8. Long-term follow-up of childhood cancer survivors: clinical decision support and research participation

    OpenAIRE

    Kilsdonk, E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research in this thesis was twofold. Part 1 aimed to provide insights into how the use of a (paper-based) clinical guideline for follow-up care of childhood cancer survivors could be improved (CCS) by communicating the guideline through a computerized clinical decision support system (CDSS). We first investigated factors that could facilitate a successful CDSS implementation through a systematic literature review. Subsequently, we investigated whether the use of an established ...

  9. Development of Clinical Decision Support Systems based on Mathematical Models of Physiological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Giannessi, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    In the last years of research, I focused my studies on different physiological problems. Together with my supervisors, I developed/improved different mathematical models in order to create valid tools useful for a better understanding of important clinical issues. The aim of all this work is to develop tools for learning and understanding cardiac and cerebrovascular physiology as well as pathology, generating research questions and developing clinical decision support systems useful for in...

  10. Incorporating INTERACT II Clinical Decision Support Tools into Nursing Home Health Information Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Handler, Steven M.; Sharkey, Siobhan S.; Hudak, Sandra; Ouslander, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial reduction in hospitalization rates has been associated with the implementation of the Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT) quality improvement intervention using the accompanying paper-based clinical practice tools (INTERACT II). There is significant potential to further increase the impact of INTERACT by integrating INTERACT II tools into nursing home (NH) health information technology (HIT) via standalone or integrated clinical decision support (CDS) systems...

  11. On Implementing Clinical Decision Support: Achieving Scalability and Maintainability by Combining Business Rules and Ontologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Kashyap, Vipul; Morales, Alfredo; Hongsermeier, Tonya

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach and architecture for implementing scalable and maintainable clinical decision support at the Partners HealthCare System. The architecture integrates a business rules engine that executes declarative if-then rules stored in a rule-base referencing objects and methods in a business object model. The rules engine executes object methods by invoking services implemented on the clinical data repository. Specialized inferences that support classification of data and instances...

  12. A ventricular assist device as a bridge to recovery, decision making, or transplantation in patients with advanced cardiac failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek

    2012-10-01

    Despite many advances in the management of patients with heart failure, acute cardiogenic shock and progressive congestive heart failure remain serious problems with dismal prognoses. Both temporary and permanent mechanical support has been gaining wide clinical application in this patient population. Although mechanical circulatory support technology is rapidly evolving, this approach is associated with multiple issues such as the optimal duration of temporary support, ideal timing to bridge these patients to a long-term device, and selection of the right device for the right patient. The currently available devices are categorized into two major groups: temporary and long-term devices (including destination therapy). Heart failure is a dynamic condition, and the therapeutic approach may need to be modified depending on the patient's condition. Furthermore, the patient's preexisting morbidity, age, socioeconomic status, and family support are confounding factors that need to be considered when making such decisions. Clinical trials including prospective studies, as well as meticulous analysis of existing data, may help develop universal guidelines to select the right device. This manuscript will review the most widely used ventricular assist devices. PMID:22814623

  13. Evaluating a Clinical Decision Support Interface for End-of-Life Nurse Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febretti, Alessandro; Stifter, Janet; Keenan, Gail M; Lopez, Karen D; Johnson, Andrew; Wilkie, Diana J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) are tools that assist healthcare personnel in the decision-making process for patient care. Although CDSSs have been successfully deployed in the clinical setting to assist physicians, few CDSS have been targeted at professional nurses, the largest group of health providers. We present our experience in designing and testing a CDSS interface embedded within a nurse care planning and documentation tool. We developed four prototypes based on different CDSS feature designs, and tested them in simulated end-of-life patient handoff sessions with a group of 40 nurse clinicians. We show how our prototypes directed nurses towards an optimal care decision that was rarely performed in unassisted practice. We also discuss the effect of CDSS layout and interface navigation in a nurse’s acceptance of suggested actions. These findings provide insights into effective nursing CDSS design that are generalizable to care scenarios different than end-of-life.

  14. Students' Stereotypes of Patients as Barriers to Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shirley M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    At the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a study was designed that graphically illustrated to beginning students that unconscious sociocultural stereotypes may influence clinical decision-making. Students were shown a videotape depicting five simulated patients, each with the same physical complaint. (Author/MLW)

  15. Clinical Evaluation of the PCA3 Assay in Guiding Initial Biopsy Decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de la Taille; J. Irani; M. Graefen; F. Chun; T. de Reijke; P. Kil; P. Gontero; A. Mottaz; A. Haese

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the clinical utility of the PCA3 assay in guiding initial biopsy decisions in prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: A European, prospective, multicenter study enrolled men with a serum total prostate specific antigen of 2.5 to 10 ng/ml scheduled for initial biopsy. After digi

  16. Clinical decision-making to facilitate appropriate patient management in chiropractic practice: 'the 3-questions model'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amorin-Woods Lyndon G

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A definitive diagnosis in chiropractic clinical practice is frequently elusive, yet decisions around management are still necessary. Often, a clinical impression is made after the exclusion of serious illness or injury, and care provided within the context of diagnostic uncertainty. Rather than focussing on labelling the condition, the clinician may choose to develop a defendable management plan since the response to treatment often clarifies the diagnosis. Discussion This paper explores the concept and elements of defensive problem-solving practice, with a view to developing a model of agile, pragmatic decision-making amenable to real-world application. A theoretical framework that reflects the elements of this approach will be offered in order to validate the potential of a so called '3-Questions Model'; Summary Clinical decision-making is considered to be a key characteristic of any modern healthcare practitioner. It is, thus, prudent for chiropractors to re-visit the concept of defensible practice with a view to facilitate capable clinical decision-making and competent patient examination skills. In turn, the perception of competence and trustworthiness of chiropractors within the wider healthcare community helps integration of chiropractic services into broader healthcare settings.

  17. Clinical relevance of advanced glycation endproducts for vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, R; van der Vaart, M G; van Dam, G M; Tio, R A; Hillebrands, J-L; Smit, A J; Zeebregts, C J

    2008-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main contributor to cardiovascular disease and leads to intimal plaque formation, which may progress to plaque rupture with subsequent thromboembolic events and/or occlusion of the arterial lumen. There is increasing evidence that the development or progression of atherosclerosis is associated with advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). AGEs are a heterogeneous group of compounds formed by the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. An increased understanding of the mechanisms of formation and interaction of AGEs has allowed the development of several potential anti-AGE strategies. This review summarizes AGE formation and biochemistry, the pathogeneic role of AGEs in cardiovascular disease, anti-AGE therapies and clinical relevance to vascular surgery.

  18. Advances in intelligent analysis of medical data and decision support systems

    CERN Document Server

    Iantovics, Barna

    2013-01-01

    This volume is a result of the fruitful and vivid discussions during the MedDecSup'2012 International Workshop bringing together a relevant body of knowledge, and new developments in the increasingly important field of medical informatics. This carefully edited book presents new ideas aimed at the development of intelligent processing of various kinds of medical information and the perfection of the contemporary computer systems for medical decision support. The book presents advances of the medical information systems for intelligent archiving, processing, analysis and search-by-content which will improve the quality of the medical services for every patient and of the global healthcare system. The book combines in a synergistic way theoretical developments with the practicability of the approaches developed and presents the last developments and achievements in  medical informatics to a broad range of readers: engineers, mathematicians, physicians, and PhD students.

  19. Coordinated management of combined sewer overflows by means of advanced environmental decision support systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murla, Damian; Gutierrez, Oriol; Martinez, Montse;

    2016-01-01

    During heavy rainfall, the capacity of sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants may be surcharged producing uncontrolled wastewater discharges and a depletion of the environmental quality. Therefore there is a need of advanced management tools to tackle with these complex problems...... been tested in a specially designed virtual UWS, including two sewers systems, two WWTP and one river subjected to typical Mediterranean rain conditions. Results show that sewer systems, retention tanks and wastewater treatment plants improve their performance under wet weather conditions and that EDSS....... In this paper an environmental decision support system (EDSS), based on the integration of mathematical modeling and knowledge-based systems, has been developed for the coordinated management of urban wastewater systems (UWS) to control and minimize uncontrolled wastewater spills. Effectiveness of the EDSS has...

  20. Breast cancer stem cells: current advances and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Clouthier, Shawn G; Deol, Yadwinder; Liu, Suling; Nagrath, Sunitha; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, are driven by a population of cells that display stem cell properties. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells, not only drive tumor initiation and growth but also mediate tumor metastasis and therapeutic resistance. In this chapter, we summarize current advances in CSC research with a major focus on breast CSCs (BCSCs). We review the prevailing methods to isolate and characterize BCSCs and recent evidence documenting their cellular origins and phenotypic plasticity that enables them to transition between mesenchymal and epithelial-like states. We describe in vitro and clinical evidence that these cells mediate metastasis and treatment resistance in breast cancer, the development of novel strategies to isolate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that contain CSCs and the use of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models in preclinical breast cancer research. Lastly, we highlight several signaling pathways that regulate BCSC self-renewal and describe clinical implications of targeting these cells for breast cancer treatment. The development of strategies to effectively target BCSCs has the potential to significantly improve the outcomes for patients with breast cancer.

  1. Recent technological advances in computed tomography and the clinical impact therein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Val M; Marquez, Herman; Andreisek, Gustav; Valavanis, Anton; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2015-02-01

    Current technological advances in CT, specifically those with a major impact on clinical imaging, are discussed. The intent was to provide for both medical physicists and practicing radiologists a summary of the clinical impact of each advance, offering guidance in terms of utility and day-to-day clinical implementation, with specific attention to radiation dose reduction.

  2. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a clinical tool for extending the…

  3. Fuzzy-Arden-Syntax-based, Vendor-agnostic, Scalable Clinical Decision Support and Monitoring Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Fehre, Karsten; Rappelsberger, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This study's objective is to develop and use a scalable genuine technology platform for clinical decision support based on Arden Syntax, which was extended by fuzzy set theory and fuzzy logic. Arden Syntax is a widely recognized formal language for representing clinical and scientific knowledge in an executable format, and is maintained by Health Level Seven (HL7) International and approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Fuzzy set theory and logic permit the representation of knowledge and automated reasoning under linguistic and propositional uncertainty. These forms of uncertainty are a common feature of patients' medical data, the body of medical knowledge, and deductive clinical reasoning. PMID:26262410

  4. Neighborhood graph and learning discriminative distance functions for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsymbal, Alexey; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin; Huber, Martin

    2009-01-01

    There are two essential reasons for the slow progress in the acceptance of clinical case retrieval and similarity search-based decision support systems; the especial complexity of clinical data making it difficult to define a meaningful and effective distance function on them and the lack of transparency and explanation ability in many existing clinical case retrieval decision support systems. In this paper, we try to address these two problems by introducing a novel technique for visualizing inter-patient similarity based on a node-link representation with neighborhood graphs and by considering two techniques for learning discriminative distance function that help to combine the power of strong "black box" learners with the transparency of case retrieval and nearest neighbor classification. PMID:19964399

  5. Advance care planning preferences among dialysis patients and factors influencing their decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the resuscitation preferences of hemodialysis (HD) Saudi patients, we conducted a cross-sectional, observational descriptive questionnaire study in two major tertiary hospitals in Saudi Arabia from March to December 2007. We enrolled all the patients on HD for two years or more, and excluded the patients who were transplant candidates, confused, or demented. The questionnaire was composed of 4 sections. The first 3 sections were concerned with demographic data, education levels, employment, family size, number of children, and functionality status besides knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), mechanical ventilation, and ICU admission. The fourth section contained different scenarios and questions on personal and preferences such as end of life decisions, medical interventions, CPR, ICU admission, and the decision maker in these events. A total of 100 patients (53% males, 67% Saudis, and 85% married) were enrolled in the study. The mean duration on dialysis was 6.0 years (+- 4.1). More than 70% of the patients viewed themselves as above average in the religiosity score, and 44% disclosed a good life quality. More than 95% had little or no knowledge about cardiac resuscitation, intubation, and mechanical ventilation. The majority of the patients authorized their treating physician to decide for them about cardiac resuscitation in case they did not make advanced directives and only 22% believed that this decision should be made by their family members. If their physician believed their condition was hopeless, 77% preferred to stay at home. We conclude that the majority of our patients had limited awareness about cardiac resuscitation measures. The majority of the patients trust their physicians to decide about the futility of resuscitation. Patients were able to decide reasonably well when they are well informed. (author)

  6. Clinical implications of hepatitis B virus mutations: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarevic, Ivana

    2014-06-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of acute and chronic hepatitis, and of its long-term complications. It is the most variable among DNA viruses, mostly because of its unique life cycle which includes the activity of error-prone enzyme, reverse transcriptase, and the very high virion production per day. In last two decades, numerous research studies have shown that the speed of disease progression, reliability of diagnostic methods and the success of antiviral therapy and immunization are all influenced by genetic variability of this virus. It was shown that mutations in specific regions of HBV genome could be responsible for unwanted clinical outcomes or evasion of detection by diagnostic tools, thus making the monitoring for these mutations a necessity in proper evaluation of patients. The success of the vaccination programs has now been challenged by the discovery of mutant viruses showing amino acid substitutions in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), which may lead to evasion of vaccine-induced immunity. However, the emergence of these mutations has not yet raised concern since it was shown that they develop slowly. Investigations of HBV genetic variability and clinical implications of specific mutations have resulted in significant advances over the past decade, particularly in regard to management of resistance to antiviral drugs. In the era of drugs with high genetic barrier for resistance, on-going monitoring for possible resistance is still essential since prolonged therapy is often necessary. Understanding the frequencies and clinical implications of viral mutations may contribute to improvement of diagnostic procedures, more proper planning of immunization programs and creating the most efficient therapeutic protocols. PMID:24976703

  7. Consensus Recommendations for Systematic Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Evidence for Clinical Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheife, Richard T.; Hines, Lisa E.; Boyce, Richard D.; Chung, Sophie P.; Momper, Jeremiah; Sommer, Christine D.; Abernethy, Darrell R.; Horn, John; Sklar, Stephen J.; Wong, Samantha K.; Jones, Gretchen; Brown, Mary; Grizzle, Amy J.; Comes, Susan; Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Borst, Clarissa; Wittie, Michael A.; Rich, Alissa; Malone, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations, compendia, and drug knowledgebase vendors use varying methods to evaluate and synthesize evidence on drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This situation has a negative effect on electronic prescribing and medication information systems that warn clinicians of potentially harmful medication combinations. Objective To provide recommendations for systematic evaluation of evidence from the scientific literature, drug product labeling, and regulatory documents with respect to DDIs for clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to develop a structured process to improve the quality of DDI alerting systems. Three expert workgroups were assembled to address the goals of the conference. The Evidence Workgroup consisted of 15 individuals with expertise in pharmacology, drug information, biomedical informatics, and clinical decision support. Workgroup members met via webinar from January 2013 to February 2014. Two in-person meetings were conducted in May and September 2013 to reach consensus on recommendations. Results We developed expert-consensus answers to three key questions: 1) What is the best approach to evaluate DDI evidence?; 2) What evidence is required for a DDI to be applicable to an entire class of drugs?; and 3) How should a structured evaluation process be vetted and validated? Conclusion Evidence-based decision support for DDIs requires consistent application of transparent and systematic methods to evaluate the evidence. Drug information systems that implement these recommendations should be able to provide higher quality information about DDIs in drug compendia and clinical decision support tools. PMID:25556085

  8. Decision theory and the evaluation of risks and benefits of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabe, Rosemarie D C; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; Raaijmakers, Jan A M; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2012-12-01

    Research ethics committees (RECs) are tasked to assess the risks and the benefits of a clinical trial. In previous studies, it was shown that RECs find this task difficult, if not impossible, to do. The current approaches to benefit-risk assessment (i.e. Component Analysis and the Net Risk Test) confound the various risk-benefit tasks, and as such, make balancing impossible. In this article, we show that decision theory, specifically through the expected utility theory and multiattribute utility theory, enable for an explicit and ethically weighted risk-benefit evaluation. This makes a balanced ethical justification possible, and thus a more rationally defensible decision making. PMID:22819925

  9. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Robitaille, Hubert; Gane, Claire; Hébert, Jessica; Labrecque, Michel; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation (KT) interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties. Objective We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing. Methods We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153) published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) and Consumers and Communication. Results We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%). Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1) and educational outreach (n = 1). Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15), communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7), personalized risk communication (n = 3) and mobile phone messaging (n = 1). Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective. Conclusions More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations. PMID:26938633

  10. Decisions to withhold diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a clinical suspicion of venous thromboembolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike J Schouten

    Full Text Available This study aimed to gather insights in physicians' considerations for decisions to either refer for- or to withhold additional diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a suspicion of venous thromboembolism.Our study was nested in an observational study on diagnostic strategies for suspected venous thromboembolism in nursing home patients. Patient characteristics, bleeding-complications and mortality were related to the decision to withhold investigations. For a better understanding of the physicians' decisions, 21 individual face-to-face in-depth interviews were performed and analysed using the grounded theory approach.Referal for additional diagnostic investigations was forgone in 126/322 (39.1% patients with an indication for diagnostic work-up. 'Blind' anticoagulant treatment was initiated in 95 (75.4% of these patients. The 3 month mortality rates were higher for patients in whom investigations were withheld than in the referred patients, irrespective of anticoagulant treatment (odds ratio 2.45; 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 4.29 but when adjusted for the probability of being referred (i.e. the propensity score, there was no relation of non-diagnosis decisions to mortality (odds ratio 1.75; 0.98 to 3.11. In their decisions to forgo diagnostic investigations, physicians incorporated the estimated relative impact of the potential disease; the potential net-benefits of diagnostic investigations and whether performing investigations agreed with established management goals in advance care planning.Referral for additional diagnostic investigations is withheld in almost 40% of Dutch nursing home patients with suspected venous thromboembolism and an indication for diagnostic work-up. We propose that, given the complexity of these decisions and the uncertainty regarding their indirect effects on patient outcome, more attention should be focused on the decision to either use or withhold additional diagnostic tests.

  11. Clinical decision support for whole genome sequence information leveraging a service-oriented architecture: a prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time. PMID:25954430

  12. Clinical Decision Support for Whole Genome Sequence Information Leveraging a Service-Oriented Architecture: a Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time. PMID:25954430

  13. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  14. The Use of Intuition in Homeopathic Clinical Decision Making: An Interpretative Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Brien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While intuition plays a role in clinical decision making within conventional medicine, little is understood about its use in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate intuition from the perspective of homeopathic practitioners; its’ manifestation, how it was recognized, its origins and when it was used within daily clinical practice. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with clinically experienced non-National Health Service (NHS UK homeopathic practitioners. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the data. Homeopaths reported many similarities with conventional medical practitioner regarding the nature, perceived origin and manifestation of their intuitions in clinical practice. Intuition was used in two key aspects of the consultation: (i to enhance the practitioner-patient relationship, these were generally trusted; and (ii intuitions relating to the prescribing decision. Homeopaths were cautious about these latter intuitions, testing any intuitive thoughts through deductive reasoning before accepting them. Their reluctance is not surprising given the consequences for patient care, but we propose this also reflects homeopaths’ sensitivity to the academic and medical mistrust of both homeopathy and intuition. This study is the first to explore the use of intuition in decision making in any form of complementary medicine. The similarities with conventional practitioners may provide confidence in validating intuition as a legitimate part of the decision making process for these specific practitioners. Further work is needed to elucidate if these findings reflect intuitive use in clinical practice of other CAM practitioners in both private and NHS (i.e., time limited settings.

  15. Designing a Clinical Framework to Guide Gross Motor Intervention Decisions for Infants and Young Children with Hypotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Johanna; O'Donnell, Maureen; Lam, Joyce; Story, Maureen; Wickenheiser, Diane; Xu, Kaishou; Jin, Xiaokun

    2013-01-01

    Clinical practice frameworks are a valuable component of clinical education, promoting informed clinical decision making based on the best available evidence and/or clinical experience. They encourage standardized intervention approaches and evaluation of practice. Based on an international project to support the development of an enhanced service…

  16. Multi-site evaluation of a clinical decision support system for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Ruchi; DeMarco, John; Kessel, Kerstin; Liu, Brent J.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an imaging informatics based decision support system that learns from retrospective treatment plans to provide recommendations for healthy tissue sparing to prospective incoming patients. This system incorporates a model of best practices from previous cases, specific to tumor anatomy. Ultimately, our hope is to improve clinical workflow efficiency, patient outcomes and to increase clinician confidence in decision-making. The success of such a system depends greatly on the training dataset, which in this case, is the knowledge base that the data-mining algorithm employs. The size and heterogeneity of the database is essential for good performance. Since most institutions employ standard protocols and practices for treatment planning, the diversity of this database can be greatly increased by including data from different institutions. This work presents the results of incorporating cross-country, multi-institutional data into our decision support system for evaluation and testing.

  17. Decision making and senior management: the implementation of change projects covering clinical management in SUS hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, José Márcio da Cunha; Gomes, Romeu

    2016-08-01

    This paper analyses the decision making process for senior management in public hospitals that are a part of the National Health Service in Brazil (hereafter SUS) in relation to projects aimed at changing clinical management. The methodological design of this study is qualitative in nature taking a hermeneutics-dialectics perspective in terms of results. Hospital directors noted that clinical management projects changed the state of hospitals through: improving their organizations, mobilizing their staff in order to increase a sense of order and systemizing actions and available resources. Technical rationality was the principal basis used in the decision making process for managers. Due to the reality of many hospitals having fragmented organizations, this fact impeded the use of aspects related to rationality, such as economic and financial factors in the decision making process. The incremental model and general politics also play a role in this area. We concluded that the decision making process embraces a large array of factors including rational aspects such as the use of management techniques and the ability to analyze, interpret and summarize. It also incorporates subjective elements such as how to select values and dealing with people's working experiences. We recognized that management problems are wide in scope, ambiguous, complex and do not come with a lot of structure in practice. PMID:27557021

  18. THE IMPACT OF RACISM ON CLINICIAN COGNITION, BEHAVIOR, AND CLINICAL DECISION MAKING

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ryn, Michelle; Burgess, Diana J.; Dovidio, John F.; Phelan, Sean M.; Saha, Somnath; Malat, Jennifer; Griffin, Joan M.; Fu, Steven S.; Perry, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, thousands of studies have demonstrated that Blacks receive lower quality medical care than Whites, independent of disease status, setting, insurance, and other clinically relevant factors. Despite this, there has been little progress towards eradicating these inequities. Almost a decade ago we proposed a conceptual model identifying mechanisms through which clinicians’ behavior, cognition, and decision making might be influenced by implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, and thereby contribute to racial inequities in care. Empirical evidence has supported many of these hypothesized mechanisms, demonstrating that White medical care clinicians: (1) hold negative implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, (2) have implicit racial biases that persist independently of and in contrast to their explicit (conscious) racial attitudes, and (3) can be influenced by racial bias in their clinical decision making and behavior during encounters with Black patients. This paper applies evidence from several disciplines to further specify our original model and elaborate on the ways racism can interact with cognitive biases to affect clinicians’ behavior and decisions and in turn, patient behavior and decisions. We then highlight avenues for intervention and make specific recommendations to medical care and grant-making organizations. PMID:24761152

  19. Decision making and senior management: the implementation of change projects covering clinical management in SUS hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, José Márcio da Cunha; Gomes, Romeu

    2016-08-01

    This paper analyses the decision making process for senior management in public hospitals that are a part of the National Health Service in Brazil (hereafter SUS) in relation to projects aimed at changing clinical management. The methodological design of this study is qualitative in nature taking a hermeneutics-dialectics perspective in terms of results. Hospital directors noted that clinical management projects changed the state of hospitals through: improving their organizations, mobilizing their staff in order to increase a sense of order and systemizing actions and available resources. Technical rationality was the principal basis used in the decision making process for managers. Due to the reality of many hospitals having fragmented organizations, this fact impeded the use of aspects related to rationality, such as economic and financial factors in the decision making process. The incremental model and general politics also play a role in this area. We concluded that the decision making process embraces a large array of factors including rational aspects such as the use of management techniques and the ability to analyze, interpret and summarize. It also incorporates subjective elements such as how to select values and dealing with people's working experiences. We recognized that management problems are wide in scope, ambiguous, complex and do not come with a lot of structure in practice.

  20. Conflicts of interest in research: is clinical decision-making compromised? An opinion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Shawn; Abidi, Shawn; Bebermeyer, Richard D

    2010-08-01

    Lack of transparency in funded research can compromise clinical decision-making in an evidence-based practice. Transparency can be defined as full disclosure of all financial assistance and support to authors and investigators. There is a perception that ethical principles are eroding and that research data can be biased due to conflicts of interest. These research outcomes biased or not, are used for clinical decision-making in the evidence-based practice. One suggested solution to this common ethical dilemma is to continue the dialogue on transparency in research and to create oversight bodies which include representatives from business and industry, private practice, academia, and research. There is increasing evidence of the need for more ethics education at all levels.

  1. How Qualitative Research Informs Clinical and Policy Decision Making in Transplantation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Allison; Morton, Rachael L; Webster, Angela C

    2016-09-01

    Patient-centered care is no longer just a buzzword. It is now widely touted as a cornerstone in delivering quality care across all fields of medicine. However, patient-centered strategies and interventions necessitate evidence about patients' decision-making processes, values, priorities, and needs. Qualitative research is particularly well suited to understanding the experience and perspective of patients, donors, clinicians, and policy makers on a wide range of transplantation-related topics including organ donation and allocation, adherence to prescribed therapy, pretransplant and posttransplant care, implementation of clinical guidelines, and doctor-patient communication. In transplantation, evidence derived from qualitative research has been integrated into strategies for shared decision-making, patient educational resources, process evaluations of trials, clinical guidelines, and policies. The aim of this article is to outline key concepts and methods used in qualitative research, guide the appraisal of qualitative studies, and assist clinicians to understand how qualitative research may inform their practice and policy.

  2. How Qualitative Research Informs Clinical and Policy Decision Making in Transplantation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Allison; Morton, Rachael L; Webster, Angela C

    2016-09-01

    Patient-centered care is no longer just a buzzword. It is now widely touted as a cornerstone in delivering quality care across all fields of medicine. However, patient-centered strategies and interventions necessitate evidence about patients' decision-making processes, values, priorities, and needs. Qualitative research is particularly well suited to understanding the experience and perspective of patients, donors, clinicians, and policy makers on a wide range of transplantation-related topics including organ donation and allocation, adherence to prescribed therapy, pretransplant and posttransplant care, implementation of clinical guidelines, and doctor-patient communication. In transplantation, evidence derived from qualitative research has been integrated into strategies for shared decision-making, patient educational resources, process evaluations of trials, clinical guidelines, and policies. The aim of this article is to outline key concepts and methods used in qualitative research, guide the appraisal of qualitative studies, and assist clinicians to understand how qualitative research may inform their practice and policy. PMID:27479165

  3. Clinical judgment and decision making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided.

  4. Are patient decision aids the best way to improve clinical decision making? Report of the IPDAS Symposium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes-Rovner, M.; Nelson, W.L.; Pignone, M.; Elwyn, G.; Rovner, D.; O'Connor, A.M.; Coulter, A.; Correa-de-Araujo, R.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Symposium held in 2006 at the annual meeting of the Society for Medical Decision Making in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The symposium featured a debate regarding the proposition that "decision aids are the best way to improve clin

  5. Editorial: The search for core symptoms - will this help clinical decision-making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier Norbury, Courtenay

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosis is an important component of our clinical roles, and should also lead to particular treatment pathways. The diagnostic process may be challenged by co-occurring deficits that are neither specific nor universal to the diagnosis under consideration and may well be evident across a range of other clinical conditions. How important is it to refine our instruments so that they measure unique symptoms? Will this alter or improve intervention choices? This Editorial focuses on the extent to which fine tuning diagnostic instruments improves our decisions about treatment, in the context of articles published in this issue of JCPP. PMID:27445109

  6. Discriminative distance functions and the patient neighborhood graph for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsymbal, Alexey; Huber, Martin; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin

    2010-01-01

    There are two essential reasons for the slow progress in the acceptance of clinical similarity search-based decision support systems (DSSs); the especial complexity of biomedical data making it difficult to define a meaningful and effective distance function and the lack of transparency and explanation ability in many existing DSSs. In this chapter, we address these two problems by introducing a novel technique for visualizing patient similarity with neighborhood graphs and by considering two techniques for learning discriminative distance functions. We present an experimental study and discuss our implementation of similarity visualization within a clinical DSS. PMID:20865536

  7. EHRs Connect Research and Practice: Where Predictive Modeling, Artificial Intelligence, and Clinical Decision Support Intersect

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Casey; Selove, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Electronic health records (EHRs) are only a first step in capturing and utilizing health-related data - the challenge is turning that data into useful information. Furthermore, EHRs are increasingly likely to include data relating to patient outcomes, functionality such as clinical decision support, and genetic information as well, and, as such, can be seen as repositories of increasingly valuable information about patients' health conditions and responses to treatment over time. Methods: We describe a case study of 423 patients treated by Centerstone within Tennessee and Indiana in which we utilized electronic health record data to generate predictive algorithms of individual patient treatment response. Multiple models were constructed using predictor variables derived from clinical, financial and geographic data. Results: For the 423 patients, 101 deteriorated, 223 improved and in 99 there was no change in clinical condition. Based on modeling of various clinical indicators at baseline, the high...

  8. The effect of concept mapping on clinical decision making skills of ICU nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Dokht Akbari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Concept mapping is an innovative tool that would help hospital educators and nurses to promote their knowledge and clinical decision making skills. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of concept mapping on clinical decision making skills of nurses working in the intensive care unit (ICU. Methods: The quasi-experimental, non-equivalent control group, pretest-posttest design was conducted among baccalaureate nurses working in an intensive care unit. Forty two nurses were recruited and data gathering was performed through a self-administered questionnaire. Statistical analysis was conducted by SPSS software package version 16.0. Results: Despite the significant difference between the mean pre-, post- and retention test scores (P<0.001, there was no significant correlation between these results and the nurses’ gender. A negative significant association was found between age and improved post test scores (P=0.02. Work experience had a significant positive effect on post test score improvement (P<0.001. Conclusion: This study revealed that the concept mapping strategy had a significant effect on the clinical decision making skills of nurses. However, further research on a larger sample size is recommended to confirm the results.

  9. Clinical Recommendations in Medical Practice: A Proposed Framework to Reduce Bias and Improve the Quality of Medical Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfandre, David

    2016-01-01

    Patients rely on, benefit from, and are strongly influenced by physicians' recommendations. In spite of the centrality and importance of physicians' recommendations to clinical care, there is only a scant literature describing the conceptual process of forming a clinical recommendation, and no discrete professional standards for making individual clinical recommendations. Evidence-based medicine and shared decision making together are intended to improve medical decision making, but there has been limited attention to how a recommendation is discretely formulated from either of those processes or how patients' preferences ought to be considered and how much weight they should hold. Moreover, physicians' bias has been reported to strongly influence how a recommendation is derived, thereby undermining the quality of healthcare decisions and patients' trust. To demonstrate a potential for improving the quality of decisions, this article proposes a conceptual framework for how physicians should reach a clinical recommendation and apply the process in practice. For preference-sensitive clinical decisions-that is, clinical decisions when patients' values and preferences are relevant-the process for reaching a recommendation should be transparent to patients and should be based solely on the medical evidence and patients' values and preferences. When patients' preferences for care do not prioritize health, physicians decide whether their recommendation will prioritize a welfare-enhancing versus an autonomy-enhancing approach. When there are gaps in understanding how physicians derive their clinical recommendations and how to further improve the quality of the decisions, the author calls for further empiric research. PMID:27045301

  10. Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Malene; Reddy, Sunita; Patel, Tulsi; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun

    2015-09-01

    As a neo-liberal economy, India has become one of the new health tourism destinations, with commercial gestational surrogacy as an expanding market. Yet the Indian Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Bill has been pending for five years, and the guidelines issued by the Indian Council of Medical Research are somewhat vague and contradictory, resulting in self-regulated practices of fertility clinics. This paper broadly looks at clinical ethics in reproduction in the practice of surrogacy and decision-making in various procedures. Through empirical research in New Delhi, the capital of India, from December 2011 to November 2012, issues of decision-making on embryo transfer, fetal reduction, and mode of delivery were identified. Interviews were carried out with doctors in eighteen ART clinics, agents from four agencies, and fourteen surrogates. In aiming to fulfil the commissioning parents' demands, doctors were willing to go to the greatest extent possible in their medical practice. Autonomy and decision-making regarding choice of the number of embryos to transfer and the mode of delivery lay neither with commissioning parents nor surrogate mothers but mostly with doctors. In order to ensure higher success rates, surrogates faced the risk of multiple pregnancy and fetal reduction with little information regarding the risks involved. In the globalized market of commercial surrogacy in India, and with clinics compromising on ethics, there is an urgent need for formulation of regulative law for the clinical practice and maintenance of principles of reproductive ethics in order to ensure that the interests of surrogate mothers are safeguarded. PMID:26133889

  11. Physician Attitudes toward Adopting Genome-Guided Prescribing through Clinical Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Lynnette Overby

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support (CDS, prior to enlisting in the Clinical Implementation of Personalized Medicine through Electronic Health Records and Genomics pilot pharmacogenomics project (CLIPMERGE PGx. We developed a survey instrument that includes the Evidence Based Practice Attitude Scale, adapted to measure attitudes toward adopting genome-informed interventions (EBPAS-GII. The survey also includes items to measure physicians’ characteristics (awareness, experience, and perceived usefulness, attitudes about personal genome testing (PGT services, and comfort using technology. We surveyed 101 General Internal Medicine physicians from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS. The majority were residency program trainees (~88%. Prior to enlisting into CLIPMERGE PGx, most physicians were aware of and had used decision support aids. Few physicians, however, were aware of and had used genome-guided prescribing. The majority of physicians viewed decision support aids and genotype data as being useful for making prescribing decisions. Most physicians had not heard of, but were willing to use, PGT services and felt comfortable interpreting PGT results. Most physicians were comfortable with technology. Physicians who perceived genotype data to be useful in making prescribing decisions, had more positive attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through CDS. Our findings suggest that internal medicine physicians have a deficit in their familiarity and comfort interpreting and using genomic information. This has reinforced the importance of gathering feedback and guidance from our enrolled physicians when designing genome-guided CDS and the importance of prioritizing genomic medicine education at our institutions.

  12. Introducing Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine (ABCmed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad EJ Golzari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We are pleased to announce the launch of the Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine (ABCmed, aninternational open-access, and peer-reviewed journal. Mostly intended to cover all areas of bioscience and medicine, theJournal would provide a unique venue for the scientists from all over the world to publish their scientific works. One ofthe advantages of publishing with us is the rapid yet rigorous review process which is mostly performed by ourdistinguished Editorial and Review Board members; this obviously hard-to-achieve goal would not be realized withouttheir continuous support and advice.Another distinguishing characteristic of ABCmed is the diversity of published items in each issue. The editorial team ofthe Journal has devoted separate sections to rather unknown yet interesting fields of the science for instance hypotheses,history of medicine, etc. In the first issue of ABCmed, the readers might refer to the two published hypotheseshighlighting the possible role of chamomile in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, and also the preventive effects oftadalafil together with nimodipine in subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced cerebral vasospasm.Letters to the Editor are one of the major sectors in the ABCmed providing not only further on the already publisheddata in the Journal, but also personal comments on the major public health concerns and medical issues. In the firstissue of the Journal, a very important cancer surgery complication is debated, introducing different strategies in the painmanagement of breast cancer patients.We hope that ABCmed will provide a basis to bring together the scientists from all over the globe with the same goal ofpromoting science.

  13. Advances in endodontics: Potential applications in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Anil Kishen; Peters, Ove A.; Matthias Zehnder; Anibal R Diogenes; Nair, Madhu K.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary endodontics has seen an unprecedented advance in technology and materials. This article aimed to review some of the challenges and advances in the following sections: (1) endodontic imaging, (2) root canal preparation, (3) root canal disinfection, (4) root canal filling, and (4) regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). Jointly, these advances are aimed at improving the state of the art and science of root canal treatment.

  14. Patient exposure in the basic science classroom enhances differential diagnosis formation and clinical decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin G. Peacock

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The authors proposed that introducing real patients into a pathology classroom early in medical education would help integrate fundamental principles and disease pathology with clinical presentation and medical history. Methods. Three patients with different pathologies described their history and presentation without revealing their diagnosis. Students were required to submit a differential diagnosis in writing, and then were able to ask questions to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Students were surveyed on the efficacy of patient-based learning. Results. Average student scores on the differential diagnosis assignments significantly improved 32% during the course. From the survey, 72% of students felt that patient encounters should be included in the pathology course next year. Seventy-four percent felt that the differential diagnosis assignments helped them develop clinical decision-making skills. Seventy-three percent felt that the experience helped them know what questions to ask patients. Eighty-six percent felt that they obtained a better understanding of patients’ social and emotional challenges. Discussion. Having students work through the process of differential diagnosis formulation when encountering a real patient and their clinical presentation improved clinical decision-making skills and integrated fundamental concepts with disease pathology during a basic science pathology course.

  15. Radiographer's impact on improving clinical decision-making, patient care and patient diagnosis: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This pilot study attempts to quantify the benefits of a documented radiographic clinical history through the use of the clinical history template form designed by Egan and Baird. Six radiographers completed the clinical history template for 40 patients and four radiologists included the recorded information as part of their reporting process. A focus discussion group was held between the radiographers to ascertain the level of satisfaction and benefits encountered with the use of the template form. A questionnaire was designed for the radiologists to complete regarding the usefulness of the template form with respect to the radiological reporting process. Results/Discussion: 15 cases for which the form was used demonstrated a direct benefit in respect to improved radiographic clinical decision-making. Radiographers agreed the template form aided the establishment of a stronger radiographer-patient relationship during the radiographic examination. Two radiologists agreed the form aided in establishing a radiological diagnosis and suggested the form be implemented as part of the standard departmental protocol. Despite the small sample size, there is evidence the form aided radiographic decision-making and assisted in the establishment of an accurate radiological diagnosis. The overall consensus amongst radiographers was that it enhanced radiographer-patient communication and improved the level of patient care. Copyright (2004) Australian Institute of Radiography

  16. Students' stereotypes of patients as barriers to clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S M; Kurtz, M E; Tomlinson, T; Howe, K R

    1986-09-01

    The ability to formulate quick, accurate clinical judgments is stressed in medical training. Speed is usually an asset when a physician sorts through his biomedical knowledge, but it is often a liability when the physician assesses the sociocultural context of a clinical encounter. At the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a study was designed which graphically illustrated to beginning students that unconscious sociocultural stereotypes may influence clinical decision-making. Three entering classes of students were shown a videotape depicting five simulated patients (attractive black woman, attractive white woman, professional man, middle-aged housewife, and elderly man), each presenting with the same physical complaint. Elements of positive and negative stereotypes were incorporated into each of the portrayals, and the students rated these patients on positive and negative characteristics. The results suggested that the students attributed both positive and negative characteristics to patients on the basis of irrelevant characteristics, such as attractiveness, and with little further justification for their attributions. Such stereotypic generalizations held by students may become barriers to the students' objective clinical decision-making. PMID:3755759

  17. Students' stereotypes of patients as barriers to clinical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S M; Kurtz, M E; Tomlinson, T; Howe, K R

    1986-09-01

    The ability to formulate quick, accurate clinical judgments is stressed in medical training. Speed is usually an asset when a physician sorts through his biomedical knowledge, but it is often a liability when the physician assesses the sociocultural context of a clinical encounter. At the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a study was designed which graphically illustrated to beginning students that unconscious sociocultural stereotypes may influence clinical decision-making. Three entering classes of students were shown a videotape depicting five simulated patients (attractive black woman, attractive white woman, professional man, middle-aged housewife, and elderly man), each presenting with the same physical complaint. Elements of positive and negative stereotypes were incorporated into each of the portrayals, and the students rated these patients on positive and negative characteristics. The results suggested that the students attributed both positive and negative characteristics to patients on the basis of irrelevant characteristics, such as attractiveness, and with little further justification for their attributions. Such stereotypic generalizations held by students may become barriers to the students' objective clinical decision-making.

  18. FAmily CEntered (FACE) advance care planning: Study design and methods for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for patients with HIV/AIDS and their surrogate decision-makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Allison L; Wang, Jichuan; Scott, Rachel K; Briggs, Linda; Lyon, Maureen E

    2015-07-01

    Although the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has become a chronic illness, disease-specific advance care planning has not yet been evaluated for the palliative care needs of adults with HIV/AIDS. This prospective, longitudinal, randomized, two-arm controlled clinical trial aims to test the efficacy of FAmily CEntered advance care planning among adults living with AIDS and/or HIV with co-morbidities on congruence in treatment preferences, healthcare utilization, and quality of life. The FAmily CEntered intervention arm is two face-to-face sessions with a trained, certified facilitator: Session 1) Disease-Specific Advance Care Planning Respecting Choices Interview; Session 2) Completion of advance directive. The Healthy Living Control arm is: Session 1) Developmental/Relationship History; Session 2) Nutrition. Follow-up data will be collected at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months post-intervention. A total of 288 patient/surrogate dyads will be enrolled from five hospital-based, out-patient clinics in Washington, District of Columbia. Participants will be HIV positive and ≥ 21 years of age; surrogates will be ≥ 18 years of age. Exclusion criteria are homicidality, suicidality, psychosis, and impaired cognitive functioning. We hypothesize that this intervention will enhance patient-centered communication with a surrogate decision-maker about end of life treatment preferences over time, enhance patient quality of life and decrease health care utilization. We further hypothesize that this intervention will decrease health disparities for Blacks in completion of advance directives. If proposed aims are achieved, the benefits of palliative care, particularly increased treatment preferences about end-of-life care and enhanced quality of life, will be extended to people living with AIDS.

  19. Computerized clinical decision support systems for therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weise-Kelly Lorraine

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some drugs have a narrow therapeutic range and require monitoring and dose adjustments to optimize their efficacy and safety. Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs may improve the net benefit of these drugs. The objective of this review was to determine if CCDSSs improve processes of care or patient outcomes for therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. Studies from our previous review were included, and new studies were sought until January 2010 in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews, and Inspec databases. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of a CCDSS on process of care or patient outcomes were selected by pairs of independent reviewers. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results Thirty-three randomized controlled trials were identified, assessing the effect of a CCDSS on management of vitamin K antagonists (14, insulin (6, theophylline/aminophylline (4, aminoglycosides (3, digoxin (2, lidocaine (1, or as part of a multifaceted approach (3. Cluster randomization was rarely used (18% and CCDSSs were usually stand-alone systems (76% primarily used by physicians (85%. Overall, 18 of 30 studies (60% showed an improvement in the process of care and 4 of 19 (21% an improvement in patient outcomes. All evaluable studies assessing insulin dosing for glycaemic control showed an improvement. In meta-analysis, CCDSSs for vitamin K antagonist dosing significantly improved time in therapeutic range. Conclusions CCDSSs have potential for improving process of care for therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing, specifically insulin and vitamin K antagonist dosing. However, studies were small and generally of modest quality, and effects on patient outcomes were uncertain, with no convincing

  20. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian. PMID:26946752

  1. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian.

  2. Decision Making in the PICU: An Examination of Factors Influencing Participation Decisions in Phase III Randomized Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Slosky, Laura E; Marilyn Stern; Burke, Natasha L.; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. In stressful situations, decision making processes related to informed consent may be compromised. Given the profound levels of distress that surrogates of children in pediatric intensive care units (PICU) experience, it is important to understand what factors may be influencing the decision making process beyond the informed consent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of clinician influence and other factors on decision making regarding participation in a randomiz...

  3. Clinical decision making and outcome in the routine care of people with severe mental illness across Europe (CEDAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puschner, B; Becker, T; Mayer, B;

    2016-01-01

    and Satisfaction Scale (CDIS) measured involvement and satisfaction with a specific decision at all time points. Primary outcome was patient-rated unmet needs measured with the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule (CANSAS). Mixed-effects multinomial regression was used to examine differences......Aims. Shared decision making has been advocated as a means to improve patient-orientation and quality of health care. There is a lack of knowledge on clinical decision making and its relation to outcome in the routine treatment of people with severe mental illness. This study examined preferred...... and experienced clinical decision making from the perspectives of patients and staff, and how these affect treatment outcome. Methods. "Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People with Severe Mental Illness" (CEDAR; ISRCTN75841675) is a naturalistic prospective observational study...

  4. Alzheimer's disease: Cerebrovascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and advanced clinical therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Marlatt; P.J. Lucassen; G. Perry; M.A. Smith; X. Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Many lines of independent research have provided convergent evidence regarding oxidative stress, cerebrovascular disease, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical studies spurred by these findings engage basic and clinical communities with tangible results regarding molecular targets and pat

  5. A Critical Review of the Theoretical Frameworks and the Conceptual Factors in the Adoption of Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-12-01

    The clinical decision support system is utilized to translate knowledge into evidence-based practice in clinical settings. Many studies have been conducted to understand users' adoption of the clinical decision support system. A critical review was conducted to understand the theoretical or conceptual frameworks used to inform the studies on the adoption of the clinical decision support system. The review identified 15 theoretical and conceptual frameworks using multiple hybrids of theories and concepts. The Technology Acceptance Model was the most frequently used baseline framework combined with frameworks such as the diffusion of innovation, social theory, longitudinal theory, and so on. The results from these articles yielded multiple concepts influencing the adoption of the clinical decision support system. These concepts can be recategorized into nine major concepts, namely, the information system, person (user or patient), social, organization, perceived benefits, emotions, trustability, relevance (fitness), and professionalism. None of the studies found all the nine concepts. That said, most of them have identified the information system, organization, and person concepts as three of its concepts affecting the use of the clinical decision support system. Within each of the concepts, its subconcepts were noted to be very varied. Yet each of these subconcepts has significantly contributed toward the different facets of the concepts. A pluralistic framework was built using the concepts and subconcepts to provide an overall framework construct for future study on the adoption of the clinical decision support system. PMID:26535769

  6. Constructing Clinical Decision Support Systems for Adverse Drug Event Prevention: A Knowledge-based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutkias, Vassilis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Stalidis, George; Lazou, Katerina; Collyda, Chrysa; Chazard, Emmanuel; McNair, Peter; Beuscart, Regis; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2010-11-13

    A knowledge-based approach is proposed that is employed for the construction of a framework suitable for the management and effective use of knowledge on Adverse Drug Event (ADE) prevention. The framework has as its core part a Knowledge Base (KB) comprised of rule-based knowledge sources, that is accompanied by the necessary inference and query mechanisms to provide healthcare professionals and patients with decision support services in clinical practice, in terms of alerts and recommendations on preventable ADEs. The relevant Knowledge Based System (KBS) is developed in the context of the EU-funded research project PSIP (Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in Medication). In the current paper, we present the foundations of the framework, its knowledge model and KB structure, as well as recent progress as regards the population of the KB, the implementation of the KBS, and results on the KBS verification in decision support operation.

  7. How can clinical practice guidelines be adapted to facilitate shared decision making? A qualitative key-informant study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijden, T.T. van der; Pieterse, A.H.; Koelewijn-van Loon, M.S.; Knaapen, L.; Legare, F.; Boivin, A.; Burgers, J.S.; Stiggelbout, A.M.; Faber, M.J.; Elwyn, G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To explore how clinical practice guidelines can be adapted to facilitate shared decision making. METHODS: This was a qualitative key-informant study with group discussions and semi-structured interviews. First, 75 experts in guideline development or shared decision making participated in

  8. A study of diverse clinical decision support rule authoring environments and requirements for integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Li

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient rule authoring tools are critical to allow clinical Knowledge Engineers (KEs, Software Engineers (SEs, and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs to convert medical knowledge into machine executable clinical decision support rules. The goal of this analysis was to identify the critical success factors and challenges of a fully functioning Rule Authoring Environment (RAE in order to define requirements for a scalable, comprehensive tool to manage enterprise level rules. Methods The authors evaluated RAEs in active use across Partners Healthcare, including enterprise wide, ambulatory only, and system specific tools, with a focus on rule editors for reminder and medication rules. We conducted meetings with users of these RAEs to discuss their general experience and perceived advantages and limitations of these tools. Results While the overall rule authoring process is similar across the 10 separate RAEs, the system capabilities and architecture vary widely. Most current RAEs limit the ability of the clinical decision support (CDS interventions to be standardized, sharable, interoperable, and extensible. No existing system meets all requirements defined by knowledge management users. Conclusions A successful, scalable, integrated rule authoring environment will need to support a number of key requirements and functions in the areas of knowledge representation, metadata, terminology, authoring collaboration, user interface, integration with electronic health record (EHR systems, testing, and reporting.

  9. Developing more open and equitable relationships with industry to improve advancements in clinical research in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, M; Ryan, C; Menter, A

    2016-06-01

    Relationships between physicians, scientists, and the pharmaceutical industry can be complicated by conflicts of interest. Honest and equitable relationships, however, are essential to the advancement of dermatologic clinical research. Several factors can increase transparency in clinical trials including preregistration of clinical trials, reporting of all data produced from clinical trials, non-industry ownership of clinical trial data, clarity of statistical methods and publication of both positive and negative results. Through collaborative, scientifically rigorous studies, physicians and industry can achieve significant advances in dermatologic care. PMID:27317287

  10. Design and layout decisions for refuelling system of advanced fast neutron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience in operation of BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 power units, as well as development of refuelling systems for BN-800 power unit, allows developing of refuelling system for BN-1200 advanced reactor of new generation. The refuelling system was developed on the basis of possible technical decisions aimed at improvement of safety and technical-and-economic indices. Structural layout of BN-1200 reactor refuelling system is given. Main differences in BN-1200 reactor refuelling system as compared with BN-800 reactor are given. Design features of refuelling equipment are: - BN-1200 reactor has a split large rotating plug to allow transporting of its components by railway with subsequent assembling at site; - the refuelling box is fabricated in the form of sectional parallelepiped to allow transporting of its components by railway with subsequent assembling at site; - one 'direct' refuelling mechanism and one cantilever' refuelling mechanism are used to refuel rarely replaced protection assemblies that allows reducing of overall dimensions of rotating plugs; - the vertical elevator is arranged on the oval plug installed on the reactor cover. The upper structure with elevator drive rotates together with the elevator plug under rotary drive located on the oval plug. The vertical elevator allows sufficient reduction of refuelling box; - the refuelling machine runs on straight-line rails. The vertical elevator, gas gate valve on reactor refuelling channel, non-use of spent FA drum and enhanced radiation protection on the column of refuelling box machine allows reduction of specific materials consumption of BN-1200 reactor refuelling system by more than 10 times as compared with BN-800 reactor. To verify refuelling equipment operability the following experiments are planned: - mastering of gripper design for 'direct' refuelling mechanism and refuelling machine; - mastering of 'cantilever' for refuelling mechanism; - mastering of fresh FA conveyor design. As for the

  11. A conceptual framework and protocol for defining clinical decision support objectives applicable to medical specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timbie Justin W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services established the Electronic Health Record (EHR Incentive Program in 2009 to stimulate the adoption of EHRs. One component of the program requires eligible providers to implement clinical decision support (CDS interventions that can improve performance on one or more quality measures pre-selected for each specialty. Because the unique decision-making challenges and existing HIT capabilities vary widely across specialties, the development of meaningful objectives for CDS within such programs must be supported by deliberative analysis. Design We developed a conceptual framework and protocol that combines evidence review with expert opinion to elicit clinically meaningful objectives for CDS directly from specialists. The framework links objectives for CDS to specialty-specific performance gaps while ensuring that a workable set of CDS opportunities are available to providers to address each performance gap. Performance gaps may include those with well-established quality measures but also priorities identified by specialists based on their clinical experience. Moreover, objectives are not constrained to performance gaps with existing CDS technologies, but rather may include those for which CDS tools might reasonably be expected to be developed in the near term, for example, by the beginning of Stage 3 of the EHR Incentive program. The protocol uses a modified Delphi expert panel process to elicit and prioritize CDS meaningful use objectives. Experts first rate the importance of performance gaps, beginning with a candidate list generated through an environmental scan and supplemented through nominations by panelists. For the highest priority performance gaps, panelists then rate the extent to which existing or future CDS interventions, characterized jointly as “CDS opportunities,” might impact each performance gap and the extent to which each CDS opportunity is compatible with

  12. Translating shared decision-making into health care clinical practices: Proof of concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Jacques Sylvie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable interest today in shared decision-making (SDM, defined as a decision-making process jointly shared by patients and their health care provider. However, the data show that SDM has not been broadly adopted yet. Consequently, the main goal of this proposal is to bring together the resources and the expertise needed to develop an interdisciplinary and international research team on the implementation of SDM in clinical practice using a theory-based dyadic perspective. Methods Participants include researchers from Canada, US, UK, and Netherlands, representing medicine, nursing, psychology, community health and epidemiology. In order to develop a collaborative research network that takes advantage of the expertise of the team members, the following research activities are planned: 1 establish networking and on-going communication through internet-based forum, conference calls, and a bi-weekly e-bulletin; 2 hold a two-day workshop with two key experts (one in theoretical underpinnings of behavioral change, and a second in dyadic data analysis, and invite all investigators to present their views on the challenges related to the implementation of SDM in clinical practices; 3 conduct a secondary analyses of existing dyadic datasets to ensure that discussion among team members is grounded in empirical data; 4 build capacity with involvement of graduate students in the workshop and online forum; and 5 elaborate a position paper and an international multi-site study protocol. Discussion This study protocol aims to inform researchers, educators, and clinicians interested in improving their understanding of effective strategies to implement shared decision-making in clinical practice using a theory-based dyadic perspective.

  13. A diagnosis-based clinical decision rule for spinal pain part 2: review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurwitz Eric L

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal pain is a common and often disabling problem. The research on various treatments for spinal pain has, for the most part, suggested that while several interventions have demonstrated mild to moderate short-term benefit, no single treatment has a major impact on either pain or disability. There is great need for more accurate diagnosis in patients with spinal pain. In a previous paper, the theoretical model of a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule was presented. The approach is designed to provide the clinician with a strategy for arriving at a specific working diagnosis from which treatment decisions can be made. It is based on three questions of diagnosis. In the current paper, the literature on the reliability and validity of the assessment procedures that are included in the diagnosis-based clinical decision rule is presented. Methods The databases of Medline, Cinahl, Embase and MANTIS were searched for studies that evaluated the reliability and validity of clinic-based diagnostic procedures for patients with spinal pain that have relevance for questions 2 (which investigates characteristics of the pain source and 3 (which investigates perpetuating factors of the pain experience. In addition, the reference list of identified papers and authors' libraries were searched. Results A total of 1769 articles were retrieved, of which 138 were deemed relevant. Fifty-one studies related to reliability and 76 related to validity. One study evaluated both reliability and validity. Conclusion Regarding some aspects of the DBCDR, there are a number of studies that allow the clinician to have a reasonable degree of confidence in his or her findings. This is particularly true for centralization signs, neurodynamic signs and psychological perpetuating factors. There are other aspects of the DBCDR in which a lesser degree of confidence is warranted, and in which further research is needed.

  14. MACVIA clinical decision algorithm in adolescents and adults with allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, Holger J; Hellings, Peter W;

    2016-01-01

    decision support systems (CDSSs) might be beneficial for the assessment of disease control. CDSSs should be based on the best evidence and algorithms to aid patients and health care professionals to jointly determine treatment and its step-up or step-down strategy depending on AR control. Contre les......The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) depends on several factors, including age, prominent symptoms, symptom severity, control of AR, patient preferences, and cost. Allergen exposure and the resulting symptoms vary, and treatment adjustment is required. Clinical...

  15. Mobile Clinical Decision Support Systems in Our Hands - Great Potential but also a Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the powerful computer resources as well as the availability of today's mobile devices, a special field of mobile systems for clinical decision support in medicine has been developed. The benefits of these applications (systems) are: availability of necessary hardware (mobile phones, tablets and phablets are widespread, and can be purchased at a relatively affordable price), availability of mobile applications (free or for a "small" amount of money) and also mobile applications are tailored for easy use and save time of clinicians in their daily work. In these systems lies a huge potential, and certainly a great economic benefit, so this issue must be approached multidisciplinary. PMID:27350467

  16. Clinical decision support, systems methodology, and telemedicine: their role in the management of chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, E R; Cramp, D G; Morgan, A; Roudsari, A V

    1998-06-01

    In this paper, the design and evaluation of decision support systems, including those incorporating a telematic component, are considered. It is argued that effective design and evaluation are dependent upon the adoption of appropriate methodology set firmly within a systemic framework. Systems modeling is proposed as an approach to system design, with evaluation adopting an approach incorporating evaluability analysis and formative and summative evaluation, including the use of stakeholder matrix analysis. The relevance of such systemic methodology is demonstrated in the context of diabetes and end-stage renal disease as examples of the generic clinical problem of the management of chronic disease. PMID:10719517

  17. Performance of online drug information databases as clinical decision support tools in infectious disease medication management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polen, Hyla H; Zapantis, Antonia; Clauson, Kevin A; Clauson, Kevin Alan; Jebrock, Jennifer; Paris, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Infectious disease (ID) medication management is complex and clinical decision support tools (CDSTs) can provide valuable assistance. This study evaluated scope and completeness of ID drug information found in online databases by evaluating their ability to answer 147 question/answer pairs. Scope scores produced highest rankings (%) for: Micromedex (82.3), Lexi-Comp/American Hospital Formulary Service (81.0), and Medscape Drug Reference (81.0); lowest includes: Epocrates Online Premium (47.0), Johns Hopkins ABX Guide (45.6), and PEPID PDC (40.8). PMID:18999059

  18. Mobile Clinical Decision Support Systems in Our Hands - Great Potential but also a Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the powerful computer resources as well as the availability of today's mobile devices, a special field of mobile systems for clinical decision support in medicine has been developed. The benefits of these applications (systems) are: availability of necessary hardware (mobile phones, tablets and phablets are widespread, and can be purchased at a relatively affordable price), availability of mobile applications (free or for a "small" amount of money) and also mobile applications are tailored for easy use and save time of clinicians in their daily work. In these systems lies a huge potential, and certainly a great economic benefit, so this issue must be approached multidisciplinary.

  19. Effects of computerized clinical decision support systems on practitioner performance and patient outcomes: Methods of a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilczynski Nancy L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computerized clinical decision support systems are information technology-based systems designed to improve clinical decision-making. As with any healthcare intervention with claims to improve process of care or patient outcomes, decision support systems should be rigorously evaluated before widespread dissemination into clinical practice. Engaging healthcare providers and managers in the review process may facilitate knowledge translation and uptake. The objective of this research was to form a partnership of healthcare providers, managers, and researchers to review randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of computerized decision support for six clinical application areas: primary preventive care, therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing, drug prescribing, chronic disease management, diagnostic test ordering and interpretation, and acute care management; and to identify study characteristics that predict benefit. Methods The review was undertaken by the Health Information Research Unit, McMaster University, in partnership with Hamilton Health Sciences, the Hamilton, Niagara, Haldimand, and Brant Local Health Integration Network, and pertinent healthcare service teams. Following agreement on information needs and interests with decision-makers, our earlier systematic review was updated by searching Medline, EMBASE, EBM Review databases, and Inspec, and reviewing reference lists through 6 January 2010. Data extraction items were expanded according to input from decision-makers. Authors of primary studies were contacted to confirm data and to provide additional information. Eligible trials were organized according to clinical area of application. We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect on practitioner performance or patient outcomes of patient care provided with a computerized clinical decision support system compared with patient care without such a system. Results Data will be summarized

  20. The Nijmegen decision tool for chronic low back pain. Development of a clinical decision tool for secondary or tertiary spine care specialists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda L van Hooff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Western Europe, low back pain has the greatest burden of all diseases. When back pain persists, different medical specialists are involved and a lack of consensus exists among these specialists for medical decision-making in Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP. OBJECTIVE: To develop a decision tool for secondary or tertiary spine care specialists to decide which patients with CLBP should be seen by a spine surgeon or by other non-surgical medical specialists. METHODS: A Delphi study was performed to identify indicators predicting the outcome of interventions. In the preparatory stage evidence from international guidelines and literature were summarized. Eligible studies were reviews and longitudinal studies. Inclusion criteria: surgical or non-surgical interventions and persistence of complaints, CLBP-patients aged 18-65 years, reported baseline measures of predictive indicators, and one or more reported outcomes had to assess functional status, quality of life, pain intensity, employment status or a composite score. Subsequently, a three-round Delphi procedure, to reach consensus on candidate indicators, was performed among a multidisciplinary panel of 29 CLBP-professionals (>five years CLBP-experience. The pre-set threshold for general agreement was ≥70%. The final indicator set was used to develop a clinical decision tool. RESULTS: A draft list with 53 candidate indicators (38 with conclusive evidence and 15 with inconclusive evidence was included for the Delphi study. Consensus was reached to include 47 indicators. A first version of the decision tool was developed, consisting of a web-based screening questionnaire and a provisional decision algorithm. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first clinical decision tool based on current scientific evidence and formal multidisciplinary consensus that helps referring the patient for consultation to a spine surgeon or a non-surgical spine care specialist. We expect that this tool considerably helps

  1. Clinical and Experimental Advances in Regeneration of Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jung Keun Hyun; Hae-Won Kim

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the major disabilities dealt with in clinical rehabilitation settings and is multifactorial in that the patients suffer from motor and sensory impairments as well as many other complications throughout their lifetimes. Many clinical trials have been documented during the last two decades to restore damaged spinal cords. However, only a few pharmacological therapies used in clinical settings which still have only limited effects on the regeneration, recovery ...

  2. Decision Support Systems for Research and Management in Advanced Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Luis F.

    2004-01-01

    Decision support systems have been implemented in many applications including strategic planning for battlefield scenarios, corporate decision making for business planning, production planning and control systems, and recommendation generators like those on Amazon.com(Registered TradeMark). Such tools are reviewed for developing a similar tool for NASA's ALS Program. DSS are considered concurrently with the development of the OPIS system, a database designed for chronicling of research and development in ALS. By utilizing the OPIS database, it is anticipated that decision support can be provided to increase the quality of decisions by ALS managers and researchers.

  3. Recent advances towards the clinical application of DNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bins, A D; van den Berg, J H; Oosterhuis, K; Haanen, J B A G

    2013-04-01

    DNA vaccination is an attractive method for therapeutic vaccination against intracellular pathogens and cancer. This review provides an introduction into the DNA vaccination field and discusses the pre-clinical successes and most interesting clinical achievements thus far. Furthermore, general attributes, mechanism of action and safety of DNA vaccination will be discussed. Since clinical results with DNA vaccination so far show room for improvement, possibilities to improve the delivery and immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are reviewed. In the coming years, these new developments should show whether DNA vaccination is able to induce clinically relevant responses in patients.

  4. A decision exercise to engage cancer patients and families in Deliberation about Medicare Coverage for advanced Cancer Care

    OpenAIRE

    Danis, Marion; Abernethy, Amy P; Zafar, S Yousuf; Samsa, Gregory P.; Wolf, Steven P; Howie, Lynn; Taylor, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns about unsustainable costs in the US Medicare program loom as the number of retirees increase and experiences serious and costly illnesses like cancer. Engagement of stakeholders, particularly cancer patients and their families, in prioritizing insured services offers a valuable strategy for informing Medicare coverage policy. We designed and evaluated a decision exercise that allowed cancer patients and family members to choose Medicare benefits for advanced cancer patient...

  5. [Advance Care Planning and Decisions to limit treatment at the end of life - the view from medical ethics and psychooncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Eva C; Heußner, Pia

    2016-03-01

    Decisions to limit treatment are important in order to avoid overtreatment at the end of life. They proceed more than half of expected deaths in Europe and the US, but are not always communicated with the patient in advance. One reason for non-involvement is that conversations that prepare patients for end-of-life decisions and work out their preferences do not take place on a regular basis. At the same time there is growing evidence that such communication improves patients' quality of life, reduces anxiety and depression and allows patients to develop a realistic understanding of their situation - which in turn is a prerequisite for shared decision making about limiting treatment. In this paper we define "treatment limitation" and explain the medical ethics perspective. The main focus, however, is on the causes that hinder advanced care planning and conversations about limiting treatment in the care of patients with advanced disease. Finally the evidence for approaches to improve the situation is presented with concrete suggestions for solutions.

  6. Multidisciplinary Modelling of Symptoms and Signs with Archetypes and SNOMED-CT for Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Maldonado, J Alberto; Karlsen, Randi; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) help to improve health care and reduce costs. However, the lack of knowledge management and modelling hampers their maintenance and reuse. Current EHR standards and terminologies can allow the semantic representation of the data and knowledge of CDSS systems boosting their interoperability, reuse and maintenance. This paper presents the modelling process of respiratory conditions' symptoms and signs by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and information architects with the help of openEHR, SNOMED and clinical information modelling tools for a CDSS. The information model of the CDSS was defined by means of an archetype and the knowledge model was implemented by means of an SNOMED-CT based ontology. PMID:25991115

  7. Which factors play a role in clinical decision-making in subfertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steeg, Jan W; Steures, Pieternel; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Habbema, J Dik F; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Hompes, Peter G A; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben W J

    2006-04-01

    Sixteen vignettes of subfertile couples were constructed by varying fertility history, post-coital test, sperm motility, FSH concentration and Chlamydia antibody titre (CAT). Thirty-five gynaecologists estimated probabilities of treatment-independent pregnancy, intrauterine insemination (IUI) and IVF. Thereafter, they chose IUI, IVF or no treatment. The relative contribution of each factor to probability estimates and to subsequent treatment decisions was calculated. Duration of subfertility and maternal age were the most important contributors for gynaecologists' estimates of treatment-independent pregnancy [relative contribution (RC) 41, 26%]. Maternal age and FSH concentration were the most important contributors in the estimates for IUI (RC: 51, 25%) and for IVF (RC: 64, 31%). The decision to start IVF was mainly determined by maternal age, duration of subfertility, FSH concentration and CAT. The relative contribution of maternal age and duration of subfertility was in concordance with existing prediction models, whereas previous pregnancy and FSH concentration were under- and overestimated respectively. In conclusion, maternal age, duration of subfertility and FSH concentration are the main factors in clinical decision-making in subfertility. Gynaecologists overestimate the importance of FSH concentration, but underestimate that of a previous pregnancy, as compared with their importance reported in prediction models and guidelines. PMID:16740221

  8. Application of a diagnosis-based clinical decision guide in patients with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Donald R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain (NP is a common cause of disability. Accurate and efficacious methods of diagnosis and treatment have been elusive. A diagnosis-based clinical decision guide (DBCDG; previously referred to as a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule has been proposed which attempts to provide the clinician with a systematic, evidence-based guide in applying the biopsychosocial model of care. The approach is based on three questions of diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to present the prevalence of findings using the DBCDG in consecutive patients with NP. Methods Demographic, diagnostic and baseline outcome measure data were gathered on a cohort of NP patients examined by one of three examiners trained in the application of the DBCDG. Results Data were gathered on 95 patients. Signs of visceral disease or potentially serious illness were found in 1%. Centralization signs were found in 27%, segmental pain provocation signs were found in 69% and radicular signs were found in 19%. Clinically relevant myofascial signs were found in 22%. Dynamic instability was found in 40%, oculomotor dysfunction in 11.6%, fear beliefs in 31.6%, central pain hypersensitivity in 4%, passive coping in 5% and depression in 2%. Conclusion The DBCDG can be applied in a busy private practice environment. Further studies are needed to investigate clinically relevant means to identify central pain hypersensitivity, oculomotor dysfunction, poor coping and depression, correlations and patterns among the diagnostic components of the DBCDG as well as inter-examiner reliability, validity and efficacy of treatment based on the DBCDG.

  9. Application of a diagnosis-based clinical decision guide in patients with low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Donald R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain (LBP is common and costly. Development of accurate and efficacious methods of diagnosis and treatment has been identified as a research priority. A diagnosis-based clinical decision guide (DBCDG; previously referred to as a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule has been proposed which attempts to provide the clinician with a systematic, evidence-based means to apply the biopsychosocial model of care. The approach is based on three questions of diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to present the prevalence of findings using the DBCDG in consecutive patients with LBP. Methods Demographic, diagnostic and baseline outcome measure data were gathered on a cohort of LBP patients examined by one of three examiners trained in the application of the DBCDG. Results Data were gathered on 264 patients. Signs of visceral disease or potentially serious illness were found in 2.7%. Centralization signs were found in 41%, lumbar and sacroiliac segmental signs in 23% and 27%, respectively and radicular signs were found in 24%. Clinically relevant myofascial signs were diagnosed in 10%. Dynamic instability was diagnosed in 63%, fear beliefs in 40%, central pain hypersensitivity in 5%, passive coping in 3% and depression in 3%. Conclusion The DBCDG can be applied in a busy private practice environment. Further studies are needed to investigate clinically relevant means to identify central pain hypersensitivity, poor coping and depression, correlations and patterns among the diagnostic components of the DBCDG as well as inter-examiner reliability and efficacy of treatment based on the DBCDG.

  10. Evaluation of Clinical Decision Rules for Bone Mineral Density Testing among White Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Anders

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteoporosis is a devastating, insidious disease that causes skeletal fragility. Half of women will suffer osteoporotic fractures during their lifetimes. Many fractures occur needlessly, because of inattentiveness to assessment, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of osteoporosis. Study Purpose. Study Purpose. To evaluate the discriminatory performance of clinical decision rules to determine the need to undergo bone mineral density testing. Methods. A nationally representative sample from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey consisted of 14,060 subjects who completed surveys, physical examinations, laboratory tests, and bone mineral density exams. Multivariable linear regression tested the correlation of covariates that composed the clinical decision rules with bone mineral density. Results. Increased age and decreased weight were variables in the final regression models for each gender and race/ethnicity. Among the indices, the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool, which is composed of age and weight, performed best for White women. Study Implications. These results have implications for the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis. The Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool performed best and is inexpensive and the least time consuming to implement.

  11. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Pierre; Ben Yamin, Barbara; Fourrière, Lou; Lescure, Aurianne; Boudier, Thomas; Del Nery, Elaine; Chauchereau, Anne; Goldgar, David E; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Nicolas, Alain; Millot, Gaël A

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the medical effect of an ever-growing number of human variants detected is a long term challenge in genetic counseling. Functional assays, based on in vitro or in vivo evaluations of the variant effects, provide essential information, but they require robust statistical validation, as well as adapted outputs, to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays. Next, we developed a novel approach that refines the variant ranking in these functional assays. Lastly, we developed a computational system that provides a probabilistic classification of variants, adapted to clinical interpretation. Using this system, the best functional assay exhibits a variant classification accuracy estimated at 93%. Additional theoretical simulations highlight the benefit of this ready-to-use system in the classification of variants after functional assessment, which should facilitate the consideration of functional evidences in the decision-making process after genetic testing. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the system with the classification of siRNAs tested for human cell growth inhibition in high throughput screening. PMID:27272900

  12. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Thouvenot

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the medical effect of an ever-growing number of human variants detected is a long term challenge in genetic counseling. Functional assays, based on in vitro or in vivo evaluations of the variant effects, provide essential information, but they require robust statistical validation, as well as adapted outputs, to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays. Next, we developed a novel approach that refines the variant ranking in these functional assays. Lastly, we developed a computational system that provides a probabilistic classification of variants, adapted to clinical interpretation. Using this system, the best functional assay exhibits a variant classification accuracy estimated at 93%. Additional theoretical simulations highlight the benefit of this ready-to-use system in the classification of variants after functional assessment, which should facilitate the consideration of functional evidences in the decision-making process after genetic testing. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the system with the classification of siRNAs tested for human cell growth inhibition in high throughput screening.

  13. Building the Clinical Bridge to Advance Education, Research, and Practice Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Svejda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Michigan School of Nursing and the Health System partnered to develop an undergraduate clinical education model as part of a larger project to advance clinical education, practice, and scholarship with education serving as the clinical bridge that anchors all three areas. The clinical model includes clusters of clinical units as the clinical home for four years of a student's education, clinical instruction through team mentorship, clinical immersion, special skills preparation, and student portfolio. The model was examined during a one-year pilot with junior students. Stakeholders were largely positive. Findings showed that Clinical Faculty engaged in more role modeling of teaching strategies as Mentors assumed more direct teaching used more clinical reasoning strategies. Students reported increased confidence and competence in clinical care by being integrated into the team and the Mentor's assignment. Two new full time faculty roles in the Health System support education, practice, and research.

  14. Design and implementation of a decision support system for breast cancer treatment based on clinical practice guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence based medicine is the clinical practice that uses medical data and proof in order to make efficient clinical decisions. Information technology (IT) can play a crucial role in exploiting the huge size of raw medical data involved. In an attempt to improve clinical efficacy, health care society nowadays also utilizes a new assistant, clinical guidelines. Our research concerns the medical domain of the breast cancer disease. Our research's focus is twofold; our primary goal is to ensure consistency in clinical practice by importing clinical guidelines in an IT driven decision support system (DSS). Furthermore, we seek to improve visualization of disease specific, clinical data, providing for it's faster and more efficient use. (orig.)

  15. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah M. Westberg, Pharm.D.; Kathrine Beeksma, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic.Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, includ...

  16. Advancing description and explanation in clinical linguistics: a legacy of Martin J. Ball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, Jack S; Damico, Holly L; Nelson, Ryan L

    2011-11-01

    This article asserts the importance of explication of order and disorder in language as a privileged objective of clinical linguistics and service delivery and reviews the contributions of Martin Ball in advancing this agenda.

  17. Student Pharmacists’ Clinical Interventions in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences at a Community Nonteaching Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Shogbon, Angela O.; Lundquist, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess student pharmacists’ clinical interventions in advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) at a community nonteaching hospital and evaluate completed interventions based on the type of documentation method used.

  18. Recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support and knowledge management in community settings: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ash Joan S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to identify recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support (CDS development and implementation and for knowledge management (KM processes in ambulatory clinics and community hospitals using commercial or locally developed systems in the U.S. Methods Guided by the Multiple Perspectives Framework, the authors conducted ethnographic field studies at two community hospitals and five ambulatory clinic organizations across the U.S. Using a Rapid Assessment Process, a multidisciplinary research team: gathered preliminary assessment data; conducted on-site interviews, observations, and field surveys; analyzed data using both template and grounded methods; and developed universal themes. A panel of experts produced recommended practices. Results The team identified ten themes related to CDS and KM. These include: 1 workflow; 2 knowledge management; 3 data as a foundation for CDS; 4 user computer interaction; 5 measurement and metrics; 6 governance; 7 translation for collaboration; 8 the meaning of CDS; 9 roles of special, essential people; and 10 communication, training, and support. Experts developed recommendations about each theme. The original Multiple Perspectives framework was modified to make explicit a new theoretical construct, that of Translational Interaction. Conclusions These ten themes represent areas that need attention if a clinic or community hospital plans to implement and successfully utilize CDS. In addition, they have implications for workforce education, research, and national-level policy development. The Translational Interaction construct could guide future applied informatics research endeavors.

  19. A proposed clinical decision support architecture capable of supporting whole genome sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M; Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-04-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  20. Myocardial strain imaging: how useful is it in clinical decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiseth, Otto A; Torp, Hans; Opdahl, Anders; Haugaa, Kristina H; Urheim, Stig

    2016-04-14

    Myocardial strain is a principle for quantification of left ventricular (LV) function which is now feasible with speckle-tracking echocardiography. The best evaluated strain parameter is global longitudinal strain (GLS) which is more sensitive than left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) as a measure of systolic function, and may be used to identify sub-clinical LV dysfunction in cardiomyopathies. Furthermore, GLS is recommended as routine measurement in patients undergoing chemotherapy to detect reduction in LV function prior to fall in LVEF. Intersegmental variability in timing of peak myocardial strain has been proposed as predictor of risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Strain imaging may be applied to guide placement of the LV pacing lead in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy. Strain may also be used to diagnose myocardial ischaemia, but the technology is not sufficiently standardized to be recommended as a general tool for this purpose. Peak systolic left atrial strain is a promising supplementary index of LV filling pressure. The strain imaging methodology is still undergoing development, and further clinical trials are needed to determine if clinical decisions based on strain imaging result in better outcome. With this important limitation in mind, strain may be applied clinically as a supplementary diagnostic method.

  1. Esophageal perforation: diagnostic work-up and clinical decision-making in the first 24 hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søreide Jon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Esophageal perforation is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition. Early clinical suspicion and imaging is important for case management to achieve a good outcome. However, recent studies continue to report high morbidity and mortality greater than 20% from esophageal perforation. At least half of the perforations are iatrogenic, mostly related to endoscopic instrumentation used in the upper gastrointestinal tract, while about a third are spontaneous perforations. Surgical treatment remains an important option for many patients, but a non-operative approach, with or without use of an endoscopic stent or placement of internal or external drains, should be considered when the clinical situation allows for a less invasive approach. The rarity of this emergency makes it difficult for a physician to obtain extensive individual clinical experience; it is also challenging to obtain firm scientific evidence that informs patient management and clinical decision-making. Improved attention to non-specific symptoms and signs and early diagnosis based on imaging may translate into better outcomes for this group of patients, many of whom are elderly with significant comorbidity.

  2. Lung cancer patients' decisions about clinical trials and the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Pratt, Christie L; Bryant-George, Kathy; Caraway, Vicki D; Paternoster, Bonnie; Roldan, Tere; Shaffer, Andrea; Shimizu, Cynthia O; Vaughn, Elizabeth J; Williams, Charles; Bepler, Gerold

    2011-12-01

    The theory of planned behavior explores the relationship between behavior, beliefs, attitudes, and intentions presupposing that behavioral intention is influenced by a person's attitude about the behavior and beliefs about whether individuals, who are important to them, approve or disapprove of the behavior (subjective norm). An added dimension to the theory is the idea of perceived behavioral control, or the belief that one has control over performing the behavior. The theory of planned behavior suggests that people may make greater efforts to perform a behavior if they feel they have a high level of control over it. In this examination of data, we explored the application of the theory of planned behavior to patient's decisions about participating in a clinic trial. Twelve respondents in this study had previously participated in a clinical trial for lung cancer and nine respondents had declined a clinical trial for lung cancer. The data were analyzed with regard to the four constructs associated with the theory of planned behavior: behavioral intention, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control. Results indicate that the theory of planned behavior may be a useful tool to examine psychosocial needs in relation to behavioral intention of clinical trial participation.

  3. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    , and logistical concerns. Ensuring data security and protection of patient rights while simultaneously facilitating standardization is paramount to maintaining public support. The capabilities of supercomputing need to be applied strategically. A standardized, methodological implementation must be applied to developed artificial intelligence systems with the ability to integrate data and information into clinically relevant knowledge. Ultimately, the integration of bioinformatics and clinical data in a clinical decision support system promises precision medicine and cost effective and personalized patient care.

  4. Clinical Application of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Patients with Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    WU Zhi-sen; ZHENG Chen-xiao; Qi, Liang; CHANG Shang-yi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. Methods: The clinical data and efficacy of 26 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis (26 knees) who were given TKA in our department from June 2012 to May 2013 were retrospectively observed and analyzed. The knee function scores before operation and after follow up were evaluated according to American HSS scoring standard. Results: At the end of follow up, of...

  5. A clinical decision aid for the selection of antithrombotic therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaHaye, Stephen Andrew; Gibbens, Sabra Lynn; Ball, David Gerald Andrew;

    2012-01-01

    The availability of new antithrombotic agents, each with a unique efficacy and bleeding profile, has introduced a considerable amount of clinical uncertainty with physicians. We have developed a clinical decision aid in order to assist clinicians in determining an optimal antithrombotic regime fo...... the prevention of stroke in patients who are newly diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation....

  6. Integrating Clinical Decision Making and Patient Care at the Paediatric Emergency Department -focusing on children with serious infections-

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. De Vos-Kerkhof (Evelien)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe general aim of this thesis was to integrate clinical decision making and patient care in the clinical practice of the paediatric ED, focusing on children at risk for serious infections. Serious infections still cause morbidity and mortality and this underlines the importance of

  7. CLINICAL-MORPHOLOGICAL CORRELATIONS IN ADVANCED COLORECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Bălan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: During 2000-2007 we have selected and supervised a lot of 279 cases operated for colorectal cancer in Clinic no.1 Surgery from “St. Spiridon” Hospital. The sex repartition during the entire study period shows the preponderance of male cases (61.29% in comparison to the female cases of 38.7 %. In our study the operated colorectal carcinomas have a higher incidence at patients over 60 years old, 71.67%. There is as well a higher percent for the age group 60-70 years old and 70-80 years old which percent reaches 34.76% respectively 32.97% out of the total number of cases. When comparing the average age of the two analyzed lots there we can notice that the average age of the female patients does not differ significantly from the age of the male patients. The average age of the female patients was of 64,3±8,58 with minimum values of 51 years and maximum of 78 years and the average age of male patients was of 67,9±10,5 with minim of 44 years and maximum of 86 years. The on segments distribution of the colorectal cancer is presented as follows: rectum 108 cases (38,7%, sigmoid 96 cases (34,40%, descendent 19 cases (6,81%, hepatic angle 17 cases (6.09%, transverse 17 cases (6.09%, ascending 12 cases (4,3% % the rest of the localizations being in a smaller number. In the case of males the colorectal cancer is met most often at the level of the rectum (32.74% and the case of females at the level of the sigmoid (41.66%. Regarding the microscopic results they were: well differentiated adenocarcinoma 45.83%, moderate differentiated 43.75% and weak differentiated 10.42%. The Chi-square analysis shows that there is no association between the macroscopic aspects of the tumours and their histological aspect. Analyzing the microscopic aspect according to the location of the tumour there is observed that 86.95% of the tumours that were located at the level of the rectum have a vegetative aspect. There was not observed any link between the gender

  8. Recent developments in choledochoscopy: technical and clinical advances

    OpenAIRE

    Xu MM; Kahaleh M

    2016-01-01

    Ming-Ming Xu, Michel Kahaleh Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Peroral cholangioscopy has become an important tool in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of biliary diseases, ranging from indeterminate biliary strictures to bile duct stones. Although the first cholangioscopy was performed in the 1970s, recent technological advances have provided us with cholangioscopes that yield high-resolution im...

  9. Prioritization of engineering support requests and advanced technology projects using decision support and industrial engineering models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Madjid

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation and prioritization of Engineering Support Requests (ESR's) is a particularly difficult task at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) -- Shuttle Project Engineering Office. This difficulty is due to the complexities inherent in the evaluation process and the lack of structured information. The evaluation process must consider a multitude of relevant pieces of information concerning Safety, Supportability, O&M Cost Savings, Process Enhancement, Reliability, and Implementation. Various analytical and normative models developed over the past have helped decision makers at KSC utilize large volumes of information in the evaluation of ESR's. The purpose of this project is to build on the existing methodologies and develop a multiple criteria decision support system that captures the decision maker's beliefs through a series of sequential, rational, and analytical processes. The model utilizes the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), subjective probabilities, the entropy concept, and Maximize Agreement Heuristic (MAH) to enhance the decision maker's intuition in evaluating a set of ESR's.

  10. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, fourteen topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, high-level evidence for annual screening with multimodal strategy which could reduce ovarian cancer deaths was reported. The best preventive strategies with current status of evidence level were also summarized. Final report of chemotherapy or upfront surgery (CHORUS) trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced stage ovarian cancer and individualized therapy based on gene characteristics followed. There was no sign of abating in great interest in immunotherapy as well as targeted therapies in various gynecologic cancers. The fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference which was held in November 7–9 in Tokyo was briefly introduced. For cervical cancer, update of human papillomavirus vaccines regarding two-dose regimen, 9-valent vaccine, and therapeutic vaccine was reviewed. For corpus cancer, the safety concern of power morcellation in presumed fibroids was explored again with regard to age and prevalence of corpus malignancy. Hormone therapy and endometrial cancer risk, trabectedin as an option for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial cancer and Lynch syndrome, and the radiation therapy guidelines were also discussed. In addition, adjuvant therapy in vulvar cancer and the updated of targeted therapy in gynecologic cancer were addressed. For breast cancer, palbociclib in hormone-receptor-positive advanced disease, oncotype DX Recurrence Score in low-risk patients, regional nodal irradiation to internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes, and cavity shave margins were summarized as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:27775259

  11. Artificial Sight Basic Research, Biomedical Engineering, and Clinical Advances

    CERN Document Server

    Humayun, Mark S; Chader, Gerald; Greenbaum, Elias

    2008-01-01

    Artificial sight is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology combining the multidisciplinary skills of surgical ophthalmology, biomedical engineering, biological physics, and psychophysical testing. Many scientific, engineering, and surgical challenges must be surmounted before widespread practical applications can be realized. The goal of Artificial Sight is to summarize the state-of-the-art research in this exciting area, and to describe some of the current approaches and initiatives that may help patients in a clinical setting. The Editors are active researchers in the fields of artificial sight, biomedical engineering and biological physics. They have received numerous professional awards and recognition for their work. The artificial sight team at the Doheny Eye Institute, led by Dr. Mark Humayun, is a world leader in this area of biomedical engineering and clinical research. Key Features Introduces and assesses the state of the art for a broad audience of biomedical engineers, biophysicists, and clinical...

  12. Proceedings of Joint International Symposium on the role of noninvasive imaging modalities in clinical decision making of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains ten papers on the use of noninvasive imaging in clinical diagnosis and decision making. Topics include a cost analysis of magnetic resonance imaging in medical technology, diagnostic uses of MRI in chronic coronary artery disease, clinical applications of cine computed tomography, the use of PET as a clinical tool, and the use of echocardiography in coronary artery disease. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  13. Model-based decision making in early clinical development: minimizing the impact of a blood pressure adverse event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Mark; Addy, Carol; Wu, Yunhui; Stoch, S Aubrey; Pourkavoos, Nazaneen; Groff, Michelle; Xu, Yang; Wagner, John; Gottesdiener, Keith; Shadle, Craig; Wang, Hong; Manser, Kimberly; Winchell, Gregory A; Stone, Julie A

    2009-03-01

    We describe how modeling and simulation guided program decisions following a randomized placebo-controlled single-rising oral dose first-in-man trial of compound A where an undesired transient blood pressure (BP) elevation occurred in fasted healthy young adult males. We proposed a lumped-parameter pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model that captured important aspects of the BP homeostasis mechanism. Four conceptual units characterized the feedback PD model: a sinusoidal BP set point, an effect compartment, a linear effect model, and a system response. To explore approaches for minimizing the BP increase, we coupled the PD model to a modified PK model to guide oral controlled-release (CR) development. The proposed PK/PD model captured the central tendency of the observed data. The simulated BP response obtained with theoretical release rate profiles suggested some amelioration of the peak BP response with CR. This triggered subsequent CR formulation development; we used actual dissolution data from these candidate CR formulations in the PK/PD model to confirm a potential benefit in the peak BP response. Though this paradigm has yet to be tested in the clinic, our model-based approach provided a common rational framework to more fully utilize the limited available information for advancing the program.

  14. Electronic clinical decision support systems attitudes and barriers to use in the oncology setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, I M

    2012-03-02

    BACKGROUND: There is little evidence regarding attitudes to clinical decision support systems (CDSS) in oncology. AIMS: We examined the current usage, awareness, and concerns of Irish medical oncologists and oncology pharmacists in this area. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 27 medical oncologists and 34 oncology pharmacists, identified through professional interest groups. Respondents ranked concerns regarding their use of a CDSS on a scale from 1 to 4, with 4 being most important. RESULTS: Overall, 67% (41\\/61) responded, 48% (13\\/27) of oncologists and 82% (28\\/34) of pharmacists surveyed. Concerns included "difficulty defining complex clinical situations with a set of rules" (mean ± SD) (3.2 ± 0.9), "ensuring evidence base is up to date and relevant" (3.2 ± 0.9) and "lack of clinically relevant suggestions" (2.9 ± 0.9). Ninety-three percent reported using a CDSS but 54% were unaware of this. CONCLUSION: While there are benefits to using a CDSS, concerns must be addressed through user education. This may be a starting point for a user-centred design approach to the development of future local systems through a consultative process.

  15. Using clinical decision support as a means of implementing a universal postpartum depression screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Holly; Nentin, Farida; Silverman, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    A major barrier to the diagnosis of postpartum depression (PPD) includes symptom detection. The lack of awareness and understanding of PPD among new mothers, the variability in clinical presentation, and the various diagnostic strategies can increase this further. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of adding clinical decision support (CDS) to the electronic health record (EHR) as a means of implementing a universal standardized PPD screening program within a large, at high risk, population. All women returning to the Mount Sinai Hospital OB/GYN Ambulatory Practice for postpartum care between 2010 and 2013 were presented with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in response to a CDS "hard stop" built into the EHR. Of the 2102 women who presented for postpartum care, 2092 women (99.5 %) were screened for PPD in response to a CDS hard stop module. Screens were missing on ten records (0.5 %) secondary to refusal, language barrier, or lack of clarity in the EHR. Technology is becoming increasingly important in addressing the challenges faced by health care providers. While the identification of PPD has become the recent focus of public health concerns secondary to the significant social burden, numerous barriers to screening still exist within the clinical setting. The utility of adding CDS in the form of a hard stop, requiring clinicians to enter a standardized PPD mood assessment score to the patient EHR, offers a sufficient way to address a primary barrier to PPD symptom identification at the practitioner level.

  16. Advances in data exchange for the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolin, R H

    1999-06-01

    The focus of the article is on the nuts and bolts of those standards relevant to the exchange of data between a clinical laboratory and an electronic health record. These include: Health Level 7 (HL7), Logical Observation Identifier Names and Codes (LOINC), Systematized Nomenclature of Human and Veterinary Medicine (SNOMED), and, most recently, the Extensible Markup Language (XML). PMID:10421962

  17. The role of advance directives in end-of-life decisions in Austria: survey of intensive care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schopper Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, intensive care medicine strives to define a generally accepted way of dealing with end-of-life decisions, therapy limitation and therapy discontinuation. In 2006 a new advance directive legislation was enacted in Austria. Patients may now document their personal views regarding extension of treatment. The aim of this survey was to explore Austrian intensive care physicians' experiences with and their acceptance of the new advance directive legislation two years after enactment (2008. Methods Under the aegis of the OEGARI (Austrian Society of Anaesthesiology, Resuscitation and Intensive Care an anonymised questionnaire was sent to the medical directors of all intensive care units in Austria. The questions focused on the physicians' experiences regarding advance directives and their level of knowledge about the underlying legislation. Results There were 241 questionnaires sent and 139 were turned, which was a response rate of 58%. About one third of the responders reported having had no experience with advance directives and only 9 directors of intensive care units had dealt with more than 10 advance directives in the previous two years. Life-supporting measures, resuscitation, and mechanical ventilation were the predominantly refused therapies, wishes were mainly expressed concerning pain therapy. Conclusion A response rate of almost 60% proves the great interest of intensive care professionals in making patient-oriented end-of-life decisions. However, as long as patients do not make use of their right of co-determination, the enactment of the new law can be considered only a first important step forward.

  18. Service oriented architecture for clinical decision support: a systematic review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Chatwin, Chris; Huser, Vojtech

    2014-12-01

    The use of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been identified as a promising approach for improving health care by facilitating reliable clinical decision support (CDS). A review of the literature through October 2013 identified 44 articles on this topic. The review suggests that SOA related technologies such as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) and Service Component Architecture (SCA) have not been generally adopted to impact health IT systems' performance for better care solutions. Additionally, technologies such as Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and architectural approaches like Service Choreography have not been generally exploited among researchers and developers. Based on the experience of other industries and our observation of the evolution of SOA, we found that the greater use of these approaches have the potential to significantly impact SOA implementations for CDS. PMID:25325996

  19. Four Principles for User Interface Design of Computerised Clinical Decision Support Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Marion Berg; Nøhr, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract.  The paper presents results from design of a user interface for a Computerised Clinical Decision Support System (CSSS). The ambition has been to design Human-Computer Interaction that can minimise medication errors. Through an iterative design process a digital prototype for prescription...... emphasises a focus on how users interact with the system, a focus on how information is provided by the system, and four principles of interaction. The four principles for design of user interfaces for CDSS are summarised as four A’s: All in one, At a glance, At hand and Attention. It is recommended that all...... four interaction principles are integrated in the design of user interfaces for CDSS, i.e. the model is an integrated model which we suggest as a guide for interaction design when working with preventing medication errors....

  20. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Nurses' Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Yang, Jinqiu; Liu, Lingying; Ye, Benlan

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the influencing factors on nurses' clinical decision-making (CDM) skills. A cross-sectional nonexperimental research design was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency departments of two university hospitals, between May and June 2014. We used a quantile regression method to identify the influencing factors across different quantiles of the CDM skills distribution and compared the results with the corresponding ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates. Our findings revealed that nurses were best at the skills of managing oneself. Educational level, experience, and the total structural empowerment had significant positive impacts on nurses' CDM skills, while the nurse-patient relationship, patient care and interaction, formal empowerment, and information empowerment were negatively correlated with nurses' CDM skills. These variables explained no more than 30% of the variance in nurses' CDM skills and mainly explained the lower quantiles of nurses' CDM skills distribution. PMID:26906246

  1. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Mao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD go back at least 500 years to the late 16th century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21st century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade.

  2. Fertility Intent and Contraceptive Decision-making among HIV Positive and Negative Antenatal Clinic Attendees in Durban, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Marlow, Heather M.; Maman, Suzanne; Groves, Allison K.; Moodley, Daya

    2012-01-01

    We explored contraceptive decision-making among South African antenatal clinic attendees, fertility intent post-HIV diagnosis, and women’s experiences at government health facilities. Data are from in-depth interviews with HIV negative and HIV positive women. We interviewed women in Zulu; interviews were recorded, transcribed and translated. We conducted qualitative analyses of interviews. Women were the dominant decision-makers about contraceptive use, whether they involved their partners or...

  3. Recent advances in understanding xenotransplantation: implications for the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David Kc; Bottino, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The results of organ and cell allotransplantation continue to improve, but the field remains limited by a lack of deceased donor organs. Xenotransplantation, for example, between pig and human, offers unlimited organs and cells for clinical transplantation. The immune barriers include a strong innate immune response in addition to the adaptive T-cell response. The innate response has largely been overcome by the transplantation of organs from pigs with genetic modifications that protect their tissues from this response. T-cell-mediated rejection can be controlled by immunosuppressive agents that inhibit costimulation. Coagulation dysfunction between the pig and primate remains problematic but is being overcome by the transplantation of organs from pigs that express human coagulation-regulatory proteins. The remaining barriers will be resolved by the introduction of novel genetically-engineered pigs. Limited clinical trials of pig islet and corneal transplantation are already underway. PMID:26548357

  4. Advanced Nursing Directives: Integrating Validated Clinical Scoring Systems into Nursing Care in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Kate deForest

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to improve the quality and flow of care provided to children presenting to the emergency department the implementation of nurse-initiated protocols is on the rise. We review the current literature on nurse-initiated protocols, validated emergency department clinical scoring systems, and the merging of the two to create Advanced Nursing Directives (ANDs. The process of developing a clinical pathway for children presenting to our pediatric emergency department (PED with suspected appendicitis will be used to demonstrate the successful integration of validated clinical scoring systems into practice through the use of Advanced Nursing Directives. Finally, examples of 2 other Advanced Nursing Directives for common clinical PED presentations will be provided.

  5. ATLAAS: an automatic decision tree-based learning algorithm for advanced image segmentation in positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Beatrice; Marshall, Christopher; Evans, Mererid; Spezi, Emiliano

    2016-07-01

    Accurate and reliable tumour delineation on positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for radiotherapy treatment planning. PET automatic segmentation (PET-AS) eliminates intra- and interobserver variability, but there is currently no consensus on the optimal method to use, as different algorithms appear to perform better for different types of tumours. This work aimed to develop a predictive segmentation model, trained to automatically select and apply the best PET-AS method, according to the tumour characteristics. ATLAAS, the automatic decision tree-based learning algorithm for advanced segmentation is based on supervised machine learning using decision trees. The model includes nine PET-AS methods and was trained on a 100 PET scans with known true contour. A decision tree was built for each PET-AS algorithm to predict its accuracy, quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), according to the tumour volume, tumour peak to background SUV ratio and a regional texture metric. The performance of ATLAAS was evaluated for 85 PET scans obtained from fillable and printed subresolution sandwich phantoms. ATLAAS showed excellent accuracy across a wide range of phantom data and predicted the best or near-best segmentation algorithm in 93% of cases. ATLAAS outperformed all single PET-AS methods on fillable phantom data with a DSC of 0.881, while the DSC for H&N phantom data was 0.819. DSCs higher than 0.650 were achieved in all cases. ATLAAS is an advanced automatic image segmentation algorithm based on decision tree predictive modelling, which can be trained on images with known true contour, to predict the best PET-AS method when the true contour is unknown. ATLAAS provides robust and accurate image segmentation with potential applications to radiation oncology.

  6. Clinical utility of nivolumab in the treatment of advanced melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmar R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ramsey Asmar,1 Jessica Yang,1 Richard D Carvajal1,2 1Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, 2Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Melanomas are highly immunogenic tumors that evade the immune system by exploiting innate checkpoint pathways, rendering effector T-cells anergic. The immunotherapeutic approach of checkpoint inhibition can restore and invigorate endogenous antitumor T-cell responses and has become an important treatment option for patients with advanced melanoma. The CTLA-4 inhibitor ipilimumab and the PD-1 inhibitors nivolumab and pembrolizumab have been shown to induce durable responses and improve overall survival in metastatic, refractory melanoma. Optimization and validation of pretreatment biomarkers to predict response to these agents is a crucial area of ongoing research. Combination immunotherapy has recently demonstrated superior response rates compared to monotherapy; further investigation is needed to refine combinatorial strategies. Keywords: nivolumab, immune checkpoint inhibitors, PD-1, melanoma

  7. Regulation of Clinical Trials with Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Matthias; Anliker, Brigitte; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schuele, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union, clinical trials for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products are regulated at the national level, in contrast to the situation for a Marketing Authorisation Application, in which a centralised procedure is foreseen for these medicinal products. Although based on a common understanding regarding the regulatory requirement to be fulfilled before conduct of a clinical trial with an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product, the procedures and partly the scientific requirements for approval of a clinical trial application differ between the European Union Member States. This chapter will thus give an overview about the path to be followed for a clinical trial application and the subsequent approval process for an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product in Germany and will describe the role of the stakeholders that are involved. In addition, important aspects of manufacturing, quality control and non-clinical testing of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in the clinical development phase are discussed. Finally, current and future approaches for harmonisation of clinical trial authorisation between European Union Member States are summarised.

  8. Clinical Performance and Management Outcomes with the DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Profile Test in a Prospective Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Meldi Plasseraud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Uveal melanoma management is challenging due to its metastatic propensity. DecisionDx-UM is a prospectively validated molecular test that interrogates primary tumor biology to provide objective information about metastatic potential that can be used in determining appropriate patient care. To evaluate the continued clinical validity and utility of DecisionDx-UM, beginning March 2010, 70 patients were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, IRB-approved study to document patient management differences and clinical outcomes associated with low-risk Class 1 and high-risk Class 2 results indicated by DecisionDx-UM testing. Thirty-seven patients in the prospective study were Class 1 and 33 were Class 2. Class 1 patients had 100% 3-year metastasis-free survival compared to 63% for Class 2 (log rank test p=0.003 with 27.3 median follow-up months in this interim analysis. Class 2 patients received significantly higher-intensity monitoring and more oncology/clinical trial referrals compared to Class 1 patients (Fisher’s exact test p=2.1×10-13 and p=0.04, resp.. The results of this study provide additional, prospective evidence in an independent cohort of patients that Class 1 and Class 2 patients are managed according to the differential metastatic risk indicated by DecisionDx-UM. The trial is registered with Clinical Application of DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Assay Results (NCT02376920.

  9. Clinical Decision Support for the Classification of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Comparison of Manual and Automated Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsch, Christoph; Fehre, Karsten; Prager, Sonja; Scholda, Christoph; Kriechbaum, Katharina; Wrba, Thomas; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The management of diabetic retinopathy, a frequent ophthalmological manifestation of diabetes mellitus, consists of regular examinations and a standardized, manual classification of disease severity, which is used to recommend re-examination intervals. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing automated, guideline-based diabetic retinopathy (DR) grading into clinical routine by applying established clinical decision support (CDS) technology. We compared manual with automated classification that was generated using medical documentation and an Arden server with a specific medical logic module. Of 7169 included eyes, 47% (n=3373) showed inter-method classification agreement, specifically 29.4% in mild DR, 38.3% in moderate DR, 27.6% in severe DR, and 65.7% in proliferative DR. We demonstrate that the implementation of a CDS system for automated disease severity classification in diabetic retinopathy is feasible but also that, due to the highly individual nature of medical documentation, certain important criteria for the used electronic health record system need to be met in order to achieve reliable results.

  10. Healthy workplaces: the case for shared clinical decision making and increased full-time employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinspun, Doris

    2007-01-01

    Today, healthy work environments are recognized as essential to attain positive experiences and optimal clinical outcomes for patients, the well-being of healthcare providers and organizational effectiveness. Creating such environments is both a collective and an individual responsibility. It requires each of us to move away from the rhetoric, abandon our comfort zones and territorialities, adopt new evidence, and fully embrace the collective good. This commentary builds on the two excellent papers on this issue (Shamian and El-Jardali, and Clements, Dault and Priest), and adds two new necessary elements to build healthy workplaces and productive teamwork. The first is shared clinical decision making, the most substantive form of teamwork, and a necessary condition to build healthy work environments and deliver optimal patient care. The second is employment status: we cannot achieve healthy work environments and optimal teamwork with overreliance on part-time, casual or agency employment. The key premise for Ontario's 70% full-time employment policy is based on the fact that such a percentage is a necessary, minimal condition to ensure continuity of care and caregiver for patients, and continuity of relationships for our teams. PMID:17479007

  11. Evaluating acceptance and user experience of a guideline-based clinical decision support system execution platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenestado, David; Elorz, Javier; Pérez-Yarza, Eduardo G; Iruetaguena, Ander; Segundo, Unai; Barrena, Raúl; Pikatza, Juan M

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to determine what the initial disposition of physicians towards the use of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) based on Computerised Clinical Guidelines and Protocols (CCGP) is; and whether their prolonged utilisation has a positive effect on their intention to adopt them in the future. For a period of 3 months, 8 volunteer paediatricians monitored each up to 10 asthmatic patients using two CCGPs deployed in the-GuidesMed CDSS. A Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) questionnaire was supplied to them before and after using the system. Results from both questionnaires are analysed searching for significant improvements in opinion between them. An additional survey was performed to analyse the usability of the system. It was found that initial disposition of physicians towards e-GuidesMed is good. Improvement between the pre and post iterations of the TAM questionnaire has been found to be statistically significant. Nonetheless, slightly lower values in the Compatibility and Habit variables show that participants perceive possible difficulties to integrate e-GuidesMed into their daily routine. The variable Facilitators shows the highest correlation with the Intention to Use. Usability of the system has also been rated very high and, in this regard, no fundamental flaw has been detected. Initial views towards e-GuidesMed are positive, and become reinforced after continued utilisation of the system. In order to achieve an effective implementation, it becomes essential to facilitate conditions to integrate the system into the physician's daily routine.

  12. Clinical Holistic Health: Advanced Tools for Holistic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available According to holistic medical theory, the patient will heal when old painful moments, the traumatic events of life that are often called “gestalts”, are integrated in the present “now”. The advanced holistic physician’s expanded toolbox has many different tools to induce this healing, some that are more dangerous and potentially traumatic than others. The more intense the therapeutic technique, the more emotional energy will be released and contained in the session, but the higher also is the risk for the therapist to lose control of the session and lose the patient to his or her own dark side. To avoid harming the patient must be the highest priority in holistic existential therapy, making sufficient education and training an issue of highest importance. The concept of “stepping up” the therapy by using more and more “dramatic” methods to get access to repressed emotions and events has led us to a “therapeutic staircase” with ten steps: (1 establishing the relationship; (2 establishing intimacy, trust, and confidentiality; (3 giving support and holding; (4 taking the patient into the process of physical, emotional, and mental healing; (5 social healing of being in the family; (6 spiritual healing — returning to the abstract wholeness of the soul; (7 healing the informational layer of the body; (8 healing the three fundamental dimensions of existence: love, power, and sexuality in a direct way using, among other techniques, “controlled violence” and “acupressure through the vagina”; (9 mind-expanding and consciousness-transformative techniques like psychotropic drugs; and (10 techniques transgressing the patient's borders and, therefore, often traumatizing (for instance, the use of force against the will of the patient.We believe that the systematic use of the staircase will greatly improve the power and efficiency of holistic medicine for the patient and we invite a broad cooperation in scientifically testing the

  13. Comparison of residents’ approaches to clinical decisions before and after the implementation of Evidence Based Medicine course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAHRA KARIMIAN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been found that the decision-making process in medicine is affected, to a large extent, by one’s experience, individual mentality, previous models, and common habitual approaches, in addition to scientific principles. Evidence-based medicine is an approach attempting to reinforce scientific, systematic and critical thinking in physicians and provide the ground for optimal decision making. In this connection, the purpose of the present study is to find out to what extent the education of evidence based medicine affects clinical decision making. Methods: The present quasi-experimental study was carried out on 110 clinical residents, who started their education in September, 2012 and finally 62 residents filled out the questionnaires. The instrument used was a researchermade questionnaire containing items on four decision-making approaches. The questionnaire was used both as a pre-test and a post-test to assess the residents’ viewpoints on decision making approaches. The validity of the questionnaire was determined using medical education and clinical professionals’ viewpoints, and the reliability was calculated through Chronbach alpha; it was found to be 0.93. The results were analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS, version 14. Results: The results demonstrated that evidence-based medicine workshop significantly affected the residents’ decision-making approaches (p<0.001. The pre-test showed that principles-based, reference-based and routine model-based approaches were more preferred before the program (p<0.001. However, after the implementation of the program, the dominant approaches used by the residents in their decision making were evidence-based ones. Conclusion: To develop the evidence-based approach, it is necessary for educational programs to continue steadily and goal-orientedly. In addition, the equipment infrastructure such as the Internet, access to data bases, scientific data, and clinical guides should

  14. [Dapoxetine for premature ejaculation: Advances in clinical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting-you; Li, Yan-feng

    2015-10-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a most common sexual dysfunction, for which dapoxetine, a novel selective serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI), is the only licensed oral medicine at present. With the advantages of fast absorption, rapid action, on-demand medication, and short half-life time, dapoxetine has been proved by clinical trials to be effective in prolonging the intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) and improving the overall condition of PE patients in various areas and populations. Compared with the traditional SSRIs, dapoxetine has a better safety and tolerability. The most frequently reported dapoxetine-related adverse events include nausea, diarrhea, headache and dizziness, but with very few severe or serious cases. PMID:26665685

  15. [Research advance on clinical blood transfusion and tumor therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xue-Bing; Zhang, Li-Ping; Wang, Yan-Ju; Ma, Cong

    2010-08-01

    Clinical blood transfusion is one of the most important supportive therapy for patients with tumor. The blood transfusion has dual effects for patients with tumor. First, blood transfusion can rectify anemia and improve oxygen saturation, accelerate oxidation and necrosis for tumor cells; the second, blood transfusion can induce immunosuppression, tumor recurrence and postoperative infection for tumor patients. Filtering white blood cells (WBC) before blood transfusion can decrease the incidence of the adverse reactions. The rational perioperative autotransfusion for patients with tumors is focus to which the world medical sciences pay close attention. In this article, the support effect of blood transfusion for treatment of tumor patients, blood transfusion and immunosuppression, blood transfusion and postoperative infection and relapse of tumor patients, depleted leukocyte blood transfusion and autologous transfusion of tumor patients are reviewed.

  16. Recent Advances in the Clinical Management of Lead Poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Kianoush

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning is a historic universal disease. Acute or chronic lead exposure may cause reversible or even permanent damages in human beings. Environmental lead exposure is a global health concern in children. Occupational lead poisoning is still a health issue, particularly in developing countries. During the last decades, new methods and medications have been advocated for the prevention and treatment of lead poisoning. This review deals mainly with recent developments in the management of lead poisoning. Sources of lead exposure are introduced, and methods for the primary prevention of lead poisoning are discussed. Details for the screening of adults and children are also explained to serve as a practical guideline for the secondary prevention. Standard chelation therapy in different groups and up-to-date less toxic new medications for the treatment of lead poisoning are finally discussed. Our published clinical research on the therapeutic effects of garlic tablets in mild to moderate occupational lead poisoning will also be discussed.

  17. Formative assessment and design of a complex clinical decision support tool for pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sundas; McCullagh, Lauren; Press, Anne; Kharche, Manish; Schachter, Andy; Pardo, Salvatore; McGinn, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Electronic health record (EHR)-based clinical decision support (CDS) tools are rolled out with the urgency to meet federal requirements without time for usability testing and refinement of the user interface. As part of a larger project to design, develop and integrate a pulmonary embolism CDS tool for emergency physicians, we conducted a formative assessment to determine providers' level of interest and input on designs and content. This was a study to conduct a formative assessment of emergency medicine (EM) physicians that included focus groups and key informant interviews. The focus of this study was twofold, to determine the general attitude towards CDS tool integration and the ideal integration point into the clinical workflow. To accomplish this, we first approached EM physicians in a focus group, then, during key informant interviews, we presented workflow designs and gave a scenario to help the providers visualise how the CDS tool works. Participants were asked questions regarding the trigger location, trigger words, integration into their workflow, perceived utility and heuristic of the tool. Results from the participants' survey responses to trigger location, perceived utility and efficiency, indicated that the providers felt the tool would be more of a hindrance than an aid. However, some providers commented that they had not had exposure to CDS tools but had used online calculators, and thought the tools would be helpful at the point-of-care if integrated into the EHR. Furthermore, there was a preference for an order entry wireframe. This study highlights several factors to consider when designing CDS tools: (1) formative assessment of EHR functionality and clinical environment workflow, (2) focus groups and key informative interviews to incorporate providers' perceptions of CDS and workflow integration and/or (3) the demonstration of proposed workflows through wireframes to help providers visualise design concepts.

  18. Advanced clinical practice for radiographers in Great Britain: professional roles, accountability and the educational provision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A change in British health care has resulted in a broadening of roles and responsibilities beyond 'traditional boundaries' for a range of health care professionals. This has occurred because of staff shortages (particularly within the medical profession) and the recognition that many 'non-doctor' health care staff can make safe, competent and effective contributions outside their 'normal' sphere of responsibilities. In the context of advanced clinical practice, this paper will explain the current arrangements for radiographers' roles and responsibilities, their accountability and the educational provision that underpins the development of competencies at these higher clinical levels. Some advanced roles that British radiographers perform, within their current normal responsibilities, will be identified and some British legislation and professional body guidance that make role advancement possible will be outlined. The article will conclude with an indication of the educational level at which the advanced competencies are learned and assessed. (author)

  19. Pharmacogenetics Informed Decision Making in Adolescent Psychiatric Treatment: A Clinical Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teri Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances made in genetic testing and tools applied to pharmacogenetics are increasingly being used to inform clinicians in fields such as oncology, hematology, diabetes (endocrinology, cardiology and expanding into psychiatry by examining the influences of genetics on drug efficacy and metabolism. We present a clinical case example of an adolescent male with anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and autism spectrum disorder who did not tolerate numerous medications and dosages over several years in attempts to manage his symptoms. Pharmacogenetics testing was performed and DNA results on this individual elucidated the potential pitfalls in medication use because of specific pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences specifically involving polymorphisms of genes in the cytochrome p450 enzyme system. Future studies and reports are needed to further illustrate and determine the type of individualized medicine approach required to treat individuals based on their specific gene patterns. Growing evidence supports this biological approach for standard of care in psychiatry.

  20. Communication Skills and Decision Making for Elderly Patients With Advanced Kidney Disease: A Guide for Nephrologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncicki, Holly M; Schell, Jane O

    2016-04-01

    Elderly patients comprise the most rapidly growing population initiating dialysis therapy and may derive particular benefit from comprehensive assessment of geriatric syndromes, coexisting comorbid conditions, and overall prognosis. Palliative care is a philosophy that aims to improve quality of life and assist with treatment decision making for patients with serious illness such as kidney disease. Palliative skills for the nephrology provider can aid in the care of these patients. This review provides nephrology providers with 4 primary palliative care skills to guide treatment decision making: (1) use prognostic tools to identify patients who may benefit from conservative management, (2) disclose prognostic information to patients who may not do well with dialysis therapy, (3) incorporate patient goals and values to outline a treatment plan, and (4) prepare patients and families for transitions and end of life.

  1. Chronic hepatitis C: Treat or wait? Medical decision making in clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claus Niederau; Dietrich Hüppe; Elmar Zehnter; Bernd M(o)ller; Renate Heyne; Stefan Christensen; Rainer Pfaff

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To analyzes the decision whether patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are treated or not.METHODS:This prospective cohort study included 7658 untreated patients and 6341 patients receiving pegylated interferon α2a/ribavirin,involving 434 physicians/institutions throughout Germany (377 in private practice and 57 in hospital settings).A structured questionnaire had to be answered prior to the treatment decision,which included demographic data,information about the personal life situation of the patients,anamnesis and symptomatology of hepatitis C,virological data,laboratory data and data on concomitant diseases.A second part of the study analyzes patients treated with pegylated interferon α2a.All questionnaires included reasons against treatment mentioned by the physician.RESULTS:Overall treatment uptake was 45%.By multivariate analysis,genotype 1/4/5/6,HCV-RNA ≤ 520 000 IU/mL,normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT),platelets ≤ 142 500/μL,age > 56 years,female gender,infection length > 12.5 years,concomitant diseases,human immunodeficiency virus co-infection,liver biopsy not performed,care in private practice,asymptomatic disease,and unemployment were factors associated with reduced treatment rate.Treatment and sustained viral response rates in migrants (1/3 of cohort) were higher than in German natives although 1/3 of migrants had language problems.Treatment rate and liver biopsy were higher in clinical settings when compared to private practice and were low when ALT and HCV-RNA were low.CONCLUSION:Some reasons against treatment were medically based whereas others were related to fears,socio-economical problems,and information deficits both on the side of physicians and patients.

  2. Clinical Application of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Patients with Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhi-sen; ZHENG Chen-xiao; QI Liang; CHANG Shang-yi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical value of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. Methods:The clinical data and efficacy of 26 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis (26 knees) who were given TKA in our department from June 2012 to May 2013 were retrospectively observed and analyzed. The knee function scores before operation and after follow up were evaluated according to American HSS scoring standard. Results:At the end of follow up, of the 26 patients, 18 were excellent, 6 were good and 2 were not bad in knee function and mobility without sense of pain, which was regarded to be associated with the poor enthusiasm in knee function training, and the total rate of excellent and good was 92.3%. Conclusion:TKA has signiifcant clinical value and favorable efifcacy on patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis.

  3. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu; Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Kagadis, George C. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 26504 (Greece); McNutt, Todd R. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  4. Construction of a Clinical Decision Support System for Undergoing Surgery Based on Domain Ontology and Rules Reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Bau, Cho-Tsan; Chen, Rung-Ching; Huang, Chung-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To construct a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for undergoing surgery based on domain ontology and rules reasoning in the setting of hospitalized diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: The ontology was created with a modified ontology development method, including specification and conceptualization, formalization, implementation, and evaluation and maintenance. The Protégé–Web Ontology Language editor was used to implement the ontology. Embedded clinical knowle...

  5. An HL7-CDA wrapper for facilitating semantic interoperability to rule-based Clinical Decision Support Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sáez Silvestre, Carlos; BRESÓ GUARDADO, ADRIÁN; Vicente Robledo, Javier; Robles Viejo, Montserrat; García Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The success of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) greatly depends on its capability of being integrated in Health Information Systems (HIS). Several proposals have been published up to date to permit CDSS gathering patient data from HIS. Some base the CDSS data input on the HL7 reference model, however, they are tailored to specific CDSS or clinical guidelines technologies, or do not focus on standardizing the CDSS resultant knowledge. We propose a solution for facilitating semantic int...

  6. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of maxillary central incisors exposure in patients undergoing maxillary advancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme dos Santos Trento

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Patients with dentofacial deformities may undergo orthodontic or orthodontic-surgical treatment. Both modalities can affect esthetics. Objective: This study aims to evaluate clinical and radiographic changes in exposure of maxillary central incisors occurring after orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement. Methods: A total of 17 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement between September, 2010 and July, 2011 were selected. Exposure of maxillary central incisors was evaluated clinically and by lateral cephalograms. Measurements were taken one week before and three months after surgery. Data were paired in terms of sex, age, nasolabial angle, height and thickness of the upper lip, the amount of maxillary advancement, clinical exposure and inclination of maxillary central incisor by statistical tests (CI 95%. Results: After maxillary advancement, incisor clinical exposure had increased even with relaxed lips and under forced smile. Moreover, there was a mean increase of 23.33% revealed by lateral cephalograms. There was an inverse correlation between upper lip thickness and incisors postsurgical exposure revealed by radiographic images (p = 0.002. Conclusions: Significant changes in the exposure of maxillary central incisors occur after maxillary advancement, under the influence of some factors, especially lip thickness.

  7. Advances in basic and clinical immunology in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Javier; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Shearer, William T

    2015-05-01

    Genetic identification of immunodeficiency syndromes has become more efficient with the availability of whole-exome sequencing, expediting the identification of relevant genes and complementing traditional linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping. New genes defects causing immunodeficiency include phophoglucomutase 3 (PGM3), cytidine 5' triphosphate synthase 1 (CTPS1), nuclear factor κB-inducing kinase (NIK), cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4), B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 10 (BCL10), phosphoinositide-3 kinase regulatory subunit 1 (PIK3R1), IL21, and Jagunal homolog 1 (JAGN1). New case reports expanded the clinical spectrum of gene defects. For example, a specific recombination-activating gene 1 variant protein with partial recombinant activity might produce Omenn syndrome or a common variable immunodeficiency phenotype. Central and peripheral B-cell tolerance was investigated in patients with several primary immunodeficiencies, including common variable immunodeficiency and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, to explain the occurrence of autoimmunity and inflammatory disorders. The role of IL-12 and IL-15 in the enhancement of natural killer cell activity was reported. Newborn screening for T-cell deficiency is being implemented in more states and is achieving its goal of defining the true incidence of severe combined immunodeficiency and providing early treatment that offers the highest survival for these patients. Definitive treatment of severe immunodeficiency with both hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and gene therapy was reported to be successful, with increasing definition of conditions needed for optimal outcomes. Progress in HIV infection is directed toward the development of an effective vaccine and the eradication of hidden latent virus reservoirs.

  8. A generic tool for development of decision aids based on clinical practice guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raats, C.J.; Veenendaal, H van; Versluijs, M.M.; Burgers, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patient involvement in medical decision making has been suggested to contribute to patients' satisfaction and better patient outcomes. Decision aids are particularly useful for preference-sensitive decisions. Ideally, these should be based on up-to-date evidence-based guidelines. The obje

  9. Producing the BEANs needed for person-centred healthcare decision making requires translating the wisdom of the clinical crowd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Eiring, Øystein; Nielsen, Jesper Bo;

    Producing the BEANs needed for person-centred healthcare decision making requires translating the wisdom of the clinical crowd Mette Kjer Kaltoft, University of Southern Denmark Øystein Eiring, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services Jesper Bo Nielsen, University of Southern Denmark...... Glenn Salkeld, University of Sydney School of Public Health Jack Dowie, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (presenting) Abstract (500) Person-centred care is the increasingly avowed aim of health services and professionals. To be meaningful such care requires a shared decision making process...... validation in this respect, we have a situation where demonstrated scientific rigour is simultaneously regarded as essential and irrelevant to clinical decision making. Attempts to increase the external validity of scientific studies (notably randomised controlled trials) are attractive to many, but can...

  10. Discussing End-of-Life Decisions in a Clinical Ethics Committee: An Interview Study of Norwegian Doctors' Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahus, Marianne K; Førde, Reidun

    2016-09-01

    With disagreement, doubts, or ambiguous grounds in end-of-life decisions, doctors are advised to involve a clinical ethics committee (CEC). However, little has been published on doctors' experiences with discussing an end-of-life decision in a CEC. As part of the quality assurance of this work, we wanted to find out if clinicians have benefited from discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs and why. We will disseminate some Norwegian doctors' experiences when discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs, based on semi-structured interviews with fifteen Norwegian physicians who had brought an end-of-life decision case to a CEC. Almost half of the cases involved conflicts with the patients' relatives. In a majority of the cases, there was uncertainty about what would be the ethically preferable solution. Reasons for referring the case to the CEC were to get broader illumination of the case, to get perspective from people outside the team, to get advice, or to get moral backing on a decision already made. A great majority of the clinicians reported an overall positive experience with the CECs' discussions. In cases where there was conflict, the clinicians reported less satisfaction with the CECs' discussions. The study shows that most doctors who have used a CEC in an end-of-life decision find it useful to have ethical and/or legal aspects illuminated, and to have the dilemma scrutinized from a new perspective. A systematic discussion seems to be significant to the clinicians.

  11. C-reactive protein and white blood cell count do not improve clinical decision-making in acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tind, Sofie; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Zimmermann-Nielsen, Erik;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute appendicitis (AA) remains a diagnostic challenge as indicated by the high rate of unnecessary surgery. Blood samples, primarily C-reactive protein (CRP) and leucocyte counts, are used as a diagnostic supplement despite their relatively low sensitivities and specificities...... leucocyte counts did not influence clinical decision-making....

  12. Recent clinical and translational advances in pediatric hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Bonita

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological reports describe a child population increase in BP level and an increase in prevalence of hypertension, that is largely, but not entirely, driven by a concurrent increase in childhood obesity. Given current estimates, ≈10% of adolescents have hypertension or prehypertension. In addition to obesity, dietary salt intake and waist circumference, a marker of visceral obesity, are found to be independently associated with the rise in BP among children and adolescents. Dietary salt intake in urban children is well above recommended levels largely because of consumption of processed and fast foods. Childhood exposures, such as stress,52 salt, and fructose, as well as lifestyles, including food sources, sleep patterns, and reductions in physical activity may have a role in obesity-high BP associations. In addition, clinical and translational evidence is mounting that intrauterine exposures alter can effect changes in fetal development that have an enduring effect on cardiovascular and metabolic function later in life. These effects can be detected even in children who are products of a term otherwise normal pregnancy. Hypertension in childhood has been defined statistically (BP ≥ 95th percentile) because of lack of outcome data that links a BP level with heightened risk for future cardiovascular events. Therefore, primary hypertension had been considered a risk factor for later hypertension in adulthood. Intermediate markers of TOD, including cardiac hypertrophy, vascular stiffness, and increases in cIMT, are detectable in adolescents with primary hypertension. Evidence that vascular injury is present in the early phase of hypertension and even in prehypertension warrants consideration on the current definition of pediatric hypertension. With further studies on TOD and other risk factors in addition to high BP, it may be possible to shift from a statistical definition to a definition of childhood hypertension that is evidence based. Preventing or

  13. Clinical information system services and capabilities desired for scalable, standards-based, service-oriented decision support: consensus assessment of the Health Level 7 clinical decision support Work Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Jacobs, Jason; Welch, Brandon M; Huser, Vojtech; Paterno, Marilyn D; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Shields, David; Strasberg, Howard R; Haug, Peter J; Liu, Zhijing; Jenders, Robert A; Rowed, David W; Chertcoff, Daryl; Fehre, Karsten; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Curtis, A Clayton

    2012-01-01

    A standards-based, service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support (CDS) has the potential to significantly enhance CDS scalability and robustness. To enable such a CDS architecture, the Health Level 7 CDS Work Group reviewed the literature, hosted multi-stakeholder discussions, and consulted domain experts to identify and prioritize the services and capabilities required from clinical information systems (CISs) to enable service-oriented CDS. In addition, relevant available standards were identified. Through this process, ten CIS services and eight CIS capabilities were identified as being important for enabling scalable, service-oriented CDS. In particular, through a survey of 46 domain experts, five services and capabilities were identified as being especially critical: 1) the use of standard information models and terminologies; 2) the ability to leverage a Decision Support Service (DSS); 3) support for a clinical data query service; 4) support for an event subscription and notification service; and 5) support for a user communication service. PMID:23304315

  14. Clinical Information System Services and Capabilities Desired for Scalable, Standards-Based, Service-oriented Decision Support: Consensus Assessment of the Health Level 7 Clinical Decision Support Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Jacobs, Jason; Welch, Brandon M.; Huser, Vojtech; Paterno, Marilyn D.; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Shields, David; Strasberg, Howard R.; Haug, Peter J.; Liu, Zhijing; Jenders, Robert A.; Rowed, David W.; Chertcoff, Daryl; Fehre, Karsten; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Curtis, A. Clayton

    2012-01-01

    A standards-based, service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support (CDS) has the potential to significantly enhance CDS scalability and robustness. To enable such a CDS architecture, the Health Level 7 CDS Work Group reviewed the literature, hosted multi-stakeholder discussions, and consulted domain experts to identify and prioritize the services and capabilities required from clinical information systems (CISs) to enable service-oriented CDS. In addition, relevant available standards were identified. Through this process, ten CIS services and eight CIS capabilities were identified as being important for enabling scalable, service-oriented CDS. In particular, through a survey of 46 domain experts, five services and capabilities were identified as being especially critical: 1) the use of standard information models and terminologies; 2) the ability to leverage a Decision Support Service (DSS); 3) support for a clinical data query service; 4) support for an event subscription and notification service; and 5) support for a user communication service. PMID:23304315

  15. Clinical information system services and capabilities desired for scalable, standards-based, service-oriented decision support: consensus assessment of the Health Level 7 clinical decision support Work Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Jacobs, Jason; Welch, Brandon M; Huser, Vojtech; Paterno, Marilyn D; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Shields, David; Strasberg, Howard R; Haug, Peter J; Liu, Zhijing; Jenders, Robert A; Rowed, David W; Chertcoff, Daryl; Fehre, Karsten; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Curtis, A Clayton

    2012-01-01

    A standards-based, service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support (CDS) has the potential to significantly enhance CDS scalability and robustness. To enable such a CDS architecture, the Health Level 7 CDS Work Group reviewed the literature, hosted multi-stakeholder discussions, and consulted domain experts to identify and prioritize the services and capabilities required from clinical information systems (CISs) to enable service-oriented CDS. In addition, relevant available standards were identified. Through this process, ten CIS services and eight CIS capabilities were identified as being important for enabling scalable, service-oriented CDS. In particular, through a survey of 46 domain experts, five services and capabilities were identified as being especially critical: 1) the use of standard information models and terminologies; 2) the ability to leverage a Decision Support Service (DSS); 3) support for a clinical data query service; 4) support for an event subscription and notification service; and 5) support for a user communication service.

  16. A fuzzy logic decision support system for assessing clinical nutritional risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Hadianfard

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies have indicated a global high prevalence of hospital malnutrition on admission and during hospitalization. Clinical Nutritional Risk Screen (CNRS is a way to identify malnutrition and manage nutritional interventions. Several traditional and non-computer based tools have been suggested for screening nutritional risk levels. The present study was an attempt to employ a computer based fuzzy model decision support system as a nutrition-screening tool for inpatients. Method: This is an applied modeling study. The system architecture was designed based on the fuzzy logic model including input data, inference engine, and output. A clinical nutritionist entered nineteen input variables using a windows-based graphical user interface. The inference engine was involved with knowledge obtained from literature and the construction of ‘IF-THEN’ rules. The output of the system was stratification of patients into four risk levels from ‘No’ to ‘High’ where a number was also allocated to them as a nutritional risk grade. All patients (121 people admitted during implementing the system participated in testing the model. The classification tests were used to measure the CNRS fuzzy model performance. IBM SPSS version 21 was utilized as a tool for data analysis with α = 0.05 as a significance level. Results: Results showed that sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and precision of the fuzzy model performance were 91.67% (±4.92, 76% (±7.6, 88.43% (±5.7, and 93.62% (±4.32, respectively. Instant performance on admission and very low probability of mistake in predicting malnutrition risk level may justify using the model in hospitals. Conclusion: To conclude, the fuzzy model-screening tool is based on multiple nutritional risk factors, having the capability of classifying inpatients into several nutritional risk levels and identifying the level of required nutritional intervention.

  17. Dose coefficients and derived guidance and clinical decision levels for contaminated wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertelli, Luiz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toohey, Richard E [ORISE/ORAU; Sugarman, Steven A [ORISE/ORAU; Christensen, Doran R [ORISE/ORAU

    2009-01-01

    The NCRP Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the ICRP element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Those coefficients have been used to generate derived guidance levels (i.e., the activity in a wound that would result in an effective dose of 20 or 50 mSv, or in some cases, a committed organ equivalent dose of 500 mSv), and clinical decision levels (i.e., activity levels that would indicate the need for consideration of medical intervention to remove activity from the wound site or administration of decorporation therapy or both), typically set at 5 times the derived guidance levels. Data are provided for the radionuclides commonly encountered at nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons, fuel fabrication or recycling, waste disposal, medical and research facilities. These include: {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 210}Po, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 228,232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242,244}Cm, and {sup 252}Cf.

  18. MACVIA clinical decision algorithm in adolescents and adults with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, Holger J; Hellings, Peter W; Arnavielhe, Sylvie; Bachert, Claus; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brozek, Jan; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, G Walter; Casale, Thomas B; Chavannes, Niels H; Cox, Linda; Chrystyn, Henry; Cruz, Alvaro A; Dahl, Ronald; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Demoly, Pascal; Devillier, Phillipe; Dray, Gérard; Fletcher, Monica; Fokkens, Wytske J; Fonseca, Joao; Gonzalez-Diaz, Sandra N; Grouse, Lawrence; Keil, Thomas; Kuna, Piotr; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Lodrup Carlsen, Karin C; Meltzer, Eli O; Mullol, Jaoquim; Muraro, Antonella; Naclerio, Robert N; Palkonen, Susanna; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Price, David; Ryan, Dermot; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Scadding, Glenis K; Sheikh, Aziz; Spertini, François; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Walker, Samantha; Wickman, Magnus; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Haahtela, Tari; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) depends on several factors, including age, prominent symptoms, symptom severity, control of AR, patient preferences, and cost. Allergen exposure and the resulting symptoms vary, and treatment adjustment is required. Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) might be beneficial for the assessment of disease control. CDSSs should be based on the best evidence and algorithms to aid patients and health care professionals to jointly determine treatment and its step-up or step-down strategy depending on AR control. Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif en Languedoc-Roussillon (MACVIA-LR [fighting chronic diseases for active and healthy ageing]), one of the reference sites of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing, has initiated an allergy sentinel network (the MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel Network). A CDSS is currently being developed to optimize AR control. An algorithm developed by consensus is presented in this article. This algorithm should be confirmed by appropriate trials.

  19. MACVIA clinical decision algorithm in adolescents and adults with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, Holger J; Hellings, Peter W; Arnavielhe, Sylvie; Bachert, Claus; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brozek, Jan; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, G Walter; Casale, Thomas B; Chavannes, Niels H; Cox, Linda; Chrystyn, Henry; Cruz, Alvaro A; Dahl, Ronald; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Demoly, Pascal; Devillier, Phillipe; Dray, Gérard; Fletcher, Monica; Fokkens, Wytske J; Fonseca, Joao; Gonzalez-Diaz, Sandra N; Grouse, Lawrence; Keil, Thomas; Kuna, Piotr; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Lodrup Carlsen, Karin C; Meltzer, Eli O; Mullol, Jaoquim; Muraro, Antonella; Naclerio, Robert N; Palkonen, Susanna; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Price, David; Ryan, Dermot; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Scadding, Glenis K; Sheikh, Aziz; Spertini, François; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Walker, Samantha; Wickman, Magnus; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Haahtela, Tari; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) depends on several factors, including age, prominent symptoms, symptom severity, control of AR, patient preferences, and cost. Allergen exposure and the resulting symptoms vary, and treatment adjustment is required. Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) might be beneficial for the assessment of disease control. CDSSs should be based on the best evidence and algorithms to aid patients and health care professionals to jointly determine treatment and its step-up or step-down strategy depending on AR control. Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif en Languedoc-Roussillon (MACVIA-LR [fighting chronic diseases for active and healthy ageing]), one of the reference sites of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing, has initiated an allergy sentinel network (the MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel Network). A CDSS is currently being developed to optimize AR control. An algorithm developed by consensus is presented in this article. This algorithm should be confirmed by appropriate trials. PMID:27260321

  20. Molecular profiling of liver tumors: classification and clinical translation for decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyol, Roser; Nault, Jean Charles; Quetglas, Iris M; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Llovet, Josep M

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex disease with a dismal prognosis. Consequently, a translational approach is required to personalized clinical decision making to improve survival of HCC patients. Molecular signatures from cirrhotic livers and single nucleotide polymorphism have been linked with HCC occurrence. Identification of high-risk populations will be useful to design chemopreventive trials. In addition, molecular signatures derived from tumor and nontumor samples are associated with early tumor recurrence due to metastasis and late tumor recurrence due to de novo carcinogenesis after curative treatment, respectively. Identification of patients with a high risk of relapse will guide adjuvant randomized trials. The genetic landscape drawn by next-generation sequencing has highlighted the genomic diversity of HCC. Genetic drivers recurrently mutated belong to different signaling pathways including telomere maintenance, cell-cycle regulators, chromatin remodeling, Wnt/b-catenin, RAS/RAF/MAPK kinase, and AKT/mTOR pathway. These cancer genes will be ideally targeted by biotherapies as a paradigm of stratified medicine adapted to tumor biology. PMID:25369299

  1. What clinical activities do advanced-practice registered dietitian nutritionists perform? Results of a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Rebecca A; Byham-Gray, Laura; Touger-Decker, Riva; Passannante, Marian R; Rothpletz Puglia, Pamela; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Activities performed by advanced-practice registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) have yet to be clearly elucidated. The study aimed to gain consensus on the practice activities of advanced-practice RDNs who provide direct clinical nutrition care. A three-round Delphi study was conducted. Purposive sampling identified 117 RDN experts working as clinicians and/or managers in direct care settings that met inclusion criteria for advanced-level practice. In Round 1, 85 experts provided open-ended advanced-level practice activities linked to the Nutrition Care Process sections. Using content analysis, the responses were coded into activity statements. In Round 2, experts rated the essentiality of these activities. In Round 3, experts re-rated statements not reaching consensus while viewing their previous rating, the group median, and comments. Median ratings of 1.0 to 3.0 were defined as essential, 4.0 were neither essential nor nonessential, and 5.0 to 7.0 were nonessential. Consensus was reached when the interquartile range of responses to each question was <2.0. Seventy-six (89.4%) experts completed all rounds. From 770 comments, 129 activity statements were generated. All statements reached consensus: 97.7% as essential; 0.8% as nonessential; and 1.5% as neither. Of essential activities, 67.5% were highly essential with limited variability (median=1.0; interquartile range≤2.0). Advanced-practice RDNs' tasks are patient-centered and reflect complex care; involve a comprehensive and discriminating approach; are grounded in advanced knowledge and expertise in clinical nutrition; include use of advanced interviewing, education, and counseling strategies; and require communication with patient, families, and the health care team. The high-level of consensus from experts suggest advanced-level clinical nutrition practice exists and can be defined.

  2. Selecting Gravitational Wave Candidates for Electromagnetic Follow-up: Advanced LIGO/Virgo's Decision Making Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min-A.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most violent events in the universe are bright in both their gravitational wave (GW) emission and electromagnetic (EM). This means that prospects for multi-messenger astronomy increase as more and more detectors join the search for gravitational waves. Here I present the protocol created by members of Advanced LIGO/Virgo's EM Follow-up Program which ultimately results in alerting its astronomy partners or not. I discuss the series of checks and questions performed by humans (follow-up advocates and control room personnel) and automated online software (Approval Processor). This talk will follow the fate of the gravitational wave candidate event after it first enters Advanced LIGO/Virgo's online candidate event database. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the U.S. National Science Foundation through Grant PHY-1404121.

  3. Risk-informed decision making a keystone in advanced safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) has provided extremely valuable complementary insight, perspective, comprehension, and balance to deterministic nuclear reactor safety assessment. This integrated approach of risk-informed management and decision making has been called Risk-Informed Decision Making (RIDM). RIDM provides enhanced safety, reliability, operational flexibility, reduced radiological exposure, and improved fiscal economy. Applications of RIDM continuously increase. Current applications are in the areas of design, construction, licensing, operations, and security. Operational phase safety applications include the following: technical specifications improvement, risk-monitors and configuration control, maintenance planning, outage planning and management, in-service inspection, inservice testing, graded quality assurance, reactor oversight and inspection, inspection finding significance determination, operational events assessment, and rulemaking. Interestingly there is a significant spectrum of approaches, methods, programs, controls, data bases, and standards. The quest of many is to assimilate the full compliment of PSA and RIDM information and to achieve a balanced international harmony. The goal is to focus the best of the best, so to speak, for the benefit of all. Accordingly, this presentation will address the principles, benefits, and applications of RIDM. It will also address some of the challenges and areas to improve. Finally it will highlight efforts by the IAEA and others to capture the international thinking, experience, successes, challenges, and lessons in RIDM. (authors)

  4. Implementing shared decision-making in nutrition clinical practice: A theory-based approach and feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Légaré France

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a growing number of dietary treatment options to choose from for the management of many chronic diseases. Shared decision making represents a promising approach to improve the quality of the decision making process needed for dietary choices that are informed by the best evidence and value-based. However, there are no studies reporting on theory-based approaches that foster the implementation of shared decision making in health professions allied to medicine. The objectives of this study are to explore the integration of shared decision making within real nutritional consultations, and to design questionnaires to assess dieticians' intention to adopt two specific behaviors related to shared decision making using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Methods Forty dieticians will audiotape one clinical encounter to explore the presence of shared decision making within the consultation. They will also participate to one of five to six focus groups that aim to identify the salient beliefs underlying the determinants of their intention to present evidence-based dietary treatment options to their patients, and clarify the values related to dietary choices that are important to their patients. These salient beliefs will be used to elaborate the items of two questionnaires. The internal consistency of theoretical constructs and the temporal stability of their measurement will be checked using the test-retest method by asking 35 dieticians to complete the questionnaire twice within a two-week interval. Discussion The proposed research project will be the first study to: provide preliminary data about the adoption of shared decision making by dieticians and theirs patients; elicit dieticians' salient beliefs regarding the intention to adopt shared decision making behaviors, report on the development of a specific questionnaire; explore dieticians' views on the implementation of shared decision making; and compare their views

  5. Impact of MammaPrint on Clinical Decision-Making in South African Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Heinrich; Kotze, Maritha J; Grant, Kathleen A; van der Merwe, Lize; Pienaar, Fredrieka M; Apffelstaedt, Justus P; Myburgh, Ettienne J

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of MammaPrint on treatment decision-making in patients with breast cancer. Clinicopathologic information of all breast cancer patients referred for MammaPrint testing in South Africa was collected from 2007 until 2014. A total of 107 patients (109 tumors) with estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative tumors were selected with tumors ≥10 mm, or when 1-3 nodes were involved without extra-nodal extension. None of the clinical indicators correlated significantly with the MammaPrint risk classification, which changed the decision for adjuvant chemotherapy in 52% of patients. Of 60 patients who were clinically high risk, 62% had a low-risk MammaPrint result and of the 47 clinically low -risk patients 40% had a high-risk MammaPrint result. This study indicates that MammaPrint could reduce the need for adjuvant chemotherapy by 17% using the selection criteria stipulated. The significant impact on treatment decisions confirmed the clinical utility of MammaPrint independent of standard clinicopathologic risk factors as supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:27079770

  6. Impact of MammaPrint on Clinical Decision-Making in South African Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Heinrich; Kotze, Maritha J; Grant, Kathleen A; van der Merwe, Lize; Pienaar, Fredrieka M; Apffelstaedt, Justus P; Myburgh, Ettienne J

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of MammaPrint on treatment decision-making in patients with breast cancer. Clinicopathologic information of all breast cancer patients referred for MammaPrint testing in South Africa was collected from 2007 until 2014. A total of 107 patients (109 tumors) with estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative tumors were selected with tumors ≥10 mm, or when 1-3 nodes were involved without extra-nodal extension. None of the clinical indicators correlated significantly with the MammaPrint risk classification, which changed the decision for adjuvant chemotherapy in 52% of patients. Of 60 patients who were clinically high risk, 62% had a low-risk MammaPrint result and of the 47 clinically low -risk patients 40% had a high-risk MammaPrint result. This study indicates that MammaPrint could reduce the need for adjuvant chemotherapy by 17% using the selection criteria stipulated. The significant impact on treatment decisions confirmed the clinical utility of MammaPrint independent of standard clinicopathologic risk factors as supported by long-term clinical outcome studies.

  7. Emerging medical informatics with case-based reasoning for aiding clinical decision in multi-agent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; Colloc, Joël; Jacquet-Andrieu, Armelle; Lei, Kai

    2015-08-01

    This research aims to depict the methodological steps and tools about the combined operation of case-based reasoning (CBR) and multi-agent system (MAS) to expose the ontological application in the field of clinical decision support. The multi-agent architecture works for the consideration of the whole cycle of clinical decision-making adaptable to many medical aspects such as the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, therapeutic monitoring of gastric cancer. In the multi-agent architecture, the ontological agent type employs the domain knowledge to ease the extraction of similar clinical cases and provide treatment suggestions to patients and physicians. Ontological agent is used for the extension of domain hierarchy and the interpretation of input requests. Case-based reasoning memorizes and restores experience data for solving similar problems, with the help of matching approach and defined interfaces of ontologies. A typical case is developed to illustrate the implementation of the knowledge acquisition and restitution of medical experts.

  8. Competency in health care management: a training model in epidemiologic methods for assessing and improving the quality of clinical practice through evidence-based decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, R P; Jacoby, I; Meyer, G S; Potter, A L; Hooper, T I; Krakauer, H

    1997-01-01

    This article describes a training model that focuses on health care management by applying epidemiologic methods to assess and improve the quality of clinical practice. The model's uniqueness is its focus on integrating clinical evidence-based decision making with fundamental principles of resource management to achieve attainable, cost-effective, high-quality health outcomes. The target students are current and prospective clinical and administrative executives who must optimize decision making at the clinical and managerial levels of health care organizations.

  9. Development of a clinical decision support system using genetic algorithms and Bayesian classification for improving the personalised management of women attending a colposcopy room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bountris, Panagiotis; Topaka, Elena; Pouliakis, Abraham; Haritou, Maria; Karakitsos, Petros; Koutsouris, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    Cervical cancer (CxCa) is often the result of underestimated abnormalities in the test Papanicolaou (Pap test). The recent advances in the study of the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection (the necessary cause for CxCa development) have guided clinical practice to add HPV related tests alongside the Pap test. In this way, today, HPV DNA testing is well accepted as an ancillary test and it is used for the triage of women with abnormal findings in cytology. However, these tests are either highly sensitive or highly specific, and therefore none of them provides an optimal solution. In this Letter, a clinical decision support system based on a hybrid genetic algorithm - Bayesian classification framework is presented, which combines the results of the Pap test with those of the HPV DNA test in order to exploit the benefits of each method and produce more accurate outcomes. Compared with the medical tests and their combinations (co-testing), the proposed system produced the best receiver operating characteristic curve and the most balanced combination among sensitivity and specificity in detecting high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and CxCa (CIN2+). This system may support decision-making for the improved management of women who attend a colposcopy room following a positive test result. PMID:27382484

  10. Barriers to implementation of a computerized decision support system for depression: an observational report on lessons learned in "real world" clinical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunderajan Prabha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite wide promotion, clinical practice guidelines have had limited effect in changing physician behavior. Effective implementation strategies to date have included: multifaceted interventions involving audit and feedback, local consensus processes, marketing; reminder systems, either manual or computerized; and interactive educational meetings. In addition, there is now growing evidence that contextual factors affecting implementation must be addressed such as organizational support (leadership procedures and resources for the change and strategies to implement and maintain new systems. Methods To examine the feasibility and effectiveness of implementation of a computerized decision support system for depression (CDSS-D in routine public mental health care in Texas, fifteen study clinicians (thirteen physicians and two advanced nurse practitioners participated across five sites, accruing over 300 outpatient visits on 168 patients. Results Issues regarding computer literacy and hardware/software requirements were identified as initial barriers. Clinicians also reported concerns about negative impact on workflow and the potential need for duplication during the transition from paper to electronic systems of medical record keeping. Conclusion The following narrative report based on observations obtained during the initial testing and use of a CDSS-D in clinical settings further emphasizes the importance of taking into account organizational factors when planning implementation of evidence-based guidelines or decision support within a system.

  11. Identifying components of advanced-level clinical nutrition practice: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Rebecca A; Byham-Gray, Laura; Touger-Decker, Riva; Passannante, Marian R; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie

    2012-06-01

    The dietetics profession lacks a comprehensive definition of advanced-level practice. Using a three-round Delphi study with mailed surveys, expert consensus on four dimensions of advanced-level practice that define advanced practice registered dietitians (RDs) in clinical nutrition was explored. Purposive sampling identified 117 RDs who met advanced-level practice criteria. In round 1, experts rated the essentiality of statements on a 7-point ordinal scale and generated open-ended practice activity statements regarding the following four dimensions of advanced-level practice: professional knowledge, abilities and skills, approaches to practice, roles and relationships, and practice behaviors. Median ratings of 1.0 to 3.0 were defined as essential, 4.0 was neutral, and 5.0 to 7.0 were nonessential. In rounds 2 and 3, experts re-rated statements not reaching consensus by evaluating their previous responses, group median rating, and comments. Consensus was reached when the interquartile range of responses to a statement was ≤2.0. Eighty-five experts enrolled (72.6%); 76 (89.4%) completed all rounds. In total, 233 statements were rated, with 100% achieving consensus; 211 (90.6%) were essential to advanced practice RD clinical practice. Having a master's degree; completing an advanced practice residency; research coursework; and advanced continuing education were essential, as were having 8 years of experience; clinical nutrition knowledge/expertise; specialization; participation in research activities; and skills in technology and communication. Highly essential approaches to practice were systematic yet adaptable and used critical thinking and intuition and highly essential values encompassed professional growth and service to patients. Roles emphasized patient care and leadership. Essential practice activities within the nutrition care process included provision of complex patient-centered nutrition care using application of advanced knowledge/expertise and

  12. Identifying components of advanced-level clinical nutrition practice: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Rebecca A; Byham-Gray, Laura; Touger-Decker, Riva; Passannante, Marian R; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie

    2012-06-01

    The dietetics profession lacks a comprehensive definition of advanced-level practice. Using a three-round Delphi study with mailed surveys, expert consensus on four dimensions of advanced-level practice that define advanced practice registered dietitians (RDs) in clinical nutrition was explored. Purposive sampling identified 117 RDs who met advanced-level practice criteria. In round 1, experts rated the essentiality of statements on a 7-point ordinal scale and generated open-ended practice activity statements regarding the following four dimensions of advanced-level practice: professional knowledge, abilities and skills, approaches to practice, roles and relationships, and practice behaviors. Median ratings of 1.0 to 3.0 were defined as essential, 4.0 was neutral, and 5.0 to 7.0 were nonessential. In rounds 2 and 3, experts re-rated statements not reaching consensus by evaluating their previous responses, group median rating, and comments. Consensus was reached when the interquartile range of responses to a statement was ≤2.0. Eighty-five experts enrolled (72.6%); 76 (89.4%) completed all rounds. In total, 233 statements were rated, with 100% achieving consensus; 211 (90.6%) were essential to advanced practice RD clinical practice. Having a master's degree; completing an advanced practice residency; research coursework; and advanced continuing education were essential, as were having 8 years of experience; clinical nutrition knowledge/expertise; specialization; participation in research activities; and skills in technology and communication. Highly essential approaches to practice were systematic yet adaptable and used critical thinking and intuition and highly essential values encompassed professional growth and service to patients. Roles emphasized patient care and leadership. Essential practice activities within the nutrition care process included provision of complex patient-centered nutrition care using application of advanced knowledge/expertise and

  13. Instruments to assess the perception of physicians in the decision-making process of specific clinical encounters: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeBlanc Annie

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The measurement of processes and outcomes that reflect the complexity of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters is an important area of research to pursue. A systematic review was conducted to identify instruments that assess the perception physicians have of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters. Methods For every year available up until April 2007, PubMed, PsycINFO, Current Contents, Dissertation Abstracts and Sociological Abstracts were searched for original studies in English or French. Reference lists from retrieved studies were also consulted. Studies were included if they reported a self-administered instrument evaluating physicians' perceptions of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters, contained sufficient description to permit critical appraisal and presented quantitative results based on administering the instrument. Two individuals independently assessed the eligibility of the instruments and abstracted information on their conceptual underpinnings, main evaluation domain, development, format, reliability, validity and responsiveness. They also assessed the quality of the studies that reported on the development of the instruments with a modified version of STARD. Results Out of 3431 records identified and screened for evaluation, 26 potentially relevant instruments were assessed; 11 met the inclusion criteria. Five instruments were published before 1995. Among those published after 1995, five offered a corresponding patient version. Overall, the main evaluation domains were: satisfaction with the clinical encounter (n = 2, mutual understanding between health professional and patient (n = 2, mental workload (n = 1, frustration with the clinical encounter (n = 1, nurse-physician collaboration (n = 1, perceptions of communication competence (n = 2, degree of comfort with a decision (n = 1 and information on medication (n = 1. For most

  14. Clinical cancer advances 2007: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralow, Julie; Ozols, Robert F; Bajorin, Dean F; Cheson, Bruce D; Sandler, Howard M; Winer, Eric P; Bonner, James; Demetri, George D; Curran, Walter; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Davidson, Nancy E; Schilsky, Richard L; Lichter, Allen S

    2008-01-10

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT: For the third year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO publishes this report to demonstrate the important progress being made on the front lines of clinical cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and organizations, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening, the association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer incidence, the link between human papillomavirus and head and neck cancers, and the use of radiation therapy to prevent lung cancer from spreading. They also report on effective new targeted therapies for cancers that have been historically difficult to treat, such as liver cancer and kidney cancer, among many others. A total of 24 advances are featured in this year's report. These advances and many more over the past several years show that the nation's long-term investment in cancer research is paying off. But there are disturbing signs that progress could slow. We are now in the midst of the longest sustained period of flat government funding for cancer research in history. The budgets for the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have been unchanged for four years. When adjusted for inflation, cancer research funding has actually declined 12% since 2004. These budget constraints limit the NCI's ability to fund promising cancer research. In the past several years the number of grants that the NCI has been able to fund has significantly decreased; this year, in response to just the

  15. Healthcare decision-making in end stage renal disease-patient preferences and clinical correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Jayanti, Anuradha; Neuvonen, Markus; Wearden, Alison; Morris, Julie; Foden, Philip; Brenchley, Paul,; Mitra, Sandip; ,

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical decision-making is critical to patient survival and well-being. Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) are faced with incrementally complex decision-making throughout their treatment journey. The extent to which patients seek involvement in the decision-making process and factors which influence these in ESRD need to be understood. Methods 535 ESRD patients were enrolled into the cross-sectional study arm and 30 patients who started dialysis were prospectively evaluat...

  16. The Clinical Impact of Recent Advances in LC-MS for Cancer Biomarker Discovery and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Camp, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has become an indispensable tool in biomedical research with broad applications ranging from fundamental biology, systems biology, and biomarker discovery. Recent advances in LC-MS have made it become a major technology in clinical applications, especially in cancer biomarker discovery and verification. To overcome the challenges associated with the analysis of clinical samples, such as extremely wide dynamic range of protein concentrations in biofluids and the need to perform high throughput and accurate quantification, significant efforts have been devoted to improve the overall performance of LC-MS bases clinical proteomics. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in LC-MS in the aspect of cancer biomarker discovery and quantification, and discuss its potentials, limitations, and future perspectives.

  17. Anti-EGFR Therapy: Mechanism and Advances in Clinical Efficacy in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Flynn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will focus on recent advances in the application of antiepidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR for the treatment of breast cancer. The choice of EGFR, a member of the ErbB tyrosine kinase receptor family, stems from evidence pinpointing its role in various anti-EGFR therapies. Therefore, an increase in our understanding of EGFR mechanism and signaling might reveal novel targets amenable to intervention in the clinic. This knowledge base might also improve existing medical treatment options and identify research gaps in the design of new therapeutic agents. While the approved use of drugs like the dual kinase inhibitor Lapatinib represents significant advances in the clinical management of breast cancer, confirmatory studies must be considered to foster the use of anti-EGFR therapies including safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy.

  18. Computerized clinical decision support systems for acute care management: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahota Navdeep

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute medical care often demands timely, accurate decisions in complex situations. Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs have many features that could help. However, as for any medical intervention, claims that CCDSSs improve care processes and patient outcomes need to be rigorously assessed. The objective of this review was to systematically review the effects of CCDSSs on process of care and patient outcomes for acute medical care. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews databases (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, ACP Journal Club, and others, and the Inspec bibliographic database were searched to January 2010, in all languages, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs of CCDSSs in all clinical areas. We included RCTs that evaluated the effect on process of care or patient outcomes of a CCDSS used for acute medical care compared with care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results Thirty-six studies met our inclusion criteria for acute medical care. The CCDSS improved process of care in 63% (22/35 of studies, including 64% (9/14 of medication dosing assistants, 82% (9/11 of management assistants using alerts/reminders, 38% (3/8 of management assistants using guidelines/algorithms, and 67% (2/3 of diagnostic assistants. Twenty studies evaluated patient outcomes, of which three (15% reported improvements, all of which were medication dosing assistants. Conclusion The majority of CCDSSs demonstrated improvements in process of care, but patient outcomes were less likely to be evaluated and far less likely to show positive results.

  19. Usability evaluation of a clinical decision support tool for osteoporosis disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton David

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis affects over 200 million people worldwide at a high cost to healthcare systems. Although guidelines are available, patients are not receiving appropriate diagnostic testing or treatment. Findings from a systematic review of osteoporosis interventions and a series of focus groups were used to develop a functional multifaceted tool that can support clinical decision-making in osteoporosis disease management at the point of care. The objective of our study was to assess how well the prototype met functional goals and usability needs. Methods We conducted a usability study for each component of the tool--the Best Practice Recommendation Prompt (BestPROMPT, the Risk Assessment Questionnaire (RAQ, and the Customised Osteoporosis Education (COPE sheet--using the framework described by Kushniruk and Patel. All studies consisted of one-on-one sessions with a moderator using a standardised worksheet. Sessions were audio- and video-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis consisted of a combination of qualitative and quantitative analyses. Results In study 1, physicians liked that the BestPROMPT can provide customised recommendations based on risk factors identified from the RAQ. Barriers included lack of time to use the tool, the need to alter clinic workflow to enable point-of-care use, and that the tool may disrupt the real reason for the visit. In study 2, patients completed the RAQ in a mean of 6 minutes, 35 seconds. Of the 42 critical incidents, 60% were navigational and most occurred when the first nine participants were using the stylus pen; no critical incidents were observed with the last six participants that used the touch screen. Patients thought that the RAQ questions were easy to read and understand, but they found it difficult to initiate the questionnaire. Suggestions for improvement included improving aspects of the interface and navigation. The results of study 3 showed that most patients were able

  20. The problematic of decision-sharing: deconstructing 'cholesterol' in a clinical encounter.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gwyn, R.; Elwyn, G.; Edwards, A.; Mooney, A.

    2003-01-01

    Shared decision-making is increasingly advocated as a means of interacting with patients but there is also a widely accepted view that many factors will militate against this ideal. While some patients may not wish to take on the responsibility of decision-making, it is also evident that many find i

  1. Quality assurance issues in conducting multi-institutional advanced technology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, James A

    2008-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute-sponsored Advanced Technology Quality Assurance (QA) Consortium, which consisted of the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Radiological Physics Center, Quality Assurance Review Center, and Resource Center for Emerging Technologies, has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials that requires volumetric digital data submission of a protocol patient's treatment plan and verification data. In particular, the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center has nearly 15 years experience in facilitating QA review for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trials. This QA process includes (1) a data integrity review for completeness of protocol required elements, the format of data, and possible data corruption, and recalculation of dose-volume histograms; (2) a review of compliance with target volume and organ-at-risk contours by study chairs; and (3) a review of dose prescription and dose heterogeneity compliance by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Headquarters Dosimetry Group or the Radiological Physics Center dosimetrists (for brachytherapy protocols). This report reviews the lessons learned and the QA challenges presented by the use of advanced treatment modalities in clinical trials requiring volumetric digital data submission. PMID:18406941

  2. ADVANCES IN RENEWAL DECISION-MAKING UTILISING THE PROPORTIONAL HAZARDS MODEL WITH VIBRATION COVARIATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter-Jan Vlok

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Increased competitiveness in the production world necessitates improved maintenance strategies to increase availabilities and drive down cost . The maintenance engineer is thus faced with the need to make more intelligent pre ventive renewal decisions . Two of the main techniques to achieve this is through Condition Monitoring (such as vibrat ion monitoring and oil anal ysis and Statistical Failure Analysis (typically using probabilistic techniques . The present paper discusses these techniques, their uses and weaknesses and then presents th e Proportional Hazard Model as an solution to most of these weaknesses. It then goes on to compare the results of the different techniques in monetary terms, using a South African case study. This comparison shows clearly that the Proportional Hazards Model is sup erior to the present t echniques and should be the preferred model for many actual maintenance situations.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Verhoogde vlakke van mededinging in die produksie omgewing noodsaak verbeterde instandhouding strategies om beskikbaarheid van toerusting te verhoog en koste te minimeer. Instandhoudingsingenieurs moet gevolglik meer intellegente voorkomende hernuwings besluite neem. Twee prominente tegnieke om hierdie doelwit te bereik is Toestandsmonitering (soos vibrasie monitering of olie analise en Statistiese Falingsanalise (gewoonlik m.b.v. probabilistiese metodes. In hierdie artikel beskou ons beide hierdie tegnieke, hulle gebruike en tekortkominge en stel dan die Proporsionele Gevaarkoers Model voor as 'n oplossing vir meeste van die tekortkominge. Die artikel vergelyk ook die verskillende tegnieke in geldelike terme deur gebruik te maak van 'n Suid-Afrikaanse gevalle studie. Hierdie vergelyking wys duidelik-uit dat die Proporsionele Gevaarkoers Model groter beloft e inhou as die huidige tegni eke en dat dit die voorkeur oplossing behoort te wees in baie werklike instandhoudings situasies.

  3. A clinical study of radiotherapy with CHFU for advanced and recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the usefulness of combination therapy with radiation and CHFU for advanced and recurrent breast cancer according to a clinical cotrolled multicenter trial from 1982 to 1984. One hundred cases were registered and 82 of them were availabe. Treatment sites were the lymph nodes, skin, bone and lung, and the overall response rate was 58% in CR and 19% in PR, while the duration of remission was 18 weeks in CR. Side effects were found in 10% of the patients. Combination therapy with radiation and HCFU may be useful in multimodal tretment for advanced recurrent breast cancer. (author)

  4. Using a service oriented architecture approach to clinical decision support: performance results from two CDS Consortium demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Marilyn D; Goldberg, Howard S; Simonaitis, Linas; Dixon, Brian E; Wright, Adam; Rocha, Beatriz H; Ramelson, Harley Z; Middleton, Blackford

    2012-01-01

    The Clinical Decision Support Consortium has completed two demonstration trials involving a web service for the execution of clinical decision support (CDS) rules in one or more electronic health record (EHR) systems. The initial trial ran in a local EHR at Partners HealthCare. A second EHR site, associated with Wishard Memorial Hospital, Indianapolis, IN, was added in the second trial. Data were gathered during each 6 month period and analyzed to assess performance, reliability, and response time in the form of means and standard deviations for all technical components of the service, including assembling and preparation of input data. The mean service call time for each period was just over 2 seconds. In this paper we report on the findings and analysis to date while describing the areas for further analysis and optimization as we continue to expand our use of a Services Oriented Architecture approach for CDS across multiple institutions. PMID:23304342

  5. Recommendations for Standardizing Glucose Reporting and Analysis to Optimize Clinical Decision Making in Diabetes: The Ambulatory Glucose Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Bergenstal, Richard M.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W.; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H.; Garg, Satish K.; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B.; Klonoff, David C.; Kruger, Davida F; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring da...

  6. Knowledge of Fecal Calprotectin and Infliximab Trough Levels Alters Clinical Decision-making for IBD Outpatients on Maintenance Infliximab Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Vivian W; Prosser, Connie; Kroeker, Karen I.; Wang, Haili; Shalapay, Carol; Dhami, Neil; Fedorak, Darryl K; Halloran, Brendan; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Goodman, Karen J; Richard N Fedorak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infliximab is an effective therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, more than 50% of patients lose response. Empiric dose intensification is not effective for all patients because not all patients have objective disease activity or subtherapeutic drug level. The aim was to determine how an objective marker of disease activity or therapeutic drug monitoring affects clinical decisions regarding maintenance infliximab therapy in outpatients with IBD. Methods: Consecutiv...

  7. Attitudes towards Prosthodontic Clinical Decision-Making for Edentulous Patients among South West Deanery Dental Foundation Year One Dentists

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Barber; James Puryer; Sam Leary; Lisa McNally; Dominic O’Sullivan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe Dental Foundation year one dentists’ attitudes towards prosthodontic decision making for edentulous patients, and identify whether there are gender differences in these attitudes. All South West Deanery trainees were invited to take part in the study between May and June 2011 and a previously piloted questionnaire was administered to the trainees by their training programme directors. The questionnaire posed questions based upon a clinical scenario of dis...

  8. Support and Assessment for Fall Emergency Referrals (SAFER 1): Cluster Randomised Trial of Computerised Clinical Decision Support for Paramedics

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Anne Snooks; Ben Carter; Jeremy Dale; Theresa Foster; Ioan Humphreys; Philippa Anne Logan; Ronan Anthony Lyons; Suzanne Margaret Mason; Ceri James Phillips; Antonio Sanchez; Mushtaq Wani; Alan Watkins; Bridget Elizabeth Wells; Richard Whitfield; Ian Trevor Russell

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of Computerised Clinical Decision Support (CCDS) for paramedics attending older people who fall. Design Cluster trial randomised by paramedic; modelling. Setting 13 ambulance stations in two UK emergency ambulance services. Participants 42 of 409 eligible paramedics, who attended 779 older patients for a reported fall. Interventions Intervention paramedics received CCDS on Tablet computers to guide patient care. Control parame...

  9. Implementation of Clinical Pharmacogenomics within a Large Health System: From Electronic Health Record Decision Support to Consultation Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, J Kevin; Stowe, David; Willner, Marc A; Wai, Maya; Daly, Thomas; Gordon, Steven M; Lashner, Bret A; Parikh, Sumit; White, Robert; Teng, Kathryn; Moss, Timothy; Erwin, Angelika; Chalmers, Jeffrey; Eng, Charis; Knoer, Scott

    2016-08-01

    The number of clinically relevant gene-based guidelines and recommendations pertaining to drug prescribing continues to grow. Incorporating gene-drug interaction information into the drug-prescribing process can help optimize pharmacotherapy outcomes and improve patient safety. However, pharmacogenomic implementation barriers exist such as integration of pharmacogenomic results into electronic health records (EHRs), development and deployment of pharmacogenomic decision support tools to EHRs, and feasible models for establishing ambulatory pharmacogenomic clinics. We describe the development of pharmacist-managed pharmacogenomic services within a large health system. The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for HLA-B*57:01-abacavir, HLA-B*15:02-carbamazepine, and TPMT-thiopurines (i.e., azathioprine, mercaptopurine, and thioguanine) were systematically integrated into patient care. Sixty-three custom rules and alerts (20 for TPMT-thiopurines, 8 for HLA-B*57:01-abacavir, and 35 for HLA-B*15:02-anticonvulsants) were developed and deployed to the EHR for the purpose of providing point-of-care pharmacogenomic decision support. In addition, a pharmacist and physician-geneticist collaboration established a pharmacogenomics ambulatory clinic. This clinic provides genetic testing when warranted, result interpretation along with pharmacotherapy recommendations, and patient education. Our processes for developing these pharmacogenomic services and solutions for addressing implementation barriers are presented. PMID:27312955

  10. Design and Development of a Sharable Clinical Decision Support System Based on a Semantic Web Service Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Gou, Ling; Tian, Yu; Li, Tian-Chang; Zhang, Mao; Li, Jing-Song

    2016-05-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems provide clinicians and other health care stakeholders with patient-specific assessments or recommendations to aid in the clinical decision-making process. Despite their demonstrated potential for improving health care quality, the widespread availability of CDS systems has been limited mainly by the difficulty and cost of sharing CDS knowledge among heterogeneous healthcare information systems. The purpose of this study was to design and develop a sharable clinical decision support (S-CDS) system that meets this challenge. The fundamental knowledge base consists of independent and reusable knowledge modules (KMs) to meet core CDS needs, wherein each KM is semantically well defined based on the standard information model, terminologies, and representation formalisms. A semantic web service framework was developed to identify, access, and leverage these KMs across diverse CDS applications and care settings. The S-CDS system has been validated in two distinct client CDS applications. Model-level evaluation results confirmed coherent knowledge representation. Application-level evaluation results reached an overall accuracy of 98.66 % and a completeness of 96.98 %. The evaluation results demonstrated the technical feasibility and application prospect of our approach. Compared with other CDS engineering efforts, our approach facilitates system development and implementation and improves system maintainability, scalability and efficiency, which contribute to the widespread adoption of effective CDS within the healthcare domain.

  11. Decision-making capacity and competency in the elderly: a clinical and neuropsychological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Paul J; Rick, Jacqueline H

    2008-01-01

    With our ageing population, the number of older adults with cognitive impairment has also increased. There is both an acute and growing need for evidence-based assessments to identify their decision making capacity and competence. In the present article we (1) present definitions of decision-making capacity and competence, (2) review cognitive functions that are central to decision-making capacity as well as the methods and procedures commonly used to assess these domains, and (3) address the communication of assessment findings to patients and their loved ones. The importance of assessing decision-making capacity in the context of specific functions and of respecting the values and interests of older adults are emphasized.

  12. Helping patients make better decisions: how to apply behavioral economics in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney MR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maureen Reni Courtney,1 Christy Spivey,2 Kathy M Daniel1 1College of Nursing, 2College of Business, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, USA  Abstract: Clinicians are committed to effectively educating patients and helping them to make sound decisions concerning their own health care. However, how do clinicians determine what is effective education? How do they present information clearly and in a manner that patients understand and can use to make informed decisions? Behavioral economics (BE is a subfield of economics that can assist clinicians to better understand how individuals actually make decisions. BE research can help guide interactions with patients so that information is presented and discussed in a more deliberate and impactful way. We can be more effective providers of care when we understand the factors that influence how our patients make decisions, factors of which we may have been largely unaware. BE research that focuses on health care and medical decision making is becoming more widely known, and what has been reported suggests that BE interventions can be effective in the medical realm. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an overview of BE decision science and derived practice strategies to promote more effective behavior change in patients.Keywords: nursing, message framing, defaults, incentives, social norms, commitment devices, health care

  13. Usability of clinical decision support system as a facilitator for learning the assistive technology adaptation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial-Saad, Alexandra; Kuflik, Tsvi; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar; Schreuer, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of Ontology Supported Computerized Assistive Technology Recommender (OSCAR), a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for the assistive technology adaptation process, its impact on learning the matching process, and to determine the relationship between its usability and learnability. Two groups of expert and novice clinicians (total, n = 26) took part in this study. Each group filled out system usability scale (SUS) to evaluate OSCAR's usability. The novice group completed a learning questionnaire to assess OSCAR's effect on their ability to learn the matching process. Both groups rated OSCAR's usability as "very good", (M [SUS] = 80.7, SD = 11.6, median = 83.7) by the novices, and (M [SUS] = 81.2, SD = 6.8, median = 81.2) by the experts. The Mann-Whitney results indicated that no significant differences were found between the expert and novice groups in terms of OSCAR's usability. A significant positive correlation existed between the usability of OSCAR and the ability to learn the adaptation process (rs = 0.46, p = 0.04). Usability is an important factor in the acceptance of a system. The successful application of user-centered design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically in developing other systems. Implications for Rehabilitation Creating a CDSS with a focus on its usability is an important factor for its acceptance by its users. Successful usability outcomes can impact the learning process of the subject matter in general, and the AT prescription process in particular. The successful application of User-Centered Design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically. The study emphasizes the importance of close collaboration between the developers and

  14. A Bright Future for Precision Medicine: Advances in Fluorescent Chemical Probe Design and Their Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Megan; Yim, Joshua J; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-21

    The Precision Medicine Initiative aims to use advances in basic and clinical research to develop therapeutics that selectively target and kill cancer cells. Under the same doctrine of precision medicine, there is an equally important need to visualize these diseased cells to enable diagnosis, facilitate surgical resection, and monitor therapeutic response. Therefore, there is a great opportunity for chemists to develop chemically tractable probes that can image cancer in vivo. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of optical probes, as well as their current and future applications in the clinical management of cancer. The progress in probe development described here suggests that optical imaging is an important and rapidly developing field of study that encourages continued collaboration among chemists, biologists, and clinicians to further refine these tools for interventional surgical imaging, as well as for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26933740

  15. Clinical Research of Crizotinib in Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo ZHU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available At present, in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, targeted therapy has an important status. After epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKIs, crizotinib targeted at EML4-ALK fusion gene becomes a significant drug of molecular targeted therapy in NSCLC. Phase I and II clinical trials prove that crizotinib is effective for treatment of activating EML4-ALK mutation in advanced NSCLC patients, little side-effect, and well tolerated. Recently, crizotinib can inhibit ROS1 receptor tyrosine kinase and show extraordinary significant antitumor activity in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC. Drug resistance also exists in crizotinib. The mechanism of drug resistance needs further research. In this study, a review is performed in the mechanism and pharmacokinetics of crizotinib, and the clinical progress of treatment in advanced NSCLC.

  16. Future perspectives toward the early definition of a multivariate decision-support scheme employed in clinical decision making for senior citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzidis, Christos A; Gilou, Sotiria; Billis, Antonis; Karagianni, Maria; Bratsas, Charalampos D; Bamidis, Panagiotis

    2016-03-01

    Recent neuroscientific studies focused on the identification of pathological neurophysiological patterns (emotions, geriatric depression, memory impairment and sleep disturbances) through computerised clinical decision-support systems. Almost all these research attempts employed either resting-state condition (e.g. eyes-closed) or event-related potentials extracted during a cognitive task known to be affected by the disease under consideration. This Letter reviews existing data mining techniques and aims to enhance their robustness by proposing a holistic decision framework dealing with comorbidities and early symptoms' identification, while it could be applied in realistic occasions. Multivariate features are elicited and fused in order to be compared with average activities characteristic of each neuropathology group. A proposed model of the specific cognitive function which may be based on previous findings (a priori information) and/or validated by current experimental data should be then formed. So, the proposed scheme facilitates the early identification and prevention of neurodegenerative phenomena. Neurophysiological semantic annotation is hypothesised to enhance the importance of the proposed framework in facilitating the personalised healthcare of the information society and medical informatics research community.

  17. Future perspectives toward the early definition of a multivariate decision-support scheme employed in clinical decision making for senior citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzidis, Christos A; Gilou, Sotiria; Billis, Antonis; Karagianni, Maria; Bratsas, Charalampos D; Bamidis, Panagiotis

    2016-03-01

    Recent neuroscientific studies focused on the identification of pathological neurophysiological patterns (emotions, geriatric depression, memory impairment and sleep disturbances) through computerised clinical decision-support systems. Almost all these research attempts employed either resting-state condition (e.g. eyes-closed) or event-related potentials extracted during a cognitive task known to be affected by the disease under consideration. This Letter reviews existing data mining techniques and aims to enhance their robustness by proposing a holistic decision framework dealing with comorbidities and early symptoms' identification, while it could be applied in realistic occasions. Multivariate features are elicited and fused in order to be compared with average activities characteristic of each neuropathology group. A proposed model of the specific cognitive function which may be based on previous findings (a priori information) and/or validated by current experimental data should be then formed. So, the proposed scheme facilitates the early identification and prevention of neurodegenerative phenomena. Neurophysiological semantic annotation is hypothesised to enhance the importance of the proposed framework in facilitating the personalised healthcare of the information society and medical informatics research community. PMID:27222732

  18. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of small renal masses: Clinical effectiveness and technological advances

    OpenAIRE

    Nabi, G; Goodman, C; Melzer, A.

    2010-01-01

    The review summarises the technological advances in the application of high-intensity focused ultrasound for small renal masses presumed to be cancer including the systematic review of its clinical application. Current progress in the area of magnetic resonance image guided ultrasound ablation is also appraised. Specifically, organ tracking and real time monitoring of temperature changes during the treatment are discussed. Finally, areas of future research interest are outlined.

  19. Personalised Medicine Possible With Real-Time Integration of Genomic and Clinical Data To Inform Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Turner, Maureen; Johnstone, Alice; Heffer, Leon; Rafael, Naomi; Bakker, Tim; Thorne, Natalie; Macciocca, Ivan; Gaff, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Despite widespread use of genomic sequencing in research, there are gaps in our understanding of the performance and provision of genomic sequencing in clinical practice. The Melbourne Genomics Health Alliance (the Alliance), has been established to determine the feasibility, performance and impact of using genomic sequencing as a diagnostic tool. The Alliance has partnered with BioGrid Australia to enable the linkage of genomic sequencing, clinical treatment and outcome data for this project. This integrated dataset of genetic, clinical and patient sourced information will be used by the Alliance to evaluate the potential diagnostic value of genomic sequencing in routine clinical practice. This project will allow the Alliance to provide recommendations to facilitate the integration of genomic sequencing into clinical practice to enable personalised disease treatment. PMID:26262351

  20. Assessing Competing Demands and Charting a Course: A Phenomenological Study of Advanced Placement U.S. History Teachers' Decision Making and Course Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kerry D.

    2014-01-01

    Florida has experienced some of the greatest growth of Advanced Placement (AP) programs in recent years and student scores on the AP exams have evolved into a highly significant metric in evaluating student proficiency and teacher and school effectiveness. Despite this growth, it is not well known how AP teachers make decisions about the content…

  1. The clinical observation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer with DX regimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Zhang; Jianing Qiu; Shuxian Qu; Yaling Han; Zhaozhe Liu; Xiaodong Xie

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The recent clinical curative ef ect and adverse events of docetaxel and capecitabine (DX) of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with local y advanced breast cancer was discussed. Methods:The data of 72 cases of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (DX) in local y advanced breast cancer after 4 cycles were retrospectively analyzed. Docetaxel 75 mg/m2 by infusion 1 h on d1, capecitabine 2000 mg/m2 by oral for twice daily on d1–14, 21 days was a cycle. Results:Al 72 patients were assessed for ef icacy and adverse events. The total ef ective rate was 80.5%(58/72), including pathological complete response (pCR) was 7 (9.7%), clinical complete remission (cCR) was 15(20.8%), clinical partial response (PR) was 43 (59.7%), stable disease (SD) was 8 (11.1%) and progressive disease (PD) was 6 (8.3%). The main adverse events were gastrointestinal reactions and bone marrow suppression. The 3 to 4 degrees of adverse reactions including granulocytopenia in 7 patients (20.6%), hand-foot syndrome in 6 patients (15.2%). Conclusion:The DX regimen provide a favorable ef icacy and safety profile in patients with local y advanced breast cancer for neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  2. Influence of the sFlt-1/PlGF Ratio on Clinical Decision-Making in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Evelyn; Schlembach, Dietmar; Ramoni, Angela; Langer, Elena; Bahlmann, Franz; Grill, Sabine; Schaffenrath, Helene; van der Does, Reinhard; Messinger, Diethelm; Verhagen-Kamerbeek, Wilma D. J.; Reim, Manfred; Hund, Martin; Stepan, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of the soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1/placental growth factor ratio in physicians’ decision making in pregnant women with signs and symptoms of preeclampsia in routine clinical practice. Methods A multicenter, prospective, open, non-interventional study enrolled pregnant women presenting with preeclampsia signs and symptoms in several European perinatal care centers. Before the soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1/placental growth factor ratio result was known, physicians documented intended clinical procedures using an iPad® application (data locked/time stamped). After the result was available, clinical decisions were confirmed or revised and documented. An independent adjudication committee evaluated the appropriateness of decisions based on maternal/fetal outcomes. Clinician decision making with regard to hospitalization was the primary outcome. Results In 16.9% of mothers (20/118) the hospitalization decision was changed after knowledge of the ratio. In 13 women (11.0%), the initial decision to hospitalize was changed to no hospitalization. In seven women (5.9%) the revised decision was hospitalization. All revised decisions were considered appropriate by the panel of adjudicators (McNemar test; p preeclampsia. This is the first study to demonstrate the impact of angiogenic biomarkers on decision making in a routine clinical practice. PMID:27243815

  3. Impact of Nonvascular Thoracic MR Imaging on the Clinical Decision Making of Thoracic Surgeons: A 2-year Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackman, Jeanne B; Gaissert, Henning A; Lanuti, Michael; Digumarthy, Subba R; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Halpern, Elkan F; Wright, Cameron D

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of nonvascular thoracic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging on the clinical decision making and diagnostic certainty of thoracic surgeons. Materials and Methods Seven thoracic surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital, an academic quaternary referral hospital, participated in this 2-year, prospective, institution review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant pre- and post-MR imaging survey study after completing a one-time demographic survey. Between July 16, 2013, and July 13, 2015, each time a thoracic surgeon ordered a nonvascular thoracic MR imaging study via radiology order entry, he or she was sent a link to the pre-test survey that ascertained the clinical rationale for MR imaging, the clinical management plan if MR imaging was not an option, and pre-test diagnostic certainty. Upon completion of the MR imaging report, the surgeon was sent a link to the post-test survey assessing if/how MR imaging changed clinical management, the surgeon's comfort with the clinical management plan, and post-test diagnostic certainty. Data were analyzed with Student t, Wilcoxon, and McNemar tests. Results A total of 99 pre- and post-test surveys were completed. Most MR imaging studies (64 of 99 [65%]) were requested because of indeterminate computed tomographic findings. The use of MR imaging significantly reduced the number of planned surgical interventions (P management plan in 95% (94 of 99) of cases. Increased diagnostic certainty as a result of MR imaging was highly significant (P < .0001). In 21% (21 of 99) of cases, definitive MR imaging results warranted no further follow-up or clinical care. Conclusion In appropriate cases, assessment with nonvascular thoracic MR imaging substantially affects the clinical decision making and diagnostic certainty of thoracic surgeons. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. An earlier incorrect version of this article appeared online. This article was corrected on May 2, 2016

  4. Attitudes towards Prosthodontic Clinical Decision-Making for Edentulous Patients among South West Deanery Dental Foundation Year One Dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Barber

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe Dental Foundation year one dentists’ attitudes towards prosthodontic decision making for edentulous patients, and identify whether there are gender differences in these attitudes. All South West Deanery trainees were invited to take part in the study between May and June 2011 and a previously piloted questionnaire was administered to the trainees by their training programme directors. The questionnaire posed questions based upon a clinical scenario of discussing treatment options with patients. Seventy-two questionnaires were used in the analysis (91% overall response rate. Trainees perceived their own values to be less important than the patient’s values (p < 0.001 in decision making, but similar to the patient’s friend’s/relative’s values (p = 0.1. In addition, the trainees perceived the patient’s values to be less important than their friend’s/relatives (p < 0.001. Sixty-six per cent of trainees acknowledged an influence from their own personal values on their presentation of material to patients who are in the process of choosing among different treatment options, and 87% thought their edentulous patients were satisfied with the decision making process when choosing among different treatment options. Fifty-eight per cent of trainees supported a strategy of negotiation between patients and clinicians (shared decision making. There was no strong evidence to suggest gender had an influence on the attitudes towards decision making. The finding of a consensus towards shared decision making in the attitudes of trainees, and no gender differences is encouraging and is supportive of UK dental schools’ ability to foster ethical and professional values among dentists.

  5. Clinical evaluation of endodotic therapy on periodontal tissue healing in chronic advanced periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi R.

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There is a controversy about the relationship between pulpal and periodontal diseases. The interrelationship between pulp and periodontium could have an important effect on the treatment plan of the tooth. Purpose: The aim of the present research is to evaluate root canal therapy effects on periodontal healing of teeth with chronic advanced periodontitis. Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial 32 single rooted teeth which had necrotic pulp or irreversible pulpitis in 7 patients with chronic advanced periodontitis were selected based on specific criteria. Using a split mouth design, teeth were randomly put in two groups of test and control. In the test group root canal therapy ,scaling & root planing were done.In the control group, only scaling & root planing were performed. Clinical parameters including Pocket Depth (PD, Clinical Attachment Level (CAL, mobility, pattern of bone destruction and plaque index (PI were evaluated in two groups at base line, 1 and 3 months after treatment. Appropriate tests such as paired Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney were performed. Results: Statistically significant reductions were found in the test group when comparing baseline and one-month post treatment values for Clinical Attachment level (CAL but not after 3-months. In the control group the CAL reductions were not statistically significant between baseline and one month post-treatment, but a increase were observed between one month and three months after treatment. There was a statstically significant difference between the test and the control groups. Other parameters didn’t show any significant differences in each group and between two groups. Conclusion: Since clinical attachment level was the most important parameter we found it can high lighted the role of pathogene with pulpal origin in progression of periodeontal disease and it is concluded that beside periodontal treatment in some advanced periodontal

  6. Clinical significance of preoperative regional intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Wu Zhang; Shou-Chun Zou; Dun Shi; Da-Jian Zhao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy could increase the radical resection rate of advanced gastric cancer, but its effect on the long-term survival has not been assessed. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical significance of preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.METHODS: Clinicopathological data of 91 patients who underwent curative resection for advanced gastric cancer were collected. Among them, 37 patients undertaken preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy were used as the interventional chemotherapy group, and the remaining 54 patients as the control group. Eleven factors including clinicopathological variables, treatment procedures and molecular biological makers that might contribute to the long-term survival rate were analyzed using Cox multivariate regression analysis.RESULTS: The 5-year survival rate was 52.5% and 39.8%,respectively, for the interventional group and the control group (P<0.05). Cox multivariate regression analysis revealed that the TNM stage (P<0.001), preoperative intraarterial infusion chemotherapy (P = 0.029) and growth pattern (P = 0.042) were the independent factors for the long-term survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer.CONCLUSION: Preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy plays an important role in improving the prognosis of advanced gastric cancer.

  7. Professional excellence and career advancement in nursing: a conceptual framework for clinical leadership development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Rita Kudirat; Bhattacharya, Anand; Adeniran, Anthony A

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, stakeholders in the health care community are recognizing nursing as key to solving the nation's health care issues. This acknowledgment provides a unique opportunity for nursing to demonstrate leadership by developing clinical nurse leaders to collaborate with the multidisciplinary care team in driving evidence-based, safe quality, cost-effective health care services. One approach for nursing success is standardizing the entry-level education for nurses and developing a uniform professional development and career advancement trajectory with appropriate incentives to encourage participation. A framework to guide and provide scientific evidence of how frontline nurses can be engaged will be paramount. The model for professional excellence and career advancement provides a framework that offers a clear path for researchers to examine variables influencing nurses' professional development and career advancement in a systematic manner. Professional Excellence and Career Advancement in Nursing underscores professional preparedness of a registered nurse as central to leadership development. It also describes the elements that influence nurses' participation in professional development and career advancement under 4 main categories emphasizing mentorship and self-efficacy as essential variables.

  8. Professional autonomy in 21st century healthcare: Nurses' accounts of clinical decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traynor, Michael; Boland, Maggie; Buus, Niels

    2010-01-01

    for interpreting instances where the nurses collectively withdrew from the potential dangers of too extreme claims for technicality or indeterminacy in their work. However, their theory did not explain the full range of accounts of decision-making that were given. Taken at face value, the accounts from......Autonomy in decision-making has traditionally been described as a feature of professional work, however the work of healthcare professionals has been seen as steadily encroached upon by State and managerialist forces. Nursing has faced particular problems in establishing itself as a credible....... The study uses accounts of decision-making to gain insight into contemporary professional nursing. The study also aims to explore the usefulness of a theory of professional work set out by Jamous and Peloille (1970). The analysis draws on notions of interpretive repertoires and elements of narrative...

  9. A structured process to develop scenarios for use in evaluation of an evidence-based approach in clinical decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manns PJ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Patricia J Manns, Johanna DarrahDepartment of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, CanadaBackground and purpose: Scenarios are used as the basis from which to evaluate the use of the components of evidence-based practice in decision making, yet there are few examples of a standardized process of scenario writing. The aim of this paper is to describe a step-by-step scenario writing method used in the context of the authors’ curriculum research study.Methods: Scenario writing teams included one physical therapy clinician and one academic staff member. There were four steps in the scenario development process: (1 identify prevalent condition and brainstorm interventions; (2 literature search; (3 develop scenario framework; and (4 write scenario.Results: Scenarios focused only on interventions, not diagnostic or prognostic problems. The process led to two types of scenarios – ones that provided an intervention with strong research evidence and others where the intervention had weak evidence to support its use. The end product of the process was a scenario that incorporates aspects of evidence-based decision making and can be used as the basis for evaluation.Conclusion: The use of scenarios has been very helpful to capture therapists’ reasoning processes. The scenario development process was applied in an education context as part of a final evaluation of graduating clinical physical therapy students.Keywords: physical therapists, clinical decision making, evaluation, curriculum

  10. Advanced radiological work-up as an adjunct to decision in early reconstructive surgery in brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkman Anders

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As neurophysiologic tests may not reveal the extent of brachial plexus injury at the early stage, the role of early radiological work-up has become increasingly important. The aim of the study was to evaluate the concordance between the radiological and clinical findings with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injuries. Methods Seven consecutive male patients (median age 33; range 15-61 with brachial plexus injuries, caused by motor cycle accidents in 5/7 patients, who underwent extensive radiological work-up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography myelography (CT-M or both were included in this retrospective study. A total of 34 spinal nerve roots were evaluated by neuroradiologists at two different occasions. The degree of agreement between the radiological findings of every individual nerve root and the intraoperative findings was estimated by calculation of kappa coefficient (К-value. Using the operative findings as a gold standard, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of the clinical findings and the radiological findings were estimated. Results The diagnostic accuracy of radiological findings was 88% compared with 65% for the clinical findings. The concordance between the radiological findings and the intraoperative findings was substantial (К = 0.76 compared with only fair (К = 0.34 for the clinical findings. There were two false positive and two false negative radiological findings (sensitivity and PPV of 0.90; specificity and NPV of 0.87. Conclusions The advanced optimized radiological work-up used showed high reliability and substantial agreement with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injury.

  11. Role of the community matron in advance care planning and 'do not attempt CPR' decision-making: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierski, Mandy; King, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The community matron (CM) is often the key worker caring for patients with chronic, life-limiting, long-term conditions, but these patients are not always recognised as palliative cases. This study explored the experiences of CMs with regard to advance care planning (ACP) and 'do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation' (DNACPR) decision-making to understand whether or not they felt adequately prepared for this aspect of their role, and why. Qualitative data were generated from six CMs using a broad interpretive phenomenological approach. Face-to-face recorded interviews were analysed using template analysis. The study found that although participants faced complex ethical situations around ACP and DNACPR almost on a daily basis, none had received any formal training despite the emphasis on training in national and local guidelines. Participants often struggled to get their patients accepted on to the Gold Standards Framework. The research found variability and complexity of cases to be the main barriers to clear identification of the palliative phase.

  12. Value of ovarian reserve testing before IVF: a clinical decision analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W. Mol; T.E.M. Verhagen; D.J. Hendriks; J.A. Collins; A. Coomarasamy; B.C. Opmeer; F.J. Broekmans

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the value of testing for ovarian reserve prior to a first cycle IVF incorporating patient and doctor valuation of mismatches between test results and treatment outcome. METHODS: A decision model was developed for couples who were considering participation in an IVF programme. T

  13. Rapid molecular diagnostic tests in patients with bacteremia: evaluation of their impact on decision making and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardakas, K Z; Anifantaki, F I; Trigkidis, K K; Falagas, M E

    2015-11-01

    We performed a systematic review of the data regarding rapid diagnostic tests and their advantages or limitations on patients' clinical outcomes. The PubMed and Scopus databases were searched independently by two reviewers. Mortality was the primary outcome. Most studies compared rapid tests with blood cultures. Although not observed in all studies, only studies comparing rapid tests in conjunction with antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) showed a mortality benefit. A reduction in hospital or intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay was also observed in almost all studies when the rapid tests, with or without ASPs, were used. Finally, treatment decisions were taken earlier in the rapid test groups. Despite a faster treatment decision, a clear mortality benefit was not seen when rapid tests were used. It is crucial to differentiate the influence of rapid tests from that of ASPs and clarify the actual effect of each factor separately.

  14. Improving awareness of cancer clinical trials among Hispanic patients and families: audience segmentation decisions for a media intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; McIntyre, Jessica; Gonzalez, Luis E; Antonia, Teresita Muñoz; Antolino, Prado; Wells, Kristen J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials hold great promise for cancer treatment; yet, Hispanic cancer patients have low rates of clinical trial participation. Lack of awareness and knowledge of clinical trials and language barriers may account for low participation rates. Patient education through audiovisual materials can improve knowledge of and attitudes toward clinical trials among Hispanic populations. In this study, 36 Hispanic cancer patients/survivors and caregivers in Florida and Puerto Rico participated in focus groups to aid in developing a Spanish-language DVD and booklet intervention designed to increase knowledge about clinical trials. Focus group results showed (a) low levels of knowledge about clinical trials, (b) uncertainty about why a physician would expect a patient to make a choice about treatment, and (c) desire for family participation in decision making. Respondents expressed various preferences for aspects of the DVD such as showing extended family in the DVD and physician explanations about key terms. On the basis of these preferences, the authors developed a creative brief for a DVD. The content of the DVD was reviewed by Hispanic community leaders and key stakeholders. A final DVD was created, in Spanish, using Hispanic patients and physicians, which contained the information deemed important from the focus groups and stakeholder interviews. The DVD is complete with companion booklet and currently undergoing a randomized control trial.

  15. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  16. Clinical observation of capecitabine monotherapy in elderly patients with advanced breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Zhang; Zhaozhe Liu Co-first author; Zhendong Zheng; Tao Han; Yaling Han; Min Song; Xiaodong Xie

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the safety and ef icacy of capecitabine mono-chemo-therapy in elderly patients with advanced breast cancer. Methods The data from 36 cases of capecitabine monotherapy in elderly patients with advanced breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Oral administration of capecitabine 2000 mg/m2 twice daily (D1–14) for 21 days constituted a cycle. The ef ect of the disease and main adverse reactions were evaluated every 2 cycles. Results The data from 36 elderly patients were studied. The median number of chemotherapy cycles was 4. The total ef ective rate was 30.6% (11/36) and the disease control rate was 72.2% (26/36). The number of patients with clinical complete remission was 2, clinical partial response was 9, stable disease was 15, and progressive disease was 10. Where treatment was ef ective, the median time to progression was 6 months and the median overal survival was 9.5 months. The main adverse events were gastroin-testinal reactions, bone marrow suppression, and oral mucositis; most of the reactions were grade 1 to 2. Grade 3 to 4 adverse reactions included granulocytopenia in 2 patients (12.5%) and hand-foot syndrome in 1 patient (6.7%). Conclusion Capecitabine monotherapy was ef ective in control ing disease progression, and adverse reactions were tolerated by elderly patients with advanced breast cancer.

  17. The effect of high-fidelity patient simulation on the critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills of new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneval, Rhonda; Fowler, Kimberly A; Kays, John A; Boyd, Tiffany M; Shuey, Jennifer; Harne-Britner, Sarah; Mastrine, Cynthia

    2012-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of high-fidelity patient simulation to new nurse orientation enhanced critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills. A pretest-posttest design was used to assess critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills in two groups of graduate nurses. Compared with the control group, the high-fidelity patient simulation group did not show significant improvement in mean critical thinking or clinical decision-making scores. When mean scores were analyzed, both groups showed an increase in critical thinking scores from pretest to posttest, with the high-fidelity patient simulation group showing greater gains in overall scores. However, neither group showed a statistically significant increase in mean test scores. The effect of high-fidelity patient simulation on critical thinking and clinical decision-making skills remains unclear.

  18. A clinical decision support system for integrating tuberculosis and HIV care in Kenya: a human-centered design approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caricia Catalani

    Full Text Available With the aim of integrating HIV and tuberculosis care in rural Kenya, a team of researchers, clinicians, and technologists used the human-centered design approach to facilitate design, development, and deployment processes of new patient-specific TB clinical decision support system for medical providers. In Kenya, approximately 1.6 million people are living with HIV and have a 20-times higher risk of dying of tuberculosis. Although tuberculosis prevention and treatment medication is widely available, proven to save lives, and prioritized by the World Health Organization, ensuring that it reaches the most vulnerable communities remains challenging. Human-centered design, used in the fields of industrial design and information technology for decades, is an approach to improving the effectiveness and impact of innovations that has been scarcely used in the health field. Using this approach, our team followed a 3-step process, involving mixed methods assessment to (1 understand the situation through the collection and analysis of site observation sessions and key informant interviews; (2 develop a new clinical decision support system through iterative prototyping, end-user engagement, and usability testing; and, (3 implement and evaluate the system across 24 clinics in rural West Kenya. Through the application of this approach, we found that human-centered design facilitated the process of digital innovation in a complex and resource-constrained context.

  19. A clinical decision support system for integrating tuberculosis and HIV care in Kenya: a human-centered design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalani, Caricia; Green, Eric; Owiti, Philip; Keny, Aggrey; Diero, Lameck; Yeung, Ada; Israelski, Dennis; Biondich, Paul

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of integrating HIV and tuberculosis care in rural Kenya, a team of researchers, clinicians, and technologists used the human-centered design approach to facilitate design, development, and deployment processes of new patient-specific TB clinical decision support system for medical providers. In Kenya, approximately 1.6 million people are living with HIV and have a 20-times higher risk of dying of tuberculosis. Although tuberculosis prevention and treatment medication is widely available, proven to save lives, and prioritized by the World Health Organization, ensuring that it reaches the most vulnerable communities remains challenging. Human-centered design, used in the fields of industrial design and information technology for decades, is an approach to improving the effectiveness and impact of innovations that has been scarcely used in the health field. Using this approach, our team followed a 3-step process, involving mixed methods assessment to (1) understand the situation through the collection and analysis of site observation sessions and key informant interviews; (2) develop a new clinical decision support system through iterative prototyping, end-user engagement, and usability testing; and, (3) implement and evaluate the system across 24 clinics in rural West Kenya. Through the application of this approach, we found that human-centered design facilitated the process of digital innovation in a complex and resource-constrained context. PMID:25170939

  20. A clinical decision support system for integrating tuberculosis and HIV care in Kenya: a human-centered design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalani, Caricia; Green, Eric; Owiti, Philip; Keny, Aggrey; Diero, Lameck; Yeung, Ada; Israelski, Dennis; Biondich, Paul

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of integrating HIV and tuberculosis care in rural Kenya, a team of researchers, clinicians, and technologists used the human-centered design approach to facilitate design, development, and deployment processes of new patient-specific TB clinical decision support system for medical providers. In Kenya, approximately 1.6 million people are living with HIV and have a 20-times higher risk of dying of tuberculosis. Although tuberculosis prevention and treatment medication is widely available, proven to save lives, and prioritized by the World Health Organization, ensuring that it reaches the most vulnerable communities remains challenging. Human-centered design, used in the fields of industrial design and information technology for decades, is an approach to improving the effectiveness and impact of innovations that has been scarcely used in the health field. Using this approach, our team followed a 3-step process, involving mixed methods assessment to (1) understand the situation through the collection and analysis of site observation sessions and key informant interviews; (2) develop a new clinical decision support system through iterative prototyping, end-user engagement, and usability testing; and, (3) implement and evaluate the system across 24 clinics in rural West Kenya. Through the application of this approach, we found that human-centered design facilitated the process of digital innovation in a complex and resource-constrained context.

  1. Evaluation of two preoparative chemotherapy regimens for complete operability of advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sedighi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: This prospective phase III study was designed to compare the activity of two combinations chemotherapy drugs in advanced gastric adenocarcinoma Methods: In a double blinded clinical trial, From Jan. 2002 to Jan. 2005, ninety patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned to 1 Cisplatin and continuous infusion of 5FU and Epirubicin (ECF, and 2 Cisplatin and continuous infusion of 5FU with Docetaxel (TCF. Reduction in tumor mass, overall survival (OS, time to progression (TTP, and safety were measured outcome. Results: About 90% of patients had stage III or IV disease and the most common sites of tumor spread were peritoneal surfaces, liver and Paraaortic lymph nodes in either group. The objective clinical response rate (more than 50% decreases in tumor mass was 38% and 43% in ECF and TCF group respectively. Global quality of life increased (p=0 002 and symptoms of pain and insomnia decreased after chemotherapy. Patients in TCF had more grade one or two skin reactions, neuropathy and diarrhea. Fourteen patients underwent surgery. Complete microscopic (R0 resection had done in two of ECF and six of TCF tumors (p=0.015. Two cases in TCF group showed complete pathologic response. Median TTP was nine months and 10 months in ECF and TCF group respectively. Median OS was 12 months in both groups. Conclusion: Although there wasn’t statistically significant difference regarded to clinical response or survival between two groups, TCF showed more complete pathologic response.

  2. Testing an advanced satellite technique for dust detection as a decision support system for the air quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconieri, Alfredo; Filizzola, Carolina; Femiano, Rossella; Marchese, Francesco; Sannazzaro, Filomena; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio; Di Muro, Ersilia; Divietri, Mariella; Crisci, Anna Maria; Lovallo, Michele; Mangiamele, Lucia; Vaccaro, Maria Pia; Palma, Achille

    2014-05-01

    In order to correctly apply the European directive for air quality (2008/50/CE), local Authorities are often requested to discriminate the possible origin (natural/anthropic) of anomalous concentration of pollutants in the air (art.20 Directive 2008/50/CE). In this framework, it's been focused on PM10 and PM2,5 concentrations and sources. In fact, depending on their origin, appropriate counter-measures can be taken devoted to prevent their production (e.g. by traffic restriction) or simply to reduce their impact on citizen health (e.g. information campaigns). In this context suitable satellite techniques can be used in order to identify natural sources (particularly Saharan dust, but also volcanic ash or forest fire smoke) that can be responsible of over-threshold concentration of PM10/2,5 in populated areas. In the framework of the NIBS (Networking and Internationalization of Basilicata Space Technologies) project, funded by the Basilicata Region within the ERDF 2007-2013 program, the School of Engineering of University of Basilicata, the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis of National Research Council (IMAA-CNR) and the Regional Agency for the Protection of the Environment of Basilicata Region (ARPAB) have started a collaboration devoted to assess the potential of the use of advanced satellite techniques for Saharan dust events identification to support ARPAB activities related to the application of the European directive for air quality (2008/50/CE) in Basilicata region. In such a joint activity, the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) approach has been assessed and tested as a decision support system for monitoring and evaluating air quality at local and regional level. In particular, RST-DUST products, derived by processing high temporal resolution data provided by SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) sensor on board Meteosat Second Generation platforms, have been analysed together with PM10 measurements performed by the ground

  3. Making Evidence-based Decisions in the Clinical Practice of Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hao; CHEN Ke-ji

    2010-01-01

    @@ In 1948.the first clinical paper adopting the protocol of randomized and controlled design was published in British Medical Journal by Bradford Hill, a noted British biostatistician, who introduced rigorous theory of mathematical statistics into clinical design the first time and successfully evaluated the therapeutic effect of streptomycin on tuberculosis(1).

  4. Decision-tree analysis of clinical data to aid diagnostic reasoning for equine laminitis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, C E; Shaw, D J; Verheyen, K L P; Newton, J R

    2016-04-23

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to compare the prevalence of selected clinical signs in laminitis cases and non-laminitic but lame controls to evaluate their capability to discriminate laminitis from other causes of lameness. Participating veterinary practitioners completed a checklist of laminitis-associated clinical signs identified by literature review. Cases were defined as horses/ponies with veterinary-diagnosed, clinically apparent laminitis; controls were horses/ponies with any lameness other than laminitis. Associations were tested by logistic regression with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals, with veterinary practice as an a priori fixed effect. Multivariable analysis using graphical classification tree-based statistical models linked laminitis prevalence with specific combinations of clinical signs. Data were collected for 588 cases and 201 controls. Five clinical signs had a difference in prevalence of greater than +50 per cent: 'reluctance to walk' (OR 4.4), 'short, stilted gait at walk' (OR 9.4), 'difficulty turning' (OR 16.9), 'shifting weight' (OR 17.7) and 'increased digital pulse' (OR 13.2) (all Pdiscriminator; 92 per cent of animals with this clinical sign had laminitis (OR 40.5, Pdiscrimination (OR 15.5, P<0.001). This is the first epidemiological laminitis study to use decision-tree analysis, providing the first evidence base for evaluating clinical signs to differentially diagnose laminitis from other causes of lameness. Improved evaluation of the clinical signs displayed by laminitic animals examined by first-opinion practitioners will lead to equine welfare improvements. PMID:26969668

  5. A UMLS-based knowledge acquisition tool for rule-based clinical decision support system development.

    OpenAIRE

    Achour, Soumeya,; Dojat, Michel; Rieux, Claire; Bierling, Philippe; Lepage, Eric

    2001-01-01

    International audience Decision support systems in the medical field have to be easily modified by medical experts themselves. The authors have designed a knowledge acquisition tool to facilitate the creation and maintenance of a knowledge base by the domain expert and its sharing and reuse by other institutions. The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) contains the domain entities and constitutes the relations repository from which the expert builds, through a specific browser, the expl...

  6. The process of development of a prioritization tool for a clinical decision support build within a computerized provider order entry system: Experiences from St Luke's Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Matthew; Miller, Suzanne; DeJong, Doug; House, John A; Dirks, Carl; Beasley, Brent

    2016-09-01

    To establish a process for the development of a prioritization tool for a clinical decision support build within a computerized provider order entry system and concurrently to prioritize alerts for Saint Luke's Health System. The process of prioritizing clinical decision support alerts included (a) consensus sessions to establish a prioritization process and identify clinical decision support alerts through a modified Delphi process and (b) a clinical decision support survey to validate the results. All members of our health system's physician quality organization, Saint Luke's Care as well as clinicians, administrators, and pharmacy staff throughout Saint Luke's Health System, were invited to participate in this confidential survey. The consensus sessions yielded a prioritization process through alert contextualization and associated Likert-type scales. Utilizing this process, the clinical decision support survey polled the opinions of 850 clinicians with a 64.7 percent response rate. Three of the top rated alerts were approved for the pre-implementation build at Saint Luke's Health System: Acute Myocardial Infarction Core Measure Sets, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis within 4 h, and Criteria for Sepsis. This study establishes a process for developing a prioritization tool for a clinical decision support build within a computerized provider order entry system that may be applicable to similar institutions. PMID:25814483

  7. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-10-07

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs.

  8. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillebrands Jan-Luuk

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs.

  9. First-line treatment with FOLFOXIRI for advanced pancreatic cancer in clinical practice: Patients' outcome and analysis of prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivaldi, Caterina; Caparello, Chiara; Musettini, Gianna; Pasquini, Giulia; Catanese, Silvia; Fornaro, Lorenzo; Lencioni, Monica; Falcone, Alfredo; Vasile, Enrico

    2016-08-15

    FOLFIRINOX is a standard first-line treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (aPC). The Gruppo Oncologico Nord Ovest (GONO) FOLFOXIRI regimen demonstrated efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer. We aimed to evaluate activity and tolerability of FOLFOXIRI regimen in patients with aPC and to explore putative prognostic factors. One hundred thirty-seven consecutive aPC patients were treated with FOLFOXIRI in our institution between 2008 and 2014. Clinical, laboratory and pathological data were collected and their association with activity, progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was investigated. After a median follow up of 30 months, median PFS and OS were 8.0 months (95% CI 6.19-9.81) and 12 months (95% CI 9.75-14.25), respectively. Response rate was 38.6%, while disease-control rate 72.2%. At multivariate analysis liver metastases (p = 0.019; Hazard Ratio, HR, 0.59, 95% Confidence Interval, CI, 0.380.96), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) 1 (p = 0.001; HR 2.26, 95%CI 1.42-3.59) and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR)> 4 (p= 0.002; HR: 2.42; 95% CI 1.38-4.25) were associated with poorer OS. We categorized 119 pts with complete available data as good-risk (0 factors, 38 pts), intermediate-risk (1 factor, 49 pts) and poor-risk (≥2 factors, 32 pts). Median OS for these three groups were 17.6, 11.1 and 7.4 months, respectively (p factors: our analysis revealed ECOG PS, liver metastases and NLR as the most important predictors of survival. These factors could be helpful for treatment decision and clinical trial design. PMID:27038273

  10. Recommendations for standardizing glucose reporting and analysis to optimize clinical decision making in diabetes: the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenstal, Richard M; Ahmann, Andrew J; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H; Garg, Satish K; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B; Klonoff, David C; Kruger, Davida F; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S; Olson, Beth A; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardization of analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from CGM systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP), and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This paper provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients.

  11. Recommendations for standardizing glucose reporting and analysis to optimize clinical decision making in diabetes: the ambulatory glucose profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenstal, Richard M; Ahmann, Andrew J; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H; Garg, Satish K; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B; Klonoff, David C; Kruger, Davida F; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S; Olson, Beth A; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients.

  12. Preliminary Data from an Advanced Dementia Consult Service: Integrating Research, Education, and Clinical Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catic, Angela G.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Hospitalized patients with advanced dementia often receive care that is of limited clinical benefit and inconsistent with preferences. We designed an Advanced Dementia Consult Service and conducted a pre and post pilot study to evaluate it in a Boston hospital. Consults were conducted by geriatricians and palliative care nurse practitioner. They consisted of structured consultation, counseling and provision of an information booklet to the family, and post-discharge follow-up with the family and primary care providers. Patients > 65 admitted with advanced dementia were identified and consults were solicited using pop-ups programmed into the computerized provider order entry (POE) system. In the initial 3-month period, patients received usual care (N=24). In the subsequent 3-month period, consults were provided to patients for whom it was requested (N=5). Data were obtained from the electronic medical record and proxies interviews (admission, 1-month post-discharge). The patients’ mean age in the combined sample (N=29) was 85.4, 58.6% were from nursing homes, and 86.2% of their proxies stated comfort was the goal of care. Nonetheless, their hospitalizations were characterized by high rates of intravenous antibiotics (86.2%), > 5 venipunctures (44.8%), and radiological exams (96.6%). Acknowledging the small sample size, there were trends towards better outcomes in the intervention group including: higher proxy knowledge of the disease, greater communication between proxies and providers, more advance care planning, lower re-hospitalization rates, and fewer feeding tube insertions after discharge. Targeted consultation for advanced dementia is feasible and may promote greater engagement of proxies and goal-directed care for patients after discharge. PMID:24219202

  13. Clinical Studies in the Second Line Setting of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Are We Making Any Progress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios S Ramfidis

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the enormous advances in clinical research in oncology, the prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma remains poor. Thetherapeutic options in this type of cancer are very limited, with modest results at present. In the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Annual Meeting, four interesting trials on the second line treatment of pancreatic cancer were presented. The first study (Abstract #4017 with a phase II design suggested that maintenance therapy with sunitinib, after a complete course of standard first line treatment, was feasible and effective while the second phase I/II study (Abstract #4034 evaluated the role of trabedersen, an agent that inhibits TGF-β2 expression. Finally, the efficacy and toxicity of lapatinib combined with either FOLFOX (Abstract #e14533 or capecitabine (Abstract #e14569 were examined in the second line setting of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Evaluating the value of a web-based natural medicine clinical decision tool at an academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpa Kelly

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumer use of herbal and natural products (H/NP is increasing, yet physicians are often unprepared to provide guidance due to lack of educational training. This knowledge deficit may place consumers at risk of clinical complications. We wished to evaluate the impact that a natural medicine clinical decision tool has on faculty attitudes, practice experiences, and needs with respect to H/NP. Methods All physicians and clinical staff (nurse practitioners, physicians assistants (n = 532 in departments of Pediatrics, Family and Community Medicine, and Internal Medicine at our medical center were invited to complete 2 electronic surveys. The first survey was completed immediately before access to a H/NP clinical-decision tool was obtained; the second survey was completed the following year. Results Responses were obtained from 89 of 532 practitioners (16.7% on the first survey and 87 of 535 (16.3% clinicians on the second survey. Attitudes towards H/NP varied with gender, age, time in practice, and training. At baseline, before having an evidence-based resource available, nearly half the respondents indicated that they rarely or never ask about H/NP when taking a patient medication history. The majority of these respondents (81% indicated that they would like to learn more about H/NP, but 72% admitted difficulty finding evidence-based information. After implementing the H/NP tool, 63% of database-user respondents indicated that they now ask patients about H/NP when taking a drug history. Compared to results from the baseline survey, respondents who used the database indicated that the tool significantly increased their ability to find reliable H/NP information (P Conclusions Our results demonstrate healthcare provider knowledge and confidence with H/NP can be improved without costly and time-consuming formal H/NP curricula. Yet, it will be challenging to make providers aware of such resources.

  15. Prognostic significance of clinical and pathological stages on locally advanced rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate prognostic significance of clinical and pathological stages in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (neo-CRT) and total mesorectal excision. 210 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma (cT3-4 or cN+) treated with neo-CRT followed by total mesorectal excision. Treatment outcomes were compared according to clinical and pathological stage. Overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS) among patients with different clinical stage and pathological stage after neo-CRT. The median follow-up time was 47 months (range, 14–98 months). Clinical T stage was associated with 5 year OS (p = 0.042) and 5 year DFS (p = 0.014) while clinical N stage was not associated with 5 year OS (p = 0.440), 5 year DFS (p = 0.711). Pathological T stage was associate with 5 year OS (p = 0.001) and 5 year DFS (p = 0.046); and N stage was associated with 5 year OS (p = 0.001), 5 year DFS (p = 0.002). The pathological stage was further classified into three groups: ypT0–2N0 in 91 patients (43.3 %), ypT3–4N0 in 69 patients (32.9 %) and ypT0–4N+ in 50 patients (23.8 %). While pathological stage (ypT0–2 vs ypT3–4N0 vs ypT0–4N+) was associated with 5 year OS (87.9 %, 75.5 %, 56.7 %, p = 0.000), 5 year DFS (74.5 %, 77.4 %, 50.5 %, p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that ypN stage was an independent prognostic factor for patients 5 year DFS. Pathological stage is strongly associated with treatment outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with neo-CRT followed by total mesorectal excision, which may be used as guidance for further individualized treatment

  16. Opioid growth factor improves clinical benefit and survival in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill P Smith

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jill P Smith1, Sandra I Bingaman1, David T Mauger2, Harold H Harvey1, Laurence M Demers3, Ian S Zagon41Departments of Medicine, 2Public Health Sciences, 3Pathology, and 4Neurosciences and Anatomy, Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USABackground: Advanced pancreatic cancer carries the poorest prognosis of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Once the tumor has spread beyond the margins of the pancreas, chemotherapy is the major treatment modality offered to patients; however, chemotherapy does not significantly improve survival.Objective: Opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met5]-enkephalin is a natural peptide that has been shown to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer in cell culture and in nude mice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of OGF biotherapy on subjects with advanced pancreatic cancer who failed chemotherapy.Methods: In a prospective phase II open-labeled clinical trial, 24 subjects who failed standard chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer were treated weekly with OGF 250 μg/kg intravenously. Outcomes measured included clinical benefit, tumor response by radiographic imaging, quality of life, and survival.Results: Clinical benefit response was experienced by 53% of OGF-treated patients compared to historical controls of 23.8% and 4.8% for gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, respectively. Of the subjects surviving more than eight weeks, 62% showed either a decrease or stabilization in tumor size by computed tomography. The median survival time for OGF-treated patients was three times that of untreated patients (65.5 versus 21 days, p < 0.001. No adverse effects on hematologic or chemistry parameters were noted, and quality of life surveys suggested improvement with OGF. Limitations: Measurements other than survival were not allowed in control patients, and clinical benefit comparisons were made to historical controls.Conclusion: OGF biotherapy improves the

  17. Impact of Pretreatment Combined {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Staging on Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Sweet Ping, E-mail: sweet.ng@petermac.org [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); David, Steven [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Alamgeer, Muhammad; Ganju, Vinod [Monash Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary

  18. Clinical evaluation and surgical decision making for patients with lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessitore, Enrico, E-mail: enrico.tessitore@hcuge.ch [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Molliqaj, Granit, E-mail: granitmolliqaj@gmail.com [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Schatlo, Bawarjan, E-mail: schatlo@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Georg-August University, University of Medicine Gottingen, 37075 Gottingen (Germany); Schaller, Karl, E-mail: karl.schaller@hcuge.ch [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    In industrialized countries, more than two thirds of the population suffers from low back pain (LBP) in their lifetime. LBP associated with lumbar disc herniation, stenosis, and instability is a well-known and documented entity. On the other hand, the lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome are difficult to be clearly identified, and they are not always detectable by imaging. This article describes the causes of these painful syndromes, which are typically without radicular component, explains the modern diagnostic procedures, and provides guidelines for surgical decision making.

  19. Development and validation of a tool to measure self-confidence and anxiety in nursing students during clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Krista A

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision making (CDM) is a cornerstone skill for nurses. Self-confidence and anxiety affect the learning and adeptness of CDM. This study aimed to develop and test a quantitative tool to assess undergraduate nursing students' self-confidence and anxiety during CDM. The 27-item Nursing Anxiety and Self-Confidence with Clinical Decision Making (NASC-CDM) scale is a 6-point, Likert-type tool with two subscales. Two samples of prelicensure associate and baccalaureate nursing students participated in the pilot (n = 303) and main testing (n = 242) phases of the study. Construct validity assessment, using exploratory factor analysis, produced a stable three-dimensional scale. Convergent validity assessment produced positive, moderate, and statistically significant correlations of the tool sub-scales with two existing instruments. Internal consistency reliability was assessed for each subscale (self-confidence, α = .97; anxiety, α = .96). The NASC-CDM scale may be a useful assessment tool for nurse educators to help novice clinicians improve CDM skills.

  20. ADVANCES IN CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT OF ACUTE CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Jing; SHI Xue-min

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, the authors review recent advances in clinical and experimental studies on acupuncture treatment of cerebral hemorrhage(CH). Regarding clinical studies, the resuscitation-inducing needling maneuver, and main points of Shuigou(水沟GV 26),Baihui(百会 GV 20) and scalp-points Motor Area(MS 6), Sensory Area(MS 7), etc. are often involved. Concerning experimental studies, the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture of GV-26+"Neiguan"(内关 PC 6), GV-20,GV-26+GV-20, etc. in improving acute CH are introduced. In a word, acupuncture therapy works well in improving clinical symptoms and signs of CH patients, and acupuncture stimulation induced ameilioration of cerebral blood flow, favorable modulation of some bioactive substances as excitatory and inhibitory amino acids, endothelin, CGRP, heat shock protein 70, etc. and neuro-endocrine-immune network may contribute to the effect of acupuncture on CH. In addition, acupuncture combined with medicine and earlier application of acupuncture therapy in the acute stage of CH are recommended in clinical practice.

  1. Advances in clinical determinants and neurological manifestations of B vitamin deficiency in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechi, GianPietro; Sechi, Elia; Fois, Chiara; Kumar, Neeraj

    2016-05-01

    B vitamin deficiency is a leading cause of neurological impairment and disability throughout the world. Multiple B vitamin deficiencies often coexist, and thus an understanding of the complex relationships between the different biochemical pathways regulated in the brain by these vitamins may facilitate prompter diagnosis and improved treatment. Particular populations at risk for multiple B vitamin deficiencies include the elderly, people with alcoholism, patients with heart failure, patients with recent obesity surgery, and vegetarians/vegans. Recently, new clinical settings that predispose individuals to B vitamin deficiency have been highlighted. Moreover, other data indicate a possible pathogenetic role of subclinical chronic B vitamin deficiency in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In light of these findings, this review examines the clinical manifestations of B vitamin deficiency and the effect of B vitamin deficiency on the adult nervous system. The interrelationships of multiple B vitamin deficiencies are emphasized, along with the clinical phenotypes related to B vitamin deficiencies. Recent advances in the clinical determinants and diagnostic clues of B vitamin deficiency, as well as the suggested therapies for B vitamin disorders, are described. PMID:27034475

  2. Variations in clinical decision-making between cardiologists and cardiac surgeons; a case for management by multidisciplinary teams?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess variations in decisions to revascularise patients with coronary heart disease between general cardiologists, interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons Design Six cases of coronary heart disease were presented at an open meeting in a standard format including clinical details which might influence the decision to revascularise. Clinicians (n = 53 were then asked to vote using an anonymous electronic system for one of 5 treatment options: medical, surgical (CABG, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI or initially medical proceeding to revascularisation if symptoms dictated. Each case was then discussed in an open forum following which clinicians were asked to revote. Differences in treatment preference were compared by chi squared test and agreement between groups and between voting rounds compared using Kappa. Results Surgeons were more likely to choose surgery as a form of treatment (p = 0.034 while interventional cardiologists were more likely to choose PCI (p = 0.056. There were no significant differences between non-interventional and interventional cardiologists (p = 0.13 in their choice of treatment. There was poor agreement between all clinicians in the first round of voting (Kappa 0.26 but this improved to a moderate level of agreement after open discussion for the second vote (Kappa 0.44. The level of agreement among surgeons (0.15 was less than that for cardiologists (0.34 in Round 1, but was similar in Round 2 (0.45 and 0.45 respectively Conclusion In this case series, there was poor agreement between cardiac clinical specialists in the choice of treatment offered to patients. Open discussion appeared to improve agreement. These results would support the need for decisions to revascularise to be made by a multidisciplinary panel.

  3. Assessing the information desire of patients with advanced cancer by providing information with a decision aid, which is evaluated in a randomized trial: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Graaf Winette TA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a continuing debate on the desirability of informing patients with cancer and thereby involving them in treatment decisions. On the one hand, information uptake may be hampered, and additional stress could be inflicted by involving these patients. On the other hand, even patients with advanced cancer desire information on risks and prognosis. To settle the debate, a decision aid will be developed and presented to patients with advanced disease at the point of decision making. The aid is used to assess the amount of information desired. Factors related to information desire are explored, as well as the ability of the medical oncologist to judge the patient's information desire. The effects of the information on patient well-being are assessed by comparing the decision aid group with a usual care group. Methods/Design This study is a randomized controlled trial of patients with advanced colorectal, breast, or ovarian cancer who have started treatment with first-line palliative chemotherapy. The trial will consist of 100 patients in the decision aid group and 70 patients in the usual care group. To collect complete data of 170 patients, 246 patients will be approached for the study. Patients will complete a baseline questionnaire on sociodemographic data, well-being measures, and psychological measures, believed to predict information desire. The medical oncologist will judge the patient's information desire. After disease progression is diagnosed, the medical oncologist offers the choice between second-line palliative chemotherapy plus best supportive care (BSC and BSC alone. Randomization will take place to determine whether patients will receive usual care (n = 70 or usual care and the decision aid (n = 100. The aid offers information about the potential risks and benefits of both treatment options, in terms of adverse events, tumour response, and survival. Patients decide for each item whether they desire the

  4. Comfort Feeding Only: A Proposal to Bring Clarity to Decision-Making Regarding Difficulty with Eating for Persons with Advanced Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Palecek, Eric J.; Teno, Joan M.; Casarett, David J; Hanson, Laura C.; Rhodes, Ramona L.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Feeding and eating difficulties leading to weight loss are common in the advanced stages of dementia. When such problems arise, family members are often faced with making a decision regarding the placement of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube. The existing evidence based on observational studies suggests that feeding tubes do not improve survival or reduce the risk of aspiration, yet the use of feeding tubes is prevalent in patients with dementia, and the majority of nursing home res...

  5. Interrelation between orthodontics and phonoaudiology in the clinical decision-making of individuals with mouth breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rúbia Vezaro Vanz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the decision making of orthodontists of Passo Fundo district - Rio Grande do Sul (RS, Brazil, in the Orthodontics/Speech Therapy interdisciplinary treatment of mouth breathing individuals. METHODS: The present study is a quantitative approach and the design is descriptive, using as instrument data collection of a questionnaire sent to 22 orthodontists practicing in the above-mentioned district. The project was approved the the Ethics in Research Committee and all individuals signed a free informed consent. RESULTS: All professionals considered the inter-relation between Orthodontics and Speech Therapy necessary, but divergences were found in situations where a associated therapy may exist, considering that 54.5% trust the inter-relation to develop aspects associated to language, orofacial motricity and habits. In cases of associated treatment, the results obtained were considered satisfactory by 73.7% of professionals, even though they consider that only 6 to 20% of their patients collaborate with treatment. CONCLUSION: In relation to decision-making in treatment of mouth breathing individuals, the orthodontists in Passo Fundo/RS agree that there is need for speech therapy. The full vision of the individual in a multidisciplinary team is of fundamental importance in the treatment of patients with mouth breathing syndrome.

  6. Impact of Health Information Exchange on Emergency Medicine Clinical Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley D. Gordon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of the study was to understand the immediate utility of health information exchange (HIE on emergency department (ED providers by interviewing them shortly after the information was retrieved. Prior studies of physician perceptions regarding HIE have only been performed outside of the care environment. Methods: Trained research assistants interviewed resident physicians, physician assistants and attending physicians using a semi-structured questionnaire within two hours of making a HIE request. The responses were recorded, then transcribed for qualitative analysis. The transcribed interviews were analyzed for emerging qualitative themes. Results: We analyzed 40 interviews obtained from 29 providers. Primary qualitative themes discovered included the following: drivers for requests for outside information; the importance of unexpected information; historical lab values as reference points; providing context when determining whether to admit or discharge a patient; the importance of information in refining disposition; improved confidence of provider; and changes in decisions for diagnostic imaging. Conclusion: ED providers are driven to use HIE when they’re missing a known piece of information. This study finds two additional impacts not previously reported. First, providers sometimes find additional unanticipated useful information, supporting a workflow that lowers the threshold to request external information. Second, providers sometimes report utility when no changes to their existing plan are made as their confidence is increased based on external records. Our findings are concordant with previous studies in finding exchanged information is useful to provide context for interpreting lab results, making admission decisions, and prevents repeat diagnostic imaging.

  7. [Preserving the natural tooth versus extraction and implant placement: making a rational clinical decision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsesis, I; Nemkowsky, C E; Tamse, E; Rosen, E

    2010-01-01

    Modern dental practice offers a wide variety of treatment alternatives and modalities. With the wider scale of treatment options, new dilemmas emerged. A common dilemma is the decision whether to preserve the natural tooth by endodontic treatment, or to extract the tooth and replace it with a single dental implant. The clinician needs to remember that the basic goal of dental implants is to replace missing teeth, and not present teeth. Prosthodontic, periodontal, and esthetic considerations should be integrated in the treatment planning process. Long-term prognosis, the capabilities offered by the modern endodontic treatment, the alternatives in case of treatment failure, post treatment quality of life and patient's preferences should all be recognized and incorporated in the dentist decision making. An important factor is the communication between the prosthodontist and the endodontist before and during the treatment in order to avoid possible risks or treatment failure. The integration of these factors would assist the clinician to achieve a rational treatment plan for the benefit of the patient.

  8. Advanced Pre-clinical Research Approaches and Models to Studying Pediatric Anesthetic Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng eWang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in pediatric and obstetric surgery have resulted in an increase in the duration and complexity of anesthetic procedures. A great deal of concern has recently arisen regarding the safety of anesthesia in infants and children. Because of obvious limitations, it is not possible to thoroughly explore the effects of anesthetic agents on neurons in vivo in human infants or children. However, the availability of some advanced pre-clinical research approaches and models, such as imaging technology both in vitro and in vivo, stem cell and nonhuman primate experimental models, have provided potentially invaluable tools for examining the developmental effects of anesthetic agents. This review discusses the potential application of some sophisticaled research approaches, e.g., calcium imaging, in stem cell-derived in vitro models, especially human embryonic neural stem cells, along with their capacity for proliferation and their potential for differentiation, to dissect relevant mechanisms underlying the etiology of the neurotoxicity associated with developmental exposures to anesthetic agents. Also, this review attempts to discuss several advantages for using the developing rhesus monkey models (in vivo, when combined with dynamic molecular imaging approaches, in addressing critical issues related to the topic of pediatric sedation/anesthesia. These include the relationships between anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity, dose response, time-course and developmental stage at time of exposure (in vivo studies, serving to provide the most expeditious platform toward decreasing the uncertainty in extrapolating pre-clinical data to the human condition.

  9. Breast Cancer Clinical Trials: Past Half Century Moving Forward Advancing Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerer, Henry M; van la Parra, Raquel F D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical trials in breast cancer have contributed immensely to the advancements of modern multimodal breast cancer treatment. Due to improved screening methods and more effective biologic-based tailored systemic therapies, the extent of surgery necessary for local and systemic control of disease is decreasing. Sequential trials for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) have changed the management of this disease and are culminating in randomized active surveillance studies in an effort potentially to prevent overtreatment of low- and intermediate-grade disease. For patients with initial node-positive disease, clipping and marking of the biopsy-proven nodal metastases before the start of neoadjuvant chemotherapy can allow for selective node dissection based on the axillary response. With the current advances in primary systemic therapy, feasibility trials are beginning to investigate the potential of nonoperative therapy for invasive cancers with percutaneously documented pathologic complete response. This article presents a review and update on landmark clinical trials related to DCIS, the extent of axillary surgery in node-positive disease, and the integration of systemic therapy with local therapy. PMID:27364503

  10. Special issue of clinical pharmacology: advances and applications in new protein therapeutics modulating tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frankel AE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Arthur E Frankel Department of Internal Medicine, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Until recent decades, the role of the immune system in harnessing tumor growth was based on anecdotal observations of increased cancers in immune-compromised patients, the benefits of graft-versus-leukemia in allogeneic stem cell transplants, and the limited but reproducible anticancer activity of several lymphokines, including interferon and interleukin (IL-2. Vaccine studies and infusions of "activated" lymphocytes yielded variable clinical responses and disease control. An improved understanding of the molecular and cell mechanisms of the innate and adaptive immune system in cancer-bearing animals and the discovery of an immune-suppressive tumor microenvironment then led to development and testing of a battery of new drug and cell-based approaches to trigger antitumor immunity. This issue of Clinical Pharmacology: Advances and Applications highlights some of the new protein-based compounds that are radically changing the cancer therapeutic landscape. The purpose of this collection of reviews is to inform the readership regarding the importance of the seismic change in cancer therapeutics and stimulate efforts to find novel niches and combinations of agents similar to recent advances in the application of cancer pathway inhibitors.

  11. An HL7-CDA wrapper for facilitating semantic interoperability to rule-based Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Carlos; Bresó, Adrián; Vicente, Javier; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2013-03-01

    The success of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) greatly depends on its capability of being integrated in Health Information Systems (HIS). Several proposals have been published up to date to permit CDSS gathering patient data from HIS. Some base the CDSS data input on the HL7 reference model, however, they are tailored to specific CDSS or clinical guidelines technologies, or do not focus on standardizing the CDSS resultant knowledge. We propose a solution for facilitating semantic interoperability to rule-based CDSS focusing on standardized input and output documents conforming an HL7-CDA wrapper. We define the HL7-CDA restrictions in a HL7-CDA implementation guide. Patient data and rule inference results are mapped respectively to and from the CDSS by means of a binding method based on an XML binding file. As an independent clinical document, the results of a CDSS can present clinical and legal validity. The proposed solution is being applied in a CDSS for providing patient-specific recommendations for the care management of outpatients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:23199936

  12. Clinical observation on docetaxel plus S1 in the treatment of advanced metastatic breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Cao; Ping Sun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to observe the efficacy and adverse reactions of docetaxel plus S1 in patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer receiving docetaxel plus S1 in our hospital were analyzed. The efficacy and safety were evaluated according to RECIST and NCI CTC 3.0. Results: The clinical efficacy and toxicity were evaluated in all the 27 patients, including 1 case of CR, 12 of PR, 6 of SD, and 8 of PD (ORR = 48.1%, CBR = 70.3%). The median time to tumor progression (mTTP) was 7.3 months. No IV degree of adverse reaction was observed in the observation group. Most adverse reactions were degrees I and II, the most common reactions were neutropenia (59.3%), abnormal liver function (33.3%), gastrointestinal adverse events (29.6 %) and stomatitis (7.4%). Conclusion: With good efficacy and low toxicity, docetaxel plus S1 could be administered in the treatment of advanced metastatic breast cancer.

  13. Impact of a clinical decision model for febrile children at risk for serious bacterial infections at the emergency department: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien de Vos-Kerkhof

    Full Text Available To assess the impact of a clinical decision model for febrile children at risk for serious bacterial infections (SBI attending the emergency department (ED.Randomized controlled trial with 439 febrile children, aged 1 month-16 years, attending the pediatric ED of a Dutch university hospital during 2010-2012. Febrile children were randomly assigned to the intervention (clinical decision model; n = 219 or the control group (usual care; n = 220. The clinical decision model included clinical symptoms, vital signs, and C-reactive protein and provided high/low-risks for "pneumonia" and "other SBI". Nurses were guided by the intervention to initiate additional tests for high-risk children. The clinical decision model was evaluated by 1 area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic-curve (AUC to indicate discriminative ability and 2 feasibility, to measure nurses' compliance to model recommendations. Primary patient outcome was defined as correct SBI diagnoses. Secondary process outcomes were defined as length of stay; diagnostic tests; antibiotic treatment; hospital admission; revisits and medical costs.The decision model had good discriminative ability for both pneumonia (n = 33; AUC 0.83 (95% CI 0.75-0.90 and other SBI (n = 22; AUC 0.81 (95% CI 0.72-0.90. Compliance to model recommendations was high (86%. No differences in correct SBI determination were observed. Application of the clinical decision model resulted in less full-blood-counts (14% vs. 22%, p-value < 0.05 and more urine-dipstick testing (71% vs. 61%, p-value < 0.05.In contrast to our expectations no substantial impact on patient outcome was perceived. The clinical decision model preserved, however, good discriminatory ability to detect SBI, achieved good compliance among nurses and resulted in a more standardized diagnostic approach towards febrile children, with less full blood-counts and more rightfully urine-dipstick testing.Nederlands Trial Register NTR2381.

  14. Clinical observation of raltitrexed/bevacizumab combined with irinotecan or oxaliplation for advanced colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianwei Yang; Wei Gao; Jinyuan Lin; Yan Meng; Shuzhen Zhang; Tong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the ef icacy and safety of raltitrexed/bevacizumab in combina-tion with irinotecan or oxaliplation for advanced colorectal cancer as the second-line and second-line above treatments. Meth-ods: Fifteen cases of advanced colorectal cancer were enrol ed to receive regimens including raltitrexed/bevacizumab com-bined with irinotecan or oxaliplation. Two cases were treated with raltitrexed + bavacizumab regimen, 9 cases with raltitrexed+ bavacizumab + irinotecan regimen, and 4 cases with raltitrexed + bevacizumab + oxaliplation regimen. The doses of the drugs were as fol ows: bevacizumab 5 mg/kg ivgtt, d1; raltitrexed 2.0 mg/m2 ivgtt 15 min, d2; irinotecan 180 mg/m2 ivgtt 1 h, d2; and oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2 ivgtt 2 h, d2. Two weeks was a cycle for each regimen. Results: The ef icacy of the 15 patients could be evaluated. Two cases were in PR ,10 cases in SD, 3 cases in PD, the response rate was 13.3%, and the disease control rate was 80.0%. The median progress-free survival was 5.1 months (95% CI: 3.404-6.813 months), and the median overal survival was 11.5 months (95% CI: 8.985-13.930 months). The adverse ef ects included anorexia, nausea/vomit-ing, fatigue, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, etc, and the main 3-4 grades adverse ef ects were anorexia, nausea/vomiting, fatigue, and thrombocytopenia. Conclusion: Raltitrexed/bevacizumab combined with irinotecan or oxaliplatin as the second-line and second-line above treatments for advanced colorectal cancer has high disease control rates, and the adverse ef ect is wel tolerated. The combined regimen can be recommended as a phase III clinical research and second-line and second-lines above treatments for advanced colorectal cancer.

  15. Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People with Severe Mental Illness (CEDAR: Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemes Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A considerable amount of research has been conducted on clinical decision making (CDM in short-term physical conditions. However, there is a lack of knowledge on CDM and its outcome in long-term illnesses, especially in care for people with severe mental illness. Methods/Design The study entitled "Clinical decision making and outcome in routine care for people with severe mental illness" (CEDAR is carried out in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Switzerland and UK. First, CEDAR establishes a methodology to assess CDM in people with severe mental illness. Specific instruments are developed (and psychometric properties established to measure CDM style, key elements of CDM in routine care, as well as CDM involvement and satisfaction from patient and therapist perspectives. Second, these instruments are being put to use in a multi-national prospective observational study (bimonthly assessments during a one-year observation period; N = 560. This study investigates the immediate, short- and long-term effect of CDM on crucial dimensions of clinical outcome (symptom level, quality of life, needs by taking into account significant variables moderating the relationship between CDM and outcome. Discussion The results of this study will make possible to delineate quality indicators of CDM, as well as to specify prime areas for further improvement. Ingredients of best practice in CDM in the routine care for people with severe mental illness will be extracted and recommendations formulated. With its explicit focus on the patient role in CDM, CEDAR will also contribute to strengthening the service user perspective. This project will substantially add to improving the practice of CDM in mental health care across Europe. Trial register ISRCTN75841675.

  16. Should I Pack My Umbrella? Clinical versus Statistical Prediction of Mental Health Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aegisdottir, Stefania; Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    In this rejoinder, the authors respond to the insightful commentary of Strohmer and Arm, Chwalisz, and Hilton, Harris, and Rice about the meta-analysis on statistical versus clinical prediction techniques for mental health judgments. The authors address issues including the availability of statistical prediction techniques for real-life psychology…

  17. [An expert system of aiding decision making in breast pathology connected to a clinical data base].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, M; Durrleman, S; Ferber, J; Ganascia, J G; Hacene, K; Hirt, F; Jouniaux, F; Meeus, L

    1987-01-01

    The René Huguenin Cancer Center holds a medical file for each patient which is intended to store and process medical data. Since 1970, we introduced computerization: a development plan was elaborated and simultaneously a statistical software (Clotilde--GSI/CFRO) was selected. Thus, we now have access to a large database, structured according to medical rationale, and utilizable with methods of artificial intelligence towards three objectives: improved data acquisition, decision making and exploitation. The first application was to breast pathology, which represents one of the Center's primary activities. The structure of the data concerning patients is by all criteria part of the medical knowledge. This information needs to be presented as well as processed with a suitable language. To this end, we chose a language-oriented object, Mering II, usable with Apple and IBM 4 micro-computers. This project has already allowed to work out an operational model. PMID:3620732

  18. Thermochemoradiotherapy for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer. Analysis of clinical results and background variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshina, Hideyuki; Takagi, Ritsuo; Nagashima, Katsuhiro; Fujita, Hajime; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Sohma, Yoh; Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Imai, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Masaki [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    2001-03-01

    Eighteen patients with 25 unresectable advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers (squamous cell carcinomas) received thermochemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy. The total radiation dose ranged from 50 to 82 Gy (mean, 65.6 Gy). Patients received thermochemotherapy twice a week, for a total number of 8.8 sessions, on average. The temperature in the tumor, as a result of the hyperthermia, was over 42 deg C in 185 (84.5%) of the 219 treatments. Three kinds of heating systems were used: a 13.56-MHz radiofrequency system, a 2450-MHz microwave system, and a radiofrequency interstitial system. The total amount of administered CDDP ranged from 40 to 300 mg (mean, 110 mg), combined with PEP and/or 5FU. Background factors (tumor factors and treatment factors) were investigated in detail, and the clinical results (tumor response and the 5-year cumulative focal control rate) were evaluated. The relationship between these two results was then analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistics. The clinical results of patients with a WHO histological classification of grade 3 were poor compared with patients with a classification of grade 1 or 2. The difference between these two results was significant when analyzed using univariate statistics, but not significant when analyzed using multivariate statistics. The clinical results of patients with primary lesions surrounded by bony tissues were slightly poor compared with those of patients whose lesions were surrounded by soft tissues, but the difference between these two results was not significant. Successful treatment of refractory recurrent tumors, large tumor masses, and diffuse invasive carcinomas was not affected by the treatment factors (heating systems, heating sessions, radiation dose, and CDDP dose and drug combination). These results suggest that refractory recurrence, proximity to bony tissues, tumor size, and histological malignancy might not be prognostic variables for thermochemoradiotherapy strategy

  19. From orphan drugs to adopted therapies: Advancing C3-targeted intervention to the clinical stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Reis, Edimara S; Yancopoulou, Despina; Hajishengallis, George; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2016-10-01

    Complement dysregulation is increasingly recognized as an important pathogenic driver in a number of clinical disorders. Complement-triggered pathways intertwine with key inflammatory and tissue destructive processes that can either increase the risk of disease or exacerbate pathology in acute or chronic conditions. The launch of the first complement-targeted drugs in the clinic has undeniably stirred the field of complement therapeutic design, providing new insights into complement's contribution to disease pathogenesis and also helping to leverage a more personalized, comprehensive approach to patient management. In this regard, a rapidly expanding toolbox of complement therapeutics is being developed to address unmet clinical needs in several immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases. Elegant approaches employing both surface-directed and fluid-phase inhibitors have exploited diverse components of the complement cascade as putative points of therapeutic intervention. Targeting C3, the central hub of the system, has proven to be a promising strategy for developing biologics as well as small-molecule inhibitors with clinical potential. Complement modulation at the level of C3 has recently shown promise in preclinical primate models, opening up new avenues for therapeutic intervention in both acute and chronic indications fueled by uncontrolled C3 turnover. This review highlights recent developments in the field of complement therapeutics, focusing on C3-directed inhibitors and alternative pathway (AP) regulator-based approaches. Translational perspectives and considerations are discussed, particularly with regard to the structure-guided drug optimization and clinical advancement of a new generation of C3-targeted peptidic inhibitors. PMID:27353192

  20. Treatment outcome of advanced pancreatic cancer patients who are ineligible for a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Akira Ueda, Ayumu Hosokawa, Kohei Ogawa, Hiroki Yoshita, Takayuki Ando, Shinya Kajiura, Haruka Fujinami, Kengo Kawai, Jun Nishikawa, Kazuto Tajiri, Masami Minemura, Toshiro SugiyamaDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toyama, Toyama, JapanObjective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in clinical practice, and assess whether chemotherapy provided a clinical benefit for patients who did not meet the eligibility criteria of the clinical trial.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 75 patients who received first-line chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer between April 2006 and September 2011. Patients were treated with gemcitabine (GEM alone, S-1 (tegafur, gimeracil, and oteracil potassium alone, or GEM plus S-1. Patients were divided into the clinical trial eligible group (arm eligible or the ineligible group (arm ineligible. We evaluated the efficacy and the safety of the chemotherapy.Results: A total of 23 patients out of 75 (31% belonged to the ineligible group, for the following reasons: 20 patients had poor performance status, eight had massive ascites, one had synchronous malignancy, and one had icterus. The median progression-free survival (PFS was 3.5 months, and the median overall survival (OS was 6.7 months in all patients. In arm eligible, median PFS was 4.5 months, and median OS was 10.5 months. In arm ineligible, median PFS was 1.1 months, and median OS was 2.9 months.Conclusion: The outcome of the patients who did not meet the eligibility criteria was very poor. It is important to select the patients that could benefit from either chemotherapy or optimal supportive care.Keywords: gemcitabine, S-1, clinical practice

  1. The role (or not) of economic evaluation at the micro level: can Bourdieu's theory provide a way forward for clinical decision-making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Chantale; Contandriopoulos, André-Pierre; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique

    2010-06-01

    Despite increasing interest in health economic evaluation, investigations have shown limited use by micro (clinical) level decision-makers. A considerable amount of health decisions take place daily at the point of the clinical encounter; especially in primary care. Since every decision has an opportunity cost, ignoring economic information in family physicians' (FPs) decision-making may have a broad impact on health care efficiency. Knowledge translation of economic evaluation is often based on taken-for-granted assumptions about actors' interests and interactions, neglecting much of the complexity of social reality. Health economics literature frequently assumes a rational and linear decision-making process. Clinical decision-making is in fact a complex social, dynamic, multifaceted process, involving relationships and contextual embeddedness. FPs are embedded in complex social networks that have a significant impact on skills, attitudes, knowledge, practices, and on the information being used. Because of their socially constructed nature, understanding preferences, professional culture, practices, and knowledge translation requires serious attention to social reality. There has been little exploration by health economists of whether the problem may be more fundamental and reside in a misunderstanding of the process of decision-making. There is a need to enhance our understanding of the role of economic evaluation in decision-making from a disciplinary perspective different than health economics. This paper argues for a different conceptualization of the role of economic evaluation in FPs' decision-making, and proposes Bourdieu's sociological theory as a research framework. Bourdieu's theory of practice illustrates how the context-sensitive nature of practice must be understood as a socially constituted practical knowledge. The proposed approach could substantially contribute to a more complex understanding of the role of economic evaluation in FPs' decision-making.

  2. Recent advances in innovative therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: from discovery to clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shouta; Komaki, Hirofumi; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked progressive degenerative muscle disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. There is no curative therapy, although innovative therapeutic approaches have been aggressively investigated over recent years. Currently, the international clinical trial registry platform for this disease has been constructed and clinical trials for innovative therapeutic approaches are underway. Among these, exon skipping and read-through of nonsense mutations are in the most advanced stages, with exon skipping theoretically applicable to a larger number of patients. To date, exon skipping that targets exons 51, 44, 45, and 53 is being globally investigated including in USA, EU, and Japan. The latest announcement from Japan was made, demonstrating successful dystrophin production in muscles of patients with DMD after treating with exon 53 skipping antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). However, the innovative therapeutic approaches have demonstrated limited efficacy. To address this issue in exon skipping, studies to unveil the mechanism underlying gymnotic delivery of ASO uptake in living cells have been conducted in an effort to improve in vivo delivery. Further, establishing the infrastructures to integrate multi-institutional clinical trials are needed to facilitate the development of successful therapies for DMD, which ultimately is applicable to other myopathies and neurodegenerative diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy and motor neuron diseases. PMID:27398133

  3. Real-Time Clinical Decision Support System with Data Stream Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to describe a new design of data stream mining system that can analyze medical data stream and make real-time prediction. The motivation of the research is due to a growing concern of combining software technology and medical functions for the development of software application that can be used in medical field of chronic disease prognosis and diagnosis, children healthcare, diabetes diagnosis, and so forth. Most of the existing software technologies are case-based data mining systems. They only can analyze finite and structured data set and can only work well in their early years and can hardly meet today's medical requirement. In this paper, we describe a clinical-support-system based data stream mining technology; the design has taken into account all the shortcomings of the existing clinical support systems.

  4. Skin Disease in the Uninsured: Diagnoses, Management Decisions, and Referral Outcomes of an Urban Free Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Brooke E; Freitas, Derek; Nosal, Sarah C; Meydani, Ahou

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the burden of skin disease in the uninsured population is needed to address the unique barriers they face to access dermatologic care. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients seen for skin conditions over three years at the New York City (NYC) Free Clinic, a weekly primary care clinic operated by the NYU School of Medicine and the Institute for Family Health. Main outcomes of this study were descriptive analyses of demographic characteristics, diagnoses, management strategies, and referral outcomes, as well as key factors influencing referral to a dermatologist and referral attendance. Diagnosis was a significant predictor of referral (ptravel distance had no significant association with non-attendance. While demand for dermatologic care by uninsured patients in NYC is high, referral non-attendance remains a substantial barrier to care. PMID:27180711

  5. An RDF/OWL knowledge base for query answering and decision support in clinical pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwald, Matthias; Freimuth, Robert; Luciano, Joanne S; Lin, Simon; Powers, Robert L; Marshall, M Scott; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Dumontier, Michel; Boyce, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    Genetic testing for personalizing pharmacotherapy is bound to become an important part of clinical routine. To address associated issues with data management and quality, we are creating a semantic knowledge base for clinical pharmacogenetics. The knowledge base is made up of three components: an expressive ontology formalized in the Web Ontology Language (OWL 2 DL), a Resource Description Framework (RDF) model for capturing detailed results of manual annotation of pharmacogenomic information in drug product labels, and an RDF conversion of relevant biomedical datasets. Our work goes beyond the state of the art in that it makes both automated reasoning as well as query answering as simple as possible, and the reasoning capabilities go beyond the capabilities of previously described ontologies.

  6. CLINICAL DECISION MAKING IN NURSING CARE: EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE AND SENIORITY

    OpenAIRE

    Sivasangari Subramaniam; Sotheenathan Krishinan; Revathy U. Thandapani; Hans Van Rostenberghe; Azriani Berahim

    2015-01-01

    In the nursing profession, EBP makes a positive contribution to healthcare outcomes, care delivery, clinical teaching and research. The research objective was to determine the nurses' knowledge, attitude, practice towards EBP and barriers to use EBP in four (4) Government Hospitals in Malaysia, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM), Hospital Pulau Pinang (HPP), Hospital Sultan Abdul Halim (HSAH) and Hospital Seberang Jaya (HSJ). A cross-sectional study was conducted from January until Dec...

  7. Are nurse and pharmacist independent prescribers making clinically appropriate prescribing decisions? An analysis of consultations

    OpenAIRE

    Latter, Sue; Smith, Alesha; Blenkinsopp, Alison; Nicholls, Peter G.; Little, Paul; Chapman, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Legislation and health policy enabling nurses and pharmacists to prescribe a comprehensive range of medicines has been in place in the UK since 2006. Our objective was to evaluate the clinical appropriateness of prescribing by these professionals. METHODS: A modified version of the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) was used by 10 medical, seven pharmacist and three nurse independent raters to evaluate a sample of 100 audio-recorded consultations in which a medicine was pr...

  8. Proposal of a Clinical Decision Tree Algorithm Using Factors Associated with Severe Dengue Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Narwani; Cheah, Wee Kooi; Ng, Kee Sing; Muninathan, Prema

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO’s new classification in 2009: dengue with or without warning signs and severe dengue, has necessitated large numbers of admissions to hospitals of dengue patients which in turn has been imposing a huge economical and physical burden on many hospitals around the globe, particularly South East Asia and Malaysia where the disease has seen a rapid surge in numbers in recent years. Lack of a simple tool to differentiate mild from life threatening infection has led to unnecessary hospitalization of dengue patients. Methods We conducted a single-centre, retrospective study involving serologically confirmed dengue fever patients, admitted in a single ward, in Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Data was collected for 4 months from February to May 2014. Socio demography, co-morbidity, days of illness before admission, symptoms, warning signs, vital signs and laboratory result were all recorded. Descriptive statistics was tabulated and simple and multiple logistic regression analysis was done to determine significant risk factors associated with severe dengue. Results 657 patients with confirmed dengue were analysed, of which 59 (9.0%) had severe dengue. Overall, the commonest warning sign were vomiting (36.1%) and abdominal pain (32.1%). Previous co-morbid, vomiting, diarrhoea, pleural effusion, low systolic blood pressure, high haematocrit, low albumin and high urea were found as significant risk factors for severe dengue using simple logistic regression. However the significant risk factors for severe dengue with multiple logistic regressions were only vomiting, pleural effusion, and low systolic blood pressure. Using those 3 risk factors, we plotted an algorithm for predicting severe dengue. When compared to the classification of severe dengue based on the WHO criteria, the decision tree algorithm had a sensitivity of 0.81, specificity of 0.54, positive predictive value of 0.16 and negative predictive of 0.96. Conclusion The decision tree algorithm proposed

  9. Clinical decision-making tools for exam selection, reporting and dose tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many efforts have been made to reduce the radiation dose associated with individual medical imaging examinations to ''as low as reasonably achievable,'' efforts to ensure such examinations are performed only when medically indicated and appropriate are equally if not more important. Variations in the use of ionizing radiation for medical imaging are concerning, regardless of whether they occur on a local, regional or national basis. Such variations among practices can be reduced with the use of decision support tools at the time of order entry. These tools help reduce radiation exposure among practices through the appropriate use of medical imaging. Similarly, adoption of best practices among imaging facilities can be promoted through tracking the radiation exposure among imaging patients. Practices can benchmark their aggregate radiation exposures for medical imaging through the use of dose index registries. However several variables must be considered when contemplating individual patient dose tracking. The specific dose measures and the variation among them introduced by variations in body habitus must be understood. Moreover the uncertainties in risk estimation from dose metrics related to age, gender and life expectancy must also be taken into account. (orig.)

  10. A Belief Rule-Based (BRB) Decision Support System for Assessing Clinical Asthma Suspicion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mohammad Shahadat; Hossain, Emran; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin;

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease that affects millions of people around the world. The most common signs and symptoms of asthma are cough; breathlessness; wheeze; chest tightness and respiratory rate. They cannot be measured accurately since they consist of various types of uncertainty such as ......Asthma is a common chronic disease that affects millions of people around the world. The most common signs and symptoms of asthma are cough; breathlessness; wheeze; chest tightness and respiratory rate. They cannot be measured accurately since they consist of various types of uncertainty...... such as vagueness; imprecision; randomness; ignorance and incompleteness. Consequently; traditional disease diagnosis; which is performed by a physician; cannot deliver accurate results. Therefore; this paper presents the design; development and application of a decision support system for assessing asthma under...... conditions of uncertainty. The Belief Rule-Based Inference Methodology Using the Evidential Reasoning (RIMER) approach was adopted to develop this expert system; which is named the Belief Rule-Based Expert System (BRBES). The system can handle various types of uncertainty in knowledge representation...

  11. Clinical decision-making tools for exam selection, reporting and dose tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, James A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Although many efforts have been made to reduce the radiation dose associated with individual medical imaging examinations to ''as low as reasonably achievable,'' efforts to ensure such examinations are performed only when medically indicated and appropriate are equally if not more important. Variations in the use of ionizing radiation for medical imaging are concerning, regardless of whether they occur on a local, regional or national basis. Such variations among practices can be reduced with the use of decision support tools at the time of order entry. These tools help reduce radiation exposure among practices through the appropriate use of medical imaging. Similarly, adoption of best practices among imaging facilities can be promoted through tracking the radiation exposure among imaging patients. Practices can benchmark their aggregate radiation exposures for medical imaging through the use of dose index registries. However several variables must be considered when contemplating individual patient dose tracking. The specific dose measures and the variation among them introduced by variations in body habitus must be understood. Moreover the uncertainties in risk estimation from dose metrics related to age, gender and life expectancy must also be taken into account. (orig.)

  12. Clinical holistic medicine: factors influencing the therapeutic decision-making. From academic knowledge to emotional intelligence and spiritual "crazy" wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2007-01-01

    Scientific holistic medicine is built on holistic medical theory, on therapeutic and ethical principles. The rationale is that the therapist can take the patient into a state of salutogenesis, or existential healing, using his skills and knowledge. But how ever much we want to make therapy a science it remains partly an art, and the more developed the therapist becomes, the more of his/her decisions will be based on intuition, feeling and even inspiration that is more based on love and human concern and other spiritual motivations than on mental reason and rationality in a simple sense of the word. The provocative and paradoxal medieval western concept of the "truth telling clown", or the eastern concepts of "crazy wisdom" and "holy madness" seems highly relevant here. The problem is how we can ethically justify this kind of highly "irrational" therapeutic behavior in the rational setting of a medical institution. We argue here that holistic therapy has a very high success rate and is doing no harm to the patient, and encourage therapists, psychiatrists, psychologist and other academically trained "helpers" to constantly measure their own success-rate. This paper discusses many of the important factors that influence clinical holistic decision-making. Sexuality could, as many psychoanalysts from Freud to Reich and Searles have believed, be the most healing power that exists and also the most difficult for the mind to comprehend, and thus the most "crazy-wise" tool of therapy. PMID:18167609

  13. An international observational study suggests that artificial intelligence for clinical decision support optimizes anemia management in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Carlo; Molina, Manuel; Ponce, Pedro; Tothova, Monika; Cattinelli, Isabella; Ion Titapiccolo, Jasmine; Mari, Flavio; Amato, Claudia; Leipold, Frank; Wehmeyer, Wolfgang; Stuard, Stefano; Stopper, Andrea; Canaud, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Managing anemia in hemodialysis patients can be challenging because of competing therapeutic targets and individual variability. Because therapy recommendations provided by a decision support system can benefit both patients and doctors, we evaluated the impact of an artificial intelligence decision support system, the Anemia Control Model (ACM), on anemia outcomes. Based on patient profiles, the ACM was built to recommend suitable erythropoietic-stimulating agent doses. Our retrospective study consisted of a 12-month control phase (standard anemia care), followed by a 12-month observation phase (ACM-guided care) encompassing 752 patients undergoing hemodialysis therapy in 3 NephroCare clinics located in separate countries. The percentage of hemoglobin values on target, the median darbepoetin dose, and individual hemoglobin fluctuation (estimated from the intrapatient hemoglobin standard deviation) were deemed primary outcomes. In the observation phase, median darbepoetin consumption significantly decreased from 0.63 to 0.46 μg/kg/month, whereas on-target hemoglobin values significantly increased from 70.6% to 76.6%, reaching 83.2% when the ACM suggestions were implemented. Moreover, ACM introduction led to a significant decrease in hemoglobin fluctuation (intrapatient standard deviation decreased from 0.95 g/dl to 0.83 g/dl). Thus, ACM support helped improve anemia outcomes of hemodialysis patients, minimizing erythropoietic-stimulating agent use with the potential to reduce the cost of treatment.

  14. An international observational study suggests that artificial intelligence for clinical decision support optimizes anemia management in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Carlo; Molina, Manuel; Ponce, Pedro; Tothova, Monika; Cattinelli, Isabella; Ion Titapiccolo, Jasmine; Mari, Flavio; Amato, Claudia; Leipold, Frank; Wehmeyer, Wolfgang; Stuard, Stefano; Stopper, Andrea; Canaud, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Managing anemia in hemodialysis patients can be challenging because of competing therapeutic targets and individual variability. Because therapy recommendations provided by a decision support system can benefit both patients and doctors, we evaluated the impact of an artificial intelligence decision support system, the Anemia Control Model (ACM), on anemia outcomes. Based on patient profiles, the ACM was built to recommend suitable erythropoietic-stimulating agent doses. Our retrospective study consisted of a 12-month control phase (standard anemia care), followed by a 12-month observation phase (ACM-guided care) encompassing 752 patients undergoing hemodialysis therapy in 3 NephroCare clinics located in separate countries. The percentage of hemoglobin values on target, the median darbepoetin dose, and individual hemoglobin fluctuation (estimated from the intrapatient hemoglobin standard deviation) were deemed primary outcomes. In the observation phase, median darbepoetin consumption significantly decreased from 0.63 to 0.46 μg/kg/month, whereas on-target hemoglobin values significantly increased from 70.6% to 76.6%, reaching 83.2% when the ACM suggestions were implemented. Moreover, ACM introduction led to a significant decrease in hemoglobin fluctuation (intrapatient standard deviation decreased from 0.95 g/dl to 0.83 g/dl). Thus, ACM support helped improve anemia outcomes of hemodialysis patients, minimizing erythropoietic-stimulating agent use with the potential to reduce the cost of treatment. PMID:27262365

  15. A Novel Clinical Decision Support System Using Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm for the Assessment of Fetal Well-Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu Ravindran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel clinical decision support system is proposed in this paper for evaluating the fetal well-being from the cardiotocogram (CTG dataset through an Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (IAGA and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM. IAGA employs a new scaling technique (called sigma scaling to avoid premature convergence and applies adaptive crossover and mutation techniques with masking concepts to enhance population diversity. Also, this search algorithm utilizes three different fitness functions (two single objective fitness functions and multi-objective fitness function to assess its performance. The classification results unfold that promising classification accuracy of 94% is obtained with an optimal feature subset using IAGA. Also, the classification results are compared with those of other Feature Reduction techniques to substantiate its exhaustive search towards the global optimum. Besides, five other benchmark datasets are used to gauge the strength of the proposed IAGA algorithm.

  16. Recent advances in computational methods and clinical applications for spine imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Glocker, Ben; Klinder, Tobias; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at the MICCAI 2014 workshop on Computational Methods and Clinical Applications for Spine Imaging. The workshop brought together scientists and clinicians in the field of computational spine imaging. The chapters included in this book present and discuss the new advances and challenges in these fields, using several methods and techniques in order to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving signal and image acquisition, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration and fusion, computer simulation, image based modeling, simulation and surgical planning, image guided robot assisted surgical and image based diagnosis. The book also includes papers and reports from the first challenge on vertebra segmentation held at the workshop.

  17. Does accountability for reasonableness work? A protocol for a mixed methods study using an audit tool to evaluate the decision-making of clinical commissioning groups in England

    OpenAIRE

    Kieslich, Katharina; Littlejohns, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England are tasked with making difficult decisions on which healthcare services to provide against the background of limited budgets. The question is how to ensure that these decisions are fair and legitimate. Accounts of what constitutes fair and legitimate priority setting in healthcare include Daniels’ and Sabin's accountability for reasonableness (A4R) and Clark's and Weale's framework for the identification of social values. This study...

  18. Clinical Study of Endostar Combined with DP Protocol in Treatment of Advanced Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-ying DENG

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the clinical outcomes of Endostar combined with DP regimen for treating advanced esophageal cancer.Methods: A total of 62 patients with advanced esophageal cancer admitted from May, 2011 to May, 2013 were enrolled for a prospective, randomized controlled trial and 2 cases were excluded from the study because of Ⅳ degree of digestive tract reaction and myelosuppression. Therefore, 60 cases could be evaluated, and then divided into combined group (given Endostar+DP plan and single chemotherapy group, 30 cases in each group. The level of VEGF, tumor size and CT perfusion (CTP parameters, including blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, mean transit time (MTT, and permeability surface (PS before and after treatment were determined for comparison. Kaplan-Merier method was used to analyze the overall survival (OS of 2 groups.Results: The efficacy of combined group was superior to single chemotherapy group. The level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in combined group was obviously lower than that in single chemotherapy group after treatment (P<0.01. Compared with treatment before in combined group, BF, BV and PS decreased while MTT increased after treatment (P<0.05. However, there were no significant differences in single chemotherapygroup before and after treatment (P>0.05. The median OS was 30 months (95%CI: 20.935-39.065 for combined group and 21 months (95%CI: 15.109-26.591 for single chemotherapy group, respectively (P=0.048. The 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates were 86.2%, 59.3% and 36.6% in combined group, and 70.8%, 32.1% and 17.8% in single chemotherapy group, respectively.Conclusion: Endostar can down-regulate the expression of VEGF, improve the state of hypertransfusion and high permeability of tumor vessels, has better curative effect without slighter adverse reactions, and prolong the survival time of patients with advanced esophageal cancer when combined with chemotherapy.

  19. Clinical Study of Endostar Combined with DP Protocol in Treatment of Advanced Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Wen-ying; LI Ning; LUO Su-xia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical outcomes of Endostar combined with DP regimen for treating advanced esophageal cancer. Methods: A total of 62 patients with advanced esophageal cancer admitted from May, 2011 to May, 2013 were enrolled for a prospective, randomized controlled trial and 2 cases were excluded from the study because ofⅣ degree of digestive tract reaction and myelosuppression. Therefore, 60 cases could be evaluated, and then divided into combined group (given Endostar+DP plan) and single chemotherapy group, 30 cases in each group. The level of VEGF, tumor size and CT perfusion (CTP) parameters, including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability surface (PS) before and after treatment were determined for comparison. Kaplan-Merier method was used to analyze the overall survival (OS) of 2 groups. Results:The efifcacy of combined group was superior to single chemotherapy group. The level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in combined group was obviously lower than that in single chemotherapy group after treatment (P0.05). The median OS was 30 months (95%CI: 20.935-39.065) for combined group and 21 months (95%CI: 15.109-26.591) for single chemotherapy group, respectively (P=0.048). The 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates were 86.2%, 59.3% and 36.6% in combined group, and 70.8%, 32.1% and 17.8% in single chemotherapy group, respectively. Conclusion: Endostar can down-regulate the expression of VEGF, improve the state of hypertransfusion and high permeability of tumor vessels, has better curative effect without slighter adverse reactions, and prolong the survival time of patients with advanced esophageal cancer when combined with chemotherapy.

  20. Cryotherapy combined with chemoembolization for the treatment of advanced hepatic carcinoma: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the technique, efficacy and clinical significance of cryoablation combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization(TACE) for the treatment of advanced hepatic carcinoma. Methods: One hundred and ninety-two patients, who accorded with the selected criterion, were divided into TACE group (n=100) and combination group (cryotherapy combined with TACE, n=92). Pre-and post-treatment AFP level, recurrence rate and life span between two groups were compared. Results: The complete necrosis rate of the tumor and the recurrence rate in TACE group were 29% and 42%, which were 88.04% and 24% in combination group, respectively. The serum AFP level was significantly decreased after treatment in both groups (P<0.05), and the reduction in AFP level was significantly greater in combination group than that in TACE group (P<0.05). During a follow-up of 30 months the survival rate at each evaluation period of combination group was higher than that of TACE group without exception. Conclusion: As an effective and safe technique, cryoablation combined with chemoembolization is far superior to simple TACE in treating advanced hepatic carcinoma. (authors)

  1. Clinical outcome of hyperthermo-radio-chemotherapy combined with surgery for patients with advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Kokuriki; Fujimoto, Shigeru; Takahashi, Makoto; Nemoto, Kazuhisa; Mutou, Takaaki; Toyosawa, Tadashi [Social Insurance Funabashi Central Hospital, Chiba (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    For the patients with breast cancer that are locally advanced or metastatic, treatment to control not only local disease but also distant metastasis is desirable. Hyperthermo-radio-chemotherapy (HRC) combined with surgery was performed for 16 patients with stage III or stage IV breast cancer and the clinical outcomes of this multimodal treatment were analyzed. The size of the primary tumor was significantly reduced after preoperative HRC with the CR rate of 18.8% (3/16) and PR rate of 81.3% (13/16). Three- and 5-year overall survival rates for the stage III patients were 100% and 87.5%, respectively; their 3- and 5- year disease free rates were 78.8% and 52.5%, respectively. One- and 3-year survival rates for the stage IV patients were 80.0% and 20.0%, respectively. No loco-regional recurrence was observed. HRC combined with surgery for advanced breast cancer patients was effective for down-staging of the primary tumor and maintaining local control. (author)

  2. Why I wrote my advance decision to refuse life-prolonging treatment: and why the law on sanctity of life remains problematic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, Raanan

    2016-06-01

    This paper, pursuing themes indefatigably defended in this journal and elsewhere by Professors Jenny and Celia Kitzinger, explains what led me to write my own advance decision (AD) to refuse life-prolonging treatment if I become legally incapacitated to make my own healthcare decisions for longer than 3 months and am medically assessed as very unlikely to regain such legal capacity. I attach my Advance Decision to Refuse Life Prolonging Treatment to the online version of this paper for comment advice and possible general interest. I argue that while a Supreme Court judgement in 2013, followed by a Court of Protection judgement in 2015 greatly ameliorate my earlier concerns about excessive judicial emphasis on the sanctity of life, certain current requirements in the Code of Practice to the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and in the Rules of the Court of Protection, especially Practice Direction 9E, concerning permanent vegetative state and minimally conscious state, seem clearly to contradict aspects of that Supreme Court judgement. If the logical implications of those legal requirements were thoroughly implemented medical practice would be substantially and undesirably skewed towards provision of treatments to prolong life that are unwanted, non-beneficial and wasteful of healthcare resources. I urge that these legal requirements are modified to make them consistent with the Supreme Court's judgement in Aintree v James. PMID:27118692

  3. Valid comparisons and decisions based on clinical registers and population based cohort studies: assessing the accuracy, completeness and epidemiological relevance of a breast cancer query database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacke Christian Olaf

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data accuracy and completeness are crucial for ensuring both the correctness and epidemiological relevance of a given data set. In this study we evaluated a clinical register in the administrative district of Marburg-Biedenkopf, Germany, for these criteria. Methods The register contained data gathered from a comprehensive integrated breast-cancer network from three hospitals that treated all included incident cases of malignant breast cancer in two distinct time periods from 1996–97 (N=389 and 2003–04 (N=488. To assess the accuracy of this data, we compared distributions of risk, prognostic, and predictive factors with distributions from established secondary databases to detect any deviations from these “true” population parameters. To evaluate data completeness, we calculated epidemiological standard measures as well as incidence-mortality-ratios (IMRs. Results In total, 12% (13 of 109 of the variables exhibited inaccuracies: 9% (5 out of 56 in 1996–97 and 15% (8 out of 53 in 2003–04. In contrast to raw, unstandardized incidence rates, (in- directly age-standardized incidence rates showed no systematic deviations. Our final completeness estimates were IMR=36% (1996–97 and IMR=43% (2003–04. Conclusion Overall, the register contained accurate, complete, and correct data. Regional differences accounted for detected inaccuracies. Demographic shifts occurred. Age-standardized measures indicate an acceptable degree of completeness. The IMR method of measuring completeness was inappropriate for incidence-based data registers. For the rising number of population-based health-care networks, further methodological advancements are necessary. Correct and epidemiologically relevant data are crucial for clinical and health-policy decision-making.

  4. "Metabolic staging" after major trauma - a guide for clinical decision making?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Ernest E

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic changes after major trauma have a complex underlying pathophysiology. The early posttraumatic stress response is associated with a state of hyperinflammation, with increased oxygen consumption and energy expenditure. This hypercatabolic state must be recognized early and mandates an early nutritional management strategy. A proactive concept of early enteral "immunonutrition" in severely injured patients, is aimed at counterbalancing the negative aspects of hyperinflammation and hypercatabolism in order to reduce the risk of late complications, including infections and posttraumatic organ failure. Recently, the concept of "metabolic staging" has been advocated, which takes into account the distinct inflammatory phases and metabolic phenotypes after major trauma, including the "ischemia/reperfusion phenotype", the "leukocytic phenotype", and the "angiogenic phenotype". The potential clinical impact of metabolic staging, and of an appropriately adapted "metabolic control" and nutritional support, remains to be determined.

  5. Clinical Decision Support Tools for Selecting Interventions for Patients with Disabling Musculoskeletal Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gross, Douglas P; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Shaw, William S;

    2016-01-01

    the research question; (2) identifying relevant studies; (3) selecting studies for analysis; (4) charting the data; and (5) collating, summarizing and reporting results. We considered computer-based, and other available tools, such as algorithms, care pathways, rules and models. Since this research crosses...... multiple disciplines, we searched health care, computing science and business databases. Results Our search resulted in 4605 manuscripts. Titles and abstracts were screened for relevance. The reliability of the screening process was high with an average percentage of agreement of 92.3 %. Of the located...... articles, 123 were considered relevant. Within this literature, there were 43 CDS tools located. These were classified into 3 main areas: computer-based tools/questionnaires (n = 8, 19 %), treatment algorithms/models (n = 14, 33 %), and clinical prediction rules/classification systems (n = 21, 49 %). Each...

  6. AAC assessment and clinical-decision making: the impact of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Aimee; Quach, Wendy; Lund, Shelley K; McKelvey, Miechelle

    2012-09-01

    People with complex communication needs often require a comprehensive augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) assessment to maximize participation in daily interactions. Assessment of AAC is a complex process and limited practice guidelines exist. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how 25 speech-language pathologists with varying levels of experience approach the AAC assessment process. Participants were classified as either (a) General Practice Speech-Language Pathologists (GPSLPs), (b) AAC Clinical Specialists (AAC-CS), or (c) AAC Research/Policy Specialists (AAC-RS). In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore the participants' approach to AAC assessment. The results revealed that GPSLPs approach AAC assessment differently than the AAC-CS and AAC-RS; however, the Specialists reported a similar approach that may help guide the development of practice guidelines for AAC assessment.

  7. Formal Logic and Flowchart for Diagnosis Validity Verification and Inclusion in Clinical Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, M.; Grundel, L.; Simini, F.

    2016-04-01

    Logical reasoning is part of medical practice since its origins. Modern Medicine has included information-intensive tools to refine diagnostics and treatment protocols. We are introducing formal logic teaching in Medical School prior to Clinical Internship, to foster medical practice. Two simple examples (Acute Myocardial Infarction and Diabetes Mellitus) are given in terms of formal logic expression and truth tables. Flowcharts of both diagnostic processes help understand the procedures and to validate them logically. The particularity of medical information is that it is often accompanied by “missing data” which suggests to adapt formal logic to a “three state” logic in the future. Medical Education must include formal logic to understand complex protocols and best practices, prone to mutual interactions.

  8. Predictors of custody and visitation decisions by a family court clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raub, Jonathan M; Carson, Nicholas J; Cook, Benjamin L; Wyshak, Grace; Hauser, Barbara B

    2013-01-01

    Children's psychological adjustment following parental separation or divorce is a function of the characteristics of the custodial parent, as well as the degree of postdivorce parental cooperation. Over time, custody has shifted from fathers to mothers and currently to joint arrangements. In this retrospective chart review of family court clinic records we examined predictors of custody and visitation. Our work improves on previous studies by assessing a greater number of predictor variables. The results suggest that parental emotional instability, antisocial behavior, and low income all decrease chances of gaining custody. The findings also show that income predicts whether a father is recommended for visitation rights and access to his child or children. Furthermore, joint custody is not being awarded as a function of parental postdivorce cooperation. At issue is whether parental emotional stability, antisocial behavior, and income are appropriate markers for parenting capacity and whether visitation rights and joint custody are being decided in a way that serves the child's best interests.

  9. Tc99m - Dextran Sentinel Node detection: Improvement of clinical decision making in malignant skin lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and sentinel node detection are necessary to perform selective lymphadenectomies for staging purposes in malignant skin lesions. Aim: Our goal was to assess the usefulness of Tc99m-Dextran lymphoscintigraphy and sentinel node detection in the nodal staging of malignant skin lesions. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively an experienced oncologic surgeon defined the nodal staging approach he would have had based on the clinical information excluding only the scintigraphic sentinel node detection result in 44 consecutive patients, 21 men, ages 5 - 79, with melanoma (41), Merkel cell tumor (2) and squamous cell tumor (1). We analyze the changes introduced by the use of sentinel node detection in view of anatomopathological findings and clinical outcome. Results: In 35/44 patients no adenectomy would have been performed. Thus, leaving 3 (+) sentinel nodes and 32 (-) sentinel nodes undetected. One of this 32 patients would have had unnecessary radiotherapy because of unknown nodal status. Two of these 32 patients, with malignant melanoma, had metastasis after 15 and 22 month to 1/16 regional lymph nodes and to the skin close to the original lesion respectively. In two other patients the sentinel node could not be identified by scintigraphy : one had negative pathology of regional lymphadenectomy and the other is healthy 20 month after surgery. In 9/44 patients regional adenectomy would have excised 4 (+) sentinel nodes, 4 (-) sentinel nodes and left 1 (+) sentinel node located in an unexpected lymphatic bed. Conclusion: Preoperative sentinel node location guides the surgeon to a rational, limited lymph node excision avoiding staging errors. Selective adenectomy has less complications thus permitting anatomopathological evaluation even for lower risk patients

  10. A pilot study to evaluate the role of the Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) in clinical decisions for pressure ulcer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Susan S; Graves, Barbara Ann; Madaris, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) was designed to assess pressure ulcer (PrU) healing in the spinal cord impaired (SCI) population. The tool contains 7 variables: wound surface area, depth, edges, tunneling, undermining, exudate type, and necrotic tissue amount. A 2-phased, quantitative pilot study based on the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior was conducted at a large SCI/Disorders Center in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In the first phase of the study, a convenience sample of 5 physicians, 3 advanced practice registered nurses, and 3 certified wound care nurses (CWCN) was surveyed using a 2-part questionnaire to assess use of the SCI-PUMT instrument, its anticipated improvement in PrU assessment, and intent to use the SCI-PUMT in clinical practice. Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral controls, and barriers related to the intent to use the SCI-PUMT were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale (range: 1= extremely likely, 5 = extremely unlikely). In the second phase of the study, the electronic health records (EHR) of 24 veterans (with 30 PrUs) who had at least 2 completed SCI-PUMT scores during a 4-week period were used to evaluate whether an association existed between magnitudes of change of total SCI-PUMT scores and ordered changes in PrU treatment. The overall mean score for intent to use SCI-PUMT was 1.80 (SD 0.75). The least favorable scores were for convenience and motivation to use the SCI-PUMT. Analysis of EHR data showed no significant difference in magnitudes of change in the SCI-PUMT score and changes in PrU treatment recommendations made by the CWCNs. The significance was not affected regardless of an increase or no change in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 1.158, P = 0.282) or for a decrease in the score (χ2 with 1 degree of freedom = 0.5, P = 0.478). In this pilot study, the expressed intent to use the SCI-PUMT in making clinical decisions was generally

  11. Development of a real-time clinical decision support system upon the web mvc-based architecture for prostate cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wen-Miin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A real-time clinical decision support system (RTCDSS with interactive diagrams enables clinicians to instantly and efficiently track patients' clinical records (PCRs and improve their quality of clinical care. We propose a RTCDSS to process online clinical informatics from multiple databases for clinical decision making in the treatment of prostate cancer based on Web Model-View-Controller (MVC architecture, by which the system can easily be adapted to different diseases and applications. Methods We designed a framework upon the Web MVC-based architecture in which the reusable and extractable models can be conveniently adapted to other hospital information systems and which allows for efficient database integration. Then, we determined the clinical variables of the prostate cancer treatment based on participating clinicians' opinions and developed a computational model to determine the pretreatment parameters. Furthermore, the components of the RTCDSS integrated PCRs and decision factors for real-time analysis to provide evidence-based diagrams upon the clinician-oriented interface for visualization of treatment guidance and health risk assessment. Results The resulting system can improve quality of clinical treatment by allowing clinicians to concurrently analyze and evaluate the clinical markers of prostate cancer patients with instantaneous clinical data and evidence-based diagrams which can automatically identify pretreatment parameters. Moreover, the proposed RTCDSS can aid interactions between patients and clinicians. Conclusions Our proposed framework supports online clinical informatics, evaluates treatment risks, offers interactive guidance, and provides real-time reference for decision making in the treatment of prostate cancer. The developed clinician-oriented interface can assist clinicians in conveniently presenting evidence-based information to patients and can be readily adapted to an existing hospital

  12. Application of next-generation sequencing in clinical oncology to advance personalized treatment of cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Fang Guan; Gai-Rui Li; Rong-Jiao Wang; Yu-Ting Yi; Ling Yang; Dan Jiang; Xiao-Ping Zhang; Yin Peng

    2012-01-01

    With the development and improvement of new sequencing technology,next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied increasingly in cancer genomics research over the past decade.More recently,NGS has been adopted in clinical oncology to advance personalized treatment of cancer.NGS is used to identify novel and rare cancer mutations,detect familial cancer mutation carriers,and provide molecular rationale for appropriate targeted therapy.Compared to traditional sequencing,NGS holds many advantages,such as the ability to fully sequence all types of mutations for a large number of genes (hundreds to thousands) in a single test at a relatively low cost.However,significant challenges,particularly with respect to the requirement for simpler assays,more flexible throughput,shorter turnaround time,and most importantly,easier data analysis and interpretation,will have to be overcome to translate NGS to the bedside of cancer patients.Overall,continuous dedication to apply NGS in clinical oncology practice will enable us to be one step closer to personalized medicine.

  13. Advancing clinical development pathways for new CFTR modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Boyle, Michael; VanDevanter, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening genetic disease affecting approximately 70,000 individuals worldwide. Until recently, drug development efforts have emphasised therapies treating downstream signs and symptoms resulting from the underlying CF biological defect: reduced function of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The current CF drug development landscape has expanded to include therapies that enhance CFTR function by either restoring wild-type CFTR protein expression or increasing (modulating) the function of mutant CFTR proteins in cells. To date, two systemic small-molecule CFTR modulators have been evaluated in pivotal clinical trials in individuals with CF and specific mutant CFTR genotypes that have led to regulatory review and/or approval. Advances in the discovery of CFTR modulators as a promising new class of therapies have been impressive, yet work remains to develop highly effective, disease-modifying modulators for individuals of all CF genotypes. The objectives of this review are to outline the challenges and opportunities in drug development created by systemic genotype-specific CFTR modulators, highlight the advantages of sweat chloride as an established biomarker of CFTR activity to streamline early-phase development and summarise options for later phase clinical trial designs that respond to the adoption of approved genotype-specific modulators into standard of care. An optimal development framework will be needed to move the most promising therapies efficiently through the drug development pipeline and ultimately deliver efficacious and safe therapies to all individuals with CF.

  14. Clinical Relevance of the Advanced Microbiologic and Biochemical Investigations in Periodontal Diagnosis: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishakha Grover

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New approaches to periodontal diagnosis, including advanced microbiologic, biochemical, and genetic tests, have been shown to provide the clinician with the information not available by traditional means. The purpose of a diagnostic test is to confirm, exclude, classify, or monitor disease to guide treatment. Their clinical value depends on whether the information they provide leads to improved patient outcomes. This can be assessed by randomized trials, which compare patient outcomes from the new diagnostic test versus the old test strategy. Being nonmandatory for marketing approval, such trials are not always feasible because of large sample sizes requirements. So, many diagnostic tests enter the practice without being critically analysed for any additional benefits. Effective diagnosis is just as essential as the selection of effective treatments for the success of periodontal therapy. So, the current paper aims to focus on the practical utility of this rapidly emerging plethora of periodontal diagnostic tools, emphasizing the critical issues surrounding the clinical application of microbiologic and biochemical investigations, employed for periodontal diagnosis.

  15. Photodynamic therapy of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (VERTPAC study): final clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggett, M. T.; Jermyn, M.; Gillams, A.; Mosse, S.; Kent, E.; Bown, S. G.; Hasan, T.; Pogue, B. W.; Pereira, S. P.

    2013-03-01

    We undertook a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 15 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Needle placement and laser delivery were technically successful in all patients. Thirteen patients were treated with a single laser fibre. Three treatments were carried out each at 5, 10 and 20 J/cm2; and 5 treatments (4 patients) at 40 J/cm2. A further 2 patients were treated with 2 or 3 laser fibres at 40 J/cm2. Tumour necrosis was measured on CT (computed tomography) by two radiologists 5 days after treatment. There was a clear dosedependent increase in necrosis with a median area of 20 x 16 mm (range 18 x 16 to 35 x 30 mm) at 40 J/cm2. In the 2 patients treated with multiple fibres, necrosis was 40 x 36 mm and 30 x 28 mm, respectively. There were no early complications in patients treated with a single fibre. Both patients treated with multiple fibres had evidence on CT of inflammatory change occurring anterior to the pancreas but without clinical deterioration. These results suggest that single fibre verteporfin PDT is safe in a clinical setting up to 40J/cm2 and produces a dose-dependent area of pancreatic necrosis.

  16. Clinical advances on Cardiac Insuffiency Avances clínicos en insuficiencia cardiaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Rivero González

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac insuffiency is a complex clinical syndrome which constitutes a common final path to get in by the majority of the cardiac diseases. Studies based on the communitarian surveys shows that from 30 to 40 % of the patients decease within the first year of the diagnosis. The rest of the patients (from 60 to 70 % die within the 5 years after being diagnosed. For this reason it has been called as the ¨cancer of cardiology¨. The objective of this article is to update the advances reached in the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this important syndrome.

    La insuficiencia cardiaca es un síndrome clínico complejo que constituye una vía final común a la que van a llegar la mayoría de las enfermedades cardiacas. Los estudios basados en encuestas comunitarias muestran que entre el 30 – 40 % de los pacientes mueren dentro del primer año del diagnóstico y el 60 – 70 % dentro de los 5 años, por lo que ha sido denominada, como el ¨cáncer de la cardiología¨. El objetivo de este artículo consiste en actualizar los avances alcanzados en los aspectos clínicos y terapéuticos de este importante síndrome.

  17. Current clinical advances and future perspectives in the psychiatry/mental health field of Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cía, Alfredo H; Rojas, Rodrigo Córdoba; Adad, Miguel Abib

    2010-01-01

    The history of Mental Health in Latin America is relatively young. It dates back to the mid nineteenth century and widely developed during the twentieth century, with formidable scientific, social, political, and ethical challenges. Latin American psychiatry has contributed in the fields of epidemiology, phenomenology, social psychiatry, psychiatric and epistemological research, and clinical genetics as well. More recent advances can also be seen in clinical psychotherapy and psychopharmacology. Now, there is a formal and informal recognition of various areas of expertise, such as children and adolescents, addictions, anxiety disorders, among others. However, we need to solve the health problems resulting from mental illnesses as well as the disorders related to the social, environmental, political, and economic factors of a continent marked by the precariousness of underdevelopment, which have a high impact on population health. Therefore, considering and trying to minimize the impact of those factors, contributing to the destigmatization of mental illnesses and their consequences, together with the growing number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), human rights defenders, public figures, etc., and collaborating in building a society that guarantees the right to mental health and adequate treatment and rehabilitation are part of our present challenges in Latin America. PMID:20874063

  18. Myositis registries and biorepositories: powerful tools to advance clinical, epidemiologic and pathogenic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Dankó, Katalin; Miller, Frederick W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Clinical registries and biorepositories have proven extremely useful in many studies of diseases, especially rare diseases. Given their rarity and diversity, the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, or myositis syndromes, have benefited from individual researchers’ collections of cohorts of patients. Major efforts are being made to establish large registries and biorepositories that will allow many additional studies to be performed that were not possible before. Here we describe the registries developed by investigators and patient support groups that are currently available for collaborative research purposes. Recent findings We have identified 46 myositis research registries, including many with biorepositories, which have been developed for a wide variety of purposes and have resulted in great advances in understanding the range of phenotypes, clinical presentations, risk factors, pathogenic mechanisms, outcome assessment, therapeutic responses, and prognoses. These are now available for collaborative use to undertake additional studies. Two myositis patient registries have been developed for research, and myositis patient support groups maintain demographic registries with large numbers of patients available to be contacted for potential research participation. Summary Investigator-initiated myositis research registries and biorepositories have proven extremely useful in understanding many aspects of these rare and diverse autoimmune diseases. These registries and biorepositories, in addition to those developed by myositis patient support groups, deserve continued support to maintain the momentum in this field as they offer major opportunities to improve understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of these diseases in cost-effective ways. PMID:25225838

  19. Serum levels of MMP-11 correlate with clinical outcome in Chinese patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between serum levels of matrix metalloproteinase 11 (MMP-11) and responses to front-line chemotherapy and prognosis in advanced unresectable gastric adenocarcinoma. Clinical data concerning 86 patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma (stages III c to IV), treated in Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital from 2005 to 2009, were reviewed retrospectively. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by pathology and patients received 5-fluorouracil-based front-line combination chemotherapy with third generation chemotherapeutic agents including paclitaxel, docetaxel and oxaliplatin. The regimen was repeated every two to three weeks, and the first evaluation was carried out after three cycles. The median cycle of chemotherapy was 6 (ranging from three to twelve cycles). Serum MMP-11 protein from the 86 patients was examined using enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay (ELISA) prior to chemotherapy and after three cycles of chemotherapy. Serum samples from healthy individuals were used as controls. The response rate (RR, complete response plus partial response) to chemotherapy in the 86 patients was 44.2% (38/86). The median TTP (time to progression) and overall survival (OS) in patients who responded to chemotherapy were 6.0 and 10.0 months, respectively. The response rate to chemotherapy in patients with high levels of serum MMP-11 (42.9%; 9/21) was similar to that in patients with low levels (44.6%; 29/65) (P = 0.935). Patients with low serum levels of MMP-11 had a higher median survival time and 1-year survival rate than those with high levels (11 months vs. 8 months, 50.2% vs. 21.7%, P = 0.017), although the TTP was comparable in all patients, irrespective of serum MMP-11 level (P = 0.178). Serum MMP-11 levels were correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.006). Cox multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the serum level of MMP-11 was an independent prognostic factor for patients presenting with advanced gastric

  20. Current technological advances in magnetic resonance with critical impact for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Val M

    2013-12-01

    The last 5 years of technological advances with major impact on clinical magnetic resonance (MR) are discussed, with greater emphasis on those that are most recent. These developments have already had a critical positive effect on clinical diagnosis and therapy and presage continued rapid improvements for the next 5 years. This review begins with a discussion of 2 topics that encompass the breadth of MR, in terms of anatomic applications, contrast media, and MR angiography. Subsequently, innovations are discussed by anatomic category, picking the areas with the greatest development, starting with the brain, moving forward to the liver and kidney, and concluding with the musculoskeletal system, breast, and prostate. Two final topics are then considered, which will likely, with time, become independent major fields in their own right, interventional MR and MR positron emission tomography (PET).The next decade will bring a new generation of MR contrast media, with research focused on substantial improvements (>100-fold) in relaxivity (contrast effect), thus providing greater efficacy, safety, and tissue targeting. Magnetic resonance angiography will see major advances because of the use of compressed sensing, in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, with movement away from nondynamic imaging. The breadth of available techniques and tissue contrast has greatly expanded in brain imaging, benefiting both from the introduction of new basic categories of imaging techniques, such as readout-segmented echo planar imaging and 3D fast spin echo imaging with variable flip angles, and from new refinements specific to anatomic areas, such as double inversion recovery and MP2RAGE. Liver imaging has benefited from the development of techniques to easily and rapidly assess lipid, and will see, overall, a marked improvement in the next 5 years from new techniques on the verge of clinical introduction, such as controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration

  1. The impact of smoking on the clinical outcome of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma after chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigarette smoking is a common risk factor for developing nasopharyngeal carcinoma. However, the relationship between smoking and clinical outcomes remains uncertain. The patients who participated in this study were drawn from a randomized clinical trial, for which the purpose was to compare the efficacy of induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy with that of induction chemotherapy plus radiotherapy in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The patients who ever smoked were divided into the following categories of cumulative smoking exposure based on the duration of smoking and the quantity of cigarettes smoked: light, short-term smokers; light, long-term smokers; heavy, short-term smokers; and heavy, long-term smokers. A log-rank test and Cox models were used to assess the association between smoking and the clinical outcomes of overall survival (OS), failure-free survival (FFS), locoregional recurrence failure-free survival (LRFFS) and distant failure-free survival (DFFS). We found that ever-smokers experienced significantly shorter LRFFS times than never-smokers (5-year LRFFS rates: 85.8% vs. 88.5%, P = 0.022). The amount of smoking was significantly associated with FFS (P = 0.046) and LRFFS (P = 0.001) in the different ever-smoker groups. The amount of smoking was associated with LRFFS [P = 0.002, HR = 2.069 (95% confident interval (CI), 1.298-3.299)] even after a multivariable adjustment. Smoking increases the risk of locoregional recurrence. Furthermore, the amount of smoking influences the prognosis of smokers, and these effects are dose-dependent

  2. Clinical Decision Support and Closed-Loop Control for Cardiopulmonary Management and Intensive Care Unit Sedation Using Expert Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Behnood; Bailey, James M; Haddad, Wassim M; Tannenbaum, Allen R

    2012-03-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the ICU, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. While physicians select the agent(s) used for sedation and cardiovascular function, the actual administration of these agents is the responsibility of the nursing staff. If clinical decision support systems and closed-loop control systems could be developed for critical care monitoring and lifesaving interventions as well as the administration of sedation and cardiopulmonary management, the ICU nurse could be released from the intense monitoring of sedation, allowing her/him to focus on other critical tasks. One particularly attractive strategy is to utilize the knowledge and experience of skilled clinicians, capturing explicitly the rules expert clinicians use to decide on how to titrate drug doses depending on the level of sedation. In this paper, we extend the deterministic rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and ICU sedation framework presented in [1] to a stochastic setting by using probability theory to quantify uncertainty and hence deal with more realistic clinical situations.

  3. Clinical decision-making: midwifery students' recognition of, and response to, post partum haemorrhage in the simulation environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholes Julie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper reports the findings of a study of how midwifery students responded to a simulated post partum haemorrhage (PPH. Internationally, 25% of maternal deaths are attributed to severe haemorrhage. Although this figure is far higher in developing countries, the risk to maternal wellbeing and child health problem means that all midwives need to remain vigilant and respond appropriately to early signs of maternal deterioration. Methods Simulation using a patient actress enabled the research team to investigate the way in which 35 midwifery students made decisions in a dynamic high fidelity PPH scenario. The actress wore a birthing suit that simulated blood loss and a flaccid uterus on palpation. The scenario provided low levels of uncertainty and high levels of relevant information. The student's response to the scenario was videoed. Immediately after, they were invited to review the video, reflect on their performance and give a commentary as to what affected their decisions. The data were analysed using Dimensional Analysis. Results The students' clinical management of the situation varied considerably. Students struggled to prioritise their actions where more than one response was required to a clinical cue and did not necessarily use mnemonics as heuristic devices to guide their actions. Driven by a response to single cues they also showed a reluctance to formulate a diagnosis based on inductive and deductive reasoning cycles. This meant they did not necessarily introduce new hypothetical ideas against which they might refute or confirm a diagnosis and thereby eliminate fixation error. Conclusions The students response demonstrated that a number of clinical skills require updating on a regular basis including: fundal massage technique, the use of emergency standing order drugs, communication and delegation of tasks to others in an emergency and working independently until help arrives. Heuristic devices helped the

  4. CLINICAL DECISION MAKING IN NURSING CARE: EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE AND SENIORITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivasangari Subramaniam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the nursing profession, EBP makes a positive contribution to healthcare outcomes, care delivery, clinical teaching and research. The research objective was to determine the nurses' knowledge, attitude, practice towards EBP and barriers to use EBP in four (4 Government Hospitals in Malaysia, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM, Hospital Pulau Pinang (HPP, Hospital Sultan Abdul Halim (HSAH and Hospital Seberang Jaya (HSJ. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January until December 2012 among (n=600 nurses working in all disciplines, on shift or day time duties in four selected hospitals. The questionnaire was adapted from a Singapore study (Majid, 2011. Results showed that among the nurses working in 4 different Malaysian hospitals, close to fifty percent (53 % knew what the evidence based practice meant. The items assessing the attitude showed a large number nurses responding that they did neither agree nor disagree with statements provided. The majority of the remaining nurses tended to show a rather positive attitude except when asked about how the workload interfered with their EBP practice. The practice level of EBP scored a mean of more than 3 out of maximal five for most items. Most nurses recognized there were many barriers to EBP in their working place. In conclusion, this study may have helped to increase our understanding of knowledge, attitudes, practice and barriers towards to use of EBP to the utilization of research by nurses through an exploration of perceived barriers and facilitators on the part of nurses.

  5. Clinical advances in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia: focus on bosutinib and patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweet K

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kendra Sweet,1 Javier Pinilla-Ibarz,1 Ling Zhang21Malignant Hematology, 2Hematopathology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: The treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia has changed significantly over the past 15 years, and as of now, there are five BCR-ABL1 (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have gained approval for treatment of this disease. All five are very effective drugs, and the decision surrounding which to use in specific patients is based on numerous factors. Bosutinib is one of the newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors to gain approval, and has been studied in the first-line setting as well as after failure of other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It is an SRC-ABL1 (steroid receptor co-activator-ABL1 inhibitor that works in the presence of most kinase domain mutations. The primary side effects of bosutinib are gastrointestinal upsets. In the appropriate clinical setting, bosutinib can be considered a valuable addition to the armamentarium of treatments available for chronic myeloid leukemia.Keywords: chronic myeloid leukemia, bosutinib, treatment options

  6. Advanced decision support techniques in combination with smart card and local operating network technologies for intelligent energy management in buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolokotsa, D.; Kalaitzakis, K.; Stavrakakis, G.; Sutherland, G.; Santamouris, M.; Soultanidis, S.; Moumtzis, P.; Brunet, J.; Guillaumin, P.; Pelegrini, L.; Romiti, G.; Bakker, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to present recent developments of integrated building energy manaeement system combining intelligent decision making systems and smart card technology using Local Operating Network (LON) techniques applying mainly to existing buildings and to new buildings with mi

  7. Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and sorafenib:Diagnosis, indications, clinical and radiological follow-up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is acategory of disease defined by radiological, clinical andhepatic function parameters, comprehending a widerange of patients with different general conditions. Themain therapeutic option is represented by sorafenibtreatment, a multi-kinase inhibitor with anti-proliferativeand anti-angiogenic effect. Trans-arterial Radio Embolizationalso represents a promising new approach tointermediate/advanced HCC. Post-marketing clinicalstudies showed that only a portion of patients actuallybenefits from sorafenib treatment, and an even smallerpercentage of patients treated shows partial/completeresponse on follow-up examinations, up against relevantcosts and an incidence of drug related adverse effects.Although the treatment with sorafenib has shown asignificant increase in mean overall survival in differentstudies, only a part of patients actually shows realbenefits, while the incidence of drug related significantadverse effects and the economic costs are relativelyhigh. Moreover, only a small percentage of patientsalso shows a response in terms of lesion dimensionsreduction. Being able to properly differentiate patientswho are responding to the therapy from non-respondersas early as possible is then still difficult and couldbe a pivotal challenge for the future; in fact it couldspare several patients a therapy often difficult to bear,directing them to other second line treatments (many ofwhich are at the moment still under investigation). Forthis reason, some supplemental criteria to be added tothe standard modified Response Evaluation Criteriain Solid Tumors evaluation are being searched for. Inparticular, finding some parameters (cellular density,perfusion grade and enhancement rate) able to predictthe sensitivity of the lesions to anti-angiogenic agentscould help in stratifying patients in terms of treatmentresponsiveness before the beginning of the therapyitself, or in the first weeks of sorafenib treatment

  8. Advancing a framework for fostering innovative use of ICESat-2 data to inform actionable decisions of value to society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Arias, S.; Brown, M. E.; Escobar, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) Early Adopter Program is an initiative of the ICESat-2 Applications Team that encourages and facilitates a transparent understanding of the utility of ICESat-2 data products within different decision-making contexts. Latency, spatial and temporal resolutions are key data characteristics uniquely inherent to individual decision processes and operations; the ICESat-2 Early Adopter program facilitates the necessary feedback loops between the mission and user communities to clarify these characteristics for particular applications and to help redefine the paths for how the mission products can become actively relevant. Through a bi-annual approval process, the program selects groups and individuals who have a direct or clearly defined need for particular ICESat-2 data products; have an existing application or decision-making activity; and who are planning to apply their own resources (i.e., funding, personnel, facilities, etc.) to demonstrate the utility of ICESat-2 data for their specific application. The Early Adopters (EAs) may either be organizations who will use the data in decision making (end-users), or scientists or technical people in a science-based organization who will conduct the prelaunch research for an end-user and then work with the decision-making organization to ensure routine use of the new product. Currently hosting a total of 16 EAs, ICESat-2 is the second NASA mission to implement the Early Adopter program. In this session, we summarize the Early Adopter research and highlight the various applications the EAs are leading for potential end-uses of the ICESat-2 data. We also include a discussion on the various stakeholder requirements for the data and illustrate the EA program as a component of a much broader Applications framework.

  9. The Clinical Significance of Cathepsin D and p53 Expression in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun-Sang; Lee, Sheng-Jin; Kim, Jin-Man; Cho, Moon-June [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    Cathepsin D (CD) is a lysosomal acid proteinase that is related to malignant progression, invasion, and a poor prognosis in several tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic clinical significance of CD and p53 expression in pretreatment biopsy specimens from patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Eighty-nine patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/T4 or N+) were included in this study. Preoperative chemoradiation consisted of a dose of 50.4 Gy of pelvic radiation and two concurrent cycles of administration of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. Surgery was performed six weeks after chemoradiation. CD and p53 expression in pretreatment formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor biopsy specimens were assessed by immunohistochemical staining using a CD and p53 monoclonal antibodies. The threshold value for a positive stain in tumor tissue and stromal cells was 1+ intensity in 10% of the tumors or stromal cells, respectively. Positive CD expression was found in 57 (64%) of the tumors and 32 (35%) of the stromal cell specimens. There was no association with CD expression of the tumor or stromal cells and patient characteristics. There was a correlation between tumor CD expression with stromal cell CD expression (p=0.01). Overexpression of p53 was not a significant prognostic factor. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates were not different between tumor CD-negative and positive patient biopsy samples (69% vs. 65%, 60% vs. 61%, respectively). The 5-year OS rates in the tumor-negative/stromal cell-negative, tumor-negative/stromal cell-positive, tumor-positive/stromal cell-negative and tumor-positive/ stromal cell-positive biopsy samples were 75%, 28%, 62%, and 73%, respectively. Stromal cell staining only without positive tumor staining demonstrated the worst overall survival prognosis for patients (p=0.013). Overexpression of p53 in rectal biopsy tissue was not

  10. Using Clinical Decision Support and Dashboard Technology to Improve Heart Team Efficiency and Accuracy in a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sarah; Wilson, Marisa L; Terhaar, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Heart Team meetings are becoming the model of care for patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI) worldwide. While Heart Teams have potential to improve the quality of patient care, the volume of patient data processed during the meeting is large, variable, and comes from different sources. Thus, consolidation is difficult. Also, meetings impose substantial time constraints on the members and financial pressure on the institution. We describe a clinical decision support system (CDSS) designed to assist the experts in treatment selection decisions in the Heart Team. Development of the algorithms and visualization strategy required a multifaceted approach and end-user involvement. An innovative feature is its ability to utilize algorithms to consolidate data and provide clinically useful information to inform the treatment decision. The data are integrated using algorithms and rule-based alert systems to improve efficiency, accuracy, and usability. Future research should focus on determining if this CDSS improves patient selection and patient outcomes. PMID:27332170

  11. Recent advances and clinical application of erythropoietin and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2012-05-15

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is an essential glycoprotein that facilitates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and mediates erythropoiesis. The use of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) dramatically changed management of anemic patients with chronic kidney disease and improved their quality of life. EPO is mainly produced in the fetal liver and the postnatal kidney, although the molecular determinants for tissue-specific expression are elusive. Meanwhile, recent advances established a role of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) in transcriptionally upregulating EPO in hypoxia. Out of three HIF- isoforms, HIF-2 appears to play a central role. Prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD), a key regulator connecting oxygen availability and HIF-α expression, is also involved in hypoxic induction of EPO mRNA and the precise roles of PHD paralogs in erythropoiesis are now beginning to be uncovered. On the other hand, widespread expression of EPO receptors (EPOR) beyond erythroid progenitors led to the discovery of non-hematopoietic, pleiotropic roles of EPO in the brain, the heart and the kidney. The precise signal transduction pathways of pleiotropic EPO remain unclear, but carbamylated EPO, which fails to bind to the canonical EPOR homodimers or transduce the JAK2-STAT5 signaling, conferred organ protection through multimeric receptors composed of EPO-R and the common β subunit (βCR). The clinical benefit of normalization of anemia in pre-dialysis CKD by EPO therapy is controversial and recent large-scale, randomized-controlled trials do not favor normalization of anemia by EPO in improving cardiovascular as well as renal outcomes. The optimal EPO therapy should be determined based on the clinical context of individual patients. PMID:22414872

  12. Clinical Decision-Making in Community Children's Mental Health: Using Innovative Methods to Compare Clinicians with and without Training in Evidence-Based Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Ericzén, Mary J.; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Park, Soojin; Garland, Ann F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mental health professionals' decision-making practice is an area of increasing interest and importance, especially in the pediatric research and clinical communities. Objective: The present study explored the role of prior training in evidence-based treatments (EBTs) on clinicians' assessment and treatment formulations using…

  13. An Organizational Informatics Analysis of Colorectal, Breast, and Cervical Cancer Screening Clinical Decision Support and Information Systems within Community Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Timothy Jay

    2012-01-01

    A study design has been developed that employs a dual modeling approach to identify factors associated with facility-level cancer screening improvement and how this is mediated by the use of clinical decision support. This dual modeling approach combines principles of (1) Health Informatics, (2) Cancer Prevention and Control, (3) Health Services…

  14. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Slaar (Annelie); M.M.J. Walenkamp (Monique); A. Bentohami (Abdelali); M. Maas (Mario); R.R. van Rijn (Rick); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); L.C. Jager (L. Cara); N.L. Sosef (Nico L.); R. van Velde (Romuald); J.M. Ultee (Jan); J.C. Goslings (Carel); N.W.L. Schep (Niels)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. Objective: To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. Materials and methods: We prospectively developed a

  15. The age-adjusted D-dimer safely excludes a high number of pulmonary embolisms in combination with four different clinical decision rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, J.; Mos, I.C.M.; Douma, R.A.; Nizet, T.A.C.; Durian, M.; van Houten, A.A.; Hofstee, H.M.A.; ten Cate, H.; Ullmann, E.F.; Buller, H.R.; Huisman, M.V.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Four different clinical decision rules (CDRs) (Wells score, Revised Geneva score (RGS), simplified Wells score and simplified RGS) safely exclude pulmonary embolism (PE), when combined with a normal D-dimer test. Recently, an age adjusted cut-off of the D-dimer (patient's age x 10 ig/L)

  16. Perceived barriers of heart failure nurses and cardiologists in using clinical decision support systems in the treatment of heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Arjen E.; van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Nieuwenhuis, Maurice M. W.; de Jong, Richard M.; van Dijk, Rene B.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans L.; Jorna, Rene J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSSs) can support guideline adherence in heart failure (HF) patients. However, the use of CDSSs is limited and barriers in working with CDSSs have been described as a major obstacle. It is unknown if barriers to CDSSs are present and differ between HF

  17. IT for advanced Life Support in English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejerø Pedersen, Birgitte; Jeberg, Kirsten Ann; Koerner, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    In this study we analyzed how IT support can be established for the treatment and documentation of advanced life support (ALS) in a hospital. In close collaboration with clinical researchers, a running prototype of an IT solution to support the clinical decisions in ALS was developed and tried out...

  18. Rationale and design of decision: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of sorafenib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic radioactive iodine (RAI-refractory, differentiated thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brose Marcia S

    2011-08-01

    , response rate, duration of response, safety, and pharmacokinetic analysis. Discussion The DECISION study has been designed to test whether sorafenib improves PFS in patients with locally advanced or metastatic RAI-refractory DTC. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00984282; EudraCT: 2009-012007-25.

  19. Lost in Translation: The Gap in Scientific Advancements and Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of medicine and medical technology hinges on the successful translation of basic science research from the bench to clinical implementation at the bedside. Out of the increasing need to facilitate the transfer of scientific knowledge to patients, translational research has emerged. Significant leaps in improving global health, such as antibiotics, vaccinations, and cancer therapies, have all seen successes under this paradigm, yet today, it has become increasingly difficult to realize this ideal scenario. As hospital revenue demand increases, and financial support declines, clinician-protected research time has been limited. Researchers, likewise, have been forced to abandon time- and resource-consuming translational research to focus on publication-generating work to maintain funding and professional advancement. Compared to the surge in scientific innovation and new fields of science, realization of transformational scientific findings in device development and materials sciences has significantly lagged behind. Herein, we describe: how the current scientific paradigm struggles in the new health-care landscape; the obstacles met by translational researchers; and solutions, both public and private, to overcoming those obstacles. We must rethink the old dogma of academia and reinvent the traditional pathways of research in order to truly impact the health-care arena and ultimately those that matter most: the patient. PMID:27376058

  20. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-14

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  1. Advanced age and the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implan-tation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osama Alsara; Ahmad Alsarah; Heather Laird-Fick

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is common in the elderly. Although surgical replacement of the valve has been the gold standard of management, many patients have been excluded from surgery because they were very old, frail, or had co-morbidities that increased operative risks. In the last decade, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as a new treatment option suitable for these patients. This article reviews the available literature on the role of TAVI in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis. Published studies showed that elderly individuals who underwent TAVI experienced better in-hospital recovery, and similar short and mid-term mortality compared to those underwent surgical treatment of AS. However, long-term outcomes of TAVI in elderly patients are still unknown. The available data in the literature on the ef-fect of advanced age on clinical outcomes of TAVI are limited, but the data that are available suggest that TAVI is a beneficial and tolerable procedure in very old patients. Some of the expected complications after TAVI are reported more in the oldest patients such as vascular in-jures. Other complications were comparable in TAVI patients regardless of their age group. However, very old patients may need closer monitoring to avoid further morbidities and mortality.

  2. Clinical management of advanced gastric cancer: The role of new molecular drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vita, Ferdinando; Di Martino, Natale; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Petrillo, Angelica; Gambardella, Valentina; Sforza, Vincenzo; Marano, Luigi; Auricchio, Annamaria; Galizia, Gennaro; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Orditura, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm and the second leading cause of death for cancer in Western countries with more than 20000 new cases yearly diagnosed in the United States. Surgery represents the main approach for this disease but, notwithstanding the advances in surgical techniques, we observed a minimal improvement in terms of overall survival with a significant increasing of relapsing disease rates. Despite the development of new drugs has significantly improved the effectiveness of chemotherapy, the prognosis of patients with unresectable or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma remains poor. Recently, several molecular target agents have been investigated; in particular, trastuzumab represents the first target molecule showing improvements in overall survival in human epithelial growth factor 2-positive gastric cancer patients. New molecules targeting vascular epithelial growth factor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and anti hepatocyte growth factor-c-Met pathway are also under investigation, with interesting results. Anyway, it seems necessary to select more accurately the population to treat with new agents by the identification of new biomarkers in order to optimize the results. In this paper we review the actual “scenario” of targeted treatments, also focusing on the new agents in development for gastric cancer and gastro-esophageal carcinoma, discussing their efficacy and potential applications in clinical practice. PMID:25356019

  3. Lost in Translation: The Gap in Scientific Advancements and Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph eFernandez-Moure

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of medicine and medical technology hinges on the successful translation of basic science research from the bench to clinical implementation at the bedside. Born out of the increasing need to facilitate the transfer of scientific knowledge to patients, translational research has emerged. Significant leaps in improving global health such as antibiotics, vaccinations, and cancer therapies have all seen successes under this paradigm yet today it has become increasingly difficult to realize this ideal scenario. As hospital revenue demand increase, and financial support declines, clinician protected research time has been limited. Researchers, likewise, have been forced to abandon time and resource consuming translational research to focus on publication generating work to maintain funding and professional advancement. Compared to the surge in scientific innovation and new fields of science have surged, realization of transformational scientific findings in device development and materials sciences has significantly lagged behind. Herein, we describe: how the current scientific paradigm struggles in the new health-care landscape; the obstacles met by translational researchers; and solutions, both public and private, to overcoming those obstacles. We must rethink the old dogma of academia and reinvent the traditional pathways of research in order to truly impact the health-care arena and ultimately those that matter most: the patient.

  4. Traumatic brain injury: advanced multimodal neuromonitoring from theory to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Sandy; Chen, Patrick M; Callaway, Sarah E; Rowland, Susan M; Adler, David E; Chen, Jefferson W

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury accounts for nearly 1.4 million injuries and 52 000 deaths annually in the United States. Intensive bedside neuromonitoring is critical in preventing secondary ischemic and hypoxic injury common to patients with traumatic brain injury in the days following trauma. Advancements in multimodal neuromonitoring have allowed the evaluation of changes in markers of brain metabolism (eg, glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol) and other physiological parameters such as intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, cerebral blood flow, partial pressure of oxygen in brain tissue, blood pressure, and brain temperature. This article highlights the use of multimodal monitoring in the intensive care unit at a level I trauma center in the Pacific Northwest. The trends in and significance of metabolic, physiological, and hemodynamic factors in traumatic brain injury are reviewed, the technical aspects of the specific equipment used to monitor these parameters are described, and how multimodal monitoring may guide therapy is demonstrated. As a clinical practice, multimodal neuromonitoring shows great promise in improving bedside therapy in patients with traumatic brain injury, ultimately leading to improved neurological outcomes. PMID:20592189

  5. To Know or Not to Know? Theta and Delta Reflect Complementary Information about an Advanced Cue before Feedback in Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Zhaofeng; Peng, Xiaozhe; Yang, Tiantian; Li, Peng; Cong, Fengyu; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate brain activity during the reinforcement learning process in social contexts is a topic of increasing research interest. Previous studies have mainly focused on using electroencephalograms (EEGs) for feedback evaluation in reinforcement learning tasks by measuring event-related potentials. Few studies have investigated the time–frequency (TF) profiles of a cue that manifested whether a following feedback is available or not after decision-making. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the TF profiles of the cue interact with different agents to whom the feedback related. In this study we used the TF approach to test EEG oscillations of the cue stimuli in three agents (‘Self’, ‘Other’, and ‘Computer’) conditions separately. The results showed that the increased central-posterior delta power was elicited by the feedback unavailable cues more so than with the feedback available cue within 200–350 ms after the onset of the cue, but only in the self-condition. Moreover, a frontal-central theta oscillation had enhanced power when following the feedback unavailable cue as opposed to the feedback available cue across three agencies. These findings demonstrated that the cue for knowing an outcome produced reward prediction error-like signals, which were mirrored by the delta and theta oscillations during decision-making. More importantly, the present study demonstrated that the theta and delta oscillations reflected separable components of the advanced cue processing before the feedback in decision-making.

  6. The Role of Proteomics in Biomarker Development for Improved Patient Diagnosis and Clinical Decision Making in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L. Tonry

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate Cancer (PCa is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Although increased expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA is an effective indicator for the recurrence of PCa, its intended use as a screening marker for PCa is of considerable controversy. Recent research efforts in the field of PCa biomarkers have focused on the identification of tissue and fluid-based biomarkers that would be better able to stratify those individuals diagnosed with PCa who (i might best receive no treatment (active surveillance of the disease; (ii would benefit from existing treatments; or (iii those who are likely to succumb to disease recurrence and/or have aggressive disease. The growing demand for better prostate cancer biomarkers has coincided with the development of improved discovery and evaluation technologies for multiplexed measurement of proteins in bio-fluids and tissues. This review aims to (i provide an overview of these technologies as well as describe some of the candidate PCa protein biomarkers that have been discovered using them; (ii address some of the general limitations in the clinical evaluation and validation of protein biomarkers; and (iii make recommendations for strategies that could be adopted to improve the successful development of protein biomarkers to deliver improvements in personalized PCa patient decision making.

  7. An Intelligent Clinical Decision Support System for Patient-Specific Predictions to Improve Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Bountris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there are molecular biology techniques providing information related to cervical cancer and its cause: the human Papillomavirus (HPV, including DNA microarrays identifying HPV subtypes, mRNA techniques such as nucleic acid based amplification or flow cytometry identifying E6/E7 oncogenes, and immunocytochemistry techniques such as overexpression of p16. Each one of these techniques has its own performance, limitations and advantages, thus a combinatorial approach via computational intelligence methods could exploit the benefits of each method and produce more accurate results. In this article we propose a clinical decision support system (CDSS, composed by artificial neural networks, intelligently combining the results of classic and ancillary techniques for diagnostic accuracy improvement. We evaluated this method on 740 cases with complete series of cytological assessment, molecular tests, and colposcopy examination. The CDSS demonstrated high sensitivity (89.4%, high specificity (97.1%, high positive predictive value (89.4%, and high negative predictive value (97.1%, for detecting cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+. In comparison to the tests involved in this study and their combinations, the CDSS produced the most balanced results in terms of sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV. The proposed system may reduce the referral rate for colposcopy and guide personalised management and therapeutic interventions.

  8. Cesarean section without clinical indication versus vaginal delivery as a paradigmatic model in the discourse of medical setting decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demontis, Roberto; Pisu, Salvatore; Pintor, Michela; D'aloja, Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    Natural childbirth has ceased to be considered the gold standard in the delivery room. For this reason cesarean section on demand is increasing. Many obstetricians justify this phenomenon on evidence-based obstetrical practice. However, other pieces of evidence demonstrate that the data are often a product of the social milieu, and as stated by Wendland, "technology magically wards off the unpredictability and danger of birth". In a recent paper, Kalish pointed out several problems with cesarean deliveries in the absence of medical indications regarding issues of good clinical practice, autonomy, and informed consent. From the late 1990s, the medical community began to speak in favor of women's autonomy in childbirth decisions thus supporting the maternal choice and request for a cesarean section. Starting from these new considerations, it is of primary importance to understand whether emphasizing patient's autonomy is the best, or the only, way to helping the medical decisional process. This general approach may be helpful in all the other cases in which patient's autonomy and physician's responsibility appear to be intertwined in an apparent conflicting manner. We fear that the rhetoric of autonomous choice represents a fundamental shift from medicine-based beneficence toward a perilous relationship founded mainly on patient's wishes, representing a dangerous slippery slope where the physician could be reduced to the role of a functionary delegated to execute patient's claims and demands. PMID:21158491

  9. Coupling Clinical Decision Support System with Computerized Prescriber Order Entry and their Dynamic Plugging in the Medical Workflow System

    CERN Document Server

    Bouzguenda, Lotfi

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with coupling Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) with Computerized Prescriber Order Entry (CPOE) and their dynamic plugging in the medical Workflow Management System (WfMS). First, in this paper we argue some existing CDSS representative of the state of the art in order to emphasize their inability to deal with coupling with CPOE and medical WfMS. The multi-agent technology is at the basis of our proposition since (i) it provides natural abstractions to deal with distribution, heterogeneity and autonomy which are inherent to the previous systems (CDSS, CPOE and medical WfMS), and (ii) it introduces powerful concepts such as organizations, goals and roles useful to describe in details the coordination of the different components involved in these systems. In this paper, we also propose a Multi-Agent System (MAS) to support the coupling CDSS with CPOE. Finally, we show how we integrate the proposed MAS in the medical workflow management system which is also based on collaborating agents

  10. Current Molecular Targeted Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Comprehensive Review of Therapeutic Mechanism, Clinical Trials, and Practical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaichun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great progress in the treatment of gastric cancer, it is still the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients often miss the opportunity for a surgical cure, because the cancer has already developed into advanced cancer when identified. Compared to best supportive care, chemotherapy can improve quality of life and prolong survival time, but the overall survival is often short. Due to the molecular study of gastric cancer, new molecular targeted drugs have entered the clinical use. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, can significantly improve survival in advanced gastric cancer patients with HER2 overexpression. Second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer with ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, has been proved to provide a beneficial effect. The VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, apatinib, can improve the survival of advanced gastric cancer patients after second-line chemotherapy failure. Unfortunately, none of the EGFR targeting antibodies (cetuximab or panitumumab, VEGF targeting monoclonal antibodies (bevacizumab, mTOR inhibitor (everolimus, or HGF/MET pathway targeting drugs has a significant survival benefit. Many other clinical trials based on molecular markers are underway. This review will summarize targeted therapies for advanced gastric cancer.

  11. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. We prospectively developed and validated a clinical decision rule in two study populations. All children who presented in the emergency department of four hospitals with pain following wrist trauma were included and evaluated for 18 clinical variables. The outcome was a wrist fracture diagnosed by plain radiography. Included in the study were 787 children. The prediction model consisted of six variables: age, swelling of the distal radius, visible deformation, distal radius tender to palpation, anatomical snuffbox tender to palpation, and painful or abnormal supination. The model showed an area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). The sensitivity and specificity were 95.9% and 37.3%, respectively. The use of this model would have resulted in a 22% absolute reduction of radiographic examinations. In a validation study, 7/170 fractures (4.1%, 95% CI: 1.7-8.3%) would have been missed using the decision model. The decision model may be a valuable tool to decide whether radiography in children after wrist trauma is required. (orig.)

  12. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaar, Annelie; Maas, Mario; Rijn, Rick R. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105, AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Walenkamp, Monique M.J.; Bentohami, Abdelali; Goslings, J.C. [University of Amsterdam, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steyerberg, Ewout W. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre, Department of Public Health, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jager, L.C. [University of Amsterdam, Emergency Department, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sosef, Nico L. [Spaarne Hospital, Department of Surgery, Hoofddorp (Netherlands); Velde, Romuald van [Tergooi Hospitals, Department of Surgery, Hilversum (Netherlands); Ultee, Jan M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schep, Niels W.L. [University of Amsterdam, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maasstadziekenhuis Rotterdam, Department of Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. We prospectively developed and validated a clinical decision rule in two study populations. All children who presented in the emergency department of four hospitals with pain following wrist trauma were included and evaluated for 18 clinical variables. The outcome was a wrist fracture diagnosed by plain radiography. Included in the study were 787 children. The prediction model consisted of six variables: age, swelling of the distal radius, visible deformation, distal radius tender to palpation, anatomical snuffbox tender to palpation, and painful or abnormal supination. The model showed an area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). The sensitivity and specificity were 95.9% and 37.3%, respectively. The use of this model would have resulted in a 22% absolute reduction of radiographic examinations. In a validation study, 7/170 fractures (4.1%, 95% CI: 1.7-8.3%) would have been missed using the decision model. The decision model may be a valuable tool to decide whether radiography in children after wrist trauma is required. (orig.)

  13. Research on the Internet Resources for Evidence-based Clinical Decision-making%循证临床决策支持的网络资源研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿劲松; 陈亚兰; 吴辉群; 施李丽; 董建成

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the internet resources for evidence-based clinical decision-making, thus providing theoretical basis for the development of evidence-based clinical decision-making resources in China. Methods: To systematically analyze the resources including BMJ Best Practice, DynaMed Plus and Essential Evidence Plus. The information module, the evidence-based clinical decision-making support functions and the linked evidence resources were investigated. Results: The main characteristics of the evidence-based clinical decision-making resources included multi-dimension decision support information, the integrated evidence retrieving platform, the structured evidence synopsis, consideration of level of evidence and the recommendation for practice, peer-reviewed evidence, and APP as well as remote access of the database. Conclusions: The peer-reviewed, latest, and best clinical evidence are needed for the evidence-based clinical decision-making resources, and the resources should be easily access and should be able to resolve the common clinical questions.%目的:通过探讨循证临床决策支持网络资源,为我国研发循证临床决策支持数据库提供理论依据.方法:系统分析循证临床决策支持的网络资源,包括BMJ Best Practice、DynaMed Plus和Essential Evidence Plus,探讨其信息模块、提供的循证临床决策支持功能以及链接的证据资源等.结果:循证临床决策支持网络资源的主要特点是多维度的决策支持信息、一站式的证据检索平台、结构式的证据摘要、证据分级与循证临床推荐意见、同行专家参与证据分析、数据库的APP访问和远程访问.结论:建议循证临床决策支持数据库整合经过同行评审的当前最新、最佳临床研究证据,易于使用且提供解决常见临床问题的循证信息.

  14. The design and implementation of an Interactive Computerised Decision Support Framework (ICDSF) as a strategy to improve nursing students' clinical reasoning skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Kerry; Dempsey, Jennifer; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Noble, Danielle; Hickey, Noelene; Jeong, Sarah; Hunter, Sharyn; Norton, Carol

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design and testing of an Interactive Computerised Decision Support Framework (ICDSF) which was constructed to enable student nurses to "think like a nurse." The ICDSF was based on a model of clinical reasoning. Teaching student nurses to reason clinically is important as poor clinical reasoning skills can lead to "failure-to rescue" of deteriorating patients. The framework of the ICDSF was based on nursing concepts to encourage deep learning and transferability of knowledge. The principles of active student participation, situated cognition to solve problems, authenticity, and cognitive rehearsal were used to develop the ICDSF. The ICDSF was designed in such a way that students moved through it in a step-wise fashion and were required to achieve competency at each step before proceeding to the next. The quality of the ICDSF was evaluated using a questionairre survey, students' written comments and student assessment measures on a pilot and the ICDSF. Overall students were highly satisfied with the clinical scenarios of the ICDSF and believed they were an interesting and useful way to engage in authentic clinical learning. They also believed the ICDSF was useful in developing cognitive skills such as clinical reasoning, problem-solving and decision-making. Some reported issues were the need for good technical support and the lack of face to face contact when using e-learning. Some students also believed the ICDSF was less useful than actual clinical placements. PMID:21074299

  15. Implementing shared decision-making in nutrition clinical practice: A theory-based approach and feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Légaré France; Tapp Sylvie; Gagnon Marie-Pierre; Desroches Sophie

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background There are a growing number of dietary treatment options to choose from for the management of many chronic diseases. Shared decision making represents a promising approach to improve the quality of the decision making process needed for dietary choices that are informed by the best evidence and value-based. However, there are no studies reporting on theory-based approaches that foster the implementation of shared decision making in health professions allied to medicine. The...

  16. Advances with the Chinese anthelminthic drug tribendimidine in clinical trials and laboratory investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu-Hua; Utzinger, Jürg; Tanner, Marcel; Keiser, Jennifer; Xue, Jian

    2013-05-01

    The anthelminthic drug tribendimidine has been approved by Chinese authorities for human use in 2004, and a first comprehensive review was published in Acta Tropica in 2005. Here, we summarise further advances made through additional clinical trials and laboratory investigations. Two phase IV trials have been conducted in the People's Republic of China, the first one enrolling 1292 adolescents and adults aged 15-70 years and the second one conducted with 899 children aged 4-14 years who were infected with one or multiple species of soil-transmitted helminths. Oral tribendimidine (single 400mg enteric-coated tablet given to adolescents/adults and 200mg to children) showed high cure rates against Ascaris lumbricoides (90.1-95.0%) and moderate-to-high cure rates against hookworm (82.0-88.4%). Another trial done in school-aged children using a rigorous diagnostic approach found a cure rate against hookworm of 76.5%. A single oral dose of tribendimidine showed only low cure rates against Trichuris trichiura (23.9-36.8%) confirming previous results. Tribendimidine administered to children infected with Enterobius vermicularis (two doses of 200mg each on consecutive days) resulted in a high cure rate (97.1%). Importantly, a series of randomised, exploratory trials revealed that tribendimidine shows interesting activity against the liver flukes Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis, the tapeworm Taenia spp. and the threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis with respective cure rates of 70.0%, 40.0%, 53.3% and 36.4%. Pharmacokinetic studies in healthy Chinese volunteers indicated that after oral administration of tribendimidine, no parent drug was detected in plasma, but its primary metabolite, p-(1-dimethylamino ethylimino) aniline (aminoamidine, deacylated amidantel) (dADT), was found in plasma. dADT is then further metabolised to acetylated dADT (AdADT). dADT exhibits activity against several species of hookworm and C. sinensis in experimental studies, similar to

  17. Advancing theories, models and measurement for an interprofessional approach to shared decision making in primary care: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frosch Dominick

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared decision-making (SDM is defined as a process by which a healthcare choice is made by practitioners together with the patient. Although many diagnostic and therapeutic processes in primary care integrate more than one type of health professional, most SDM conceptual models and theories appear to be limited to the patient-physician dyad. The objectives of this study are to develop a conceptual model and propose a set of measurement tools for enhancing an interprofessional approach to SDM in primary healthcare. Methods/Design An inventory of SDM conceptual models, theories and measurement tools will be created. Models will be critically assessed and compared according to their strengths, limitations, acknowledgement of interprofessional roles in the process of SDM and relevance to primary care. Based on the theory analysis, a conceptual model and a set of measurements tools that could be used to enhance an interprofessional approach to SDM in primary healthcare will be proposed and pilot-tested with key stakeholders and primary healthcare teams. Discussion This study protocol is informative for researchers and clinicians interested in designing and/or conducting future studies and educating health professionals to improve how primary healthcare teams foster active participation of patients in making health decisions using a more coordinated approach.

  18. External audit of clinical practice and medical decision making in a new Asian oncology center: Results and implications for both developing and developed nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The external audit of oncologist clinical practice is increasingly important because of the incorporation of audits into national maintenance of certification (MOC) programs. However, there are few reports of external audits of oncology practice or decision making. Our institution (The Cancer Institute, Singapore) was asked to externally audit an oncology department in a developing Asian nation, providing a unique opportunity to explore the feasibility of such a process. Methods and Materials: We audited 100 randomly selected patients simulated for radiotherapy in 2003, using a previously reported audit instrument assessing clinical documentation/quality assurance and medical decision making. Results: Clinical documentation/quality assurance, decision making, and overall performance criteria were adequate 74.4%, 88.3%, and 80.2% of the time, respectively. Overall 52.0% of cases received suboptimal management. Multivariate analysis revealed palliative intent was associated with improved documentation/clinical quality assurance (p = 0.07), decision making (p 0.007), overall performance (p = 0.003), and optimal treatment rates (p 0.07); non-small-cell lung cancer or central nervous system primary sites were associated with better decision making (p = 0.001), overall performance (p = 0.03), and optimal treatment rates (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Despite the poor results, the external audit had several benefits. It identified learning needs for future targeting, and the auditor provided facilitating feedback to address systematic errors identified. Our experience was also helpful in refining our national revalidation audit instrument. The feasibility of the external audit supports the consideration of including audit in national MOC programs

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy for pathologically advanced prostate cancer a randomized clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian, M.; Thompson, J.R.; Catherine, M.; Tangen, P.H.; Paradelo, J.; Scott Lucia, M.; Miller, G.; Troyer, D.; Messing, E.; Forman, J.; Chin, J.; Swanson, G.; Canby-Hagino, E.; Crawford, E.D

    2008-01-15

    Context - Despite a stage-shift to earlier cancer stages and lower tumor volumes for prostate cancer, pathologically advanced disease is detected at radical prostatectomy in 38% to 52% of patients. However, the optimal management of these patients after radical prostatectomy is unknown. Objective - To determine whether adjuvant radiotherapy improves metastasis-free survival in patients with stage pT3 NO MO prostate cancer. Design, Setting, and Patients - Randomized, prospective, multi-institutional, US clinical trial with enrollment between August 15, 1988, and January 1, 1997 (with database frozen for statistical analysis on September 21, 2005). Patients were 425 men with pathologically advanced prostate cancer who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Intervention - Men were randomly assigned to receive 60 to 64 Gy of external beam radiotherapy delivered to the prostatic fossa (n = 214) or usual care plus observation (n = 211). Main Outcome Measures - Primary outcome was metastasis-free survival, defined as time to first occurrence of metastatic disease or death due to any cause. Secondary outcomes included prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, recurrence-free survival, overall survival, freedom from hormonal therapy, and postoperative complications. Results - Among the 425 men, median follow-up was 10.6 years (inter-quartile range, 9.2-12.7 years). For metastasis-free survival,76 (35.5%) of 214 men in the adjuvant radiotherapy group were diagnosed with metastatic disease or died (median metastasis-free estimate, 14.7 years), compared with 91 (43.1%) of 211 (median metastasis-free estimate, 13.2 years) of those in the observation group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.55-1.02; P = .06). There were no significant between-group differences for overall survival (71 deaths, median survival of 14.7 years for radiotherapy vs 83 deaths, median survival of 13.8 years for observation; HR, 0.80; 95% Cl, 0.58-1.09; P =.16). PSA relapse (median PSA relapse-free survival

  20. IMRT for locally advanced anal cancer: clinical experience of the Montpellier Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess outcomes of patients with carcinoma of the anal canal (CAC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). From August 2007 to January 2011, seventy-two patients suffering from CAC were treated with IMRT. Concurrent chemotherapy was added in case of locally advanced tumors. Radiation course consisted in delivering an initial plan to the PTV1 defined as the primary tumor and the risk area including pelvic and inguinal nodes. Forty-five Gy in daily 1.8 Gy-daily fractions were delivered five days a week. A second plan of 14.4-20 Gy to the primary tumor (PTV2) was administered in 1.8-2 Gy-daily fractions, 5 days a week. We present here the results of dosimetry, toxicities, and clinical outcome of the first 39 patients with a median follow-up of 24 months. Thirty-one women and eight men were included in the present analysis. Tumors were classified as stages I, II, III and IV in 2, 7, 27 and 2 patients, respectively. Median age was 59 years (range, 38-85). Radiotherapy alone (RT) or combined with chemotherapy (RCT) were delivered in 6 (15%) and 33 (85%) patients, respectively. Six patients (15%) required a treatment break ≥ 3 days, and median time for treatment break was 8 days (range, 3-14 days). Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were seen in 10 and 5% of patients, respectively. Grade 4 toxicity was only hematologic and occurred in 12% patients receiving RCT. With a median follow-up of 24 months, no patient experienced any late grade 4 toxicity. The 2-year overall survival rate was 89%, the 2-year local relapse free survival was 77% and the 2-year colostomy-free survival rate was 85%. IMRT is well tolerated with acceptable treatment interruption allowing dose escalation

  1. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    OpenAIRE

    Langenau, Erik E.; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Roberts, William L.; Andre F. DeChamplain; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important.Methods: Using data from previously developed surveys and expert p...

  2. Clinical Education, the lessons learned from practical applications - Albanian issues, East Europe and the advanced international practices on Clinical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Koci

    2015-01-01

    In legal clinics, students perform various tasks just as an attorney would do in the same job position, such as doing legal research, drafting briefs and other legal documents, and interviewing clients. Many jurisdictions even allow students to appear in court on behalf of clients, even in criminal defense. Legal clinics is part of the academic law program in the most of the law faculties all over the world and it has a great impact in the community’s life. Throughout legal clinics students not only get the opportunity to be part of an important experience, but also they can be effective and help the people in need with their work. This paper aims to bring attention to the importance of clinical education in the formation of young lawyers and how one can learn from experience. There will be discussed important issues about legal clinic, the objectives and its mission, how to apply it and the benefits legal clinic brings not only for the academic area but also for the society.

  3. Protocol for the Quick Clinical study: a randomised controlled trial to assess the impact of an online evidence retrieval system on decision-making in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidd Michael R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Online information retrieval systems have the potential to improve patient care but there are few comparative studies of the impact of online evidence on clinicians' decision-making behaviour in routine clinical work. Methods/design A randomized controlled parallel design is employed to assess the effectiveness of an online evidence retrieval system, Quick Clinical (QC in improving clinical decision-making processes in general practice. Eligible clinicians are randomised either to receive access or not to receive access to QC in their consulting rooms for 12 months. Participants complete pre- and post trial surveys. Two-hundred general practitioners are recruited. Participants must be registered to practice in Australia, have a computer with Internet access in their consulting room and use electronic prescribing. Clinicians planning to retire or move to another practice within 12 months or participating in any other clinical trial involving electronic extraction of prescriptions data are excluded from the study. The primary end-points for the study is clinician acceptance and use of QC and the resulting change in decision-making behaviour. The study will examine prescribing patterns related to frequently prescribed medications where there has been a recent significant shift in recommendations regarding their use based upon new evidence. Secondary outcome measures include self-reported changes in diagnosis, patient education, prescriptions written, investigations and referrals. Discussion A trial under experimental conditions is an effective way of examining the impact of using QC in routine general practice consultations.

  4. Nottingham Prognostic Index Plus: Validation of a clinical decision making tool in breast cancer in an independent series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew R; Soria, Daniele; Stephen, Jacqueline; Powe, Desmond G; Nolan, Christopher C; Kunkler, Ian; Thomas, Jeremy; Kerr, Gillian R; Jack, Wilma; Cameron, David; Piper, Tammy; Ball, Graham R; Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Rakha, Emad A; Bartlett, John Ms; Ellis, Ian O

    2016-01-01

    The Nottingham Prognostic Index Plus (NPI+) is a clinical decision making tool in breast cancer (BC) that aims to provide improved patient outcome stratification superior to the traditional NPI. This study aimed to validate the NPI+ in an independent series of BC. Eight hundred and eighty five primary early stage BC cases from Edinburgh were semi-quantitatively assessed for 10 biomarkers [Estrogen Receptor (ER), Progesterone Receptor (PgR), cytokeratin (CK) 5/6, CK7/8, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER2, HER3, HER4, p53, and Mucin 1] using immunohistochemistry and classified into biological classes by fuzzy logic-derived algorithms previously developed in the Nottingham series. Subsequently, NPI+ Prognostic Groups (PGs) were assigned for each class using bespoke NPI-like formulae, previously developed in each NPI+ biological class of the Nottingham series, utilising clinicopathological parameters: number of positive nodes, pathological tumour size, stage, tubule formation, nuclear pleomorphism and mitotic counts. Biological classes and PGs were compared between the Edinburgh and Nottingham series using Cramer's V and their role in patient outcome prediction using Kaplan-Meier curves and tested using Log Rank. The NPI+ biomarker panel classified the Edinburgh series into seven biological classes similar to the Nottingham series (p > 0.01). The biological classes were significantly associated with patient outcome (p  0.01). The good PGs were similarly validated in Luminal B, Basal p53 normal, HER2+/ER- tumours and the poor PG in the Luminal N class (p > 0.01). Due to small patient numbers assigned to the remaining PGs, Luminal N, Luminal B, Basal p53 normal and HER2+/ER- classes could not be validated. This study demonstrates the reproducibility of NPI+ and confirmed its prognostic value in an independent cohort of primary BC. Further validation in large randomised controlled trial material is warranted.

  5. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis in men who have sex with men: risk calculators for real-world decision-making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP can be clinically effective and cost-effective for HIV prevention in high-risk men who have sex with men (MSM. However, individual patients have different risk profiles, real-world populations vary, and no practical tools exist to guide clinical decisions or public health strategies. We introduce a practical model of HIV acquisition, including both a personalized risk calculator for clinical management and a cost-effectiveness calculator for population-level decisions. METHODS: We developed a decision-analytic model of PrEP for MSM. The primary clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness outcomes were the number needed to treat (NNT to prevent one HIV infection, and the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY gained. We characterized patients according to risk factors including PrEP adherence, condom use, sexual frequency, background HIV prevalence and antiretroviral therapy use. RESULTS: With standard PrEP adherence and national epidemiologic parameters, the estimated NNT was 64 (95% uncertainty range: 26, 176 at a cost of $160,000 (cost saving, $740,000 per QALY--comparable to other published models. With high (35% HIV prevalence, the NNT was 35 (21, 57, and cost per QALY was $27,000 (cost saving, $160,000, and with high PrEP adherence, the NNT was 30 (14, 69, and cost per QALY was $3,000 (cost saving, $200,000. In contrast, for monogamous, serodiscordant relationships with partner antiretroviral therapy use, the NNT was 90 (39, 157 and cost per QALY was $280,000 ($14,000, $670,000. CONCLUSIONS: PrEP results vary widely across individuals and populations. Risk calculators may aid in patient education, clinical decision-making, and cost-effectiveness evaluation.

  6. GMP facilities for manufacturing of advanced therapy medicinal products for clinical trials: an overview for clinical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alici, Evren; Blomberg, Pontus

    2010-12-01

    To be able to produce advanced therapy medicinal products, compliance with regulatory standards while maintaining flexibility is mandatory. For this purpose, careful planning is vital in the design or upgrade of a facility. Similarly, extensive foresight is elemental to anticipate upcoming needs and requirements. Failing this may lead to the facility's in-ability to meet the demands. In this chapter we aimed to outline the current issues with regards to the European Union Directives (EUD) and the proposal for Advanced Therapies, which are of importance to cellular and gene therapy facilities in Europe. This chapter is an attempt to elucidate what the minimum requirements for GMP facilities for cell and gene therapy products are and what is considered necessary to comply with the regulations in Europe.

  7. Next-generation sequencing in patients with advanced cancer: are we ready for widespread clinical use? A single institute's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenader, Tal; Tauber, Rachel; Shavit, Linda

    2016-10-01

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay targeting cancer-relevant genes has been adopted widely for use in patients with advanced cancer. The primary aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of commercially available NGS. We retrospectively collected demographic and clinicopathologic data, recommended therapy, and clinical outcomes of 30 patients with a variety of advanced solid tumors referred to Foundation Medicine NGS. The initial pathologic examination was performed at the pathology department of the referring hospital. The comprehensive clinical NSG assay was performed on paraffin-embedded tumor samples using the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified FoundationOne platform. The median number of genomic alterations was 3 (0-19). The median number of therapies with potential benefit was 2 (0-8). In 12 cases, a comprehensive clinical NGS assay did not indicate any therapy with potential benefit according to the genomic profile. Ten of the 30 patients received treatments recommended by genomic profile results. In six of the 10 cases, disease progressed within 2 months and four patients died within 3 months of treatment initiation. Three of the 30 patients benefited from a comprehensive clinical NGS assay and the subsequent recommended therapy. The median PFS was 12 weeks (95% confidence interval 10-57) in patients treated with molecularly targeted agents chosen on the basis of tumor genomic profiling versus 48 weeks (95% confidence interval 8-38) in the control group treated with physician choice therapy (P=0.12). Our study suggests that NGS can detect additional treatment targets in individual patients, but prospective medical research and appropriate clinical guidelines for proper clinical use are vital. PMID:27384593

  8. Residency training in advance care planning: can it be done in the outpatient clinic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Jeffrey S; Nair, Baishali; Fox, Mark D

    2008-01-01

    Resident physicians are expected to assist their outpatients to understand and complete advance directives, but their efficacy in doing so remains uncertain. After receiving educational training, internal medicine residents identified at-risk patients and solicited them about advance directives. Residents completed pretest and posttest questionnaires that assessed their knowledge, skills, attitude, and comfort with advance directives. Patients were also surveyed about their attitudes regarding advance directives. Ten internal medicine residents and 88 patients participated. Residents' self-assessed knowledge rose from 6.0 to 9.2 on a 10-point Likert scale. Skills using advance directives increased from 4.0 to 7.9, attitudes improved from 6.0 to 8.4, and comfort rose from 5.4 to 8.9. Eighty-four percent of patients expressed interest in completing advance directives, and 16% actually completed documents. An educational intervention improved knowledge, skills, attitudes, and comfort with advance directives among internal medicine residents practicing in the outpatient setting. Meanwhile, patients demonstrated a strong interest in completing advance directives.

  9. Clinical review: surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Courtney, D

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent and locally advanced colorectal cancers frequently require en bloc resection of involved organs to achieve negative margins. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most current literature related to the surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  10. EGFR testing and clinical management of advanced NSCLC: a Galician Lung Cancer Group study (GGCP 048-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Vázquez,1 Joaquín Casal,2 Francisco Javier Afonso Afonso,3 José Luis Fírvida,4 Lucía Santomé,5 Francisco Barón,6 Martín Lázaro,7 Carolina Pena,7 Margarita Amenedo,8 Ihab Abdulkader,9 Carmen González-Arenas,10 Laura Fachal,11 Ana Vega11 On behalf of the Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP1Medical Oncology Department, Lucus Augusti University Hospital, Lugo, 2Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Pontevedra, 3Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ferrol, Ferrol, 4Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ourense, Ourense, 5Medical Oncology Department Povisa Hospital, Vigo, 6Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 7Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Complex of Pontevedra, Pontevedra, 8Medical Oncology Department, Oncology Center of Galicia, A Coruña, 9Anatomical Pathology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 10AstraZeneca, Madrid, 11Galician Public Foundation of Genomic Medicine-SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela Clinic Hospital, Santiago de Compostela, Spain Purpose: This study aimed to assess the incidence of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients in the Galician region of Spain and the clinical management and outcome of patients carrying EGFR mutations. Patients and methods: All newly diagnosed advanced or metastatic NSCLC patients were screened for EGFR mutations in matched tumor samples (tissue or cytology specimens and serum samples. Results: Of 198 patients screened for EGFR mutations in tumor samples, 184 had evaluable data and, of these, 25 (13.6% had EGFR mutations (84% sensitizing mutations. EGFR mutation was found in serum in 14 (8.1% patients (of 174 evaluable. Compared to matched tumor tissue, serum EGFR mutation testing specificity and sensitivity were 99% and 52

  11. Clinical experience of intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer is an intractable and serious pathosis, which directly aggravates patients' Quality of Life (QOL) and prognosis. We first select the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. From April 2009 to May 2012, we encountered 5 patients who developed secondary pneumothorax during treatment for advanced lung cancer. Their average age was 60.8 years old, and 4 of them had squamous cell carcinoma, 1 had adenocarcinoma, and all had unresectable advanced lung cancer. In 4 of them, the point of air leakage could be detected by pleurography, and leakage could be stopped by the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue. All of them could receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy after treatment for secondary pneumothorax. The intrapleural administration of fibrin glue may be an effective and valid treatment for intractable secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. (author)

  12. Clinical Effects for Patients with Recurrent Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Icotinib Hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingying NONG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Icotinib hydrochloride is the third single target EGFR-TKI used in clinical treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Clinical research reports on its efficacy and survival in patients with Recurrent Advanced NSCLC are still little.The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and survival of Icotinib hydrochloride for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who failed to previous chemotherapy and explore the association of clinical features with the efficacy and survival. Methods The clinical data of 60 NSCLC patients referred to the Beijing Chest Hospital, Capital Medical University from March 2009 to July 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Results The overall response rate (ORR was 45.0% and the disease control rate (DCR was 80.0%. The median progression-free survival (PFS time was 6.7 months. RR and PFS in female were superior to male (P=0.014, 0.013, respectively. RR, DCR in 2nd-line subgroup were superior to ≥3rd-line subgroup (P=0.020, 0.024, respectively. RR, DCR and PFS in EGFR mutation carriers were significantly superior to wild-type patients (P=0.006, <0.001, 0.002, respectively . There was no statistical difference in RR and PFS between those age <65 and ≥65 or PS<2 and PS≥2. There was no statistical difference in RR and DCR between exon 19 deletion and exon 21 mutations, while the former had much longer PFS (P=0.020. EGFR mutation and exon 19 deletion are the independent prognostic factors to significantly improve the PFS (P=0.009, 0.012, respectively. The side effects were generally mild and consisted of rash and diarrhea. Conclusion Icotinib hydrochloride is effective especially in EGFR mutation carriers and well tolerated in patients with recurrent advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

  13. Why mothers choose to enrol their children in malaria clinical studies and the involvement of relatives in decision making: evidence from Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiye, Francis; Kass, Nancy; Hyder, Adnan; Ndebele, Paul; Mfutso-Bengo, Joseph

    2008-06-01

    This study was aimed at researching the reasons why mothers enrol their children in malaria clinical research and how family members or relatives are involved in the decision-making process. Issues related to informed consent were also a particular focus of this study. A total of 81 participants took part in 8 focus group discussions. Thirty-nine participants were recruited from Blantyre, an urban setting, and forty-two participants were from Chikwawa, a rural setting. All the participants were mothers whose children had participated or were participating in the Intermittent Prevention Therapy post-discharge (IPTpd) Malaria Research. A majority of the participants reported that they chose to participate in the IPTpd research as a way of accessing better quality medical care. They also decided to enrol their children in order to benefit from the material and monetary incentives that were being given to participants for their participation. Most participants reported that they made the enrollment decisions on their own. They informed their family members/marital partners about their enrollment decisions after they had given their consent. A few made their enrollment decisions after consulting their family members. There was also a sense of trust in health workers who asked the potential participants to join the IPTpd research. Most participants decide to take part in malaria research because of better medical treatment. Partners and relatives play a very small role in the decision-making process of participants in malaria clinical research. Research participants'have a sense of trust in health workers who enrol them in clinical research.

  14. Evaluation of Nursing Documentation Completion of Stroke Patients in the Emergency Department: A Pre-Post Analysis Using Flowsheet Templates and Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Karen J; Sengstack, Patricia; Doucette, Jeffrey N; Hammond, William E; Schertz, Matthew; Thompson, Julie; Johnson, Constance

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of this performance improvement project was to determine whether the electronic health record implementation of stroke-specific nursing documentation flowsheet templates and clinical decision support alerts improved the nursing documentation of eligible stroke patients in seven stroke-certified emergency departments. Two system enhancements were introduced into the electronic record in an effort to improve nursing documentation: disease-specific documentation flowsheets and clinical decision support alerts. Using a pre-post design, project measures included six stroke management goals as defined by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and three clinical decision support measures based on entry of orders used to trigger documentation reminders for nursing: (1) the National Institutes of Health's Stroke Scale, (2) neurological checks, and (3) dysphagia screening. Data were reviewed 6 months prior (n = 2293) and 6 months following the intervention (n = 2588). Fisher exact test was used for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was found for documentation of five of the six stroke management goals, although effect sizes were small. Customizing flowsheets to meet the needs of nursing workflow showed improvement in the completion of documentation. The effects of the decision support alerts on the completeness of nursing documentation were not statistically significant (likely due to lack of order entry). For example, an order for the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was entered only 10.7% of the time, which meant no alert would fire for nursing in the postintervention group. Future work should focus on decision support alerts that trigger reminders for clinicians to place relevant orders for this population. PMID:26679006

  15. Analysis of the process of representing clinical statements for decision-support applications: a comparison of openEHR archetypes and HL7 virtual medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ferrer, A; Peleg, M; Marcos, M; Maldonado, J A

    2016-07-01

    Delivering patient-specific decision-support based on computer-interpretable guidelines (CIGs) requires mapping CIG clinical statements (data items, clinical recommendations) into patients' data. This is most effectively done via intermediate data schemas, which enable querying the data according to the semantics of a shared standard intermediate schema. This study aims to evaluate the use of HL7 virtual medical record (vMR) and openEHR archetypes as intermediate schemas for capturing clinical statements from CIGs that are mappable to electronic health records (EHRs) containing patient data and patient-specific recommendations. Using qualitative research methods, we analyzed the encoding of ten representative clinical statements taken from two CIGs used in real decision-support systems into two health information models (openEHR archetypes and HL7 vMR instances) by four experienced informaticians. Discussion among the modelers about each case study example greatly increased our understanding of the capabilities of these standards, which we share in this educational paper. Differing in content and structure, the openEHR archetypes were found to contain a greater level of representational detail and structure while the vMR representations took fewer steps to complete. The use of openEHR in the encoding of CIG clinical statements could potentially facilitate applications other than decision-support, including intelligent data analysis and integration of additional properties of data items from existing EHRs. On the other hand, due to their smaller size and fewer details, the use of vMR potentially supports quicker mapping of EHR data into clinical statements. PMID:27209183

  16. Perceived barriers of heart failure nurses and cardiologists in using clinical decision support systems in the treatment of heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vries, Arjen E. de; van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Nieuwenhuis, Maurice M. W.; Richard M. de Jong; Rene B. van Dijk; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans L; Jorna, Rene J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSSs) can support guideline adherence in heart failure (HF) patients. However, the use of CDSSs is limited and barriers in working with CDSSs have been described as a major obstacle. It is unknown if barriers to CDSSs are present and differ between HF nurses and cardiologists. Therefore the aims of this study are; 1. Explore the type and number of perceived barriers of HF nurses and cardiologists to use a CDSS in the treatment of HF patients. 2. ...

  17. Patient and primary care provider experience using a family health history collection, risk stratification, and clinical decision support tool: a type 2 hybrid controlled implementation-effectiveness trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, R. Ryanne; Orlando, Lori A.; Himmel, Tiffany L; Buchanan, Adam H; Powell, Karen P; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Agbaje, Astrid B; Henrich, Vincent C.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Family health history (FHH) is the single strongest predictor of disease risk and yet is significantly underutilized in primary care. We developed a patient facing FHH collection tool, MeTree©, that uses risk stratification to generate clinical decision support for breast cancer, colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, hereditary cancer syndromes, and thrombosis. Here we present data on the experience of patients and providers after integration of MeTree© into 2 primary care practices. ...

  18. Advance care planning - a multi-centre cluster randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rietjens, Judith A C; Korfage, Ida J; Dunleavy, Lesley;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Awareness of preferences regarding medical care should be a central component of the care of patients with advanced cancer. Open communication can facilitate this but can occur in an ad hoc or variable manner. Advance care planning (ACP) is a formalized process of communication between......, and improve their quality of life. METHODS/DESIGN: We will study the effects of the ACP program Respecting Choices on the quality of life of patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer. In a phase III multicenter cluster randomised controlled trial, 22 hospitals in 6 countries will be randomised...

  19. Use Of Clinical Decision Analysis In Predicting The Efficacy Of Newer Radiological Imaging Modalities: Radioscintigraphy Versus Single Photon Transverse Section Emission Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, John R.

    1982-12-01

    Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy have been shown to be useful measures of the clinical efficacy of diagnostic tests and can be used to predict the potential improvement in diagnostic certitude resulting from the introduction of a competing technology. This communication demonstrates how the informal use of clinical decision analysis may guide health planners in the allocation of resources, purchasing decisions, and implementation of high technology. For didactic purposes the focus is on a comparison between conventional planar radioscintigraphy (RS) and single photon transverse section emission conputed tomography (SPECT). For example, positive predictive accuracy (PPA) for brain RS in a specialist hospital with a 50% disease prevalance is about 95%. SPECT should increase this predicted accuracy to 96%. In a primary care hospital with only a 15% disease prevalance the PPA is only 77% and SPECT may increase this accuracy to about 79%. Similar calculations based on published data show that marginal improvements are expected with SPECT in the liver. It is concluded that: a) The decision to purchase a high technology imaging modality such as SPECT for clinical purposes should be analyzed on an individual organ system and institutional basis. High technology may be justified in specialist hospitals but not necessarily in primary care hospitals. This is more dependent on disease prevalance than procedure volume; b) It is questionable whether SPECT imaging will be competitive with standard RS procedures. Research should concentrate on the development of different medical applications.

  20. In utero stem cell transplantation and gene therapy: rationale, history, and recent advances toward clinical application

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida-Porada, Graça; Atala, Anthony; Porada, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput molecular testing have made it possible to diagnose most genetic disorders relatively early in gestation with minimal risk to the fetus. These advances should soon allow widespread prenatal screening for the majority of human genetic diseases, opening the door to the possibility of treatment/correction prior to birth. In addition to the obvious psychological and financial benefits of curing a disease in utero, and thereby enabling the birth of a healthy infa...