WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced chemical imaging

  1. Visualizing Chemistry: The Progess and Promise of Advanced Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Committee on Revealing Chemistry Through Advanced Chemical Imaging

    2006-09-01

    The field of chemical imaging can provide detailed structural, functional, and applicable information about chemistry and chemical engineering phenomena that have enormous impacts on medicine, materials, and technology. In recognizing the potential for more research development in the field of chemical imaging, the National Academies was asked by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, U.S. Army, and National Cancer Institute to complete a study that would review the current state of molecular imaging technology, point to promising future developments and their applications, and suggest a research and educational agenda to enable breakthrough improvements in the ability to image molecular processes simultaneously in multiple physical dimensions as well as time. The study resulted in a consensus report that provides guidance for a focused research and development program in chemical imaging and identifies research needs and possible applications of imaging technologies that can provide the breakthrough knowledge in chemistry, materials science, biology, and engineering for which we should strive. Public release of this report is expected in early October.

  2. Recent advances in chemical imaging technology for the detection of contaminants for food safety and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priore, Ryan J.; Olkhovyk, Oksana; Drauch, Amy; Treado, Patrick; Kim, Moon; Chao, Kaunglin

    2009-05-01

    The need for routine, non-destructive chemical screening of agricultural products is increasing due to the health hazards to animals and humans associated with intentional and unintentional contamination of foods. Melamine, an industrial additive used to increase flame retardation in the resin industry, has recently been used to increase the apparent protein content of animal feed, of infant formula, as well as powdered and liquid milk in the dairy industry. Such contaminants, even at regulated levels, pose serious health risks. Chemical imaging technology provides the ability to evaluate large volumes of agricultural products before reaching the consumer. In this presentation, recent advances in chemical imaging technology that exploit Raman, fluorescence and near-infrared (NIR) are presented for the detection of contaminants in agricultural products.

  3. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics. This volume explores: Quantum Dynamical Resonances in Ch

  4. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Prigogine, Ilya

    2009-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics.

  5. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  6. Advances in chemical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  7. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series presents contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study o

  8. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Chemical Physics is the only series of volumes available that explores the cutting edge of research in chemical physics. This is the only series of volumes available that presents the cutting edge of research in chemical physics.Includes contributions from experts in this field of research.Contains a representative cross-section of research that questions established thinking on chemical solutions.Structured with an editorial framework that makes the book an excellent supplement to an advanced graduate class in physical chemistry or chemical physics.

  9. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2008-01-01

    This series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. This stand-alone special topics volume reports recent advances in electron-transfer research with significant, up-to-date chapters by internationally recognized researchers.

  10. Advanced Chemical Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, L.

    2004-11-01

    Improving the performance and reliability characteristics of chemical propulsion systems requires research and testing of higher-performance propellants, higher efficiency thrusters, cryogenics technology, lightweight components and advancements in propulsion system design and assessment. Propellants are being investigated to identify practical combinations with higher efficiencies and better thermal properties to reduce thermal control requirements. This includes combinations with modest increases, such as LOX-hydrazine, as well as a new evaluation of major improvements available from fluorine-bearing oxidizers. Practical ways of implementing cryogenic propulsion to further increase efficiency are also being studied. Some potential advances include small pump-fed engines, and improvements in cryocooler technology and tank pressure control. Gelled propellants will be tested to determine the practicality of letting propellants freeze at low environmental temperatures and thawing them only when required for use. The propellant tank is typically the single highest non-expendable mass in a chemical propulsion system. Lightweight tank designs, materials and methods of fabrication are being investigated. These are projected to offer a 45-50 percent decrease in tank mass, representing the potential inert system mass savings. Mission and systems analyses are being conducted to guide the technology research and set priorities for technology investment, based on estimated gains in payload and mission capabilities. This includes development of advanced assessment tools and analyses of specific missions selected from Science Missions' Directorate. The goal is to mature a suite of reliable advanced propulsion technologies that will promote more cost efficient missions through the reduction of interplanetary trip time, increased scientific payload mass fraction and longer on-station operations. This talk will review the Advanced Chemical technology development roadmap, current

  11. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2007-01-01

    SAVO BRATOS, Laboratoire de Physique The´orique des Liquides Universite´ Pierre et Marie Curie, 75252 Paris Cedex, France MARK S. CHILD, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford, 0X1 3QZ, United Kingdom EVELYN M. GOLDFIELD, Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University of Michigan, 48202 USA STEPHEN K. GRAY, Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 USA VASSILIY LUBCHENKO, Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-5003 USA G. ALI MANSOORI, Departments of Biology and Chemical Engineering, University of

  12. Advanced laser image recorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramenopoulos, N; Hartfield, E D

    1972-12-01

    A laser image recorder is described, which is unique because of its advanced design and the state-of-the-art components employed to achieve high performance and versatility. The critical components are the pyramidal mirror scanner and the beam focusing lens. The scanner has a six-facet, beryllium mirror accurate to 0.33 sec of arc and rotating at 0-50,000 rpm on air bearings. A rapid change in speed is an important feature of this scanner. The focusing lens is diffraction limited with a flat field of 54 degrees , allowing a 90% duty cycle and the use of photographic film transported by a cylindrical drum. The lens converts the constant angular velocity of the reflected beam to a constant scanning velocity of the focused spot with a linearity of 0.05%. Maximum number of picture elements per line is 36,800 over a format of 228.6 mm. PMID:20119408

  13. Advanced biomedical image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    "This book covers the four major areas of image processing: Image enhancement and restoration, image segmentation, image quantification and classification, and image visualization. Image registration, storage, and compression are also covered. The text focuses on recently developed image processing and analysis operators and covers topical research"--Provided by publisher.

  14. Osteogenic sarcoma : imaging advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents are classification of osteosarcoma, radiographic appearance, radionuclide imaging, PET - positron emission tomography scanning, arteriography, computed tomography, MRI imaging, response of chemotherapy (43 refs.)

  15. Image restoration fundamentals and advances

    CERN Document Server

    Gunturk, Bahadir Kursat

    2012-01-01

    Image Restoration: Fundamentals and Advances responds to the need to update most existing references on the subject, many of which were published decades ago. Providing a broad overview of image restoration, this book explores breakthroughs in related algorithm development and their role in supporting real-world applications associated with various scientific and engineering fields. These include astronomical imaging, photo editing, and medical imaging, to name just a few. The book examines how such advances can also lead to novel insights into the fundamental properties of image sources. Addr

  16. Advances in alimentary tract imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Maglinte, Dean DT; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Tann, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Advances in imaging techniques are changing the way radiologists undertake imaging of the gastrointestinal tract and their ability to answer questions posed by surgeons. In this paper we discuss the technological improvements of imaging studies that have occurred in the last few years and how these help to better diagnosing alimentary tract disease.

  17. Chemical sensing and imaging with metallic nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Catherine J; Gole, Anand M; Hunyadi, Simona E; Stone, John W; Sisco, Patrick N; Alkilany, Alaaldin; Kinard, Brian E; Hankins, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    In this Feature Article, we examine recent advances in chemical analyte detection and optical imaging applications using gold and silver nanoparticles, with a primary focus on our own work. Noble metal nanoparticles have exciting physical and chemical properties that are entirely different from the bulk. For chemical sensing and imaging, the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles provide a wide range of opportunities, all of which ultimately arise from the collective oscillations of conduction band electrons ("plasmons") in response to external electromagnetic radiation. Nanorods have multiple plasmon bands compared to nanospheres. We identify four optical sensing and imaging modalities for metallic nanoparticles: (1) aggregation-dependent shifts in plasmon frequency; (2) local refractive index-dependent shifts in plasmon frequency; (3) inelastic (surface-enhanced Raman) light scattering; and (4) elastic (Rayleigh) light scattering. The surface chemistry of the nanoparticles must be tunable to create chemical specificity, and is a key requirement for successful sensing and imaging platforms. PMID:18209787

  18. Materials Advance Chemical Propulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In the future, the Planetary Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate hopes to use better-performing and lower-cost propulsion systems to send rovers, probes, and observers to places like Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. For such purposes, a new propulsion technology called the Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) was developed under NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project, located at Glenn Research Center. As an advanced chemical propulsion system, AMBR uses nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer and hydrazine fuel to propel a spacecraft. Based on current research and development efforts, the technology shows great promise for increasing engine operation and engine lifespan, as well as lowering manufacturing costs. In developing AMBR, ISPT has several goals: to decrease the time it takes for a spacecraft to travel to its destination, reduce the cost of making the propulsion system, and lessen the weight of the propulsion system. If goals like these are met, it could result in greater capabilities for in-space science investigations. For example, if the amount (and weight) of propellant required on a spacecraft is reduced, more scientific instruments (and weight) could be added to the spacecraft. To achieve AMBR s maximum potential performance, the engine needed to be capable of operating at extremely high temperatures and pressure. To this end, ISPT required engine chambers made of iridium-coated rhenium (strong, high-temperature metallic elements) that allowed operation at temperatures close to 4,000 F. In addition, ISPT needed an advanced manufacturing technique for better coating methods to increase the strength of the engine chamber without increasing the costs of fabricating the chamber.

  19. Advanced image memory architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercillo, Richard; McNeill, Kevin M.

    1994-05-01

    A workstation for radiographic images, known as the Arizona Viewing Console (AVC), was developed at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in the Department of Radiology. This workstation has been in use as a research tool to aid us in investigating how a radiologist interacts with a workstation, to determine which image processing features are required to aid the radiologist, to develop user interfaces and to support psychophysical and clinical studies. Results from these studies have show a need to increase the current image memory's available storage in order to accommodate high resolution images. The current triple-ported image memory can be allocated to store any number of images up to a combined total of 4 million pixels. Over the past couple of years, higher resolution images have become easier to generate with the advent of laser digitizers and computed radiology systems. As part of our research, a larger 32 million pixel image memory for AVC has been designed to replace the existing image memory.

  20. Tobacco and chemicals (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of the chemicals associated with tobacco smoke include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, propane, methane, acetone, hydrogen cyanide and various carcinogens. Other chemicals that are associated with chewing ...

  1. Modern Imaging Technology: Recent Advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Michael J.; Eckelman, William C.

    2004-06-18

    This 2-day conference is designed to bring scientist working in nuclear medicine, as well as nuclear medicine practitioners together to discuss the advances in four selected areas of imaging: Biochemical Parameters using Small Animal Imaging, Developments in Small Animal PET Imaging, Cell Labeling, and Imaging Angiogenesis Using Multiple Modality. The presentations will be on molecular imaging applications at the forefront of research, up to date on the status of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as in related imaging areas. Experts will discuss the basic science of imaging techniques, and scheduled participants will engage in an exciting program that emphasizes the current status of molecular imaging as well as the role of DOE funded research in this area.

  2. Modern Imaging Technology: Recent Advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 2-day conference is designed to bring scientist working in nuclear medicine, as well as nuclear medicine practitioners together to discuss the advances in four selected areas of imaging: Biochemical Parameters using Small Animal Imaging, Developments in Small Animal PET Imaging, Cell Labeling, and Imaging Angiogenesis Using Multiple Modality. The presentations will be on molecular imaging applications at the forefront of research, up to date on the status of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as in related imaging areas. Experts will discuss the basic science of imaging techniques, and scheduled participants will engage in an exciting program that emphasizes the current status of molecular imaging as well as the role of DOE funded research in this area

  3. Advances in chemical physics advances in liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Prigogine, Ilya; Vij, Jagdish K

    2009-01-01

    Prigogine and Rice's highly acclaimed series, Advances in Chemical Physics, provides a forum for critical, authoritative reviews of current topics in every area of chemical physics. Edited by J.K. Vij, this volume focuses on recent advances in liquid crystals with significant, up-to-date chapters authored by internationally recognized researchers in the field.

  4. Review of advanced imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathology informatics encompasses digital imaging and related applications. Several specialized microscopy techniques have emerged which permit the acquisition of digital images ("optical biopsies" at high resolution. Coupled with fiber-optic and micro-optic components, some of these imaging techniques (e.g., optical coherence tomography are now integrated with a wide range of imaging devices such as endoscopes, laparoscopes, catheters, and needles that enable imaging inside the body. These advanced imaging modalities have exciting diagnostic potential and introduce new opportunities in pathology. Therefore, it is important that pathology informaticists understand these advanced imaging techniques and the impact they have on pathology. This paper reviews several recently developed microscopic techniques, including diffraction-limited methods (e.g., confocal microscopy, 2-photon microscopy, 4Pi microscopy, and spatially modulated illumination microscopy and subdiffraction techniques (e.g., photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. This article serves as a primer for pathology informaticists, highlighting the fundamentals and applications of advanced optical imaging techniques.

  5. Java advanced medical image toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Java Advanced Medical Image Toolkit (jAMIT) has been developed at the Center for PET and Department of Nuclear Medicine in an effort to provide a suite of tools that can be utilised in applications required to perform analysis, processing and visualisation of medical images. jAMIT uses Java Advanced Imaging (JAI) to combine the platform independent nature of Java with the speed benefits associated with native code. The object-orientated nature of Java allows the production of an extensible and robust package which is easily maintained. In addition to jAMIT, a Medical Image VO API called Sushi has been developed to provide access to many commonly used image formats. These include DICOM, Analyze, MINC/NetCDF, Trionix, Beat 6.4, Interfile 3.2/3.3 and Odyssey. This allows jAMIT to access data and study information contained in different medical image formats transparently. Additional formats can be added at any time without any modification to the jAMIT package. Tools available in jAMIT include 2D ROI Analysis, Palette Thresholding, Image Groping, Image Transposition, Scaling, Maximum Intensity Projection, Image Fusion, Image Annotation and Format Conversion. Future tools may include 2D Linear and Non-linear Registration, PET SUV Calculation, 3D Rendering and 3D ROI Analysis. Applications currently using JAMIT include Antibody Dosimetry Analysis, Mean Hemispheric Blood Flow Analysis, QuickViewing of PET Studies for Clinical Training, Pharamcodynamic Modelling based on Planar Imaging, and Medical Image Format Conversion. The use of jAMIT and Sushi for scripting and analysis in Matlab v6.1 and Jython is currently being explored. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  6. Advances in multimodality molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidi Habib

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality molecular imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET combined with other modalities is now playing a pivotal role in basic and clinical research. The introduction of combined PET/CT systems in clinical setting has revolutionized the practice of diagnostic imaging. The complementarity between the intrinsically aligned anatomic (CT and functional or metabolic (PET information provided in a "one-stop shop" and the possibility to use CT images for attenuation correction of the PET data has been the driving force behind the success of this technology. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI in a single gantry is technically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of few preclinical PET systems and one human prototype dedicated for simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging. This paper discusses recent advances in PET instrumentation and the advantages and challenges of multimodality imaging systems. Future opportunities and the challenges facing the adoption of multimodality imaging instrumentation will also be addressed.

  7. Imaging spectrometer - An advanced multispectral imaging concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, J. B.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Kupferman, P. N.; Salazar, R.

    1982-01-01

    The concept of an imaging spectrometer, which is being studied as a potential Space Shuttle experiment, is evaluated as a 'push-broom' imager that includes a spectrometer to disperse each line of imaging information into its spectral components. Using this instrument, the dispersed energy falls upon a two-dimensional focal plane array that detects both spatial and spectral information. As the line field of view is advanced over the earth by the motion of the spacecraft, the focal plane is read out constantly, which produces 'push-broom' images at multiple wavelengths. Ground instantaneous fields of view of 10 m in the visual and 20 m in the infrared are provided by the system, at a spectral resolution of 20 nm over the range from 0.4-2.5 microns. The system utilizes a triple-pass Schmidt optical system with a mosaic focal plane. A subset of the data stream is selected and encoded for transmission by the use of onboard processing.

  8. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capellos, Christos

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the formal lectures and contributed papers presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on. the Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics. The meeting convened at the city of Iraklion, Crete, Greece on 25 August 1985 and continued to 7 September 1985. The material presented describes the fundamental and recent advances in experimental and theoretical aspects of, reaction dynamics. A large section is devoted to electronically excited states, ionic species, and free radicals, relevant to chemical sys­ tems. In addition recent advances in gas phase polymerization, formation of clusters, and energy release processes in energetic materials were presented. Selected papers deal with topics such as the dynamics of electric field effects in low polar solutions, high electric field perturbations and relaxation of dipole equilibria, correlation in picosecond/laser pulse scattering, and applications to fast reaction dynamics. Picosecond transient Raman spectroscopy which has been used for the elucidati...

  9. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  10. Multivariate Chemical Image Fusion of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, Aoife A; Dorrepaal, Ronan M

    2016-01-01

    Chemical image fusion refers to the combination of chemical images from different modalities for improved characterisation of a sample. Challenges associated with existing approaches include: difficulties with imaging the same sample area or having identical pixels across microscopic modalities, lack of prior knowledge of sample composition and lack of knowledge regarding correlation between modalities for a given sample. In addition, the multivariate structure of chemical images is often overlooked when fusion is carried out. We address these challenges by proposing a framework for multivariate chemical image fusion of vibrational spectroscopic imaging modalities, demonstrating the approach for image registration, fusion and resolution enhancement of chemical images obtained with IR and Raman microscopy. PMID:27384549

  11. Advances in imaging and electron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    1995-01-01

    Academic Press is pleased to announce the creation of Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics. This serial publication results from the merger of two long running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics will feature extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies,microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Continuation order customers for either of the original Advances will receiveVolume 90, the first combined volume.

  12. Advances in imaging and electron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mulvey, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Academic Press is pleased to announce the creation of Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics. This serial publication results from the merger of two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics will feature extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies,microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.

  13. Recent advances in imaging technologies in dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naseem; Shah; Nikhil; Bansal; Ajay; Logani

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry has witnessed tremendous advances in all its branches over the past three decades. With these advances, the need for more precise diagnostic tools,specially imaging methods, have become mandatory.From the simple intra-oral periapical X-rays, advanced imaging techniques like computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have also found place in modern dentistry. Changing from analogue to digital radiography has not only made the process simpler and faster but also made image storage, manipulation(brightness/contrast, image cropping, etc.) and retrieval easier. The three-dimensional imaging has made the complex cranio-facial structures more accessible for examination and early and accurate diagnosis of deep seated lesions. This paper is to review current advances in imaging technology and their uses in different disciplines of dentistry.

  14. Recent Advances and Applications of External Cavity-QCLs towards Hyperspectral Imaging for Standoff Detection and Real-Time Spectroscopic Sensing of Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Ostendorf

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available External-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL are now established as versatile wavelength-tunable light sources for analytical spectroscopy in the mid-infrared (MIR spectral range. We report on the realization of rapid broadband spectral tuning with kHz scan rates by combining a QCL chip with a broad gain spectrum and a resonantly driven micro-opto-electro-mechanical (MOEMS scanner with an integrated diffraction grating in Littrow configuration. The capability for real-time spectroscopic sensing based on MOEMS EC-QCLs is demonstrated by transmission measurements performed on polystyrene reference absorber sheets, as well as on hazardous substances, such as explosives. Furthermore, different applications for the EC-QCL technology in spectroscopic sensing are presented. These include the fields of process analysis with on- or even inline capability and imaging backscattering spectroscopy for contactless identification of solid and liquid contaminations on surfaces. Recent progress in trace detection of explosives and related precursors in relevant environments as well as advances in food quality monitoring by discriminating fresh and mold contaminated peanuts based on their MIR backscattering spectrum is shown.

  15. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy.

  16. Advances in Multimodality Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multimodality molecular imaging is now playing a pivotal role in clinical setting and biomedical research. Modern molecular imaging technologies are deemed to potentially lead to a revolutionary paradigm shift in healthcare and revolutionize clinical practice. Within the spectrum of macroscopic medical imaging, sensitivity ranges from the detection of millimolar to submillimolar concentrations of contrast media with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively, to picomolar concentrations in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission 8 9 tomography (PET): a 108-109 difference. Even though the introduction of dedicated dual-modality imaging systems designed specifically and available commercially for clinical practice is relatively recent, the concept of combining anatomical and functional imaging has been recognized for several decades. Software- and hardware-based correlation between anatomical (x-ray CT, MRI) and physiological (PET) information is a promising research field and now offers unique capabilities for the medical imaging community and biomedical researchers. The introduction of dual-modality PET/CT imaging systems in clinical environments has revolutionized the practice of diagnostic imaging. The complementarity between the intrinsically aligned anatomic (CT) and functional or metabolic (PET) information provided in a 'one-stop shop' and the possibility to use CT images for attenuation correction of the PET data has been the driving force behind the success of this technology. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in a single gantry is technically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of few preclinical PET systems and one human prototype dedicated for simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging where the first patient images have been shown late in 2006. This paper discusses the

  17. Imaging of the pituitary: Recent advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Chaudhary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary lesions, albeit relatively infrequent, can significantly alter the quality of life. This article highlights the role of advanced imaging modalities in evaluating pituitary-hypothalamic axis lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the examination of choice for evaluating hypothalamic-pituitary-related endocrine diseases. Advanced MR techniques discussed in this article include dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, 3T MRI, magnetization transfer (MT imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, proton MR spectroscopy, fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, intraoperative MRI, and intraoperative real-time ultrasonography.

  18. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  19. Recent Advancements in Microwave Imaging Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Park; C.C. Chang; B.H. Deng; C.W. Domier; A.J.H. Donni; K. Kawahata; C. Liang; X.P. Liang; H.J. Lu; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; A. Mase; H. Matsuura; E. Mazzucato; A. Miura; K. Mizuno; T. Munsat; K. and Y. Nagayama; M.J. van de Pol; J. Wang; Z.G. Xia; W-K. Zhang

    2002-03-26

    Significant advances in microwave and millimeter wave technology over the past decade have enabled the development of a new generation of imaging diagnostics for current and envisioned magnetic fusion devices. Prominent among these are revolutionary microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), microwave phase imaging interferometers, imaging microwave scattering and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) systems for imaging electron temperature and electron density fluctuations (both turbulent and coherent) and profiles (including transport barriers) on toroidal devices such as tokamaks, spherical tori, and stellarators. The diagnostic technology is reviewed, and typical diagnostic systems are analyzed. Representative experimental results obtained with these novel diagnostic systems are also presented.

  20. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  1. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-10-25

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  2. Desktop supercomputers. Advance medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisiello, R S

    1991-02-01

    Medical imaging tools that radiologists as well as a wide range of clinicians and healthcare professionals have come to depend upon are emerging into the next phase of functionality. The strides being made in supercomputing technologies--including reduction of size and price--are pushing medical imaging to a new level of accuracy and functionality.

  3. Advanced Imaging Algorithms for Radiation Imaging Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The intent of the proposed work, in collaboration with University of Michigan, is to develop the algorithms that will bring the analysis from qualitative images to quantitative attributes of objects containing SNM. The first step to achieving this is to develop an indepth understanding of the intrinsic errors associated with the deconvolution and MLEM algorithms. A significant new effort will be undertaken to relate the image data to a posited three-dimensional model of geometric primitives that can be adjusted to get the best fit. In this way, parameters of the model such as sizes, shapes, and masses can be extracted for both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. This model-based algorithm will need the integrated response of a hypothesized configuration of material to be calculated many times. As such, both the MLEM and the model-based algorithm require significant increases in calculation speed in order to converge to solutions in practical amounts of time.

  4. Arthritis: Conventional and Advanced Radiological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adviye Ergun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides are acute or chronic inflammation of one or more joints. The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, but there are more than 100 different forms. Right and early diagnosis is extremely important for the prevention of eventual structural and functional disability of the affected joint. Imaging findings, especially those of advanced level imaging, play a major role in diagnosis and monitor the progression of arthritis or its response to therapy. The objective of the review is to discuss the findings of conventional and advanced radiological imaging of most common arthritides and to present a simplified approach for their radiological evaluation.

  5. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    The main purpose of the PhD project was to develop methods that increase the 3-D ultrasound imaging quality available for the medical personnel in the clinic. Acquiring a 3-D volume gives the medical doctor the freedom to investigate the measured anatomy in any slice desirable after the scan has...... beamforming. This is achieved partly because synthetic aperture imaging removes the limitation of a fixed transmit focal depth and instead enables dynamic transmit focusing. Lately, the major ultrasound companies have produced ultrasound scanners using 2-D transducer arrays with enough transducer elements...

  6. Advances in noninvasive functional imaging of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Sheng-Min; Wu, Ya-Na; Wu, Ping-Ching; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Lin, Ruey-Mo

    2014-02-01

    The demand for functional imaging in clinical medicine is comprehensive. Although the gold standard for the functional imaging of human bones in clinical settings is still radionuclide-based imaging modalities, nonionizing noninvasive imaging technology in small animals has greatly advanced in recent decades, especially the diffuse optical imaging to which Britton Chance made tremendous contributions. The evolution of imaging probes, instruments, and computation has facilitated exploration in the complicated biomedical research field by allowing longitudinal observation of molecular events in live cells and animals. These research-imaging tools are being used for clinical applications in various specialties, such as oncology, neuroscience, and dermatology. The Bone, a deeply located mineralized tissue, presents a challenge for noninvasive functional imaging in humans. Using nanoparticles (NP) with multiple favorable properties as bioimaging probes has provided orthopedics an opportunity to benefit from these noninvasive bone-imaging techniques. This review highlights the historical evolution of radionuclide-based imaging, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, diffuse optics-enabled in vivo technologies, vibrational spectroscopic imaging, and a greater potential for using NPs for biomedical imaging. PMID:24439341

  7. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES (AOP'S FOR THE TREATMENT OF CCL CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on treatment of Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) chemicals is being conducted. Specific groups of contaminants on the CCL will be evaluated using numerous advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Initially, these CCL contaminants will be evaluated in groups based on chemical...

  8. Advanced Imaging of Chiari 1 Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Akbar; Shah, Manish N; Goyal, Manu S

    2015-10-01

    Type I Chiari malformations are congenital deformities involving cerebellar tonsillar herniation downward through the foramen magnum. Structurally, greater than 5 mm of tonsillar descent in adults and more than 6 mm in children is consistent with type I Chiari malformations. However, the radiographic severity of the tonsillar descent does not always correlate well with the clinical symptomatology. Advanced imaging can help clinically correlate imaging to symptoms. Specifically, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow abnormalities are seen in patients with type I Chiari malformation. Advanced MRI involving cardiac-gated and phase-contrast MRI affords a view of such CSF flow abnormalities. PMID:26408061

  9. IMAGE AUTHENTICATION TECHNIQUES AND ADVANCES SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derroll David

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the advanced technologies in the area of Engineering the World has become a smaller place and communication is in our finger tips. The multimedia sharing traffic through electronic media has increased tremendously in the recent years with the higher use of social networking sites. The statistics of amount of images uploaded in the internet per day is very huge. Digital Image security has become vulnerable due to increase transmission over non-secure channel and needs protection. Digital Images play a crucial role in medical and military images etc. and any tampering of them is a serious issue. Several approaches are introduced to authenticate multimedia images. These approaches can be categorized into fragile and semi-fragile watermarking, conventional cryptography and digital signatures based on the image content. The aim of this paper is to provide a comparative study and also a survey of emerging techniques for image authentication. The important requirements for an efficient image authentication system design are discussed along with the classification of image authentication into tamper detection, localization and reconstruction and robustness against image processing operation. Furthermore, the concept of image content based authentication is enlightened.

  10. Chemically Sensitive Imaging of MgP with STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Li, Shaowei; Czap, Greg; Ho, Wilson

    2014-03-01

    Since its invention, the STM has been limited by its lack of sensitivity to chemical structures in molecules. Recent advances in scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as non-contact AFM and scanning tunneling hydrogen microscopy have enabled imaging of the internal structure and bonding of aromatic molecules such as pentacene and PTCDA. Here, we present a novel method of using the STM to image magnesium porphyrin molecules adsorbed on Au(110) with chemical sensitivity. In our previous study, we have shown that hydrogen molecules weakly adsorb on Au(110), exhibiting both vibrational and rotational IETS spectra. Exploiting the sensitivity of the vibrational and rotational mode energies to the local chemical environment, we perform dI/dV and d2I/dV2 imaging at different bias voltages, highlighting the various parts of the MgP molecule. In particular, we are able to image the positions of the nitrogen atoms in MgP. d2I/dV2 spectral mapping reveals that the origin of the chemical sensitivity comes from an energy shift of the rotational peak as the tip is scanned across the molecule, indicating a changing potential landscape for the H2. Similar d2I/dV2 imaging with a CO terminated tip reveals no chemical sensitivity to nitrogen.

  11. Advanced seismic imaging for geothermal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, John [UNR; Pullammanappallil, Satish [Optim; Honjas, Bill [Optim

    2016-08-01

    J. N. Louie, Pullammanappallil, S., and Honjas, W., 2011, Advanced seismic imaging for geothermal development: Proceedings of the New Zealand Geothermal Workshop 2011, Nov. 21-23, Auckland, paper 32, 7 pp. Preprint available at http://crack.seismo.unr.edu/geothermal/Louie-NZGW11.pdf

  12. Advanced imaging and visualization in gastrointestinal disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Odd Helge Gilja; Jan G Hatlebakk; Svein φdegaard; Arnold Bersta; Ivan Viola; Christopher Giertsen; Trygve Hausken; Hans Gregersen

    2007-01-01

    Advanced medical imaging and visualization has a strong impact on research and clinical decision making in gastroenterology. The aim of this paper is to show how imaging and visualization can disclose structural and functional abnormalities of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.Imaging methods such as ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopy, endosonography,and elastography will be outlined and visualization with Virtual Reality and haptic methods. Ultrasonography is a versatile method that can be used to evaluate antral contractility, gastric emptying, transpyloric flow, gastric configuration, intragastric distribution of meals, gastric accommodation and strain measurement of the gastric wall. Advanced methods for endoscopic ultrasound,three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, and tissue Doppler (Strain Rate Imaging) provide detailed information of the GI tract. Food hypersensitivity reactions including gastrointestinal reactions due to food allergy can be visualized by ultrasonography and MRI. Development of multi-parametric and multi-modal imaging may increase diagnostic benefits and facilitate fusion of diagnostic and therapeutic imaging in the future.

  13. Terahertz Tools Advance Imaging for Security, Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Picometrix, a wholly owned subsidiary of Advanced Photonix Inc. (API), of Ann Arbor, Michigan, invented the world s first commercial terahertz system. The company improved the portability and capabilities of their systems through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements with Langley Research Center to provide terahertz imaging capabilities for inspecting the space shuttle external tanks and orbiters. Now API s systems make use of the unique imaging capacity of terahertz radiation on manufacturing floors, for thickness measurements of coatings, pharmaceutical tablet production, and even art conservation.

  14. Advanced endoscopic imaging to improve adenomadetection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helmut Neumann; Andreas N?gel; Andrea Buda

    2015-01-01

    Advanced endoscopic imaging is revolutionizing ourway on how to diagnose and treat colorectal lesions.Within recent years a variety of modern endoscopicimaging techniques was introduced to improveadenoma detection rates. Those include high-definitionimaging, dye-less chromoendoscopy techniques andnovel, highly flexible endoscopes, some of themequipped with balloons or multiple lenses in order toimprove adenoma detection rates. In this review wewill focus on the newest developments in the field ofcolonoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detectionrates. Described techniques include high-definitionimaging, optical chromoendoscopy techniques, virtualchromoendoscopy techniques, the Third Eye Retroscopeand other retroviewing devices, the G-EYE endoscopeand the Full Spectrum Endoscopy-system.

  15. Image stabilization for SWIR advanced optoelectronic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru; Granciu, Dana

    2015-02-01

    At long ranges and under low visibility conditions, Advanced Optoelectronic Device provides the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in the Short-wave Infra-red - SWIR (wavelengths between 1,1 ÷2,5 μm), significantly better than in the near wave infrared - NWIR and visible spectral bands [1,2]. The quality of image is nearly independent of the polarization in the incoming light, but it is influenced by the relative movement between the optical system and the observer (the operators' handshake), and the movement towards the support system (land and air vehicles). All these make it difficult to detect objectives observation in real time. This paper presents some systems enhance which the ability of observation and sighting through the optical systems without the use of the stands, tripods or other means. We have to eliminate the effect of "tremors of the hands" and the vibration in order to allow the use of optical devices by operators on the moving vehicles on land, on aircraft, or on boats, and to provide additional comfort for the user to track the moving object through the optical system, without losing the control in the process of detection and tracking. The practical applications of stabilization image process, in SWIR, are the most advanced part of the optical observation systems available worldwide [3,4,5]. This application has a didactic nature, because it ensures understanding by the students about image stabilization and their participation in research.

  16. Recent advances in imaging in Parkinson disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite recent knowledge on the pathophysiology of Parkinson disease, the precise and early diagnosis of this condition remains difficult. Advances in imaging techniques have enabled the assessment of in vivo structural, neurometabolic, and neurochemical changes in Parkinson disease, and their role as biomarkers have assumed greater importance in recent years. We presently review the various approaches with these imaging techniques for the study of Parkinson disease. Voxel-based morphometry studies with structural MRI showed a characteristic pattern of gray matter loss, and fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) studies have indicated latent network abnormalities in Parkinson disease. Moreover, radiotracer imaging with dopaminergic markers facilitates the assessment of pre- and postsynaptic nigro-striatal integrity, and other radiotracers have been used in the studies of nondopaminergic neurotransmitter systems, such as the cholinergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic systems. These imaging techniques can be used to detect presymptomatic disease and to monitor disease progression. Thus, imaging data provide meaningful insights into the pathological process in Parkinson disease. (author)

  17. Towards advanced chemical microsensors-an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewski, W; Dybko, A; Malinowska, E; Brzózka, Z

    2004-05-10

    The paper presents design and performance of miniaturized chemical sensors based on silicon transducers: ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) and solid-state electrode (SSE). The sensors were fabricated as back-side contact structures, which facilitate their mounting in a flow-cell. The role of an intermediate layer between the transducer and the ion-selective membrane is discussed. Various polymeric matrices were used to manufacture microsensors: polysiloxanes, polyacrylates (polymethacrylates), polyurethanes. PMID:18969402

  18. Radar foundations for imaging and advanced concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Through courses internally taught at IDA, Dr. Roger Sullivan has devised a book that brings readers fully up to speed on the most essential quantitave aspects of general radar in order to introduce study of the most exciting and relevant applications to radar imaging and advanced concepts: Synthetic Aperture Radar (4 chapters), Space-time Adaptive Processing, moving target indication (MTI), bistatic radar, low probability of intercept (LPI) radar, weather radar, and ground-penetrating radar. Whether you're a radar novice or experienced professional, this is an essential refer

  19. Advances in Imaging for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last fifteen years, our understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF) has paved the way for ablation to be utilized as an effective treatment option. With the aim of gaining more detailed anatomical representation, advances have been made using various imaging modalities, both before and during the ablation procedure, in planning and execution. Options have flourished from procedural fluoroscopy, electro anatomic mapping systems, pre procedural computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and combinations of these technologies. Exciting work is underway in an effort to allow the electro physiologist to assess scar formation in real time. One advantage would be to lessen the learning curve for what are very complex procedures. The hope of these developments is to improve the likelihood of a successful ablation procedure and to allow more patients access to this treatment

  20. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  1. Chemical changes during extrusion cooking. Recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camire, M E

    1998-01-01

    Cooking extruders process a variety of foods, feeds, and industrial materials. Greater flexibility in product development with extruders depends upon understanding chemical reactions that occur within the extruder barrel and at the die. Starch gelatinization and protein denautration are the most important reactions during extrusion. Proteins, starches, and non-starch polysaccharides can fragment, creating reactive molecules that may form new linkages not found in nature. Vitamin stability varies with vitamin structure, extrusion conditions, and food matrix composition. Little is known about the effects of extrusion parameters on phytochemical bioavailability and stability. Reactive extrusion to create new flavor, antioxidant and color compounds will be an area of interest in the future.

  2. Advanced imaging of the scapholunate ligamentous complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabpour, Maryam; Staelens, Barbara; Van Overstraeten, Luc; De Maeseneer, Michel; Boulet, Cedric; De Mey, Johan; Scheerlinck, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    The scapholunate joint is one of the most involved in wrist injuries. Its stability depends on primary and secondary stabilisers forming together the scapholunate complex. This ligamentous complex is often evaluated by wrist arthroscopy. To avoid surgery as diagnostic procedure, optimization of MR imaging parameters as use of three-dimensional (3D) sequences with very thin slices and high spatial resolution, is needed to detect lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the scapholunate complex. The paper reviews the literature on imaging of radial-sided carpal ligaments with advanced computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) to evaluate the scapholunate complex. Anatomy and pathology of the ligamentous complex are described and illustrated with CTA, MRA and corresponding arthroscopy. Sprains, mid-substance tears, avulsions and fibrous infiltrations of carpal ligaments could be identified on CTA and MRA images using 3D fat-saturated PD and 3D DESS (dual echo with steady-state precession) sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices. Imaging signs of scapholunate complex pathology include: discontinuity, nonvisualization, changes in signal intensity, contrast extravasation (MRA), contour irregularity and waviness and periligamentous infiltration by edema, granulation tissue or fibrosis. Based on this preliminary experience, we believe that 3 T MRA using 3D sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices and multiplanar reconstructions is capable to evaluate the scapholunate complex and could help to reduce the number of diagnostic arthroscopies.

  3. Advanced imaging of the scapholunate ligamentous complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabpour, Maryam; Maeseneer, Michel de; Boulet, Cedric; Mey, Johan de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Staelens, Barbara; Scheerlinck, Thierry [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Brussels (Belgium); Overstraeten, Luc van [Hand and Foot Surgery Unit (HFSU), Tournai (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The scapholunate joint is one of the most involved in wrist injuries. Its stability depends on primary and secondary stabilisers forming together the scapholunate complex. This ligamentous complex is often evaluated by wrist arthroscopy. To avoid surgery as diagnostic procedure, optimization of MR imaging parameters as use of three-dimensional (3D) sequences with very thin slices and high spatial resolution, is needed to detect lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the scapholunate complex. The paper reviews the literature on imaging of radial-sided carpal ligaments with advanced computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) to evaluate the scapholunate complex. Anatomy and pathology of the ligamentous complex are described and illustrated with CTA, MRA and corresponding arthroscopy. Sprains, mid-substance tears, avulsions and fibrous infiltrations of carpal ligaments could be identified on CTA and MRA images using 3D fat-saturated PD and 3D DESS (dual echo with steady-state precession) sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices. Imaging signs of scapholunate complex pathology include: discontinuity, nonvisualization, changes in signal intensity, contrast extravasation (MRA), contour irregularity and waviness and periligamentous infiltration by edema, granulation tissue or fibrosis. Based on this preliminary experience, we believe that 3 T MRA using 3D sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices and multiplanar reconstructions is capable to evaluate the scapholunate complex and could help to reduce the number of diagnostic arthroscopies. (orig.)

  4. Advanced techniques in digital mammographic images recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer Aided Detection and Diagnosis is used in digital radiography as a second thought in the process of determining diagnoses, which reduces the percentage of wrong diagnoses of the established interpretation of mammographic images. The issues that are discussed in the dissertation are the analyses and improvement of advanced technologies in the field of artificial intelligence, more specifically in the field of machine learning for solving diagnostic problems and automatic detection of speculated lesions in digital mammograms. The developed of SVM-based ICAD system with cascade architecture for analyses and comparison mammographic images in both projections (CC and MLO) gives excellent result for detection and masses and microcalcifications. In order to develop a system with optimal performances of sensitivity, specificity and time complexity, a set of relevant characteristics need to be created which will show all the pathological regions that might be present in the mammographic image. The structure of the mammographic image, size and the large number of pathological structures in this area are the reason why the creation of a set of these features is necessary for the presentation of good indicators. These pathological structures are a real challenge today and the world of science is working in that direction. The doctoral dissertation showed that the system has optimal results, which are confirmed by experts, and institutions, which are dealing with these same issues. Also, the thesis presents a new approach for automatic identification of regions of interest in the mammographic image where regions of interest are automatically selected for further processing mammography in cases when the number of examined patients is higher. Out of 480 mammographic images downloaded from MIAS database and tested with ICAD system the author shows that, after separation and selection of relevant features of ICAD system the accuracy is 89.7% (96.4% for microcalcifications

  5. Nanoscale chemical imaging by photoinduced force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek; Morrison, William; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Jahng, Junghoon; Potma, Eric; Wan, Lei; Ruiz, Ricardo; Albrecht, Thomas R.; Schmidt, Kristin; Frommer, Jane; Sanders, Daniel P.; Park, Sung

    2016-01-01

    Correlating spatial chemical information with the morphology of closely packed nanostructures remains a challenge for the scientific community. For example, supramolecular self-assembly, which provides a powerful and low-cost way to create nanoscale patterns and engineered nanostructures, is not easily interrogated in real space via existing nondestructive techniques based on optics or electrons. A novel scanning probe technique called infrared photoinduced force microscopy (IR PiFM) directly measures the photoinduced polarizability of the sample in the near field by detecting the time-integrated force between the tip and the sample. By imaging at multiple IR wavelengths corresponding to absorption peaks of different chemical species, PiFM has demonstrated the ability to spatially map nm-scale patterns of the individual chemical components of two different types of self-assembled block copolymer films. With chemical-specific nanometer-scale imaging, PiFM provides a powerful new analytical method for deepening our understanding of nanomaterials. PMID:27051870

  6. Neurolight -astonishing advances in brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojczyk-Gołębiewska, Ewa; Pałasz, Artur; Worthington, John J; Markowski, Grzegorz; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, significant advances in basic neuroanatomical studies have taken place. Moreover, such classical, clinically-oriented human brain imaging methods such as MRI, PET and DTI have been applied to small laboratory animals allowing improvement in current experimental neuroscience. Contemporary structural neurobiology also uses various technologies based on fluorescent proteins. One of these is optogenetics, which integrates physics, genetics and bioengineering to enable temporal precise control of electrical activity of specific neurons. Another important challenge in the field is the accurate imaging of complicated neural networks. To address this problem, three-dimensional reconstruction techniques and retrograde labeling with modified viruses has been developed. However, a revolutionary step was the invention of the "Brainbow" system, utilizing gene constructs including the sequences of fluorescent proteins and the usage of Cre recombinase to create dozens of colour combinations, enabling visualization of neurons and their connections in extremely high resolution. Furthermore, the newly- introduced CLARITY method should make it possible to visualize three-dimensionally the structure of translucent brain tissue using the hydrogel polymeric network. This original technique is a big advance in neuroscience creating novel viewpoints completely different than standard glass slide immunostaining.

  7. Thermodynamics an advanced textbook for chemical engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Astarita, Gianni

    1989-01-01

    If a Writer would know how to behave himself with relation to Posterity; let him consider in old Books, what he finds, that he is glad to know; and what Omissions he most laments. Jonathan Swift This book emerges from a long story of teaching. I taught chemical engineering thermodynamics for about ten years at the University of Naples in the 1960s, and I still remember the awkwardness that I felt about any textbook I chose to consider-all of them seemed to be vague at best, and the standard of logical rigor seemed immensely inferior to what I could find in books on such other of the students in my first class subjects as calculus and fluid mechanics. One (who is now Prof. F. Gioia of the University of Naples) once asked me a question which I have used here as Example 4. 2-more than 20 years have gone by, and I am still waiting for a more intelligent question from one of my students. At the time, that question compelled me to answer in a way I didn't like, namely "I'll think about it, and I hope I'll have the ...

  8. Recent advances of MIBG imaging in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of cardiovascular function both in healthy subjects and in patients with heart disease. Cardiac neurotransmission imaging allows in vivo noninvasive assessment of presynaptic storage, release and reuptake of neurotransmitters. Iodine-123 labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an analogue of the sympatholytic agent guanethidine and behaves in a manner that is similar to norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system in the heart. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of MIBG uptake and washout kinetics has evaluated alterations of the cardiac sympathetic function in various heart diseases, such as cardiomyopathies, coronary artery disease, diabetic heart and arrhythmias. As reduced MIBG uptake has been related to the clinical indices of severity and prognosis, it can be used to evaluate the therapeutic effects on the cardiac sympathetic dysfunction. For example, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and β-blockers which have been shown to improve functional capacity and prognosis in patients with heart failure, have been demonstrated to increase MIBG uptake and reduce its washout rate in these patients, indicating favorable effects on the sympathetic nervous system. Thus, MIBG imaging has become a promising noninvasive tool and a widely available modality for the assessment of prognosis and effects of medical therapy in various forms of cardiac pathology. The usefulness and recent advances of MIBG imaging in cardiology will be noted in this article. (author)

  9. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  10. Imaging advances in upper cervical vertebral disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upper cervical vertebral has complex anatomic structure and some diseases may involve this vital center area of human body. Most of the diseases, such as trauma, malformation, and degeneration, need to be treated with surgery to recover the function of cervical vertebral. The accurate evaluation is crucial before and after the surgery. In the past few years, CT, MRI, and ultra-sound play important roles in the evaluation of upper cervical vertebral diseases and planning treatment. Comprehensive evaluation with multidisciplinary approach is advocated. In this paper we reviewed the anatomy and clinic treatments; summarized the latest imaging advances in upper cervical vertebral disease; discussed the perspective of comprehensive evaluation with multidisciplinary approach. (authors)

  11. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  12. Recent Advances in Morphological Cell Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyong Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the recent advances in image processing methods for morphological cell analysis. The topic of morphological analysis has received much attention with the increasing demands in both bioinformatics and biomedical applications. Among many factors that affect the diagnosis of a disease, morphological cell analysis and statistics have made great contributions to results and effects for a doctor. Morphological cell analysis finds the cellar shape, cellar regularity, classification, statistics, diagnosis, and so forth. In the last 20 years, about 1000 publications have reported the use of morphological cell analysis in biomedical research. Relevant solutions encompass a rather wide application area, such as cell clumps segmentation, morphological characteristics extraction, 3D reconstruction, abnormal cells identification, and statistical analysis. These reports are summarized in this paper to enable easy referral to suitable methods for practical solutions. Representative contributions and future research trends are also addressed.

  13. Advanced Color Image Processing and Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume does much more than survey modern advanced color processing. Starting with a historical perspective on ways we have classified color, it sets out the latest numerical techniques for analyzing and processing colors, the leading edge in our search to accurately record and print what we see. The human eye perceives only a fraction of available light wavelengths, yet we live in a multicolor world of myriad shining hues. Colors rich in metaphorical associations make us “purple with rage” or “green with envy” and cause us to “see red.” Defining colors has been the work of centuries, culminating in today’s complex mathematical coding that nonetheless remains a work in progress: only recently have we possessed the computing capacity to process the algebraic matrices that reproduce color more accurately. With chapters on dihedral color and image spectrometers, this book provides technicians and researchers with the knowledge they need to grasp the intricacies of today’s color imaging.

  14. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  15. Fast infrared chemical imaging with a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kevin; Kenkel, Seth; Liu, Jui-Nung; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm(-1)) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues. PMID:25474546

  16. A Bright Future for Precision Medicine: Advances in Fluorescent Chemical Probe Design and Their Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Megan; Yim, Joshua J; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-21

    The Precision Medicine Initiative aims to use advances in basic and clinical research to develop therapeutics that selectively target and kill cancer cells. Under the same doctrine of precision medicine, there is an equally important need to visualize these diseased cells to enable diagnosis, facilitate surgical resection, and monitor therapeutic response. Therefore, there is a great opportunity for chemists to develop chemically tractable probes that can image cancer in vivo. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of optical probes, as well as their current and future applications in the clinical management of cancer. The progress in probe development described here suggests that optical imaging is an important and rapidly developing field of study that encourages continued collaboration among chemists, biologists, and clinicians to further refine these tools for interventional surgical imaging, as well as for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26933740

  17. Space-Ready Advanced Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II effort Toyon will increase the state-of-the-art for video/image systems. This will include digital image compression algorithms as well as system...

  18. Optics for Advanced Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncton, David E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Khaykovich, Boris [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    During the report period, we continued the work as outlined in the original proposal. We have analyzed potential optical designs of Wolter mirrors for the neutron-imaging instrument VENUS, which is under construction at SNS. In parallel, we have conducted the initial polarized imaging experiment at Helmholtz Zentrum, Berlin, one of very few of currently available polarized-imaging facilities worldwide.

  19. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  20. Nanotechnology for Advanced Imaging and Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our first objective is that of nanostructured devices for advanced light detection.  Our periodic structures exhibit absorptive (nano-antenna) and reflective...

  1. Advanced Imaging Modalities in the Detection of Cerebral Vasospasm

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Jena N.; Vivek Mehta; Jonathan Russin; Amar, Arun P.; Anandh Rajamohan; William J. Mack

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is complex and is not entirely understood. Mechanistic insights have been gained through advances in the capabilities of diagnostic imaging. Core techniques have focused on the assessment of vessel caliber, tissue metabolism, and/or regional perfusion parameters. Advances in imaging have provided clinicians with a multifaceted approach to assist in the detection of cerebral vasospasm and the diagnosis...

  2. Advances in boron-10 isotope separation by chemical exchange distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Shuang, E-mail: chengruoyu2@sina.co [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Mu Yujun; Li Xiaofeng; Bai Peng [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Advances in boron-10 isotope separation by chemical exchange distillation are reviewed in this article. With a brief introduction of the principle of the separation, the progress on the research of this method and the problems relating to the separation coefficient are discussed. Several new donors, including nitromethane, acetone, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and diisobutyl ketone (DIBK), which have large separation factors are introduced. The complexes of these new donors and boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}) are more stable than those of using the donors examined before. Among these new donors nitromethane could be a promising substitute for donors in present use to develop new technology of separating boron-10.

  3. Advanced Imaging Technology Other than Narrow Band Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jun-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    To improve the detection rate of gastrointestinal tumors, image-enhanced endoscopy has been widely used during screening and surveillance endoscopy in Korea. In addition to narrow band imaging (NBI) with/without magnification, various types of electronic chromoendoscopies have been used, including autofluorescence imaging, I-scan, and flexible spectral imaging color enhancement. These technologies enable the accurate characterization of tumors because they enable visualization of microvascula...

  4. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrymgeour, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boye, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Adelsberger, Kathleen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  5. Nonlinear optical imaging: toward chemical imaging during neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tobias; Dietzek, Benjamin; Krafft, Christoph; Romeike, Bernd F. M.; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Popp, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    Tumor recognition and precise tumor margin detection presents a central challenge during neurosurgery. In this contribution we present our recent all-optical approach to tackle this problem. We introduce various nonlinear optical techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPEF), to study the morphology and chemical composition of (ex vivo) brain tissue. As the experimental techniques presented are contact-free all-optical techniques, which do not rely on the administration of external (fluorescence) labels, we anticipate that their implementation into surgical microscopes will provide significant advantages of intraoperative tumor diagnosis. In this contribution an introduction to the different optical spectroscopic methods will be presented and their implementation into a multimodal microscopic setup will be discussed. Furthermore, we will exemplify their application to brain tissue, i.e. both pig brain as a model for healthy brain tissue and human brain samples taken from surgical procedures. The data to be discussed show the capability of a joint CARS/SHG/TPEF multimodal imaging approach in highlighting various aspects of tissue morphochemistry. The consequences of this microspectroscopic potential, when combined with the existing technology of surgical microscopes, will be discussed.

  6. Combining advanced imaging processing and low cost remote imaging capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Matthew J.; McQuiddy, Brian

    2008-04-01

    Target images are very important for evaluating the situation when Unattended Ground Sensors (UGS) are deployed. These images add a significant amount of information to determine the difference between hostile and non-hostile activities, the number of targets in an area, the difference between animals and people, the movement dynamics of targets, and when specific activities of interest are taking place. The imaging capabilities of UGS systems need to provide only target activity and not images without targets in the field of view. The current UGS remote imaging systems are not optimized for target processing and are not low cost. McQ describes in this paper an architectural and technologic approach for significantly improving the processing of images to provide target information while reducing the cost of the intelligent remote imaging capability.

  7. Optical physics enables advances in multiphoton imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the initial images were taken using a multiphoton imaging technique the method has rapidly established itself as the preferred method for imaging deeply into biological samples with micron resolution in three dimensions. Multiphoton imaging has thus enabled researchers in the life sciences to undertake studies that had previously been believed to be impossible without significantly perturbing the sample. Many of these experiments have only been realized due to close cooperation between optical physicists, from a range of disciplines, and the biomedical researchers. This paper will provide a general review of the current state of the field demonstrating how the various aspects of the physics development have brought the multiphoton technique to its current position at the forefront of biological microscopy. (topical review)

  8. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  9. Center for Advanced Signal and Imaging Sciences Workshop 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClellan, J H; Carrano, C; Poyneer, L; Palmer, D; Baker, K; Chen, D; London, R; Weinert, G; Brase, J; Paglieroni, D; Lopez, A; Grant, C W; Wright, W; Burke, M; Miller, W O; DeTeresa, S; White, D; Toeppen, J; Haugen, P; Kamath, C; Nguyen, T; Manay, S; Newsam, S; Cantu-Paz, E; Pao, H; Chang, J; Chambers, D; Leach, R; Paulson, C; Romero, C E; Spiridon, A; Vigars, M; Welsh, P; Zumstein, J; Romero, K; Oppenheim, A; Harris, D B; Dowla, F; Brown, C G; Clark, G A; Ong, M M; Clance, T J; Kegelmeyer, l M; Benzuijen, M; Bliss, E; Burkhart, S; Conder, A; Daveler, S; Ferguson, W; Glenn, S; Liebman, J; Norton, M; Prasad, R; Salmon, T; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hafiz, O; Cheung, S; Fodor, I; Aufderheide, M B; Bary, A; Martz, Jr., H E; Burke, M W; Benson, S; Fisher, K A; Quarry, M J

    2004-11-15

    Welcome to the Eleventh Annual C.A.S.I.S. Workshop, a yearly event at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, presented by the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences, or CASIS, and sponsored by the LLNL Engineering Directorate. Every November for the last 10 years we have convened a diverse set of engineering and scientific talent to share their work in signal processing, imaging, communications, controls, along with associated fields of mathematics, statistics, and computing sciences. This year is no exception, with sessions in Adaptive Optics, Applied Imaging, Scientific Data Mining, Electromagnetic Image and Signal Processing, Applied Signal Processing, National Ignition Facility (NIF) Imaging, and Nondestructive Characterization.

  10. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  11. Imaging chemical extraction by polymer inclusion membranes using fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) transport chemicals between bodies of liquid by simultaneously performing chemical extraction and back-extraction. The internal chemical and physical mechanisms by which this transport occurs are, however, poorly understood. Also, some PIMs, which are otherwise optimal for their task, age and lose function after only days, limiting their feasibility for industrial upscaling. Through the application of fluorescence imaging methods we are able for the first time to see where chemical extraction occurs in the membrane. Extraction of fluorescein from solution by PIMs demonstrates inhomogeneities that do not correlate to surface morphology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging demonstrates that regions of increased extraction have distinctly different fluorescence lifetimes to that of the surrounding PIM indicating localized chemical environments, and this is observed to change with membrane age. Fluorescence imaging is shown to allow probing and novel understanding of PIM internal chemical morphology. (paper)

  12. Imaging chemical extraction by polymer inclusion membranes using fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Clare A.; Nagul, Edward A.; Cattrall, Robert W.; Kolev, Spas D.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2014-06-01

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) transport chemicals between bodies of liquid by simultaneously performing chemical extraction and back-extraction. The internal chemical and physical mechanisms by which this transport occurs are, however, poorly understood. Also, some PIMs, which are otherwise optimal for their task, age and lose function after only days, limiting their feasibility for industrial upscaling. Through the application of fluorescence imaging methods we are able for the first time to see where chemical extraction occurs in the membrane. Extraction of fluorescein from solution by PIMs demonstrates inhomogeneities that do not correlate to surface morphology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging demonstrates that regions of increased extraction have distinctly different fluorescence lifetimes to that of the surrounding PIM indicating localized chemical environments, and this is observed to change with membrane age. Fluorescence imaging is shown to allow probing and novel understanding of PIM internal chemical morphology.

  13. Imaging morphogenesis: technological advances and biological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Philipp J

    2013-06-01

    Morphogenesis, the development of the shape of an organism, is a dynamic process on a multitude of scales, from fast subcellular rearrangements and cell movements to slow structural changes at the whole-organism level. Live-imaging approaches based on light microscopy reveal the intricate dynamics of this process and are thus indispensable for investigating the underlying mechanisms. This Review discusses emerging imaging techniques that can record morphogenesis at temporal scales from seconds to days and at spatial scales from hundreds of nanometers to several millimeters. To unlock their full potential, these methods need to be matched with new computational approaches and physical models that help convert highly complex image data sets into biological insights.

  14. Advances in low-level color image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Smolka, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Color perception plays an important role in object recognition and scene understanding both for humans and intelligent vision systems. Recent advances in digital color imaging and computer hardware technology have led to an explosion in the use of color images in a variety of applications including medical imaging, content-based image retrieval, biometrics, watermarking, digital inpainting, remote sensing, visual quality inspection, among many others. As a result, automated processing and analysis of color images has become an active area of research, to which the large number of publications of the past two decades bears witness. The multivariate nature of color image data presents new challenges for researchers and practitioners as the numerous methods developed for single channel images are often not directly applicable to multichannel  ones. The goal of this volume is to summarize the state-of-the-art in the early stages of the color image processing pipeline.

  15. Computational chemical imaging for cardiovascular pathology: chemical microscopic imaging accurately determines cardiac transplant rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Tiwari

    Full Text Available Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients' biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures.

  16. Advanced optical imaging in living embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Canaria, Christie A.; Lansford, Rusty

    2010-01-01

    Developmental biology investigations have evolved from static studies of embryo anatomy and into dynamic studies of the genetic and cellular mechanisms responsible for shaping the embryo anatomy. With the advancement of fluorescent protein fusions, the ability to visualize and comprehend how thousands to millions of cells interact with one another to form tissues and organs in three dimensions (xyz) over time (t) is just beginning to be realized and exploited. In this review, we explore recen...

  17. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in p...

  18. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Laird, Forrest M.

    2011-09-10

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed.

  19. Image transfer technology in health care advancing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instead of recording images used in medicine, such as x-ray images, on film, it is now increasingly often possible to record them digitally in a computer. Using open and integrated information systems, digital images and the related data can in future be processed simultaneously, for instance, at x-ray units, in laboratories and at hospital wards. The data are fed into an open and integrated information system only once. Users may search for and combine data easily and any way they wish. Images are stored in the computer system at the location where they are generated, and transferred in the network only when they are needed elsewhere. In future, it will be possible to obtain information from a database using, for instance, sound as a means of communication. Data may be stored in the network as graphs, as sound or even as films. Despite all this , the introduction of new information technology still requires much consideration, resources and time. An open information system also needs standardised concepts and services so that different pieces of equipment and programmes are able to work together. (orig.)

  20. Multispectral laser imaging for advanced food analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senni, L.; Burrascano, P.; Ricci, M.

    2016-07-01

    A hardware-software apparatus for food inspection capable of realizing multispectral NIR laser imaging at four different wavelengths is herein discussed. The system was designed to operate in a through-transmission configuration to detect the presence of unwanted foreign bodies inside samples, whether packed or unpacked. A modified Lock-In technique was employed to counterbalance the significant signal intensity attenuation due to transmission across the sample and to extract the multispectral information more efficiently. The NIR laser wavelengths used to acquire the multispectral images can be varied to deal with different materials and to focus on specific aspects. In the present work the wavelengths were selected after a preliminary analysis to enhance the image contrast between foreign bodies and food in the sample, thus identifying the location and nature of the defects. Experimental results obtained from several specimens, with and without packaging, are presented and the multispectral image processing as well as the achievable spatial resolution of the system are discussed.

  1. Conventional and advanced imaging in neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Y; Sutton, I J; Ghadiri, M; Masters, L; Zivadinov, R; Barnett, M H

    2014-08-01

    Myelitis and optic neuritis are prototypic clinical presentations of both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Once considered a subtype of multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, is now known to have a discrete pathogenesis in which antibodies to the water channel, aquaporin 4, play a critical role. Timely differentiation of neuromyelitis optica from MS is imperative, determining both prognosis and treatment strategy. Early, aggressive immunosuppression is required to prevent the accrual of severe disability in neuromyelitis optica; conversely, MS-specific therapies may exacerbate the disease. The diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica requires the integration of clinical, MR imaging, and laboratory data, but current criteria are insensitive and exclude patients with limited clinical syndromes. Failure to recognize the expanding spectrum of cerebral MR imaging patterns associated with aquaporin 4 antibody seropositivity adds to diagnostic uncertainty in some patients. We present the state of the art in conventional and nonconventional MR imaging in neuromyelitis optica and review the place of neuroimaging in the diagnosis, management, and research of the condition.

  2. Recent advances in radiology and medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, R.E.; Sherwood, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first chapter, on the radiology of arthritis, is an overview. The second and seventh chapters are on the chest the former, on adult respiratory distress syndrome, is a brief summary, and the latter, on digital radiography of the chest with the prototype slit-scanning technique. The third chapter reviews computed tomography of the lumbar spine. The following two chapters are on MR imaging, one on the central nervous system (covering demyelinating diseases, cardiovascular disease, infections, and tumors), with excellent illustrations; and one on MR imaging of the body. The illustrations are good. The following chapter is on extracardiac digital subtraction angiography (DSA), with an interesting table comparing and contrasting conventional angiography with both intraveneous and intraarterial DSA. The eighth chapter on pediatric imaging fits a world of experience. Chapter 9 is an update on contrast media, while the next chapter is on barium infusion examination of the small intestine. The final three chapters are concerned with the present state of angioplasty, interventional radiology in the urinary tract.

  3. 7th International Workshop on Advanced Optical Imaging and Metrology

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of the FRINGE Workshop Series this Proceeding contains all contributions presented at the 7. International Workshop on Advanced Optical Imaging and Metrology. The FRINGE Workshop Series is dedicated to the presentation, discussion and dissemination of recent results in Optical Imaging and Metrology. Topics of particular interest for the 7. Workshop are: - New methods and tools for the generation, acquisition, processing, and evaluation of data in Optical Imaging and Metrology (digital wavefront engineering, computational imaging, model-based reconstruction, compressed sensing, inverse problems solution) - Application-driven technologies in Optical Imaging and Metrology (high-resolution, adaptive, active, robust, reliable, flexible, in-line, real-time) - High-dynamic range solutions in Optical Imaging and Metrology (from macro to nano) - Hybrid technologies in Optical Imaging and Metrology (hybrid optics, sensor and data fusion, model-based solutions, multimodality) - New optical sensors, imagi...

  4. Advances in brain imaging of neuropathic pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fu-yong; TAO Wei; LI Yong-jie

    2008-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the use of brain imaging,including functional magnetic resonance imaging(fMRI), positron emission tomography(PET),magnetic resonance spectroscopy(MRS)and voxel-based morphometry(VBM)in investigation of the activity in diverse brain regions that creates and modulates chronic neuropathic pain. Data sources English literatures from January 1,2000 to July 31,2007 that examined human brain activity in chronic neuropathic pain were accessed through MEDLINE/CD ROM,using PET,fMRI,VBM,MRS and receptor binding. Study selection Published articles about the application of fMRI,PET,VBM,MRS and chronic neuropathic pain were selected. Data extraction Data were mainly extracted from 40 representative articles as the research basis. Results The PET studies suggested that spontaneous neuropathic pain is associated with changes in thalamic activity. Both PET and fMRI have been used to investigate the substrate of allodynia.The VBM demonstrated that brain structural changes are involved in chronic neuropathic pain,which is not seen in a matched control group.However,the results obtained had a large variety,which may be due to different pain etiology,pain distribution,lesion tomography,symptoms and stimulation procedures. Conclusions Application of the techniques of brain imaging plays a very important role in the study of structural and functional reorganization In patients with neuropathic pain.However,a unique"pain matrix" has not been defined.Future studies should be conducted using a prospective longitudinal research design,which would guarantee the control for many confounding factors.

  5. Advances in the diagnostic imaging of pheochromocytomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forssell-Aronsson E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Eva Forssell-Aronsson1, Emil Schüler1, Håkan Ahlman21Department of Radiation Physics, 2Department of Surgery, Lundberg Laboratory of Cancer Research, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: Pheochromocytomas (PCs and paragangliomas (PGLs are routinely localized by computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG scintigraphy. CT can identify tumors with high sensitivity but rather low specificity. MRI has higher sensitivity and specificity than CT and is superior to detect extra-adrenal disease. Radioiodinated MIBG scintigraphy has been used for more than 30 years and is based on MIBG uptake via the norepinephrine transporter on the cell membrane. The technique is very useful for whole-body studies in case of multiple primary tumors or metastases. Tumors with sole production of dopamine usually cannot be visualized with MIBG and may require positron emission tomographic (PET studies with 18F-labeled radiotracers. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS using the radiolabeled somatostatin analog octreotide (based on the expression of the somatostatin receptors 2 and 5 by the tumor can demonstrate PGL or metastases not visualized by MIBG. In this article, we review the use of MIBG scintigraphy to diagnose PC/PGL and compare the sensitivity and specificity with that of CT and MRI. We also describe the recent SRS and PET techniques and review the latest results of clinical studies by comparing these imaging modalities. Future perspectives of functional imaging modalities for PC/PGL are finally presented.Keywords: MIBG, scintigraphy, pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma, PET

  6. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZAYAS Pérez Teresa; GEISSLER Gunther; HERNANDEZ Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculatio and advanced oxidation processes(AOP)had been studied.The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H202,UVO3 and UV/H-H202/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions.For each of these processes,different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater.Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand(COD)and low total suspended solids.The outcomes of coffee wastewater reeatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD,color,and turbidity.It was found that a reductiOn in COD of 67%could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculatlon witll lime and coagulant T-1.When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H202,a COD reduction of 86%was achieved,although only after prolonged UV irradiation.Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered,UV/H202,uv/03 and UV/H202/03,we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective,with an efficiency of color,turbidity and further COD removal of 87%,when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater.

  7. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas Pérez, Teresa; Geissler, Gunther; Hernandez, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculation and advanced oxidation processes (AOP) had been studied. The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions. For each of these processes, different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater. Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and low total suspended solids. The outcomes of coffee wastewater treatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD, color, and turbidity. It was found that a reduction in COD of 67% could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculation with lime and coagulant T-1. When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H2O2, a COD reduction of 86% was achieved, although only after prolonged UV irradiation. Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered, UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3, we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective, with an efficiency of color, turbidity and further COD removal of 87%, when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater. PMID:17918591

  8. Advanced pixel architectures for scientific image sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Coath, R; Godbeer, A; Wilson, M; Turchetta, R

    2009-01-01

    We present recent developments from two projects targeting advanced pixel architectures for scientific applications. Results are reported from FORTIS, a sensor demonstrating variants on a 4T pixel architecture. The variants include differences in pixel and diode size, the in-pixel source follower transistor size and the capacitance of the readout node to optimise for low noise and sensitivity to small amounts of charge. Results are also reported from TPAC, a complex pixel architecture with ~160 transistors per pixel. Both sensors were manufactured in the 0.18μm INMAPS process, which includes a special deep p-well layer and fabrication on a high resistivity epitaxial layer for improved charge collection efficiency.

  9. Advances in Bio-Imaging From Physics to Signal Understanding Issues State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Racoceanu, Daniel; Gouaillard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Imaging Devices and Image processing stem from cross-fertilization between many fields of research such as Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and Computer Sciences. This BioImaging Community feel the urge to integrate more intensively its various results, discoveries and innovation into ready to use tools that can address all the new exciting challenges that Life Scientists (Biologists, Medical doctors, ...) keep providing, almost on a daily basis. Devising innovative chemical probes, for example, is an archetypal goal in which image quality improvement must be driven by the physics of acquisition, the image processing and analysis algorithms and the chemical skills in order to design an optimal bioprobe. This book offers an overview of the current advances in many research fields related to bioimaging and highlights the current limitations that would need to be addressed in the next decade to design fully integrated BioImaging Device.

  10. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  11. Advances in the Application of Image Processing Fruit Grading

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Chengjun; Hua, Chunjian

    2013-01-01

    In the perspective of actual production, the paper presents the advances in the application of image processing fruit grading from several aspects, such as processing precision and processing speed of image processing technology. Furthermore, the different algorithms about detecting size, shape, color and defects are combined effectively to reduce the complexity of each algorithm and achieve a balance between the processing precision and processing speed are keys to automatic apple grading.

  12. Advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Part 1: Synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrant, J.M.; O' Connor, P.J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Chapel Allerton Hospital, Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the synovium. We now recognise that conventional radiographic images show changes of rheumatoid arthritis long after irreversible joint damage has occured. With the advent of powerful disease-modifying drugs, there is a need for early demonstration of rheumatoid arthritis and a need to monitor progress of the disease and response to therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI have focussed on the demonstration and quantification of synovitis and erosions and allow early diagnosis of RA. The technology to quantify synovitis and erosions is developing rapidly and now allows change in disease activity to be assessed. However, problems undoubtedly exist in quantification techniques, and this review serves to highlight them. Much of the literature on advanced imaging in RA appears in rheumatological journals and may not be familiar to radiologists. This review article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists about this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration, it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. The first part addresses synovitis imaging. The second part will look at advanced imaging of erosions in RA. (orig.)

  13. Advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Part 2: Erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrant, J.M.; O' Connor, P.J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Chapel Allerton Hospital, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the synovium. We now recognise that conventional radiographic images show changes of rheumatoid arthritis late after irreversible joint damage has occured. With the advent of powerful disease-modifying drugs there is a need for early demonstration of rheumatoid arthritis and to monitor progress of the disease and response to therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI have focussed on the demonstration and quanitification of synovitis and erosions and allow early diagnosis of RA. The technology to quantify synovitis and erosions is developing rapidly and now allows change in disease activity to be assessed. However, problems undoubtedly exist in quantification techniques and this review serves to highlight them. Much of the literature on advanced imaging in RA appears in rheumatological journals and may not be familiar to radiologists. This review article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists to this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. This first part addresses synovitis imaging. The second part will look at advanced imaging of erosions in RA. (orig.)

  14. Predictive spectroscopy and chemical imaging based on novel optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew Paul

    1998-10-01

    This thesis describes two futuristic optical systems designed to surpass contemporary spectroscopic methods for predictive spectroscopy and chemical imaging. These systems are advantageous to current techniques in a number of ways including lower cost, enhanced portability, shorter analysis time, and improved S/N. First, a novel optical approach to predicting chemical and physical properties based on principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed and evaluated. A regression vector produced by PCA is designed into the structure of a set of paired optical filters. Light passing through the paired filters produces an analog detector signal directly proportional to the chemical/physical property for which the regression vector was designed. Second, a novel optical system is described which takes a single-shot approach to chemical imaging with high spectroscopic resolution using a dimension-reduction fiber-optic array. Images are focused onto a two- dimensional matrix of optical fibers which are drawn into a linear distal array with specific ordering. The distal end is imaged with a spectrograph equipped with an ICCD camera for spectral analysis. Software is used to extract the spatial/spectral information contained in the ICCD images and deconvolute them into wave length-specific reconstructed images or position-specific spectra which span a multi-wavelength space. This thesis includes a description of the fabrication of two dimension-reduction arrays as well as an evaluation of the system for spatial and spectral resolution, throughput, image brightness, resolving power, depth of focus, and channel cross-talk. PCA is performed on the images by treating rows of the ICCD images as spectra and plotting the scores of each PC as a function of reconstruction position. In addition, iterative target transformation factor analysis (ITTFA) is performed on the spectroscopic images to generate ``true'' chemical maps of samples. Univariate zero-order images, univariate first

  15. Improving Seismic Image with Advanced Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mericy Lastra Cunill

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Taking Taking into account the need to improve the seismic image in the central area of Cuba, specifically in the area of the Venegas sector, located in the Cuban Folded Belt, the seismic data acquired by Cuba Petróleo (CUPET in the year 2007 was reprocessed according to the experience accumulated during the previous processing carried out in the same year, and the new geologic knowledge on the area. This was done with the objective of improving the results. The processing applied previously was analyzed by reprocessing the primary data with new focuses and procedures, among them are the following: the attenuation of the superficial wave with a filter in the Radon domain in its lineal variant, the change of the primary statics corrections of elevation by those of refraction, the study of velocity with the selection automatic biespectral of high density, the study of the anisotropy, the attenuation of the random noise, and the pre stack time and depth migration. As a result of this reprocessing, a structure that was not identified in the seismic sections of the previous processing was located at the top of a Continental Margin sediment located to the north of the sector that increased the potentialities of finding hydrocarbons in quantities of economic importance thus diminishing the risk of drilling in the sector Venegas.

  16. Technical advances of interventional fluoroscopy and flat panel image receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2008-11-01

    In the past decade, various radiation reducing devices and control circuits have been implemented on fluoroscopic imaging equipment. Because of the potential for lengthy fluoroscopic procedures in interventional cardiovascular angiography, these devices and control circuits have been developed for the cardiac catheterization laboratories and interventional angiography suites. Additionally, fluoroscopic systems equipped with image intensifiers have benefited from technological advances in x-ray tube, x-ray generator, and spectral shaping filter technologies. The high heat capacity x-ray tube, the medium frequency inverter generator with high performance switching capability, and the patient dose reduction spectral shaping filter had already been implemented on the image intensified fluoroscopy systems. These three underlying technologies together with the automatic dose rate and image quality (ADRIQ) control logic allow patients undergoing cardiovascular angiography procedures to benefit from "lower patient dose" with "high image quality." While photoconductor (or phosphor plate) x-ray detectors and signal capture thin film transistor (TFT) and charge coupled device (CCD) arrays are analog in nature, the advent of the flat panel image receptor allowed for fluoroscopy procedures to become more streamlined. With the analog-to-digital converter built into the data lines, the flat panel image receptor appears to become a digital device. While the transition from image intensified fluoroscopy systems to flat panel image receptor fluoroscopy systems is part of the on-going "digitization of imaging," the value of a flat panel image receptor may have to be evaluated with respect to patient dose, image quality, and clinical application capabilities. The advantage of flat panel image receptors has yet to be fully explored. For instance, the flat panel image receptor has its disadvantages as compared to the image intensifiers; the cost of the equipment is probably the most

  17. Automated extraction of chemical structure information from digital raster images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shedden Kerby A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To search for chemical structures in research articles, diagrams or text representing molecules need to be translated to a standard chemical file format compatible with cheminformatic search engines. Nevertheless, chemical information contained in research articles is often referenced as analog diagrams of chemical structures embedded in digital raster images. To automate analog-to-digital conversion of chemical structure diagrams in scientific research articles, several software systems have been developed. But their algorithmic performance and utility in cheminformatic research have not been investigated. Results This paper aims to provide critical reviews for these systems and also report our recent development of ChemReader – a fully automated tool for extracting chemical structure diagrams in research articles and converting them into standard, searchable chemical file formats. Basic algorithms for recognizing lines and letters representing bonds and atoms in chemical structure diagrams can be independently run in sequence from a graphical user interface-and the algorithm parameters can be readily changed-to facilitate additional development specifically tailored to a chemical database annotation scheme. Compared with existing software programs such as OSRA, Kekule, and CLiDE, our results indicate that ChemReader outperforms other software systems on several sets of sample images from diverse sources in terms of the rate of correct outputs and the accuracy on extracting molecular substructure patterns. Conclusion The availability of ChemReader as a cheminformatic tool for extracting chemical structure information from digital raster images allows research and development groups to enrich their chemical structure databases by annotating the entries with published research articles. Based on its stable performance and high accuracy, ChemReader may be sufficiently accurate for annotating the chemical database with links

  18. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging Of the Magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Rayrnont, G.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S.; Owen, C. J.; Read, A. M.; Peacocke, L.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    AXIOM (Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere) is a concept mission which aims to explain how the Earth's magnetosphere responds to the changing impact of the solar wind using a unique method never attempted before; performing wide-field soft X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the magnetosheath. magnetopause and bow shock at high spatial and temporal resolution. Global imaging of these regions is possible because of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) process which produces elevated soft X-ray emission from the interaction of high charge-state solar wind ions with primarily neutral hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and near-interplanetary space.

  19. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advan

  20. Introduction: Advances in Optical Coherence Tomography, Photoacoustic Imaging, and Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X; Beard, P.C.; Georgakoudi, I.

    2010-01-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue, “Advances in Optical Coherence Tomography, Photoacoustic Imaging, and Microscopy,” which combines three technical areas from the 2010 Optical Society of America (OSA), Biomedical Optics (BIOMED) Topical Meeting held on 11–14 April in Miami, Florida, and includes contributions from conference attendees.

  1. Advances in Time-Resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis details advanced developments in 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) based on the tomographic PIV technique, with an emphasis on time-resolved experiments. Tomographic PIV is a technique introduced in 2006 to measure the flow velocity in a three-dimensional volume. When measurements are

  2. Advances in Chemical Engineering — A Review of Petrochemical Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Chemical engineering has played an important role in the development of petrochemical industry. Some important advances in chemical engineering have been discussed in detail, i. e. petroleum refining, organic chemicals, synthetic resin, synthetic fibers and relevant raw materials, synthetic rubber, and process energy integration. The main business targets of China Petroleum & Chemical Corporation (SINOPEC Corp.) and the focus of further researches are also addressed.

  3. Avogadro: an advanced semantic chemical editor, visualization, and analysis platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanwell Marcus D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Avogadro project has developed an advanced molecule editor and visualizer designed for cross-platform use in computational chemistry, molecular modeling, bioinformatics, materials science, and related areas. It offers flexible, high quality rendering, and a powerful plugin architecture. Typical uses include building molecular structures, formatting input files, and analyzing output of a wide variety of computational chemistry packages. By using the CML file format as its native document type, Avogadro seeks to enhance the semantic accessibility of chemical data types. Results The work presented here details the Avogadro library, which is a framework providing a code library and application programming interface (API with three-dimensional visualization capabilities; and has direct applications to research and education in the fields of chemistry, physics, materials science, and biology. The Avogadro application provides a rich graphical interface using dynamically loaded plugins through the library itself. The application and library can each be extended by implementing a plugin module in C++ or Python to explore different visualization techniques, build/manipulate molecular structures, and interact with other programs. We describe some example extensions, one which uses a genetic algorithm to find stable crystal structures, and one which interfaces with the PackMol program to create packed, solvated structures for molecular dynamics simulations. The 1.0 release series of Avogadro is the main focus of the results discussed here. Conclusions Avogadro offers a semantic chemical builder and platform for visualization and analysis. For users, it offers an easy-to-use builder, integrated support for downloading from common databases such as PubChem and the Protein Data Bank, extracting chemical data from a wide variety of formats, including computational chemistry output, and native, semantic support for the CML file format

  4. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Chemical Transport in Melasomatic Processes

    CERN Document Server

    1987-01-01

    As indicated on the title page, this book is an outgrowth of the NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) on Chemical Transport in Metasomatic Processes, which was held in Greece, June 3-16, 1985. The ASI consisted of five days of invited lectures, poster sessions, and discussion at the Club Poseidon near Loutraki, Corinthia, followed by a two-day field trip in Corinthia and Attica. The second week of the ASI consisted of an excursion aboard M/S Zeus, M/Y Dimitrios II, and the M/S Irini to four of the Cycladic Islands to visit, study, and sample outstanding exposures of metasomatic activity on Syros, Siphnos, Seriphos, and Naxos. Nine­ teen invited lectures and 10 session chairmen/discussion leaders participated in the ASI, which was attended by a total of 92 professional scientists and graduate stu­ dents from 15 countries. Seventeen of the invited lectures and the Field Excursion Guide are included in this volume, together with 10 papers and six abstracts representing contributed poster sessions. Although more...

  5. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yielder, Jill, E-mail: j.yielder@auckland.ac.nz [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen [University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand); University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  6. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ

  7. Advanced hyperspectral video imaging system using Amici prism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiao; Fang, Xiaojing; Cao, Xun; Ma, Chenguang; Dai, Qionghai; Zhu, Hongbo; Wang, Yongjin

    2014-08-11

    In this paper, we propose an advanced hyperspectral video imaging system (AHVIS), which consists of an objective lens, an occlusion mask, a relay lens, an Amici prism and two cameras. An RGB camera is used for spatial reading and a gray scale camera is used for measuring the scene with spectral information. The objective lens collects more light energy from the observed scene and images the scene on an occlusion mask, which subsamples the image of the observed scene. Then, the subsampled image is sent to the gray scale camera through the relay lens and the Amici prism. The Amici prism that is used to realize spectral dispersion along the optical path reduces optical distortions and offers direct view of the scene. The main advantages of the proposed system are improved light throughput and less optical distortion. Furthermore, the presented configuration is more compact, robust and practicable. PMID:25321019

  8. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    complicated organism, we needed to first turn our attention to a well understood organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a well-studied organism and will be used to compare our results with others. Then, we will turn our attention to TD. It is expected that the research performed will provide key data to validate biochemical studies of TD and result in high profile publications in leading journals. For this project, our ultimate goal was to combine both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experimental analysis with computer simulations to provide unique 3D molecular structural, dynamics, and functional information on the order of microns for this DOE mission relevant microorganism, T. denitrificans. For FY05, our goals were to: (1) Determine proper media for optimal growth of PA; growth rate measurements in that media and characterization of metabolite signatures during growth via {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, (2) Determine and build mineral, metal, and implant material surfaces to support growth of PA, (3) Implementing new MRI sequences to image biofilms more efficiently and increase resolution with new hardware design, (4) Develop further diffusion and flow MRI measurements of biofilms and biofilm formation with different MRI pulse sequences and different hardware design, and (5) Develop a zero dimension model of the rate of growth and the metabolite profiles of PA. Our major accomplishments are discussed in the following text. However, the bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled, ''NMR Metabolomics of Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa''. This paper will be submitted to the Journal of Bacteriology in coming weeks. In addition, this one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign during FY05 for some proof-of-principle MRI measurements on polymers. We are currently using similar methods to evaluate these polymers. In addition

  9. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    complicated organism, we needed to first turn our attention to a well understood organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a well-studied organism and will be used to compare our results with others. Then, we will turn our attention to TD. It is expected that the research performed will provide key data to validate biochemical studies of TD and result in high profile publications in leading journals. For this project, our ultimate goal was to combine both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experimental analysis with computer simulations to provide unique 3D molecular structural, dynamics, and functional information on the order of microns for this DOE mission relevant microorganism, T. denitrificans. For FY05, our goals were to: (1) Determine proper media for optimal growth of PA; growth rate measurements in that media and characterization of metabolite signatures during growth via {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, (2) Determine and build mineral, metal, and implant material surfaces to support growth of PA, (3) Implementing new MRI sequences to image biofilms more efficiently and increase resolution with new hardware design, (4) Develop further diffusion and flow MRI measurements of biofilms and biofilm formation with different MRI pulse sequences and different hardware design, and (5) Develop a zero dimension model of the rate of growth and the metabolite profiles of PA. Our major accomplishments are discussed in the following text. However, the bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled, ''NMR Metabolomics of Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa''. This paper will be submitted to the Journal of Bacteriology in coming weeks. In addition, this one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign during FY05 for some proof-of-principle MRI measurements on polymers. We are currently using similar methods to evaluate these polymers. In addition

  10. Advanced imaging modalities in the detection of cerebral vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jena N; Mehta, Vivek; Russin, Jonathan; Amar, Arun P; Rajamohan, Anandh; Mack, William J

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is complex and is not entirely understood. Mechanistic insights have been gained through advances in the capabilities of diagnostic imaging. Core techniques have focused on the assessment of vessel caliber, tissue metabolism, and/or regional perfusion parameters. Advances in imaging have provided clinicians with a multifaceted approach to assist in the detection of cerebral vasospasm and the diagnosis of delayed ischemic neurologic deficits (DIND). However, a single test or algorithm with broad efficacy remains elusive. This paper examines both anatomical and physiological imaging modalities applicable to post-SAH vasospasm and offers a historical background. We consider cerebral blood flow velocities measured by Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD). Structural imaging techniques, including catheter-based Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), CT Angiography (CTA), and MR Angiography (MRA), are reviewed. We examine physiologic assessment by PET, HMPAO SPECT, (133)Xe Clearance, Xenon-Enhanced CT (Xe/CT), Perfusion CT (PCT), and Diffusion-Weighted/MR Perfusion Imaging. Comparative advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:23476766

  11. Advanced Imaging Modalities in the Detection of Cerebral Vasospasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena N. Mills

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is complex and is not entirely understood. Mechanistic insights have been gained through advances in the capabilities of diagnostic imaging. Core techniques have focused on the assessment of vessel caliber, tissue metabolism, and/or regional perfusion parameters. Advances in imaging have provided clinicians with a multifaceted approach to assist in the detection of cerebral vasospasm and the diagnosis of delayed ischemic neurologic deficits (DIND. However, a single test or algorithm with broad efficacy remains elusive. This paper examines both anatomical and physiological imaging modalities applicable to post-SAH vasospasm and offers a historical background. We consider cerebral blood flow velocities measured by Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD. Structural imaging techniques, including catheter-based Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA, CT Angiography (CTA, and MR Angiography (MRA, are reviewed. We examine physiologic assessment by PET, HMPAO SPECT, 133Xe Clearance, Xenon-Enhanced CT (Xe/CT, Perfusion CT (PCT, and Diffusion-Weighted/MR Perfusion Imaging. Comparative advantages and limitations are discussed.

  12. Optical design and characterization of an advanced computational imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, R. Hamilton; Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Raskar, Ramesh; Shi, Boxin; Barsi, Christopher; Zhao, Hang

    2014-09-01

    We describe an advanced computational imaging system with an optical architecture that enables simultaneous and dynamic pupil-plane and image-plane coding accommodating several task-specific applications. We assess the optical requirement trades associated with custom and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) optics and converge on the development of two low-cost and robust COTS testbeds. The first is a coded-aperture programmable pixel imager employing a digital micromirror device (DMD) for image plane per-pixel oversampling and spatial super-resolution experiments. The second is a simultaneous pupil-encoded and time-encoded imager employing a DMD for pupil apodization or a deformable mirror for wavefront coding experiments. These two testbeds are built to leverage two MIT Lincoln Laboratory focal plane arrays - an orthogonal transfer CCD with non-uniform pixel sampling and on-chip dithering and a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) with advanced on-chip per-pixel processing capabilities. This paper discusses the derivation of optical component requirements, optical design metrics, and performance analyses for the two testbeds built.

  13. Labeling of virus components for advanced, quantitative imaging analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakin, Volkan; Paci, Giulia; Lemke, Edward A; Müller, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, investigation of virus-cell interactions has moved from ensemble measurements to imaging analyses at the single-particle level. Advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques provide single-molecule sensitivity and subdiffraction spatial resolution, allowing observation of subviral details and individual replication events to obtain detailed quantitative information. To exploit the full potential of these techniques, virologists need to employ novel labeling strategies, taking into account specific constraints imposed by viruses, as well as unique requirements of microscopic methods. Here, we compare strengths and limitations of various labeling methods, exemplify virological questions that were successfully addressed, and discuss challenges and future potential of novel approaches in virus imaging. PMID:26987299

  14. Standard codecs image compression to advanced video coding

    CERN Document Server

    Ghanbari, Mohammed

    2003-01-01

    This book discusses the growth of digital television technology and the revolution in image and video compression (such as JPEG2000, broadcast TV, video phone), highlighting the need for standardisation in processing static and moving images and their exchange between computer systems. The book gives an authoritative explanation of picture and video coding algorithms, working from basic principles through to the advanced video compression systems now being developed. One of its main objectives is to describe the reasons behind the introduction of a standard codec for a specific application and

  15. Digital Mammography Imaging: Breast Tomosynthesis and Advanced Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvie, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis This article discusses recent developments in advanced derivative technologies associated with digital mammography. Digital breast tomosynthesis – its principles, development, and early clinical trials are reviewed. Contrast enhanced digital mammography and combined imaging systems with digital mammography and ultrasound are also discussed. Although all these methods are currently research programs, they hold promise for improving cancer detection and characterization if early results are confirmed by clinical trials. PMID:20868894

  16. Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

    1999-05-12

    One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications.

  17. Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications

  18. Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences II: Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical Index (MI) and Ispta.3 as required by FDA. The method is performed on four different imaging schemes and compared to measurements conducted using the SARUS experimental scanner. The sequences include focused emissions with an F-number of 2 with 64 elements that generate highly non-linear fields......An automatic approach for simulating the emitted pressure, intensity, and MI of advanced ultrasound imaging sequences is presented. It is based on a linear simulation of pressure fields using Field II, and it is hypothesized that linear simulation can attain the needed accuracy for predicting....... The simulation time is between 0.67 ms to 2.8 ms per emission and imaging point, making it possible to simulate even complex emission sequences in less than 1 s for a single spatial position. The linear simulations yield a relative accuracy on MI between -12.1% to 52.3% and for Ispta.3 between -38.6% to 62...

  19. Advances in chemical technologies for water and wastewater treatment: preface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochang WANG

    2009-01-01

    @@ Chemical technologies have been applied for water and wastewater treatment since more than 150 year ago, and are still playing the leading role in this field. With the fast development of sciences and technologies especially in the last two decades, chemical technologies which are applicable for solving water quality and water environmental problems underwent a great development not only in traditional areas such as coagulation, solid/liquid separation, oxidation, adsorption etc., but also in the emerging multidisciplinary fields. Nowadays, an increasing number of chemists and chemical engineers has broadened research interests. Biochemical/biological technologies, ecological technologies and process modeling and simulation have become important branches of chemical technologies. Such a tendency has been well reflected in the activities of the Group of Chemists for Water and Wastewater Treatment (GCWWT), a subdivision of Chinese Chemical Society (CCS).

  20. Advances in Chemical Engineering A Review of Petrochemical Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪定一

    2001-01-01

    Chemical engineering has played an important role in the development of petrochemical industry. Some important advances in chemical engineering have been discussed in detail, i. e. petroleum refining, organic chemicals,synthetic resin, synthetic fibers and relevant raw materials, synthetic rubber, and process energy integration. The main business targets of China Petroleum & Chemical Corporation (SINOPEC Corp.) and the focus of further researches axe also addressed.

  1. Advances in infrared and imaging fibres for astronomical instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Haynes, R; Marcel, J; Jovanovic, N; Haynes, Roger; Namara, Pam Mc; Marcel, Jackie; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2006-01-01

    Optical fibres have already played a huge part in ground based astronomical instrumentation, however, with the revolution in photonics currently taking place new fibre technologies and integrated optical devices are likely to have a profound impact on the way we manipulate light in the future. The Anglo-Australian Observatory, along with partners at the Optical Fibre Technology Centre of the University of Sydney, is investigating some of the developing technologies as part of our Astrophotonics programme. In this paper we discuss the advances that have been made with infrared transmitting fibre, both conventional and microstructured, in particular those based on flouride glasses. Flouride glasses have a particularly wide transparent region from the UV through to around 7um, whereas silica fibres, commonly used in astronomy, only transmit out to about 2um. We discuss the impact of advances in fibre manufacture that have greatly improved the optical, chemical resistance and physical properties of the flouride f...

  2. Obsessive-compulsive disorder: advances in brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past twenty years functional brain imaging has advanced to the point of tackling the differential diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic response in Neurology and Psychiatry. Psychiatric disorders were rendered 'functional' a century ago; however nowadays they can be seen by means of brain imaging. Functional images in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (NEUROSPET) show in non-invasive fashion the state of brain functioning. PET does this assessing glucose metabolism and NEUROSPET by putting cerebral blood flow in images. Prevalence of OCD is clearly low (2 to 3%), but comorbidity with depression, psychoses, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia is high. Furthermore, it is not infrequent with autism, attention disorder, tichotillomany, borderline personality disorders, in pathological compulsive spending, sexual compulsion and in pathological gambling, in tics, and in Gilles de la Tourette disorder, NEUROSPET and PET show hypoperfusion in both frontal lobes, in their prefrontal dorsolateral aspects, in their inferior zone and premotor cortex, with hyperperfusion in the posterior cingulum and hypoperfusion in basal ganglia (caudate nucleus). Cummings states that hyperactivity of the limbic system might be involved in OCD. Thus, brain imaging in OCD is a diagnostic aid, allows us to see clinical imagenological evolution and therapeutic response and, possibly, it is useful predict therapeutic response (Au)

  3. Quantitative Computed Tomography and image analysis for advanced muscle assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Joseph Edmunds

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging is of particular interest in the field of translational myology, as extant literature describes the utilization of a wide variety of techniques to non-invasively recapitulate and quantity various internal and external tissue morphologies. In the clinical context, medical imaging remains a vital tool for diagnostics and investigative assessment. This review outlines the results from several investigations on the use of computed tomography (CT and image analysis techniques to assess muscle conditions and degenerative process due to aging or pathological conditions. Herein, we detail the acquisition of spiral CT images and the use of advanced image analysis tools to characterize muscles in 2D and 3D. Results from these studies recapitulate changes in tissue composition within muscles, as visualized by the association of tissue types to specified Hounsfield Unit (HU values for fat, loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, and normal muscle, including fascia and tendon. We show how results from these analyses can be presented as both average HU values and compositions with respect to total muscle volumes, demonstrating the reliability of these tools to monitor, assess and characterize muscle degeneration.

  4. Analysis of pharmaceutical pellets: An approach using near-infrared chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabin, Guilherme P.; Breitkreitz, Marcia C.; Souza, Andre M. de [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Patricia da; Calefe, Lupercio; Moffa, Mario [Zelus Servicos para Industria Farmaceutica Ltda., Av. Professor Lineu Prestes n. 2242, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Poppi, Ronei J., E-mail: ronei@iqm.unicamp.br [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-07

    Highlights: {yields} Near-Infrared Chemical Imaging was used for pellets analysis. {yields} Distribution of the components throughout the coatings layers and core of the pellets was estimated. {yields} Classical Least Squares (CLS) was used for calculation of the concentration maps. - Abstract: Pharmaceutical pellets are spherical or nearly spherical multi-unit dosage forms designed to optimize pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics features of drug release. The distribution of the pharmaceutical ingredients in the layers and core is a very important parameter for appropriate drug release, especially for pellets manufactured by the process of layer gain. Physical aspects of the sample are normally evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), but it is in many cases unsuitable to provide conclusive chemical information about the distribution of the pharmaceutical ingredients in both layers and core. On the other hand, methods based on spectroscopic imaging can be very promising for this purpose. In this work, a Near-Infrared Chemical Imaging (NIR-CI) method was developed and applied to the analysis of diclophenac sodium pellets. Since all the compounds present in the sample were known in advance, Classical Least Squares (CLS) was used for calculations. The results have shown that the method was capable of providing chemical information about the distribution of the active ingredient and excipients in the core and coating layers and therefore can be complementary to SEM for the pharmaceutical development of pellets.

  5. AN ADVANCED SYSTEM FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION IN CHEMICAL COMPLEXES

    Science.gov (United States)

    One important accomplishment is that the system will give process engineers interactively and simultaneously use of programs for total cost analysis, life cycle assessment and sustainability metrics to provide direction for the optimal chemical complex analysis pro...

  6. Chemical imaging and solid state analysis at compact surfaces using UV imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian X.; Rehder, Sönke; van den Berg, Frans;

    2014-01-01

    Fast non-destructive multi-wavelength UV imaging together with multivariate image analysis was utilized to visualize distribution of chemical components and their solid state form at compact surfaces. Amorphous and crystalline solid forms of the antidiabetic compound glibenclamide, and...... excipients in a non-invasive way, as well as mapping the glibenclamide solid state form. An exploratory data analysis supported the critical evaluation of the mapping results and the selection of model parameters for the chemical mapping. The present study demonstrated that the multi-wavelength UV imaging is...... microcrystalline cellulose together with magnesium stearate as excipients were used as model materials in the compacts. The UV imaging based drug and excipient distribution was in good agreement with hyperspectral NIR imaging. The UV wavelength region can be utilized in distinguishing between glibenclamide and...

  7. Advances and challenges in deformable image registration: From image fusion to complex motion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Julia A; Heinrich, Mattias P; Papież, Bartłomiej W; Brady, Sir J Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of medical image registration has significantly advanced from multi-modal image fusion to highly non-linear, deformable image registration for a wide range of medical applications and imaging modalities, involving the compensation and analysis of physiological organ motion or of tissue changes due to growth or disease patterns. While the original focus of image registration has predominantly been on correcting for rigid-body motion of brain image volumes acquired at different scanning sessions, often with different modalities, the advent of dedicated longitudinal and cross-sectional brain studies soon necessitated the development of more sophisticated methods that are able to detect and measure local structural or functional changes, or group differences. Moving outside of the brain, cine imaging and dynamic imaging required the development of deformable image registration to directly measure or compensate for local tissue motion. Since then, deformable image registration has become a general enabling technology. In this work we will present our own contributions to the state-of-the-art in deformable multi-modal fusion and complex motion modelling, and then discuss remaining challenges and provide future perspectives to the field. PMID:27364430

  8. Advances and challenges in deformable image registration: From image fusion to complex motion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Julia A; Heinrich, Mattias P; Papież, Bartłomiej W; Brady, Sir J Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of medical image registration has significantly advanced from multi-modal image fusion to highly non-linear, deformable image registration for a wide range of medical applications and imaging modalities, involving the compensation and analysis of physiological organ motion or of tissue changes due to growth or disease patterns. While the original focus of image registration has predominantly been on correcting for rigid-body motion of brain image volumes acquired at different scanning sessions, often with different modalities, the advent of dedicated longitudinal and cross-sectional brain studies soon necessitated the development of more sophisticated methods that are able to detect and measure local structural or functional changes, or group differences. Moving outside of the brain, cine imaging and dynamic imaging required the development of deformable image registration to directly measure or compensate for local tissue motion. Since then, deformable image registration has become a general enabling technology. In this work we will present our own contributions to the state-of-the-art in deformable multi-modal fusion and complex motion modelling, and then discuss remaining challenges and provide future perspectives to the field.

  9. Advances on image interpolation based on ant colony algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukundo, Olivier; Cao, Hanqiang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an advance on image interpolation based on ant colony algorithm (AACA) for high resolution image scaling. The difference between the proposed algorithm and the previously proposed optimization of bilinear interpolation based on ant colony algorithm (OBACA) is that AACA uses global weighting, whereas OBACA uses local weighting scheme. The strength of the proposed global weighting of AACA algorithm depends on employing solely the pheromone matrix information present on any group of four adjacent pixels to decide which case deserves a maximum global weight value or not. Experimental results are further provided to show the higher performance of the proposed AACA algorithm with reference to the algorithms mentioned in this paper. PMID:27047729

  10. Quantitative Chemical Imaging with Multiplex Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dan; Lu, Fake; Zhang, Xu; Freudiger, Christian Wilhelm; Pernik, Douglas R.; Holtom, Gary; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a newly developed label-free chemical imaging technique that overcomes the speed limitation of confocal Raman microscopy while avoiding the nonresonant background problem of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Previous demonstrations have been limited to single Raman band measurements. We present a novel modulation multiplexing approach that allows real-time detection of multiple species using the fast Fourier transform. ...

  11. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; Marconcini, Mattia; Tilton, James C.; Trianni, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  12. High-resolution X-ray imaging for microbiology at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exciting new applications of high-resolution x-ray imaging have emerged recently due to major advances in high-brilliance synchrotrons sources and high-performance zone plate optics. Imaging with submicron resolution is now routine with hard x-rays: the authors have demonstrated 150 run in the 6--10 keV range with x-ray microscopes at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotrons radiation facility. This has fueled interest in using x-ray imaging in applications ranging from the biomedical, environmental, and materials science fields to the microelectronics industry. One important application they have pursued at the APS is a study of the microbiology of bacteria and their associated extracellular material (biofilms) using fluorescence microanalysis. No microscopy techniques were previously available with sufficient resolution to study live bacteria (∼1 microm x 4 microm in size) and biofilms in their natural hydrated state with better than part-per-million elemental sensitivity and the capability of determining g chemical speciation. In vivo x-ray imaging minimizes artifacts due to sample fixation, drying, and staining. This provides key insights into the transport of metal contaminants by bacteria in the environment and potential new designs for remediation and sequestration strategies

  13. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik;

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...... of CVD processes; however very little information on the process and its characteristics can be found. This work presents the state of the art on the CVD of tantalum in long narrow channels and a reaction mechanism is suggested based on a rudimentary model. The effects of the system pressure, temperature...... and process-setup on the deposition rates and material distribution are also presented....

  14. Advancements in Development of Chemical-Looping Combustion: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Fang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical-looping combustion (CLC is a novel combustion technology with inherent separation of greenhouse CO2. Extensive research has been performed on CLC in the last decade with respect to oxygen carrier development, reaction kinetics, reactor design, system efficiencies, and prototype testing. Transition metal oxides, such as Ni, Fe, Cu, and Mn oxides, were reported as reactive species in the oxygen carrier particles. Ni-based oxygen carriers exhibited the best reactivity and stability during multiredox cycles. The performance of the oxygen carriers can be improved by changing preparation method or by making mixedoxides. The CLC has been demonstrated successfully in continuously operated prototype reactors based on interconnected fluidized-bed system in the size range of 0.3–50 kW. High fuel conversion rates and almost 100%  CO2 capture efficiencies were obtained. The CLC system with two interconnected fluidized-bed reactors was considered the most suitable reactor design. Development of oxygen carriers with excellent reactivity and stability is still one of the challenges for CLC in the near future. Experiences of building and operating the large-scale CLC systems are needed before this technology is used commercially. Chemical-looping reforming (CLR and chemical-looping hydrogen (CLH are novel chemical-looping techniques to produce synthesis gas and hydrogen deserving more attention and research.

  15. Advances and trends in ionophore-based chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhelson, K. N.; Peshkova, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    The recent advances in the theory and practice of potentiometric, conductometric and optical sensors based on ionophores are critically reviewed. The role of the heterogeneity of the sensor/sample systems is emphasized, and it is shown that due to this heterogeneity such sensors respond to the analyte activities rather than to concentrations. The basics of the origin of the response of all three kinds of ionophore-based sensors are briefly described. The use of novel sensor materials, new preparation and application techniques of the sensors as well as advances in theoretical treatment of the sensor response are analyzed using literature sources published mainly from 2012 to 2014. The basic achievements made in the past are also addressed when necessary for better understanding of the trends in the field of ionophore-based sensors. The bibliography includes 295 references.

  16. Advances in Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Julian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral window has evolved from a routine laboratory technique into a state-of-the-art spectroscopy and sensing tool by benefitting from recent progress in increasingly sophisticated spectra acquisition techniques and advanced materials for generating, guiding, and detecting mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. Today, MIR spectroscopy provides molecular information with trace to ultratrace sensitivity, fast data acquisition rates, and high spectral resolution catering to demanding applications in bioanalytics, for example, and to improved routine analysis. In addition to advances in miniaturized device technology without sacrificing analytical performance, selected innovative applications for MIR spectroscopy ranging from process analysis to biotechnology and medical diagnostics are highlighted in this review.

  17. Do provisions to advance chemical facility safety also advance chemical facility security? An analysis of possible synergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2012-01-01

    existing provisions that have been put into existence to advance safety objectives due to synergy effects could be expected advance security objectives as well. The paper provides a conceptual definition of safety and security and presents a framework of their essential components. Key differences...... are presented. A safety framework is examined with the intent to identify security elements potentially covered. Vice versa, a security framework is examined with the intent to identify safety elements potentially covered. It is concluded that synergies are largely absent at the preventive level. Synergies...

  18. [Advances in studies on chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Qian-Jun; Kang, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Long; Zhou, Qing-Di

    2013-12-01

    The chemical constituents isolated from Desmodium species (Leguminosae) included terpenoids, flavonoids, steroids, alkaloids compounds. Modem pharmacological studies have showed that the Desmodium species have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, diuretic, antipyretic, analgesic and choleretic activity. This article mainly has reviewed the research advances of chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species since 2003. PMID:24791478

  19. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo [Yale University

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  20. Advancements in Development of Chemical-Looping Combustion: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    He Fang; Li Haibin; Zhao Zengli

    2009-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel combustion technology with inherent separation of greenhouse CO2. Extensive research has been performed on CLC in the last decade with respect to oxygen carrier development, reaction kinetics, reactor design, system efficiencies, and prototype testing. Transition metal oxides, such as Ni, Fe, Cu, and Mn oxides, were reported as reactive species in the oxygen carrier particles. Ni-based oxygen carriers exhibited the best reactivity and stability dur...

  1. Advances in the segmentation of multi-component microanalytical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segmenting multi-component microanalytical images consists in trying to find zones of the specimen with approximate homogeneous composition, representing different chemical phases. This can be done through pixel clustering. We first highlight some limitations of classical clustering algorithms (C-means and fuzzy C-means). Then, we describe a new algorithm we have contributed to develop: the Parzen-watersheds algorithm. This algorithm is based on the estimation of the probability density function of the whole data set in the feature space (through the Parzen approach) and its partitioning using a method inherited from mathematical morphology: the watersheds method. Next, we introduce a fuzzy version of this approach, where the pixels are characterized by their grades of membership to the different classes. Finally, we show how the definition of the grades of membership can be used to improve the results of clustering, through probabilistic relaxation in the image space. The different methods presented are illustrated through an example in the field of electron energy loss mapping, where four elemental maps are concentrated in a single chemical phase map

  2. Advanced imaging in femoroacetabular impingement: current state and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd eBittersohl

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques include magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA and biochemically sensitive techniques of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC, T1rho, T2/T2* mapping and several others. The diagnostic performance of these techniques to evaluate cartilage degeneration could improve the ability to predict an individual patient-specific outcome with non-surgical and surgical care. This review discusses the facts and current applications of biochemical MRI for hip joint cartilage assessment covering the roles of dGEMRIC, T2/T2*, and T1rho mapping. The basics of each technique and their specific role in FAI assessment are outlined. Current limitations and potential pitfalls as well as future directions of biochemical imaging are also outlined.

  3. Detection of chemical pollutants by passive LWIR hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Bouffard, François; Puckrin, Eldon; Dubé, Denis

    2012-09-01

    Toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) represent a major threat to public health and security. Their detection constitutes a real challenge to security and first responder's communities. One promising detection method is based on the passive standoff identification of chemical vapors emanating from the laboratory under surveillance. To investigate this method, the Department of National Defense and Public Safety Canada have mandated Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC) - Valcartier to develop and test passive Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors for standoff detection. The initial effort was focused to address the standoff detection and identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and precursors. Sensors such as the Multi-option Differential Detection and Imaging Fourier Spectrometer (MoDDIFS) and the Improved Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (iCATSI) were developed for this application. This paper describes the sensor developments and presents initial results of standoff detection and identification of TICs and precursors. The standoff sensors are based on the differential Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) radiometric technology and are able to detect, spectrally resolve and identify small leak plumes at ranges in excess of 1 km. Results from a series of trials in asymmetric threat type scenarios will be presented. These results will serve to establish the potential of the method for standoff detection of TICs precursors and surrogates.

  4. LWIR hyperspectral imaging application and detection of chemical precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Bouffard, François; Puckrin, Eldon; Dubé, Denis

    2012-10-01

    Detection and identification of Toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) represent a major challenge to protect and sustain first responder and public security. In this context, passive Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) is a promising technology for the standoff detection and identification of chemical vapors emanating from a distant location. To investigate this method, the Department of National Defense and Public Safety Canada have mandated Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC) - Valcartier to develop and test Very Long Wave Infrared (VLWIR) HSI sensors for standoff detection. The initial effort was focused to address the standoff detection and identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), surrogates and precursors. Sensors such as the Improved Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (iCATSI) and the Multi-option Differential Detection and Imaging Fourier Spectrometer (MoDDIFS) were developed for this application. This paper presents the sensor developments and preliminary results of standoff detection and identification of TICs and precursors. The iCATSI and MoDDIFS sensors are based on the optical differential Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) radiometric technology and are able to detect, spectrally resolve and identify small leak at ranges in excess of 1 km. Results from a series of trials in asymmetric threat type scenarios are reported. These results serve to establish the potential of passive standoff HSI detection of TICs, precursors and surrogates.

  5. Survey of knowledge of hazards of chemicals potentially associated with the advanced isotope separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazards of chemical potentially associated with the advanced isotope separation processes are estimated based on open literature references. The tentative quantity of each chemical associated with the processes and the toxicity of the chemical are used to estimate this hazard. The chemicals thus estimated to be the most potentially hazardous to health are fluorine, nitric acid, uranium metal, uranium hexafluoride, and uranium dust. The estimated next most hazardous chemicals are bromine, hydrobromic acid, hydrochloric acid, and hydrofluoric acid. For each of these chemicals and for a number of other process-associated chemicals the following information is presented: (1) any applicable standards, recommended standards and their basis; (2) a brief discussion to toxic effects including short exposure tolerance, atmospheric concentration immediately hazardous to life, evaluation of exposures, recommended control procedures, chemical properties, and a list of any toxicology reviews; and (3) recommendations for future research

  6. Advances in chemical physics dynamical processes in condensed matter

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Myron W

    2009-01-01

    Transport Properties and Soliton Models for Polyacetylene (M. Andretta, et al.). Development and Application of the Theory of Brownian Motion (W. Coffey). The Fading of Memory During the Regression of Structural Fluctuations (L. Dissado, et al.). Cooperative Molecular Behavior and Field Effects on Liquids: Experimental Considerations (G. Evans). A Review and Computer Simulation of the Molecular Dynamics of a Series of Specific Molecular Liquids (M. Evans and G. Evans). Recent Advances in Molecular-Dynamics Computer Simulation (D. Fincham and D. Heyes). Nonadiabatic Scattering Probl

  7. AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S. E.; Owen, C. J.; Peacocke, L.; Read, A. M.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G. W.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways - by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques. which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located. X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock. with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose 'AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere', a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth - Moon Ll point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and

  8. Recent Advances in Chemical Modification of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriks Rozners

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptide nucleic acid (PNA has become an extremely powerful tool in chemistry and biology. Although PNA recognizes single-stranded nucleic acids with exceptionally high affinity and sequence selectivity, there is considerable ongoing effort to further improve properties of PNA for both fundamental science and practical applications. The present paper discusses selected recent studies that improve on cellular uptake and binding of PNA to double-stranded DNA and RNA. The focus is on chemical modifications of PNA's backbone and heterocyclic nucleobases. The paper selects representative recent studies and does not attempt to provide comprehensive coverage of the broad and vibrant field of PNA modification.

  9. Recent advances in chemical evolution and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, John; Lazcano, Antonio

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the ideas of Oparin and Haldane who independently suggested more than 60 years ago that the first forms of life were anaerobic, heterotrophic bacteria that emerged as the result of a long period of chemical abiotic synthesis of organic compounds. It is suggested that at least some requirements for life are met in the Galaxy due to the cosmic abundance of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and other biogenic elements; the existence of extraterrestrial organic compounds; and the processes of stellar and interstellar planetary formation.

  10. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using VUV light from a Free Electron Laser [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 263002 (2010)]. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond-breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and definitively quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations.

  11. Advances in the chemical utilization of alkali lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large quantities of alkali lignin are produced as by-products by the South African pulping industry. The potential utilization of industrial soda/anthraquinone (soda/AQ) eucalyptus, kraft pine and soda bagasse lignin was subsequently investigated. The molecular mass distributions of the three lignins were similar when determined by high pressure gel permeation chromatography (HP-GPC). The quantitative and quanlitative occurrence of various low molecular mass lignin fragments in the different spent liquors, on the other hand, indicated that the three lignins have substantial chemical differences. Analysis of the purified degraded lignins by NMR, methoxyl content determinations, elemental analysis, carbohydrate content determinations etc., quantified various of the chemical properties of the lignin. The properties of the three lignins were ultimately used to make recommendations regarding the potential use of each lignin. One such application was investigated and it was shown that soda bagasse lignin can be used successfully in phenol formaldehyde resin applications. The reaction of formaldehyde with lignin model compounds in acidic medium was also investigated. This reaction was shown to give fast crosslinking of alkyl substituted phenolic and etherified phenolic lignin model compounds at positions meta to the aromatic hydroxy groups

  12. Fifteen years of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, Catherine E; Ford, Peter G; Plucinsky, Paul P

    2014-01-01

    As the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory enters its fifteenth year of operation on orbit, it continues to perform well and produce spectacular scientific results. The response of ACIS has evolved over the lifetime of the observatory due to radiation damage, molecular contamination and aging of the spacecraft in general. Here we present highlights from the instrument team's monitoring program and our expectations for the future of ACIS. The ACIS calibration source produces multiple line energies and fully illuminates the entire focal plane which has greatly facilitated the measurement of charge transfer inefficiency and absorption from contamination. While the radioactive decay of the source has decreased its utility, it continues to provide valuable data on the health of the instrument. Performance changes on ACIS continue to be manageable, and do not indicate any limitations on ACIS lifetime.

  13. Water-fat imaging and general chemical shift imaging with spectrum modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Li

    Water-fat chemical shift imaging (CSI) has been an active research area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the early 1980's. There are two main reasons for water- fat imaging. First, water-fat imaging can serve as a fat- suppression method. Removing the usually bright fatty signals not only extends the useful dynamic range of an image, but also allows better visualization of lesions or injected contrast, and removes chemical shift artifacts, which may contribute to improved diagnosis. Second, quantification of water and fat provides useful chemical information for characterizing tissues such as bone marrow, liver, and adrenal masses. A milestone in water- fat imaging is the Dixon method that can produce separate water and fat images with only two data acquisitions. In practice, however, the Dixon method is not always successful due to field inhomogeneity problems. In recent years, many variations of the Dixon method have been proposed to overcome the field inhomogeneity problem. In general, these methods can at best separate water and fat without identifying the two because the water and fat magnetization vectors are sampled symmetrically, only parallel and anti-parallel. Furthermore, these methods usually depend on two-dimensional phase unwrapping which itself is sensitive to noise and artifacts, and becomes unreliable when the images have disconnected tissues in the field-of-view (FOV). We will first introduce the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chapter 1, and briefly review the existing water-fat imaging techniques in chapter 2. In chapter 3, we will introduce a new method for water-fat imaging. With three image acquisitions, a general direct phase encoding (DPE) of the chemical shift information is achieved, which allows an unambiguous determination of water and fat on a pixel by pixel basis. Details of specific implementations and noise performance will be discussed. Representative results

  14. Pitfalls of adrenal imaging with chemical shift MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical shift (CS) MRI of the adrenal glands exploits the different precessional frequencies of fat and water protons to differentiate the intracytoplasmic lipid-containing adrenal adenoma from other adrenal lesions. The purpose of this review is to illustrate both technical and interpretive pitfalls of adrenal imaging with CS MRI and emphasize the importance of adherence to strict technical specifications and errors that may occur when other imaging features and clinical factors are not incorporated into the diagnosis. When performed properly, the specificity of CS MRI for the diagnosis of adrenal adenoma is over 90%. Sampling the in-phase and opposed-phase echoes in the correct order and during the same breath-hold are essential requirements, and using the first echo pair is preferred, if possible. CS MRI characterizes more adrenal adenomas then unenhanced CT but may be non-diagnostic in a proportion of lipid-poor adenomas; CT washout studies may be able to diagnose these lipid-poor adenomas. Other primary and secondary adrenal tumours and supra-renal disease entities may contain lipid or gross fat and mimic adenoma or myelolipoma. Heterogeneity within an adrenal lesion that contains intracytoplasmic lipid could be due to myelolipoma, lipomatous metaplasia of adenoma, or collision tumour. Correlation with previous imaging, other imaging features, clinical history, and laboratory investigations can minimize interpretive errors

  15. [Advances in chemical constituents and bioactivity of Salvia genus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing; Liu, Jian-xun

    2015-06-01

    The genus Salvia in the family Lamiaceae with nearly 1 000 species, is widespread in temperate and tropical regions around the world. Many species of genus Salvia are important medicinal plants with a long history of which Danshen (the dried roots and rhizomes of S. miltiorrhiza) is one of the most popular herbal traditional medicines in Asian countries. The chemical constituents from Salvia plants mainly contain sesquiterpenoids, diterpenoids, triterpenoids, steroids and polyphenols etc, which exhibit antibacterial, antidermatophytic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic, antiplatelet aggregation activities and so on. In this article, the development of new constituents and their biological activities of Salvia genus in the past five years were reviewed and summarized for its further development and utilization. PMID:26552163

  16. Advanced titania buffer layer architectures prepared by chemical solution deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, J.; Bäcker, M.; Brunkahl, O.; Wesolowski, D.; Edney, C.; Clem, P.; Thomas, N.; Liersch, A.

    2011-08-01

    Chemical solution deposition (CSD) was used to grow high-quality (100) oriented films of SrTiO3 (STO) on CSD CaTiO3 (CTO), Ba0.1Ca0.9TiO3 (BCT) and STO seed and template layers. These template films bridge the lattice misfit between STO and the nickel-tungsten (NiW) substrate, assisting in dense growth of textured STO. Additional niobium (Nb) doping of the STO buffer layer reduces oxygen diffusion which is necessary to avoid undesired oxidation of the NiW. The investigated templates offer suitable alternatives to established standard buffer systems like La2Zr2O7 (LZO) and CeO2 for coated conductors.

  17. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the deve......Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up...... the development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology...... and the advances in yeast strain engineering will stimulate development of novel yeast-based processes for chemicals production....

  18. Advanced electron crystallography through model-based imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aert, Sandra; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T; den Dekker, Arnold J; Van Dyck, Dirk; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2016-01-01

    The increasing need for precise determination of the atomic arrangement of non-periodic structures in materials design and the control of nanostructures explains the growing interest in quantitative transmission electron microscopy. The aim is to extract precise and accurate numbers for unknown structure parameters including atomic positions, chemical concentrations and atomic numbers. For this purpose, statistical parameter estimation theory has been shown to provide reliable results. In this theory, observations are considered purely as data planes, from which structure parameters have to be determined using a parametric model describing the images. As such, the positions of atom columns can be measured with a precision of the order of a few picometres, even though the resolution of the electron microscope is still one or two orders of magnitude larger. Moreover, small differences in average atomic number, which cannot be distinguished visually, can be quantified using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images. In addition, this theory allows one to measure compositional changes at interfaces, to count atoms with single-atom sensitivity, and to reconstruct atomic structures in three dimensions. This feature article brings the reader up to date, summarizing the underlying theory and highlighting some of the recent applications of quantitative model-based transmisson electron microscopy. PMID:26870383

  19. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Clas Linnman; David Borsook

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain p...

  20. Application of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Levenston, Marc E.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews current magnetic resonance imaging techniques for imaging the lower extremity, focusing on imaging of the knee, ankle, and hip joints. Recent advancements in MRI include imaging at 7 Tesla, using multiple receiver channels, T2* imaging, and metal suppression techniques, allowing more detailed visualization of complex anatomy, evaluation of morphological changes within articular cartilage, and imaging around orthopedic hardware. PMID:23622097

  1. Solar-Enhanced Advanced Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment: Simultaneous Removal of Pathogens and Chemical Pollutants

    OpenAIRE

    Oyuna Tsydenova; Valeriy Batoev; Agniya Batoeva

    2015-01-01

    The review explores the feasibility of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by solar-enhanced advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The AOPs are based on in-situ generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), most notably hydroxyl radicals •OH, that are capable of destroying both pollutant molecules and pathogen cells. The review presents evidence of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by photocatalytic processes, namely TiO2 photocatalysis and photo-Fe...

  2. Magnetic Doppler imaging of the chemically peculiar star HD 125248

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusomarov, N.; Kochukhov, O.; Ryabchikova, T.; Ilyin, I.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Intermediate-mass, chemically peculiar stars with strong magnetic fields provide an excellent opportunity to study the topology of their surface magnetic fields and the interplay between magnetic geometries and abundance inhomogeneities in the atmospheres of these stars. Aims: We reconstruct detailed maps of the surface magnetic field and abundance distributions for the magnetic Ap star HD 125248. Methods: We performed the analysis based on phase-resolved, four Stokes parameter spectropolarimetric observations obtained with the HARPSpol instrument. These data were interpreted with the help of magnetic Doppler imaging techniques and model atmospheres taking the effects of strong magnetic fields and nonsolar chemical composition into account. Results: We improved the atmospheric parameters of the star, Teff = 9850 ± 250 K and log g = 4.05 ± 0.10. We performed detailed abundance analysis, which confirmed that HD 125248 has abundances typical of other Ap stars, and discovered significant vertical stratification effects for the Fe ii and Cr ii ions. We computed LSD Stokes profiles using several line masks corresponding to Fe-peak and rare earth elements, and studied their behavior with rotational phase. Combining previous longitudinal field measurements with our own observations, we improved the rotational period of the star Prot = 9.29558 ± 0.00006 d. Magnetic Doppler imaging of HD 125248 showed that its magnetic field is mostly poloidal and quasi-dipolar with two large spots of different polarity and field strength. The chemical maps of Fe, Cr, Ce, Nd, Gd, and Ti show abundance contrasts of 0.9-3.5 dex. Among these elements, the Fe abundance map does not show high-contrast features. Cr is overabundant around the negative magnetic pole and has 3.5 dex abundance range. The rare earth elements and Ti are overabundant near the positive magnetic pole. Conclusions: The magnetic field of HD 125248 has strong deviations from the classical oblique dipole field

  3. Development of a Raman chemical imaging detection method for authenticating skim milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research demonstrated that Raman chemical imaging coupled with a simple image classification algorithm can be used to detect multiple chemical adulterants in skim milk powder. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea were mixed into the milk powder as chemical adulterants in the conc...

  4. A collaborative enterprise for multi-stakeholder participation in the advancement of quantitative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Andrew J; Bresolin, Linda; Dunnick, N Reed; Sullivan, Daniel C

    2011-03-01

    Medical imaging has seen substantial and rapid technical advances during the past decade, including advances in image acquisition devices, processing and analysis software, and agents to enhance specificity. Traditionally, medical imaging has defined anatomy, but increasingly newer, more advanced, imaging technologies provide biochemical and physiologic information based on both static and dynamic modalities. These advanced technologies are important not only for detecting disease but for characterizing and assessing change of disease with time or therapy. Because of the rapidity of these advances, research to determine the utility of quantitative imaging in either clinical research or clinical practice has not had time to mature. Methods to appropriately develop, assess, regulate, and reimburse must be established for these advanced technologies. Efficient and methodical processes that meet the needs of stakeholders in the biomedical research community, therapeutics developers, and health care delivery enterprises will ultimately benefit individual patients. To help address this, the authors formed a collaborative program-the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance. This program draws from the very successful precedent set by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise effort but is adapted to the needs of imaging science. Strategic guidance supporting the development, qualification, and deployment of quantitative imaging biomarkers will lead to improved standardization of imaging tests, proof of imaging test performance, and greater use of imaging to predict the biologic behavior of tissue and monitor therapy response. These, in turn, confer value to corporate stakeholders, providing incentives to bring new and innovative products to market. PMID:21339352

  5. A collaborative enterprise for multi-stakeholder participation in the advancement of quantitative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Andrew J; Bresolin, Linda; Dunnick, N Reed; Sullivan, Daniel C

    2011-03-01

    Medical imaging has seen substantial and rapid technical advances during the past decade, including advances in image acquisition devices, processing and analysis software, and agents to enhance specificity. Traditionally, medical imaging has defined anatomy, but increasingly newer, more advanced, imaging technologies provide biochemical and physiologic information based on both static and dynamic modalities. These advanced technologies are important not only for detecting disease but for characterizing and assessing change of disease with time or therapy. Because of the rapidity of these advances, research to determine the utility of quantitative imaging in either clinical research or clinical practice has not had time to mature. Methods to appropriately develop, assess, regulate, and reimburse must be established for these advanced technologies. Efficient and methodical processes that meet the needs of stakeholders in the biomedical research community, therapeutics developers, and health care delivery enterprises will ultimately benefit individual patients. To help address this, the authors formed a collaborative program-the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance. This program draws from the very successful precedent set by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise effort but is adapted to the needs of imaging science. Strategic guidance supporting the development, qualification, and deployment of quantitative imaging biomarkers will lead to improved standardization of imaging tests, proof of imaging test performance, and greater use of imaging to predict the biologic behavior of tissue and monitor therapy response. These, in turn, confer value to corporate stakeholders, providing incentives to bring new and innovative products to market.

  6. Recent advances in microbial production of fuels and chemicals using tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Changhee; Choi, So Young; Luo, Zi Wei;

    2015-01-01

    The advent of various systems metabolic engineering tools and strategies has enabled more sophisticated engineering of microorganisms for the production of industrially useful fuels and chemicals. Advances in systems metabolic engineering have been made in overproducing natural chemicals and prod...

  7. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  8. Burnout prediction using advance image analysis coal characterization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Lester; Dave Watts; Michael Cloke [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). School of Chemical Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2003-07-01

    The link between petrographic composition and burnout has been investigated previously by the authors. However, these predictions were based on 'bulk' properties of the coal, including the proportion of each maceral or the reflectance of the macerals in the whole sample. Combustion studies relating burnout with microlithotype analysis, or similar, remain less common partly because the technique is more complex than maceral analysis. Despite this, it is likely that any burnout prediction based on petrographic characteristics will become more accurate if it includes information about the maceral associations and the size of each particle. Chars from 13 coals, 106-125 micron size fractions, were prepared using a Drop Tube Furnace (DTF) at 1300{degree}C and 200 millisecond and 1% Oxygen. These chars were then refired in the DTF at 1300{degree}C 5% oxygen and residence times of 200, 400 and 600 milliseconds. The progressive burnout of each char was compared with the characteristics of the initial coals. This paper presents an extension of previous studies in that it relates combustion behaviour to coals that have been characterized on a particle by particle basis using advanced image analysis techniques. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging: technology and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Bradford C

    2007-07-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a valuable method for use by clinical investigators to study task-related brain activation in patients with neurological or neuropsychiatric illness. Despite the relative infancy of the field, the rapid adoption of this functional neuroimaging technology has resulted from, among other factors, its ready availability, its relatively high spatial and temporal resolution, and its safety as a noninvasive imaging tool that enables multiple repeated scans over the course of a longitudinal study, and thus may lend itself well as a measure in clinical drug trials. Investigators have used fMRI to identify abnormal functional brain activity during task performance in a variety of patient populations, including those with neurodegenerative, demyelinating, cerebrovascular, and other neurological disorders that highlight the potential utility of fMRI in both basic and clinical spheres of research. In addition, fMRI studies reveal processes related to neuroplasticity, including compensatory hyperactivation, which may be a universally-occurring, adaptive neural response to insult. Functional MRI is being used to study the modulatory effects of genetic risk factors for neurological disease on brain activation; it is being applied to differential diagnosis, as a predictive biomarker of disease course, and as a means to identify neural correlates of neurotherapeutic interventions. Technological advances are rapidly occurring that should provide new applications for fMRI, including improved spatial resolution, which promises to reveal novel insights into the function of fine-scale neural circuitry of the human brain in health and disease.

  10. Magnetic Doppler imaging of the chemically peculiar star HD 125248

    CERN Document Server

    Rusomarov, N; Ryabchikova, T; Ilyin, I

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate-mass, chemically peculiar stars with strong magnetic fields give us an excellent opportunity to study the topology of their surface magnetic fields and the interplay between magnetic geometries and abundance inhomogeneities in their atmospheres. We reconstruct detailed maps of the surface magnetic field and abundance distributions for the magnetic Ap star HD 125248. We performed the analysis based on phase-resolved, four Stokes parameter spectropolarimetric observations obtained with the HARPSpol instrument. These data were interpreted with the magnetic Doppler imaging technique. We improved the atmospheric parameters of the star, T_eff = 9850K +/- 250K and logg = 4.05 +/- 0.10. We performed detailed abundance analysis and discovered vertical stratification effects for the FeII and CrII ions. We computed LSD Stokes profiles and studied their behavior with rotational phase. We improved the rotational period of the star P_rot = 9.29558(6)d. Magnetic Doppler imaging of HD 125248 showed that its magn...

  11. Applications of Chemical Shift Imaging to Marine Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haakil Lee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The successful applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in medicine are mostly due to the non-invasive and non-destructive nature of MRI techniques. Longitudinal studies of humans and animals are easily accomplished, taking advantage of the fact that MRI does not use harmful radiation that would be needed for plain film radiographic, computerized tomography (CT or positron emission (PET scans. Routine anatomic and functional studies using the strong signal from the most abundant magnetic nucleus, the proton, can also provide metabolic information when combined with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. MRS can be performed using either protons or hetero-nuclei (meaning any magnetic nuclei other than protons or 1H including carbon (13C or phosphorus (31P. In vivo MR spectra can be obtained from single region ofinterest (ROI or voxel or multiple ROIs simultaneously using the technique typically called chemical shift imaging (CSI. Here we report applications of CSI to marine samples and describe a technique to study in vivo glycine metabolism in oysters using 13C MRS 12 h after immersion in a sea water chamber dosed with [2-13C]-glycine. This is the first report of 13C CSI in a marine organism.

  12. Significant advancement of mass spectrometry imaging for food chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Food contains various compounds that have an impact on our daily lives. Many technologies have been established to analyze these molecules of interest in foods. However, the analysis of the spatial distribution of these compounds in foods using conventional technology, such as high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is difficult. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) is considered an ideal complementary approach. MALDI-MSI is a two-dimensional MALDI-MS technology that can detect compounds in a tissue section without extraction, purification, separation, or labeling. MALDI-MSI can be used to visualize the spatial distribution of chemical compounds or biomolecules in foods. Although the methodology of MALDI-MSI in food science is not yet fully established, the versatility of MALDI-MSI is expected to open a new frontier in food science. Herein, we describe the principles and applications of MALDI-MSI in food science and related fields. PMID:27211639

  13. Significant advancement of mass spectrometry imaging for food chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Food contains various compounds that have an impact on our daily lives. Many technologies have been established to analyze these molecules of interest in foods. However, the analysis of the spatial distribution of these compounds in foods using conventional technology, such as high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is difficult. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) is considered an ideal complementary approach. MALDI-MSI is a two-dimensional MALDI-MS technology that can detect compounds in a tissue section without extraction, purification, separation, or labeling. MALDI-MSI can be used to visualize the spatial distribution of chemical compounds or biomolecules in foods. Although the methodology of MALDI-MSI in food science is not yet fully established, the versatility of MALDI-MSI is expected to open a new frontier in food science. Herein, we describe the principles and applications of MALDI-MSI in food science and related fields.

  14. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  15. Recent advances in rapid and non-destructive assessment of meat quality using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feifei; Ngadi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Meat is an important food item in human diet. Its production and consumption has greatly increased in the last decades with the development of economies and improvement of peoples' living standards. However, most of the traditional methods for evaluation of meat quality are time-consuming, laborious, inconsistent and destructive to samples, which make them not appropriate for a fast-paced production and processing environment. Development of innovative and non-destructive optical sensing techniques to facilitate simple, fast, and accurate evaluation of quality are attracting increasing attention in the food industry. Hyperspectral imaging is one of the promising techniques. It integrates the combined merits of imaging and spectroscopic techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review on recent advances in evaluation of the important quality attributes of meat including color, marbling, tenderness, pH, water holding capacity, and also chemical composition attributes such as moisture content, protein content and fat content in pork, beef and lamb. In addition, the future potential applications and trends of hyperspectral imaging are also discussed in this paper.

  16. Advanced Methods for Localized Content Based Image Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Radhey Shyam; Pooja Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Localized Content based image retrieval is an effective technique for image retrieval in large databases. It is the retrieval of images based on visual features such as color, texture and shape. In this paper, our desired content of an image is not holistic, but is localized. Specifically, we define Localized Content-Based Image Retrieval, where the user is only interested in a portion of the image, and the rest of the image is irrelevant. Some work already has been done in this direction. We...

  17. Chemical Imaging of the Cell Membrane by NanoSIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P K; Kraft, M L; Frisz, J F; Carpenter, K J; Hutcheon, I D

    2010-02-23

    The existence of lipid microdomains and their role in cell membrane organization are currently topics of great interest and controversy. The cell membrane is composed of a lipid bilayer with embedded proteins that can flow along the two-dimensional surface defined by the membrane. Microdomains, known as lipid rafts, are believed to play a central role in organizing this fluid system, enabling the cell membrane to carry out essential cellular processes, including protein recruitment and signal transduction. Lipid rafts are also implicated in cell invasion by pathogens, as in the case of the HIV. Therefore, understanding the role of lipid rafts in cell membrane organization not only has broad scientific implications, but also has practical implications for medical therapies. One of the major limitations on lipid organization research has been the inability to directly analyze lipid composition without introducing artifacts and at the relevant length-scales of tens to hundreds of nanometers. Fluorescence microscopy is widely used due to its sensitivity and specificity to the labeled species, but only the labeled components can be observed, fluorophores can alter the behavior of the lipids they label, and the length scales relevant to imaging cell membrane domains are between that probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging (<10 nm) and the diffraction limit of light. Topographical features can be imaged on this length scale by atomic force microscopy (AFM), but the chemical composition of the observed structures cannot be determined. Immuno-labeling can be used to study the distribution of membrane proteins at high resolution, but not lipid composition. We are using imaging mass spectrometry by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in concert with other high resolution imaging methods to overcome these limitations. The experimental approach of this project is to combine molecule-specific stable isotope labeling with high-resolution SIMS using a

  18. Chemical Imaging of Heterogeneous Muscle Foods Using Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging in Transmission Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Jens Petter; Kermit, Martin; Segtnan, Vegard Herman

    2016-06-01

    Foods and biomaterials are, in general, heterogeneous and it is often a challenge to obtain spectral data which are representative for the chemical composition and distribution. This paper presents a setup for near-infrared (NIR) transmission imaging where the samples are completely trans-illuminated, probing the entire sample. The system measures falling samples at high speed and consists of an NIR imaging scanner covering the spectral range 760-1040 nm and a powerful line light source. The investigated samples were rather big: whole pork bellies of thickness up to 5 cm, salmon fillets with skin, and 3 cm thick model samples of ground pork meat. Partial least square regression models for fat were developed for ground pork and salmon fillet with high correlations (R = 0.98 and R = 0.95, respectively). The regression models were applied at pixel level in the hyperspectral transmission images and resulted in images of fat distribution where also deeply embedded fat clearly contributed to the result. The results suggest that it is possible to use transmission imaging for rapid, nondestructive, and representative sampling of very heterogeneous foods. The proposed system is suitable for industrial use. PMID:27257302

  19. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibener, Steven J. [University of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-03-11

    This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy in conjunction with supersonic molecular beam gas-surface scattering to significantly enhance our understanding of chemical processes occurring on well-characterized interfaces. One program focus was on the spatially-resolved emergent behavior of complex reaction systems as a function of the local geometry and density of adsorbate-substrate systems under reaction conditions. Another focus was on elucidating the emergent electronic and related reactivity characteristics of intentionally constructed single and multicomponent atom- and nanoparticle-based materials. We also examined emergent chirality and self-organization in adsorbed molecular systems where collective interactions between adsorbates and the supporting interface lead to spatial symmetry breaking. In many of these studies we combined the advantages of scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) imaging, scanning tunneling local electronic spectroscopy (STS), and reactive supersonic molecular beams to elucidate precise details of interfacial reactivity that had not been observed by more traditional surface science methods. Using these methods, it was possible to examine, for example, the differential reactivity of molecules adsorbed at different bonding sites in conjunction with how reactivity is modified by the local configuration of nearby adsorbates. At the core of this effort was the goal of significantly extending our understanding of interfacial atomic-scale interactions to create, with intent, molecular assemblies and materials with advanced chemical and physical properties. This ambitious program addressed several key topics in DOE Grand Challenge Science, including emergent chemical and physical properties in condensed phase systems, novel uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon

  20. Advanced magneto-optical microscopy: Imaging from picoseconds to centimeters - imaging spin waves and temperature distributions (invited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necdet Onur Urs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in the observation of magnetic domains and domain walls by wide-field optical microscopy based on the magneto-optical Kerr, Faraday, Voigt, and Gradient effect are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the existence of higher order magneto-optical effects for advanced magnetic imaging. Fundamental concepts and advances in methodology are discussed that allow for imaging of magnetic domains on various length and time scales. Time-resolved imaging of electric field induced domain wall rotation is shown. Visualization of magnetization dynamics down to picosecond temporal resolution for the imaging of spin-waves and magneto-optical multi-effect domain imaging techniques for obtaining vectorial information are demonstrated. Beyond conventional domain imaging, the use of a magneto-optical indicator technique for local temperature sensing is shown.

  1. DESIGN AN ADVANCE COMPUTER-AIDED TOOL FOR IMAGE AUTHENTICATION AND CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Teymourzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, advancements in the fields of digital image processing and artificial intelligence have been applied in solving many real-life problems. This could be seen in facial image recognition for security systems, identity registrations. Hence a bottleneck of identity registration is image processing. These are carried out in form of image preprocessing, image region extraction by cropping, feature extraction using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and image compression using Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT. Other processing include filtering and histogram equalization using contrast stretching is performed while enhancing the image as part of the analytical tool. Hence, this research work presents a universal integration image forgery detection analysis tool with image facial recognition using Black Propagation Neural Network (BPNN processor. The proposed designed tool is a multi-function smart tool with the novel architecture of programmable error goal and light intensity. Furthermore, its advance dual database increases the efficiency for high performance application. With the fact that, the facial image recognition will always, give a matching output or closest possible output image for every input image irrespective of the authenticity, the universal smart GUI tool is proposed and designed to perform image forgery detection with the high accuracy of ±2% error rate. Meanwhile, a novel structure that provides efficient automatic image forgery detection for all input test images for the BPNN recognition is presented. Hence, an input image will be authenticated before being fed into the recognition tool.

  2. Advances in Imaging of the Pediatric Pituitary Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Ayache, Jad M; Delman, Bradley N

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution MRI of the pediatric sella can help identity or confirm clinical abnormalities, assess pituitary gland size and structure, and reveal acquired lesions. This article reviews contemporary techniques for imaging of the sella and associated structures in this population. Strengths and weaknesses of conventional imaging are discussed, as are techniques that can enhance yield. Some new and emerging technologies are discussed, including MR elastography, perfusion imaging, spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted and diffusion-tensor imaging. It is expected that this overview will provide insight as to where pediatric sella imaging is currently and where it may head in the future. PMID:27241974

  3. Rodent-repellent studies. III. Advanced studies in the evaluation of chemical repellents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellack, E.; DeWitt, J.B.

    1949-01-01

    In order to bridge the gap between preliminary screening of chemicals for potential rodent repellency and the application ofthese compounds to paper cartons, more advanced studies in the evaluation ofpromising materials have been carried out. These studies have resulted in: (1) a modification of the food acceptance technique which eliminates doubtful compounds and also provides a closer analogy to the ultimate goal, and (2) a method for rapidly testing chemicals incorporated in paper. When the results of these latter tests are expressed as a function of time, it can be shown that a distinct correlation exists between the deterrency exhibited by treated paper and the repellency of treated food.

  4. Assessment of impacts at the advanced test reactor as a result of chemical releases at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides an assessment of potential impacts at the Advanced Test Reactor Facility (ATR) resulting from accidental chemical spill at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Spills postulated to occur at the Lincoln Blvd turnoff to ICPP were also evaluated. Peak and time weighted average concentrations were calculated for receptors at the ATR facility and the Test Reactor Area guard station at a height above ground level of 1.0 m. Calculated concentrations were then compared to the 15 minute averaged Threshold Limit Value - Short Term Exposure Limit (TLV-STEL) and the 30 minute averaged Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) limit. Several different methodologies were used to estimate source strength and dispersion. Fifteen minute time weighted averaged concentrations of hydrofluoric acid and anhydrous ammonia exceeded TLV-STEL values for the cases considered. The IDLH value for these chemicals was not exceeded. Calculated concentrations of ammonium hydroxide, hexone, nitric acid, propane, gasoline, chlorine and liquid nitrogen were all below the TLV-STEL value

  5. A Raman chemical imaging system for detection of contaminants in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presented a preliminary investigation into the use of macro-scale Raman chemical imaging for the screening of dry milk powder for the prescence of chemical contaminants. Melamine was mixed into dry milk at concentrations (w/w) of 0.2%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% and images of the ...

  6. Development of a Raman chemical image detection algorithm for authenticating dry milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research developed a Raman chemical imaging method for detecting multiple adulterants in skim milk powder. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea were mixed into the milk powder as chemical adulterants in the concentration range of 0.1–5.0%. A Raman imaging system using a 785-nm la...

  7. Terahertz pulsed imaging as an advanced characterisation tool for film coatings--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaser, Miriam; Gordon, Keith C; Strachan, Clare J; Rades, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Solid dosage forms are the pharmaceutical drug delivery systems of choice for oral drug delivery. These solid dosage forms are often coated to modify the physico-chemical properties of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), in particular to alter release kinetics. Since the product performance of coated dosage forms is a function of their critical coating attributes, including coating thickness, uniformity, and density, more advanced quality control techniques than weight gain are required. A recently introduced non-destructive method to quantitatively characterise coating quality is terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI). The ability of terahertz radiation to penetrate many pharmaceutical materials enables structural features of coated solid dosage forms to be probed at depth, which is not readily achievable with other established imaging techniques, e.g. near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy. In this review TPI is introduced and various applications of the technique in pharmaceutical coating analysis are discussed. These include evaluation of coating thickness, uniformity, surface morphology, density, defects and buried structures as well as correlation between TPI measurements and drug release performance, coating process monitoring and scale up. Furthermore, challenges and limitations of the technique are discussed. PMID:23570960

  8. Advanced imaging of skeletal manifestations of systemic mastocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, J. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fishman, E.K.; Carrino, J.A. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Horger, M.S. [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Systemic mastocytosis comprises a group of clonal disorders of the mast cell that most commonly involves the skeletal system. Imaging can be helpful in the detection and characterization of the osseous manifestations of this disease. While radiography and bone scans are frequently used for this assessment, low-dose multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can be more sensitive for the detection of marrow involvement and for the demonstration of the various disease patterns. In this article, we review the pathophysiological and clinical features of systemic mastocytosis, discuss the role of imaging for staging and management, and illustrate the various cross-sectional imaging appearances. Awareness and knowledge of the imaging features of this disorder will increase the accuracy of image interpretation and can contribute important information for management decisions. (orig.)

  9. Advanced imaging of skeletal manifestations of systemic mastocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systemic mastocytosis comprises a group of clonal disorders of the mast cell that most commonly involves the skeletal system. Imaging can be helpful in the detection and characterization of the osseous manifestations of this disease. While radiography and bone scans are frequently used for this assessment, low-dose multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can be more sensitive for the detection of marrow involvement and for the demonstration of the various disease patterns. In this article, we review the pathophysiological and clinical features of systemic mastocytosis, discuss the role of imaging for staging and management, and illustrate the various cross-sectional imaging appearances. Awareness and knowledge of the imaging features of this disorder will increase the accuracy of image interpretation and can contribute important information for management decisions. (orig.)

  10. Advanced phase-contrast imaging using a grating interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, S.A.; Marone, F.; Hintermüller, C; Mikuljan, G; David, C.; Pfeiffer, F.; Stampanoni, M.

    2009-01-01

    Phase-sensitive X-ray imaging methods can provide substantially increased contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging, and therefore new and otherwise inaccessible information. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) imaging, which uses a grating interferometer and a phase-stepping technique, has been integrated into TOMCAT, a beamline dedicated to tomographic microscopy and coherent radiology experiments at the Swiss Light Source. Developments have been made focusing on the fast acquisitio...

  11. Advanced techniques in medical image segmentation of the liver

    OpenAIRE

    López Mir, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Image segmentation is, along with multimodal and monomodal registration, the operation with the greatest applicability in medical image processing. There are many operations and filters, as much as applications and cases, where the segmentation of an organic tissue is the first step. The case of liver segmentation in radiological images is, after the brain, that on which the highest number of scientific publications can be found. This is due, on the one hand, to the need to continue inno...

  12. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT: Advances in Gastrointestinal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas S. Kirtane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly evolving field of endoscopic gastrointestinal imaging, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT has found many diverse applications. We present the current status of OCT and its practical applications in imaging normal and abnormal mucosa in the esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines, and biliary and pancreatic ducts. We highlight technical aspects and principles of imaging, assess published data, and suggest future directions for OCT-guided evaluation and therapy.

  13. SAR image segmentation based on the advanced level set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image segmentation takes an important role in SAR image processing. In this paper, a SAR image segmentation method based on level set evolution combining edge feature and statistic information is proposed. In order to enhance the impact of edge on image segmentation, all edge values are homogenized according to the calculated ROA operator. Different from traditional method where the SAR distribution is often specified based on human experiences, the Edgeworth algorithm, an approximation method for statistical distribution model, gives any SAR image distribution a statistical expression. Considering the practicability of ROA operator and the adaptivity of Edgeworth series expansion at fitting statistical distribution, an energy function based on edge and region properties is defined. To implement image division, partial differential equation (PDE) of curve evolution is obtained by minimizing the function. The proposed approach uses more information from SAR images and is appropriate for any SAR images without the need for human-specified distribution pattern. Finally, the experimental results which are obtained from the SAR images of some typical regions such as rivers and buildings show the applicability of the proposed method

  14. Review on advanced of solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer for agriculture produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadhel, M.I. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia); Sopian, K.; Daud, W.R.W.; Alghoul, M.A. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    Over the past three decades there has been nearly exponential growth in drying R and D on a global scale. Improving of the drying operation to save energy, improve product quality as well as reduce environmental effect remained as the main objectives of any development of drying system. A solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer is a new solar drying system, which have contributed to better cost-effectiveness and better quality dried products as well as saving energy. A solar collector is adapted to provide thermal energy in a reactor so a chemical reaction can take place. This reduces the dependency of the drying technology on fossil energy for heating. In this paper a review on advanced of solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer is presented (the system model and the results from experimental studies on the system performance are discussed). The review of heat pump dryers and solar assisted heat pump dryer is presented. Description of chemical heat pump types and the overview of chemical heat pump dryer are discussed. The combination of chemical heat pump and solar technology gives extra efficiency in utilizing energy. (author)

  15. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Theory of Chemical Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    1986-01-01

    The calculation of cross sections and rate constants for chemical reactions in the gas phase has long been a major problem in theoretical chemistry. The need for reliable and applicable theories in this field is evident when one considers the significant recent advances that have been made in developing experimental techniques, such as lasers and molecular beams, to probe the microscopic details of chemical reactions. For example, it is now becoming possible to measure cross sections for chemical reactions state selected in the vibrational­ rotational states of both reactants and products. Furthermore, in areas such as atmospheric, combustion and interstellar chemistry, there is an urgent need for reliable reaction rate constant data over a range of temperatures, and this information is often difficult to obtain in experiments. The classical trajectory method can be applied routinely to simple reactions, but this approach neglects important quantum mechanical effects such as tunnelling and resonances. For al...

  16. Secure and Faster Clustering Environment for Advanced Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Kesavaraja

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing provides ample opportunity in many areas such as fastest image transmission, secure and efficient imaging as a service. In general users needs faster and secure service. Usually Image Compression Algorithms are not working faster. In spite of several ongoing researches, Conventional Compression and its Algorithms might not be able to run faster. So, we perform comparative study of three image compression algorithm and their variety of features and factors to choose best among them for cluster processing. After choosing a best one it can be applied for a cluster computing environment to run parallel image compression for faster processing. This paper is the real time implementation of a Distributed Image Compression in Clustering of Nodes. In cluster computing, security is also more important factor. So, we propose a Distributed Intrusion Detection System to monitors all the nodes in cluster . If an intrusion occur in node processing then take an prevention step based on RIC (Robust Intrusion Control Method. We demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of our method on a set of satellite images for defense forces. The efficiency ratio of this computation process is 91.20.

  17. Bio-image warehouse system: concept and implementation of a diagnosis-based data warehouse for advanced imaging modalities in neuroradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, L; Ghielmetti, F; Ciobanu, V; D'Incerti, L; Maccagnano, C; Bizzi, A; Bruzzone, M G

    2007-03-01

    Advanced neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), chemical shift spectroscopy imaging (CSI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) create novel challenges in terms of data storage and management: huge amounts of raw data are generated, the results of analysis may depend on the software and settings that have been used, and most often intermediate files are inherently not compliant with the current DICOM (digital imaging and communication in medicine) standard, as they contain multidimensional complex and tensor arrays and various other types of data structures. A software architecture, referred to as Bio-Image Warehouse System (BIWS), which can be used alongside a radiology information system/picture archiving and communication system (RIS/PACS) system to store neuroimaging data for research purposes, is presented. The system architecture is conceived with the purpose of enabling to query by diagnosis according to a predefined two-layered classification taxonomy. The operational impact of the system and the time needed to get acquainted with the web-based interface and with the taxonomy are found to be limited. The development of modules enabling automated creation of statistical templates is proposed.

  18. 3D Imaging with Structured Illumination for Advanced Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dagel, Amber Lynn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kast, Brian A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, Collin S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information in a physical security system is a highly useful dis- criminator. The two-dimensional data from an imaging systems fails to provide target dis- tance and three-dimensional motion vector, which can be used to reduce nuisance alarm rates and increase system effectiveness. However, 3D imaging devices designed primarily for use in physical security systems are uncommon. This report discusses an architecture favorable to physical security systems; an inexpensive snapshot 3D imaging system utilizing a simple illumination system. The method of acquiring 3D data, tests to understand illumination de- sign, and software modifications possible to maximize information gathering capability are discussed.

  19. Recent advances in computational methods and clinical applications for spine imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Glocker, Ben; Klinder, Tobias; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at the MICCAI 2014 workshop on Computational Methods and Clinical Applications for Spine Imaging. The workshop brought together scientists and clinicians in the field of computational spine imaging. The chapters included in this book present and discuss the new advances and challenges in these fields, using several methods and techniques in order to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving signal and image acquisition, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration and fusion, computer simulation, image based modeling, simulation and surgical planning, image guided robot assisted surgical and image based diagnosis. The book also includes papers and reports from the first challenge on vertebra segmentation held at the workshop.

  20. Advanced Calibration Source for Planetary and Earth Observing Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiometric calibration is critical to many NASA activities.  At NASA SSC, imaging cameras have been used in-situ to monitor propulsion test stand...

  1. Earth Observing 1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI): 2009-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Global Land Survey (GLS) datasets are a collection of orthorectified, cloud-minimized Landsat-type satellite images, providing near complete coverage of the...

  2. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI): 2004-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Global Land Survey (GLS) datasets are a collection of orthorectified, cloud-minimized Landsat-type satellite images, providing near complete coverage of the...

  3. Advanced Techniques for Automatic Change Detection in Multitemporal Hyperspectral Images

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Sicong

    2015-01-01

    The increasing availability of the new generation remote sensing satellite hyperspectral images provides an important data source for Earth Observation (EO). Hyperspectral images are characterized by a very detailed spectral sampling (i.e., very high spectral resolution) over a wide spectral wavelength range. This important property makes it possible the monitoring of the land-cover dynamic and environmental evolution at a fine spectral scale. This also allows one to potentially detect subtle...

  4. Digital radiography and advanced imaging techniques in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Burcu Keles Evlice; Haluk Oztunc

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of x-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying and storing radiographic images. Digital or filmless radiography is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital radiography offers a number of capabilities compared with conventional radiography, such as postprocessing, electronic archiving, concurrent access to images, and improved data distribution. Computer based applications which are used for quantitative measurements and evaluati...

  5. Advanced Neuromonitoring and Imaging in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart H. Friess

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While the cornerstone of monitoring following severe pediatric traumatic brain injury is serial neurologic examinations, vital signs, and intracranial pressure monitoring, additional techniques may provide useful insight into early detection of evolving brain injury. This paper provides an overview of recent advances in neuromonitoring, neuroimaging, and biomarker analysis of pediatric patients following traumatic brain injury.

  6. Advanced diffusion imaging sequences could aid assessing patients with focal cortical dysplasia and epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Winston, G P; Micallef, C.; Symms, M.R.; Alexander, D. C.; Duncan, J.S.; Zhang, H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Malformations of cortical development (MCD), particularly focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), are a common cause of refractory epilepsy but are often invisible on structural imaging. NODDI (neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging) is an advanced diffusion imaging technique that provides additional information on tissue microstructure, including intracellular volume fraction (ICVF), a marker of neurite density. We applied this technique in 5 patients with suspected dysplasia to ...

  7. Digital radiography and advanced imaging techniques in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Keles Evlice

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of x-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying and storing radiographic images. Digital or filmless radiography is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital radiography offers a number of capabilities compared with conventional radiography, such as postprocessing, electronic archiving, concurrent access to images, and improved data distribution. Computer based applications which are used for quantitative measurements and evaluations on digital images for better user interpretation. New diagnostic imaging processes are improved connected with the technological progress of computer systems. Since the first clinical use of computed tomography (CT scans in 1972, technological development has been rapid. Dental volumetric tomography (DVT, uniquely used for dentomaxillofacial imaging came to the market owing to recent rapid developments in digital radiology technology and is becoming more popular in dental applications. Low radiation dose cone beam computed tomography (CBCT units that are commercially available at a lower cost than CT units, has performed valuable diagnostic information for dentists. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 230-238

  8. X-ray photon-in/photon-out methods for chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-24

    Most interesting materials in nature are heterogeneous, so it is useful to have analytical techniques with spatial resolution sufficient to resolve these heterogeneities.This article presents the basics of X-ray photon-in/photon-out chemical imaging. This family of methods allows one to derive images reflectingthe chemical state of a given element in a complex sample, at micron or deep sub-micron scale. X-ray chemical imaging is relatively non-destructiveand element-selective, and requires minimal sample preparation. The article presents the basic concepts and some considerations of data takingand data analysis, along with some examples.

  9. Neuroimaging of pediatric brain tumors: from basic to advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Blüml, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    In this review, the basic magnetic resonance concepts used in the imaging approach of a pediatric brain tumor are described with respect to different factors including understanding the significance of the patient's age. Also discussed are other factors directly related to the magnetic resonance scan itself including evaluating the location of the tumor, determining if the lesion is extra-axial or intra-axial, and evaluating the contrast characteristics of the lesion. Of note, there are key imaging features of pediatric brain tumors, which can give information about the cellularity of the lesion, which can then be confirmed with advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. The second part of this review will provide an overview of the major advanced MRI techniques used in pediatric imaging, particularly, magnetic resonance diffusion, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance perfusion. The last part of the review will provide more specific information about the use of advanced magnetic resonance techniques in the evaluation of pediatric brain tumors.

  10. Machine Vision and Advanced Image Processing in Remote Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    This paper describes the multivariate alteration detection (MAD) transformation which is based on the established canonical correlation analysis. It also proposes post-processing of the change detected by the MAD variates by means of maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis. As opposed to most......, and to the application of radiometric and atmospheric correction schemes that are linear or affine in the gray numbers of each image band. Other multivariate change detection schemes described are principal component type analysis of simple difference images. A case study with Landsat TM data using simple linear...... stretching and masking of the change images shows the usefulness of the new MAD and MAF/MAD change detection schemes. A simple simulation of a no-change situation shows the power of the MAD and MAF/MAD transformations...

  11. Conventional and advanced MR imaging in infantile Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Mustafa; Karlı-Oğuz, Kader; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Topçu, Meral; Wanders, Ronald James; Coşkun, Turgay

    2015-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings including diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings in a patient with infantile Refsum disease. The initial diagnosis was made on the basis of history, clinical findings and biochemical studies. Bilateral and symmetrical involvement of the peritrigonal white matter, centrum semiovale, thalami, corpus callosum and corticospinal tracts as assessed by increased T2 signal was highly suggestive of a peroxisomal disorder. Facilitated diffusion was observed in diseased parenchyma. Long echo-time (TE: 270 ms) MRS showed decreased N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine and elevated choline/creatine and lactate; short echo-time MRS (TE: 30 ms) revealed increased myoinositol at 3.56 ppm and lipid peaks at 0.9 and 1.3 ppm. A major contribution to the differential diagnosis came from MR imaging and proton MRS, as discussed in this report.

  12. Advances in radionuclide molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, β-cell mass (BCM) is lost.Various treatments are developed to restore or reconstruct BCM. The development of non-invasive methods to quantify BCM in vivo offers the potential for early detection of β-cell dysfunction prior to the clinical onset of diabetes. PET imaging with radioligands that directly target the pancreatic β-cells appears promising. The ability to determine the BCM has been investigated in several targets and their corresponding radiotracers, including radiolabeled receptor ligands, antibodies, metabolites and reporter genes. Therefore, we summarize the recent progress in radionuclide molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells. (authors)

  13. Advances in chemical synthesis and application of metal-metalloid amorphous alloy nanoparticulate catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhijie; LI Wei; ZHANG Minghui; TAO Keyi

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the advances in the chemical synthesis and application of metal-metalloid amorphous alloy nanoparticles consisting of transition metal (M) and metalloid elements (B,P).After a brief introduction on the history of amorphous alloy catalysts,the paper focuses on the properties and characterization of amorphous alloy catalysts,and recent developments in the solution-phase synthesis of amorphous alloy nanoparticles.This paper further outlines the applications of amorphous alloys,with special emphasis on the problems and strategies for the application of amorphous alloy nanoparticles in catalytic reactions.

  14. Diffusion, Thermal Properties and Chemical Compatibilities of Select MAX Phases with Materials For Advanced Nuclear Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsoum, Michel [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bentzel, Grady [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tallman, Darin J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sindelar, Robert [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, Brenda [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hoffman, Elizabeth [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-04

    The demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron irradiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ ºC) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the chemical compatibility of select MAX with potential materials that are important for nuclear energy, as well as to measure the thermal transport properties as a function of neutron irradiation. The chemical counterparts chosen for this work are: pyrolytic carbon, SiC, U, Pd, FLiBe, Pb-Bi and Na, the latter 3 in the molten state. The thermal conductivities and heat capacities of non-irradiated MAX phases will be measured.

  15. Recent advances in chemical functionalization of nanoparticles with biomolecules for analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ju-Hwan; Park, Do Hyun; Joo, Jang Ho; Lee, Jae-Seung

    2015-11-01

    The recent synthetic development of a variety of nanoparticles has led to their widespread application in diagnostics and therapeutics. In particular, the controlled size and shape of nanoparticles precisely determine their unique chemical and physical properties, which is highly attractive for accurate analysis of given systems. In addition to efforts toward controlling the synthesis and properties of nanoparticles, the surface functionalization of nanoparticles with biomolecules has been intensively investigated since the mid-1990s. The complicated yet programmable properties of biomolecules have proved to substantially enhance and enrich the novel functions of nanoparticles to achieve "smart" nanoparticle materials. In this review, the advances in chemical functionalization of four types of representative nanoparticle with DNA and protein molecules in the past five years are critically reviewed, and their future trends are predicted.

  16. Diffusion, Thermal Properties and Chemical Compatibilities of Select MAX Phases with Materials For Advanced Nuclear Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsoum, Michel [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bentzel, Grady [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tallman, Darin J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sindelar, Robert [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, Brenda [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hoffman, Elizabeth [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-04

    The demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron irradiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ ºC) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the chemical compatibility of select MAX with potential materials that are important for nuclear energy, as well as, to measure the thermal transport properties as a function of neutron irradiation. The chemical counterparts chosen for this work are: pyrolytic carbon, SiC, U, Pd, FLiBe, Pb-Bi and Na; the latter 3 in the molten state. The thermal conductivities and heat capacities of non-irradiated MAX phases will be measured.

  17. Fabry-Perot MEMS Accelerometers for Advanced Seismic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisum, Brad [Lumedyne Technologies Incorporated, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-05-31

    This report summarizes the technical achievements that occurred over the duration of the project. On November 14th, 2014, Lumedyne Technologies Incorporated was acquired. As a result of the acquisition, the work toward seismic imaging applications was suspended indefinitely. This report captures the progress achieved up to that time.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P;

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...

  19. Perspectives on Imaging: Advanced Applications. Introduction and Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Clifford A.; Lunin, Lois F.

    1991-01-01

    Provides an overview of six articles that address relationships between electronic imaging technology and information science. Articles discuss the areas of technology; applications in the fields of visual arts, medicine, and textile history; conceptual foundations; and future visions, including work in virtual reality and cyberspace. (LRW)

  20. Raman and mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging: applications and advancements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautam, R.; Samuel, A.; Sil, S.; Chaturvedi, D.; Dutta, A.; Ariese, F.; Umapathy, S.

    2015-01-01

    Using Raman and Mid-Infrared (MIR) spectroscopic imaging techniques one can examine the spatial distribution of various molecular constituents in a heterogeneous sample at a microscopic scale. Raman and MIR spectroscopy techniques provide bond-specific vibrational frequencies to characterize molecul

  1. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angélica M V; Barros, Paulo S M; Morelhão, Sérgio L

    2006-07-01

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength lambda=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  2. Carbon fiber intramedullary nails reduce artifact in postoperative advanced imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimel, Melissa N. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Orthopaedic Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Hwang, Sinchun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Riedel, Elyn R. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Healey, John H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Orthopaedic Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-09-15

    This study assessed whether radiolucent carbon fiber reinforced-polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) intramedullary nails decreased hardware artifact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in vitro and in an oncologic patient population. In vitro and clinical evaluations were done. A qualitative assessment of metal artifact was performed using CFR-PEEK and titanium nail MRI phantoms. Eight patients with a femoral or tibial prophylactic CFR-PEEK nail were retrospectively identified. All patients had postoperative surveillance imaging by MRI, CT, and were followed for a median 20 months (range, 12-28 months). CFR-PEEK images were compared to images from a comparative group of patients with titanium femoral intramedullary nails who had a postoperative MRI or CT. A musculoskeletal-trained radiologist graded visualization of the cortex, corticomedullary junction, and bone-muscle interface, on T1-weighted (T1W), STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fat-saturated (T1W FS) sequences of both groups with a five-point scale, performing independent reviews 4 months apart. Statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a weighted kappa. Substantially less MRI signal loss occurred in the CFR-PEEK phantom than in the titanium phantom simulation, particularly as the angle increased with respect to direction of the static magnetic field. CFR-PEEK nails had less MRI artifact than titanium nails on scored T1W, STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1W FS MRI sequences (p ≤ 0.03). The mean weighted kappa was 0.64, showing excellent intraobserver reliability between readings. CFR-PEEK intramedullary nail fixation is a superior alternative to minimize implant artifact on MRI or CT imaging for patients requiring long bone fixation. (orig.)

  3. Imaging in rheumatoid arthritis--status and recent advances for magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, computed tomography and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Morten; Dohn, U.M.; Østergaard, Mikkel;

    2008-01-01

    , and have several documented and potential applications in RA patients. This chapter will review key aspects of the current status and recent important advances in imaging in RA, briefly discussing X-ray and computed tomography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. Suggestions for use in clinical trials...

  4. Chemical imaging of surfaces with the scanning electrochemical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, A J; Fan, F R; Pierce, D T; Unwin, P R; Wipf, D O; Zhou, F

    1991-10-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy is a scanning probe technique that is based on faradaic current changes as a small electrode is moved across the surface of a sample. The images obtained depend on the sample topography and surface reactivity. The response of the scanning electrochemical microscope is sensitive to the presence of conducting and electroactive species, which makes it useful for imaging heterogeneous surfaces. The principles and instrumentation used to obtain images and surface reaction-kinetic information are discussed, and examples of applications to the study of electrodes, minerals, and biological samples are given. PMID:17739954

  5. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  6. EPS in Environmental Microbial Biofilms as Examined by Advanced Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, T. R.; Lawrence, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Biofilm communities are highly structured associations of cellular and polymeric components which are involved in biogenic and geogenic environmental processes. Furthermore, biofilms are also important in medical (infection), industrial (biofouling) and technological (biofilm engineering) processes. The interfacial microbial communities in a specific habitat are highly dynamic and change according to the environmental parameters affecting not only the cellular but also the polymeric constituents of the system. Through their EPS biofilms interact with dissolved, colloidal and particulate compounds from the bulk water phase. For a long time the focus in biofilm research was on the cellular constituents in biofilms and the polymer matrix in biofilms has been rather neglected. The polymer matrix is produced not only by different bacteria and archaea but also by eukaryotic micro-organisms such as algae and fungi. The mostly unidentified mixture of EPS compounds is responsible for many biofilm properties and is involved in biofilm functionality. The chemistry of the EPS matrix represents a mixture of polymers including polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, neutral polymers, charged polymers, amphiphilic polymers and refractory microbial polymers. The analysis of the EPS may be done destructively by means of extraction and subsequent chemical analysis or in situ by means of specific probes in combination with advanced imaging. In the last 15 years laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has been established as an indispensable technique for studying microbial communities. LSM with 1-photon and 2-photon excitation in combination with fluorescence techniques allows 3-dimensional investigation of fully hydrated, living biofilm systems. This approach is able to reveal data on biofilm structural features as well as biofilm processes and interactions. The fluorescent probes available allow the quantitative assessment of cellular as well as polymer distribution. For this purpose

  7. Status and Advances of RGD Molecular Imaging in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning YUE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  8. Pulse laser imaging amplifier for advanced ladar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir; Tomov, Ivan; Murrell, David

    2016-05-01

    Security measures sometimes require persistent surveillance of government, military and public areas Borders, bridges, sport arenas, airports and others are often surveilled with low-cost cameras. Their low-light performance can be enhanced with laser illuminators; however various operational scenarios may require a low-intensity laser illumination with the object-scattered light intensity lower than the sensitivity of the Ladar image detector. This paper discusses a novel type of high-gain optical image amplifier. The approach enables time-synchronization of the incoming and amplifying signals with accuracy <= 1 ns. The technique allows the incoming signal to be amplified without the need to match the input spectrum to the cavity modes. Instead, the incoming signal is accepted within the spectral band of the amplifier. We have gauged experimentally the performance of the amplifier with a 40 dB gain and an angle of view 20 mrad.

  9. Recent advances in blood flow vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Udesen, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    with magnetic resonance phase contrast angiography (MRA) revealed a correlation between the stroke volume estimated by TO and MRA of 0.91 (pflow in e.g. bifurcations and around valves have...... investigated using both simulations, flow rig measurements, and in-vivo validation against MR scans. The TO method obtains a relative accuracy of 10% for a fully transverse flow in both simulations and flow rig experiments. In-vivo studies performed on 11 healthy volunteers comparing the TO method...... tracking. The key advantages of these techniques are very fast imaging that can attain an order of magnitude higher precision than conventional methods. SA flow imaging was implemented on the experimental scanner RASMUS using an 8-emission spherical emission sequence and reception of 64 channels on a BK...

  10. AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Branduardi-Raymont, G; Eastwood, J P; Sibeck, D G; Abbey, A; Brown, P; Carter, J A; Carr, C M; Forsyth, C; Kataria, D; Kemble, S; Milan, S E; Owen, C J; Peacocke, L; Read, A M; Coates, A J; Collier, M R; Cowley, S W H; Fazakerley, A N; Fraser, G W; Jones, G H; Lallement, R; Lester, M; Porter, F S; Yeoman, T K

    2011-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied by in situ measurements or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques, which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. We describe how an appropriately designed and located X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock, with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Our studies have led...

  11. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Inverse Methods in Electromagnetic Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, Hans; Cram, Leonard; Gjessing, Dag; Jordan, Arthur; Keydel, Wolfgang; Schwierz, Günther; Vogel, Martin

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the use of polarization effects for radar and electromagnetic imaging problems (References 1, 2, and 3). The problem of electro­ magnetic imaging can be divided into the following areas: (1) Propagation of the Stokes' vector from the transmitter to the target region through various atmospheric conditions (rain, dust, fog, clouds, turbulence, etc.). (2) Scattering of the Stokes' vector from the object. (3) Scattering of the Stokes' vector from the rough surface, terrain, and the volume scattering. (4) Propagation of the Stokes' vector from the target region to the receiver. (5) The characteristics of the receiver relating the Stokes' vector to the output. The propagation characteristics of the Stokes' vector through various media can be described by the equation of transfer. Even though the scalar equation of transfer has been studied extensively in the past, the vector equation of transfer has not received as much attention. In recent years, however, a...

  12. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    OpenAIRE

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and curre...

  13. Recent advances in echocardiography: strain and strain rate imaging [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Mirea

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Deformation imaging by echocardiography is a well-established research tool which has been gaining interest from clinical cardiologists since the introduction of speckle tracking. Post-processing of echo images to analyze deformation has become readily available at the fingertips of the user. New parameters such as global longitudinal strain have been shown to provide added diagnostic value, and ongoing efforts of the imaging societies and industry aimed at harmonizing methods will improve the technique further. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of echocardiographic strain and strain rate imaging, and provides an overview on its current and potential future clinical applications.

  14. Advanced Chemical Reactor Technologies for Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oils - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Buchori

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative biofuel that can replace diesel oil without requiring modifications to the engine and advantageously produces cleaner emissions. Biodiesel can be produced through transesterification process between oil or fat and alcohol to form esters and glycerol. The transesterification can be carried out with or without a catalyst. The catalyzed production of biodiesel can be performed by using homogeneous, heterogeneous and enzyme. Meanwhile, non-catalytic transesterification with supercritical alcohol provides a new way of producing biodiesel. Microwave and ultrasound assisted transesterification significantly can reduce reaction time as well as improve product yields. Another process, a plasma technology is promising for biodiesel synthesis from vegetable oils due to very short reaction time, no soap formation and no glycerol as a by-product. This paper reviews briefly the technologies on transesterification reaction for biodiesel production using homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzyme catalysts, as well as advanced methods (supercritical, microwave, ultrasonic, and plasma technology. Advantages and disadvantages of each method were described comprehensively. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 17th May 2016; Revised: 20th September 2016; Accepted: 20th September 2016 How to Cite: Buchori, L., Istadi, I., Purwanto, P. (2016. Advanced Chemical Reactor Technologies for Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oils - A Review. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (3: 406-430 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.3.490.406-430 Permalink/DOI: http://doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.3.490.406-430

  15. Backside versus frontside advanced chemical analysis of high-k/metal gate stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, E., E-mail: eugenie.martinez@cea.fr [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Saidi, B. [STMicroelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Rousset Cedex, Crolles (France); Veillerot, M. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Caubet, P. [STMicroelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Rousset Cedex, Crolles (France); Fabbri, J-M. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Piallat, F. [STMicroelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Rousset Cedex, Crolles (France); Gassilloud, R. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Schamm-Chardon, S. [CEMES-CNRS et Université de Toulouse, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The backside approach is a promising solution for advanced chemical characterization of future MOSFETs. • Frontside ToF-SIMS and Auger depth profiles are affected by cumulative mixing effects and thus not relevant for analyzing ultra-thin layers. • Higher in-depth resolution is possible in the backside approach for Auger and ToF-SIMS depth profiling. • Backside depth profiling allows revealing ultra-thin layers and elemental in-depth redistribution inside high-k/metal gate stacks. • Backside XPS allows preserving the full metal gate, thus enabling the analysis of real technological samples. - Abstract: Downscaling of transistors beyond the 14 nm technological node requires the implementation of new architectures and materials. Advanced characterization methods are needed to gain information about the chemical composition of buried layers and interfaces. An effective approach based on backside analysis is presented here. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger depth profiling and time-of-flight secondary ions mass spectrometry are combined to investigate inter-diffusion phenomena. To highlight improvements related to the backside method, backside and frontside analyses are compared. Critical information regarding nitrogen, oxygen and aluminium redistribution inside the gate stacks is obtained only in the backside configuration.

  16. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events.

  17. Chemical imaging of biological systems with the scanning electrochemical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Jágerszki, Gyula; Kiss, Gergely; Tóth, Klára

    2004-06-01

    A brief overview on recent advances in the application of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to the investigation of biological systems is presented. Special emphasis is given to the mapping of local enzyme activity by SECM, which is exemplified by relevant original systems. PMID:15110274

  18. Determing the feasiblity of chemical imaging of cotton trash

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is some interest in the textile community about the identity of cotton trash that has become comingled with cotton lint. Currently, trash is identified visually by human “classers” and instrumentally by the Advanced Fiber Information System (AFIS) and the High Volume Instrument (HVI). Although...

  19. Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen; Kilbourn, Michael R; Scott, Peter J H

    2016-08-24

    The Internet of Chemical Things (IoCT), a growing network of computers, mobile devices, online resources, software suites, laboratory equipment, synthesis apparatus, analytical devices, and a host of other machines, all interconnected to users, manufacturers, and others through the infrastructure of the Internet, is changing how we do chemistry. While in its infancy across many chemistry laboratories and departments, it became apparent when considering our own work synthesizing radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) that a more mature incarnation of the IoCT already exists. How does the IoCT impact our lives today, and what does it hold for the smart (radio)chemical laboratories of the future?

  20. Chemical Composition of Polymer Surfaces Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy and Complementary Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancso, G. Julius; Hillborg, Henrik; Schönherr, Holger

    2005-01-01

    In this article we review the recent developments in the field of high resolution lateral mapping of the surface chemical composition of polymers by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other complementary imaging techniques. The different AFM approaches toward nanometer scale mapping with chemical sen

  1. Advanced human machine interaction for an image interpretation workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, S.; Martin, M.; van de Camp, F.; Peinsipp-Byma, E.; Beyerer, J.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, many new interaction technologies have been developed that enhance the usability of computer systems and allow for novel types of interaction. The areas of application for these technologies have mostly been in gaming and entertainment. However, in professional environments, there are especially demanding tasks that would greatly benefit from improved human machine interfaces as well as an overall improved user experience. We, therefore, envisioned and built an image-interpretation-workstation of the future, a multi-monitor workplace comprised of four screens. Each screen is dedicated to a complex software product such as a geo-information system to provide geographic context, an image annotation tool, software to generate standardized reports and a tool to aid in the identification of objects. Using self-developed systems for hand tracking, pointing gestures and head pose estimation in addition to touchscreens, face identification, and speech recognition systems we created a novel approach to this complex task. For example, head pose information is used to save the position of the mouse cursor on the currently focused screen and to restore it as soon as the same screen is focused again while hand gestures allow for intuitive manipulation of 3d objects in mid-air. While the primary focus is on the task of image interpretation, all of the technologies involved provide generic ways of efficiently interacting with a multi-screen setup and could be utilized in other fields as well. In preliminary experiments, we received promising feedback from users in the military and started to tailor the functionality to their needs

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P;

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been......, and financial context of the study in question. We review the extent to which MRI assessments of joint erosion, bone edema, and synovitis fulfil these criteria, particularly as they relate to proof-of-concept RA clinical trials....

  3. Parry-Romberg syndrome: findings in advanced magnetic resonance imaging sequences - case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Rafael Alfenas de; Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas, E-mail: alfenas85@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de radiologia; Ribeiro, Renato Niemeyer de Freitas [Hospital de Clinica de Jacarepagua, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, Lais Balbi de [Universidade Presidente Antonio Carlos (Unipac), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    Parry-Romberg syndrome is a rare disease characterized by progressive hemifacial atrophy associated with other systemic changes, including neurological symptoms. Currently, there are few studies exploring the utilization of advanced magnetic resonance sequences in the investigation of this disease. The authors report the case of a 45-year-old patient and describe the findings at structural magnetic resonance imaging and at advanced sequences, correlating them with pathophysiological data. (author)

  4. Quasi-Optical Terahertz Microfluidic Devices for Chemical Sensing and Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Liu; Zhenguo Jiang; Syed (Shawon) Rahman; Md. Itrat Bin Shams; Benxin Jing; Akash Kannegulla; Li-Jing Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We first review the development of a frequency domain quasi-optical terahertz (THz) chemical sensing and imaging platform consisting of a quartz-based microfluidic subsystem in our previous work. We then report the application of this platform to sensing and characterizing of several selected liquid chemical samples from 570–630 GHz. THz sensing of chemical mixtures including isopropylalcohol-water (IPA-H2O) mixtures and acetonitrile-water (ACN-H2O) mixtures have been successfully demonstrate...

  5. Automated angiogenesis quantification through advanced image processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Charlampos N; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels in tumors, is an interactive process between tumor, endothelial and stromal cells in order to create a network for oxygen and nutrients supply, necessary for tumor growth. According to this, angiogenic activity is considered a suitable method for both tumor growth or inhibition detection. The angiogenic potential is usually estimated by counting the number of blood vessels in particular sections. One of the most popular assay tissues to study the angiogenesis phenomenon is the developing chick embryo and its chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), which is a highly vascular structure lining the inner surface of the egg shell. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated image analysis method that would give an unbiased quantification of the micro-vessel density and growth in angiogenic CAM images. The presented method has been validated by comparing automated results to manual counts over a series of digital chick embryo photos. The results indicate the high accuracy of the tool, which has been thus extensively used for tumor growth detection at different stages of embryonic development. PMID:17946107

  6. Recent advances in PET imaging for evaluation of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioka, Chrissa; Fotopoulos, Andreas; Kyritsis, Athanassios P

    2010-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) consists of loss of pigmented dopamine-secreting neurons in the pars compacta of the midbrain substantia nigra. These neurons project to the striatum (putamen and caudate nucleus) and their loss leads to alterations in the activity of the neural circuits that regulate movement. In a simplified model, two dopamine pathways are involved: the direct pathway, which is mediated through facilitation of the D(1) receptors, and the indirect pathway through D(2) receptors (inhibitory). Positron emission tomography (PET) tracers to image the presynaptic sites of the dopaminergic system include 6-[(18)F]FDOPA and 6-[(18)F]FMT, [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine, [(11)C]nomifensine and various radiolabelled cocaine derivatives. Postsynaptically, for the dopamine D(1) subtype the most commonly used ligands are [(11)C]SCH 23390 or [(11)C]NNC 112 and for the D(2) subtype [(11)C]raclopride, [(11)C]MNPA and [(18)F]DMFP. PET is a sensitive and specific non-invasive molecular imaging technique that may be helpful for evaluation of PD and its differential diagnosis from other parkinsonian syndromes. PMID:20107789

  7. Crosswell Imaging Technology & Advanced DSR Navigation for Horizontal Directional Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Stolarczyk

    2008-08-08

    The objective of Phase II is to develop and demonstrate real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of drill strings during horizontal drilling operations applicable to both short and long holes. The end product of Phase II is a functional drill-string assembly outfitted with a commercial version of Drill String Radar (DSR). Project Objectives Develop and demonstrate a dual-phase methodology of in-seam drilling, imaging, and structure confirmation. This methodology, illustrated in Figure 1, includes: (1) Using RIM to image between drill holes for seam thickness estimates and in-seam structures detection. Completed, February 2005; and (2) Using DSR for real-time MWD guidance and navigation of drillstrings during horizontal drilling operations. Completed, November 2008. As of November 2008, the Phase II portion of Contract DE-FC26-04NT42085 is about 99% complete, including milestones and tasks original outlined as Phase II work. The one percent deficiency results from MSHA-related approvals which have yet to be granted (at the time of reporting). These approvals are pending and are do not negatively impact the scope of work or project objectives.

  8. Advancement in the chemical analysis and quality control of flavonoid in Ginkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-Guang; Wu, Si-Qi; Li, Ping; Yang, Hua

    2015-09-10

    Flavonoids are the main active constituents in Ginkgo biloba L., which have been suggested to have broad-spectrum free-radical scavenging activities. This review summarizes the recent advances in the chemical analysis of the flavonoids in G. biloba and its finished products (from 2009 to 2014), including chemical composition, sample preparation, separation, detection and different quality criteria. More than 70 kinds of flavonoids have been identified in this plant. In this review, various analytical approaches as well as their chromatographic conditions have been described, and their advantages/disadvantages are also compared. Quantitative analyses of Ginkgo flavonoids applied by most pharmacopeias start with an acidic hydrolysis followed by determination of the resulting aglycones using HPLC. But increasing direct assay of individual flavonol glycosides found that many adulterated products were still qualified by the present tests. To obtain an authentic and applicable analytical approach for quality evaluation of Ginkgo and its finished products, related suggestions and opinions in the recent publications are mainly discussed in this review. This discussion on chemical analyses of Ginkgo flavonoids will also be found as a significant guide for widely varied natural flavonoids.

  9. Chemical and physical analysis of core materials for advanced high temperature reactors with process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various chemical and physical methods for the analysis of structural materials have been developed in the research programmes for advanced high temperature reactors. These methods are discussed using as examples the structural materials of the reactor core - the fuel elements consisting of coated particles in a graphite matrix and the structural graphite. Emphasis is given to the methods of chemical analysis. The composition of fuel kernels is investigated using chemical analysis methods to determine the heavy metals content (uranium, plutonium, thorium and metallic impurity elements) and the amount of non-metallic constituents. The properties of the pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings of fuel elements are investigated using specially developed physiochemical methods. Regarding the irradiation behaviour of coated particles and fuel elements, methods have been developed for examining specimens in hot cells following exposures under reactor operating conditions, to supplement the measurements of in-reactor performance. For the structural graphite, the determination of impurities is important because certain impurities may cause pitting corrosion during irradiation. The localized analysis of very low impurity concentrations is carried out using spectrochemical d.c. arc excitation, local laser and inductively coupled plasma methods. (orig.)

  10. Advanced Modeling Techniques to Study Anthropogenic Influences on Atmospheric Chemical Budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Rohit

    1997-01-01

    This research work is a collaborative effort between research groups at MCNC and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The overall objective of this research is to improve the level of understanding of the processes that determine the budgets of chemically and radiatively active compounds in the atmosphere through development and application of advanced methods for calculating the chemical change in atmospheric models. The research performed during the second year of this project focused on four major aspects: (1) The continued development and refinement of multiscale modeling techniques to address the issue of the disparate scales of the physico-chemical processes that govern the fate of atmospheric pollutants; (2) Development and application of analysis methods utilizing process and mass balance techniques to increase the interpretive powers of atmospheric models and to aid in complementary analysis of model predictions and observations; (3) Development of meteorological and emission inputs for initial application of the chemistry/transport model over the north Atlantic region; and, (4) The continued development and implementation of a totally new adaptive chemistry representation that changes the details of what is represented as the underlying conditions change.

  11. Toxicological and chemical assessment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater after electrochemical and advanced oxidation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, Sandra; Crnojević, Helena; Vujčić, Valerija; Gajski, Goran; Gerić, Marko; Cvetković, Želimira; Petra, Cvjetko; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2016-02-01

    Owing to its proven toxicity and mutagenicity, arsenic is regarded a principal pollutant in water used for drinking. The objective of this study was the toxicological and chemical evaluation of groundwater samples obtained from arsenic enriched drinking water wells before and after electrochemical and ozone-UV-H2O2-based advanced oxidation processes (EAOP). For this purpose, acute toxicity test with Daphnia magna and chronic toxicity test with Lemna minor L. were employed as well as in vitro bioassays using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs). Several oxidative stress parameters were estimated in L.minor. Physicochemical analysis showed that EAOP treatment was highly efficient in arsenic but also in ammonia and organic compound removal from contaminated groundwater. Untreated groundwater caused only slight toxicity to HPBLs and D. magna in acute experiments. However, 7-day exposure of L. minor to raw groundwater elicited genotoxicity, a significant growth inhibition and oxidative stress injury. The observed genotoxicity and toxicity of raw groundwater samples was almost completely eliminated by EAOP treatment. Generally, the results obtained with L. minor were in agreement with those obtained in the chemical analysis suggesting the sensitivity of the model organism in monitoring of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. In parallel to chemical analysis, the implementation of chronic toxicity bioassays in a battery is recommended in the assessment of the toxic and genotoxic potential of such complex mixtures. PMID:26580737

  12. Toxicological and chemical assessment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater after electrochemical and advanced oxidation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, Sandra; Crnojević, Helena; Vujčić, Valerija; Gajski, Goran; Gerić, Marko; Cvetković, Želimira; Petra, Cvjetko; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2016-02-01

    Owing to its proven toxicity and mutagenicity, arsenic is regarded a principal pollutant in water used for drinking. The objective of this study was the toxicological and chemical evaluation of groundwater samples obtained from arsenic enriched drinking water wells before and after electrochemical and ozone-UV-H2O2-based advanced oxidation processes (EAOP). For this purpose, acute toxicity test with Daphnia magna and chronic toxicity test with Lemna minor L. were employed as well as in vitro bioassays using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs). Several oxidative stress parameters were estimated in L.minor. Physicochemical analysis showed that EAOP treatment was highly efficient in arsenic but also in ammonia and organic compound removal from contaminated groundwater. Untreated groundwater caused only slight toxicity to HPBLs and D. magna in acute experiments. However, 7-day exposure of L. minor to raw groundwater elicited genotoxicity, a significant growth inhibition and oxidative stress injury. The observed genotoxicity and toxicity of raw groundwater samples was almost completely eliminated by EAOP treatment. Generally, the results obtained with L. minor were in agreement with those obtained in the chemical analysis suggesting the sensitivity of the model organism in monitoring of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. In parallel to chemical analysis, the implementation of chronic toxicity bioassays in a battery is recommended in the assessment of the toxic and genotoxic potential of such complex mixtures.

  13. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    The development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has had a significant impact for patients with digestive diseases, enabling enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with most of the available evidence focusing on upper gastrointestinal (GI) and pancreatico-biliary diseases. For the lower GI tract the main application of EUS has been in staging rectal cancer, as a complementary technique to other cross-sectional imaging methods. EUS can provide highly accurate in-depth assessments of tumour infiltration, performing best in the diagnosis of early rectal tumours. In the light of recent developments other EUS applications for colorectal diseases have been also envisaged and are currently under investigation, including beyond-rectum tumour staging by means of the newly developed forward-viewing radial array echoendoscope. Due to its high resolution, EUS might be also regarded as an ideal method for the evaluation of subepithelial lesions. Their differential diagnosis is possible by imaging the originating wall layer and the associated echostructure, and cytological and histological confirmation can be obtained through EUS-guided fine needle aspiration or trucut biopsy. However, reports on the use of EUS in colorectal subepithelial lesions are currently limited. EUS allows detailed examination of perirectal and perianal complications in Crohn's disease and, as a safe and less expensive investigation, can be used to monitor therapeutic response of fistulae, which seems to improve outcomes and reduce the need for additional surgery. Furthermore, EUS image enhancement techniques, such as the use of contrast agents or elastography, have recently been evaluated for colorectal indications as well. Possible applications of contrast enhancement include the assessment of tumour angiogenesis in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and

  14. Recent Applications of Chemical Imaging to Pharmaceutical Process Monitoring and Quality Control

    OpenAIRE

    Gowen, A.A.; O' Donnell, Colm; Cullen, Patrick; Bell, S

    2008-01-01

    Chemical Imaging (CI) is an emerging platform technology that integrates conventional imaging and spectroscopy to attain both spatial and spectral information from an object. Vibrational spectroscopic methods, such as Near Infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy, combined with imaging are particularly useful for analysis of biological/pharmaceutical forms. The rapid, non-destructive and non-invasive features of CI mark its potential suitability as a process analytical tool for the pharmaceutica...

  15. Advanced Image Processing for Defect Visualization in Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a defect visualization process based on pulse infrared thermography are presented. Algorithms have been developed to reduce the amount of operator participation required in the process of interpreting thermographic images. The algorithms determine the defect's depth and size from the temporal and spatial thermal distributions that exist on the surface of the investigated object following thermal excitation. A comparison of the results from thermal contrast, time derivative, and phase analysis methods for defect visualization are presented. These comparisons are based on three dimensional simulations of a test case representing a plate with multiple delaminations. Comparisons are also based on experimental data obtained from a specimen with flat bottom holes and a composite panel with delaminations.

  16. Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences I: Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jorgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Holbek, Simon; Hoyos, Carlos Armando Villagómez; Bradway, David P; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2016-01-01

    A method for rapid measurement of intensities (I(spta)), mechanical index (MI), and probe surface temperature for any ultrasound scanning sequence is presented. It uses the scanner's sampling capability to give an accurate measurement of the whole imaging sequence for all emissions to yield the true distributions. The method is several orders of magnitude faster than approaches using an oscilloscope, and it also facilitates validating the emitted pressure field and the scanner's emission sequence software. It has been implemented using the experimental synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound system (SARUS) scanner and the Onda AIMS III intensity measurement system (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). Four different sequences have been measured: a fixed focus emission, a duplex sequence containing B-mode and flow emissions, a vector flow sequence with B-mode and flow emissions in 17 directions, and finally a SA duplex flow sequence. A BK8820e (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) convex array probe is used for the first three sequences and a BK8670 linear array probe for the SA sequence. The method is shown to give the same intensity values within 0.24% of the AIMS III Soniq 5.0 (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) commercial intensity measurement program. The approach can measure and store data for a full imaging sequence in 3.8-8.2 s per spatial position. Based on I(spta), MI, and probe surface temperature, the method gives the ability to determine whether a sequence is within U.S. FDA limits, or alternatively indicate how to scale it to be within limits. PMID:26625411

  17. Approximating tasseled cap values to evaluate brightness, greenness, and wetness for the Advanced Land Imager (ALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kristina H.; Finn, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The Tasseled Cap transformation is a method of image band conversion to enhance spectral information. It primarily is used to detect vegetation using the derived brightness, greenness, and wetness bands. An approximation of Tasseled Cap values for the Advanced Land Imager was investigated and compared to the Landsat Thematic Mapper Tasseled Cap values. Despite sharing similar spectral, temporal, and spatial resolution, the two systems are not interchangeable with regard to Tasseled Cap matrices.

  18. Advances in Functional and Structural Imaging of the Human Lung Using Proton MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, G. Wilson; Mugler, John P.; Sá, Rui C.; Altes, Talissa A.; Prisk, G. Kim; Hopkins, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    The field of proton lung MRI is advancing on a variety of fronts. In the realm of functional imaging, it is now possible to use arterial spin labeling (ASL) and oxygen-enhanced imaging techniques to quantify regional perfusion and ventilation, respectively, in standard units of measure. By combining these techniques into a single scan, it is also possible to quantify the local ventilation-perfusion ratio, which is the most important determinant of gas-exchange efficiency in the lung. To demon...

  19. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnman, Clas; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central), objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain. PMID:24228169

  20. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clas Linnman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central, objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain.

  1. Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen; Kilbourn, Michael R; Scott, Peter J H

    2016-08-24

    The Internet of Chemical Things (IoCT), a growing network of computers, mobile devices, online resources, software suites, laboratory equipment, synthesis apparatus, analytical devices, and a host of other machines, all interconnected to users, manufacturers, and others through the infrastructure of the Internet, is changing how we do chemistry. While in its infancy across many chemistry laboratories and departments, it became apparent when considering our own work synthesizing radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) that a more mature incarnation of the IoCT already exists. How does the IoCT impact our lives today, and what does it hold for the smart (radio)chemical laboratories of the future? PMID:27610410

  2. Radiochemistry, PET Imaging, and the Internet of Chemical Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Chemical Things (IoCT), a growing network of computers, mobile devices, online resources, software suites, laboratory equipment, synthesis apparatus, analytical devices, and a host of other machines, all interconnected to users, manufacturers, and others through the infrastructure of the Internet, is changing how we do chemistry. While in its infancy across many chemistry laboratories and departments, it became apparent when considering our own work synthesizing radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) that a more mature incarnation of the IoCT already exists. How does the IoCT impact our lives today, and what does it hold for the smart (radio)chemical laboratories of the future? PMID:27610410

  3. Overview of recent advances in thermo-chemical conversion of biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy from biomass, bioenergy, is a perspective source to replace fossil fuels in the future, as it is abundant, clean, and carbon dioxide neutral. Biomass can be combusted directly to generate heat and electricity, and by means of thermo-chemical and bio-chemical processes it can be converted into bio-fuels in the forms of solid (e.g., charcoal), liquid (e.g., bio-oils, methanol and ethanol), and gas (e.g., methane and hydrogen), which can be used further for heat and power generation. This paper provides an overview of the principles, reactions, and applications of four fundamental thermo-chemical processes (combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, and liquefaction) for bioenergy production, as well as recent developments in these technologies. Some advanced thermo-chemical processes, including co-firing/co-combustion of biomass with coal or natural gas, fast pyrolysis, plasma gasification and supercritical water gasification, are introduced. The advantages and disadvantages, potential for future applications and challenges of these processes are discussed. The co-firing of biomass and coal is the easiest and most economical approach for the generation of bioenergy on a large-sale. Fast pyrolysis has attracted attention as it is to date the only industrially available technology for the production of bio-oils. Plasma techniques, due to their high destruction and reduction efficiencies for any form of waste, have great application potential for hazardous waste treatment. Supercritical water gasification is a promising approach for hydrogen generation from biomass feedstocks, especially those with high moisture contents.

  4. Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

  5. NMR imaging: A 'chemical' microscope for coal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3-D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging technique for spatially mapping proton distributions in whole coals and solvent-swollen coal samples. The technique is based on a 3-D back-projection protocol for data acquisition, and a reconstruction technique based on 3-D Radon transform inversion. In principle, the 3-D methodology provides higher spatial resolution of solid materials than is possible with conventional slice-selection protocols. The applicability of 3-D NMR imaging has been demonstrated by mapping the maceral phases in Utah Blind Canyon (APCS number-sign 6) coal and the distribution of mobile phases in Utah coal swollen with deuterated and protic pyridine. 7 refs., 5 figs

  6. PET Imaging and biodistribution of chemically modified bacteriophage MS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Michelle E; Aanei, Ioana L; Behrens, Christopher R; Tong, Gary J; Murphy, Stephanie T; O'Neil, James P; Francis, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    The fields of nanotechnology and medicine have merged in the development of new imaging and drug delivery agents based on nanoparticle platforms. As one example, a mutant of bacteriophage MS2 can be differentially modified on the exterior and interior surfaces for the concurrent display of targeting functionalities and payloads, respectively. In order to realize their potential for use in in vivo applications, the biodistribution and circulation properties of this class of agents must first be investigated. A means of modulating and potentially improving the characteristics of nanoparticle agents is the appendage of PEG chains. Both MS2 and MS2-PEG capsids possessing interior DOTA chelators were labeled with (64)Cu and injected intravenously into mice possessing tumor xenografts. Dynamic imaging of the agents was performed using PET-CT on a single animal per sample, and the biodistribution at the terminal time point (24 h) was assessed by gamma counting of the organs ex vivo for 3 animals per agent. Compared to other viral capsids of similar size, the MS2 agents showed longer circulation times. Both MS2 and MS2-PEG bacteriophage behaved similarly, although the latter agent showed significantly less uptake in the spleen. This effect may be attributed to the ability of the PEG chains to mask the capsid charge. Although the tumor uptake of the agents may result from the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect, selective tumor imaging may be achieved in the future by using exterior targeting groups. PMID:23214968

  7. Characterization of Surface Chemical States of a Thick Insulator: Chemical State Imaging on MgO Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yeonjin; Cho, Sangwan; Noh, Myungkeun; Whang, Chung-Nam; Jeong, Kwangho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2005-02-01

    We report a surface characterization tool that can be effectively used to investigate the chemical state and subtle radiation damage on a thick insulator surface. It has been used to examine the MgO surface of a plasma display panel (PDP) consisting of a stack of insulator layers of approximately 51 μm thickness on a 2-mm-thick glass plate. The scanning photoelectron microscopy (SPEM) image of the insulating MgO surface was obtained by using the difference in Au 4f peak shift due to the surface charging at each pixel, where a Au adlayer of approximately 15 {\\AA} thickness was formed on the surface to overcome the serious charging shift of the peak position and the spectral deterioration in the photoelectron spectra. The observed contrast in the SPEM image reveals the chemical modification of the underlying MgO surface induced by the plasma discharge damage. The chemical state analysis of the MgO surface was carried out by comparing the Mg 2p, C 1s and O 1s photoemission spectra collected at each pixel of the SPEM image. We assigned four suboxide phases, MgO, MgCO3, Mg(OH)2 and Mg1+, on the initial MgO surface, where the Mg(OH)2 and Mg1+ phases vanished rapidly as the discharge-induced surface damage began.

  8. Advances in Chemical and Structural Characterization of Concretion with Implications for Modeling Marine Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald L.; DeAngelis, Robert J.; Medlin, Dana J.; Carr, James D.; Conlin, David L.

    2014-05-01

    The Weins number model and concretion equivalent corrosion rate methodology were developed as potential minimum-impact, cost-effective techniques to determine corrosion damage on submerged steel structures. To apply the full potential of these technologies, a detailed chemical and structural characterization of the concretion (hard biofouling) that transforms into iron bearing minerals is required. The fractions of existing compounds and the quantitative chemistries are difficult to determine from x-ray diffraction. Environmental scanning electron microscopy was used to present chemical compositions by means of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). EDS demonstrates the chemical data in mapping format or in point or selected area chemistries. Selected-area EDS data collection at precise locations is presented in terms of atomic percent. The mechanism of formation and distribution of the iron-bearing mineral species at specific locations will be presented. Based on water retention measurements, porosity in terms of void volume varies from 15 v/o to 30 v/o (vol.%). The void path displayed by scanning electron microscopy imaging illustrates the tortuous path by which oxygen migrates in the water phase within the concretion from seaside to metalside.

  9. Recent advances in microbial production of fuels and chemicals using tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Changhee; Choi, So Young; Luo, Zi Wei; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-11-15

    The advent of various systems metabolic engineering tools and strategies has enabled more sophisticated engineering of microorganisms for the production of industrially useful fuels and chemicals. Advances in systems metabolic engineering have been made in overproducing natural chemicals and producing novel non-natural chemicals. In this paper, we review the tools and strategies of systems metabolic engineering employed for the development of microorganisms for the production of various industrially useful chemicals belonging to fuels, building block chemicals, and specialty chemicals, in particular focusing on those reported in the last three years. It was aimed at providing the current landscape of systems metabolic engineering and suggesting directions to address future challenges towards successfully establishing processes for the bio-based production of fuels and chemicals from renewable resources.

  10. Recent advances in the chemical biology of nitroxyl (HNO) detection and generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhengrui; King, S Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Nitroxyl or azanone (HNO) represents the redox-related (one electron reduced and protonated) relative of the well-known biological signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO). Despite the close structural similarity to NO, defined biological roles and endogenous formation of HNO remain unclear due to the high reactivity of HNO with itself, soft nucleophiles and transition metals. While significant work has been accomplished in terms of the physiology, biology and chemistry of HNO, important and clarifying work regarding HNO detection and formation has occurred within the last 10 years. This review summarizes advances in the areas of HNO detection and donation and their application to normal and pathological biology. Such chemical biological tools allow a deeper understanding of biological HNO formation and the role that HNO plays in a variety of physiological systems. PMID:27108951

  11. AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J. [eds.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  12. Industrialization of Biology. A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Douglas C. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The report stresses the need for efforts to inform the public of the nature of industrial biotechnology and of its societal benefits, and to make sure that concerns are communicated effectively between the public and other stakeholders. In addition to scientific advances, a number of governance and societal factors will influence the industrialization of biology. Industry norms and standards need to be established in areas such as read/write accuracy for DNA, data and machine technology specifications, and organism performance in terms of production rates and yields. An updated regulatory regime is also needed to accelerate the safe commercialization of new host organisms, metabolic pathways, and chemical products, and regulations should be coordinated across nations to enable rapid, safe, and global access to new technologies and products.

  13. Advances in the Simultaneous Multiple Surface optical design method for imaging and non-imaging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Classical imaging optics has been developed over centuries in many areas, such as its paraxial imaging theory and practical design methods like multi-parametric optimization techniques. Although these imaging optical design methods can provide elegant solutions to many traditional optical problems, there are more and more new design problems, like solar concentrator, illumination system, ultra-compact camera, etc., that require maximum energy transfer efficiency, or ultra-compact optical stru...

  14. Advances in metabolic pathway and strain engineering paving the way for sustainable production of chemical building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Bio-based production of chemical building blocks from renewable resources is an attractive alternative to petroleum-based platform chemicals. Metabolic pathway and strain engineering is the key element in constructing robust microbial chemical factories within the constraints of cost effective production. Here we discuss how the development of computational algorithms, novel modules and methods, omics-based techniques combined with modeling refinement are enabling reduction in development time and thus advance the field of industrial biotechnology. We further discuss how recent technological developments contribute to the development of novel cell factories for the production of the building block chemicals: adipic acid, succinic acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid.

  15. Ultrasound imaging of oxidative stress in vivo with chemically-generated gas microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, John Kangchun; Lee, Seungjun; Kundu, Kousik; Caskey, Charles F; Knight, Sarah F; Satir, Sarp; Ferrara, Katherine W; Taylor, W Robert; Degertekin, F Levent; Sorescu, Daniel; Murthy, Niren

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have tremendous potential for in vivo molecular imaging because of their high sensitivity. However, the diagnostic potential of UCAs has been difficult to exploit because current UCAs are based on pre-formed microbubbles, which can only detect cell surface receptors. Here, we demonstrate that chemical reactions that generate gas forming molecules can be used to perform molecular imaging by ultrasound in vivo. This new approach was demonstrated by imaging reactive oxygen species in vivo with allylhydrazine, a liquid compound that is converted into nitrogen and propylene gas after reacting with radical oxidants. We demonstrate that allylhydrazine encapsulated within liposomes can detect a 10 micromolar concentration of radical oxidants by ultrasound, and can image oxidative stress in mice, induced by lipopolysaccharide, using a clinical ultrasound system. We anticipate numerous applications of chemically-generated microbubbles for molecular imaging by ultrasound, given ultrasound's ability to detect small increments above the gas saturation limit, its spatial resolution and widespread clinical use.

  16. Advanced Chemical Reduction of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Its Photocatalytic Activity in Degrading Reactive Black 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Pau Ping Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Textile industries consume large volumes of water for dye processing, leading to undesirable toxic dyes in water bodies. Dyestuffs are harmful to human health and aquatic life, and such illnesses as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A, and hinder the photosynthetic activity of aquatic plants. To overcome this environmental problem, the advanced oxidation process is a promising technique to mineralize a wide range of dyes in water systems. In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO was prepared via an advanced chemical reduction route, and its photocatalytic activity was tested by photodegrading Reactive Black 5 (RB5 dye in aqueous solution. rGO was synthesized by dispersing the graphite oxide into the water to form a graphene oxide (GO solution followed by the addition of hydrazine. Graphite oxide was prepared using a modified Hummers’ method by using potassium permanganate and concentrated sulphuric acid. The resulted rGO nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Raman, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to further investigate their chemical properties. A characteristic peak of rGO-48 h (275 cm−1 was observed in the UV spectrum. Further, the appearance of a broad peak (002, centred at 2θ = 24.1°, in XRD showing that graphene oxide was reduced to rGO. Based on our results, it was found that the resulted rGO-48 h nanoparticles achieved 49% photodecolorization of RB5 under UV irradiation at pH 3 in 60 min. This was attributed to the high and efficient electron transport behaviors of rGO between aromatic regions of rGO and RB5 molecules.

  17. Ultra-realistic imaging advanced techniques in analogue and digital colour holography

    CERN Document Server

    Bjelkhagen, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high resolution holograms are now finding commercial and industrial applications in such areas as holographic maps, 3D medical imaging, and consumer devices. Ultra-Realistic Imaging: Advanced Techniques in Analogue and Digital Colour Holography brings together a comprehensive discussion of key methods that enable holography to be used as a technique of ultra-realistic imaging.After a historical review of progress in holography, the book: Discusses CW recording lasers, pulsed holography lasers, and reviews optical designs for many of the principal laser types with emphasis on attaining th

  18. A standard data set for performance analysis of advanced IR image processing techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, A.R.; Adomeit, U.; Chevalier, P.; Landeau, S.; Bijl, P.; Champagnat, F.; Dijk, J.; Göhler, B.; Landini, S.; Reynolds, J.P.; Smith, L.N.

    2012-01-01

    Modern IR cameras are increasingly equipped with built-in advanced (often non-linear) image and signal processing algorithms (like fusion, super-resolution, dynamic range compression etc.) which can tremendously influence performance characteristics. Traditional approaches to range performance model

  19. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis: recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Døhn, Uffe M; Ejbjerg, Bo J;

    2006-01-01

    Efficient methods for diagnosis, monitoring, and prognostication are essential in early rheumatoid arthritis. Data on the value of ultrasonography and MRI are accumulating rapidly, fueling their increasing use in early rheumatoid arthritis. This review focuses on recent advances in the clinical a...... applications of these imaging modalities. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Oct...

  20. Large area super-resolution chemical imaging via rapid dithering of a nanoprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languirand, Eric R.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2015-05-01

    Super-resolution chemical imaging via Raman spectroscopy provides a significant ability to simultaneously or pseudosimultaneously monitor numerous label-free analytes while elucidating their spatial distribution on the surface of the sample. However, spontaneous Raman is an inherently weak phenomenon making trace detection and thus superresolution imaging extremely difficult, if not impossible. To circumvent this and allow for trace detection of the few chemical species present in any sub-diffraction limited resolution element of an image, we have developed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coherent fiber-optic imaging bundle probe consisting of 30,000 individual fiber elements. When the probes are tapered, etched and coated with metal, they provide circular Raman chemical images of a sample with a field of view of approximately 20μm (i.e. diameter) via the array of 30,000 individual 50 nm fiber elements. An acousto-optic tunable filter is used to rapidly scan or select discrete frequencies for multi- or hyperspectral analysis. Although the 50nm fiber element dimensions of this probe inherently provide spatial resolutions of approximately 100nm, further increases in the spatial resolution can be achieved by using a rapid dithering process. Using this process, additional images are obtained one-half fiber diameter translations in the x- and y- planes. A piezostage drives the movement, providing the accurate and reproducible shifts required for dithering. Optimal probability algorithms are then used to deconvolute the related images producing a final image with a three-fold increase in spatial resolution. This paper describes super-resolution chemical imaging using these probes and the dithering method as well as its potential applications in label-free imaging of lipid rafts and other applications within biology and forensics.

  1. MO-C-18A-01: Advances in Model-Based 3D Image Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pan, X [University Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Stayman, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Recent years have seen the emergence of CT image reconstruction techniques that exploit physical models of the imaging system, photon statistics, and even the patient to achieve improved 3D image quality and/or reduction of radiation dose. With numerous advantages in comparison to conventional 3D filtered backprojection, such techniques bring a variety of challenges as well, including: a demanding computational load associated with sophisticated forward models and iterative optimization methods; nonlinearity and nonstationarity in image quality characteristics; a complex dependency on multiple free parameters; and the need to understand how best to incorporate prior information (including patient-specific prior images) within the reconstruction process. The advantages, however, are even greater – for example: improved image quality; reduced dose; robustness to noise and artifacts; task-specific reconstruction protocols; suitability to novel CT imaging platforms and noncircular orbits; and incorporation of known characteristics of the imager and patient that are conventionally discarded. This symposium features experts in 3D image reconstruction, image quality assessment, and the translation of such methods to emerging clinical applications. Dr. Chen will address novel methods for the incorporation of prior information in 3D and 4D CT reconstruction techniques. Dr. Pan will show recent advances in optimization-based reconstruction that enable potential reduction of dose and sampling requirements. Dr. Stayman will describe a “task-based imaging” approach that leverages models of the imaging system and patient in combination with a specification of the imaging task to optimize both the acquisition and reconstruction process. Dr. Samei will describe the development of methods for image quality assessment in such nonlinear reconstruction techniques and the use of these methods to characterize and optimize image quality and dose in a spectrum of clinical

  2. Advanced large airway CT imaging in children: evolution from axial to 4-D assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Zucker, Evan J. [Tufts Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Floating Hospital for Children, Boston, MA (United States); Restrepo, Ricardo [Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Daltro, Pedro [Clinica de DiagnOstico Por Imagem, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Boiselle, Phillip M. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Continuing advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) technology are revolutionizing the non-invasive evaluation of congenital and acquired large airway disorders in children. For example, the faster scanning time and increased anatomical coverage that are afforded by MDCT are especially beneficial to children. MDCT also provides high-quality multiplanar 2-dimensional (2-D), internal and external volume-rendering 3-dimensional (3-D), and dynamic 4-dimensional (4-D) imaging. These advances have enabled CT to become the primary non-invasive imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up evaluation of various large airway disorders in infants and children. It is thus essential for radiologists to be familiar with safe and effective techniques for performing MDCT and to be able to recognize the characteristic imaging appearances of large airway disorders affecting children. (orig.)

  3. Advancing Exposure Science through Chemical Data Curation and Integration in the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Cynthia J.; Davis, Allan Peter; Wiegers, Thomas C.; King, Benjamin L.; Wiegers, Jolene A.; Reif, David M.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Mattingly, Carolyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure science studies the interactions and outcomes between environmental stressors and human or ecological receptors. To augment its role in understanding human health and the exposome, we aimed to centralize and integrate exposure science data into the broader biological framework of the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), a public resource that promotes understanding of environmental chemicals and their effects on human health. Objectives: We integrated exposure data within the CTD to provide a centralized, freely available resource that facilitates identification of connections between real-world exposures, chemicals, genes/proteins, diseases, biological processes, and molecular pathways. Methods: We developed a manual curation paradigm that captures exposure data from the scientific literature using controlled vocabularies and free text within the context of four primary exposure concepts: stressor, receptor, exposure event, and exposure outcome. Using data from the Agricultural Health Study, we have illustrated the benefits of both centralization and integration of exposure information with CTD core data. Results: We have described our curation process, demonstrated how exposure data can be accessed and analyzed in the CTD, and shown how this integration provides a broad biological context for exposure data to promote mechanistic understanding of environmental influences on human health. Conclusions: Curation and integration of exposure data within the CTD provides researchers with new opportunities to correlate exposures with human health outcomes, to identify underlying potential molecular mechanisms, and to improve understanding about the exposome. Citation: Grondin CJ, Davis AP, Wiegers TC, King BL, Wiegers JA, Reif DM, Hoppin JA, Mattingly CJ. 2016. Advancing exposure science through chemical data curation and integration in the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database. Environ Health Perspect 124:1592–1599; http://dx.doi.org/10

  4. Smart image sensors: an emerging key technology for advanced optical measurement and microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Peter

    1996-08-01

    Optical microsystems typically include photosensitive devices, analog preprocessing circuitry and digital signal processing electronics. The advances in semiconductor technology have made it possible today to integrate all photosensitive and electronical devices on one 'smart image sensor' or photo-ASIC (application-specific integrated circuits containing photosensitive elements). It is even possible to provide each 'smart pixel' with additional photoelectronic functionality, without compromising the fill factor substantially. This technological capability is the basis for advanced cameras and optical microsystems showing novel on-chip functionality: Single-chip cameras with on- chip analog-to-digital converters for less than $10 are advertised; image sensors have been developed including novel functionality such as real-time selectable pixel size and shape, the capability of performing arbitrary convolutions simultaneously with the exposure, as well as variable, programmable offset and sensitivity of the pixels leading to image sensors with a dynamic range exceeding 150 dB. Smart image sensors have been demonstrated offering synchronous detection and demodulation capabilities in each pixel (lock-in CCD), and conventional image sensors are combined with an on-chip digital processor for complete, single-chip image acquisition and processing systems. Technological problems of the monolithic integration of smart image sensors include offset non-uniformities, temperature variations of electronic properties, imperfect matching of circuit parameters, etc. These problems can often be overcome either by designing additional compensation circuitry or by providing digital correction routines. Where necessary for technological or economic reasons, smart image sensors can also be combined with or realized as hybrids, making use of commercially available electronic components. It is concluded that the possibilities offered by custom smart image sensors will influence the design

  5. Imaging the neural circuitry and chemical control of aggressive motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchard D Caroline

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in awake animals it is possible to resolve patterns of neuronal activity across the entire brain with high spatial and temporal resolution. Synchronized changes in neuronal activity across multiple brain areas can be viewed as functional neuroanatomical circuits coordinating the thoughts, memories and emotions for particular behaviors. To this end, fMRI in conscious rats combined with 3D computational analysis was used to identifying the putative distributed neural circuit involved in aggressive motivation and how this circuit is affected by drugs that block aggressive behavior. Results To trigger aggressive motivation, male rats were presented with their female cage mate plus a novel male intruder in the bore of the magnet during image acquisition. As expected, brain areas previously identified as critical in the organization and expression of aggressive behavior were activated, e.g., lateral hypothalamus, medial basal amygdala. Unexpected was the intense activation of the forebrain cortex and anterior thalamic nuclei. Oral administration of a selective vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist SRX251 or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, drugs that block aggressive behavior, both caused a general suppression of the distributed neural circuit involved in aggressive motivation. However, the effect of SRX251, but not fluoxetine, was specific to aggression as brain activation in response to a novel sexually receptive female was unaffected. Conclusion The putative neural circuit of aggressive motivation identified with fMRI includes neural substrates contributing to emotional expression (i.e. cortical and medial amygdala, BNST, lateral hypothalamus, emotional experience (i.e. hippocampus, forebrain cortex, anterior cingulate, retrosplenial cortex and the anterior thalamic nuclei that bridge the motor and cognitive components of aggressive responding

  6. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MR Imaging Is Superior to Diffusion Tensor Imaging in the Diagnosis and Severity Evaluation of Parkinson's Disease: a Study on Substantia Nigra and Striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by nigrostriatal cell loss. To date the diagnosis of PD is still based primarily on the clinical manifestations which may be typical and obvious only in advanced-stage PD. Thus, it is crucial to find a reliable marker for the diagnosis of PD. We conducted this study to assess the diagnostic efficiency of chemical-exchange-saturation-transfer (CEST imaging and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI in PD at 3 Tesla by evaluating changes on substantia nigra and striatum. Twenty-three PD patients and twenty-three age-matched normal controls were recruited. All patients and controls were imaged on a 3 Tesla MR system, using an 8-channel head coil. CEST imaging was acquired in two transverse slices of the head, including substantia nigra and striatum. The magnetization-transfer-ratio asymmetry at 3.5 ppm, MTRasym(3.5ppm, and the total CEST signal intensity between 0 and 4 ppm were calculated. Multi-slice DTI was acquired for all the patients and normal controls. Quantitative analysis was performed on the substantia nigra, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate. The MTRasym(3.5ppm value, the total CEST signal intensity and fractional anisotropy (FA value of the substantia nigra were all significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.003, P = 0.004 and P < 0.001, respectively. The MTRasym(3.5ppm values of the putamen and the caudate were significantly higher in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.010 and P = 0.009, respectively. There were no significant differences for the mean diffusivity (MD in these four regions between PD patients and normal controls. In conclusion, CEST MR imaging provided multiple CEST image contrasts in the substantia nigra and the striatum in PD and may be superior to DTI in the diagnosis of PD.

  7. Advances in retinal imaging for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Colin Siang Hui; Chew, Milton Cher Yong; Lim, Louis Wei Yi; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema (DME) are leading causes of blindness throughout the world, and cause significant visual morbidity. Ocular imaging has played a significant role in the management of diabetic eye disease, and the advent of advanced imaging modalities will be of great value as our understanding of diabetic eye diseases increase, and the management options become increasingly varied and complex. Color fundus photography has established roles in screening for diabetic eye disease, early detection of progression, and monitoring of treatment response. Fluorescein angiography (FA) detects areas of capillary nonperfusion, as well as leakage from both microaneurysms and neovascularization. Recent advances in retinal imaging modalities complement traditional fundus photography and provide invaluable new information for clinicians. Ultra-widefield imaging, which can be used to produce both color fundus photographs and FAs, now allows unprecedented views of the posterior pole. The pathologies that are detected in the periphery of the retina have the potential to change the grading of disease severity, and may be of prognostic significance to disease progression. Studies have shown that peripheral ischemia may be related to the presence and severity of DME. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides structural detail of the retina, and the quantitative and qualitative features are useful in the monitoring of diabetic eye disease. A relatively recent innovation, OCT angiography, produces images of the fine blood vessels at the macula and optic disc, without the need for contrast agents. This paper will review the roles of each of these imaging modalities for diabetic eye disease.

  8. Superresolution of Hyperspectral Image Using Advanced Nonlocal Means Filter and Iterative Back Projection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an efficient superresolution algorithm based on advanced nonlocal means (NLM filter and iterative back projection for hyperspectral image. The nonlocal means method achieves the to-be-interpolated pixel by the weighted average of all pixels within an image, and the unrelated neighborhoods are automatically eliminated by the trivial weights. However, spatial location distance is also an important issue to reconstruct the missing pixel. Therefore, we proposed an advanced NLM (ANLM filter considering both neighborhood similarity and patch distance. In the conventional NLM method, the search region was the whole image, while the proposed ANLM utilizes the limited search to reduce the complexity. The iterative back projection (IBP is a very famous method to deal with the image restoration. In the superresolution issue, IBP is able to recover the high-resolution image iteratively from the given low-resolution image which is blurred due to the noise by minimizing the reconstruction error, while, because the reconstruction error of IBP is back projection and isotropic, the conventional IBP suffers from jaggy and ringing artifacts. Introducing the ANLM method to improve the visual quality is necessary.

  9. Gold Nanoparticle Contrast Agents in Advanced X-ray Imaging Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungsook Ahn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been significant progress in the field of soft- and hard-X-ray imaging for a wide range of applications, both technically and scientifically, via developments in sources, optics and imaging methodologies. While one community is pursuing extensive applications of available X-ray tools, others are investigating improvements in techniques, including new optics, higher spatial resolutions and brighter compact sources. For increased image quality and more exquisite investigation on characteristic biological phenomena, contrast agents have been employed extensively in imaging technologies. Heavy metal nanoparticles are excellent absorbers of X-rays and can offer excellent improvements in medical diagnosis and X-ray imaging. In this context, the role of gold (Au is important for advanced X-ray imaging applications. Au has a long-history in a wide range of medical applications and exhibits characteristic interactions with X-rays. Therefore, Au can offer a particular advantage as a tracer and a contrast enhancer in X-ray imaging technologies by sensing the variation in X-ray attenuation in a given sample volume. This review summarizes basic understanding on X-ray imaging from device set-up to technologies. Then this review covers recent studies in the development of X-ray imaging techniques utilizing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and their relevant applications, including two- and three-dimensional biological imaging, dynamical processes in a living system, single cell-based imaging and quantitative analysis of circulatory systems and so on. In addition to conventional medical applications, various novel research areas have been developed and are expected to be further developed through AuNP-based X-ray imaging technologies.

  10. Where in the Cell Are You? Probing HIV-1 Host Interactions through Advanced Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirk, Brennan S.; Van Nynatten, Logan R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses must continuously evolve to hijack the host cell machinery in order to successfully replicate and orchestrate key interactions that support their persistence. The type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is a prime example of viral persistence within the host, having plagued the human population for decades. In recent years, advances in cellular imaging and molecular biology have aided the elucidation of key steps mediating the HIV-1 lifecycle and viral pathogenesis. Super-resolution imaging techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) and photoactivation and localization microscopy (PALM) have been instrumental in studying viral assembly and release through both cell–cell transmission and cell–free viral transmission. Moreover, powerful methods such as Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) have shed light on the protein-protein interactions HIV-1 engages within the host to hijack the cellular machinery. Specific advancements in live cell imaging in combination with the use of multicolor viral particles have become indispensable to unravelling the dynamic nature of these virus-host interactions. In the current review, we outline novel imaging methods that have been used to study the HIV-1 lifecycle and highlight advancements in the cell culture models developed to enhance our understanding of the HIV-1 lifecycle. PMID:27775563

  11. Standoff chemical D and Id with extended LWIR hyperspectral imaging spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Lavoie, Hugo; Bouffard, François; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Vallieres, Christian; Roy, Claude; Dubé, Denis

    2013-05-01

    Standoff detection and identification (D and Id) of unknown volatile chemicals such as chemical pollutants and consequences of industrial incidents has been increasingly desired for first responders and for environmental monitoring. On site gas detection sensors are commercially available and several of them can even detect more than one chemical species, however only few of them have the capabilities of detecting a wide variety of gases at long and safe distances. The ABB Hyperspectral Imaging Spectroradiometer (MR-i), configured for gas detection detects and identifies a wide variety of chemical species including toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and surrogates several kilometers away from the sensor. This configuration is called iCATSI for improved Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer. iCATSI is a standoff passive system. The modularity of the MR-i platform allows optimization of the detection configuration with a 256 x 256 Focal Plane Array imager or a line scanning imager both covering the long wave IR atmospheric window up to 14 μm. The uniqueness of its extended LWIR cut off enables to detect more chemicals as well as provide higher probability of detection than usual LWIR sensors.

  12. Procedural guidance using advance imaging techniques for percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaife, Robert A; Salcedo, Ernesto E; Carroll, John D

    2014-02-01

    The complexity of structural heart disease interventions such as edge-to edge mitral valve repair requires integration of multiple highly technical imaging modalities. Real time imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography is a relatively new technique that first, allows clear volumetric imaging of target structures such as the mitral valve for both pre-procedural diagnosis and planning in patients with degenerative or functional mitral valve regurgitation. Secondly it provides intra-procedural, real-time panoramic volumetric 3D view of structural heart disease targets that facilitates eye-hand coordination while manipulating devices within the heart. X-ray fluoroscopy and RT 3D TEE images are used in combination to display specific targets and movement of catheter based technologies in 3D space. This integration requires at least two different image display monitors and mentally fusing the individual datasets by the operator. Combined display technology such as this, allow rotation and orientation of both dataset perspectives necessary to define targets and guidance of structural disease device procedures. The inherently easy concept of direct visual feedback and eye-hand coordination allows safe and efficient completion of MitraClip procedures. This technology is now merged into a single structural heart disease guidance mode called EchoNavigator(TM) (Philips Medical Imaging Andover, MA). These advanced imaging techniques have revolutionized the field of structural heart disease interventions and this experience is exemplified by a cooperative imaging approach used for guidance of edge-to-edge mitral valve repair procedures.

  13. Application of advanced radiographic imaging techniques for characterizing low level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BIR is currently investigating the use of two advanced x-ray imaging techniques for characterizing containers of solidified nuclear waste. These techniques, digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT), are performed by computerized imaging systems that can automatically inspect containers using a set of imaging parameters chosen by the operator. Both inspection techniques can be performed by the same imaging system. The inspection result is a computer image, or series of images, that can be manipulated by the operator to show a wide variety of features within the inspected object. For the inspections performed so far, we have used the ACTIS CT/DR system that BIR designed and built for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The inspections are being performed as part of a continuing Phase I/Phase II SBIR program for the U.S. Department of Energy. This paper discusses inspections performed on three types of waste containers: (1) a simulated waste drum imaged in Phase 1; (2) 55 gallon drums of assorted waste items supplied by the DOE'S EG and G Rocky Flats plant and by Westinghouse Hanford; and (3) several containers of glass used for solidifying radioactive substances, supplied by the DOE'S Westinghouse Savannah River site. The Phase II work also includes investigating dual energy CT imaging and designing a mechanically simplified ACTIS system and mobile trailer specifically for waste inspection. (author)

  14. Advances and recent trends in heterogeneous photo(electro)-catalysis for solar fuels and chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highfield, James

    2015-01-01

    In the context of a future renewable energy system based on hydrogen storage as energy-dense liquid alcohols co-synthesized from recycled CO2, this article reviews advances in photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis that exploit solar (photonic) primary energy in relevant endergonic processes, viz., H2 generation by water splitting, bio-oxygenate photoreforming, and artificial photosynthesis (CO2 reduction). Attainment of the efficiency (>10%) mandated for viable techno-economics (USD 2.00-4.00 per kg H2) and implementation on a global scale hinges on the development of photo(electro)catalysts and co-catalysts composed of earth-abundant elements offering visible-light-driven charge separation and surface redox chemistry in high quantum yield, while retaining the chemical and photo-stability typical of titanium dioxide, a ubiquitous oxide semiconductor and performance "benchmark". The dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cell and multi-junction Si are key "voltage-biasing" components in hybrid photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical (PV/PEC) devices that currently lead the field in performance. Prospects and limitations of visible-absorbing particulates, e.g., nanotextured crystalline α-Fe2O3, g-C3N4, and TiO2 sensitized by C/N-based dopants, multilayer composites, and plasmonic metals, are also considered. An interesting trend in water splitting is towards hydrogen peroxide as a solar fuel and value-added green reagent. Fundamental and technical hurdles impeding the advance towards pre-commercial solar fuels demonstration units are considered. PMID:25884553

  15. Advances and Recent Trends in Heterogeneous Photo(Electro-Catalysis for Solar Fuels and Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Highfield

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the context of a future renewable energy system based on hydrogen storage as energy-dense liquid alcohols co-synthesized from recycled CO2, this article reviews advances in photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis that exploit solar (photonic primary energy in relevant endergonic processes, viz., H2 generation by water splitting, bio-oxygenate photoreforming, and artificial photosynthesis (CO2 reduction. Attainment of the efficiency (>10% mandated for viable techno-economics (USD 2.00–4.00 per kg H2 and implementation on a global scale hinges on the development of photo(electrocatalysts and co-catalysts composed of earth-abundant elements offering visible-light-driven charge separation and surface redox chemistry in high quantum yield, while retaining the chemical and photo-stability typical of titanium dioxide, a ubiquitous oxide semiconductor and performance “benchmark”. The dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cell and multi-junction Si are key “voltage-biasing” components in hybrid photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical (PV/PEC devices that currently lead the field in performance. Prospects and limitations of visible-absorbing particulates, e.g., nanotextured crystalline α-Fe2O3, g-C3N4, and TiO2 sensitized by C/N-based dopants, multilayer composites, and plasmonic metals, are also considered. An interesting trend in water splitting is towards hydrogen peroxide as a solar fuel and value-added green reagent. Fundamental and technical hurdles impeding the advance towards pre-commercial solar fuels demonstration units are considered.

  16. Advances in Reasoning-Based Image Processing Intelligent Systems Conventional and Intelligent Paradigms

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamatsu, Kazumi

    2012-01-01

    The book puts special stress on the contemporary techniques for reasoning-based image processing and analysis: learning based image representation and advanced video coding; intelligent image processing and analysis in medical vision systems; similarity learning models for image reconstruction; visual perception for mobile robot motion control, simulation of human brain activity in the analysis of video sequences; shape-based invariant features extraction; essential of paraconsistent neural networks, creativity and intelligent representation in computational systems. The book comprises 14 chapters. Each chapter is a small monograph, representing resent investigations of authors in the area. The topics of the chapters cover wide scientific and application areas and complement each-other very well. The chapters’ content is based on fundamental theoretical presentations, followed by experimental results and comparison with similar techniques. The size of the chapters is well-ballanced which permits a thorough ...

  17. Advanced techniques in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in children with ADHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastura, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.pastura@terra.com.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Pediatria; Mattos, Paulo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Psiquiatria; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Radiologia; Araujo, Alexandra Prufer de Queiroz Campos [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Neuropediatria

    2011-04-15

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects about 5% of school-aged child. Previous published works using different techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have demonstrated that there may be some differences between the brain of people with and without this condition. This review aims at providing neurologists, pediatricians and psychiatrists an update on the differences between the brain of children with and without ADHD using advanced techniques of magnetic resonance imaging such as diffusion tensor imaging, brain volumetry and cortical thickness, spectroscopy and functional MRI. Data was obtained by a comprehensive, non-systematic review of medical literature. The regions with a greater number of abnormalities are splenium of the corpus callosum, cingulated gyrus, caudate nucleus, cerebellum, striatum, frontal and temporal cortices. The brain regions where abnormalities are observed in studies of diffusion tensor, volumetry, spectroscopy and cortical thickness are the same involved in neurobiological theories of ADHD coming from studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  18. Advanced imaging techniques for assessment of structure, composition and function in biofilm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Thomas R; Manz, Bertram; Volke, Frank; Dynes, James J; Hitchcock, Adam P; Lawrence, John R

    2010-04-01

    Scientific imaging represents an important and accepted research tool for the analysis and understanding of complex natural systems. Apart from traditional microscopic techniques such as light and electron microscopy, new advanced techniques have been established including laser scanning microscopy (LSM), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These new techniques allow in situ analysis of the structure, composition, processes and dynamics of microbial communities. The three techniques open up quantitative analytical imaging possibilities that were, until a few years ago, impossible. The microscopic techniques represent powerful tools for examination of mixed environmental microbial communities usually encountered in the form of aggregates and films. As a consequence, LSM, MRI and STXM are being used in order to study complex microbial biofilm systems. This mini review provides a short outline of the more recent applications with the intention to stimulate new research and imaging approaches in microbiology.

  19. Recent advances in cryo-TEM imaging of soft lipid nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helvig, Shen Yu; Mat Azmi, Intan Diana Binti; Moghimi, Seyed Moien;

    2015-01-01

    Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM), and its technological variations thereof, have become a powerful tool for detailed morphological characterization and 3D tomography of soft lipid and polymeric nanoparticles as well as biological materials such as viruses and DNA without chemical...... fixation. Here, we review and discuss recent advances in Cryo-TEM analysis of lipid-based drug nanocarriers with particular emphasis on morphological and internal nanostructure characterization of lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles such as cubosomes and hexosomes....

  20. Development of a handheld widefield hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor for standoff detection of explosive, chemical, and narcotic residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Basta, Andrew; Patil, Raju; Klueva, Oksana; Treado, Patrick J.

    2013-05-01

    The utility of Hyper Spectral Imaging (HSI) passive chemical detection employing wide field, standoff imaging continues to be advanced in detection applications. With a drive for reduced SWaP (Size, Weight, and Power), increased speed of detection and sensitivity, developing a handheld platform that is robust and user-friendly increases the detection capabilities of the end user. In addition, easy to use handheld detectors could improve the effectiveness of locating and identifying threats while reducing risks to the individual. ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) has developed the HSI Aperio™ sensor for real time, wide area surveillance and standoff detection of explosives, chemical threats, and narcotics for use in both government and commercial contexts. Employing liquid crystal tunable filter technology, the HSI system has an intuitive user interface that produces automated detections and real-time display of threats with an end user created library of threat signatures that is easily updated allowing for new hazardous materials. Unlike existing detection technologies that often require close proximity for sensing and so endanger operators and costly equipment, the handheld sensor allows the individual operator to detect threats from a safe distance. Uses of the sensor include locating production facilities of illegal drugs or IEDs by identification of materials on surfaces such as walls, floors, doors, deposits on production tools and residue on individuals. In addition, the sensor can be used for longer-range standoff applications such as hasty checkpoint or vehicle inspection of residue materials on surfaces or bulk material identification. The CISS Aperio™ sensor has faster data collection, faster image processing, and increased detection capability compared to previous sensors.

  1. Investigation of drug distribution in tablets using surface enhanced Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkala, Tamás; Farkas, Attila; Vajna, Balázs; Farkas, István; Marosi, György

    2013-03-25

    This paper reports the first application of surface enhanced Raman chemical imaging on pharmaceutical tablets containing the active ingredient (API) in very low concentrations. Taking advantage of the extremely intensive Raman signals in the presence of silver colloids, image aquisition time was radically decreased. Moreover, the investigation of drug distribution below the detection limit of regular micro-Raman spectrometry was made feasible. The characteristics of different manufacturing technologies could be revealed at very low API concentrations by using chemometric methods for processing and evaluating the large number of varying spectra provided with this imaging method.

  2. Image Navigation and Registration Performance Assessment Tool Set for the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager and Geostationary Lightning Mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luccia, Frank J.; Houchin, Scott; Porter, Brian C.; Graybill, Justin; Haas, Evan; Johnson, Patrick D.; Isaacson, Peter J.; Reth, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    The GOES-R Flight Project has developed an Image Navigation and Registration (INR) Performance Assessment Tool Set (IPATS) for measuring Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) INR performance metrics in the post-launch period for performance evaluation and long term monitoring. For ABI, these metrics are the 3-sigma errors in navigation (NAV), channel-to-channel registration (CCR), frame-to-frame registration (FFR), swath-to-swath registration (SSR), and within frame registration (WIFR) for the Level 1B image products. For GLM, the single metric of interest is the 3-sigma error in the navigation of background images (GLM NAV) used by the system to navigate lightning strikes. 3-sigma errors are estimates of the 99.73rd percentile of the errors accumulated over a 24-hour data collection period. IPATS utilizes a modular algorithmic design to allow user selection of data processing sequences optimized for generation of each INR metric. This novel modular approach minimizes duplication of common processing elements, thereby maximizing code efficiency and speed. Fast processing is essential given the large number of sub-image registrations required to generate INR metrics for the many images produced over a 24-hour evaluation period. Another aspect of the IPATS design that vastly reduces execution time is the off-line propagation of Landsat based truth images to the fixed grid coordinates system for each of the three GOES-R satellite locations, operational East and West and initial checkout locations. This paper describes the algorithmic design and implementation of IPATS and provides preliminary test results.

  3. Terahertz pulsed imaging as an advanced characterisation tool for film coatings--a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaser, Miriam; Gordon, Keith C; Strachan, Clare J;

    2013-01-01

    performance of coated dosage forms is a function of their critical coating attributes, including coating thickness, uniformity, and density, more advanced quality control techniques than weight gain are required. A recently introduced non-destructive method to quantitatively characterise coating quality...... is terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI). The ability of terahertz radiation to penetrate many pharmaceutical materials enables structural features of coated solid dosage forms to be probed at depth, which is not readily achievable with other established imaging techniques, e.g. near-infrared (NIR) and Raman...

  4. Uncertainty quantification in particle image velocimetry and advances in time-resolved image and data analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sciacchitano, A.

    2014-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a well-established technique for the measurement of the flow velocity in a two or three-dimensional domain. As in any other technique, PIV data is affected by measurement errors, defined as the difference between the measured velocity and its actual value, which i

  5. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Chemical Crystallography with Pulsed Neutrons and Synchrotron X-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, George

    1988-01-01

    X-ray and neutron crystallography have played an increasingly impor­ tant role in the chemical and biochemical sciences over the past fifty years. The principal obstacles in this methodology, the phase problem and com­ puting, have been overcome. The former by the methods developed in the 1960's and just recognised by the 1985 Chemistry Nobel Prize award to Karle and Hauptman, the latter by the dramatic advances that have taken place in computer technology in the past twenty years. Within the last decade, two new radiation sources have been added to the crystallographer's tools. One is synchrotron X-rays and the other is spallation neutrons. Both have much more powerful fluxes than the pre­ vious sources and they are pulsed rather than continuos. New techniques are necessary to fully exploit the intense continuos radiation spectrum and its pulsed property. Both radiations are only available from particular National Laboratories on a guest-user basis for scientists outside these Na­ tional Laboratories. Hi...

  6. Advances in identification and validation of protein targets of natural products without chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J; Kim, Y; Kwon, H J

    2016-05-01

    Covering: up to February 2016Identification of the target proteins of natural products is pivotal to understanding the mechanisms of action to develop natural products for use as molecular probes and potential therapeutic drugs. Affinity chromatography of immobilized natural products has been conventionally used to identify target proteins, and has yielded good results. However, this method has limitations, in that labeling or tagging for immobilization and affinity purification often result in reduced or altered activity of the natural product. New strategies have recently been developed and applied to identify the target proteins of natural products and synthetic small molecules without chemical modification of the natural product. These direct and indirect methods for target identification of label-free natural products include drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS), stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX), cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA), thermal proteome profiling (TPP), and bioinformatics-based analysis of connectivity. This review focuses on and reports case studies of the latest advances in target protein identification methods for label-free natural products. The integration of newly developed technologies will provide new insights and highlight the value of natural products for use as biological probes and new drug candidates. PMID:26964663

  7. Advances of Ag, Cu, and Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles synthesized via chemical reduction route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kim Seah; Cheong, Kuan Yew, E-mail: cheong@eng.usm.my [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Electronic Materials Research Group, School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering (Malaysia)

    2013-04-15

    Silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) nanoparticles have shown great potential in variety applications due to their excellent electrical and thermal properties resulting high demand in the market. Decreasing in size to nanometer scale has shown distinct improvement in these inherent properties due to larger surface-to-volume ratio. Ag and Cu nanoparticles are also shown higher surface reactivity, and therefore being used to improve interfacial and catalytic process. Their melting points have also dramatically decreased compared with bulk and thus can be processed at relatively low temperature. Besides, regularly alloying Ag into Cu to create Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles could be used to improve fast oxidizing property of Cu nanoparticles. There are varieties methods have been reported on the synthesis of Ag, Cu, and Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles. This review aims to cover chemical reduction means for synthesis of those nanoparticles. Advances of this technique utilizing different reagents namely metal salt precursors, reducing agents, and stabilizers, as well as their effects on respective nanoparticles have been systematically reviewed. Other parameters such as pH and temperature that have been considered as an important factor influencing the quality of those nanoparticles have also been reviewed thoroughly.

  8. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  9. High-throughput Raman chemical imaging for rapid evaluation of food safety and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput macro-scale Raman chemical imaging was realized on a newly developed line-scan hyperspectral system. The system utilizes a custom-designed 785 nm line laser with maximum power of 5 W as an excitation source. A 24 cm × 1 mm excitation line is normally projected on the sample surface u...

  10. Chemical-state imaging of Li using scanning Auger electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Scanning Auger electron microscopy is used to image chemical states of Li. •The combined use of AES and EELS signals for the elemental mapping is powerful. •Distribution corresponding to metallic and oxidized states of Li can be imaged. -- Abstract: The demand for measurement tools to detect Li with high spatial resolution and precise chemical sensitivity is increasing with the spread of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for use in a wide range of applications. In this work, scanning Auger electron microscopy (SAM) is used to image chemical states of a partially oxidized Li surface on the basis of the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data obtained during an oxidation process of a metal Li. We show that distribution of metallic and oxidized states of Li is clearly imaged by mapping the intensity of the corresponding AES and EELS peaks. Furthermore, a tiny difference in the extent of oxidation can be distinguished by comparing the elemental map of an AES peak with that of an EELS peak owing to the different behaviors of those signals to the chemical states of Li

  11. Visualization and prediction of porosity in roller compacted ribbonswith near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorasani, Milad Rouhi; Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Sonnergaard, Jørn;

    2015-01-01

    The porosity of roller compacted ribbon is recognized as an important critical quality attribute which has a huge impact on the final product quality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) for porosity estimation of ribbons produced...

  12. Chemically selective NMR imaging of a 3-component (solid-solid-liquid) sedimenting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyea, Steven D; Altobelli, Stephen A; Mondy, Lisa A

    2003-04-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique which resolves the separate components of the evolving vertical concentration profiles of 3-component non-colloidal suspensions is described. This method exploits the sensitivity of MRI to chemical differences between the three phases to directly image the fluid phase and one of the solid phases, with the third phase obtained by subtraction. 19F spin-echo imaging of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) oil was interlaced with 1H SPRITE imaging of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) particles. The third phase was comprised of borosilicate glass spheres, which were not visible while imaging the PTFE or LDPE phases. The method is demonstrated by performing measurements on 2-phase materials containing only the floating (LDPE) particles, with the results contrasted to the experimental behaviour of the individual phases in the full 3-phase system. All experiments were performed using nearly monodisperse particles, with initial suspension volume fractions, phi(i), of 0.1. PMID:12713970

  13. Quantitative Chemically-Specific Coherent Diffractive Imaging of Buried Interfaces using a Tabletop EUV Nanoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Shanblatt, Elisabeth R; Gardner, Dennis F; Mancini, Giulia F; Karl, Robert M; Tanksalvala, Michael D; Bevis, Charles S; Vartanian, Victor H; Kapteyn, Henry C; Adams, Daniel E; Murnane, Margaret M

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing buried layers and interfaces is critical for a host of applications in nanoscience and nano-manufacturing. Here we demonstrate non-invasive, non-destructive imaging of buried interfaces using a tabletop, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) nanoscope. Copper nanostructures inlaid in SiO2 are coated with 100 nm of aluminum, which is opaque to visible light and thick enough that neither optical microscopy nor atomic force microscopy can image the buried interfaces. Short wavelength (29 nm) high harmonic light can penetrate the aluminum layer, yielding high-contrast images of the buried structures. Moreover, differences in the absolute reflectivity of the interfaces before and after coating reveal the formation of interstitial diffusion and oxidation layers at the Al-Cu and Al-SiO2 boundaries. Finally, we show that EUV CDI provides a unique capability for quantitative, chemically-specific imaging of buried structures, and the material evolution that occurs at these buried ...

  14. Advancing Patient-centered Outcomes in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: A Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaria, Hemal K; McCabe, Aileen M; Meisel, Zachary M; LeBlanc, Annie; Schaffer, Jason T; Bellolio, M Fernanda; Vaughan, William; Merck, Lisa H; Applegate, Kimberly E; Hollander, Judd E; Grudzen, Corita R; Mills, Angela M; Carpenter, Christopher R; Hess, Erik P

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic imaging is integral to the evaluation of many emergency department (ED) patients. However, relatively little effort has been devoted to patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) in emergency diagnostic imaging. This article provides background on this topic and the conclusions of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference PCOR work group regarding "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." The goal was to determine a prioritized research agenda to establish which outcomes related to emergency diagnostic imaging are most important to patients, caregivers, and other key stakeholders and which methods will most optimally engage patients in the decision to undergo imaging. Case vignettes are used to emphasize these concepts as they relate to a patient's decision to seek care at an ED and the care received there. The authors discuss applicable research methods and approaches such as shared decision-making that could facilitate better integration of patient-centered outcomes and patient-reported outcomes into decisions regarding emergency diagnostic imaging. Finally, based on a modified Delphi process involving members of the PCOR work group, prioritized research questions are proposed to advance the science of patient-centered outcomes in ED diagnostic imaging. PMID:26574729

  15. Important advances in technology and unique applications related to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G; Shah, Dipan J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance has become a well-established imaging modality and is considered the gold standard for myocardial tissue viability assessment and ventricular volumes quantification. Recent technological hardware and software advancements in magnetic resonance imaging technology have allowed the development of new methods that can improve clinical cardiovascular diagnosis and prognosis. The advent of a new generation of higher magnetic field scanners can be beneficial to various clinical applications. Also, the development of faster acquisition techniques have allowed mapping of the magnetic relaxation properties T1, T2, and T2* in the myocardium that can be used to quantify myocardial diffuse fibrosis, determine the presence of edema or inflammation, and measure iron within the myocardium, respectively. Another recent major advancement in CMR has been the introduction of three-dimension (3D) phase contrast imaging, also known as 4D flow. The following review discusses key advances in cardiac magnetic resonance technology and their potential to improve clinical cardiovascular diagnosis and outcomes.

  16. Evaluation of C60 secondary ion mass spectrometry for the chemical analysis and imaging of fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Demoranville, Leonard T; Gillen, Greg

    2013-09-10

    The feasibility of using C60(+) cluster primary ion bombardment secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60(+) SIMS) for the analysis of the chemical composition of fingerprints is evaluated. It was found that C60(+) SIMS could be used to detect and image the spatial localization of a number of sebaceous and eccrine components in fingerprints. These analyses were also found to not be hindered by the use of common latent print powder development techniques. Finally, the ability to monitor the depth distribution of fingerprint constituents was found to be possible - a capability which has not been shown using other chemical imaging techniques. This paper illustrates a number of strengths and potential weaknesses of C60(+) SIMS as an additional or complimentary technique for the chemical analysis of fingerprints.

  17. Chemical imaging with combined fast-scan cyclic voltammetry-scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Daniel S; Baur, John E

    2007-09-15

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is applied to the tip of a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) for imaging the distribution of chemical species near a substrate. This approach was used to image the diffusion layer of both a large substrate electrode (3-mm-diameter glassy carbon) and a microelectrode substrate (10-microm-diameter Pt). Additionally, oxygen depletion near living cells was measured and correlated to respiratory activity. Finally, oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were simultaneously detected during the oxidative burst of a zymosan-stimulated macrophage cell. These results demonstrate the utility of FSCV-SECM for chemical imaging when conditions are chosen such that feedback interactions with the substrate are minimal. PMID:17705555

  18. Live-Cell Bioorthogonal Chemical Imaging: Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy of Vibrational Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lu; Hu, Fanghao; Chen, Zhixing; Shen, Yihui; Zhang, Luyuan; Min, Wei

    2016-08-16

    Innovations in light microscopy have tremendously revolutionized the way researchers study biological systems with subcellular resolution. In particular, fluorescence microscopy with the expanding choices of fluorescent probes has provided a comprehensive toolkit to tag and visualize various molecules of interest with exquisite specificity and high sensitivity. Although fluorescence microscopy is currently the method of choice for cellular imaging, it faces fundamental limitations for studying the vast number of small biomolecules. This is because common fluorescent labels, which are relatively bulky, could introduce considerable perturbation to or even completely alter the native functions of vital small biomolecules. Hence, despite their immense functional importance, these small biomolecules remain largely undetectable by fluorescence microscopy. To address this challenge, a bioorthogonal chemical imaging platform has recently been introduced. By coupling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, an emerging nonlinear Raman microscopy technique, with tiny and Raman-active vibrational probes (e.g., alkynes and stable isotopes), bioorthogonal chemical imaging exhibits superb sensitivity, specificity, and biocompatibility for imaging small biomolecules in live systems. In this Account, we review recent technical achievements for visualizing a broad spectrum of small biomolecules, including ribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleosides, amino acids, fatty acids, choline, glucose, cholesterol, and small-molecule drugs in live biological systems ranging from individual cells to animal tissues and model organisms. Importantly, this platform is compatible with live-cell biology, thus allowing real-time imaging of small-molecule dynamics. Moreover, we discuss further chemical and spectroscopic strategies for multicolor bioorthogonal chemical imaging, a valuable technique in the era of "omics". As a unique tool for biological discovery, this platform has been applied to

  19. A standard data set for performance analysis of advanced IR image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, A. Robert; Adomeit, Uwe; Chevalier, Philippe; Landeau, Stéphane; Bijl, Piet; Champagnat, Frédéric; Dijk, Judith; Göhler, Benjamin; Landini, Stefano; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Smith, Leslie N.

    2012-06-01

    Modern IR cameras are increasingly equipped with built-in advanced (often non-linear) image and signal processing algorithms (like fusion, super-resolution, dynamic range compression etc.) which can tremendously influence performance characteristics. Traditional approaches to range performance modeling are of limited use for these types of equipment. Several groups have tried to overcome this problem by producing a variety of imagery to assess the impact of advanced signal and image processing. Mostly, this data was taken from classified targets and/ or using classified imager and is thus not suitable for comparison studies between different groups from government, industry and universities. To ameliorate this situation, NATO SET-140 has undertaken a systematic measurement campaign at the DGA technical proving ground in Angers, France, to produce an openly distributable data set suitable for the assessment of fusion, super-resolution, local contrast enhancement, dynamic range compression and image-based NUC algorithm performance. The imagery was recorded for different target / background settings, camera and/or object movements and temperature contrasts. MWIR, LWIR and Dual-band cameras were used for recording and were also thoroughly characterized in the lab. We present a selection of the data set together with examples of their use in the assessment of super-resolution and contrast enhancement algorithms.

  20. Screening of adulterants in powdered foods and ingredients using line-scan Raman chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    A newly developed line-scan Raman imaging system using a 785 nm line laser was used to authenticate powdered foods and ingredients. The system was used to collect hyperspectral Raman images in a wavenumber range of 102-2865 cm-1 from three representative food powders mixed with selected adulterants with a concentration of 0.5%, including milk and melamine, flour and benzoyl peroxide, and starch and maleic anhydride. An acoustic mixer was used to create food adulterant mixtures. All the mixed samples were placed in sample holders with a surface area of 50 mm×50 mm. Spectral and image processing algorithms were developed based on single-band images at unique Raman peaks of the individual adulterants. Chemical images were created to show identification, spatial distribution, and morphological features of the adulterant particles mixed in the food powders. The potential of estimating mass concentrations of the adulterants using the percentages of the adulterant pixels in the chemical images was also demonstrated.

  1. Advanced image processing package for FPGA-based re-programmable miniature electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovod, Vladimir I.; Baxter, Christopher R.; Massie, Mark A.; McCarley, Paul L.

    2005-05-01

    Nova Sensors produces miniature electronics for a variety of real-time digital video camera systems, including foveal sensors based on Nova's Variable Acuity Superpixel Imager (VASITM) technology. An advanced image-processing package has been designed at Nova Sensors to re-configure the FPGA-based co-processor board for numerous applications including motion detection, optical, background velocimetry and target tracking. Currently, the processing package consists of 14 processing operations that cover a broad range of point- and area-applied algorithms. Flexible FPGA designs of these operations and re-programmability of the processing board allows for easy updates of the VASITM sensors, and for low-cost customization of VASITM sensors taking into account specific customer requirements. This paper describes the image processing algorithms implemented and verified in Xilinx FPGAs and provides the major technical performances with figures illustrating practical applications of the processing package.

  2. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  3. Recent advances in synchrotron-based hard x-ray phase contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since the first demonstration of phase contrast imaging (PCI) in the 1930s by Frits Zernike, people have realized the significant advantage of phase contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging in terms of sensitivity to ‘transparent’ features within specimens. Thus, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) holds great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, typically containing low Z elements such as C, H, O and N. Particularly when synchrotron hard x-rays are employed, the favourable brightness, energy tunability, monochromatic characteristics and penetration depth have dramatically enhanced the quality and variety of XPCI methods, which permit detection of the phase shift associated with 3D geometry of relatively large samples in a non-destructive manner. In this paper, we review recent advances in several synchrotron-based hard x-ray XPCI methods. Challenges and key factors in methodological development are discussed, and biological and medical applications are presented. (paper)

  4. Technologies of image guidance and the development of advanced linear accelerator systems for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Vincent W C; Law, Maria Y Y; Star-Lack, Josh; Cheung, Fion W K; Ling, C Clifton

    2011-01-01

    As advanced radiotherapy approaches for targeting the tumor and sparing the normal tissues have been developed, the image guidance of therapy has become essential to directing and confirming treatment accuracy. To approach these goals, image guidance devices now include kV on-board imagers, kV/MV cone-beam CT systems, CT-on-rails, and mobile and in-room radiographic/fluoroscopic systems. Nonionizing sources, such as ultrasound and optical systems, and electromagnetic devices have been introduced to monitor or track the patient and/or tumor positions during treatment. In addition, devices have been designed specifically for monitoring and/or controlling respiratory motion. Optimally, image-guided radiation therapy systems should possess 3 essential elements: (1) 3D imaging of soft tissues and tumors, (2) efficient acquisition and comparison of the 3D images, and (3) an efficacious process for clinically meaningful intervention. Understanding and using these tools effectively is central to current radiotherapy practice. The implementation and integration of these devices continue to carry practical challenges, which emphasize the need for further development of the technologies and their clinical applications.

  5. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  6. A Raman chemical imaging system for detection of contaminants in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kaunglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.; Mo, Chang Yeon

    2011-06-01

    This study presented a preliminary investigation into the use of macro-scale Raman chemical imaging for the screening of dry milk powder for the presence of chemical contaminants. Melamine was mixed into dry milk at concentrations (w/w) of 0.2%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% and images of the mixtures were analyzed by a spectral information divergence algorithm. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, and urea were each separately mixed into dry milk at concentrations of (w/w) of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 5.0%, and an algorithm based on self-modeling mixture analysis was applied to these sample images. The contaminants were successfully detected and the spatial distribution of the contaminants within the sample mixtures was visualized using these algorithms. Although further studies are necessary, macro-scale Raman chemical imaging shows promise for use in detecting contaminants in food ingredients and may also be useful for authentication of food ingredients.

  7. Investigation of the composition of anabolic tablets using near infrared spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebiere, Hervé; Ghyselinck, Céline; Lempereur, Laurent; Brenier, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The use of performance enhancing drugs is a widespread phenomenon in professional and leisure sports. A spectroscopic study was carried out on anabolic tablets labelled as 5 mg methandienone tablets provided by police departments. The analytical approach was based on a two-step methodology: a fast analysis of tablets using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to assess sample homogeneity based on their global composition, followed by Raman chemical imaging of one sample per NIR profile to obtain information on sample formulation. NIR spectroscopy assisted by a principal components analysis (PCA) enabled fast discrimination of different profiles based on the excipient formulation. Raman hyperspectral imaging and multivariate curve resolution - alternating least square (MCR-ALS) provided chemical images of the distribution of the active substance and excipients within tablets and facilitated identification of the active compounds. The combination of NIR spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging highlighted dose-to-dose variations and succeeded in the discrimination of four different formulations out of eight similar samples of anabolic tablets. Some samples contained either methandienone or methyltestosterone whereas one sample did not contain an active substance. Other ingredients were sucrose, lactose, starch or talc. Both techniques were fast and non-destructive and therefore can be carried out as exploratory methods prior to destructive screening methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Investigation of the composition of anabolic tablets using near infrared spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebiere, Hervé; Ghyselinck, Céline; Lempereur, Laurent; Brenier, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The use of performance enhancing drugs is a widespread phenomenon in professional and leisure sports. A spectroscopic study was carried out on anabolic tablets labelled as 5 mg methandienone tablets provided by police departments. The analytical approach was based on a two-step methodology: a fast analysis of tablets using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to assess sample homogeneity based on their global composition, followed by Raman chemical imaging of one sample per NIR profile to obtain information on sample formulation. NIR spectroscopy assisted by a principal components analysis (PCA) enabled fast discrimination of different profiles based on the excipient formulation. Raman hyperspectral imaging and multivariate curve resolution - alternating least square (MCR-ALS) provided chemical images of the distribution of the active substance and excipients within tablets and facilitated identification of the active compounds. The combination of NIR spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging highlighted dose-to-dose variations and succeeded in the discrimination of four different formulations out of eight similar samples of anabolic tablets. Some samples contained either methandienone or methyltestosterone whereas one sample did not contain an active substance. Other ingredients were sucrose, lactose, starch or talc. Both techniques were fast and non-destructive and therefore can be carried out as exploratory methods prior to destructive screening methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26198290

  9. Application of phase equilibria and chemical thermodynamics to the preparation, farbiration, and performance of advanced fast reactor fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described are some phase equilibria and chemical thermodynamics of systems relevant to the production and operation of the so-called ''advanced'' fast breeder reactor fuels. The systems discussed include UPu carbides, nitrides, oxycarbides and carbonitrides. Some examples of the application of these phase equilibria to the preparation, fabrication and behaviour of the materials in temperature gradients appropriate to reactor conditions are presented. Finally, aspects of the complex four and five component, U-C-O-N and U-Pu-C-O-N systems are discussed, a detailed knowledge of which is required for an analysis of advanced fuel behaviour

  10. Application and further development of diffusion based 2D chemical imaging techniques in the rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Christoph; Santner, Jakob; Borisov, Sergey; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Wenzel, Walter; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Two dimensional chemical imaging of root processes refers to novel in situ methods to investigate and map solutes at a high spatial resolution (sub-mm). The visualization of these solutes reveals new insights in soil biogeochemistry and root processes. We derive chemical images by using data from DGT-LA-ICP-MS (Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) and POS (Planar Optode Sensors). Both technologies have shown promising results when applied in aqueous environment but need to be refined and improved for imaging at the soil-plant interface. Co-localized mapping using combined DGT and POS technologies and the development of new gel combinations are in our focus. DGTs are smart and thin (resin for the targeted analytes (e.g. trace metals, phosphate, sulphide or radionuclides). The measurement principle is passive and diffusion based. The present analytes are diffusing into the gel and are bound by the resin. Thereby, the resin acts as zero sink. After application, DGTs are retrieved, dried, and analysed using LA-ICP-MS. The data is then normalized by an internal standard (e.g. 13C), calibrated using in-house standards and chemical images of the target area are plotted using imaging software. POS are, similar to DGT, thin sensor foils containing a fluorophore coating depending on the target analyte. The measurement principle is based on excitation of the flourophore by a specific wavelength and emission of the fluorophore depending on the presence of the analyte. The emitted signal is captured using optical filters and a DSLR camera. While DGT analysis is destructive, POS measurements can be performed continuously during the application. Both semi-quantitative techniques allow an in situ application to visualize chemical processes directly at the soil-plant interface. Here, we present a summary of results from rhizotron experiments with different plants in metal contaminated and agricultural soils.

  11. Advances in functional and structural imaging of the human lung using proton MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G Wilson; Mugler, John P; Sá, Rui C; Altes, Talissa A; Prisk, G Kim; Hopkins, Susan R

    2014-12-01

    The field of proton lung MRI is advancing on a variety of fronts. In the realm of functional imaging, it is now possible to use arterial spin labeling (ASL) and oxygen-enhanced imaging techniques to quantify regional perfusion and ventilation, respectively, in standard units of measurement. By combining these techniques into a single scan, it is also possible to quantify the local ventilation-perfusion ratio, which is the most important determinant of gas-exchange efficiency in the lung. To demonstrate potential for accurate and meaningful measurements of lung function, this technique was used to study gravitational gradients of ventilation, perfusion, and ventilation-perfusion ratio in healthy subjects, yielding quantitative results consistent with expected regional variations. Such techniques can also be applied in the time domain, providing new tools for studying temporal dynamics of lung function. Temporal ASL measurements showed increased spatial-temporal heterogeneity of pulmonary blood flow in healthy subjects exposed to hypoxia, suggesting sensitivity to active control mechanisms such as hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and illustrating that to fully examine the factors that govern lung function it is necessary to consider temporal as well as spatial variability. Further development to increase spatial coverage and improve robustness would enhance the clinical applicability of these new functional imaging tools. In the realm of structural imaging, pulse sequence techniques such as ultrashort echo-time radial k-space acquisition, ultrafast steady-state free precession, and imaging-based diaphragm triggering can be combined to overcome the significant challenges associated with proton MRI in the lung, enabling high-quality three-dimensional imaging of the whole lung in a clinically reasonable scan time. Images of healthy and cystic fibrosis subjects using these techniques demonstrate substantial promise for non-contrast pulmonary angiography and detailed

  12. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom

    2009-11-11

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  13. High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L3 absorption edge. From these data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20–30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to operando studies of heterogeneous catalysts on the nanometer scale.

  14. High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, R.; Reinhardt, J.; Hofmann, G.;

    2013-01-01

    We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L3 absorption edge. From these...... data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20-30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to...

  15. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.;

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  16. Advanced Cu chemical displacement technique for SiO2-based electrochemical metallization ReRAM application

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Fun-Tat; Lin, Yu-Hsien; You, Hsin-Chiang; Yang, Wen-Luh; Lin, Li-Min; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Ko, Chum-Min; Chao, Tien-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates an advanced copper (Cu) chemical displacement technique (CDT) with varying the chemical displacement time for fabricating Cu/SiO2-stacked resistive random-access memory (ReRAM). Compared with other Cu deposition methods, this CDT easily controls the interface of the Cu-insulator, the switching layer thickness, and the immunity of the Cu etching process, assisting the 1-transistor-1-ReRAM (1T-1R) structure and system-on-chip integration. The modulated shape of the Cu-Si...

  17. Infrared chemical imaging: Spatial resolution evaluation and super-resolution concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offroy, Marc [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Roggo, Yves [F. Hoffmann-La Roche A.G., Basel (Switzerland); Milanfar, Peyman [Multi-Dimensional Signal Processing Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, 1156 High Street, Mailcode SOE2, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Duponchel, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.duponchel@univ-lille1.fr [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, LASIR, CNRS UMR 8516, Bat. C5, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-08-03

    Chemical imaging systems help to solve many challenges in various scientific fields. Able to deliver rapid spatial and chemical information, modern infrared spectrometers using Focal Plane Array detectors (FPA) are of great interest. Considering conventional infrared spectrometers with a single element detector, we can consider that the diffraction-limited spatial resolution is more or less equal to the wavelength of the light (i.e. 2.5-25 {mu}m). Unfortunately, the spatial resolution of FPA spectroscopic setup is even lower due to the detector pixel size. This becomes a real constraint when micron-sized samples are analysed. New chemometrics methods are thus of great interest to overcome such resolution drawback, while keeping our far-field infrared imaging spectrometers. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the super-resolution concept in order to increase the spatial resolution of infrared imaging spectrometers using FPA detectors. The main idea of super-resolution is the fusion of several low-resolution images of the same sample to obtain a higher-resolution image. Applying the super-resolution concept on a relatively low number of FPA acquisitions, it was possible to observe a 30% decrease in spatial resolution.

  18. Estimation and characterization of physical and inorganic chemical indicators of water quality by using SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Muntadher A.; Toumi, Abdelmalek; Khenchaf, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Recently, remote sensing is considering one of the most important tools in studies of water scattering and water characterization. Traditional methods for monitoring pollutants depended on optical satellite rather than Radar data. Thus, many of Water Quality Parameters (WQP) from optical imagery are still limited. In this paper, a new approach based on the TerraSAR-X images has been presented which it is used to map the region of interest and to estimate physical and chemical WQPs. This approach based on a Small Perturbation Model (SPM) for the electromagnetic scattering is applied by using the Elfouhaily spectrum. A series of inversions have been included in this model started by finding the reflectivity from backscattering coefficients which are calculated from SAR images. Another inversion has been applied to find dielectric constant from the calculation models of the reflectivity (in HH and VV polarizations). Then, a Stogryn Debye formulation has been used to estimate temperature and salinity of water surface from SAR images. After many derivations we got a new model able to estimate temperature and salinity directly from backscattering coefficients obtained from radar images. Inorganic chemical parameters which are represented by Total Dissolved Salts (TDS) and the Electrical Conductivity (EC) are estimated directly from salinity. A tow dataset of instu data have been used to validate this work. The validation included a comparison between parameters measured in situ and those estimated from Terra SAR-X image.

  19. Advanced spatio-temporal filtering techniques for photogrammetric image sequence analysis in civil engineering material testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebold, F.; Maas, H.-G.

    2016-01-01

    The paper shows advanced spatial, temporal and spatio-temporal filtering techniques which may be used to reduce noise effects in photogrammetric image sequence analysis tasks and tools. As a practical example, the techniques are validated in a photogrammetric spatio-temporal crack detection and analysis tool applied in load tests in civil engineering material testing. The load test technique is based on monocular image sequences of a test object under varying load conditions. The first image of a sequence is defined as a reference image under zero load, wherein interest points are determined and connected in a triangular irregular network structure. For each epoch, these triangles are compared to the reference image triangles to search for deformations. The result of the feature point tracking and triangle comparison process is a spatio-temporally resolved strain value field, wherein cracks can be detected, located and measured via local discrepancies. The strains can be visualized as a color-coded map. In order to improve the measuring system and to reduce noise, the strain values of each triangle must be treated in a filtering process. The paper shows the results of various filter techniques in the spatial and in the temporal domain as well as spatio-temporal filtering techniques applied to these data. The best results were obtained by a bilateral filter in the spatial domain and by a spatio-temporal EOF (empirical orthogonal function) filtering technique.

  20. Fairly direct hit. Advances in imaging of shotgun projectiles in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, Sebastian [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Peters, Alexander [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Klarhoefer, Markus [Siemens Healthcare, Zurich (Switzerland); Bolliger, Stephan A.; Thali, Michael J. [University of Zurich, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Anderson, Suzanne [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University of Notre Dame Australia, Radiology, Sydney School of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Federal Institute of Technology, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the magnetic properties of different types of projectiles and qualify the metal artefact reduction technique for diagnostic and/or forensic MRI. Ten different projectiles embedded in ordnance gelatine blocks underwent an in vitro 1.5-T MR study with seven sequences including a recently developed metal artefact reduction sequence (Advanced WARP) combining VAT (view-angle-tilting) and SEMAC (slice-encoding metal-artefact-correction). Resulting image quality (five-point scale: 1=best; 5=worst) was scored. Quantifiable magnetic characteristics were correlated with qualitative rating of the MR sequences and torque dislodgment. Metal artefact reduction sequence (median: 2.5) significantly (p < 0.001) improves depiction of projectiles in comparison to all other MR pulse sequences (median: 4.75). Images from diamagnetic composed bullets (median: 2) are much less disturbed compared to magnetic attracted ones (median: 5). Correlation (0.623) between deflection angle measurement (ferromagnetic mean 84.2 ; paramagnetic 62 ; diamagnetic mean 0 ) and median qualitative image quality was highly significant (p = 0.027). Torque dislodgement was distinct for elongated magnetic attracted projectiles. Significant improvement of MR imaging of projectiles using metal artefact reduction techniques has important implications for diagnostic/forensic work-up. The correlations between magnetic attraction force, deflection-angle results and image properties demonstrate that the MR safety of projectiles can be estimated with one of these methods. (orig.)

  1. Fairly direct hit. Advances in imaging of shotgun projectiles in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the magnetic properties of different types of projectiles and qualify the metal artefact reduction technique for diagnostic and/or forensic MRI. Ten different projectiles embedded in ordnance gelatine blocks underwent an in vitro 1.5-T MR study with seven sequences including a recently developed metal artefact reduction sequence (Advanced WARP) combining VAT (view-angle-tilting) and SEMAC (slice-encoding metal-artefact-correction). Resulting image quality (five-point scale: 1=best; 5=worst) was scored. Quantifiable magnetic characteristics were correlated with qualitative rating of the MR sequences and torque dislodgment. Metal artefact reduction sequence (median: 2.5) significantly (p < 0.001) improves depiction of projectiles in comparison to all other MR pulse sequences (median: 4.75). Images from diamagnetic composed bullets (median: 2) are much less disturbed compared to magnetic attracted ones (median: 5). Correlation (0.623) between deflection angle measurement (ferromagnetic mean 84.2 ; paramagnetic 62 ; diamagnetic mean 0 ) and median qualitative image quality was highly significant (p = 0.027). Torque dislodgement was distinct for elongated magnetic attracted projectiles. Significant improvement of MR imaging of projectiles using metal artefact reduction techniques has important implications for diagnostic/forensic work-up. The correlations between magnetic attraction force, deflection-angle results and image properties demonstrate that the MR safety of projectiles can be estimated with one of these methods. (orig.)

  2. Updates in advanced diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques in the evaluation of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hebert; Alberto; Vargas; Edward; Malnor; Lawrence; Yousef; Mazaheri; Evis; Sala

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging(DWMRI) is considered part of the standard imaging protocol for the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer.It has been proven valuable as a functional tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of prostate cancer beyond anatomical MRI sequences such as T2-weighted imaging. This review discusses ongoing controversies in DW-MRI acquisition, including the optimal number of b-values to be used for prostate DWI, and summarizes the current literature on the use of advanced DWMRI techniques. These include intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, which better accounts for the nonmono-exponential behavior of the apparent diffusion coefficient as a function of b-value and the influence of perfusion at low b-values. Another technique is diffusion kurtosis imaging(DKI). Metrics from DKI reflect excess kurtosis of tissues, representing its deviation from Gaussian diffusion behavior. Preliminary results suggest that DKI findings may have more value than findings from conventional DW-MRI for the assessment of prostate cancer.

  3. Recent Advances in Cryo-TEM Imaging of Soft Lipid Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Helvig

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM, and its technological variations thereof, have become a powerful tool for detailed morphological characterization and 3D tomography of soft lipid and polymeric nanoparticles as well as biological materials such as viruses and DNA without chemical fixation. Here, we review and discuss recent advances in Cryo-TEM analysis of lipid-based drug nanocarriers with particular emphasis on morphological and internal nanostructure characterization of lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles such as cubosomes and hexosomes.

  4. Biochemical imaging of cervical intervertebral discs with glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging: feasibility and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, Christoph; Mueller-Lutz, Anja; Zimmermann, Lisa; Boos, Johannes; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Schmitt, Benjamin [Siemens Ltd. Australia, Healthcare Sector, Macquarie Park, NSW (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer (gagCEST) imaging at 3T in the assessment of the GAG content of cervical IVDs in healthy volunteers. Forty-two cervical intervertebral discs of seven healthy volunteers (four females, three males; mean age: 21.4 ± 1.4 years; range: 19-24 years) were examined at a 3T MRI scanner in this prospective study. The MRI protocol comprised standard morphological, sagittal T2 weighted (T2w) images to assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based grading system for cervical intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) and biochemical imaging with gagCEST to calculate a region-of-interest analysis of nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF). GagCEST of cervical IVDs was technically successful at 3T with significant higher gagCEST values in NP compared to AF (1.17 % ± 1.03 % vs. 0.79 % ± 1.75 %; p = 0.005). We found topological differences of gagCEST values of the cervical spine with significant higher gagCEST effects in lower IVDs (r = 1; p = 0). We could demonstrate a significant, negative correlation between gagCEST values and cervical disc degeneration of NP (r = -0.360; p = 0.019). Non-degenerated IVDs had significantly higher gagCEST effects compared to degenerated IVDs in NP (1.76 % ± 0.92 % vs. 0.52 % ± 1.17 %; p < 0.001). Biochemical imaging of cervical IVDs is feasible at 3T. GagCEST analysis demonstrated a topological GAG distribution of the cervical spine. The depletion of GAG in the NP with increasing level of morphological degeneration can be assessed using gagCEST imaging. (orig.)

  5. Stimulated Raman scattering detection for chemically specific time-resolved imaging of gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Eynas; Gren, Per; Edenharder, Stefan; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2016-05-01

    A stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique based on spatial modulation of the pump beam has been used to study gases. The SRS gain signal was separated from the Stokes beam background in the spatial frequency domain. The SRS signal shows linear behaviour with the gas pressure at a range from 1.0 to 8.0 bars. The signal is linearly proportional to the pump beam intensity while it is enhanced with increasing the Stokes beam intensity to a certain limit than it saturates. Further, the chemical specificity of the technique has been investigated. Two sharp peaks with line width at half maximum of about 0.30 nm have been obtained at Stokes beam wavelengths of 629.93 nm and 634.05 nm corresponding to the methane and ethylene gases, respectively. The results show that SRS imaging is a promising technique to provide chemical specificity as well as spatial and temporal information of gaseous species. PMID:27137608

  6. A versatile toolbox for posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging of RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Anupam A.; Tanpure, Arun A.; Mukherjee, Progya P.; Athavale, Soumitra; Kelkar, Ashwin; Galande, Sanjeev; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular RNA labeling strategies based on bioorthogonal chemical reactions are much less developed in comparison to glycan, protein and DNA due to its inherent instability and lack of effective methods to introduce bioorthogonal reactive functionalities (e.g. azide) into RNA. Here we report the development of a simple and modular posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging technique for RNA by using a novel toolbox comprised of azide-modified UTP analogs. These analogs facilitate the enzymatic incorporation of azide groups into RNA, which can be posttranscriptionally labeled with a variety of probes by click and Staudinger reactions. Importantly, we show for the first time the specific incorporation of azide groups into cellular RNA by endogenous RNA polymerases, which enabled the imaging of newly transcribing RNA in fixed and in live cells by click reactions. This labeling method is practical and provides a new platform to study RNA in vitro and in cells. PMID:26384420

  7. Advances in EEG: home video telemetry, high frequency oscillations and electrical source imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anjla C; Thornton, Rachel C; Mitchell, Tejal N; Michell, Andrew W

    2016-10-01

    Over the last two decades, technological advances in electroencephalography (EEG) have allowed us to extend its clinical utility for the evaluation of patients with epilepsy. This article reviews three main areas in which substantial advances have been made in the diagnosis and pre-surgical planning of patients with epilepsy. Firstly, the development of small portable video-EEG systems have allowed some patients to record their attacks at home, thereby improving diagnosis, with consequent substantial healthcare and economic implications. Secondly, in specialist centres carrying out epilepsy surgery, there has been considerable interest in whether bursts of very high frequency EEG activity can help to determine the regions of the brain likely to be generating the seizures. Identification of these discharges, initially only recorded from intracranial electrodes, may thus allow better surgical planning and improve surgical outcomes. Finally we discuss the contribution of electrical source imaging in the pre-surgical evaluation of patients with focal epilepsy, and its prospects for the future.

  8. Advanced MR imaging of the placenta: Exploring the in utero placenta-brain connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andescavage, Nickie Niforatos; du Plessis, Adre; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    The placenta is a vital organ necessary for the healthy neurodevelopment of the fetus. Despite the known associations between placental dysfunction and neurologic impairment, there is a paucity of tools available to reliably assess in vivo placental health and function. Existing clinical tools for placental assessment remain insensitive in predicting and evaluating placental well-being. Advanced MRI techniques hold significant promise for the dynamic, non-invasive, real-time assessment of placental health and identification of early placental-based disorders. In this review, we summarize the available clinical tools for placental assessment, including ultrasound, Doppler, and conventional MRI. We then explore the emerging role of advanced placental MR imaging techniques for supporting the developing fetus and appraise the strengths and limitations of quantitative MRI in identifying early markers of placental dysfunction for improved pregnancy monitoring and fetal outcomes. PMID:25765905

  9. SU-E-QI-20: A Review of Advanced PET and CT Image Features for the Evaluation of Tumor Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using quantitative PET and CT image features for the evaluation of tumor response. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than fifty papers that use advanced, quantitative PET/CT image features for the evaluation of tumor response. We also discussed future works on extracting disease-specific features, combining multiple and complementary features in response modeling, delineating tumor in multimodality images, and exploring biological explanations of these advanced features. Results: Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features (characterizing spatial distribution of FDG uptake) have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Conclusions: Advanced, quantitative FDG PET/CT image features have been shown promising for the evaluation of tumor response. With the emerging multi-modality imaging performed at multiple time points for each patient, it becomes more important to analyze the serial images quantitatively, select and combine both complementary and contradictory information from various sources, for accurate and personalized evaluation of tumor response to therapy.

  10. Advances in Tumor Screening, Imaging, and Avatar Technologies for High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders eOhman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The majority of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma cases are detected in advanced stages when treatment options are limited. Surgery is less effective at eradicating the disease when it is widespread, resulting in high rates of disease relapse and chemoresistance. Current screening techniques are ineffective for early tumor detection and consequently, BRCA mutations carriers, with an increased risk for developing high-grade serous ovarian cancer, elect to undergo risk-reducing surgery. While prophylactic surgery is associated with a significant reduction in the risk of cancer development, it also results in surgical menopause and significant adverse side effects. The development of efficient early-stage screening protocols and imaging technologies is critical to improving the outcome and quality of life for current patients and women at increased risk. In addition, more accurate animal models are necessary in order to provide relevant in vivo testing systems and advance our understanding of the disease origin and progression. Moreover, both genetically engineered and tumor xenograft animal models enable the preclinical testing of novel imaging techniques and molecularly targeted therapies as they become available. Recent advances in xenograft technologies have made possible the creation of avatar mice, personalized tumorgrafts, which can be used as therapy testing surrogates for individual patients prior to or during treatment. High-grade serous ovarian cancer may be an ideal candidate for use with avatar models based on key characteristics of the tumorgraft platform. This review explores multiple strategies, including novel imaging and screening technologies in both patients and animal models, aimed at detecting cancer in the early stages and improving the disease prognosis.

  11. What advances in microscopy are required for combined MRI and optical functional brain imaging? (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfeld, David

    2016-03-01

    This overview talk will focus on forward-looking scientific needs and physical limits to images of neuronal processes. The challenge in nervous systems is that the basic unit for "switching" events in the nervous system occurs on the one micrometer scale of synaptic spines, while computations involve communication between individual neurons across the full expanse of cortex, which is ten millimeters for mouse cortex. I will address hoped-for advances in optical microscopy, within the context of existing and proposed contrast mechanisms of neuronal function, that span the four orders of magnitude of length scales for neuronal processing

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for planning intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate Miranda, M; Pinho, D F; Wardak, Z; Albuquerque, K; Pedrosa, I

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common gynecological cancer. Its treatment depends on tumor staging at the time of diagnosis, and a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in locally advanced cervical cancers. The combined use of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy increases survival in these patients. Brachytherapy enables a larger dose of radiation to be delivered to the tumor with less toxicity for neighboring tissues with less toxicity for neighboring tissues compared to the use of external beam radiotherapy alone. For years, brachytherapy was planned exclusively using computed tomography (CT). The recent incorporation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides essential information about the tumor and neighboring structures making possible to better define the target volumes. Nevertheless, MRI has limitations, some of which can be compensated for by fusing CT and MRI. Fusing the images from the two techniques ensures optimal planning by combining the advantages of each technique.

  13. Image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NamPhongNguyen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer remains a challenge because of the head and neck complex anatomy and the tumor invasion to the adjacent organs and/or metastases to the cervical nodes. Postoperative irradiation or concurrent chemoradiation may lead to damage of radiosensitive structures such as the salivary glands, mandible, cochlea, larynx, and pharyngeal muscles. Xerostomia, osteoradionecrosis, deafness, hoarseness of the voice, dysphagia, and aspiration remain serious complications of head and neck irradiation and impair patient quality of life. Intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy by virtue of steep dose gradient and daily imaging may allow for decreased radiation of the organs at risk for complication while preserving loco-regional control.

  14. Advanced MR imaging in Lhermitte-Duclos disease: moving closer to pathology and pathophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.; Krishnamoorthy, T.; Kesavadas, C. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Kerala (India); Radhakrishnan, V.V. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Pathology, Kerala (India)

    2007-09-15

    Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD, dysplastic gangliocytoma) is an extremely rare cerebellar lesion of uncertain etiology. The debate as to whether it constitutes a neoplastic, malformative, or hamartomatous lesion is still continuing. In this report we explore the usefulness of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion imaging, and chemical shift imaging (CSI) in demonstrating the pathology and pathophysiology in two patients with LDD. MR imaging of the brain and the cervicodorsal spine was performed on a 1.5-T scanner in a 47-year-old woman presenting with numbness and paresthesia of both upper and lower limbs, and in a 17-year-old male with right frontal headache associated with neck pain. Routine imaging in the first patient showed a left-side cerebellar mass with characteristic 'tiger-striped' thick folia associated with Chiari I malformation, tonsillar herniation and cervicodorsal syringomyelia and in the second patient a right cerebellar mass with similar findings. The SWI demonstrated the characteristic deep running veins between the folia, which is thought to be the cause for vascular contrast enhancement. Diffusion showed a T2 shine-through effect with mild increased diffusivity, and perfusion showed increase in relative cerebral blood volume, relative cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time in the lesion. MR spectroscopy demonstrated reduction in metabolites and a prominent lactate peak in both the patients. The pathological and pathophysiological significance of these findings is discussed. MRI with the newer imaging capabilities can demonstrate the pathology and pathophysiology in Lhermitte-Duclos disease better. SWI helps in detecting the veins around the thickened folia. (orig.)

  15. Potential for MERLIN-Expo, an advanced tool for higher tier exposure assessment, within the EU chemical legislative frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Nicoleta; Tediosi, Alice; Ciffroy, Philippe; Altenpohl, Annette; Brochot, Céline; Verdonck, Frederik; Ferrari, Federico; Giubilato, Elisa; Capri, Ettore; Fait, Gabriella

    2016-08-15

    MERLIN-Expo merges and integrates advanced exposure assessment methodologies, allowing the building of complex scenarios involving several pollution sources and targets. The assessment of exposure and risks to human health from chemicals is of major concern for policy and ultimately benefits all citizens. The development and operational fusion of the advanced exposure assessment methodologies envisaged in the MERLIN-Expo tool will have a significant impact in the long term on several policies dealing with chemical safety management. There are more than 30 agencies in Europe related to exposure and risk evaluation of chemicals, which have an important role in implementing EU policies, having especially tasks of technical, scientific, operational and/or regulatory nature. The main purpose of the present paper is to introduce MERLIN-Expo and to highlight its potential for being effectively integrated within the group of tools available to assess the risk and exposure of chemicals for EU policy. The main results show that the tool is highly suitable for use in site-specific or local impact assessment, with minor modifications it can also be used for Plant Protection Products (PPPs), biocides and REACH, while major additions would be required for a comprehensive application in the field of consumer and worker exposure assessment. PMID:27107646

  16. Image optimization for chemical species tomography with an irregular and sparse beam array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-speed tomographic imaging of hostile engineering processes using absorption-based measurements presents a number of difficulties. In some cases, these challenges include severe limitations on the number of available measurement paths through the subject and the process of designing the geometrical arrangement of these paths for best imaging performance. This paper considers the case of a chemical species tomography system based on near-IR spectroscopic absorption measurements, intended for application to one cylinder of a multi-cylinder production engine. Some of the results, however, are also applicable to other hard-field tomographic modalities in applications where similar constraints may be encountered. A hitherto unreported design criterion is presented for optimal beam geometry for imaging performance, resulting in an irregular array with only 27 measurement paths through the subject for the engine application. Image reconstruction for this severely limited geometry is considered at length, using both simulated and experimental phantom data. Novel methods are presented for the practical generation of gaseous phantoms for calibration and testing of the system. The propane absorption coefficient at 1700 nm is measured. Quantitative imaging of propane plumes in air is demonstrated, showing good localization of circular plumes with diameter as small as 1/5 of the subject diameter and excellent imaging of multiple plumes

  17. High-resolution diffusion kurtosis imaging at 3T enabled by advanced post-processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siawoosh eMohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI is more sensitive to microstructural differences and can be related to more specific micro-scale metrics (e.g. intra-axonal volume fraction than diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, offering exceptional potential for clinical diagnosis and research into the white and gray matter. Currently DKI is acquired only at low spatial resolution (2-3 mm isotropic, because of the lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and higher artifact level associated with the technically more demanding DKI. Higher spatial resolution of about 1mm is required for the characterization of fine white matter pathways or cortical microstructure. We used restricted-field-of-view imaging in combination with advanced post-processing methods to enable unprecedented high-quality, high-resolution DKI (1.2 mm isotropic on a clinical 3T scanner. Post-processing was advanced by developing a novel method for Retrospective Eddy current and Motion ArtifacT Correction in High-resolution, multi-shell diffusion data (REMATCH. Furthermore, we applied a powerful edge preserving denoising method, denoted as multi-shell orientation-position-adaptive smoothing (msPOAS. We demonstrated the feasibility of high-quality, high-resolution DKI and its potential for delineating highly myelinated fiber pathways in the motor cortex. REMATCH performs robustly even at the low SNR level of high-resolution DKI, where standard EC and motion correction failed (i.e. produced incorrectly aligned images and thus biased the diffusion model fit. We showed that the combination of REMATCH and msPOAS increased the contrast between gray and white matter in mean kurtosis (MK maps by about 35% and at the same time preserves the original distribution of MK values, whereas standard Gaussian smoothing strongly biases the distribution.

  18. Raman imaging to study structural and chemical features of the dentin enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebrahim, M. Anwar; Krafft, C.; Popp, J.

    2015-10-01

    The structure and chemical features of the human dentin enamel junction (DEJ) were characterized using Raman spectroscopic imaging. Slices were prepared from 10 German, and 10 Turkish teeth. Raman images were collected at 785 nm excitation and the average Raman spectra were calculated for analysis. Univariate and multivariate spectral analysis were applied for investigation. Raman images were obtained based on the intensity ratios of CH at 1450 cm-1 (matrix) to phosphate at 960 cm-1 (mineral), and carbonate to phosphate (1070/960) ratios. Different algorithms (HCA, K-means cluster and VCA) also used to study the DEJ. The obtained results showed that the width of DEJ is about 5 pm related to univariate method while it varies from 6 to 12 μm based on multivariate spectral technique. Both spectral analyses showed increasing in carbonate content inside the DEJ compared to the dentin, and the amide I (collagen) peak in dentin spectra is higher than DEJ spectra peak.

  19. Two decades of chemical imaging of solutes in sediments and soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santner, Jakob; Larsen, Morten; Kreuzeder, Andreas;

    2015-01-01

    The increasing appreciation of the small-scale (sub-mm) heterogeneity of biogeochemical processes in sediments, wetlands and soils has led to the development of several methods for high-resolution two-dimensional imaging of solute distribution in porewaters. Over the past decades, localised...... understanding of biogeochemical processes regulating the distribution of key elements and solutes including O2, CO2, pH, redox conditions as well as nutrient and contaminant ion species in structurally complex soils and sediments. Recently these methods have been applied in parallel or integrated as so......-called sandwich sensors for multianalyte measurements. Here we review the capabilities and limitations of the chemical imaging methods that are currently at hand, using a number of case studies, and provide an outlook on potential future developments for two-dimensional solute imaging in soils and sediments....

  20. The hunt for the dynamical resonances in chemical reaction dynamics: a perspective on historical advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Angyang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical background and basic definition of the resonances in chemical reaction dynamics have been introduced in this article. The historical breakthrough in the experimental search for the reaction resonances has been reviewed in this report, with an emphasis on the crossed molecular beam apparatus. The research of the chemical reaction resonances has attracted many scientists’ attention from 80s of last century. The chemical reaction resonances in the F+H2 reaction were firstly observed by the researchers of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2006. Besides, the partial wave resonances in the chemical reactions have been observed for the first time in 2010.

  1. Continued development of a portable widefield hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor for standoff detection of explosive, chemical, and narcotic residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Gardner, Charles W.; Klueva, Oksana; Tomas, David

    2014-05-01

    Passive, standoff detection of chemical, explosive and narcotic threats employing widefield, shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) continues to gain acceptance in defense and security fields. A robust and user-friendly portable platform with such capabilities increases the effectiveness of locating and identifying threats while reducing risks to personnel. In 2013 ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) introduced Aperio, a handheld sensor, using real-time SWIR HSI for wide area surveillance and standoff detection of explosives, chemical threats, and narcotics. That SWIR HSI system employed a liquid-crystal tunable filter for real-time automated detection and display of threats. In these proceedings, we report on a next generation device called VeroVision™, which incorporates an improved optical design that enhances detection performance at greater standoff distances with increased sensitivity and detection speed. A tripod mounted sensor head unit (SHU) with an optional motorized pan-tilt unit (PTU) is available for precision pointing and sensor stabilization. This option supports longer standoff range applications which are often seen at checkpoint vehicle inspection where speed and precision is necessary. Basic software has been extended to include advanced algorithms providing multi-target display functionality, automatic threshold determination, and an automated detection recipe capability for expanding the library as new threats emerge. In these proceedings, we report on the improvements associated with the next generation portable widefield SWIR HSI sensor, VeroVision™. Test data collected during development are presented in this report which supports the targeted applications for use of VeroVision™ for screening residue and bulk levels of explosive and drugs on vehicles and personnel at checkpoints as well as various applications for other secure areas. Additionally, we highlight a forensic application of the technology for assisting forensic

  2. New Generation of High Resolution Ultrasonic Imaging Technique for Advanced Material Characterization: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maev, R. Gr.

    The role of non-destructive material characterization and NDT is changing at a rapid rate, continuing to evolve alongside the dramatic development of novel techniques based on the principles of high-resolution imaging. The modern use of advanced optical, thermal, ultrasonic, laser-ultrasound, acoustic emission, vibration, electro-magnetic, and X-ray techniques, etc., as well as refined measurement and signal/data processing devices, allows for continuous generation of on-line information. As a result real-time process monitoring can be achieved, leading to the more effective and efficient control of numerous processes, greatly improving manufacturing as a whole. Indeed, concurrent quality inspection has become an attainable reality. With the advent of new materials for use in various structures, joints, and parts, however, innovative applications of modern NDT imaging techniques are necessary to monitor as many stages of manufacturing as possible. Simply put, intelligent advance manufacturing is impossible without actively integrating modern non-destructive evaluation into the production system.

  3. Advances in elemental imaging of rocks using the AGLAE external microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calligaro, T., E-mail: thomas.calligaro@culture.gouv.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des musees de France, CNRS UMR171, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France); Coquinot, Y.; Pichon, L.; Moignard, B. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des musees de France, CNRS UMR171, Palais du Louvre, 75001 Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    Rocks are widely represented in cultural heritage materials. They constitute the major part of archaeological artefacts like stone carvings, tools and weapons, and are present in art works in various forms, such as precious stone inlays or paint pigments. The study of such geomaterials, which are usually constituted of a complex aggregate of mineral phases, aims at determining their exact nature, their provenance and at understanding their possible alteration. Since minerals are often composed of light elements, IBA techniques such as PIXE and PIGE, thanks to their ability to measure with high sensitivity elements down to lithium, should be well adapted to their analysis. However, the bulk composition classically obtained using macro-IBA on pelletized samples or using a broad beam hides the multi-phased nature of the rocks and considerably blurs the searched chemical fingerprint. In contrast, the small size of a nuclear microprobe allows imaging the chemical composition at a finer scale and, when implemented in air, appears ideally suited to analyse without sampling these often precious items. This paper illustrates chemical micro-imaging of rocks with examples performed with the AGLAE external nuclear microprobe: characterisation of microscopic inclusions in gems and detailed chemical mapping of rocks with special emphasis to lapis lazuli. Lapis lazuli is of particular interest in both archaeology and art history: after being employed in Asia since the 7th millennium BC to make carvings and beads, it was used in Medieval Europe as a precious blue painting pigment known as ultramarine. The chemical imaging of major and trace elements in lapis lazuli using external {mu}-PIXE has permitted to identify its mineral phases, to assign their trace elements and to evidence undetected elements. In combination with {mu}-XRD and {mu}-Raman spectrometry, this approach provides a clear mineralogical fingerprint useful to determine rock provenance and to authenticate artefacts

  4. Advances in elemental imaging of rocks using the AGLAE external microbeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calligaro, T.; Coquinot, Y.; Pichon, L.; Moignard, B.

    2011-10-01

    Rocks are widely represented in cultural heritage materials. They constitute the major part of archaeological artefacts like stone carvings, tools and weapons, and are present in art works in various forms, such as precious stone inlays or paint pigments. The study of such geomaterials, which are usually constituted of a complex aggregate of mineral phases, aims at determining their exact nature, their provenance and at understanding their possible alteration. Since minerals are often composed of light elements, IBA techniques such as PIXE and PIGE, thanks to their ability to measure with high sensitivity elements down to lithium, should be well adapted to their analysis. However, the bulk composition classically obtained using macro-IBA on pelletized samples or using a broad beam hides the multi-phased nature of the rocks and considerably blurs the searched chemical fingerprint. In contrast, the small size of a nuclear microprobe allows imaging the chemical composition at a finer scale and, when implemented in air, appears ideally suited to analyse without sampling these often precious items. This paper illustrates chemical micro-imaging of rocks with examples performed with the AGLAE external nuclear microprobe: characterisation of microscopic inclusions in gems and detailed chemical mapping of rocks with special emphasis to lapis lazuli. Lapis lazuli is of particular interest in both archaeology and art history: after being employed in Asia since the 7th millennium BC to make carvings and beads, it was used in Medieval Europe as a precious blue painting pigment known as ultramarine. The chemical imaging of major and trace elements in lapis lazuli using external μ-PIXE has permitted to identify its mineral phases, to assign their trace elements and to evidence undetected elements. In combination with μ-XRD and μ-Raman spectrometry, this approach provides a clear mineralogical fingerprint useful to determine rock provenance and to authenticate artefacts of

  5. Pushing CT and MR Imaging to the Molecular Level for Studying the “Omics”: Current Challenges and Advancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Ming Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, medical imaging has made the transition from anatomical imaging to functional and even molecular imaging. Such transition provides a great opportunity to begin the integration of imaging data and various levels of biological data. In particular, the integration of imaging data and multiomics data such as genomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and pharmacogenomics may open new avenues for predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. However, to promote imaging-omics integration, the practical challenge of imaging techniques should be addressed. In this paper, we describe key challenges in two imaging techniques: computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and then review existing technological advancements. Despite the fact that CT and MRI have different principles of image formation, both imaging techniques can provide high-resolution anatomical images while playing a more and more important role in providing molecular information. Such imaging techniques that enable single modality to image both the detailed anatomy and function of tissues and organs of the body will be beneficial in the imaging-omics field.

  6. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson's disease at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54-77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55-73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (-6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P < 0.001, respectively). CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. (orig.)

  7. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson's disease at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chunmei; Peng, Shuai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Min [Beijing Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chen, Haibo; Su, Wen [Beijing Hospital, Department of Neurology, Beijing (China); Zhao, Xuna [Peking University, Center for MRI Research and Beijing City Key Lab for Medical Physics and Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54-77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55-73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (-6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P < 0.001, respectively). CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. (orig.)

  8. Advances in Bio-Optical Imaging for the Diagnosis of Early Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Keogh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is among the most common malignancies worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 5-year survival rate has remained at a dismal 50% for the past several decades. The main reason for the poor survival rate is the fact that most of the oral cancers, despite the general accessibility of the oral cavity, are not diagnosed until the advanced stage. Early detection of the oral tumors and its precursor lesions may be the most effective means to improve clinical outcome and cure most patients. One of the emerging technologies is the use of non-invasive in vivo tissue imaging to capture the molecular changes at high-resolution to improve the detection capability of early stage disease. This review will discuss the use of optical probes and highlight the role of optical imaging such as autofluorescence, fluorescence diagnosis (FD, laser confocal endomicroscopy (LCE, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, optical coherence tomography (OCT and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM in early oral cancer detection. FD is a promising method to differentiate cancerous lesions from benign, thus helping in the determination of adequate resolution of surgical resection margin. LCE offers in vivo cellular imaging of tissue structures from surface to subsurface layers and has demonstrated the potential to be used as a minimally invasive optical biopsy technique for early diagnosis of oral cancer lesions. SERS was able to differentiate between normal and oral cancer patients based on the spectra acquired from saliva of patients. OCT has been used to visualize the detailed histological features of the oral lesions with an imaging depth down to 2–3 mm. CRM is an optical tool to noninvasively image tissue with near histological resolution. These comprehensive diagnostic modalities can also be used to define surgical margin and to provide a direct assessment of the therapeutic effectiveness.

  9. Advances in bio-optical imaging for the diagnosis of early oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivo, Malini; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Keogh, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is among the most common malignancies worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 5-year survival rate has remained at a dismal 50% for the past several decades. The main reason for the poor survival rate is the fact that most of the oral cancers, despite the general accessibility of the oral cavity, are not diagnosed until the advanced stage. Early detection of the oral tumors and its precursor lesions may be the most effective means to improve clinical outcome and cure most patients. One of the emerging technologies is the use of non-invasive in vivo tissue imaging to capture the molecular changes at high-resolution to improve the detection capability of early stage disease. This review will discuss the use of optical probes and highlight the role of optical imaging such as autofluorescence, fluorescence diagnosis (FD), laser confocal endomicroscopy (LCE), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) in early oral cancer detection. FD is a promising method to differentiate cancerous lesions from benign, thus helping in the determination of adequate resolution of surgical resection margin. LCE offers in vivo cellular imaging of tissue structures from surface to subsurface layers and has demonstrated the potential to be used as a minimally invasive optical biopsy technique for early diagnosis of oral cancer lesions. SERS was able to differentiate between normal and oral cancer patients based on the spectra acquired from saliva of patients. OCT has been used to visualize the detailed histological features of the oral lesions with an imaging depth down to 2-3 mm. CRM is an optical tool to noninvasively image tissue with near histological resolution. These comprehensive diagnostic modalities can also be used to define surgical margin and to provide a direct assessment of the therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:24310585

  10. Advances of molecular imaging probes for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Xiaobo; Liu, Zhiguo; Yu, Lun; Hu, Shuo; Chen, Lizhang; Zeng, Wenbin

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive decline in multiple cognitive domains and it becomes the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. There is an urgent need for the early diagnosis and treatment of AD to ease caregiver burden and medical costs, as well as improve patients' living activities associated with the dramatic increasing number of affected individuals. Molecular imaging with target-specific probes is contributing to identify the underlying biology in AD, which benefits to the early diagnosis of AD and the evaluation of anti-AD therapy. Molecular imaging probes, such as (11)C-PIB, (11)C-MP4A, (18)F-AV-45, and (11)F-FDG, can selectively bind to special bimolecular of AD or accurately accumulate at the location of damage areas, thus become an edge tool for a better management of the diseases in the clinical practice and new drug development. In the past decades, a large variety of probes is being developed and tested to be useful for the early and accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, patient selection for disease-modifying therapeutic trials and monitoring the effect of anti-amyloid therapy. Since imaging probes may also help to guide physicians to identify those patients that could best benefit from a given therapeutic regimen, dose, or duration of drug, this paper is to present a perspective of the available imaging probes for AD, classified on different modalities. Meanwhile, recent advances of those probes that have been selected for clinical trials and are at the different stages of the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) approval are outlined. Additionally, future directions and specific application of imaging strategies designed for both diagnosis and treatment for AD are discussed. PMID:24484277

  11. 油菜化学杀雄剂研究进展%Research Advances in Chemical Emasculation of Rape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张振乾; 王国槐; 官春云; 陈社员

    2011-01-01

    利用化学杀雄剂进行品种选育可有效利用杂种优势,加快育种进程,在油菜育种中应用广泛.综述了油菜化学杀雄剂及其应用、化学杀雄的生理生化研究及其分子方面的研究进展,针对目前在杀雄机理方面研究不足,提出了相关的方法和建议,为油菜化学杀雄剂研究提供参考,促进其在油菜育种中的应用.%Chemical emasculation can effectively using hybrid advantages and promoting breeding process, therefore, it applying widely in rape breeding.The research advances in chemical emasculation agent and its application, physiology and biochemistry of chemical emasculation and its molecule study were reviewed.The results indicated that at present, it is lacking in study of emasculation mechanism, and some correlative measures and suggestions were proposed to provide reference for rape’s chemical emasculation and promote selecting tape’s chemical emasculation agents and breeding emasculated variety.

  12. A Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technique Based on Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer for In Vivo γ-Aminobutyric Acid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gen; Zhang, Tao; Dai, Zhuozhi; Yi, Meizhi; Jia, Yanlong; Nie, Tingting; Zhang, Handi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We developed a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) for GABA imaging and investigated the concentration-dependent CEST effect ofGABA in a rat model of brain tumor with blood—brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Materials and Methods All MRI studies were performed using a 7.0-T Agilent MRI scanner. Z-spectra for GABA were acquired at 7.0 T, 37°C, and a pH of 7.0 using varying B1 amplitudes. CEST images of phantoms with different concentrations of GABA solutions (pH, 7.0) and other metabolites (glutamine, myoinositol, creatinine, and choline) were collected to investigate the concentration-dependent CEST effect of GABA and the potential contribution from other brain metabolites. CEST maps for GABA in rat brains with tumors were collected at baseline and 50 min, 1.5 h, and 2.0 h after the injection of GABA solution. Results The CEST effect of GABA was observed at approximately 2.75 parts per million(ppm) downfield from bulk water, and this effect increased with an increase in the B1 amplitude and remained steady after the B1 amplitude reached 6.0 μT (255 Hz). The CEST effect of GABA was proportional to the GABA concentration in vitro. CEST imaging of GABA in a rat brain with a tumor and compromised BBB showed a gradual increase in the CEST effect after GABA injection. Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrate the feasibility and potential of CEST MRI with the optimal B1 amplitude, which exhibits excellent spatial and temporal resolutions, to map changes in GABA. PMID:27711138

  13. Comparative performance studies between tunable filter and push-broom chemical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Jouko; Saari, Heikki; Kemeny, Gabor; Shi, Zhenqi; Anderson, Carl

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports instrument characterization measurements, which were recently arranged to provide comparative information on different hyperspectral chemical imaging systems. Three different instruments were studied covering both tunable filter and push-broom techniques: The first instrument MatrixNIRTM is based on a LCTF tunable filter and InGaAs camera and covers wavelengths from 1000 to 1700 nm. The second one SisuCHEMATM is based on push-broom technology and MCT camera operating from 1000 to 2500 nm. The third system is an instrument prototype from VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland exploiting high speed Fabry-Perot interferometer and MCT camera, currently calibrated from 1260 to 2500 nm. The characterization procedure was designed to study instrumental noise, signal-to-noise ratio, linearity and spectral as well as spatial resolution. Finally, a pharmaceutical tablet sample was measured with each instrument to demonstrate speed of measurement in a typical application. In spite of differences in wavelength ranges and camera technologies used, the results provide interesting information on relative instrumental advantages and disadvantages, which may be useful for selecting appropriate instrumentation for defined applications. Further, an additional aim of this study is to compare the high speed Fabry-Perot imaging technology under development against the established chemical imaging techniques available on the market today.

  14. Ultrahigh-spatial-resolution chemical and magnetic imaging by laser-based photoemission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new chemical and magnetic imaging system, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with a continuous-wave deep-ultraviolet laser. Threshold photoemission is sensitive to the chemical and magnetic structures of the surface of materials. The spatial resolution of PEEM is limited by space charging when using pulsed photon sources as well as aberrations in the electron optics. We show that the use of a continuous-wave laser enabled us to overcome such a limit by suppressing the space-charge effect, allowing us to obtain a resolution of approximately 2.6 nm. With this system, we demonstrated the imaging of surface reconstruction domains on Si(001) by linear dichroism with normal incidence of the laser beam. We also succeeded in magnetic imaging of thin films with the use of magnetic circular dichroism near the Fermi level. The unique features of the ultraviolet laser will give us fast switching of the incident angles and polarizations of the photon source, which will be useful for the characterization of antiferromagnetic materials as well as ferromagnetic materials

  15. Localizing chemical groups while imaging single native proteins by high-resolution atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Hilbert, Manuel; Steinmetz, Michel O; Müller, Daniel J

    2014-05-14

    Simultaneous high-resolution imaging and localization of chemical interaction sites on single native proteins is a pertinent biophysical, biochemical, and nanotechnological challenge. Such structural mapping and characterization of binding sites is of importance in understanding how proteins interact with their environment and in manipulating such interactions in a plethora of biotechnological applications. Thus far, this challenge remains to be tackled. Here, we introduce force-distance curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) for the high-resolution imaging of SAS-6, a protein that self-assembles into cartwheel-like structures. Using functionalized AFM tips bearing Ni(2+)-N-nitrilotriacetate groups, we locate specific interaction sites on SAS-6 at nanometer resolution and quantify the binding strength of the Ni(2+)-NTA groups to histidine residues. The FD-based AFM approach can readily be applied to image any other native protein and to locate and structurally map histidine residues. Moreover, the surface chemistry used to functionalize the AFM tip can be modified to map other chemical interaction sites. PMID:24766578

  16. Gel for simultaneous chemical imaging of anionic and cationic solutes using diffusive gradients in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzeder, Andreas; Santner, Jakob; Prohaska, Thomas; Wenzel, Walter W

    2013-12-17

    We report on a novel gel based on diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) for the simultaneous measurement of cations and anions and its suitability for high resolution chemical imaging by using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The new high resolution mixed binding gel (HR-MBG) is based on zirconium-hydroxide and suspended particulate reagent-iminodiacetate (SPR-IDA) as resin materials which are embedded in an ether-based urethane polymer hydrogel. The use of this polymer hydrogel material allows the production of ultrathin, highly stable and tear-proof resin gel layers with superior handling properties compared to existing ultrathin polyacrylamide gels. The gel was characterized regarding its uptake kinetics, the anion and cation capacities, and the effects of pH, ionic strength, and aging on the performance of the HR-MBG. Our results demonstrate the capability of this novel gel for concomitant sampling of anions and cations. The suitability of this new gel type for DGT chemical imaging at submm spatial resolution in soils using LA-ICPMS is shown. 2D images of P, As, Co, Cu, Mn, and Zn distributions around roots of Zea mays L. demonstrate the new opportunities offered by the HR-MBG for high-resolution mapping of solute dynamics in soil and sediment hotspots, such as the rhizosphere, by simultaneous observation of anionic and cationic solute species.

  17. High-throughput Raman chemical imaging for evaluating food safety and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2014-05-01

    A line-scan hyperspectral system was developed to enable Raman chemical imaging for large sample areas. A custom-designed 785 nm line-laser based on a scanning mirror serves as an excitation source. A 45° dichroic beamsplitter reflects the laser light to form a 24 cm x 1 mm excitation line normally incident on the sample surface. Raman signals along the laser line are collected by a detection module consisting of a dispersive imaging spectrograph and a CCD camera. A hypercube is accumulated line by line as a motorized table moves the samples transversely through the laser line. The system covers a Raman shift range of -648.7-2889.0 cm-1 and a 23 cm wide area. An example application, for authenticating milk powder, was presented to demonstrate the system performance. In four minutes, the system acquired a 512x110x1024 hypercube (56,320 spectra) from four 47-mm-diameter Petri dishes containing four powder samples. Chemical images were created for detecting two adulterants (melamine and dicyandiamide) that had been mixed into the milk powder.

  18. Molecular Origin of Color Variation in Firefly (Beetle) Bioluminescence: A Chemical Basis for Biological Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Firefly shows bioluminescence by "luciferin-luciferase" (L-L) reaction using luciferin, luciferase, ATP and O2. The chemical photon generation by an enzymatic reaction is widely utilized for analytical methods including biological imaging in the life science fields. To expand photondetecting analyses with firefly bioluminescence, it is important for users to understand the chemical basis of the L-L reaction. In particular, the emission color variation of the L-L reaction is one of the distinguishing characteristics for multicolor luciferase assay and in vivo imaging. From the viewpoint of fundamental chemistry, this review explains the recent progress in the studies on the molecular mechanism of emission color variation after showing the outline of the reaction mechanism of the whole L-L reaction. On the basis of the mechanism, the progresses in organic synthesis of luciferin analogs modulating their emission colors are also presented to support further developments of red/near infrared in vivo biological imaging utility of firefly bioluminescence.

  19. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rafay Ahmed,1 Matthew J Oborski,2 Misun Hwang,1 Frank S Lieberman,3 James M Mountz11Department of Radiology, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Department of Neurology and Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies

  20. REMOVAL OF SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER: RASCO, INC. ADVANCED SIMULTANEOUS OXIDATION PROCESS (ASOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RASco, Inc. ASOP Drinking Water Treatment Module was tested at NSF’s Laboratory for the reduction of the following chemicals of concern: aldicarb, benzene, carbofuran, chloroform, dichlorvos, dicrotophos, methomyl, mevinphos, nicotine, oxamyl, paraquat, phorate, sodium fluor...

  1. Body image in Brazil: recent advances in the state of knowledge and methodological issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Laus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze Brazilian literature on body image and the theoretical and methodological advances that have been made. METHODS A detailed review was undertaken of the Brazilian literature on body image, selecting published articles, dissertations and theses from the SciELO, SCOPUS, LILACS and PubMed databases and the CAPES thesis database. Google Scholar was also used. There was no start date for the search, which used the following search terms: “body image” AND “Brazil” AND “scale(s”; “body image” AND “Brazil” AND “questionnaire(s”; “body image” AND “Brazil” AND “instrument(s”; “body image” limited to Brazil and “body image”. RESULTS The majority of measures available were intended to be used in college students, with half of them evaluating satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the body. Females and adolescents of both sexes were the most studied population. There has been a significant increase in the number of available instruments. Nevertheless, numerous published studies have used non-validated instruments, with much confusion in the use of the appropriate terms (e.g., perception, dissatisfaction, distortion. CONCLUSIONS Much more is needed to understand body image within the Brazilian population, especially in terms of evaluating different age groups and diversifying the components/dimensions assessed. However, interest in this theme is increasing, and important steps have been taken in a short space of time.

  2. Assessment of geometric errors of Advanced Himawari-8 Imager (AHI) over one year operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Wataru

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an approach to check a geometric performance of Advanced Himawari-8 imager (AHI) and demonstrate and evaluate a new approach to ensure more geometric accurately focusing on visible imagery in 500 meters. A series of processing is supplemented by ground control points of shore lines, land mark locations and digital elevation model. Firstly, a template matching technique is conducted to find a best matching point by simply moving the center of AHI sub-image over each point in a reference image of shore lines and calculating the sum of products between the coefficients and the corresponding neighbourhood pixels in the area spanned by the filter mask. Secondly, ortho-rectification processing is carried out to compensate for the geodetical distortions with respect to the acquisition condition including viewing geometry and so on. As a result, an average of root mean square sum of residual errors with system correction and that of precise geometric correction are shown. Overall geometric accuracy is about 1 to 1.5 pixels from 2015 March to July and it also gradually decreased down to 0.2 to 0.8 from 2015 September to 2016 February. AHI is officially open to public for operational use as of July 1, 2015 and after that operation date geometric errors are reasonably satisfied within one pixels of errors.

  3. Body image in Brazil: recent advances in the state of knowledge and methodological issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laus, Maria Fernanda; Kakeshita, Idalina Shiraishi; Costa, Telma Maria Braga; Ferreira, Maria Elisa Caputo; Fortes, Leonardo de Sousa; Almeida, Sebastião Sousa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze Brazilian literature on body image and the theoretical and methodological advances that have been made. METHODS A detailed review was undertaken of the Brazilian literature on body image, selecting published articles, dissertations and theses from the SciELO, SCOPUS, LILACS and PubMed databases and the CAPES thesis database. Google Scholar was also used. There was no start date for the search, which used the following search terms: “body image” AND “Brazil” AND “scale(s)”; “body image” AND “Brazil” AND “questionnaire(s)”; “body image” AND “Brazil” AND “instrument(s)”; “body image” limited to Brazil and “body image”. RESULTS The majority of measures available were intended to be used in college students, with half of them evaluating satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the body. Females and adolescents of both sexes were the most studied population. There has been a significant increase in the number of available instruments. Nevertheless, numerous published studies have used non-validated instruments, with much confusion in the use of the appropriate terms (e.g., perception, dissatisfaction, distortion). CONCLUSIONS Much more is needed to understand body image within the Brazilian population, especially in terms of evaluating different age groups and diversifying the components/dimensions assessed. However, interest in this theme is increasing, and important steps have been taken in a short space of time. PMID:24897056

  4. Wild-Type Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis: Novel Insights From Advanced Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narotsky, David L; Castano, Adam; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Bokhari, Sabahat; Maurer, Mathew S

    2016-09-01

    Amyloidosis is caused by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein fibrils, resulting in destruction of tissue architecture and impairment of organ function. The most common forms of systemic amyloidosis are light-chain and transthyretin-related (ATTR). ATTR can result from an autosomal dominant hereditary transmission of mutated genes in the transthyretin or from a wild-type form of disease (ATTRwt), previously known as senile cardiac amyloidosis. With the aging of the worldwide population, ATTRwt will emerge as the most common type of cardiac amyloidosis that clinicians encounter. Diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis is often delayed, either because of the false assumption that it is a rare disease, or because of misdiagnosis as a result of mistaking it with other conditions. Clinicians must integrate clinical clues from history, physical examination, and common diagnostic tests to raise suspicion for ATTRwt. The historical gold standard for diagnosis of cardiac amyloid is endomyocardial biopsy analysis with pathological distinction of precursor protein type, but this method often results in delayed diagnosis because of the limited availability of expertise to perform and interpret the endomyocardial biopsy specimen. Emerging noninvasive imaging modalities provide easier, accurate screening for ATTRwt. These modalities include advanced echocardiography, using strain imaging and the myocardial contraction fraction; nuclear scintigraphy, which can differentiate between ATTR and light-chain cardiac amyloid; and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using extracellular volume measurement, late gadolinium enhancement, and distinct T1 mapping. These novel approaches reveal insights into the prevalence, clinical course, morphological effects, and prognosis of ATTRwt. PMID:27568874

  5. Monitoring chemical degradation of thermally cycled glass-fibre composites using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, V. M.; Müller, B.; Hagenbeek, M.; Sinke, J.; Groves, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the application of glass-fibre composites in light-weight structures is growing. Although mechanical characterizations of those structures are commonly performed in testing, chemical changes of materials under stresses have not yet been well documented. In the present work coupon tests and Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) have been used to categorise possible chemical changes of glass-fibre reinforced polymers (GFRP) which are currently used in the aircraft industry. HSI is a hybrid technique that combines spectroscopy with imaging. It is able to detect chemical degradation of surfaces and has already been successfully applied in a wide range of fields including astronomy, remote sensing, cultural heritage and medical sciences. GFRP specimens were exposed to two different thermal loading conditions. One thermal loading condition was a continuous thermal exposure at 120°C for 24h, 48 h and 96h, i.e. ageing at a constant temperature. The other thermal loading condition was thermal cycling with three different numbers of cycles (4000, 8000, 12000) and two temperature ranges (0°C to 120°C and -25°C to 95°C). The effects of both conditions were measured using both HSI and interlaminar shear (ILSS) tests. No significant changes of the physical properties of the thermally cycled GFRP specimens were detected using interlaminar shear strength tests and optical microscopy. However, when using HIS, differences of the surface conditions were detected. The results showed that the different thermal loading conditions could be successfully clustered in different colours, using the HSI linear unmixing technique. Each different thermal loading condition showed a different chemical degradation level on its surface which was indicated using different colours.

  6. Assessment of chemical lumbar sympathectomy in critical limb ischaemia using thermal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, D; Brown, T F; Kester, R C

    1994-02-01

    Objective assessment of chemical lumbar sympathectomy (CLS) is lacking. Its success is usually judged in terms of the patient's clinical improvement. We have thermographically measured the immediate temperature changes of the lower limb following CLS using a thermal imager (SAN-EI Thermotracer 6T61). Seven patients with critical limb ischaemia and one patient with Raynaud's phenomenon underwent unilateral ablation of the lumbar sympathetic chain using 5% phenol. Four patients were diabetic, two of whom had undergone previous sympathectomy on the same side. Within fifteen minutes of injection, all patients showed a rise in skin temperature in parts of the sock distribution of between 0.8 degrees C and 8.5 degrees C. We conclude that the haemodynamic effects of CLS are immediate and can be objectively measured with thermal imaging. PMID:8195656

  7. Chemically modified STM tips for atomic-resolution imaging of ultrathin NaCI films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Li[1; Koen Schouteden[1; Violeta lancu[1; Ewald Janssens[1; Peter Lievens[1; Chris Van Haesendonck[1; Jorge I. Cerda[2

    2015-01-01

    Cl-functionalized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips are fabricated by modifying a tungsten STM tip in situ on islands of ultrathin NaCI(100) films on Au(111) surfaces. The functionalized tips are used to achieve clear atomic- resolution imaging of NaCI(100) islands. In comparison with bare metal tips, the chemically modified tips yield drastically enhanced spatial resolution as well as contrast reversal in STM topographs, implying that Na atoms, rather than C1 atoms, are imaged as protrusions. STM simulations based on a Green's function formalism reveal that the experimentally observed contrast reversal in the STM topographs is due to the highly localized character of the Cl-pz states at the tip apex. An additional remarkable characteristic of the modified tips is that in dI/dV maps, a Na atom appears as a ring with a diameter that depends crucially on the tip-sample distance.

  8. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundhikanjana, W.

    2010-06-02

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces.

  9. Infrared spectroscopic imaging detects chemical modifications in liver fibrosis due to diabetes and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedhar, Hari; Varma, Vishal K.; Gambacorta, Francesca V.; Guzman, Grace; Walsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of stroma as a rich diagnostic region in tissue biopsies is growing as there is an increasing understanding that disease processes in multiple organs can affect the composition of adjacent connective tissue regions. This may be especially true in the liver, since this organ’s central metabolic role exposes it to multiple disease processes. We use quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopic imaging to study changes in the chemical status of hepatocytes and fibrotic regions of liver tissue that result from the progression of liver cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma and the potentially confounding effects of diabetes mellitus. PMID:27375956

  10. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorek, Daniel L.J., E-mail: dthorek1@jhmi.edu [Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kramer, Robin M. [Tri-Institutional Training Program in Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), Weill Cornell Medical College, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve [Department of Medicine, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Ulmert, David [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Russell, James, E-mail: russellj@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response.

  11. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response

  12. ESTE: Verification of Portable Optical and Thermal Imaging Devices for Leak Detection at Petroleum Refineries and Chemical Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is an ESTE project summary brief. EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) is verifying the performance of portable optical and thermal imaging devices for leak detection at petroleum refineries and chemical plans. Industrial facilities, such as chemical p...

  13. Microfluidic electrochemical device and process for chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis at the electrode-liquid interface in-situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li; Zhu, Zihua; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical device and process are detailed that provide chemical imaging and electrochemical analysis under vacuum at the surface of the electrode-sample or electrode-liquid interface in-situ. The electrochemical device allows investigation of various surface layers including diffuse layers at selected depths populated with, e.g., adsorbed molecules in which chemical transformation in electrolyte solutions occurs.

  14. Advanced Tie Feature Matching for the Registration of Mobile Mapping Imaging Data and Aerial Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jende, P.; Peter, M.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile Mapping's ability to acquire high-resolution ground data is opposing unreliable localisation capabilities of satellite-based positioning systems in urban areas. Buildings shape canyons impeding a direct line-of-sight to navigation satellites resulting in a deficiency to accurately estimate the mobile platform's position. Consequently, acquired data products' positioning quality is considerably diminished. This issue has been widely addressed in the literature and research projects. However, a consistent compliance of sub-decimetre accuracy as well as a correction of errors in height remain unsolved. We propose a novel approach to enhance Mobile Mapping (MM) image orientation based on the utilisation of highly accurate orientation parameters derived from aerial imagery. In addition to that, the diminished exterior orientation parameters of the MM platform will be utilised as they enable the application of accurate matching techniques needed to derive reliable tie information. This tie information will then be used within an adjustment solution to correct affected MM data. This paper presents an advanced feature matching procedure as a prerequisite to the aforementioned orientation update. MM data is ortho-projected to gain a higher resemblance to aerial nadir data simplifying the images' geometry for matching. By utilising MM exterior orientation parameters, search windows may be used in conjunction with a selective keypoint detection and template matching. Originating from different sensor systems, however, difficulties arise with respect to changes in illumination, radiometry and a different original perspective. To respond to these challenges for feature detection, the procedure relies on detecting keypoints in only one image. Initial tests indicate a considerable improvement in comparison to classic detector/descriptor approaches in this particular matching scenario. This method leads to a significant reduction of outliers due to the limited availability

  15. Molecular Imaging : Computer Reconstruction and Practice - Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Molecular Imaging from Physical Principles to Computer Reconstruction and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2008-01-01

    This volume collects the lectures presented at the ninth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2006 and is dedicated to nuclear physics applications in molecular imaging. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of image reconstruction processing and management and illustrate the role of digital imaging in clinical practice. Medical computing and image reconstruction are introduced by analysing the underlying physics principles and their implementation, relevant quality aspects, clinical performance and recent advancements in the field. Several stages of the imaging process are specifically addressed, e.g. optimisation of data acquisition and storage, distributed computing, physiology and detector modelling, computer algorithms for image reconstruction and measurement in tomography applications, for both clinical and biomedical research applications. All topics are presented with didactical language and style, making this book an appropriate reference for students and professionals seeking a comprehen...

  16. Advances In Groundwater Remediation: Achieving Effective In Situ Delivery Of Chemical Oxidants And Amendments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siegrist, Robert L.; Crimi, Michelle; McCray, John E.;

    into the subsurface resulting in serious risks to human health and environmental quality (e.g., increased cancer risk through ingestion of contaminated drinking water or inhalation of vapors within buildings). In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) has emerged as one of several viable methods for remediation......Contamination of soil and groundwater by organic chemicals represents a major environmental problem in urban areas throughout the United States and other industrialized nations. Over many decades a wide variety of toxic organic chemicals have intentionally or accidentally been released......), and ozone (O3). Based on laboratory experimentation, reaction stoichiometries, pathways, and kinetics have been established for many organic COCs. The reactions involve electron transfer or free radical processes with simple to complex pathways following 2nd-order kinetics with very fast reaction rates...

  17. Advancing the Selection of Neurodevelopmental Measures in Epidemiological Studies of Environmental Chemical Exposure and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gutermuth Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With research suggesting increasing incidence of pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders, questions regarding etiology continue to be raised. Neurodevelopmental function tests have been used in epidemiology studies to evaluate relationships between environmental chemical exposures and neurodevelopmental deficits. Limitations of currently used tests and difficulties with their interpretation have been described, but a comprehensive critical examination of tests commonly used in studies of environmental chemicals and pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders has not been conducted. We provide here a listing and critical evaluation of commonly used neurodevelopmental tests in studies exploring effects from chemical exposures and recommend measures that are not often used, but should be considered. We also discuss important considerations in selecting appropriate tests and provide a case study by reviewing the literature on polychlorinated biphenyls.

  18. Advanced Numerical Imaging Procedure Accounting for Non-Ideal Effects in GPR Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comite, Davide; Galli, Alessandro; Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The capability to provide fast and reliable imaging of targets and interfaces in non-accessible probed scenarios is a topic of great scientific interest, and many investigations have shown that Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can provide an efficient technique to conduct this kind of analysis in various applications of geophysical nature and civil engineering. In these cases, the development of an efficient and accurate imaging procedure is strongly dependent on the capability of accounting for the incident field that activates the scattering phenomenon. In this frame, based on a suitable implementation of an electromagnetic (EM) CAD tool (CST Microwave Studio), it has been possible to accurately and efficiently model the radiation pattern of real antennas in environments typically considered in GPR surveys [1]. A typical scenario of our interest is constituted by targets hidden in a ground medium, described by certain EM parameters and probed by a movable GPR using interfacial antennas [2]. The transmitting and receiving antennas considered here are Vivaldi ones, but a wide variety of other antennas can be modeled and designed, similar to those ones available in commercial GPR systems. Hence, an advanced version of a well-known microwave tomography approach (MTA) [3] has been implemented, both in the canonical 2D scalar case and in the more realistic 3D vectorial one. Such an approach is able to account for the real distribution of the radiated and scattered EM fields. Comparisons of results obtained by means of a 'conventional' implementation of the MTA, where the antennas are modeled as ideal line sources, and by means of our 'advanced' approach, which instead takes into account the radiation features of the chosen antenna type, have been carried out and discussed. Since the antenna radiation patterns are modified by the probed environment, whose EM features and the possible stratified structure usually are not exactly known, the imaging capabilities of the MTA

  19. Mission science value-cost savings from the Advanced Imaging Communication System (AICS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    An Advanced Imaging Communication System (AICS) was proposed in the mid-1970s as an alternative to the Voyager data/communication system architecture. The AICS achieved virtually error free communication with little loss in the downlink data rate by concatenating a powerful Reed-Solomon block code with the Voyager convolutionally coded, Viterbi decoded downlink channel. The clean channel allowed AICS sophisticated adaptive data compression techniques. Both Voyager and the Galileo mission have implemented AICS components, and the concatenated channel itself is heading for international standardization. An analysis that assigns a dollar value/cost savings to AICS mission performance gains is presented. A conservative value or savings of $3 million for Voyager, $4.5 million for Galileo, and as much as $7 to 9.5 million per mission for future projects such as the proposed Mariner Mar 2 series is shown.

  20. Advances in Methane Activation Studies at Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Following successful implementation of selective oxida-tion of methane into methanol at low temperature (80℃) through setting up a circulating system of multiple electron pairs the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) has made new stride in the fundamental research on direct acti-vation of methane. This institute by means of collaboration with the US West Pacific National Laboratory has acquired the complete information on the structure of active centers of solid catalysts with the relevant results published in the latest issue of Journal of American Chemical Society.

  1. Multispectral UV imaging for fast and non-destructive quality control of chemical and physical tablet attributes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klukkert, Marten; Wu, Jian X; Rantanen, Jukka;

    2016-01-01

    with partial least squares analysis. Furthermore, an image analysis routine was developed and successfully applied to the UV images that provided qualitative information on physical tablet surface properties such as intactness and surface density profiles, as well as quantitative information on variations...... an eccentric as well as a rotary tablet press at compression pressures from 20MPa up to 410MPa. It was found, that UV imaging can provide both, relevant information on chemical and physical tablet attributes. The tablet API content and radial tensile strength could be estimated by UV imaging combined...... in the surface density. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that UV imaging combined with image analysis is an effective and non-destructive method to determine chemical and physical quality attributes of tablets and is a promising approach for (near) real-time monitoring of the tablet compaction process...

  2. Imaging the DNA Alkylator Melphalan by CEST MRI: An Advanced Approach to Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngen, Ethel J; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Jablonska, Anna; Liu, Guanshu; Song, Xiaolei; Ansari, Roxana; Bulte, Jeff W M; Janowski, Miroslaw; Pearl, Monica; Walczak, Piotr; Gilad, Assaf A

    2016-09-01

    Brain tumors are among the most lethal types of tumors. Therapeutic response variability and failure in patients have been attributed to several factors, including inadequate drug delivery to tumors due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Consequently, drug delivery strategies are being developed for the local and targeted delivery of drugs to brain tumors. These drug delivery strategies could benefit from new approaches to monitor the delivery of drugs to tumors. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of imaging 4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]-l-phenylalanine (melphalan), a clinically used DNA alkylating agent, using chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging (CEST MRI), for theranostic applications. We evaluated the physicochemical parameters that affect melphalan's CEST contrast and demonstrated the feasibility of imaging the unmodified drug by saturating its exchangeable amine protons. Melphalan generated a CEST signal despite its reactivity in an aqueous milieu. The maximum CEST signal was observed at pH 6.2. This CEST contrast trend was then used to monitor therapeutic responses to melphalan in vitro. Upon cell death, the decrease in cellular pH from ∼7.4 to ∼6.4 caused an amplification of the melphalan CEST signal. This is contrary to what has been reported for other CEST contrast agents used for imaging cell death, where a decrease in the cellular pH following cell death results in a decrease in the CEST signal. Ultimately, this method could be used to noninvasively monitor melphalan delivery to brain tumors and also to validate therapeutic responses to melphalan clinically. PMID:27398883

  3. Advanced computational sensors technology: testing and evaluation in visible, SWIR, and LWIR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Charbel G.; Wilson, John P.; Pouliquen, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Computational Sensors Team at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and the Johns Hopkins University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering has been developing advanced readout integrated circuit (ROIC) technology for more than 10 years with a particular focus on the key challenges of dynamic range, sampling rate, system interface and bandwidth, and detector materials or band dependencies. Because the pixel array offers parallel sampling by default, the team successfully demonstrated that adding smarts in the pixel and the chip can increase performance significantly. Each pixel becomes a smart sensor and can operate independently in collecting, processing, and sharing data. In addition, building on the digital circuit revolution, the effective well size can be increased by orders of magnitude within the same pixel pitch over analog designs. This research has yielded an innovative class of a system-on-chip concept: the Flexible Readout and Integration Sensor (FRIS) architecture. All key parameters are programmable and/or can be adjusted dynamically, and this architecture can potentially be sensor and application agnostic. This paper reports on the testing and evaluation of one prototype that can support either detector polarity and includes sample results with visible, short-wavelength infrared (SWIR), and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging.

  4. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging meets "omics": recent advances in the fruitful marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crecelius, A C; Schubert, U S; von Eggeling, F

    2015-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI MSI) is a method that allows the investigation of the molecular content of surfaces, in particular, tissues, within its morphological context. The applications of MALDI MSI in the field of large-scale mass spectrometric studies, which are typically denoted by the suffix "omics", are steadily increasing. This is because, on the one hand, technical advances regarding sample collection and preparation, matrix application, instrumentation, and data processing have enhanced the molecular specificity and sensitivity of MALDI MSI; on the other hand, the focus of the "omics" community has moved from establishing an inventory of certain compound classes to exploring their spatial distribution to gain novel insights. Thus, the aim of this mini-review is twofold, to display the state-of-the-art in terms of technical aspects in MALDI MSI and to highlight selected applications in the last two years, which either have significantly advanced a certain "omics" field or have introduced a new one through pioneering efforts. PMID:26161715

  5. Advances in Echocardiographic Imaging in Heart Failure With Reduced and Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Alaa Mabrouk Salem; Bansal, Manish; Sengupta, Partho P

    2016-07-01

    Echocardiography, given its safety, easy availability, and the ability to permit a comprehensive assessment of cardiac structure and function, is an indispensable tool in the evaluation and management of patients with heart failure (HF). From initial phenotyping and risk stratification to providing vital data for guiding therapeutic decision-making and monitoring, echocardiography plays a pivotal role in the care of HF patients. The recent advent of multiparametric approaches for myocardial deformation imaging has provided valuable insights in the pathogenesis of HF, elucidating distinct patterns of myocardial dysfunction and events that are associated with progression from subclinical stage to overt HF. At the same time, miniaturization of echocardiography has further expanded clinical application of echocardiography, with the use of pocket cardiac ultrasound as an adjunct to physical examination demonstrated to improve diagnostic accuracy and risk stratification. Furthermore, ongoing advances in the field of big data analytics promise to create an exciting opportunity to operationalize precision medicine as the new approach to healthcare delivery that aims to individualize patient care by integrating data extracted from clinical, laboratory, echocardiographic, and genetic assessments. The present review summarizes the recent advances in the field of echocardiography, with emphasis on their role in HF phenotyping, risk stratification, and optimizing clinical outcomes. PMID:27390337

  6. Promotion Influence in Sales Advance and in Increasing the Image to the SMEs in Kosova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Arapi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The promotion as an important element of marketing mix plays a key role in marketingmanagement regard, in every enterprise, and also for SMEs. The SMEs in Kosova aregiving more and more importance to the promotion, and this factor, beside the salesadvance for their products, is important to increase their image. What is the impact of thepromotion in SMEs longevity; respectively ëhat are the advantages and disadvantages ofpromotion application compared with the other traditional advertisement forms? Whatare the promotion models used by the advance companies to increase their sales level andimprove the service level ? These are some of the research questions that follow thispaper. On the other side the increasing promotion application in front of traditionalforms of Marketing have made SMEs to save from their budget dedicated to Marketing,always taking into consideration the advanced models that today provides thiscommunication form. The research on hand will reflect the new advanced promotionmodels which are practiced by some SMEs in Kosova, these case studies will argue thecompany’s sustainability achieved by the promotion. The budgeting as an integral part ofpromotion realization, in this research will prove the possibility to save from the budgetby avoiding the classical – traditional forms of advertisement. This aspect also will beargued by case studies of SMEs in Kosova. The mass media, in this case, thecommunication with the public, in way to transmit the promotion message, request aprofound analyze when it comes to select the mediums, rating and audiencemeasurement, etc. The research will contribute not only to SMEs but also to consumersand public in general. The research will have its conclusions and recommendations whichwill enforce each of elements that require a different treatment from the one that isapplied in reality.

  7. [Advances in research of chemical constituents and pharmacological activities of common used spices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao-nan; Zhu, Yuan; Xu, Xi-ming; Yu, Jiang-nan

    2014-11-01

    Spices have enjoyed a long history and a worldwide application. Of particular interest is the pharmaceutical value of spices in addition to its basic seasoning function in cooking. Concretely, equipped with complex chemical compositions, spices are of significant importance in pharmacologic actions, like antioxidant, antibacterial, antitumor, as well as therapeutical effects in gastrointestinal disorders and cardiovascular disease. Although increasing evidences in support of its distinct role in the medical field has recently reported, little information is available for substantive, thorough and sophisticated researches on its chemical constituents and pharmacological activities, especially mechanism of these actions. Therefore, in popular wave of studies directed at a single spice, this review presents systematic studies on the chemical constituents and pharmacological activities associated with common used spices, together with current typical individual studies on functional mechanism, in order to pave the way for the exploitation and development of new medicines derived from the chemical compounds of spice (such as, piperine, curcumin, geniposide, cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, linalool, estragole, perillaldehyde, syringic acid, crocin).

  8. Risk Assessment of New Chemical Substances. Applicability of EXAMS II as an advanced Water Quality Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs ACM; Burns LA

    1990-01-01

    In the cluster project "Risk Assessment of New Chemical Substances methods are developed to systematically predict and assess the hazards for man and environment. After the basic screening of a substance has been carried out, a more extensive study can be performed using models adhered to the

  9. Advanced Biocatalytic Processing of Heterogeneous Lignocellulosic Feedstocks to a Platform Chemical Intermediate (Lactic acid Ester)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sharon Shoemaker

    2004-09-03

    The development of commercial boi-based processes and products derived from agricultural waste biomass has the potential for significant impact on the economy and security of our nation. Adding value, rather than disposing of the waste of agriculture, can solve an environmental problem and reduce our dependence on foreign sources of fossil fuel for production of chemicals, materials and fuels.

  10. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  11. Post launch calibration and testing of the Advanced Baseline Imager on the GOES-R satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebair, William; Rollins, C.; Kline, John; Todirita, M.; Kronenwetter, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United State's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The first launch of the GOES-R series is planned for October 2016. The GOES-R series satellites and instruments are being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). One of the key instruments on the GOES-R series is the Advance Baseline Imager (ABI). The ABI is a multi-channel, visible through infrared, passive imaging radiometer. The ABI will provide moderate spatial and spectral resolution at high temporal and radiometric resolution to accurately monitor rapidly changing weather. Initial on-orbit calibration and performance characterization is crucial to establishing baseline used to maintain performance throughout mission life. A series of tests has been planned to establish the post launch performance and establish the parameters needed to process the data in the Ground Processing Algorithm. The large number of detectors for each channel required to provide the needed temporal coverage presents unique challenges for accurately calibrating ABI and minimizing striping. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on ABI over the six-month Post Launch Test period and the expected performance as it relates to ground tests.

  12. AXIS: an instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G N; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Carpenter, A C; Palmer, N E; Zacharias, R; Felker, B; Holder, J P; Allen, F V; Bell, P M; Bradley, D; Montesanti, R; Landen, O L

    2014-11-01

    Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detector for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV-200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition.

  13. Radiometric calibration stability of the EO-1 advanced land imager: 5 years on-orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, B.L.; Ong, L.; Barsi, J.A.; Mendenhall, J.A.; Lencioni, D.E.; Helder, D.L.; Hollaren, D.M.; Morfitt, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) was developed as a prototype sensor for follow on missions to Landsat-7. It was launched in November 2000 on the Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite as a nominal one-year technology demonstration mission. As of this writing, the sensor has continued to operate in excess of 5 years. Six of the ALl's nine multi-spectral (MS) bands and the panchromatic band have similar spectral coverage as those on the Landsat-7 ETM+. In addition to on-board lamps, which have been significantly more stable than the lamps on ETM+, the ALI has a solar diffuser and has imaged the moon monthly since launch. This combined calibration dataset allows understanding of the radiometric stability of the ALI system, its calibrators and some differentiation of the sources of the changes with time. The solar dataset is limited as the mechanism controlling the aperture to the solar diffuser failed approximately 18 months after launch. Results over 5 years indicate that: the shortest wavelength band (443 nm) has degraded in response about 2%; the 482 nm and 565 nm bands decreased in response about 1%; the 660 nm, 790 nm and 868 nm bands each degraded about 5%; the 1250 nm and 1650 nm bands did not change significantly and the 2215 nm band increased in response about 2%.

  14. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed.

  15. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoralf eNiendorf

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g. by supporting MR microscopy and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g. by reducing measuring time; both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (biomedical imaging, molecular medicine and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (pathophysiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular and renal disease will be discussed.

  16. Post Launch Calibration and Testing of the Advanced Baseline Imager on the GOES-R Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebair, William; Rollins, C.; Kline, John; Todirita, M.; Kronenwetter, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United State's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The first launch of the GOES-R series is planned for October 2016. The GOES-R series satellites and instruments are being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). One of the key instruments on the GOES-R series is the Advance Baseline Imager (ABI). The ABI is a multi-channel, visible through infrared, passive imaging radiometer. The ABI will provide moderate spatial and spectral resolution at high temporal and radiometric resolution to accurately monitor rapidly changing weather. Initial on-orbit calibration and performance characterization is crucial to establishing baseline used to maintain performance throughout mission life. A series of tests has been planned to establish the post launch performance and establish the parameters needed to process the data in the Ground Processing Algorithm. The large number of detectors for each channel required to provide the needed temporal coverage presents unique challenges for accurately calibrating ABI and minimizing striping. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on ABI over the six-month Post Launch Test period and the expected performance as it relates to ground tests.

  17. Utilization of optical image data from the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive use is made of optical diagnostics to obtain information on the 50-MeV, 10-kA, 70-ns pulsed-electron beam produced by the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA). Light is generated by the beam striking a foil inserted in the beamline or through excitation of the gas when the beamline is filled with air. The emitted light is collected and digitized. Two-dimensional images are recorded by either a gated framing camera or a streak camera. Extraction of relevant beam parameters, such as current density, current, and beam size, requires an understanding of the physics of the light-generation mechanism and an ability to handle and properly exploit a large digital database of image data. We will present a brief overview of the present understanding of the light-generation mechanisms in foil and gas, with emphasis on experimental observations and trends. We will review our data management and analysis techniques and indicate successful approaches for extracting beam parameters

  18. Applying advanced imaging techniques to a murine model of orthotopic osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lawrence Broadhead

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionReliable animal models are required to evaluate novel treatments for osteosarcoma. In this study, the aim was to implement advanced imaging techniques in a murine model of orthotopic osteosarcoma to improve disease modeling and the assessment of primary and metastatic disease.Materials and methodsIntra-tibial injection of luciferase-tagged OPGR80 murine osteosarcoma cells was performed in Balb/c nude mice. Treatment agent (pigment epithelium-derived factor; PEDF was delivered to the peritoneal cavity. Primary tumors and metastases were evaluated by in vivo bioluminescent assays, micro-computed tomography, [18F]-Fluoride-PET and [18F]-FDG-PET. Results[18F]-Fluoride-PET was more sensitive than [18F]-FDG-PET for detecting early disease. Both [18F]-Fluoride-PET and [18F]-FDG-PET showed progressive disease in the model, with 4-fold and 2-fold increases in SUV (p<0.05 by the study endpoint, respectively. In vivo bioluminescent assay showed that systemically delivered PEDF inhibited growth of primary osteosarcoma.DiscussionApplication of [18F]-Fluoride-PET and [18F]-FDG-PET to an established murine model of orthotopic osteosarcoma has improved the assessment of disease. The use of targeted imaging should prove beneficial for the evaluation of new approaches to osteosarcoma therapy.

  19. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Diana S. M.; Gold, Laura S.; Zeliadt, Steven; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Etzioni, Ruth; Ramsey, Scott D.; Sullivan, Sean D.; Kessler, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI) is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC) care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT) versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US) alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC) using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT) (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08–2.26, and p = 0.02) and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.59, and p = 0.01). Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively. PMID:27525122

  20. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Trice Loggers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08–2.26, and p=0.02 and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+ BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.59, and p=0.01. Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively.

  1. A Combined Method for Segmentation and Registration for an Advanced and Progressive Evaluation of Thermal Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Z. Barcelos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method that combines image analysis techniques, such as segmentation and registration, is proposed for an advanced and progressive evaluation of thermograms. The method is applied for the prevention of muscle injury in high-performance athletes, in collaboration with a Brazilian professional soccer club. The goal is to produce information on spatio-temporal variations of thermograms favoring the investigation of the athletes’ conditions along the competition. The proposed method improves on current practice by providing a means for automatically detecting adaptive body-shaped regions of interest, instead of the manual selection of simple shapes. Specifically, our approach combines the optimization features in Otsu’s method with a correction factor and post-processing techniques, enhancing thermal-image segmentation when compared to other methods. Additional contributions resulting from the combination of the segmentation and registration steps of our approach are the progressive analyses of thermograms in a unique spatial coordinate system and the accurate extraction of measurements and isotherms.

  2. ABrIL - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab : a cloud based computation environment for cooperative neuroimaging projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves Tafula, Sérgio M; Moreira da Silva, Nádia; Rozanski, Verena E; Silva Cunha, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience is an increasingly multidisciplinary and highly cooperative field where neuroimaging plays an important role. Neuroimaging rapid evolution is demanding for a growing number of computing resources and skills that need to be put in place at every lab. Typically each group tries to setup their own servers and workstations to support their neuroimaging needs, having to learn from Operating System management to specific neuroscience software tools details before any results can be obtained from each setup. This setup and learning process is replicated in every lab, even if a strong collaboration among several groups is going on. In this paper we present a new cloud service model - Brain Imaging Application as a Service (BiAaaS) - and one of its implementation - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab (ABrIL) - in the form of an ubiquitous virtual desktop remote infrastructure that offers a set of neuroimaging computational services in an interactive neuroscientist-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). This remote desktop has been used for several multi-institution cooperative projects with different neuroscience objectives that already achieved important results, such as the contribution to a high impact paper published in the January issue of the Neuroimage journal. The ABrIL system has shown its applicability in several neuroscience projects with a relatively low-cost, promoting truly collaborative actions and speeding up project results and their clinical applicability.

  3. Engineering propionibacteria as versatile cell factories for the production of industrially important chemicals: advances, challenges, and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ningzi; Zhuge, Xin; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Wu, Jing; Shi, Zhongping; Liu, Long

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacteria are actinobacteria consisting of two principal groups: cutaneous and dairy. Cutaneous propionibacteria are considered primary pathogens to humans, whereas dairy propionibacteria are widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Increasing attention has been focused on improving the performance of dairy propionibacteria for the production of industrially important chemicals, and significant advances have been made through strain engineering and process optimization in the production of flavor compounds, nutraceuticals, and antimicrobial compounds. In addition, genome sequencing of several propionibacteria species has been completed, deepening understanding of the metabolic and physiological features of these organisms. However, the metabolic engineering of propionibacteria still faces several challenges owing to the lack of efficient genome manipulation tools and the existence of various types of strong restriction-modification systems. The emergence of systems and synthetic biology provides new opportunities to overcome these bottlenecks. In this review, we first introduce the major species of propionibacteria and their properties and provide an overview of their functions and applications. We then discuss advances in the genome sequencing and metabolic engineering of these bacteria. Finally, we discuss systems and synthetic biology approaches for engineering propionibacteria as efficient and robust cell factories for the production of industrially important chemicals. PMID:25431012

  4. Advanced Exergy Analysis for Chemically Reacting Systems – Application to a Simple Open Gas-Turbine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Tsatsaronis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available

    A conventional exergy analysis has some limitations, which are significantly reduced by an advanced exergy analysis. The latter evaluates: (a the interactions among components of the overall system (splitting the exergy destruction into endogenous and exogenous parts; and, (b the real potential for improving a system component (splitting the exergy destruction into unavoidable and avoidable parts. The main role of an advanced exergy analysis is to provide engineers with additional information useful for improving the design and operation of energy conversion systems. This information cannot be supplied by any other approach. In previous publications, approaches were presented that were appropriate for application to closed thermodynamic cycles, without chemical reactions (e.g., refrigeration cycles. Here a general approach is discussed that could be applied to systems with chemical reactions. Application of this approach to a simple gas-turbine system reveals the potential for improvement and the interactions among the system components.

    • This paper is an updated version of a paper published in the ECOS'08 proceedings. 

  5. Phase contrast medical imaging with compact X-ray sources at the Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics (MAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coan, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany)], E-mail: paola.coan@esrf.fr; Gruener, F. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Munich, Garching (Germany); Glaser, C.; Schneider, T. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Institut of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany); Bravin, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Reiser, M. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Institut of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany); Habs, D. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Munich, Garching (Germany)

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, the excellence cluster 'Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics' (MAP) is presented. One of the aims of the project is the development of innovative X-ray-based diagnostics imaging techniques to be implemented at an ultra-compact high-energy and high-brilliance X-ray source. The basis of the project and the developments towards the clinical application of phase contrast imaging applied to mammography and cartilage studies will be presented and discussed.

  6. Direct imaging of mechanical and chemical gradients across the thickness of graded organosilicone microwave PECVD coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Colin J; Murphy, Peter J; Griesser, Hans J

    2014-01-22

    The characterization of variations in the chemical composition and ensuing mechanical properties across the thickness of coatings with continuously varying compositions through their thickness (graded coatings) presents considerable challenges for current analytical techniques in materials science. We report here the direct imaging of nanomechanical and chemical gradients across cross-sections of an organosilicone coating fabricated via microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Cross-sectional nanoindentation was used to determine the mechanical properties of uniform and graded organosilicone coatings. Both hardness and modulus across the coatings were directly measured. Additionally, "modulus mapping" on cross-sections was used to map the complex modulus. For the graded coating, it was found that variations in the complex modulus was predominantly due to varying storage modulus. It was observed that at the interface with the substrate there was a low storage modulus, which linearly increased to a relatively high storage modulus at the surface. It is proposed that the increase in stiffness, from the substrate interface to the outer surface, is due to the increasing content of a cross-linked O-Si-O network. This mechanical gradient has been linked to a change in the Si:O ratio via direct compositional mapping using ToF-SIMS. Direct mapping of the mechanical and compositional gradients across these protective coatings provides insight into the changes in properties with depth and supports optimization of the critical mechanical performance of PECVD graded coatings.

  7. Biocatalyzed processes for production of commodity chemicals: Assessment of future research advances for N-butanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    This report is a summary of assessments by Chem Systems Inc. and a further evaluation of the impacts of research advances on energy efficiency and the potential for future industrial production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) solvents and other products by biocatalyzed processes. Brief discussions of each of the assessments made by CSI, followed by estimates of minimum projected energy consumption and costs for production of solvents by ABE biocatalyzed processes are included. These assessments and further advances discussed in this report show that substantial decreases in energy consumption and costs are possible on the basis of specific research advances; therefore, it appears that a biocatalyzed process for ABE can be developed that will be competitive with conventional petrochemical processes for production of n-butanol and acetone. (In this work, the ABE process was selected and utilized only as an example for methodology development; other possible bioprocesses for production of commodity chemicals are not intended to be excluded.) It has been estimated that process energy consumption can be decreased by 50%, with a corresponding cost reduction of 15-30% (in comparison with a conventional petrochemical process) by increasing microorganism tolerance to n-butanol and efficient recovery of product solvents from the vapor phase.

  8. Advances in Groundwater Remediation: Achieving Effective In Situ Delivery of Chemical Oxidants and Amendments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siegrist, Robert L.; Crimi, Michelle; Broholm, Mette Martina;

    2012-01-01

    ) delivered into the subsurface using injection wells, probes, or other techniques. A continuing challenge for ISCO, as well as other in situ remediation technologies, is how to achieve in situ delivery and obtain simultaneous contact between treatment fl uids, such as oxidants and amendments, and the target...... delivery of treatment fl uids, with an emphasis on chemical oxidants and amendments, which can help achieve cleanup goals and protect groundwater and associated drinking water resources....

  9. Scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging using the chemical shift imaging sequence. Evaluation of an iterative reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingaertner, Sebastian; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Wetterling, Friedrich [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Dublin Univ. (Ireland) Trinity Inst. of Neuroscience; Fatar, Marc [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Neumaier-Probst, Eva [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate potential scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the chemical shift imaging sequence (CSI) using undersampled data of high-quality datasets, reconstructed with an iterative constrained reconstruction, compared to reduced resolution or reduced signal-to-noise ratio. CSI {sup 23}Na-images were retrospectively undersampled and reconstructed with a constrained reconstruction scheme. The results were compared to conventional methods of scan time reduction. The constrained reconstruction scheme used a phase constraint and a finite object support, which was extracted from a spatially registered {sup 1}H-image acquired with a double-tuned coil. The methods were evaluated using numerical simulations, phantom images and in-vivo images of a healthy volunteer and a patient who suffered from cerebral ischemic stroke. The constrained reconstruction scheme showed improved image quality compared to a decreased number of averages, images with decreased resolution or circular undersampling with weighted averaging for any undersampling factor. Brain images of a stroke patient, which were reconstructed from three-fold undersampled k-space data, resulted in only minor differences from the original image (normalized root means square error < 12%) and an almost identical delineation of the stroke region (mismatch < 6%). The acquisition of undersampled {sup 23}Na-CSI images enables up to three-fold scan time reduction with improved image quality compared to conventional methods of scan time saving.

  10. Scanning microwave microscope imaging of micro-patterned monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J.; Mou, S.; Chen, K.-H.; Zhuang, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of micro-patterned chemical vapor deposited monolayer graphene using a scanning microwave microscope has been presented. Monolayer graphene sheets deposited on a copper substrate were transferred to a variety of substrates and micro-patterned into a periodic array of parallel lines. The measured complex reflection coefficients exhibit a strong dependency on the operating frequency and on the samples' electrical conductivity and permittivity. The experiments show an extremely high sensitivity by detecting image contrast between single and double layer graphene sheets. Correlating the images recorded at the half- and quarter-wavelength resonant frequencies shows that the relative permittivity of the single layer graphene sheet is above 105. The results are in good agreement with the three dimensional numerical electromagnetic simulations. This method may be instrumental for a comprehensive understanding of the scanning microwave microscope image contrast and provide a unique technique to estimate the local electrical properties with nano-meter scale spatial resolution of two dimensional materials at radio frequency.

  11. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  12. Extracting knowledge from chemical imaging data using computational algorithms for digital cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Saumya; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging microscopy modality for clinical histopathologic diagnoses as well as for biomedical research. Spectral data recorded in this modality are indicative of the underlying, spatially resolved biochemical composition but need computerized algorithms to digitally recognize and transform this information to a diagnostic tool to identify cancer or other physiologic conditions. Statistical pattern recognition forms the backbone of these recognition protocols and can be used for highly accurate results. Aided by biochemical correlations with normal and diseased states and the power of modern computer-aided pattern recognition, this approach is capable of combating many standing questions of traditional histology-based diagnosis models. For example, a simple diagnostic test can be developed to determine cell types in tissue. As a more advanced application, IR spectral data can be integrated with patient information to predict risk of cancer, providing a potential road to precision medicine and personalized care in cancer treatment. The IR imaging approach can be implemented to complement conventional diagnoses, as the samples remain unperturbed and are not destroyed. Despite high potential and utility of this approach, clinical implementation has not yet been achieved due to practical hurdles like speed of data acquisition and lack of optimized computational procedures for extracting clinically actionable information rapidly. The latter problem has been addressed by developing highly efficient ways to process IR imaging data but remains one that has considerable scope for progress. Here, we summarize the major issues and provide practical considerations in implementing a modified Bayesian classification protocol for digital molecular pathology. We hope to familiarize readers with analysis methods in IR imaging data and enable researchers to develop methods that can lead to the use of this promising

  13. Asymmetric catalysis in Brazil: development and potential for advancement of Brazilian chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of enantiomerically pure or enriched substances is of fundamental importance to pharmaceutical, food, agrochemical, and cosmetics industries and involves a growing market of hundreds of billions of dollars. However, most chemical processes used for their production are not environmentally friendly because in most cases, stoichiometric amounts of chiral inductors are used and substantial waste is produced. In this context, asymmetric catalysis has emerged as an efficient tool for the synthesis of enantiomerically enriched compounds using chiral catalysts. More specifically, considering the current scenario in the Brazilian chemical industry, especially that of pharmaceuticals, the immediate prospect for the use of synthetic routes developed in Brazil in an enantioselective fashion or even the discovery of new drugs is practically null. Currently, the industrial production of drugs in Brazil is primarily focused on the production of generic drugs and is basically supported by imports of intermediates from China and India. In order to change this panorama and move forward toward the gradual incorporation of genuinely Brazilian synthetic routes, strong incentive policies, especially those related to continuous funding, will be needed. These incentives could be a breakthrough once we establish several research groups working in the area of organic synthesis and on the development and application of chiral organocatalysts and ligands in asymmetric catalysis, thus contributing to boost the development of the Brazilian chemical industry. Considering these circumstances, Brazil can benefit from this opportunity because we have a wide biodiversity and a large pool of natural resources that can be used as starting materials for the production of new chiral catalysts and are creating competence in asymmetric catalysis and related areas. This may decisively contribute to the growth of chemistry in our country. (author)

  14. Recent Advances in Imaging of the Axial Skeleton in Spondyloarthritis for Diagnosis, Assessment of Treatment Effect, and Prognostication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Maksymowych, Walter P

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, many studies have investigated the role of imaging for improved diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects, and determining prognosis in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Recent research has primarily focused on the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for...... developed and have provided insight into effects of treatment on structural progression and the interrelationships between different lesions visualized by MRI. This review gives an overview of the recent advances in imaging of the axial skeleton in axial SpA from a clinical perspective....

  15. CRYPTOGRAPHY OF A GRAY LEVEL IMAGE AND A COLOR IMAGE USING MODERN ADVANCED HILL CIPHER INCLUDING A PAIR OF INVOLUTORY MATRICES AS MULTIPLICANDS AND INVOLVING A SET OF FUNCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Samson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation we have developed a procedure for the encryption of an image by applying modern advanced Hill Cipher including a pair of involutory matrices as multiplicands and a set of functions. Firstly we have obtained an encrypted image of a gray level image. Then this analysis is extended to an RGB color image. Here it is interesting to note that the encrypted image of the gray level image and the encrypted image of the color image do not have any resemblance with their corresponding original images. This fact ensures security of images in an effective manner. .

  16. Developing Advanced Seismic Imaging Methods For Characterizing the Fault Zone Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijiang

    2015-04-01

    Here I present a series of recent developments on seismic imaging of fault zone structure. The goals of these advanced methods are to better determine the physical properties (including seismic velocity, attenuation, and anisotropy) around the fault zone and its boundaries. In order to accurately determine the seismic velocity structure of the fault zone, we have recently developed a wavelet-based double-difference seismic tomography method, in which the wavelet coefficients of the velocity model, rather than the model itself, are solved using both the absolute and differential arrival times. This method takes advantage of the multiscale nature of the velocity model and the multiscale wavelet representation property. Because of the velocity model is sparse in the wavelet domain, a sparsity constraint is applied to tomographic inversion. Compared to conventional tomography methods, the new method is both data- and model-adaptive, and thus can better resolve the fault zone structure. In addition to seismic velocity property of the fault zone, seismic anisotropy and attenuation properties are also important to characterize the fault zone structure. For this reason, we developed the seismic anisotropy tomography method to image the three-dimensional anisotropy strength model of the fault zone using shear wave splitting delay times between fast and slow shear waves. The applications to the San Andreas fault around Parkfield, California and north Anatolian fault in Turkey will be shown. To better constrain the seismic attenuation structure, we developed a new seismic attenuation tomography method using measured t* values for first arrival body waves, in which the structures of attenuation and velocity models are similar through the cross-gradient constraint. Seismic tomography can, however, only resolve the smooth variations in elastic properties in Earth's interior. To image structure at length scales smaller than what can be resolved tomographically, including

  17. Application of magnetic resonance imaging in transgenic and chemical mouse models of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liedtke Christian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common cancers worldwide. The molecular mechanisms underlying hepatocarcinogenesis are still poorly understood. Genetically modified mice are powerful tools to further investigate the mechanisms of HCC development. However, this approach is limited due to the lack of non-invasive detection methods in small rodents. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol for the non-invasive analysis of hepatocarcinogenesis in transgenic mice using a clinical 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanner. Results As a model system we used hepatocyte-specific c-myc transgenic mice developing hepatocellular carcinoma at the age of 12-15 months. The scans of the murine livers included axial T2-weighted turbo-spin echo (TSE images, axial T1-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo (fast field echo, FFE and sagittal true Fast Imaging with Steady state Precession (true-FISP images. Application of contrast agent was performed via tail vein-catheter and confirmed by evaluation of the altered longitudinal relaxation T1 time before and after application. Through technical adaptation and optimization we could detect murine liver lesions with a minimum diameter of approximately 2 mm and provided histopathological evidence that these MR findings correspond to hepatocellular carcinoma. Tumor growth was repeatedly measured using sequential MRI with intervals of 5 weeks and subsequent volumetric analysis facilitating direct comparison of tumor progression between individual animals. We finally demonstrated that our protocol is also applicable in the widely- used chemical model of N-nitrosodiethylamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Conclusion Our protocol allows the non-invasive, early detection of HCC and the subsequent continuous monitoring of liver tumorgenesis in transgenic mice thereby facilitating future investigations of transgenic tumor mouse models of the liver.

  18. Evaluation of chemical fluorescent dyes as a protein conjugation partner for live cell imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Hayashi-Takanaka

    Full Text Available To optimize live cell fluorescence imaging, the choice of fluorescent substrate is a critical factor. Although genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have been used widely, chemical fluorescent dyes are still useful when conjugated to proteins or ligands. However, little information is available for the suitability of different fluorescent dyes for live imaging. We here systematically analyzed the property of a number of commercial fluorescent dyes when conjugated with antigen-binding (Fab fragments directed against specific histone modifications, in particular, phosphorylated H3S28 (H3S28ph and acetylated H3K9 (H3K9ac. These Fab fragments were conjugated with a fluorescent dye and loaded into living HeLa cells. H3S28ph-specific Fab fragments were expected to be enriched in condensed chromosomes, as H3S28 is phosphorylated during mitosis. However, the degree of Fab fragment enrichment on mitotic chromosomes varied depending on the conjugated dye. In general, green fluorescent dyes showed higher enrichment, compared to red and far-red fluorescent dyes, even when dye:protein conjugation ratios were similar. These differences are partly explained by an altered affinity of Fab fragment after dye-conjugation; some dyes have less effect on the affinity, while others can affect it more. Moreover, red and far-red fluorescent dyes tended to form aggregates in the cytoplasm. Similar results were observed when H3K9ac-specific Fab fragments were used, suggesting that the properties of each dye affect different Fab fragments similarly. According to our analysis, conjugation with green fluorescent dyes, like Alexa Fluor 488 and Dylight 488, has the least effect on Fab affinity and is the best for live cell imaging, although these dyes are less photostable than red fluorescent dyes. When multicolor imaging is required, we recommend the following dye combinations for optimal results: Alexa Fluor 488 (green, Cy3 (red, and Cy5 or CF640 (far-red.

  19. Advanced microlens and color filter process technology for the high-efficiency CMOS and CCD image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yang-Tung; Peng, Chiou-Shian; Chu, Cheng-Yu

    2000-12-01

    New markets are emerging for digital electronic image device, especially in visual communications, PC camera, mobile/cell phone, security system, toys, vehicle image system and computer peripherals for document capture. To enable one-chip image system that image sensor is with a full digital interface, can make image capture devices in our daily lives. Adding a color filter to such image sensor in a pattern of mosaics pixel or wide stripes can make image more real and colorful. We can say 'color filter makes the life more colorful color filter is? Color filter means can filter image light source except the color with specific wavelength and transmittance that is same as color filter itself. Color filter process is coating and patterning green, red and blue (or cyan, magenta and yellow) mosaic resists onto matched pixel in image sensing array pixels. According to the signal caught from each pixel, we can figure out the environment image picture. Widely use of digital electronic camera and multimedia applications today makes the feature of color filter becoming bright. Although it has challenge but it is very worthy to develop the process of color filter. We provide the best service on shorter cycle time, excellent color quality, high and stable yield. The key issues of advanced color process have to be solved and implemented are planarization and micro-lens technology. Lost of key points of color filter process technology have to consider will also be described in this paper.

  20. Treatment of mature landfill leachate by chemical precipitation and Fenton advanced oxidation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemat Alah Jaafarzadeh Haghighi Fard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mature landfill leachate is a complicated mixture which is resistant to biological treatment processes. The treatment of mature landfill leachate by struvite precipitation and Fenton oxidation was the main objective of the current research. Methods: Struvite with the phosphate/ammonia/magnesium molar ratio of 1/1/1.05 was considered during all experiments. Five initial pHs of 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, four different H2O2/Fe mass ratios of 50, 100, 200, and 400, and reaction times of 20, 40, 80, 120, and 160 minutes were examined for the Fenton oxidation process. Results: A leachate sample with average chemical oxygen demand (COD, BOD5, and NH4 concentrations of 7350, 2220, and 2280 mg L-1, respectively, and a BOD5/COD ratio of 0.3 was introduced to the chemical precipitation unit. An NH4 removal efficiency of 87% was obtained at pH 8.5 for struvite precipitation. Under optimum conditions of Fenton oxidation, including pH 3, an H2O2/Fe2+ mass ratio of 200, and a reaction time of 160 min, more than 95% COD and BOD5 removal was observed. Conclusion: Struvite precipitation and Fenton oxidation are reliable and efficient alternatives for mature landfill treatment.

  1. Nuclear overhauser enhancement mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging at 7 Tesla in glioblastoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paech

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST is a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique on the basis of saturation transfer between exchanging protons of tissue proteins and bulk water. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the information provided by three dimensional NOE mediated CEST at 7 Tesla (7T and standard MRI in glioblastoma patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with newly diagnosed histologically proven glioblastoma were enrolled in this prospective ethics committee-approved study. NOE mediated CEST contrast was acquired with a modified three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and asymmetry analysis was conducted at 3.3 ppm (B1 = 0.7 µT to calculate the magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR(asym. Contrast enhanced T1 (CE-T1 and T2-weighted images were acquired at 3T and used for data co-registration and comparison. RESULTS: Mean NOE mediated CEST signal based on MTR(asym values over all patients was significantly increased (p<0.001 in CE-T1 tumor (-1.99 ± 1.22%, tumor necrosis (-1.36 ± 1.30% and peritumoral CEST hyperintensities (PTCH within T2 edema margins (-3.56 ± 1.24% compared to contralateral normal appearing white matter (-8.38 ± 1.19%. In CE-T1 tumor (p = 0.015 and tumor necrosis (p<0.001 mean MTR(asym values were significantly higher than in PTCH. Extent of the surrounding tumor hyperintensity was smaller in eight out of 12 patients on CEST than on T2-weighted images, while four displayed at equal size. In all patients, isolated high intensity regions (0.40 ± 2.21% displayed on CEST within the CE-T1 tumor that were not discernible on CE-T1 or T2-weighted images. CONCLUSION: NOE mediated CEST Imaging at 7 T provides additional information on the structure of peritumoral hyperintensities in glioblastoma and displays isolated high intensity regions within the CE-T1 tumor that cannot be acquired on CE-T1 or T2

  2. Final Report for SERDP Project RC-1649: Advanced Chemical Measurements of Smoke from DoD-prescribed Burns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Weise, David; Lincoln, E. N.; Sams, Robert L.; Cameron, Melanie; Veres, Patrick; Yokelson, Robert J.; Urbanski, Shawn; Profeta, Luisa T.; Williams, S.; Gilman, Jessica; Kuster, W. C.; Akagi, Sheryl; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Mendoza, Albert; Wold, Cyle E.; Warneke, Carsten; de Gouw, Joost A.; Burling, Ian R.; Reardon, James; Schneider, Matthew D.; Griffith, David WT; Roberts, James M.

    2013-12-17

    Objectives: Project RC-1649, “Advanced Chemical Measurement of Smoke from DoD-prescribed Burns” was undertaken to use advanced instrumental techniques to study in detail the particulate and vapor-phase chemical composition of the smoke that results from prescribed fires used as a land management tool on DoD bases, particularly bases in the southeastern U.S. The statement of need (SON) called for “(1) improving characterization of fuel consumption” and “(2) improving characterization of air emissions under both flaming and smoldering conditions with respect to volatile organic compounds, heavy metals, and reactive gases.” The measurements and fuels were from several bases throughout the southeast (Camp Lejeune, Ft. Benning, and Ft. Jackson) and were carried out in collaboration and conjunction with projects 1647 (models) and 1648 (particulates, SW bases). Technical Approach: We used an approach that featured developing techniques for measuring biomass burning emission species in both the laboratory and field and developing infrared (IR) spectroscopy in particular. Using IR spectroscopy and other methods, we developed emission factors (EF, g of effluent per kg of fuel burned) for dozens of chemical species for several common southeastern fuel types. The major measurement campaigns were laboratory studies at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory (FSL) as well as field campaigns at Camp Lejeune, NC, Ft. Jackson, SC, and in conjunction with 1648 at Vandenberg AFB, and Ft. Huachuca. Comparisons and fusions of laboratory and field data were also carried out, using laboratory fuels from the same bases. Results: The project enabled new technologies and furthered basic science, mostly in the area of infrared spectroscopy, a broadband method well suited to biomass burn studies. Advances in hardware, software and supporting reference data realized a nearly 20x improvement in sensitivity and now provide quantitative IR spectra for potential detection of ~60 new

  3. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  4. Advanced Image Analysis based system for Automatic Detection of Malarial Parasite in Blood Images Using SUSAN Approach

    OpenAIRE

    JIGYASHA SONI

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is a serious global health problem, and rapid, accurate diagnosis is required to control the disease. An image processing algorithm to automate the diagnosis of malaria in blood images is developed in this project. The image classification system is designed to positively identify malaria parasites present in thin blood smears, and differentiate the species of malaria. I have implemented a new approach to low-level image processing - SUSAN (Smallest Univalue Segment assimilating Nucle...

  5. Application of Image Analysis Based on SEM and Chemical Mapping on PC Mortars under Sulfate Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Cheng; SUN Wei; Scrivener Karen

    2014-01-01

    The degradation mechanisms of cementitious materials exposed to sulfate solutions have been controversial, despite considerable research. In this paper, two methodologies of image analysis based on scanning electron microscope and chemical mapping are used to analyse Portland cement mortars exposed to sodium sulfate solution. The effects of sulfate concentration in solution and water to cement ratio of mortar, which are considered as the most sensitive factors to sulfate attack, are investigated respectively by comparing the macro expansion with microstructure analysis. It is found that the sulfate concentration in pore solution, expressed as sulfate content in C-S-H, plays a critical role on the supersaturation with respect to ettringite and so on the expansion force generated.

  6. Dual Raman-Brillouin Microscope for Chemical and Mechanical Characterization and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Andrew J; Thompson, Jonathan V; Steelman, Zachary A; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-08-01

    We present a unique confocal microscope capable of measuring the Raman and Brillouin spectra simultaneously from a single spatial location. Raman and Brillouin scattering offer complementary information about a material's chemical and mechanical structure, respectively, and concurrent monitoring of both of these spectra would set a new standard for material characterization. We achieve this by applying recent innovations in Brillouin spectroscopy that reduce the necessary acquisition times to durations comparable to conventional Raman spectroscopy while attaining a high level of spectral accuracy. To demonstrate the potential of the system, we map the Raman and Brillouin spectra of a molded poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel sample in cyclohexane to create two-dimensional images with high contrast at microscale resolutions. This powerful tool has the potential for very diverse analytical applications in basic science, industry, and medicine.

  7. Chemical compatibility issues associated with use of SiC/SiC in advanced reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) composites are of interest for components that will experience high radiation fields in the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR), the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR), or the Fluoride-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR). In all of the reactor systems considered, reactions of SiC/SiC composites with the constituents of the coolant determine suitability of materials of construction. The material of interest is nuclear grade SiC/SiC composites, which consist of a SiC matrix [high-purity, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC or liquid phase-sintered SiC that is crystalline beta-phase SiC containing small amounts of alumina-yttria impurity], a pyrolytic carbon interphase, and somewhat impure yet crystalline beta-phase SiC fibers. The interphase and fiber components may or may not be exposed, at least initially, to the reactor coolant. The chemical compatibility of SiC/SiC composites in the three reactor environments is highly dependent on thermodynamic stability with the pure coolant, and on reactions with impurities present in the environment including any ingress of oxygen and moisture. In general, there is a dearth of information on the performance of SiC in these environments. While there is little to no excess Si present in the new SiC/SiC composites, the reaction of Si with O2 cannot be ignored, especially for the FHR, in which environment the product, SiO2, can be readily removed by the fluoride salt. In all systems, reaction of the carbon interphase layer with oxygen is possible especially under abnormal conditions such as loss of coolant (resulting in increased temperature), and air and/ or steam ingress. A global outline of an approach to resolving SiC/SiC chemical compatibility concerns with the environments of the three reactors is presented along with ideas to quickly determine the baseline compatibility performance of SiC/SiC.

  8. Chemical drinking water quality in Ghana: Water costs and scope for advanced treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossiter, Helfrid M.A. [School of Engineering, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JL (United Kingdom); Owusu, Peter A.; Awuah, Esi [Department of Civil Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana); MacDonald, Alan M. [British Geological Survey, Murchison House, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3LA (United Kingdom); Schaefer, Andrea I., E-mail: Andrea.Schaefer@ed.ac.uk [School of Engineering, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-01

    To reduce child mortality and improve health in Ghana boreholes and wells are being installed across the country by the private sector, NGO's and the Ghanaian government. Water quality is not generally monitored once a water source has been improved. Water supplies were sampled across Ghana from mostly boreholes, wells and rivers as well as some piped water from the different regions and analysed for the chemical quality. Chemical water quality was found to exceed the WHO guidelines in 38% of samples, while pH varied from 3.7 to 8.9. Excess levels of nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) were found in 21% of the samples, manganese (Mn) and fluoride (F{sup -}) in 11% and 6.7%, respectively. Heavy metals such as lead (Pb), arsenic (As) and uranium (U) were localised to mining areas. Elements without health based guideline values such as aluminium (Al, 95%) and chloride (Cl, 5.7%) were found above the provisional guideline value. Economic information was gathered to identify water costs and ability to pay. Capital costs of wells and boreholes are about Pounds 1200 and Pounds 3800 respectively. The majority of installation costs are generally paid by the government or NGO's, while the maintenance is expected to be covered by the community. At least 58% of the communities had a water payment system in place, either an annual fee/one-off fee or 'pay-as-you-fetch'. The annual fee was between Pounds 0.3-21, while the boreholes had a water collection fee of Pounds 0.07-0.7/m{sup 3}, many wells were free. Interestingly, the most expensive water ( Pounds 2.9-3.5/m{sup 3}) was brought by truck. Many groundwater sources were not used due to poor chemical water quality. Considering the cost of unsuccessful borehole development, the potential for integrating suitable water treatment into the capital and maintenance costs of water sources is discussed. Additionally, many sources were not in use due to lack of water capacity, equipment malfunction or lack of economic

  9. Assessment of the Utility of the Advanced Himawari Imager to Detect Active Fire Over Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hally, B.; Wallace, L.; Reinke, K.; Jones, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wildfire detection and attribution is an issue of importance due to the socio-economic impact of fires in Australia. Early detection of fires allows emergency response agencies to make informed decisions in order to minimise loss of life and protect strategic resources in threatened areas. Until recently, the ability of land management authorities to accurately assess fire through satellite observations of Australia was limited to those made by polar orbiting satellites. The launch of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Himawari-8 satellite, with the 16-band Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI-8) onboard, in October 2014 presents a significant opportunity to improve the timeliness of satellite fire detection across Australia. The near real-time availability of images, at a ten minute frequency, may also provide contextual information (background temperature) leading to improvements in the assessment of fire characteristics. This paper investigates the application of the high frequency observation data supplied by this sensor for fire detection and attribution. As AHI-8 is a new sensor we have performed an analysis of the noise characteristics of the two spectral bands used for fire attribution across various land use types which occur in Australia. Using this information we have adapted existing algorithms, based upon least squares error minimisation and Kalman filtering, which utilise high frequency observations of surface temperature to detect and attribute fire. The fire detection and attribution information provided by these algorithms is then compared to existing satellite based fire products as well as in-situ information provided by land management agencies. These comparisons were made Australia-wide for an entire fire season - including many significant fire events (wildfires and prescribed burns). Preliminary detection results suggest that these methods for fire detection perform comparably to existing fire products and fire incident reporting from relevant

  10. The value of metabolic imaging to predict tumour response after chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Río Manuel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aim to investigate the possibility of using 18F-positron emission tomography/computer tomography (PET-CT to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC treated with preoperative chemoradiation (CRT. Methods The study included 50 patients with LARC treated with preoperative CRT. All patients were evaluated by PET-CT before and after CRT, and results were compared to histopathologic response quantified by tumour regression grade (patients with TRG 1-2 being defined as responders and patients with grade 3-5 as non-responders. Furthermore, the predictive value of metabolic imaging for pathologic complete response (ypCR was investigated. Results Responders and non-responders showed statistically significant differences according to Mandard's criteria for maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax before and after CRT with a specificity of 76,6% and a positive predictive value of 66,7%. Furthermore, SUVmax values after CRT were able to differentiate patients with ypCR with a sensitivity of 63% and a specificity of 74,4% (positive predictive value 41,2% and negative predictive value 87,9%; This rather low sensitivity and specificity determined that PET-CT was only able to distinguish 7 cases of ypCR from a total of 11 patients. Conclusions We conclude that 18-F PET-CT performed five to seven weeks after the end of CRT can visualise functional tumour response in LARC. In contrast, metabolic imaging with 18-F PET-CT is not able to predict patients with ypCR accurately.

  11. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 deg. C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5x10-8 Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  12. Chemical sensing and imaging based on photon upconverting nano- and microcrystals: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Simon; Schäferling, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The demand for photostable luminescent reporters that absorb and emit light in the red to near-infrared (NIR) spectral region continues in biomedical research and bioanalysis. In recent years, classical organic fluorophores have increasingly been displaced by luminescent nanoparticles. These consist of either polymer or silica based beads that are loaded with luminescent dyes, conjugated polymers, or inorganic nanomaterials such as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots), colloidal clusters of silver and gold, or carbon dots. Among the inorganic materials, photon upconversion nanocrystals exhibit a high potential for application to bioimaging or biomolecular assays. They offer an exceptionally high photostability, can be excited in the NIR, and their anti-Stokes emission enables luminescence detection free of background and perturbing scatter effects even in complex biological samples. These lanthanide doped inorganic crystals have multiple emission lines that can be tuned by the selection of the dopants. This review article is focused on the applications of functionalized photon upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to chemical sensing. This is a comparatively new field of research activity and mainly directed at the sensing and imaging of ubiquitous chemical analytes in biological samples, particularly in living cells. For this purpose, the particles have to be functionalized with suitable indicator dyes or recognition elements, as they do not show an intrinsic or specific luminescence response to most of these analytes (e.g. pH, oxygen, metal ions). We describe the strategies for the design of such responsive nanocomposites utilizing either luminescence resonance energy transfer or emission-reabsorption (inner filter effect) mechanisms and also highlight examples for their use either immobilized in sensor layers or directly as nanoprobes for intracellular sensing and imaging.

  13. Recent Advances in Gas and Chemical Detection by Vernier Effect-Based Photonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario La Notte

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Vernier effect has been proved to be very efficient for significantly improving the sensitivity and the limit of detection (LOD of chemical, biochemical and gas photonic sensors. In this paper a review of compact and efficient photonic sensors based on the Vernier effect is presented. The most relevant results of several theoretical and experimental works are reported, and the theoretical model of the typical Vernier effect-based sensor is discussed as well. In particular, sensitivity up to 460 μm/RIU has been experimentally reported, while ultra-high sensitivity of 2,500 μm/RIU and ultra-low LOD of 8.79 × 10−8 RIU have been theoretically demonstrated, employing a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI as sensing device instead of an add drop ring resonator.

  14. Hydrodeoxygenation processes: advances on catalytic transformations of biomass-derived platform chemicals into hydrocarbon fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Sudipta; Saha, Basudeb; Luque, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass provides an attractive source of renewable carbon that can be sustainably converted into chemicals and fuels. Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) processes have recently received considerable attention to upgrade biomass-derived feedstocks into liquid transportation fuels. The selection and design of HDO catalysts plays an important role to determine the success of the process. This review has been aimed to emphasize recent developments on HDO catalysts in effective transformations of biomass-derived platform molecules into hydrocarbon fuels with reduced oxygen content and improved H/C ratios. Liquid hydrocarbon fuels can be obtained by combining oxygen removal processes (e.g. dehydration, hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, decarbonylation etc.) as well as by increasing the molecular weight via C-C coupling reactions (e.g. aldol condensation, ketonization, oligomerization, hydroxyalkylation etc.). Fundamentals and mechanistic aspects of the use of HDO catalysts in deoxygenation reactions will also be discussed. PMID:25443804

  15. An advanced alkaline slurry for barrier chemical mechanical planarization on patterned wafers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chenwei; Liu Yuling; Niu Xinhuan; Tian Jianying; Gao Baohong; Zhang Xiaoqiang

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an alkaline barrier slurry (named FA/O slurry) for barrier removal and evaluated its chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) performance through comparison with a commercially developed barrier slurry.The FA/O slurry consists of colloidal silica,which is a complexing and an oxidizing agent,and does not have any inhibitors.It was found that the surface roughness of copper blanket wafers polished by the FA/O slurry was lower than the commercial barrier slurry,demonstrating that it leads to a better surface quality.In addition,the dishing and electrical tests also showed that the patterned wafers have a lower dishing value and sheet resistance as compared to the commercial barrier slurry.By comparison,the FA/O slurry demonstrates good planarization performance and can be used for barrier CMP.

  16. Advancing environmental toxicology through chemical dosimetry: External exposures versus tissue residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, L.S.; Landrum, P.F.; Luoma, S.N.; Meador, J.P.; Merten, A.A.; Shephard, B.K.; van Wezelzz, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    The tissue residue dose concept has been used, although in a limited manner, in environmental toxicology for more than 100 y. This review outlines the history of this approach and the technical background for organic chemicals and metals. Although the toxicity of both can be explained in tissue residue terms, the relationship between external exposure concentration, body and/or tissues dose surrogates, and the effective internal dose at the sites of toxic action tends to be more complex for metals. Various issues and current limitations related to research and regulatory applications are also examined. It is clear that the tissue residue approach (TRA) should be an integral component in future efforts to enhance the generation, understanding, and utility of toxicity testing data, both in the laboratory and in the field. To accomplish these goals, several key areas need to be addressed: 1) development of a risk-based interpretive framework linking toxicology and ecology at multiple levels of biological organization and incorporating organism-based dose metrics; 2) a broadly applicable, generally accepted classification scheme for modes/mechanisms of toxic action with explicit consideration of residue information to improve both single chemical and mixture toxicity data interpretation and regulatory risk assessment; 3) toxicity testing protocols updated to ensure collection of adequate residue information, along with toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics information, based on explicitly defined toxicological models accompanied by toxicological model validation; 4) continued development of residueeffect databases is needed ensure their ongoing utility; and 5) regulatory guidance incorporating residue-based testing and interpretation approaches, essential in various jurisdictions. ??:2010 SETAC.

  17. Calculations and surface quality measurements of high-asymmetry angle x-ray crystal monochromators for advanced x-ray imaging and metrological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zápražný, Zdenko; Korytár, Dušan; Jergel, Matej; Šiffalovič, Peter; Dobročka, Edmund; Vagovič, Patrik; Ferrari, Claudio; Mikulík, Petr; Demydenko, Maksym; Mikloška, Marek

    2015-03-01

    We present the numerical optimization and the technological development progress of x-ray optics based on asymmetric germanium crystals. We show the results of several basic calculations of diffraction properties of germanium x-ray crystal monochromators and of an analyzer-based imaging method for various asymmetry factors using an x-ray energy range from 8 to 20 keV. The important parameter of highly asymmetric monochromators as image magnifiers or compressors is the crystal surface quality. We have applied several crystal surface finishing methods, including advanced nanomachining using single-point diamond turning (SPDT), conventional mechanical lapping, chemical polishing, and chemomechanical polishing, and we have evaluated these methods by means of atomic force microscopy, diffractometry, reciprocal space mapping, and others. Our goal is to exclude the chemical etching methods as the final processing technique because it causes surface undulations. The aim is to implement very precise deterministic methods with a control of surface roughness down to 0.1 nm. The smallest roughness (˜0.3 nm), best planarity, and absence of the subsurface damage were observed for the sample which was machined using an SPDT with a feed rate of 1 mm/min and was consequently polished using a fine polishing 15-min process with a solution containing SiO2 nanoparticles (20 nm).

  18. A Vision of Quantitative Imaging Technology for Validation of Advanced Flight Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Kerns, Robert V.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Grinstead, Jay H.; Schwartz, Richard J.; Gibson, David M.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Tack, Steve; Dantowitz, Ronald F.

    2011-01-01

    Flight-testing is traditionally an expensive but critical element in the development and ultimate validation and certification of technologies destined for future operational capabilities. Measurements obtained in relevant flight environments also provide unique opportunities to observe flow phenomenon that are often beyond the capabilities of ground testing facilities and computational tools to simulate or duplicate. However, the challenges of minimizing vehicle weight and internal complexity as well as instrumentation bandwidth limitations often restrict the ability to make high-density, in-situ measurements with discrete sensors. Remote imaging offers a potential opportunity to noninvasively obtain such flight data in a complementary fashion. The NASA Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements Project has demonstrated such a capability to obtain calibrated thermal imagery on a hypersonic vehicle in flight. Through the application of existing and accessible technologies, the acreage surface temperature of the Shuttle lower surface was measured during reentry. Future hypersonic cruise vehicles, launcher configurations and reentry vehicles will, however, challenge current remote imaging capability. As NASA embarks on the design and deployment of a new Space Launch System architecture for access beyond earth orbit (and the commercial sector focused on low earth orbit), an opportunity exists to implement an imagery system and its supporting infrastructure that provides sufficient flexibility to incorporate changing technology to address the future needs of the flight test community. A long term vision is offered that supports the application of advanced multi-waveband sensing technology to aid in the development of future aerospace systems and critical technologies to enable highly responsive vehicle operations across the aerospace continuum, spanning launch, reusable space access and global reach. Motivations for development of an Agency level imagery

  19. Advanced image analysis of the surface pattern emerging in Ni3Al intermetallic alloys on anodization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salerno

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Anodization of Ni3Al alloy is of interest in the field of industrial manufacturing, thanks to the formation of protective oxide layer on the materials working in corrosive environments and high temperatures. However, homogeneous surface treatment is paramount for technological applications of this material. The anodization conditions have to be set outside the ranges of corrosion and burning, which is the electric field enhanced anodic dissolution of the metal. In order to check against occurrence of these events, proper quantitative means for assessing the surface quality have to be developed and established. We approached this task by advanced analysis of scanning electron microscope images of anodized Ni3Al plates. The anodization was carried out in 0.3 M citric acid at two temperatures of 0 and 30°C and at voltages in the range of 2 12 V. Different figures can be used to characterize the quality of the surface, in terms of uniformity. Here, the concept of regularity ratio spread is used for the first time on surfaces of technological interest. Additionally, the Minkowski parameters have been calculated and their meaning is discussed.

  20. Advanced Imaging for the Early Diagnosis of Local Recurrence Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Panebianco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa after radical prostatectomy (RT is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  1. Descriptions of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics (RAPID) device is a newly developed linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device. It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. A 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state ECR plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). The cylindrical stainless steel vacuum chamber is 300 mm in diameter and 750 mm in length and has eight radial and ten axial ports including 6-in. and 8-in. viewing windows for heating and diagnostics. Experimental observation of ECR plasma heating has been recently carried out during the initial plasma operation. The main diagnostic systems including a 94 GHz heterodyne interferometer, a high-resolution 25 channel one-dimensional array spectrometer, a single channel survey spectrometer, and an electric probe have been also prepared. The RAPID device is a flexible simulator for the understanding of tokamak edge plasma physics and new diagnostic system development. In this work, we describe the RAPID device and initial operation results.

  2. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  3. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  4. Chemical and toxicological evaluation of transformation products during advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Eyser, C; Börgers, A; Richard, J; Dopp, E; Janzen, N; Bester, K; Tuerk, J

    2013-01-01

    The entry of pharmaceuticals into the water cycle from sewage treatment plants is of growing concern because environmental effects are evident at trace levels. Ozonation, UV- and UV/H(2)O(2)-treatment were tested as an additional step in waste water treatment because they have been proven to be effective in eliminating aqueous organic contaminants. The pharmaceuticals carbamazepine, ciprofloxacin, diclofenac, metoprolol and sulfamethoxazole as well as the personal care products galaxolide and tonalide were investigated in terms of degradation efficiency and by-product formation in consideration of toxic effects. The substances were largely removed from treatment plant effluent by ozonation, UV- and UV/H(2)O(2)-treatment. Transformation products were detected in all tested treatment processes. Accompanying analysis showed no genotoxic, cytotoxic or estrogenic potential for the investigated compounds after oxidative treatment of real waste waters. The results indicate that by-product formation from ozonation and advanced oxidation processes does not have any negative environmental impact. PMID:24225097

  5. Fast simulation and optimization of pulse-train chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI has been increasingly applied to detect dilute solutes and physicochemical properties, with promising in vivo applications. Whereas CEST imaging has been implemented with continuous wave (CW) radio-frequency irradiation on preclinical scanners, pulse-train irradiation is often chosen on clinical systems. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize pulse-train CEST imaging, particularly important for translational studies. Because conventional Bloch–McConnell formulas are not in the form of homogeneous differential equations, the routine simulation approach simulates the evolving magnetization step by step, which is time consuming. Herein we developed a computationally efficient numerical solution using matrix iterative analysis of homogeneous Bloch–McConnell equations. The proposed algorithm requires simulation of pulse-train CEST MRI magnetization within one irradiation repeat, with 99% computation time reduction from that of conventional approach under typical experimental conditions. The proposed solution enables determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate from pulse-train CEST MRI experiment, within 5% from those determined from quantitative CW-CEST MRI. In addition, the structural similarity index analysis shows that the dependence of CEST contrast on saturation pulse flip angle and duration between simulation and experiment was 0.98  ±  0.01, indicating that the proposed simulation algorithm permits fast optimization and quantification of pulse-train CEST MRI. (paper)

  6. Fast simulation and optimization of pulse-train chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Gang; Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wu, Renhua

    2015-06-21

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI has been increasingly applied to detect dilute solutes and physicochemical properties, with promising in vivo applications. Whereas CEST imaging has been implemented with continuous wave (CW) radio-frequency irradiation on preclinical scanners, pulse-train irradiation is often chosen on clinical systems. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize pulse-train CEST imaging, particularly important for translational studies. Because conventional Bloch-McConnell formulas are not in the form of homogeneous differential equations, the routine simulation approach simulates the evolving magnetization step by step, which is time consuming. Herein we developed a computationally efficient numerical solution using matrix iterative analysis of homogeneous Bloch-McConnell equations. The proposed algorithm requires simulation of pulse-train CEST MRI magnetization within one irradiation repeat, with 99% computation time reduction from that of conventional approach under typical experimental conditions. The proposed solution enables determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate from pulse-train CEST MRI experiment, within 5% from those determined from quantitative CW-CEST MRI. In addition, the structural similarity index analysis shows that the dependence of CEST contrast on saturation pulse flip angle and duration between simulation and experiment was 0.98 ± 0.01, indicating that the proposed simulation algorithm permits fast optimization and quantification of pulse-train CEST MRI. PMID:26020414

  7. Modeling Forced Flow Chemical Vapor Infiltration Fabrication of SiC-SiC Composites for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian P. Deck

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide fiber/silicon carbide matrix (SiC-SiC composites exhibit remarkable material properties, including high temperature strength and stability under irradiation. These qualities have made SiC-SiC composites extremely desirable for use in advanced nuclear reactor concepts, where higher operating temperatures and longer lives require performance improvements over conventional metal alloys. However, fabrication efficiency advances need to be achieved. SiC composites are typically produced using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI, where gas phase precursors flow into the fiber preform and react to form a solid SiC matrix. Forced flow CVI utilizes a pressure gradient to more effectively transport reactants into the composite, reducing fabrication time. The fabrication parameters must be well understood to ensure that the resulting composite has a high density and good performance. To help optimize this process, a computer model was developed. This model simulates the transport of the SiC precursors, the deposition of SiC matrix on the fiber surfaces, and the effects of byproducts on the process. Critical process parameters, such as the temperature and reactant concentration, were simulated to identify infiltration conditions which maximize composite density while minimizing the fabrication time.

  8. Imaging spectroscopy algorithms for mapping canopy foliar chemical and morphological traits and their uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya; Serbin, Shawn P; McNeil, Brenden E; Kingdon, Clayton C; Townsend, Philip A

    2015-12-01

    A major goal of remote sensing is the development of generalizable algorithms to repeatedly and accurately map ecosystem properties across space and time. Imaging spectroscopy has great potential to map vegetation traits that cannot be retrieved from broadband spectral data, but rarely have such methods been tested across broad regions. Here we illustrate a general approach for estimating key foliar chemical and morphological traits through space and time using NASA's Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-Classic). We apply partial least squares regression (PLSR) to data from 237 field plots within 51 images acquired between 2008 and 2011. Using a series of 500 randomized 50/50 subsets of the original data, we generated spatially explicit maps of seven traits (leaf mass per area (M(area)), percentage nitrogen, carbon, fiber, lignin, and cellulose, and isotopic nitrogen concentration, δ15N) as well as pixel-wise uncertainties in their estimates based on error propagation in the analytical methods. Both M(area) and %N PLSR models had a R2 > 0.85. Root mean square errors (RMSEs) for both variables were less than 9% of the range of data. Fiber and lignin were predicted with R2 > 0.65 and carbon and cellulose with R2 > 0.45. Although R2 of %C and cellulose were lower than M(area) and %N, the measured variability of these constituents (especially %C) was also lower, and their RMSE values were beneath 12% of the range in overall variability. Model performance for δ15N was the lowest (R2 = 0.48, RMSE = 0.95 per thousand), but within 15% of the observed range. The resulting maps of chemical and morphological traits, together with their overall uncertainties, represent a first-of-its-kind approach for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of forest functioning and nutrient cycling across a broad range of temperate and sub-boreal ecosystems. These results offer an alternative to categorical maps of functional or physiognomic types by providing non

  9. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Chemical Instabilities : Applications in Chemistry, Engineering, Geology, and Materials Science

    CERN Document Server

    Baras, F

    1984-01-01

    On March 14-18, 1983 a workshop on "Chemical Instabilities: Applications in Chemistry, Engineering, Geology, and Materials Science" was held in Austin, Texas, U.S.A. It was organized jointly by the University of Texas at Austin and the Universite Libre de Bruxelles and sponsored qy NATO, NSF, the University of Texas at Austin, the International Solvay Institutes and the Ex­ xon Corporation. The present Volume includes most of the material of the in­ vited lectures delivered in the workshop as well as material from some posters, whose content was directly related to the themes of the invited lectures. In ,recent years, problems related to the stability and the nonlinear dynamics of nonequilibrium systems invaded a great num­ ber of fields ranging from abstract mathematics to biology. One of the most striking aspects of this development is that subjects reputed to be "classical" and "well-established" like chemistry, turned out to give rise to a rich variety of phenomena leading to multiple steady states and...

  10. A novel process of dye wastewater treatment by linking advanced chemical oxidation with biological oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Haiming

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dye wastewater is one of typically non-biodegradable industrial effluents. A new process linking Fenton’s oxidation with biological oxidation proposed in this study was investigated to degrade the organic substances from real dye wastewater. During the combination process, the Fenton’s oxidation process can reduce the organic load and enhance biodegradability of dye wastewater, which is followed by biological aerated filter (BAF system to further remove organic substances in terms of discharge requirement. The results showed that 97.6% of chemical oxygen demand (COD removal by the combination process was achieved at the optimum process parameters: pH of 3.5, H2O2 of 2.0 mL/L, Fe(II of 500 mg/L, 2.0 h treatment time in the Fenton’s oxidation process and hydraulic retention time (HRT of 5 h in the BAF system. Under these conditions, COD concentration of effluent was 72.6 mg/L whereas 3020 mg/L in the influent, thus meeting the requirement of treated dye wastewater discharge performed by Chinese government (less than 100 mg/L. These results obtained here suggest that the new process combining Fenton’s oxidation with biological oxidation may provide an economical and effective alternative for treatment of non-biodegradable industrial wastewater.

  11. Insights from advances in research of chemically induced experimental models of human inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the most important being Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, results from chronic dysregulation of the mucosal immune system in the gastrointestinal tract. Although the pathogenesis of IBD remains unclear, it is widely accepted that genetic, environmental, and immunological factors are involved. Recent studies suggest that intestinal epithelial defenses are important to prevent inflammation by protecting against microbial pathogens and oxidative stresses. To investigate the etiology of IBD, animal models of experimental colitis have been developed and are frequently used to evaluate new anti-inflammatory treatments for IBD. Several models of experimental colitis that demonstrate various pathophysiological aspects of the human disease have been described. In this manuscript, we review the characteristic features of IBD through a discussion of the various chemically induced experimental models of colitis (e.g. dextran sodium sulfate-, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-, oxazolone-, acetic acid-, and indomethacin-induced models). We also summarize some regulatory and pathogenic factors demonstrated by these models that can, hopefully, be exploited to develop future therapeutic strategies against IBD.

  12. Development of a Batch Fabrication Process for Chemical Nanosensors: Recent Advancements at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin M.

    2014-01-01

    A major objective in aerospace sensor development is to produce sensors that are small in size, easy to batch fabricate and low in cost, and have low power consumption. Chemical sensors involving nanostructured materials can provide these characteristics as well as the potential for the development of sensor systems with unique properties and improved performance. However, the fabrication and processing of nanostructures for sensor applications currently is limited by the ability to control their location on the sensor platform, which in turn hinders the progress for batch fabrication. This presentation will discuss the following: the development of a novel room temperature methane (CH4) sensor fabricated using porous tin oxide (SnO2) nanorods as the sensing material, the advantages of using nanomaterials in sensor designs, the challenges encountered with the integration of nanostructures into microsensordevices, and the different methods that have been attempted to address these challenges. An approach for the mass production of sensors with nanostructures using a method developed by our group at the NASA Glenn Research Center to control the alignment of nanostructures onto a sensor platform will also be described.

  13. Synthesis of high performance ceramic fibers by chemical vapor deposition for advanced metallics reinforcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Vithal; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of fibers capable of effectively reinforcing intermetallic matrices at elevated temperatures which can be used for potential applications in high temperature composite materials is described. This process was used due to its advantage over other fiber synthesis processes. It is extremely important to produce these fibers with good reproducible and controlled growth rates. However, the complex interplay of mass and energy transfer, blended with the fluid dynamics makes this a formidable task. The design and development of CVD reactor assembly and system to synthesize TiB2, CrB, B4C, and TiC fibers was performed. Residual thermal analysis for estimating stresses arising form thermal expansion mismatch were determined. Various techniques to improve the mechanical properties were also performed. Various techniques for improving the fiber properties were elaborated. The crystal structure and its orientation for TiB2 fiber is discussed. An overall view of the CVD process to develop CrB2, TiB2, and other high performance ceramic fibers is presented.

  14. Recent advances in image reconstruction, coil sensitivity calibration, and coil array design for SMASH and generalized parallel MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodickson, Daniel K; McKenzie, Charles A; Ohliger, Michael A; Yeh, Ernest N; Price, Mark D

    2002-01-01

    Parallel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques use spatial information from arrays of radiofrequency (RF) detector coils to accelerate imaging. A number of parallel MRI techniques have been described in recent years, and numerous clinical applications are currently being explored. The advent of practical parallel imaging presents various challenges for image reconstruction and RF system design. Recent advances in tailored SiMultaneous Acquisition of Spatial Harmonics (SMASH) image reconstructions are summarized. These advances enable robust SMASH imaging in arbitrary image planes with a wide range of coil array geometries. A generalized formalism is described which may be used to understand the relations between SMASH and SENSE, to derive typical implementations of each as special cases, and to form hybrid techniques combining some of the advantages of both. Accurate knowledge of coil sensitivities is crucial for parallel MRI, and errors in calibration represent one of the most common and the most pernicious sources of error in parallel image reconstructions. As one example, motion of the patient and/or the coil array between the sensitivity reference scan and the accelerated acquisition can lead to calibration errors and reconstruction artifacts. Self-calibrating parallel MRI approaches that address this problem by eliminating the need for external sensitivity references are reviewed. The ultimate achievable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for parallel MRI studies is closely tied to the geometry and sensitivity patterns of the coil arrays used for spatial encoding. Several parallel imaging array designs that depart from the traditional model of overlapped adjacent loop elements are described. PMID:11755091

  15. Physical and chemical effects of direct aqueous advanced oxidation processing on green sand foundry mold materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clobes, Jason Kenneth

    Iron foundries using the common green sand molding process have increasingly been incorporating aqueous advanced oxidation (AO) systems to reduce the consumption of sand system bentonite clay and coal raw materials by and to decrease their volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. These AO systems typically use a combination of sonication, ozone aeration, and hydrogen peroxide to treat and recycle slurries of sand system baghouse dust, which is rich in clay and coal. While the overall effects of AO on raw material consumption and organic emissions are known, the mechanisms behind these effects are not well understood. This research examined the effects of bench-scale direct aqueous AO processing on green sand mold materials at the micro level. Bench-scale AO processing, including acoustic sonication, ozone/oxygen aeration, and hydrogen peroxide dramatically decreased the particle sizes of both western bentonite and foundry sand system baghouse dust. Bench-scale AO processing was shown to effectively separate the clay material from the larger silica and coal particles and to extensively break up the larger clay agglomerates. The acoustic sonication component of AO processing was the key contributor to enhanced clay recovery. Acoustic sonication alone was slightly more effective than combined component AO in reducing the particle sizes of the baghouse dust and in the recovery of clay yields in the supernatant during sedimentation experiments. Sedimentation separation results correlated well with the increase in small particle concentrations due to AO processing. Clay suspension viscosity decreased with AO processing due to enhanced dispersion of the particles. X-ray diffraction of freeze-dried baghouse dust indicated that AO processing does not rehydrate calcined montmorillonite and does not increase the level of interlayer water hydration in the dry clays. Zeta potential measurements indicated that AO processing also does not produce any large changes in the

  16. Chemical characterization of emissions from advanced technology light-duty vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Lisa

    Results of detailed emissions measurements of seven 2000 model year advanced technology vehicles are reported. Six of the seven vehicles were imported from Europe and Japan and are not yet available for sale in Canada. Three of the vehicles were with direct injection diesel (DDI) technology, three with gasoline direct injection (GDI) technology and one vehicle was a gasoline-electric hybrid. It is expected that vehicles with these technologies will be forming a larger fraction of the Canadian light-duty vehicle fleet in the coming years in response to requirements to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector in support of Canada's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol; and as a result of improving fuel quality (most notably reducing the sulphur content of both diesel and gasoline). It is therefore important to understand the potential impacts on air quality of such changes in the composition of the vehicle fleet. The emissions from these vehicles were characterized over four test cycles representing different driving conditions. Samples of the exhaust were collected for determining methane, non-methane hydrocarbons and carbonyl compounds for the purposes of comparing ozone-forming potential of the emissions. Although these vehicles were not certified to Canadian emissions standards as tested, all vehicles met the then current Tier 1 emission standards, except for one diesel vehicle which did not meet the particulate matter (PM) standard. The DDI vehicles had the highest NO X emissions, the highest specific reactivity and the highest ozone-forming potential of the vehicles tested. When compared to conventional gasoline vehicles, the ozone-forming potential was equivalent. The GDI vehicles had lower NO X emissions, lower specific reactivity and lower ozone-forming potential than the conventional gasoline vehicles. Both the diesel and GDI vehicles had higher PM emissions than the conventional gasoline vehicles. The gasoline-electric hybrid vehicle

  17. Is an "ideal" service institution image the same for all referral sources? The case of chemical dependency treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K; LaTour, M S

    1993-01-01

    In a competitive market like chemical dependency treatment, segmenting the professional referral market according to an "ideal" service image may offer a service institution a strategic advantage. Results of this study suggest that while different professionals in a referral market may attach differential importance to the same service feature, a favorable or unfavorable "image" seems to encompass how well both the professional and the professionals' client are treated by the service institution.

  18. Is an "ideal" service institution image the same for all referral sources? The case of chemical dependency treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K; LaTour, M S

    1993-01-01

    In a competitive market like chemical dependency treatment, segmenting the professional referral market according to an "ideal" service image may offer a service institution a strategic advantage. Results of this study suggest that while different professionals in a referral market may attach differential importance to the same service feature, a favorable or unfavorable "image" seems to encompass how well both the professional and the professionals' client are treated by the service institution. PMID:10129241

  19. Advanced treatment of liquid swine manure using physico-chemical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelme-Ayala, Pamela [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); El-Din, Mohamed Gamal, E-mail: mgamalel-din@ualberta.ca [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Smith, Richard [Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Code, Kenneth R. [IOWC Technologies Inc., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Leonard, Jerry [Edmonton Waste Management Centre of Excellence, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2011-02-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Swine manure was treated by coagulation/flocculation followed by an oxidation step. {yields} This physicochemical treatment removed suspended solids, total organic carbon and nutrients. {yields} Complete total coliforms reduction was achieved in diluted swine manure samples. {yields} Levels of ammonia, hydrogen sulphide, and carbon dioxide gases were reduced. {yields} Reduced sludge production was achieved at natural swine manure pH. - Abstract: In this study, liquid swine manure was treated by physico-chemical treatment, including coagulation, flocculation, and sedimentation followed by an oxidation step as a polishing treatment at a bench-scale level. A superabsorbent polymer (SAP) and a mineral and salt formulation able to generate molecular iodine were used as coagulant and oxidant agents, respectively. The results indicated that SAP at a concentration of 1.25 g/L was able to reduce 32% of the initial total suspended solids (TSS) in experiments using supernatant at its natural pH. Following the SAP application, 82% of initial ammonia (NH{sub 3}), 78% of initial total organic carbon (TOC), and 93% of the total coliforms were reduced using 40 mg/L of free iodine. In experiments performed with diluted supernatant (five-fold dilution), it was found that SAP at a concentration of 0.5 g/L was capable of reducing 80% of the initial TSS in experiments at pH 11. A leaching study was conducted to assess the safety of sludge disposal. From the leaching tests using non-diluted supernatant, it was found that 24% of the chloride (Cl{sup -}) and 50% of the phosphate (PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) ions retained in the sludge leached to the ultrapure water after 48 h. Potential contamination due to leaching of NH{sub 3}, nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) and nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) was found to be statistically insignificant.

  20. Advanced treatment of liquid swine manure using physico-chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Swine manure was treated by coagulation/flocculation followed by an oxidation step. → This physicochemical treatment removed suspended solids, total organic carbon and nutrients. → Complete total coliforms reduction was achieved in diluted swine manure samples. → Levels of ammonia, hydrogen sulphide, and carbon dioxide gases were reduced. → Reduced sludge production was achieved at natural swine manure pH. - Abstract: In this study, liquid swine manure was treated by physico-chemical treatment, including coagulation, flocculation, and sedimentation followed by an oxidation step as a polishing treatment at a bench-scale level. A superabsorbent polymer (SAP) and a mineral and salt formulation able to generate molecular iodine were used as coagulant and oxidant agents, respectively. The results indicated that SAP at a concentration of 1.25 g/L was able to reduce 32% of the initial total suspended solids (TSS) in experiments using supernatant at its natural pH. Following the SAP application, 82% of initial ammonia (NH3), 78% of initial total organic carbon (TOC), and 93% of the total coliforms were reduced using 40 mg/L of free iodine. In experiments performed with diluted supernatant (five-fold dilution), it was found that SAP at a concentration of 0.5 g/L was capable of reducing 80% of the initial TSS in experiments at pH 11. A leaching study was conducted to assess the safety of sludge disposal. From the leaching tests using non-diluted supernatant, it was found that 24% of the chloride (Cl-) and 50% of the phosphate (PO43-) ions retained in the sludge leached to the ultrapure water after 48 h. Potential contamination due to leaching of NH3, nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) was found to be statistically insignificant.