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Sample records for advanced cervical cancers

  1. Alterations In Lipid Profile Of Patients With Advanced Cervical Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The changes in lipid profile have long been associated with cancer because lipids play key role in maintenance of cell integrity. Aims. The study evaluated alterations in plasma lipid profile in patients with advanced squamous cervical cancer. Materials And Method This hospital-based study included 30 cervical ...

  2. Cervical cancer stem cells and correlation with radiation response in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, Supriya; Goda, Jayant Sastri; Deodhar, Kedar

    2016-01-01

    While tumour-initiating cells (TIC) have been reported across solid tumours, there is dearth of data regarding TICs and radiation response in cervical cancer. From October, 2013- July, 2015 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were included. Pretreatment biopsy was obtained. IHC was performed for SOX-2,OCT-4, Nanog (ESC), CD44 and Podoplanin (TIC). Semiquantitative scoring was used for IHC. All patients received uniform concurrent chemoradiation and brachytherapy. On follow up, local control and distant relapse was recorded

  3. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  4. Predictors of cervical cancer being at an advanced stage at diagnosis in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Rasch, Vibeke; Pukkala, Eero

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Sudan, with more than two-thirds of all women with invasive cervical cancer being diagnosed at an advanced stage (stages III and IV). The lack of a screening program for cervical cancer in Sudan may contribute to the late presentation...... diagnosis) of cervical cancer in Sudan....

  5. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Junichi; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Seki, Noriko; Hongo, Atsushi; Mizutani, Yasushi; Miyagi, Yasunari; Yoshinouchi, Mitsuo; Kudo, Takafumi

    2001-01-01

    Recently, attempts have made to use radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy in various solid tumors including cervical cancer. Twenty-four patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were treated with concurrent Carboplatin (16-24 mg/m 2 /day) or Nedaplatin (20 mg/m 2 /week) and conventional radiotherapy. Of 13 evaluable patients, there were nine complete responders and four partial responders. There was no renal damage or grade 4 hematological toxicity. Gastrointestinal adverse reactions were mild. One patient had grade 3 dermatologic toxicity after delayed radiation therapy. This pilot study suggests that daily Carboplatin or weekly Nedaplatin administered with standard radiation therapy is safe, well-tolerated, and thus may be useful as a radiation sensitizer in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. (author)

  6. Intraoperative irradiation in advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, G.; Goldson, A.L.; Ashayeri, E.; Petrilli, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional treatment of cervical cancer, such as radical hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy or pelvic exenteration, is limited to the pelvis. Standard radio-therapeutic treatment is a combination of external-beam radiotherapy to the pelvis and intracavitary applications. However, there is a group of patients for whom external radiotherapy alone has limitations. This group consists primarily of patients with large pelvic lymph nodes containing metastatic cancer, metastatically involved paraaortic lymph nodes outside the usual pelvic radiation field, or large central tumors with parametrial involvement. In patients with cancer of the cervix, the incidence of metastasis to paraaortic lymph nodes is high. Attempts to treat paraaortic nodes with external radiotherapy have resulted in high complication rates because the treatment field includes the highly sensitive gastrointestinal tract. External radiation therapy after retroperitoneal exploration of lymph nodes does not seem to improve survival. In an attempt to circumvent the morbidity and mortality associated with conventional external-beam irradiation, the authors initiated a pilot study of intraoperative electron-beam irradiation of the paraaortic nodes and of the large metastatic lymph nodes in the pelvis. The intraoperative boost was followed by conventional fractionated external-beam irradiation. The theoretical advantages of this procedure include a higher radiation tumor dose without a concomitant increase in treatment morbidity and mortality

  7. Clinical evaluation of chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Okawa, Tomohiko [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan); Okawa-Kita, Midori

    1997-11-01

    Locally advanced cervical cancer has a poor prognosis, poor survival rate, and high local failure rate. A number of questions regarding the optimal agents and schedule of concurrent chemoradiation remain unanswered. To improve the cure rate for advanced or recurrent cervix cancer, we studied intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) with or without radiotherapy. We analyzed 52 cases of advanced or recurrent cervical cancer treated by IAIC with or without radiotherapy. IAIC regimen was separated into two groups: group I consisted of 5-FU+MMC{+-}ADM (30 cases) and group II of CDDP+MMC{+-}5-FU (22 cases). The tip of the catheter was placed in the bifurcation of abdominal aorta or the bilateral internal iliac arteries (7 cases). The overall response rate (CR+PR) was 71%, 87% in patients receiving radiotherapy, 50% in those without radiotherapy, and 100% in primary cases. The five-year survival rate was 20% in primary cases, 14% in recurrent cases, 3% in group I and 38% in group II by chemotherapy regimen. Severe (more than grade III) hematological acute side effects were found in 48% of all cases, but recovered by interruption of drugs. In 7 cases in which the tip of the catheter was placed in internal iliac arteries, there were severe skin ulcers in 2 cases and severe pain of leg or gluteal region which need narcotics in 2 cases. These data suggest that IAIC mainly with cisplatin with or without radiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. But we should check blood flow distribution periodically, and control the concentration of drugs. To improve the survival rate for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, we should discuss neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and maintenance systemic chemotherapy. (author)

  8. Clinical evaluation of chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Okawa, Tomohiko; Okawa-Kita, Midori.

    1997-01-01

    Locally advanced cervical cancer has a poor prognosis, poor survival rate, and high local failure rate. A number of questions regarding the optimal agents and schedule of concurrent chemoradiation remain unanswered. To improve the cure rate for advanced or recurrent cervix cancer, we studied intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) with or without radiotherapy. We analyzed 52 cases of advanced or recurrent cervical cancer treated by IAIC with or without radiotherapy. IAIC regimen was separated into two groups: group I consisted of 5-FU+MMC±ADM (30 cases) and group II of CDDP+MMC±5-FU (22 cases). The tip of the catheter was placed in the bifurcation of abdominal aorta or the bilateral internal iliac arteries (7 cases). The overall response rate (CR+PR) was 71%, 87% in patients receiving radiotherapy, 50% in those without radiotherapy, and 100% in primary cases. The five-year survival rate was 20% in primary cases, 14% in recurrent cases, 3% in group I and 38% in group II by chemotherapy regimen. Severe (more than grade III) hematological acute side effects were found in 48% of all cases, but recovered by interruption of drugs. In 7 cases in which the tip of the catheter was placed in internal iliac arteries, there were severe skin ulcers in 2 cases and severe pain of leg or gluteal region which need narcotics in 2 cases. These data suggest that IAIC mainly with cisplatin with or without radiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. But we should check blood flow distribution periodically, and control the concentration of drugs. To improve the survival rate for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, we should discuss neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and maintenance systemic chemotherapy. (author)

  9. Concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bailleux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There is no consensus for parametrial boost technic while both transvaginal and transperineal approaches are discussed. A prototype was developed consisting of a perineal template, allowing transperineal needle insertion. This study analyzed acute toxicity of concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB boost for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods: From 01.2011 to 12.2014, 33 patients (pts presenting a locally advanced cervical cancer with parametrial invasion were treated. After the first course of external beam radiation therapy with cisplatinum, HDRB was performed combining endocavitary and interstitial technique for cervical and parametrial disease. Post-operative delineation (CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid and planification were based on CT-scan/MRI. HDRB was delivered in 3-5 fractions over 2-3 consecutive days. Acute toxicities occurring within 6 months after HDRB were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age was 56.4 years (27-79. Clinical stages were: T2b = 23 pts (69.7%, T3a = 1 pt (3%, T3b = 6 pts (18.2%, and T4a = 3 pts (9.1%. Median HDRB prescribed dose was 21 Gy (21-27. Median CTVCT (16 pts and HR-CTV MRI (17 pts were 52.6 cc (28.5-74.3, 31.9 cc (17.1-58, respectively. Median EQD2αβ10 for D90CTV and D90HR-CTV were 82.9 Gy (78.2-96.5, 84.8 Gy (80.6-91.4, respectively. Median EQD2αβ3 (CT/MRI for D2cc bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 75.5 Gy (66.6-90.9, 64.4 Gy (51.9-77.4, and 60.4 Gy (50.9-81.1, respectively. Median follow-up was 14 months (ranged 6-51. Among the 24 pts with MFU = 24 months, 2-year LRFS rate, RRFS, and OS were 86.8%, 88.8%, and 94.1%, respectively. The rates of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 36% (G1 dysuria = 8 pts, G2 infection = 2 pt, G3 infection = 2 pts, and 27% (G1 diarrhea = 9 pts, respectively. One patient presented vaginal bleeding at the time of applicator withdrawal (G3-blood transfusion; no bleeding was

  10. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  11. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  12. Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-06

    Did you know that cervical cancer rates differ by race/ethnicity and region? Or that cervical cancer can usually be prevented if precancerous cervical lesions are found by a Pap test and treated? Find out how getting regular Pap tests can save a woman's life.  Created: 3/6/2007 by National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.   Date Released: 4/25/2007.

  13. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about cervical and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  14. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-21

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  15. Cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bleeding between periods, after intercourse, or after menopause Vaginal discharge that does not stop, and may be pale, ... Instructions Hysterectomy - abdominal - discharge Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - ... Images Cervical cancer Cervical neoplasia ...

  16. Treatment results of incomplete chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ying Gao,1,* Fei Gao,2,* Zi Liu,1 Li-ping Song1 1Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China; 2Second Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Regimens that combine chemotherapy and radiotherapy increase toxicity and compromise a patient’s ability to adhere to the treatment plan. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of a partially completed chemoradiation regimen prescribed for locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix. Methods: Medical records of 156 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer stage IIB–IVA who received chemoradiation with cisplatin (40 mg/m2 and 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 from October 2006 to October 2008 were collected. The treatment protocol called for two cycles of chemotherapy. External beam radiation therapy was administered using a 10-MeV electron beam. Local control, disease free survival, overall survival, and toxicities were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, 89 patients (57% completed the planned protocol. Sixty seven patients (43% completed fewer than two cycles. The 3-year local control rate was significantly better in the patient group that completed the prescribed plan (92.1% compared to 80.6%; P = 0.033. No statistical significance was observed between the groups that completed or did not complete the two cycle protocol with regard to disease free survival (80.9% and 73.2%, respectively; P = 0.250, overall survival (84.3% and 79.1%; P = 0.405, and progression survival (3.4% and 3.0%; P = 0.892. Differences in acute hematologic toxicity and subcutaneous toxicity were observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Completion of two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin with radiotherapy was effective, safe, and responsible for better local control

  17. Critical review of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Peiretti, Michele

    2010-10-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of female cancer mortality worldwide. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy represents the standard of care for patients with stage IB2-IIIB cervical cancer. However, the lack of radiotherapy departments, especially in developing countries, the presumed high incidence of long-term complications, and the poor control of metastatic disease have brought about the development of different therapeutic approaches such as neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery. We reviewed the literature concerning the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

  18. Results of irradiation therapy for advanced uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Haruo; Asakawa, Hiroshi; Otawa, Hirokazu; Nemoto, Kenji; Saito, Hiroyuki

    1983-01-01

    152 patients with advanced uterine cervical cancer (76 in stage III, 47 in stage IV and 29 in recurrence) were treated at Miyagi Seijinbyo Center in fifteen years (1967-1981). Our standard treatment was a combined therapy of 6 MVX ray whole pelvis irradiation and intracavitary radium irradiation (or simple total hysterectomy) The actuarial 5-year-survival rate was 46.0% in stage III, 9.4% in stage IV and 10.3% in recurrence. In stage III, the actuarial 5-year-survival rate in nine cases with external irradiation alone was (22.2%), in 44 cases with intracavitary irradiation and external irradiation 48.7%; in 14 cases with operation and external irradiation 57.1%. No five year survival was found in nine interrupted-irradation cases. Moderate complications in the rectum and/or the urinary bladder were found in eight of 67 (12%) irradiation-completed patients in stage III. Five 5-year-survival cases (two in stage IV and three in recurrence) were reported. (author)

  19. Adjuvant hysterectomy after radiochemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hass, Peter [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Magdeburg (Germany); Eggemann, Holm; Costa, Serban Dan; Ignatov, Atanas [Otto-von-Guericke University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with concomitant chemotherapy (cCT) (=RCT) plus intracavitary (±interstitial) brachytherapy (iBT) is standard of care for advanced cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate morbidity and survival outcome of simple adjuvant hysterectomy (AH) after EBRT/cCT and to compare it with the standard treatment. Patients with FIGO stage III cervical cancer were treated with EBRT/cCT and then divided in two groups: group 1 was further treated with standard intracavitary/interstitial BT, while group 2 underwent AH. From 881 women with cervical cancer, 248 were eligible for analysis: 161 received iBT and 87 underwent AH. The median follow-up of the study was 53 months. Clinical and pathological characteristics were well balanced in the two groups. After EBRT/cCT, complete clinical response was observed in 121 (48.8%) of 246 patients. Clinical complete response was observed in 81 (50.3%) of 161 patients in group 1. At 6 weeks after EBRT/cCT, 40 (46.0%) of 87 patients in the surgery group had pathological complete response. Intra- and postoperative complications were observed in 10 (11.5%) of 87 cases. The rates of locoregional recurrence and metastasis were similar in both groups. Progression-free (PFS) and disease-specific overall survival (DOS) for these patients were similar between the control and surgery group. Interestingly, PFS and DOS were significantly improved by AH for the patients with residual tumor. AH could improve survival in patients with residual disease after RCT and is characterized by a low complication rate. (orig.) [German] Die Teletherapie (EBRT) mit begleitender Chemotherapie (cCT), entsprechend einer Radiochemotherapie (RCT), plus intrakavitaere (± interstitielle) Brachytherapie (iBT) ist Standard in der Behandlung des fortgeschrittenen Zervixkarzinoms. Ziel dieser Studie war es, die Morbiditaet und das Ueberleben zwischen der einfachen adjuvanten Hysterektomie (AH) nach EBRT/cCT und dem

  20. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locoregionally advanced uterine cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toita, Takafumi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Moromizato, Hidehiko [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). Faculty of Medicine] [and others

    2000-12-01

    Twenty-two patients with locoregionally advanced uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). CDDP (20 mg/m{sup 2} daily) was concurrently administered for 5 days at 21-days intervals with external beam irradiation and HDR intracavitary therapy. Blood and gastrointestinal (nausea and vomiting) toxicities were severe but manageable. There was no grade 5 (fatal) toxicity. Nine (41%) experienced recurrence. The 2-year pelvic control rate, distant metastasis-free rate, disease-free survival rate, and absolute survival rate for all 22 patients were 77%, 72%, 57%, and 65%, respectively. One suffered small intestinal perforation (grade 4). We consider that our CCRT is feasible and may have positive therapeutic value on long-term prognosis for patients with locoregionally advanced uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  1. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 800-762-2264 Foundation for Women's Cancer Phone Number: 800-444-4441 Previous Page Next Page Cervical cancer fact sheet (PDF, 162 KB) Female reproductive system Related information Human papillomavirus (HPV) and genital ...

  2. Risk Factors in a Sample of Patients with Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina IRIMIE

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The estimated burden of neoplasia of uterine cervix in the 27 EU member states sums up to 34300 cases and 16200 death, with higher incidence and mortality in eastern countries. A number of risk factors increase the likelihood of developing cervical cancer. Even if the risk factors significantly increase the chances of developing cervical cancer, a large number of women with risk factors do not develop the disease, and when a woman develops cancer or precancerous lesions in the cervix may be difficult to establish the causal relationship with certain risk factors. The present study aimed to appreciate the presence and magnitude of risk factors for patients diagnosed with advanced cervical cancer and to outline best strategies to reduce the incidence of this neoplasia, and improve prognosis. Risk factors have been investigated in 42 patients diagnosed with advanced cervical cancer using HPV genotyped determination and a questionnaire for the evaluation of cervical cancer risk factors. In our sample of patients a high risk profile is shaping for low socio-economical level, modulated by the impact of HPV infection with high risk stains of virus, overweight-obesity, smoking and inadequate cervical cancer screening. In this frame a special alarm signal is represented by the very high percentage of patients with overweight and obesity. From the public health perspective, we consider that efforts should be focused on preventing weight gain, regular screening and health education field.

  3. Diffusion Weighted MRI as a predictive tool for effect of radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Søren; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars

    Diffusion weighted MRI has shown great potential in diagnostic cancer imaging and may also have value for monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy. Patients with advanced cervical cancer are treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy. This study evaluates the value of DW......-MRI for predicting outcome of patients with advanced cervical cancer at time of brachytherapy. Volume of hyper-intensity on highly diffusion sensitive images and resulting ADC value for treatment responders and non-responders is compared. The change of ADC and volume of hyper-intensity over time of BT is also...

  4. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  5. Clinical implementation of coverage probability planning for nodal boosting in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Assenholt, Marianne S; Jensen, Maria F

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To implement coverage probability (CovP) for dose planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) of pathologic lymph nodes in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: CovP constraints for SIB of the pathological nodal target (PTV-N) with a central dose peak...

  6. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Lænsø Madsen, Mads; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary–interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented...

  7. Risk Factors for Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Røhl, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the incidence of and risk factors for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after definitive chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). METHODS AND MATERIALS: We analyzed 101 patients with LACC treated from 2008-2014. Patients received weekly cisplatin...

  8. Adjuvanticity of vitamin A in advanced irradiated cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, H.; Micksche, M.; Vienna Univ.

    1982-01-01

    For treatment of patients with inoperable cervical cancer (FIGO III) a randomized trial has been initiated. Patients were randomized to receive either conventional irradiation therapy together with vitamin A palmitate (1.5 mill. I.U./day; total dose: 30 mill. I.U.), applied orally, or irradiation alone. When lymphocyte reactivity to PHA (maximum response during therapy) was compared within the groups, it was found, that 66% of the patients who received irradiation combined with vitamin A palmitate, showed an increase in their blastogenic response, while in irradiated patients without vitamin A palmitate a response was seen only in 33%. This difference being statistically significant in comparison to pretreatment values. From immunological data it can be concluded, that vitamin A has an effect on functional response on T-cells. Concerning the clinical outcome, after an observation period of 12 months relapse rates were lower in the vitamin A group, but not significantly reduced. Therefore further follow up is warranted. (orig.) [de

  9. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Screening for cervical cancer using the Pap test has decreased the number of new cases of ... their chance of dying from cervical cancer . A Pap test is commonly used to screen for cervical cancer. ...

  10. Adnexal masses requiring surgical intervention in women with advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Christa I; Thomas, Saly K; Richardson, Debra L; Kehoe, Siobhan M; Miller, David S; Lea, Jayanthi S

    2014-09-01

    Surgical evaluation of adnexal masses in patients with cervical cancer can be considered in order to optimize treatment outcomes and rule out a second pathologic process. Our objective was to review treatment patterns and outcomes in women with advanced cervical cancer (ACC) and an adnexal mass. A retrospective review was performed with IRB approval of patients treated for advanced cervical cancer at our institution between 1990 and 2011. Patients were identified using institutional databases and tumor registries. Descriptive statistics were performed using Microsoft Excel 2011 and Instat was used to perform Fisher's exact test and student T-tests. Two hundred twenty eight patients with stage IIB-IVB cervical cancer were identified, 50 (22%) of whom had an adnexal mass on initial imaging studies (31 stage IIB, 15 stage IIIB, 3 stage IVA, 3 stage IVB). The mean follow up time of patients with adnexal masses was 22 months (range 3-128 months). Thirteen of 50 (26%) patients underwent surgical evaluation of the adnexal mass. Six were found to have cervical cancer metastatic to the adnexae, while seven had benign adnexal lesions. Thirty-seven of 50 (74%) patients were conservatively managed. All 37 women had cystic masses <8 cm or complex masses <5 cm in size. Thirty-four of the 37 (92%) patients had resolution of their adnexal mass and 3 were deemed stable on follow up imaging. Twenty three percent of surgically managed patients and 57% of conservatively managed patients had disease recurrence (p=0.05). There were no recurrences in the adnexa. Twelve percent of women with ACC and an adnexal mass have ovarian metastases. Patients with cystic masses less than 8 cm and complex masses less than 5 cm in size can be expectantly managed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Advancing cervical cancer prevention initiatives in resource-constrained settings: insights from the Cervical Cancer Prevention Program in Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulindi H Mwanahamuntu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Groesbeck Parham and colleagues describe their Cervical Cancer Prevention Program in Zambia, which has provided services to over 58,000 women over the past five years, and share lessons learned from the program's implementation and integration with existing HIV/AIDS programs.

  12. Tracer kinetic model selection for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted; Tanderup, Kari; Duan, Chong

    2014-01-01

    conditions the Tofts (TM), extended Tofts (ETM), compartmental tissue uptake model (C-TU) and 2-compartment exchange model (2CXM) were the optimal tracer kinetic models (TKMs) for the analysis of DCE-MRI in patients with cervical cancer. Material and methods. Ten patients with locally advanced cervical...

  13. Vaginal dose de-escalation in image guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; de Leeuw, Astrid A C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Vaginal stenosis is a major problem following radiotherapy in cervical cancer. We investigated a new dose planning strategy for vaginal dose de-escalation (VDD). Materials and methods Fifty consecutive locally advanced cervical cancer patients without lower or middle vaginal involvement...... at diagnosis from 3 institutions were analysed. External beam radiotherapy was combined with MRI-guided brachytherapy. VDD was obtained by decreasing dwell times in ovoid/ring and increasing dwell times in tandem/needles. The aim was to maintain the target dose (D90 of HR-CTV ⩾ 85 Gy EQD2) while reducing...... bladder and rectum (D2cm3) were reduced by 2 ± 2 Gy and 3 ± 2 Gy, respectively (p

  14. Vaginal dose de-escalation in image guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Sandy; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; de Leeuw, Astrid A C; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal stenosis is a major problem following radiotherapy in cervical cancer. We investigated a new dose planning strategy for vaginal dose de-escalation (VDD). Fifty consecutive locally advanced cervical cancer patients without lower or middle vaginal involvement at diagnosis from 3 institutions were analysed. External beam radiotherapy was combined with MRI-guided brachytherapy. VDD was obtained by decreasing dwell times in ovoid/ring and increasing dwell times in tandem/needles. The aim was to maintain the target dose (D90 of HR-CTV⩾85Gy EQD2) while reducing the dose to the surface of the vagina to vaginal loading (ovoid/ring) was reduced from 51% to 33% of the total loading with VDD, which significantly reduced the dose to the vaginal dose points (pvaginal point was reduced by a mean of 4±4Gy EQD2 (pvaginal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervical cytology (also called the Pap test or Pap smear) and, for some women, testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) . How does cervical cancer occur? Cancer occurs when cervical cells become abnormal ...

  16. Cervical cancer: what's new?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Sadalla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Cervical cancer is the most common gynecological cancer in Brazil. Among women, it is the second most frequent, second only to breast cancer. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the country, with estimated 15,590 new cases (2014 and 5,430 deaths (2013. In order to update information to improve outcomes, reduce morbidity and optimize the treatment of this cancer, this article will address the advancement of knowledge on cervical cancer. The topics covered include the role of surgery in different stages, treatment of locally advanced carcinomas, fertility preservation, the role of the sentinel lymph node technique, indications and techniques of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and some special situations.

  17. A review of patients with advanced cervical cancer presenting to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients with cancer of the cervix,6 is not yet available, unless patients travel outside the country. Tiyanjane Clinic started in 2003 and currently runs hospital- based (inpatient and outpatient) and community-based palliative care services from Queen Elizabeth Central. Hospital (QECH), along with a home-based care service.

  18. Para-aortic lymph node radiation in advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, B.; Watring, W.G.; Tak, W.; Anderson, B.; Piro, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-six patients with advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix and with iliac or para-aortic nodes interpreted as un-equivocally positive on lymphangiography have received radiation therapy to the para-aortic area at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology at Tufts-New England Medical Center Hospital. Of 29 patients who received para-aortic area irradiation as part of their initial treatment, local control was achieved in 18 patients (62%). Overall, four patients developed major complications requiring surgical intervention. Detailed results and our current pre-treatment evaluation policy including lymphangiography, percutaneous needle biopsy and selective extra-peritoneal lymph node biopsy will be discussed

  19. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain ...

  20. Californium-252 neutron curietherapy for advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Y; Bell, P R; Yoneda, J; Van Nagell, J R

    1982-01-01

    Low dose rate neutron radiotherapy using fast neutrons emitted by the radionuclide 252Cf was combined with fractionated X- or gamma rays for the radiotherapy of advanced cervicovaginal tumors. Two different implant schedules were tested to determine the response of the tumors to the scheduling of therapy with the 252CF either early or delayed in the fractionated radiotherapy course. A 90% frequency of complete local clearance of pelvic tumors was observed by the early application of 252Cf. Neutron curietherapy applied as a boost treatment at the end of fractionated radiotherapy, resulted in only 40% local control. Improved results were observed by early implantation therapy and is postulated to be the result of more effective hypoxic tumor therapy and reoxygenation of the hypoxic pelvic tumor. The two groups of patients were compared as to their general status and medical condition and were found similar in age, frequency of associated disease, body weight and tumor stage. The failures of local control by early 252Cf neutron therapy, occurred in 2 patients with high-stage tumor and severe vascular disease and suggests that tumor response was partly dependent upon the integrity and elasticity of the small vessel system.

  1. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  2. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  3. Cervical cancer screening in adolescents: an evidence-based internet education program for practice improvement among advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, Kim; McKeever, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    The literature reports great variation in the knowledge levels and application of the recent changes of cervical cancer screening guidelines into clinical practice. Evidence-based screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer offers healthcare providers the opportunity to improve practice patterns among female adolescents by decreasing psychological distress as well as reducing healthcare costs and morbidities associated with over-screening. The purpose of this pilot intervention study was to determine the effects of a Web-based continuing education unit (CEU) program on advanced practice nurses' (APNs) knowledge of current cervical cancer screening evidence-based recommendations and their application in practice. This paper presents a process improvement project as an example of a way to disseminate updated evidence-based practice guidelines among busy healthcare providers. This Web-based CEU program was developed, piloted, and evaluated specifically for APNs. The program addressed their knowledge level of cervical cancer and its relationship with high-risk human papillomavirus. It also addressed the new cervical cancer screening guidelines and the application of those guidelines into clinical practice. Results of the study indicated that knowledge gaps exist among APNs about cervical cancer screening in adolescents. However, when provided with a CEU educational intervention, APNs' knowledge levels increased and their self-reported clinical practice behaviors changed in accordance with the new cervical cancer screening guidelines. Providing convenient and readily accessible up-to-date electronic content that provides CEU enhances the adoption of clinical practice guidelines, thereby decreasing the potential of the morbidities associated with over-screening for cervical cancer in adolescents and young women. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  4. Lymphadenectomy in locally advanced cervical cancer study (LiLACS): Phase III clinical trial comparing surgical with radiologic staging in patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumovitz, Michael; Querleu, Denis; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Morice, Philippe; Jhingran, Anuja; Munsell, Mark F; Macapinlac, Homer A; Leblanc, Eric; Martinez, Alejandra; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2014-01-01

    Radiation treatment planning for women with locally advanced cervical cancer (stages IB2-IVA) is often based on positron emission tomography (PET). PET, however, has poor sensitivity in detecting metastases in aortocaval nodes. We have initiated a study with the objective of determining whether pre-therapeutic laparoscopic surgical staging followed by tailored chemoradiation improves survival as compared with PET/computed tomography (CT) radiologic staging alone followed by chemoradiation. This international, multicenter phase III trial will enroll 600 women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer and PET/CT findings showing fluorodeoxyglucose-avid pelvic nodes and fluorodeoxyglucose-negative para-aortic nodes. Eligible patients will be randomized to undergo either pelvic radiotherapy with chemotherapy (standard-of-care arm) or surgical staging via a minimally invasive extraperitoneal approach followed by tailored radiotherapy with chemotherapy (experimental arm). The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points are disease-free survival, short- and long-term morbidity with pre-therapeutic surgical staging, and determination of anatomic locations of metastatic para-aortic nodes in relationship to the inferior mesenteric artery. We believe this study will show that tailored chemoradiation after pre-therapeutic surgical staging improves survival as compared with chemoradiation based on PET/CT in women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  6. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  7. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  8. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  9. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  10. Routine management of locally advanced cervical cancer with concurrent radiation and cisplatin. Five-year results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candelaria Myrna

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, cervical cancer primarily affects socially disadvantaged women. Five randomized trials were the foundation for adopting cisplatin-based chemotherapy during radiation as the standard of care for high-risk patients after primary radical hysterectomy who require adjuvant radiation and for locally advanced patients treated with definitive radiation. These results were obtained in clinical trials performed in carefully prepared academic centers; hence, we sought to determine whether these results could be reproduced when patients were treated on an out-of-protocol basis. Methods We reviewed the files of 294 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received radiation plus weekly cisplatin as routine management between 1999 to 2003, and analyzed treatment compliance, response rate, toxicity, and survival. Results A total of 294 patients who received radiation and cisplatin were analyzed. Mean age was 43.8 years (range, 26–68 years. The majority of cases were squamous cell carcinoma (87.8%, and distribution according to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO stage was as follows: IB2-IIA, 23%; IIB, 53.3%, and IIIB, 23%; there were only two IVA cases. Overall, 96% of patients completed external beam, and intracavitary therapy. The majority of patients (67% received the planned six courses of weekly cisplatin. Complete responses were achieved in 243 (83% patients, whereas 51 (17% had either persistent (32 patients, 10.8% or progressive (19 patients, 6.4% disease. At median follow-up (28 months; range, 2–68 months, 36 patients (12.2% have relapsed (locally 30.5, and systemically, 69.5%. The most common toxicities were hematologic and gastrointestinal, in the majority of cases considered mild-moderate. At median follow-up (28 months; range, 2–68 months, overall and progression-free survival are 76.5 and 67%, respectively. Conclusion Our results support use of chemoradiation with six weekly

  11. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined with radiotherapy for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jun; Luo Jianjun; Zhang Wen; Huang Yong; Li Dengke; Cao Yueyong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical value of interventional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with subsequent pelvic radiotherapy in treating patients with advanced cervical cancer. Methods: According to the therapeutic scheme, 195 patients with phase IIb or beyond advanced cervical cancer were divided into two groups: (1) study group (n = 99), treated with TACE combined with subsequent pelvic radiotherapy (i.e. combination group); (2) control group(n = 96), treated with radiotherapy alone (i. e. radiotherapy alone group). The short-term and long-term clinical results as well as the occurrence of complications were compared between two groups. Results: Different degrees of the tumor shrinkage were found in patients of both groups after treatment. The short-term remission rate of the study group was significantly higher than that of the control group, and the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.012). After the procedure, the anaemia in patients of study group was markedly corrected. The difference in hemoglobin between preoperative levels and postoperative ones was significant (T-test, P < 0.01). Long-term follow-up for 3 years the survival rate of the study group was higher than that of the control group (P = 0.032). Both the recurrence rate and metastatic rate at one and three years after the therapy in the study group were distinctly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05). No significant difference in one-year, five-year survival rate and in five-year recurrent rate existed between two groups. The main short-term complications included digestive untoward reaction, bone marrow depression, hepatic and renal toxicity, etc., which could be well relieved after active symptomatic medication. The long-term complications included radiodermatitis, radiocystitis and / or radioproctitis. The incidence of radiocystitis and radioproctitis in the study group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P

  12. Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with locally advanced high-risk cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzelmann, F.; Henke, G.; Grafenstein, M. von; Weidner, N.; Paulsen, F.; Bamberg, M.; Weinmann, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Staebler, A. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Div. of Gynecologic Pathology; Brucker, S. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Gynecology

    2012-07-15

    Background and purpose: The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the outcome of patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated by adjuvant radiochemotherapy and to determine risk factors for local and distant relapse. Furthermore, acute and late effects of treatment were recorded. Patients and methods: A total of 72 patients with FIGO stages I-III cervical carcinoma were treated by radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and postoperative radiochemotherapy. Only patients with positive pelvic lymph nodes, parametrial involvement, positive margins, or tumor bulk were eligible. Patients were irradiated with a standard pelvic field (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). The majority of patients received platinum-based chemotherapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 37 months, estimated 1-, 2-, and 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 89%, 80%, 68% and 95%, 88%, 76%, respectively. Nine of the 72 patients had pelvic recurrences including only 1 isolated local failure; 23 of the 72 patients presented with distant relapse. The majority of relapses occurred within the first 3 years after adjuvant treatment. The number of positive pelvic lymph nodes (> 1) was the strongest prognostic factor for DFS. Treatment was well tolerated with transient acute hematologic ({proportional_to}30%) and gastrointestinal ({proportional_to}30%) grade 3 toxicity. Small bowel obstruction ({proportional_to}6%) was the only important late sequelae. Conclusion: Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with advanced cervical cancer and several risk factors is highly effective to prevent local relapse. Future efforts to improve outcome should be placed on improvement of systemic control especially in subgroups with high-risk features for distant relapse. Combined treatment was well tolerated with moderate acute and late toxicity. (orig.)

  13. Acute and long-term toxicity following radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, JH; Pras, E; Willemse, PHB; de Vries, EGE

    2003-01-01

    Randomised studies in locally advanced cervical cancer patients showed that cisplatin should be given concurrently with radiotherapy, because of a better long-term survival compared to radiotherapy alone. This increases the relevance of treatment related toxicity. This review summarises the acute

  14. Impact of radiation dose and standardized uptake value of (18)FDG PET on nodal control in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Kroon, Petra S; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite local control now exceeding 90% with image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT), regional and distant metastases continue to curb survival in locally advanced cervical cancer. As regional lymph nodes often represent first site of metastatic spread, improved nodal control could...

  15. Impact of radiation dose and standardized uptake value of (18)FDG PET on nodal control in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Kroon, Petra S; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite local control now exceeding 90% with image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT), regional and distant metastases continue to curb survival in locally advanced cervical cancer. As regional lymph nodes often represent first site of metastatic spread, improved nodal control coul...

  16. Uterus necrosis after radiochemotherapy in two patients with advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnitz, Simone; Köhler, Christhardt; Füller, Jürgen; Hinkelbein, Wolfgang; Schneider, Achim

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous platinum-based radiochemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced or node-positive cancer of the uterine cervix. A large body of literature concerning therapy-related acute and late morbidity is available. Chemoradiation-associated necrosis of the uterus has not been described so far. Two patients are reported who were treated by combined chemoradiation between 2004 and 2005 for histologically confirmed cervical cancer following laparoscopic staging. Both patients were diagnosed with squamous cell cancer of the cervix FIGO stage IIB (T2b pN1 pM1 LYM G2) and FIGO IIIA (T3a pN1 M0 G2), respectively. External-beam radiotherapy was applied in a 3-D-planned four-field technique, covering pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumor. Patient #1 received additional paraaortic irradiation. Patient #2 underwent 5 x 5 Gy brachytherapy covering the tumor. Simultaneously, cisplatin was given to both patients. Following chemoradiation, both patients developed pelvic pain and an elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the presence of a normal leukocyte count. Both patients underwent relaparoscopy, and necrosis of the uterus combined with partial necrosis of the bladder was diagnosed in patient #1. Patient #1 underwent total supralevatoric exenteration and patient #2 laparoscopically assisted hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. In patients with persisting or incident pelvic pain, questionable findings in imaging techniques and/or elevated inflammation parameters following completion of chemoradiation for cervical cancer, differential diagnosis should include radiogenic necrosis of the uterus and other pelvic organs. Laparoscopy is an ideal technique to exclude or confirm this diagnosis.

  17. Uterus necrosis after radiochemotherapy in two patients with advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnitz, S.; Hinkelbein, W.; Koehler, C.; Schneider, A.; Fueller, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Simultaneous platinum-based radiochemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced or node-positive cancer of the uterine cervix. A large body of literature concerning therapy-related acute and late morbidity is available. Chemoradiation-associated necrosis of the uterus has not been described so far. Case Report: Two patients are reported who were treated by combine chemoradiation between 2004 and 2005 for histologically confirmed cervical cancer following laparoscopic staging. Both patients were diagnosed with squamous cell cancer of the cervix FIGO stage IIB (T2b pN1 pM1 LYM G2) and FIGO IIIA (T3a pN1 MO G2), respectively. External-beam radiotherapy was applied in a 3-D-planned four-field technique, covering pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumor. Simultaneously, cisplatin was given to both patients. Following chemoradiation, both patientsdeveloped pelvic pain and an elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the presence of a normal leukocyte count. Both patients underwent relaparoscopy, and necrosis of the uterus combined with partial necrosis of the bladder was diagnosed in patient 1. Patient 1 underwent total supralevatoric exenteration and patient 2 laparoscopically assisted hysterectomy withbilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Conclusion: In patients with persisting or incident pelvic pain, questionable findings in imaging techniques and/or elevated inflammation parameters following completion of chemoradiation for cervical cancer, differential diagnosis should include radiogenic necrosis of the uterus and other pelvic organs. Laparoscopy is an ideal technique to exclude or confirm this diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Lee-May [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Littell, Ramey [Gynecologic Oncology, The Permanente Medical Group, San Francisco, California (United States); Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chan, John K. [Gynecologic Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: ichow.hsu@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  19. Locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer in a patient with septate uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Inan, Gokcen

    2017-10-01

    A 33-year-old premenopausal multiparous woman with the history of septate uterus was referred to the hospital with menorrhagia and inter-menstrual bleeding occurring for the last 6 months. Work-up revealed a stage IIB cervical cancer. The patient underwent curative chemo/radiotherapy. The patient's septate uterus presented several difficulties during application. Brachytherapy was applied using standard computed tomography-compatible tandem and ovoids. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), intermediate risk CTV, and organs at risk were contoured according to the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie - European Society for Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) guidelines. Treatment was performed via 3-dimensional high-dose-rate technique with 192 Ir, with brachytherapy dose of 28 Gy in 4 fractions/7 Gy each, prescribed to the HR-CTV. Treatment was well tolerated with manageable acute toxicities. To the best of our knowledge, the current case is the second case of septate uterus with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Due to the lack of guidelines about brachytherapy applications in patients with uterine anomaly and owing to the anatomical anomaly, brachytherapy application is challenging in this patients population.

  20. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  1. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Screening for cervical cancer using the Pap test has decreased the number of new cases of ... their chance of dying from cervical cancer . A Pap test is commonly used to screen for cervical cancer. ...

  2. Neutrophilia in locally advanced cervical cancer: A novel biomarker for image-guided adaptive brachytherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escande, Alexandre; Haie-Meder, Christine; Maroun, Pierre; Gouy, Sébastien; Mazeron, Renaud; Leroy, Thomas; Bentivegna, Enrica; Morice, Philippe; Deutsch, Eric; Chargari, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the prognostic value of leucocyte disorders in a prospective cohort of cervical cancer patients receiving definitive chemoradiation plus image—guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). Results 113 patients were identified. All patients received a pelvic irradiation concomitant with chemotherapy, extended to the para-aortic area in 13 patients with IVB disease. Neutrophilia and leukocytosis were significant univariate prognostic factors for poorer local failure-free survival (p = 0.000 and p = 0.002, respectively), associated with tumor size, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) and anemia. No effect was shown for distant metastases but leukocytosis and neutrophila were both poor prognostic factors for in-field relapses (p = 0.003 and p 7,500/μl (p = 0.018) were independent factors for poorer survival without local failure, with hazard ratio (HR) of 3.1. Materials and methods We examined patients treated in our Institution between April 2009 and July 2015 by concurrent chemoradiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions +/− lymph node boosts) followed by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided adaptive pulse-dose rate brachytherapy (15 Gy to the intermediate-risk clinical target volume). The prognostic value of pretreatment leucocyte disorders was examined. Leukocytosis and neutrophilia were defined as a leukocyte count or a neutrophils count exceeding 10,000 and 7,500/μl, respectively. Conclusions Neutrophilia is a significant prognostic factor for local relapse in locally advanced cervical cancer treated with MRI-based IGABT. This biomarker could help identifying patients with higher risk of local relapse and requiring dose escalation. PMID:27713124

  3. Nodal involvement evaluation in advanced cervical cancer: a single institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Benitez, C; Zapardiel, I; Salas, P I; Diestro, M D; Hernandez, A; De Santiago, J

    2013-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of different imaging techniques in the detection of nodal involvement in patients with advanced cervical carcinoma. Moreover, to analyze the correlation between the presurgical (FIGO) and postsurgical (pTNM) staging classifications. All patients diagnosed with advanced cervical cancer (FIGO Stages IIB-IV) from 2005 to 2012 were selected. The medical charts of 51 patients that underwent presurgical assessment with posterior surgical staging by means of para-aortic lymphadenectomy, were reviewed. Nodal status assessment by computed tomography scan (CT scan), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and sonography was compared, as well as the size given in imaging techniques compared to the final pathologic report information. Presurgical analysis by CT scan, MRI, PET, and sonography showed pelvic nodal involvement in 51.3% of patients, and para-aortic involvement in 30.8% of cases. CT scan showed positive pelvic nodes in 35% of cases, but pathologic confirmation was observed in just 17.6% of cases. However, MRI resulted in higher rates of up to 48.8% of cases. Concerning para-aortic nodal involvement, CT scan showed positive nodes in 25% of cases, MRI in 3.2% of cases, and the pathologic report in 15.6% of cases. The authors found significant differences between staging groups among both classifications (FIGO vs. pTNM; p < 0.001). Eight cases (15.7%) were understaged by FIGO classification. Despite all imaging techniques available, none has demonstrated to be efficient enough to avoid the systematic study of para-aortic nodal status by means of surgical evaluation.

  4. Transcript Profiling Distinguishes Complete Treatment Responders With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Retana, Jorge; Lasa-Gonsebatt, Federico; Lopez-Urrutia, Eduardo; Coronel-Martínez, Jaime; Cantu De Leon, David; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Perez-Montiel, Delia; Reynoso-Noveron, Nancy; Vazquez-Romo, Rafael; Perez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) mortality is a major public health concern since it is the second cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Patients diagnosed with locally advanced CC (LACC) have an important rate of recurrence and treatment failure. Conventional treatment for LACC is based on chemotherapy and radiotherapy; however, up to 40% of patients will not respond to conventional treatment; hence, we searched for a prognostic gene signature able to discriminate patients who do not respond to the conventional treatment employed to treat LACC. Tumor biopsies were profiled with genome-wide high-density expression microarrays. Class prediction was performed in tumor tissues and the resultant gene signature was validated by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. A 27-predictive gene profile was identified through its association with pathologic response. The 27-gene profile was validated in an independent set of patients and was able to distinguish between patients diagnosed as no response versus complete response. Gene expression analysis revealed two distinct groups of tumors diagnosed as LACC. Our findings could provide a strategy to select patients who would benefit from neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy-based treatment. PMID:25926073

  5. Transcript Profiling Distinguishes Complete Treatment Responders With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernandez-Retana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer (CC mortality is a major public health concern since it is the second cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Patients diagnosed with locally advanced CC (LACC have an important rate of recurrence and treatment failure. Conventional treatment for LACC is based on chemotherapy and radiotherapy; however, up to 40% of patients will not respond to conventional treatment; hence, we searched for a prognostic gene signature able to discriminate patients who do not respond to the conventional treatment employed to treat LACC. Tumor biopsies were profiled with genome-wide high-density expression microarrays. Class prediction was performed in tumor tissues and the resultant gene signature was validated by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. A 27-predictive gene profile was identified through its association with pathologic response. The 27-gene profile was validated in an independent set of patients and was able to distinguish between patients diagnosed as no response versus complete response. Gene expression analysis revealed two distinct groups of tumors diagnosed as LACC. Our findings could provide a strategy to select patients who would benefit from neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy-based treatment.

  6. SCREENING FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    CANCER SCREENING. February 2004 Vol.22 No.2 CME 63. Cervical cancer remains a major health concern worldwide, especially in devel- oping countries. It is the commonest malignancy among black women in South. Africa. The quoted incidence of cervical cancer is approximately 30/100 000 women.1 Mortality is ...

  7. Therapeutic Results of Concurrent Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seung Hee; Suh, Hyun Suk; Yang, Kwang Mo; Lee, Eung Soo; Park, Sung Kwon

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Despite a development for therapeutic machines and advance in modern radiation therapy techniques, locally advanced cervical carcinoma has shown high rate of local failure and poor survival rate. Combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy demonstrated benefit in improving local control and possibly the overall survival. Our study was performed to evaluate effect of concurrent chemoradiation on locally advanced uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials : Twenty six patients with locally advanced stage(FIGO stage IIB with ≥ 5 cm in diameter, III, IVA) were treated with combination of radiation therapy and concurrent cisplatinum between May of 1988 and September of 1993 at our hospital. Radiation therapy consisted of external irradiation and 1-2 sessions of intracavitary irradiation, Cisplatinum was administered in bolus injection of 25mg/m 2 at weekly intervals during the course of external radiation therapy. Results : Of the 26 patients, twenty-five patients were evaluable for estimation of response. Median follow-up period was 25 months with ranges from 3 to 73 months. Stage IIB, III, and IVA were 16, 5,4 patients, respectively. Twenty patients were squamous cell carcinoma. Response was noted in all 25 patients: complete response(CR) in 17/25(68%), partial response(PR) in 8/25(32%). Of the 24 patients except one who died of sepsis at 3 months follow-up, seventeen patients(70.8%) maintained local control in the pelvis: 16/17(94.1%) in CR, 1/17(14.3%) in PR. Fourteen of the 17 patients with CR are alive disease free on the completion of follow-up. Median survival is 28 months for CR and 15 months for PR. Analysis of 5-year survival by stage shows 11/16(59.8) in IIB, 3/5(60.6%) in III, and 1/4(25.0%) in IVA. Overall 5-year survival rate was 55.2%. Ten Patients recurred: 4 at locoregional, 3 in distant metastasis and 3 with locoregional and distant site. Toxicity by addition of cisplatinum was not excessive. Conclusion : Although the result of this

  8. Early clinical outcome of coverage probability based treatment planning for simultaneous integrated boost of nodes in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jacob Chr; Assenholt, Marianne; Ramlov, Anne

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 50% of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) have pathological nodes. Coverage probability (CovP) is a new planning technique allowing for relaxed dose at the boost periphery minimising collateral irradiation. The aim was to report the first early clinical...... remission at 3 months is predictive for favourable long-term nodal control, our study indicates that CovP for SIB is promising....

  9. A STUDY OF COX-2 INHIBITOR CELECOXIB AND CHEMORADIATION IN PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppa Prakash

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To evaluate efficacy of concurrent oral Cox-2 Inhibitor (celecoxib and chemoradiation in locoregional control, distant control, disease free survival and/or overall survival in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. To determine treatment related toxicity rates in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by oral celecoxib, intravenous cisplatin and concurrent pelvic radiation therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study was done for a period of 2 years in a tertiary care cancer hospital which caters to the cancer patients. Advanced squamous, adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma of uterine cervix, Patients with age <70 years, ECOG performance status 0-2, Normal haematological investigations, Normal renal function test, Normal liver function test, No disease outside of pelvis. RESULTS This prospective study consisted 30 patients, 15 patients on either arm. Overall pooled mean age for both study and comparison group was 50.3 years with a probability value P=0.91 for age. 14 patients (93.33% in both the arms had a performance status of ECOG 0 or 1 and 1 patient in both arms had ECOG PS-2. Stage distribution of the patients in study arm was 3 in IB2, 2 in IIA, 5 in IIB, 4 in III and 1 in stage IVA. In control arm, out of the 15 patients 2 are in IB2, 2 in IIA, 5 in IIB, 5 in III and 1 in stage IVA. The mean probability value was P=0.65 for stage distribution. 15 patients in arm-A (study arm received pelvic RT 50Gy 2Gy/Fr 5#/week followed by HDR –ICR 3 Fr. 700 cGy/Fr after pelvic RT on an average of 1 week along with weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m2 (50 mg (D1, D8, D15, D22 and Cox-2 inhibitor oral celecoxib 400 mg twice daily (800 mg/d starting from day 1 to throughout the duration of the chemoradiation. 15 patients in arm-B (Control arm received pelvic RT 50Gy 2Gy/Fr 5#/week followed by HDR –ICR 3 Fr. 700 cGy/Fr on an average of 1 week after pelvic RT along with weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m2 (50 mg (D1, D8, D15, D22

  10. Fludeoxyglucose F 18 PET Scan, CT Scan, and Ferumoxtran-10 MRI Scan Before Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Finding Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer or High-Risk Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  11. National Cancer Data Base Analysis of Radiation Therapy Consolidation Modality for Cervical Cancer: The Impact of New Technological Advancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Lin, Jeff F. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Krivak, Thomas C. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Sukumvanich, Paniti; Laskey, Robin A.; Ross, Malcolm S.; Lesnock, Jamie L. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    locally advanced cervical cancer; however, there has been declining utilization of brachytherapy. Increased use of IMRT and SBRT boost coupled with increased mortality risk should raise concerns about utilizing these approaches over brachytherapy.

  12. Chemo-radiotherapy plus hyperthermia in locally advanced cervical cancer: preliminary results of an institutional phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbani, M.; Marciai, N.; Maluta, S.; Griso, C.; Merlin, F.; Cassandrini, P.; Giudici, S.; Franchi, M.; Zanini, L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radiotherapy given concurrently with a cisplatin-based regimen has shown a benefit in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer so becoming the new standard treatment according to EBM criteria. Addition of hyperthermia to radiotherapy has also been proved to yield an advantage in survival and local control in pts affected by recurrent and local advanced cervical cancer in the Dutch Phase III trial so that the Consensus Forum of Kadota (Osaha June 2004) included cervical cancer among tumors treatable with hyperthermia. In our institutional multidisciplinary team a pilot study has been designed in order to evaluate feasibility, outcome and toxicity of tri-modality treatment in pts with locally advanced cervical cancer in our daily practice. Since January 2003 to now eight patients affected by cervical cancer with stage IB2 through IVA N0-N+ pelvic or paraaortic were entered the study. Six patients were treated at initial diagnosis and two patients after chemotherapy which had achieved stable disease. Treatment regimen consisted in 5 courses of weekly chemotherapy (cisplatin 40 mg/mq) with concurrent external radiotherapy to a total dose of 64-66 Gy on CTV1 and 45 Gy on para-aortic nodes plus boost in pts with enlarged nodes identified by imaging. Five weekly sessions of hyperthermia were performed by using BSD 2000 system and sigma 60 applicator. No significant toxicity occurred and all of the patients completed tri-modality treatment in accordance with the study protocol. Seven pts experienced a complete clinical remission and one patient a partial remission as defined by clinical and imaging examinations. After four months from the end of the treatment a patient with Stage IIB bulky tumor plus one pelvic positive node who was in complete remission (Clinical examination, MRI and TAC-PET three months from the end of the treatment were negative for evidence of disease) developed a bleeding recto-vaginal fistula plus central pelvic necrosis for which an

  13. Cervical Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... term pregnancies have an increased risk of cervical cancer. Using oral contraceptives for a long time Among women who are ... a 10 year period, the risk of cervical cancer returns to that of women who never used oral contraceptives. Smoking cigarettes Among women who are infected with ...

  14. The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjamaegi, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective analyses was performed in a series of patients with advanced cervix cancer. The aim of this analyses was to evaluate the efficiency of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for advanced cervix cancer. For the patients with advanced stages, active multidisciplinary treatment is necessary for local control and suppression of distant metastases

  15. Nanocarriers for the Effective Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Research Advancements and Patent Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Nida; Pathak, Kamla

    2018-04-02

    Cervical cancer being the cancer of cervix is caused by the aberrant cell growth that acquires an ability to spread/ invade to other body parts as well. It has been reported to be the second most commonest cause of death and cancer as well among women. Based on the severity of the disease, treatment aspect needs to be explored more in order to overcome the limitations acquired by conventional treatment. Recently, nanocarriers based drug delivery systems including liposomes, nanofibres, metallic NPs, polymeric NPs, dendrimers, polymeric micelles, antibody-drug conjugates etc. have been explored to target and treat cervical cancer. This review highlights numerous recent research and patent reports as well on nanocarriers based systems. Patents viz US, EP and WIPO have been retrieved using sites www.uspto.gov/patft and www.freepatentsonline.com to collect literature on nanocarriers. Various research reports and patents revealed nanocarriers to be effective in treating cervical cancer and these carriers are observed to be safer than the conventional treatment. Nanocarriers results in transforming drug distribution that can overpower drug resistance. Further, nanocarriers based drug delivery systems can particularly target drugs to cellular, subcellular and tissue sites. By enhancing the drug's bioavailability at the desired site, these systems result in therapeutic benefits like enhanced safety and efficacy. Also, in combination with other treatment approaches like radiation, photothermal and gene therapy, nanocarriers are reported to be quite effective and can define novel strategies to combat cervical cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Chemotherapy-related leukopenia as a biomarker predicting survival outcomes in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Sabatucci, Ilaria; Maltese, Giuseppa; Lecce, Francesca; Signorelli, Mauro; Martinelli, Fabio; Chiappa, Valentina; Indini, Alice; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Borghi, Chiara; Fucà, Giovanni; Ditto, Antonino; Raspagliesi, Francesco; Lorusso, Domenica

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the impact of hematologic toxicity and leukopenia in locally advanced cervical cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Data of consecutive patients undergoing platinum-based NACT followed by surgery were retrospectively searched in order to evaluate the impact of chemotherapy-related toxicity on survival outcomes. Toxicity was graded per the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAEv.4.03). Survival outcomes were evaluated using Kaplan-Meir and Cox hazard models. Overall, 126 patients were included. Among those, 94 (74.6%) patients experienced grade2+ hematologic toxicity; while, grade2+ non-hematologic toxicity occurred in 11 (8.7%) patients. After a median follow-up of 37.1 (inter-quartile range, 12-57.5) months, 21 (16.6%) patients experienced recurrence. Via multivariate analysis, no factor was independently associated with disease-free survival; while a trend toward worse prognosis was observed for patients experiencing grade2+ leukopenia at cycle-3 (HR:3.13 (95%CI: 0.94, 10.3); p=0.06). Similarly, grade2+ leukopenia (HR:9.98 (95%CI: 1.14, 86.6); p=0.03), lymph-node positivity (HR:14.6 (95%CI:1.0, 214.4); p=0.05) and vaginal involvement (HR:5.81 (95%CI:1.43, 23.6); p=0.01) impacted on overall survival, at multivariate analysis. Magnitude of leukopenia correlated with survival (pleukopenia and survival outcomes. NACT-related immunosuppression might reduce the response against the tumor, thus promoting cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nodal-staging surgery for locally advanced cervical cancer in the era of PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouy, Sebastien; Morice, Philippe; Narducci, Fabrice; Uzan, Catherine; Gilmore, Jennifer; Kolesnikov-Gauthier, Hélène; Querleu, Denis; Haie-Meder, Christine; Leblanc, Eric

    2012-05-01

    Chemoradiation therapy is deemed the standard treatment by many North American and European teams for treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. The prevalence of para-aortic nodal metastasis in these tumours is 10-25%. PET (with or without CT) is the most accurate imaging modality to assess extrapelvic disease in such tumours. The true-positive rate of PET is high, suggesting that surgical staging is not necessary if uptake takes place in the para-aortic region. Nevertheless, false-negative results (in the para-aortic region) have been recorded in 12% of patients, rising to 22% in those with uptake during PET of the pelvic nodes. In such situations, laparoscopic surgical para-aortic staging still has an important role for detection of patients with occult para-aortic spread misdiagnosed on PET or PET-CT, allowing optimisation of treatment (extension of radiation therapy fields to include the para-aortic area). Complications of the laparoscopic procedure were noted in 0-7% of patients. Survival of individuals (missed by PET) with para-aortic nodal metastasis of 5 mm or less (and managed by extended field chemoradiation therapy) seems to be similar to survival of those without para-aortic spread, suggesting a positive therapeutic effect of the addition of staging surgery. Nevertheless, the effect on survival of potential delay of chemoradiation owing to use of PET and staging surgery, and acute and late complications of surgery followed by chemoradiation therapy (particularly in case of extended field chemoradiation to para-aortic area), need to be studied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prognostic models for locally advanced cervical cancer: external validation of the published models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, David; Gómez de la Cámara, Agustín; Fernández, Sara Pedraza; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Gómez, José Fermín Pérez Regadera

    2017-09-01

    To externally validate the prognostic models for predicting the time-dependent outcome in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in an independent cohort. A historical cohort of 297 women with LACC who were treated with radical concurrent chemoradiotherapy from 1999 to 2014 at the 12 de Octubre University Hospital (H12O), Madrid, Spain. The external validity of prognostic models was quantified regarding discrimination, calibration, measures of overall performance, and decision curve analyses. The review identified 8 studies containing 13 prognostic models. Different (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stages, parametrium involvement, hydronephrosis, location of positive nodes, and race) but related cohorts with validation cohort (5-year overall survival [OS]=70%; 5-year disease-free survival [DFS]=64%; average age of 50; and over 79% squamous cell) were evaluated. The following models exhibited good external validity in terms of discrimination and calibration but limited clinical utility: the OS model at 3 year from Kidd et al.'s study (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUROC]=0.69; threshold of clinical utility [TCU] between 36% and 50%), the models of DFS at 1 year from Kidd et al.'s study (AUROC=0.64; TCU between 24% and 32%) and 2 years from Rose et al.'s study (AUROC=0.70; TCU between 19% and 58%) and the distant recurrence model at 5 years from Kang et al.'s study (AUROC=0.67; TCU between 12% and 36%). The external validation revealed the statistical and clinical usefulness of 4 prognostic models published in the literature. Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology

  19. SCREENING FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Cervical cancer remains a major health concern worldwide, especially in devel- oping countries. It is the commonest malignancy ... Based on data from Cali, Colombia, the impact of starting cervical screening at different ages shows that starting .... vated blue-white light is attached to the inner aspect of the upper speculum.

  20. Residual rotational set-up errors after daily cone-beam CT image guided radiotherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laursen, Louise Vagner; Elstrøm, Ulrik Vindelev; Vestergaard, Anne; Muren, Ludvig P.; Petersen, Jørgen Baltzer; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Grau, Cai; Tanderup, Kari

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the often quite extended treatment fields in cervical cancer radiotherapy, uncorrected rotational set-up errors result in a potential risk of target miss. This study reports on the residual rotational set-up error after using daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to position cervical cancer patients for radiotherapy treatment. Methods and materials: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced cervical cancer had daily CBCT scans (650 CBCTs in total) prior to treatment delivery. We retrospectively analyzed the translational shifts made in the clinic prior to each treatment fraction as well as the residual rotational errors remaining after translational correction. Results: The CBCT-guided couch movement resulted in a mean translational 3D vector correction of 7.4 mm. Residual rotational error resulted in a target shift exceeding 5 mm in 57 of the 650 treatment fractions. Three patients alone accounted for 30 of these fractions. Nine patients had no shifts exceeding 5 mm and 13 patients had 5 or less treatment fractions with such shifts. Conclusion: Twenty-two of the 25 patients have none or few treatment fractions with target shifts larger than 5 mm due to residual rotational error. However, three patients display a significant number of shifts suggesting a more systematic set-up error.

  1. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  2. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervical cancer: • Cytology: This test, also called a Pap test or Pap smear, looks for abnormal changes in ... women ages 21 to 65, screening with a Pap test every 3 years has the highest benefits with ...

  3. Health seeking behavior of patients diagnosed with cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is increasingly recognized as one of the public health problems among women in developing countries. Most women with cervical cancer are seen in the health care system late with advanced stage of cancer. This study aims to explore the care seeking behavior of women with cervical cancer.

  4. Is extended-field concurrent chemoradiation an option for radiologic negative paraaortic lymph node, locally advanced cervical cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asiri, Mushabbab Al; Tunio, Mutahir A; Mohamed, Reham; Bayoumi, Yasser; Alhadab, Abdulrehman; Saleh, Rasha M; AlArifi, Muhannad Saud; Alobaid, Abdelaziz

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate whether extended-field concurrent chemoradiation (EF-CCRT) leads to results better than those obtained by standard whole-pelvis concurrent chemoradiation (WP-CCRT) in locally advanced cervical cancer with radiologic negative paraaortic lymph nodes (PALNs). A total of 102 patients with histopathologically proven squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, or adenosquamous cell carcinoma, and radiologic negative PALN locally advanced cervical cancer, stage IIB-IVA, were accrued between July 2007 and April 2008 and were randomly assigned to WP-CCRT (50 patients) or EF-CCRT (52 patients), followed by high-dose rate brachytherapy. Data regarding the safety profile, response rates, and occurrence of local, PALN, or distant failure were recorded. During a median follow-up time of 60 months (18–66), 74/102 patients completed the treatment protocol and were analyzed. Overall PALN, distant-metastasis control, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were 97.1%, 86.9%, 80.3%, and 72.4% in EF-CCRT respectively in comparison with WP-CCRT (82.1%,74.7%, 69.1%, and 60.4%), with P-values of 0.02, 0.03, 0.03 and 0.04 respectively. No difference in acute toxicity profile was seen between the groups, and late toxicities were mild and minimal. Prophylactic EF-CCRT can be a reasonable option in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer with radiologic positive pelvic lymph nodes and radiologic negative PALN

  5. Preventing cervical cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer remains the most common cancer diagnosed in women in southern Africa, with an estimated lifetime risk of 1 in. 26.1. Unfortunately most of these cancers are also diagnosed at a late stage, with subsequent poor prognosis for long-term survival. This very high incidence is particularly sad in an era where.

  6. Risk Factors for Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramlov, Anne, E-mail: anraml@rm.dk [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Erik Morre; Røhl, Lisbeth [Department of Radiotherapy, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Worm, Esben [Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Fokdal, Lars; Lindegaard, Jacob Chr. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Tanderup, Kari [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of and risk factors for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after definitive chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 101 patients with LACC treated from 2008-2014. Patients received weekly cisplatin and underwent external beam radiation therapy with 45 Gy in 25 fractions (node-negative patients) or 50 Gy in 25 fractions with a simultaneous integrated boost of 60 Gy in 30 fractions (node-positive patients). Pulsed dose rate magnetic resonance imaging guided adaptive brachytherapy was given in addition. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging was performed routinely at 3 and 12 months after the end of treatment or based on clinical indication. PIF was defined as a fracture line with or without sclerotic changes in the pelvic bones. D{sub 50%} and V{sub 55Gy} were calculated for the os sacrum and jointly for the os ileum and pubis. Patient- and treatment-related factors including dose were analyzed for correlation with PIF. Results: The median follow-up period was 25 months. The median age was 50 years. In 20 patients (20%), a median of 2 PIFs (range, 1-3 PIFs) were diagnosed; half were asymptomatic. The majority of the fractures were located in the sacrum (77%). Age was a significant risk factor (P<.001), and the incidence of PIF was 4% and 37% in patients aged ≤50 years and patients aged >50 years, respectively. Sacrum D{sub 50%} was a significant risk factor in patients aged >50 years (P=.04), whereas V{sub 55Gy} of the sacrum and V{sub 55Gy} of the pelvic bones were insignificant (P=.33 and P=.18, respectively). A dose-effect curve for sacrum D{sub 50%} in patients aged >50 years showed that reduction of sacrum D{sub 50%} from 40 Gy{sub EQD2} to 35 Gy{sub EQD2} reduces PIF risk from 45% to 22%. Conclusions: PIF is common after treatment of LACC and is mainly seen in patients aged >50 years. Our data indicate that PIFs are not related to lymph node

  7. Radiosensitizers in cervical cancer. Cisplatin and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetina Lucely

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cervical cancer continues to be a significant health burden worldwide. Globally, the majority of cancers are locally advanced at diagnosis; hence, radiation remains the most frequently used therapeutical modality. Currently, the value of adding cisplatin or cisplatin-based chemotherapy to radiation for treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer is strongly supported by randomized studies and meta-analyses. Nevertheless, despite these significant achievements, therapeutic results are far from optimal; thus, novel therapies need to be assayed. A strategy currently being investigated is the use of newer radiosensitizers alone or in combination with platinum compounds. In the present work, we present preclinical information on known and newer cytotoxic agents as radiosensitizers on cervical cancer models, as well as the clinical information emanating from early phase trials that incorporate them to the cervical cancer management. In addition, we present the perspectives on the combined approach of radiation therapy and molecular target-based drugs with proven radiosensitizing capacity.

  8. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with bleomycin, ifosfamide and nedaplatin (NAC-BIN) followed by radiotherapy in locoregionally advanced uterine cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toita, Takafumi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Adachi, Genki; Nishikuramori, Yukiko; Murayama, Sadayuki [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-06-01

    Twelve patients with locoregionally advanced uterine cervical cancer (IIIB: 10, IVA: 2) were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of bleomycin, ifosfamide, and nedaplatin (NAC-BIN) and full dose radical radiotherapy. NAC-BIN achieved one complete response and seven partial responses, for a response rate of 67%. Hematologic toxicity was the most common side effect. Five experienced grade 3{<=}leukopenia, and three had grade 3{<=}anemia. With the mean follow-up of 25 months (range: 9-52 months), nine of 12 patients developed recurrence. Eight had pelvic recurrence alone, and one had both pelvic recurrence and distant metastases. The 2-year pelvic control rate, disease-free survival rate (DFS), and absolute survival rate (AS) were 25%, 25%, and 42%, respectively. The 2-year DFS and AS for patients who responded well to NAC-BIN (CR+PR) was 38% and 63%, whereas for those with a poor response (NC) were 0%. From these results, we consider that preoperative NAC-BIN should not be indicated for patients with unresectable stage (stage III{<=}) uterine cervical cancer, because poor responders must subsequently be treated with definitive radiotherapy and may suffer poor prognosis. (author)

  9. Impact of incomplete plan to treatment results of concurrent weekly cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tharavichitkul, E.; Lorvidhaya, V.; Kamnerdsupaphon, P.; Pukanhaphan, N.; Sukthomya, V.; Chitapanarax, I.; Pinitpatcharalerd, A.; Galalae, R.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of incomplete treatment protocols of cisplatin in concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced cervical carcinoma. This retrospective study was performed in 165 consecutively treated patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received a weekly cisplatin regimen. The number of weekly cisplatin cycles of each patient was recorded and used to discriminate between patients. Local control, disease free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and toxicities were calculated using the software package SPSS version 15.0. Ninety-two patients (55%) completed the planned protocol of six cycles of weekly cisplatin. With the median follow-up time of 38.2 months, the 3-year local control rate differed significantly in the two patient groups (95.4% of 6 cycles versus 84.8% of <6 cycles; p=0.028). No statistical significance was observed for disease-free survival (74.6% versus 74.5%; p=0.22) and distant metastasis-free survival (76.5% vs. 75.7%; p=0.88). In conclusion, the plan completion of concurrent cisplatin with radiotherapy was responsible for better local control. However, differences in disease-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival were not statistical significant. (author)

  10. Prevent Cervical Cancer!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-08

    Cervical cancer can be prevented. Listen as two friends—one a doctor—talk about screening tests and early detection. Learn what test you might need.  Created: 1/8/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/8/2015.

  11. Therapeutic effect of intra-arterial chemotherapy with DDP and 5-FU via bilateral uterine arteries for advanced uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Kang; Li Xiaoguang; Jin Zhengyu; Yang Ning; Liu Wei; Pan Jie; Zhang Xiaobo; Shi Haifeng; Sun Hao; Wang Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of intra-arterial chemotherapy with Ddp and 5-Fu via bilateral uterine arteries for advanced uterine cervical cancer. Methods: During the period of Jan. 2006-Jan. 2009, initial intra-arterial chemotherapy by using a combination of Ddp and 5-Fu via bilateral uterine arteries was performed in 72 patients (mean age 42.9 years) with advanced uterine cervical caner. Of 72 patients, stage I b2 cervical cancer was confirmed in 28, stage II a in 12 and stage II b in 32. Pathologically, cervical squamous cell carcinoma was seen in 56 and cervical adenocarcinoma in 16 patients. Ultrasonography and physical examination were conducted both before and after intra-arterial chemotherapy. The therapeutic results,complications,the surgical resection rate and the pathologic findings were observed and statistically analyzed. Results: Fifty-four patients received one treatment course and 18 patients received two treatment courses. The over all response rate was 77.8%. The response rates of patients with I b2, II a and II b cervical cancer were 92.9%, 83.3% and 62.5% respectively, the difference between three groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). And the response rates of patients with squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma were 85.7% and 50.0% respectively, the difference between the two was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The most common side-effects included gastrointestinal symptoms and bone marrow suppression. Thirty-four patients received radical hysterectomy,among them, 22 (78.6%) had stage I b2, 8 (66.7%) had stage II a and 4 (12.5%) had stage II b cervical cancer (P < 0.05). Pathologic exam found no vaginal invasion and ovarian metastasis in all 34 patients. The occurrence of metastasis to lymph nodes and para uterine infiltration were 17.6% and 11.8% respectively. Conclusion: Intra-arterial chemotherapy with a combination of DDP and 5-Fu via bilateral uterine arteries can safely and effectively reduce the

  12. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyan; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Wenwen; Shen, Zhaojun; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer. PMID:27354763

  13. January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Global Health supports global activities to advance global cancer research, build expertise, and leverage resources across nations to address the challenges of cancer and reduce cancer deaths worldwide. Towards these aims, NCI has partnered with Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, a global organization founded on public-private partnerships dedicated to saving women’s lives by advancing prevention, screening, and treatment for breast and cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

  14. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  15. Future Directions - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about possible changes in cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  16. Results of combined therapy of irradiation and bleomycin suppository for advanced uterine cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Haruo; Asakawa, Hiroshi; Otawa, Hirokazu; Nemoto, Kenji; Saito, Hiroyuki (Miyagi Prefectural Adult Disease Center, Natori (Japan))

    1984-09-01

    Efficacy, survival rates and adverse effects of the combined therapy of irradiation with intravaginal bleomycin suppositories were analyzed and discussed in 49 patients with uterine cervical cancer. The results were as follows: 1. Histological examination of biopsy specimens from the uterine cervix taken just after the completion of this treatment showed favorable control over the primary lesions. However, the efficacy of the bleomycin suppositories was too mild to form a basis for treatment without intracavitary irradiation. Because of the low concentration of bleomycin in serum after suppository administration, it is thought that bleomycin would have little effect on distant metastases. 2. Survival rates in stage III patients were 83% at 12 months, 77% at 24 months and 70% at 36 months. These were superior to those for irradiation alone. 3. The major adverse effect of bleomycin suppositories was fever, reduction of the bleomycin dose in each suppository but controlled this to some extent Lung fibrosis or severe damage to the liver, kidney and bone marrow were not found.

  17. Results of combined therapy of irradiation and bleomycin suppository for advanced uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Haruo; Asakawa, Hiroshi; Otawa, Hirokazu; Nemoto, Kenji; Saito, Hiroyuki

    1984-01-01

    Efficacy, survival rats and adverse effects of the combined therapy of irradiation with intravaginal bleomycin suppositories were analyzed and discussed in 49 patients with uterine cervical cancer. The results were as follows: 1. Histological examination of biopsy specimens from the uterine cervix taken just after the completion of this treatment showed favorable control over the primary lesions. However, the efficacy of the bleomycin suppositories was too mild to form a basis for treatment without intracavitary irradiation. Because of the low concentration of bleomycin in serum after suppository administration, it is thought that bleomycin would have little effect on distant metastases. 2. Survival rates in stage III patients were 83% at 12 months, 77% at 24 months and 70% at 36 months. These were superior to those for irradiation alone. 3. The major adverse effect of bleomycin suppositories was fever, reduction of the bleomycin dose in each suppository but controlled this to some extent Lung fibrosis or severe damage to the liver, kidney and bone marrow were not found. (author)

  18. Economic burden of cervical cancer in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifa E.W. Puteh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancers form the second highest number of female cancers in Malaysia, imposing a substantial amount of cost burden on its management. However, an estimation of cost burden of abnormal smears, cervical pre-invasive and invasive diseases needs to be done to show how much spending has been allocated to the problem. An expert panel committee came up with the clinical pathway and management algorithm of  cervical pre invasive and invasive diseases from July-December 2006 Malaysia. An activity based costing for each clinical pathway was done. Results were converted to USD. The cost of managing pre-invasive cervical cancers stage is USD 420,150 (Range: USD 197,158-879,679. Management of invasive cancer (new cases costs USD 51,533,233.44 (Range: USD 32,405,399.69 - USD 129,014,768.40. The cost of managing existing cases is USD 17,005,966.87 (Range: USD 10,693,781.90 - USD  28,901,587.12. The total cost of managing cervical cancers by health care providers in a public setting is around USD 75,888,329.45 (Range: USD 48,083,804.60 - USD 48,083,804.60. The outcome of this study has shown that preventive modalities such as screening have only contributed to 10.3 % of the total management cost of cervical cancer. The major cost contribution (67% came from treatment of invasive cancer especially at more advanced stages of cancer, followed by treatment of existing cases (22% and lastly on pre-invasive disease (0.6%. This study revealed that proportion of preventive modality in this country was still low, and the major cost came from actual treatment cost of cervical cancer. Therefore, heightened public cervical cancer screening in the country is needed. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 272-80Keywords: cervical cancers, pre invasive disease, HPV vaccination

  19. Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  20. Conventional and conformal technique of external beam radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: Dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutrikah, N.; Winarno, H.; Amalia, T.; Djakaria, M.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare conventional and conformal techniques of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of the dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on cervical cancer patients who underwent EBRT before brachytherapy in the Radiotherapy Department of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. The prescribed dose distribution, tumor response, and acute side effects of EBRT using conventional and conformal techniques were investigated. In total, 51 patients who underwent EBRT using conventional techniques (25 cases using Cobalt-60 and 26 cases using a linear accelerator (LINAC)) and 29 patients who underwent EBRT using conformal techniques were included in the study. The distribution of the prescribed dose in the target had an impact on the patient’s final response to EBRT. The complete response rate of patients to conformal techniques was significantly greater (58%) than that of patients to conventional techniques (42%). No severe acute local side effects were seen in any of the patients (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grades 3-4). The distribution of the dose and volume to the gastrointestinal tract affected the proportion of mild acute side effects (RTOG grades 1-2). The urinary bladder was significantly greater using conventional techniques (Cobalt-60/LINAC) than using conformal techniques at 72% and 78% compared to 28% and 22%, respectively. The use of conformal techniques in pelvic radiation therapy is suggested in radiotherapy centers with CT simulators and 3D Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (RTPSs) to decrease some uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. The use of AP/PA pelvic radiation techniques with Cobalt-60 should be limited in body thicknesses equal to or less than 18 cm. When using conformal techniques, delineation should be applied in the small bowel, as it is considered a critical organ according to RTOG

  1. Cispaltino in radiotherapy and treatment of cancer advanced cervical and high risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini, A.; Mara, C.; Terradas, M.; Ferreira, V.; Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Fulltext: Uterine cervix cancer (CCU) is a frequent disease Uruguay, killing more than 100 women per year. The standard treatment CCU for patients with locoregionally advanced cataloged as (LRA), stages IIB-IVA and operated and in those patients with high risk factors relapse (AFR) was until 1999 the radiotherapy (RT) exclusive. in February that year the National Cancer Institute USA underwent a medical alert recommending the use of chemotherapy (CT) with concomitant RT (mainly cisplatin) in this group of patients. This alert was due to the publication of 5 randomized work showing an improvement in both the locoregional control and overall survival. In June 2000, both the RT Service ospital and Clinics in INDO, I modified the standard treatment of these patients by adding cisplatin 40mg/m2 weekly for the treatment of external RT. From that date until January 2003, 36 patients were included with CCU LRA or operated with AFR. the risk factors were: tumors larger than 4cm, parametrial invasion, lymph positive, involved margins, suboptimal surgery or deep infiltration stroma. 18 patients had stage IIIB or IV and of which 6 had failure obstructive acute renal (acute obstructive renal failure). Tolerance was acceptable, only one patient not tolerated treatment for severe leucopenia continuing exclusive RT; 68% had leukopenia grade - 2 and there was no increase in toxicity gastrointestinal or urinary. There were no treatment related deaths. When comparing historical results verified an improvement in complete answers to all stages primarily for advanced in the second period with the addition of cisplatin. Stage IB2-IIB: 52% (RT-CT) - 45% RT (historical) ns. Stage IIB: 22% (RT-CT) - 15% RT (historical) sl. In those patients with acute obstructive renal failure in any complete response was not achieved. Due to the short track differences still not tested for the surviving whole or survive disease-free

  2. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy with combined intracavitary and interstitial technique improves the therapeutic ratio in locally advanced cervical cancer: Analysis from the retroEMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LU, Fokdal; Sturdza, Alina; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) applicat......Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC....../IS) applicators. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the impact on local control and late morbidity of application of combined IS/IC brachytherapy in a large multicentre population. Material/methods 610 patients with LACC from the retroEMBRACE study were included. Patients were divided into an IC group (N...

  3. The effect of logotherapy on the expressions of cortisol, HSP70, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and pain scales in advanced cervical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetrisno; Sulistyowati, Sri; Ardhianto, Adhitya; Hadi, Syamsul

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to analyze the effect of logotherapy on the expression of cortisol, HSP70, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and to conduct pain assessments in advanced cervical cancer patients. We carried out this research through pretest-posttest control-group design on the expression of cortisol, HSP70, the BDI, and pain scales after a patient receives logotherapy treatment. Based on a comparative test conducted with the two groups before the treatment, there is no significant difference (p > .05). There is a significant difference (p logotherapy affects the expression of cortisol, BDI, and pain scales in advanced cervical cancer patients, and that it does not affect the expression of HSP70.

  4. Practical aspects of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillaart, Sabrina Ada Hendrika Maria van den

    2013-01-01

    The thesis describes studies on practical aspects of cervical cancer, concering surgical considerations, and aspects of tumour behaviour and tumour spread. The thesis comprises studies on: the comparison of nerve-sparing and non-nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer; a new surgical

  5. Repeat CT-scan assessment of lymph node motion in locally advanced cervical cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, Luiza; Velema, Laura; Mens, Jan Willem; Heijmen, Ben; Hoogeman, Mischa [Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, 3008 AE, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Zwijnenburg, Ellen [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    In cervical cancer patients the nodal clinical target volume (CTV, defined using the major pelvic blood vessels and enlarged lymph nodes) is assumed to move synchronously with the bony anatomy. The aim of this study was to verify this assumption by investigating the motion of the major pelvic blood vessels and enlarged lymph nodes visible in CT scans. For 13 patients treated in prone position, four variable bladder-filling CT scans per patient, acquired at planning and after 40 Gy, were selected from an available dataset of 9-10 CT scans. The bladder, rectum, and the nodal-vessels structure containing the iliac vessels and all visible enlarged nodes were delineated in each selected CT scan. Two online patient setup correction protocols were simulated. The first corrected bony anatomy translations and the second corrected translations and rotations. The efficacy of each correction was calculated as the overlap between the nodal-vessels structure in the reference and repeat CT scans. The motion magnitude between delineated structures was quantified using nonrigid registration. Translational corrections resulted in an average overlap of 58 ± 13% and in a range of motion between 9.9 and 27.3 mm. Translational and rotational corrections significantly improved the overlap (64 ± 13%, p value = 0.007) and moderately reduced the range of motion to 7.6-23.8 mm (p value = 0.03). Bladder filling changes significantly correlated with the nodal-vessels motion (p < 0.001). The motion of the nodal-vessels was large, nonrigid, patient-specific, and only moderately synchronous with the bony anatomy. This study highlights the need for caution when reducing the CTV-to-PTV (PTV planning target volume) margin of the nodal CTV for highly conformal radiation techniques. (orig.) [German] Bei Zervixkarzinompatientinnen wird davon ausgegangen, dass das nodale klinische Zielvolumen (CTV, definiert anhand der grossen Blutgefaesse des Beckens und vergroesserter Lymphknoten) sich synchron mit

  6. [Primary cervical cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel; Tovar-Rodríguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Cervico-uterine cancer screening with cytology decrease incidence by more than 50%. The cause of this cancer is the human papilloma virus high risk, and requires a sensitive test to provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection and greater interval period when the results are negative. The test of the human papilloma virus high risk, is effective and safe because of its excellent sensitivity, negative predictive value and optimal reproducibility, especially when combined with liquid-based cytology or biomarkers with viral load, with higher sensitivity and specificity, by reducing false positives for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater injury, with excellent clinical benefits to cervical cancer screening and related infection of human papilloma virus diseases, is currently the best test for early detection infection of human papillomavirus and the risk of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of Advanced or Recurrent Cervical Cancer with Cisplatin or Cisplatin Containing Regimens: A Cost Effective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Geisler, Jayanth Swathirajan, Katherine L. Wood, Kelly J. Manahan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trials have demonstrated improvements in survival with adding paclitaxel (P or topotecan (T to cisplatin (C for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. We sought to evaluate the cost effectiveness of these regimens.Methods: A decision model was developed based on Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG protocols 169 and 179. Arm 1 is 6 cycles of cisplatin. Arm 2 is 6 cycles of CP while arm 3 is 6 cycles of CT. Parameters include overall survival (OS, cost and complications. Sensitivity analyses were performed.Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for C versus CP is $13,654/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY gained. For CT compared to C, the ICER is $152,327/QALY. When compared simultaneously, CT is dominated. At a willingness to pay (WTP threshold of $50,000/QALY, C is the preferred option but CP is acceptable. Sensitivity analyses suggest that CT would become the preferred option if it was to improve OS to 24 months (compared to 9.4 months.Conclusions: In this model, CP is an acceptable alternative to cisplatin for the treatment of these patients with an increase in cost of only $13,654/QALY. The addition of topotecan did not increase survival enough to justify the increased cost.

  8. Pharmacokinetic analysis and k-means clustering of DCEMR images for radiotherapy outcome prediction of advanced cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Erlend K F; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCEMRI) allows for quantitative characterization of vascular properties of tumors. The aim of this study is twofold, first to determine if tumor regions with similar vascularization could be labeled by clustering methods, second to determine if the identified regions can be associated with local cancer relapse. Eighty-one patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy underwent DCEMRI with Gd-DTPA prior to external beam radiotherapy. The median follow-up time after treatment was four years, in which nine patients had primary tumor relapse. By fitting a pharmacokinetic two-compartment model function to the temporal contrast enhancement in the tumor, two pharmacokinetic parameters, K(trans) and ύ(e), were estimated voxel by voxel from the DCEMR-images. Intratumoral regions with similar vascularization were identified by k-means clustering of the two pharmacokinetic parameter estimates over all patients. The volume fraction of each cluster was used to evaluate the prognostic value of the clusters. Three clusters provided a sufficient reduction of the cluster variance to label different vascular properties within the tumors. The corresponding median volume fraction of each cluster was 38%, 46% and 10%. The second cluster was significantly associated with primary tumor control in a log-rank survival test (p-value: 0.042), showing a decreased risk of treatment failure for patients with high volume fraction of voxels. Intratumoral regions showing similar vascular properties could successfully be labeled in three distinct clusters and the volume fraction of one cluster region was associated with primary tumor control.

  9. Pharmacokinetic analysis and k-means clustering of DCEMR images for radiotherapy outcome prediction of advanced cervical cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Erlend K. F.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCEMRI) allows for quantitative characterization of vascular properties of tumors. The aim of this study is twofold, first to determine if tumor regions with similar vascularization could be labeled by clustering methods, second to determine if the identified regions can be associated with local cancer relapse. Materials and methods. Eighty-one patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy underwent DCEMRI with Gd-DTPA prior to external beam radiotherapy. The median follow-up time after treatment was four years, in which nine patients had primary tumor relapse. By fitting a pharmacokinetic two-compartment model function to the temporal contrast enhancement in the tumor, two pharmacokinetic parameters, K trans and u e , were estimated voxel by voxel from the DCEMR-images. Intratumoral regions with similar vascularization were identified by k-means clustering of the two pharmacokinetic parameter estimates over all patients. The volume fraction of each cluster was used to evaluate the prognostic value of the clusters. Results. Three clusters provided a sufficient reduction of the cluster variance to label different vascular properties within the tumors. The corresponding median volume fraction of each cluster was 38%, 46% and 10%. The second cluster was significantly associated with primary tumor control in a log-rank survival test (p-value: 0.042), showing a decreased risk of treatment failure for patients with high volume fraction of voxels. Conclusions. Intratumoral regions showing similar vascular properties could successfully be labeled in three distinct clusters and the volume fraction of one cluster region was associated with primary tumor control

  10. Triapine, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer or Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  11. Cervical Cancer: Reality and Paradigm Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Quiñones Ceballos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive cervical carcinoma usually reaches its highest frequency between 35-50 years of age. The Cuban prevention program screens the female population aged 25 to 60 years using the Pap smear and reexamines them every three years. Despite this effort, advanced cancer is diagnosed in young women as well as in those 40 to 60 years of age.

  12. Cervical cancer screening among Southeast Asian American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ivy K; Dinh, Khanh T

    2011-02-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer is high among Southeast Asian American women, but their participation in preventive cervical cancer screening is alarmingly low. This paper reviews the literature on factors associated with participation in cervical cancer screening among women of Vietnamese, Cambodian and Hmong descent in the United States. These factors include acculturation, age, marital status, knowledge about cervical cancer, apprehension about cervical cancer screening, financial concerns, access to health care, and physician characteristics and recommendation. Suggestions for future research include the need to investigate the role of physicians treating Southeast Asian American women, the need for more extensive up-to-date studies on the current generation of young Southeast Asian American women, and the use of more advanced assessments of acculturation. Overall, much more work is needed in order to deepen our understanding of the various ways to improve the rate of cervical cancer screening among Southeast Asian American women.

  13. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  14. The Perceptions Of Traditional Healers Of Cervical Cancer Care At ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to explore and describe the perceptions of traditional healers of cervical cancer care. The incidence of cervical cancer, especially among black South African females, is among the highest in the world. Women report at clinics and hospitals on a daily basis with advanced stages (stages III and IV) ...

  15. Therapeutic vaccination for HPV induced cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Joeli A; Hughes, Sarah H; Stone, Pamela; Caffrey, Angela S; Muderspach, Laila I; Roman, Lynda D; Weber, Jeffrey S; Kast, W Martin

    2007-01-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  16. January Monthly Spotlight: Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    In January, CRCHD joins the nation in raising awareness for Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities. This month we share a special focus on NCI/CRCHD research programs that are trying to reduce cervical cancer disparities in underserved communities and the people who are spreading the word about the importance of early detection.

  17. Cervical cancer screening at crossroads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Rygaard, Carsten; Baillet, Miguel Vazquez-Prada

    2014-01-01

    Cervical screening has been one of the most successful public health prevention programmes. For 50 years, cytology formed the basis for screening, and detected cervical intraepithelial lesions (CIN) were treated surgically to prevent progression to cancer. In a high-risk country as Denmark......, screening decreased the incidence of cervical cancer from 34 to 11 per 100,000, age-standardized rate (World Standard Population). Screening is, however, also expensive; Denmark (population: 5.6 million) undertakes close to half a million tests per year, and has 6-8 CIN-treated women for each prevented...... cancer case. The discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the cause of cervical cancer dramatically changed perspectives for disease control. Screening with HPV testing was launched around 1990, and preventive HPV vaccination was licensed in 2006. Long-term randomized controlled trials (RCT...

  18. Cervical Dysplasia: Is It Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical dysplasia: Is it cancer? I had a Pap test recently, and my doctor said the results showed ... the appearance of the abnormal cells. On the Pap test report, this will be reported as a low- ...

  19. Cervical Cancer Screening - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Screening - English PDF It's a Simple Test - Cervical Cancer Screening - español (Spanish) PDF American Cancer Society Ukrainian (українська ) Expand Section Female Exam and Pap Smear - українська (Ukrainian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Urdu ( ...

  20. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeli A. Brinkman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  2. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  3. Expression of PD-L1 and presence of CD8-positive T cells in pre-treatment specimens of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwere, Emeka K; Kornaga, Elizabeth N; Dean, Michelle; Koulis, Theodora A; Phan, Tien; Kalantarian, Maria; Köbel, Martin; Ghatage, Prafull; Magliocco, Anthony M; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Doll, Corinne M

    2017-04-01

    Several of the cancer immunotherapies under investigation or in clinical use target the programmed death-ligand 1/programmed death-1 (PD-L1/PD-1) signaling axis. PD-L1 expression in tumor samples has been used as a predictive marker for response to these therapeutics, and may also have independent prognostic utility when assessed along with immune cell markers. Our objectives were to assess the expression of PD-L1 in tumor specimens from a uniformly treated patient cohort with locally advanced cervical cancer, and to determine its prognostic significance along with the density of tumor-infiltrating T cells. We identified 120 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radical chemoradiotherapy, and built tissue microarrays from their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pre-treatment biopsies. We used conventional brightfield and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to detect PD-L1, and quantified protein expression using both manual pathologist scoring and automated software analysis. We also evaluated the effect of PD-L1 expression in tumors, along with the presence and density of intra-tumoral CD8 + T cells, on patient survival outcomes. Approximately 96% of the tumor samples expressed PD-L1, as determined using quantitative software analysis. Neither expression of PD-L1 nor density of CD8 + T cells was associated with progression-free or overall survival. However, there was a trend towards worse progression-free survival in patients whose tumors expressed PD-L1 but lacked CD8 + T cells (hazard ratio=0.43 (0.18-1.01), P=0.053). Nevertheless, the high percentage of cervical cancer tumor samples expressing PD-L1 suggests that anti-PD-L1 or anti-PD-1 therapies are potential treatment options for this patient population.

  4. The significance of tumoral ERCC1 status in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy: a multicenter clinicopathologic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Corinne M; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Pintilie, Melania; Klimowicz, Alexander C; Petrillo, Stephanie K; Milosevic, Michael; Craighead, Peter S; Clarke, Blaise; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Fyles, Anthony W; Magliocco, Anthony M

    2013-03-01

    ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) expression has been shown to be a molecular marker of cisplatin resistance in many tumor sites, but has not been well studied in cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to measure tumoral ERCC1 in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in a large multicenter cohort, and to correlate expression with clinical outcome parameters. A total of 264 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated with curative-intent radical CRT from 3 major Canadian cancer centers were evaluated. Pretreatment formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens were retrieved, and tissue microarrays were constructed. Tumoral ERCC1 (FL297 antibody) was measured using AQUA (R) technology. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance of clinical factors and ERCC1 status with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. The majority of patients had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage II disease (n=119, 45%); median tumor size was 5 cm. OS was associated with tumor size (HR 1.16, P=.018), pretreatment hemoglobin status (HR 2.33, P=.00027), and FIGO stage. In addition, tumoral ERCC1 status (nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio) was associated with PFS (HR 2.33 [1.05-5.18], P=.038) and OS (HR 3.13 [1.27-7.71], P=.013). ERCC1 status was not significant on multivariate analysis when the model was adjusted for the clinical factors: for PFS (HR 1.49 [0.61-3.6], P=.38); for OS (HR 2.42 [0.94-6.24] P=.067). In this large multicenter cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with radical CRT, stage, tumor size, and pretreatment hemoglobin status were significantly associated with PFS and OS. ERCC1 status appears to have prognostic impact on univariate analysis in these patients, but was not independently associated with outcome on multivariate analysis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier

  5. The Significance of Tumoral ERCC1 Status in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy: A Multicenter Clinicopathologic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, Corinne M., E-mail: Corinne.Doll@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Aquino-Parsons, Christina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pintilie, Melania [Department of Biostatistics, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Klimowicz, Alexander C. [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Petrillo, Stephanie K. [Department of Pathology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Milosevic, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Craighead, Peter S. [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Clarke, Blaise [Department of Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Lees-Miller, Susan P. [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Fyles, Anthony W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Magliocco, Anthony M. [Department of Pathology, Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) expression has been shown to be a molecular marker of cisplatin resistance in many tumor sites, but has not been well studied in cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to measure tumoral ERCC1 in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in a large multicenter cohort, and to correlate expression with clinical outcome parameters. Methods and Materials: A total of 264 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated with curative-intent radical CRT from 3 major Canadian cancer centers were evaluated. Pretreatment formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens were retrieved, and tissue microarrays were constructed. Tumoral ERCC1 (FL297 antibody) was measured using AQUA (R) technology. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance of clinical factors and ERCC1 status with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. Results: The majority of patients had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage II disease (n=119, 45%); median tumor size was 5 cm. OS was associated with tumor size (HR 1.16, P=.018), pretreatment hemoglobin status (HR 2.33, P=.00027), and FIGO stage. In addition, tumoral ERCC1 status (nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio) was associated with PFS (HR 2.33 [1.05-5.18], P=.038) and OS (HR 3.13 [1.27-7.71], P=.013). ERCC1 status was not significant on multivariate analysis when the model was adjusted for the clinical factors: for PFS (HR 1.49 [0.61-3.6], P=.38); for OS (HR 2.42 [0.94-6.24] P=.067). Conclusions: In this large multicenter cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with radical CRT, stage, tumor size, and pretreatment hemoglobin status were significantly associated with PFS and OS. ERCC1 status appears to have prognostic impact on univariate analysis in these patients, but was not independently associated with outcome on

  6. The Significance of Tumoral ERCC1 Status in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy: A Multicenter Clinicopathologic Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, Corinne M.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Pintilie, Melania; Klimowicz, Alexander C.; Petrillo, Stephanie K.; Milosevic, Michael; Craighead, Peter S.; Clarke, Blaise; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Fyles, Anthony W.; Magliocco, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) expression has been shown to be a molecular marker of cisplatin resistance in many tumor sites, but has not been well studied in cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to measure tumoral ERCC1 in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in a large multicenter cohort, and to correlate expression with clinical outcome parameters. Methods and Materials: A total of 264 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated with curative-intent radical CRT from 3 major Canadian cancer centers were evaluated. Pretreatment formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens were retrieved, and tissue microarrays were constructed. Tumoral ERCC1 (FL297 antibody) was measured using AQUA (R) technology. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance of clinical factors and ERCC1 status with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. Results: The majority of patients had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage II disease (n=119, 45%); median tumor size was 5 cm. OS was associated with tumor size (HR 1.16, P=.018), pretreatment hemoglobin status (HR 2.33, P=.00027), and FIGO stage. In addition, tumoral ERCC1 status (nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio) was associated with PFS (HR 2.33 [1.05-5.18], P=.038) and OS (HR 3.13 [1.27-7.71], P=.013). ERCC1 status was not significant on multivariate analysis when the model was adjusted for the clinical factors: for PFS (HR 1.49 [0.61-3.6], P=.38); for OS (HR 2.42 [0.94-6.24] P=.067). Conclusions: In this large multicenter cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with radical CRT, stage, tumor size, and pretreatment hemoglobin status were significantly associated with PFS and OS. ERCC1 status appears to have prognostic impact on univariate analysis in these patients, but was not independently associated with outcome on

  7. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  8. Three-dimensional dose accumulation in pseudo-split-field IMRT and brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baozhou; Yang, Deshan; Esthappan, Jackie; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Price, Samantha; Mutic, Sasa; Schwarz, Julie K; Grigsby, Perry W; Tanderup, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Dose accumulation of split-field external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (BT) is challenging because of significant EBRT and BT dose gradients in the central pelvic region. We developed a method to determine biologically effective dose parameters for combined split-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and image-guided BT in locally advanced cervical cancer. Thirty-three patients treated with split-field-IMRT to 45.0-51.2 Gy in 1.6-1.8 Gy per fraction to the elective pelvic lymph nodes and to 20 Gy to the central pelvis region were included in this study. Patients received six weekly fractions of high-dose rate BT to 6.5-7.3 Gy per fraction. A dose tracker software was developed to compute the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2) to gross tumor volume (GTV), organs-at-risk and point A. Total dose-volume histogram parameters were computed on the 3D combined EQD2 dose based on rigid image registration. The dose accumulation uncertainty introduced by organ deformations between IMRT and BT was evaluated. According to International Commission on Radiation Unit and Measurement and GEC European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology recommendations, D98, D90, D50, and D2cm3 EQD2 dose-volume histogram parameters were computed. GTV D98 was 84.0 ± 26.5 Gy and D2cc was 99.6 ± 13.9 Gy, 67.4 ± 12.2 Gy, 75.0 ± 10.1 Gy, for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, respectively. The uncertainties induced by organ deformation were estimated to be -1 ± 4 Gy, -3 ± 5 Gy, 2 ± 3 Gy, and -3 ± 5 Gy for bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and GTV, respectively. It is feasible to perform 3D EQD2 dose accumulation to assess high and intermediate dose regions for combined split-field IMRT and BT. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Cervical Cancer is Preventable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Cervical Cancer is Preventable Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... 000 More than 4,000 women die of cervical cancer each year. 93% As many as 93% of ...

  10. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  11. Cervical cancer: A global health crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, William; Bacon, Monica A; Bajaj, Amishi; Chuang, Linus T; Fisher, Brandon J; Harkenrider, Matthew M; Jhingran, Anuja; Kitchener, Henry C; Mileshkin, Linda R; Viswanathan, Akila N; Gaffney, David K

    2017-07-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common malignancy diagnosed in women worldwide. Nearly all cases of cervical cancer result from infection with the human papillomavirus, and the prevention of cervical cancer includes screening and vaccination. Primary treatment options for patients with cervical cancer may include surgery or a concurrent chemoradiotherapy regimen consisting of cisplatin-based chemotherapy with external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Cervical cancer causes more than one quarter of a million deaths per year as a result of grossly deficient treatments in many developing countries. This warrants a concerted global effort to counter the shocking loss of life and suffering that largely goes unreported. This article provides a review of the biology, prevention, and treatment of cervical cancer, and discusses the global cervical cancer crisis and efforts to improve the prevention and treatment of the disease in underdeveloped countries. Cancer 2017;123:2404-12. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang-Young, E-mail: ryu@kcch.re.kr [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Moo; Kim, Kidong [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Il [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Cancer Biostatistics Branch, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eui-Don [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3-4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154-0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m{sup 2} chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m{sup 2} regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  13. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Sang-Young; Lee, Won-Moo; Kim, Kidong; Park, Sang-Il; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Cho, Chul-Koo; Nam, Byung-Ho; Lee, Eui-Don

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB–IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m 2 , six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m 2 every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3–4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154–0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m 2 chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m 2 regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  14. Cervical Cancer Vaccination | Ajiboye | Tropical Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This article provides an overview of cervical cancer vaccine including safety, efficacy and cost in the primary prevention of cervical cancer. Discussion: The quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18. These HPV types are responsible for 70% of cervical cancers ...

  15. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  16. Cervical Cancer Screening with AMIGAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lairson, David R.; Chang, Yu-Chia; Byrd, Theresa L.; Smith, Judith Lee; Fernandez, Maria E.; Wilson, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hispanic women have a higher incidence of cervical cancer than all other races and ethnicities. In Hispanic subgroups, Mexican American women were among the least likely to have received cervical cancer screening. In a recent RCT, Ayudando a las Mujeres con Información, Guia, y Amor para su Salud (AMIGAS) was shown to increase cervical cancer screening rates among women of Mexican descent at 6 months in all intervention arms compared to the control arm. Limited information exists about the economics of interventions to increase cervical cancer screening rates among women of Mexican descent. Purpose This study aims to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the alternative AMIGAS intervention methods for increasing cervical cancer screening among low-income women of Mexican descent in three U.S. communities. Methods Cost data were collected from 2008 to 2011 alongside the AMIGAS study of 613 women. Receipt of Pap test within 6 months of intervention was the primary outcome measure in the cost-effectiveness analysis, conducted during 2012–2013. Results The cost per additional woman screened comparing the video-only intervention to usual care was $980. The cost increased to $1,309 with participant time cost included. With an additional cost per participant of $3.90 compared to flipchart only, the full AMIGAS program (video plus flipchart) yielded 6.8% additional women screened. Conclusions Results on the average and incremental cost-effectiveness of the AMIGAS program elements may assist health policymakers and program managers to select and appropriately budget for interventions shown to increase cervical cancer screening among low-income women of Mexican descent. PMID:24842738

  17. Radiobiological characteristics of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagabu, Teruo; Kobayashi, Takashi; Nanayama, Kunihiko

    1976-01-01

    In order to observe the radiobiological characteristics of cervical cancer, the author carried out irradiation of 60 Co in 16 cases of cervical cancer. The primary lesion of each case was exposed to radiation of 100 R once a day, 40 times in sequence, totaling 4,000 R. To evaluate this results, the vaginal smears were obtained everyday and examined for changes in cancerous cells caused by the irradiation. The results of our study showed that cervical cancer could be classified into three groups according to the radiosensitivity of its cancerous cells. In the group of low-radiosensitivity (11 cases of 16), the cancerous cells decreased gradually, and enlargement of the nuclei of the cancerous cells was observed from 2,000 R of irradiation, but the majority of the cancerous cells were those of nucleus after the irradiation of 4,000 R. In all of the 5 uterus removed, residual cancer lesion was noted. The radiocuability was unfavourable. In the group of high-radiosensitivity (4 cases of 16), the cancerous cells decreased remarkablly. Enlargement of nucleus was noted from 1,000 R of the irradiation, the cancerous cells of small-sized nucleus appeared with the irradiation of 3,000 R but the cancerous cells almost disappeared with the irradiation of 4,000 R. The radiocuability was favourable. In the group of combination of high-radiosensitivity and low-radiosensitivity portions (one case of 16), the cancerous cells decreased remarkablly until the exposure to the radiation of 2,000 R but thereafter did slowly. In a removed uterus, the cancer lesion was noted, but the prognosis was favourable. The foregoing results suggest that changes in the nuclear diameter of the cancerous cells in vaginal smears during irradiation can tell the radiosensitivity of the cancerous cells. (Kanao, N.)

  18. Lynch Syndrome and Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antill, Yoland C; Dowty, James G; Win, Aung Ko; Thompson, Tina; Walsh, Michael D; Cummings, Margaret C; Gallinger, Steven; Lindor, Noralane M; Le Marchand, Loïc; Hopper, John L; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Church, James; Tucker, Katherine M; Buchanan, Daniel D; Young, Joanne P; Winship, Ingrid M; Jenkins, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Carriers of germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are at increased risk of several cancers including colorectal and gynecologic cancers (Lynch syndrome). There is no substantial evidence that these mutations are associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer. A total of 369 families with at least one carrier of a mutation in a MMR gene (133 MLH1, 174 MSH2, 35 MSH6, and 27 PMS2) were ascertained via population cancer registries or via family cancer clinics in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and USA. Personal and family histories of cancer were obtained from participant interviews. Modified segregation analysis was used to estimate the hazard ratio (incidence rates for carriers relative to those for the general population), and age-specific cumulative risks of cervical cancer for carriers. A total of 65 cases of cervical cancer were reported (including 10 verified by pathology reports). The estimated incidence was 5.6–fold (95% CI: 2.3–13.8; p=0.001) higher for carriers than for the general population with a corresponding cumulative risk to 80 years of 4.5% (95% CI: 1.9–10.7%) compared with 0.8% for the general population. The mean age at diagnosis was 43.1 years (95% CI: 40.0–46.2), 3.9 years younger than the reported USA population mean of 47.0 years (p=0.02). Women with MMR gene mutations were found to have an increased risk of cervical cancer. Due to limited pathology verification we cannot be certain that a proportion of these cases were not lower uterine segment endometrial cancers involving the endocervix, a recognized cancer of Lynch syndrome. PMID:26077226

  19. Thiazolidinediones abrogate cervical cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuertz, Beverly R., E-mail: knier003@umn.edu; Darrah, Lindsay, E-mail: ldarrah@obgynmn.com; Wudel, Justin, E-mail: drwudel@drwudel.com; Ondrey, Frank G., E-mail: ondre002@umn.edu

    2017-04-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR γ) is activated by thiazolidinedione drugs (TZDs) and can promote anti-cancer properties. We used three TZDs (pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, and ciglitazone) to target cervical cancer cell lines and a nude mouse animal model. Each agent increased activation of PPAR γ, as judged by a luciferase reporter gene assay in three HPV-associated cell lines (CaSki, SiHa, and HeLa cells) while decreasing cellular proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. They also promoted Oil Red O accumulation in treated cell lines and upregulated the lipid differentiation marker adipsin. Interestingly, xenograft HeLa tumors in nude mice treated with 100 mg/kg/day pioglitazone exhibited decreased growth compared to control mice or mice treated with standard cervical chemotherapy. In conclusion, TZDs slow tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo with decreases in cell proliferation and increases in PPAR γ and adipsin. These agents may be interesting treatments or treatment adjuncts for HPV-associated cancers or perhaps even precancerous conditions. - Highlights: • Thiazolidinediones decreases cervical cancer proliferation. • Pioglitazone increases cervical cancer differentiation. • Pioglitazone decreases tumor growth in mice. • Pioglitazone may be a useful treatment adjunct.

  20. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  1. Methods for Cervical Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Vargas-Revilla

    2014-12-01

    This article is divided in three sections: the first one focuses on the general impact of cervical cancer has hadin CostaRica, these condsection gathers information about different methodologies used around the world to detect this cancer and the third one makes reference to the current development of the screening devise in Mexico that works as a monitoring system and can used by women without external assistance.

  2. Selective Changes in the Immune Profile of Tumor-Draining Lymph Nodes After Different Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Regimens for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Martinelli, Enrica; Fanelli, Mara; Petrillo, Marco; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess how neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimens modulate the immune system state in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN), in the setting of advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Tumor-draining lymph nodes of patients undergoing chemotherapy only (nonirradiated, NI-TDLN) and chemoradiation with lower-dose (39.6 Gy, LD-TDLN) and higher-dose radiation (50 Gy, HD-TDLN) were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry. Results: Enlarging our previous data, LD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an enhanced antitumor response as compared with NI-TDLN, namely a significant Th1 and Tc1 polarization and a lower amount of the potent CD4 + Foxp3 + CD25 high regulatory T cell (Treg) subset identified by neuropilin-1 expression. Conversely, compared with NI-TDLN, HD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an impaired antitumor response, namely a significantly inverted CD4/CD8 cell ratio, a higher Nrp1 + Treg frequency, and a higher frequency of CCR4 + Treg, a Treg subset facilitated in migrating out from TDLN to suppress the immune response against distant cancer cells. Moreover, the Th1 and Tc1 polarization induced by LD radiation was lost, and there was an unfavorable tolerogenic/immunogenic dendritic cell ratio compared with LD-TDLN. Conclusions: Even minor differences in radiation dose in neoadjuvant regimens for locally advanced cervical cancer are crucial for determining the balance between a tolerogenic and an efficacious antitumor immune response in TDLN. Because most of the anticancer immune response takes place in TDLN, the present findings also emphasize the importance of chemoradiation protocols in the context of immunotherapeutic trials.

  3. SU-F-T-420: Dosimetry Comparison of Advanced External Beam Radiation Treatment Modalities to Brachytherapy Treatments in Patients with Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mwidu, U; Devic, S [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shehadeh, M; AlKafi, M; Mahmood, R; Moftah, B [King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A retrospective comparison of dose distributions achievable by High dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT), Helical TomoTherapy (TOMO), CyberKnife (CK) and RapidArc (RA) in locally advanced inoperable cervical cancer patients is presented. Methods: Five patients with advanced stage cervical carcinoma were selected for this study after a full course of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), chemotherapy and HDR Brachytherapy. To highlight any significant similarities/differences in dose distributions, high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) coverage, organs at risk (OAR) sparing, and machine specific delivery limitations, we used D90 (dose received by 90% of the volume) as the parameter for HRCTV coverage as recommended by the GEC-ESTRO Working Group. We also compared both integral and differential dose volume histograms (DVH) between different dose distributions treatment modalities for HRCTV and OAR. Results: TOMO and RA provided the most conformal dose distributions to HRCTV. Median doses (in Gy) to organs at risk were; for rectal wall: 1.7±0.6, 2.5±0.6,1.2±0.3, and 1.5±0.6, and for bladder wall: 1.6±0.1, 2.4±0.4, 0.8±0.6, and 1.5±0.5, for HDRBT, TOMO, CK, and RA, respectively. Conclusion: Contemporary EBRT modalities might be able to replace brachytherapy treatments for cervix cancer. While brachytherapy dose distributions feature high dose gradients, EBRT modalities provide highly conformal dose distributions to the target. However, it is still not clear whether a highly conformal dose or high gradient dose is more clinically relevant for the HRCTV in cervix cancer patients.

  4. Manifestation pattern of early-late vaginal morbidity after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: an analysis from the EMBRACE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Nout, Remi A.; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Westerveld, Henrike; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study (www.embracestudy.dk)

  5. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, 10 topics were selected for major clinical research advances in gynecologic oncology; these included three topics regarding cervical cancer, three regarding ovarian cancer, two regarding endometrial cancer, and one each regarding breast cancer and radiation oncology. For cervical cancer, bevacizumab was first demonstrated to exhibit outstanding clinical efficacy in a recurrent, metastatic setting. Regarding cervical cancer screening, visual inspections with acetic acid in low-resourc...

  6. Raman spectroscopy in cervical cancers: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rubina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer among women worldwide. Developing countries contribute more than 80% towards global burden. Over the last 2 decades, Raman spectroscopy (RS has been actively pursued for cervical cancer detection. In view of latest development in Raman spectroscopic applications in cervical cancers, especially in vivo studies, an update of the same is presented in this article. This articles opens with a brief note on Anatomy of cervix followed by Etiology, and conventional Screening and Diagnosis of Cervical cancers. In subsequent sections, brief description of Theory and Instrumentation of RS is followed by a review of recent developments in cervical cancer detection; with emphasis on cell lines, exfoliated cells, ex vivo and in vivo, and therapeutic response monitoring applications in cervical cancer.

  7. Assessment of radiation doses to the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes delivered by image-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy M I; Aagaard, Torben; Fokdal, Lars U

    2015-01-01

    .8-6.2 Gy equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fractions) to the pelvic LN (external iliac, internal iliac, obturator, and presacral) in optimized plans, whereas less-dose contribution to CI, para-aortic, and inguinal (mean D50% was 0.5-1.9 Gy equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fractions) was observed. Optimized plans......PURPOSE: This study evaluated the dose delivered to lymph nodes (LNs) by brachytherapy (BT) and the effect of BT image-guided optimization on the LN dose. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were retrospectively analyzed, 16 patients of them had LN...... involvement. The patients received whole pelvis intensity-modulated radiation therapy (45-50 Gy/25-30 fx) to whole pelvis and two fractions of MRI pulsed-dose-rate BT. The delineated LN groups were para-aortic, inguinal, common iliac (CI), external iliac, internal iliac, obturator, and presacral. For each LN...

  8. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials In total, 744...... the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired...... treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema...

  9. Cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative incidences of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive cervical cancer were studied in black and white patients at the academic hospitals of the University of the Orange Free State. A statistically highly significant difference was found between black and white patients, with a higher incidence of ...

  10. Impact of primary para-aortic lymphadenectomy on distant failure in locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated in the era of image-guided adaptive brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chargari, Cyrus; Mazeron, Renaud; Dunant, Ariane; Gouy, Sébastien; Petit, Claire; Maroun, Pierre; Uzan, Catherine; Annede, Pierre; Bentivegna, Enrica; Balleyguier, Corinne; Genestie, Catherine; Pautier, Patricia; Leary, Alexandra; Lhomme, Catherine; Deutsch, Eric; Morice, Philippe; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the impact of a primary para-aortic lymphadenectomy (PAL) in locally advanced cervical cancer patients receiving definitive chemoradiation, we reviewed the clinical records of consecutive patients treated in our Institution and receiving an external beam irradiation followed with an image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for a locally advanced cervical cancer. We examined the impact of performing a primary PAL as part of primary staging for guiding irradiation fields in patients without extra-pelvic PET uptake. The outcome of patients presenting para-aortic lymph node uptake (PALNU) was also examined. 186 patients were identified. Median follow-up was 44.4 months. Patients receiving a primary PAL (PAL group) and those who received upfront pelvic chemoradiation (no-PAL group) did not significantly differ for loco-regional failures. Survival without distant failure (DFFS), including para-aortic relapses, was at 3 years 87 % (95 % CI 84-90 %) in PAL group, 67 % (95 % CI 59-85 %) in the no-PAL group and 44 % (95 % CI 32-66 %) in the PALNU group (p = 0.04 for comparison between PAL and no-PAL groups). In a multivariate model including para-aortic lymphadenectomy, pelvic nodal uptake and high-risk clinical target volume as adjustment variables, a para-aortic lymphadenectomy was significant for DFS (HR = 0.47, 95 % CI 0.26-0.84, p = 0.01). Although confounding factors could account for these retrospective results, a primary PAL with tailored irradiation fields based on para-aortic histological findings seems to be associated with a better control for distant metastases. A randomized trial is testing the benefit of this strategy.

  11. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robyn Banerjee,1 Mitchell Kamrava21Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.Keywords: cervical cancer, brachytherapy, image-guided brachytherapy

  12. A review of patients with advanced cervical cancer presenting to palliative care services at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, M J; Mijoya, A

    2015-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the commonest cancer affecting women in Malawi, which has the highest rate of this disease in the world. Most cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage. To describe the symptom burden, palliative care interventions, and outcomes of cervical cancer patients who entered care at Tiyanjane Clinic in Blantyre, Malawi, between January and December 2012. We reviewed the case files of 72 patients presenting to our hospital-based palliative care service over one year. The mean age was 49.5 years. Twenty-six patients (36%) were HIV-positive and the majority of these (n = 22; 85%) were on antiretroviral medication at presentation to palliative care. Pain (n = 66; 92%), vaginal discharge (n = 44; 61%), and unpleasant odour (n = 37; 51%) were commonly reported. Over a third of patients (n = 26; 36%) reported pain in two or more sites. Fourteen patients (19%) reported vaginal bleeding. Spousal breakdown (through widowhood or divorce) was noted in over half (n = 41; 57%) of all cases. Pain relief was provided to 69 (96%) of the patients (morphine to 40 patients; 56%). Common interventions provided included metronidazole tablets (used vaginally), sanitary items, and counselling. At the end of the study period, 18 patients (25%) were still under the care of palliative services. Access to medications such as morphine, metronidazole and tranexamic acid can improve quality of life, even when radiotherapy is limited. Health care teams require necessary skills and training, including how to perform a comprehensive assessment, with an emphasis on the provision of psychosexual counselling, to assist with the complexity of symptoms occurring in this vulnerable group.

  13. Preventive vaccines for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WHEELER COSETTE M

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of vaccines for the human papillomavirus (HPV in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer is a possibility in the near future. Close to 20 genotypes of HPV, of the 75 that have been identified, infect the femine genital tract, but four subtypes (16, 18, 31 and 45 have been associated in close to 80% of cervical cancers. this article proposes that in order to design an effective prophylactic vaccine against HPV infection, an adequate immune response should be guaranteed through four goals; a activation of antigens present in the cell; b overcoming the host response and viral genetic variability in the T cell response; c generation of high levels of T and B memory cells; and d persistence of antigens.

  14. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Robyn; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.

  15. Priority Setting for Improvement of Cervical Cancer Prevention in Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majidi, A.; Ghiasvand, R.; Hadji, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. Organized cervical screening and vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) have been successful interventions for prevention of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). Because of cultural and religious considerations...

  16. Socioeconomic position and survival after cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, E H; Kjær, S K; Høgdall, C

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to decrease social disparities in cancer survival, it is important to consider the mechanisms by which socioeconomic position influences cancer prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether any associations between socioeconomic factors and survival after cervical cancer could be expla......In an attempt to decrease social disparities in cancer survival, it is important to consider the mechanisms by which socioeconomic position influences cancer prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether any associations between socioeconomic factors and survival after cervical cancer could...

  17. Cervical cancer: current knowledge, perception and associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objective: Cervical cancer is a major public health problem and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality amongst the gynaecological cancers worldwide, especially in developing countries. Cervical cancer continues to persist in Nigeria like other developing countries despite the existence of ...

  18. THE CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING - UNSOLVED PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of cervical cancer (CC for many decades continues to be the center of attention leading foreign and domestic oncologists. Malignant cervical tumors occupy the leading position among malignant neoplasms of reproductive system in women, second only to breast cancer, despite having far more effective screening compared with this disease. On predictive expert estimates (taking into account population growth and the expected increase in life expectancy by 2020 in developing countries, the rising incidence and prevalence of cervical cancer is 40%, while in developed countries - 11%. If we do not perform timely interventions for prevention and treatment of cervical cancer, after 2050 cervical cancer every year in the world will become sick 1 million women. In the last decade inRussiathere has been a gradual increase in the incidence of cervical cancer: average annual growth rate of 2.21%, General 25,18%. Cervical cancer is one of nosological forms that meet all the requirements of population-based screening. The current Russian normative documents do not give clear answers to questions concerning the age of onset of cervical cancer screening and the time interval between tests, no clear program organized cytological screening of cervical cancer.

  19. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A Phase II study of acute toxicity for CelebrexTM (celecoxib) and chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer: Primary endpoint analysis of RTOG 0128

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, David K.; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Dicker, Adam P.; Miller, Brigitte; Eifel, Patricia J.; Ryu, Janice; Avizonis, Vilija; Fromm, Mitch; Greven, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine treatment-related acute toxicity rates in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by oral celecoxib, i.v. cisplatin and 5-FU, and concurrent pelvic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients on this RTOG Phase I-II study for advanced cervix cancer included FIGO Stage IIB-IVA or patients with FIGO Stage IB through IIA with biopsy proven pelvic node metastases or tumor size ≥5 cm. Patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Celecoxib was prescribed at 400 mg twice daily beginning on day 1 for 1 year. Cisplatin (75 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1g/m2 for 4 days) were administered every 3 weeks times 3. The primary end point of the study was treatment related toxicity. Results: Between August 2001 and March 2004, 84 patients were accrued to the study and 77 patients were evaluable for toxicity. Regarding the primary end point, toxicities were observed in the following areas: blood/bone marrow (16), gastrointestinal (14), pain (7), renal/genitourinary (6), cardiovascular (3), hemorrhage (1), and neurologic (1). For the first 75 evaluable patients, a toxicity failure was identified in 36 patients for a rate of 48%. Conclusions: Celecoxib at 400 mg twice daily together with concurrent cisplatin and 5-FU and pelvic radiotherapy has a high incidence of acute toxicities. The most frequent toxicities were hematologic. Albeit, the toxicity was deemed excessive in this trial, the rate of toxicities was not too different compared to other recent experiences with concurrent chemoradiation for advanced cervix cancer

  1. Evaluation of Delivery Costs for External Beam Radiation Therapy and Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Nilsen, Kristine; Hill, Colin; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Lash, Donna H; Lain, Melody; Christodoulou, Deborah; Hodge, Constance; Showalter, Timothy N

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the delivery costs, using time-driven activity-based costing, and reimbursement for definitive radiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer. Process maps were created to represent each step of the radiation treatment process and included personnel, equipment, and consumable supplies used to deliver care. Personnel were interviewed to estimate time involved to deliver care. Salary data, equipment purchasing information, and facilities costs were also obtained. We defined the capacity cost rate (CCR) for each resource and then calculated the total cost of patient care according to CCR and time for each resource. Costs were compared with 2016 Medicare reimbursement and relative value units (RVUs). The total cost of radiation therapy for cervical cancer was $12,861.68, with personnel costs constituting 49.8%. Brachytherapy cost $8610.68 (66.9% of total) and consumed 423 minutes of attending radiation oncologist time (80.0% of total). External beam radiation therapy cost $4055.01 (31.5% of total). Personnel costs were higher for brachytherapy than for the sum of simulation and external beam radiation therapy delivery ($4798.73 vs $1404.72). A full radiation therapy course provides radiation oncologists 149.77 RVUs with intensity modulated radiation therapy or 135.90 RVUs with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, with total reimbursement of $23,321.71 and $16,071.90, respectively. Attending time per RVU is approximately 4-fold higher for brachytherapy (5.68 minutes) than 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (1.63 minutes) or intensity modulated radiation therapy (1.32 minutes). Time-driven activity-based costing was used to calculate the total cost of definitive radiation therapy for cervical cancer, revealing that brachytherapy delivery and personnel resources constituted the majority of costs. However, current reimbursement policy does not reflect the increased attending physician effort and delivery costs of brachytherapy. We

  2. Comparison of the result of radiation alone and radiation with daily low dose cisplatin in management of locally advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul; Lee, Mee Jo; Kim, Chul Su; Song, Eun Seop; Loh, John J. K. [Inha University Medical College, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-15

    An analysis was to compare the results of radiation alone with those of radiation with daily low dose cisplatin as a radiation sensitizer in locally advanced cervical cancer. A retrospective analysis of 59 patients diagnosed with locally advanced uterine cervix cancer between December 1996 and March 2001 was performed. Thirty one patients received radiation alone and 28 patients received daily low dose cisplatin, as a radiation sensitizer, and radiation therapy. The median follow-up period was 34 months, ranging from 2.5 to 73 months. The radiation therapy consisted of 4500 cGy external beam irradiation to the whole pelvis (midline block after 3060 cGy), a 900 {approx} 1,000 cGy boost to the involved parametrium and high dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (a total dose of 3,000 {approx} 3,500 cGy/500 cGy per fraction to point A, twice per week). In the chemoradiation group, 10 mg of daily intravenous cisplatin was given daily from the 1st day of radiation therapy to the 20th day of radiation therapy. According to the FIGO classification, the patients were subdivided into 51 (86.4%) and 8 (13.6%) stages IIB and stage IIIB, respectively. The overall 5 year survival rate was 65.65% and according to treatment modality were 56.75% and 73.42% in the radiation alone and chemoradiation groups, respectively ({rho} = 0.180). The 5 year disease-free survival rates were 49.39% and 63.34% in the radiation alone and chemoradiation groups, respectively ({rho} = 0.053). The 5 year locoregional control rates were 52.34% and 73.58% in the radiation alone and chemoradiation groups, respectively ({rho} = 0.013). The 5 year distant disease-free survival rates were 59.29% and 81.46% in the radiation alone and chemoradiation groups, respectively ({rho} = 0.477). Treatment related hematologic toxicity were prominent in the chemoradiation group. Leukopenia ({>=} 3 grade) occurred in 3.2% and 28.5% of the radiation alone and chemoradiation groups, respectively ({rho} = 0.02). There were

  3. Stages of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings ( stoma ) are made for urine and stool to flow ... information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come ...

  4. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause cancer. Most women don’t need a Pap test every year! Have your first Pap test when you’re 21. If your test results ... you can wait 3 years for your next Pap test. HPV tests aren’t recommended for screening women ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  6. Frequency distribution of HLA alleles and haplotypes in Uyghur women with advanced squamous cell cervical cancer and relation to HPV status and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifu, Mayinuer; Fan, Peiwen; Kuerban, Gulina; Yao, Xuan; Peng, Yanchun; Dong, Tao; Wang, Ruozheng

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and haplotypes in Uyghur women with advanced squamous cell cervical cancer (SCC). A total of 131 Uyghur patients with advanced SCC (IIb-IVa) and 91 healthy subjects from Xinjiang province were genotyped for HLA-I and II genes using Polymerase Chain Reaction Sequence Based Typing. The different frequencies of HLA alleles and haplotypes between patients and controls were compared and the correlations were analyzed between HLA distribution and HPV status and prognosis. (1) The frequencies of B*51:01, DRB1*07:01, DQB1*02:01, A*01:01-C*06:02, A*01:01-DRB1*07:01, C*06:02-DQB1*02:01, DRB1*07:01-DQB1*02:01 and C*06:02-DRB1*07:01-DQB1*02:01 in cancer group were higher than control group whereas the frequencies of B*44:02, B*58:01, C*05:01, DRB1*04:01, DRB1*12:01, DRB1*13:01, DQB1*02:02, DQB1*05:02, DRB1*03:01-DQB1*02:02 and DRB1*04:01-DQB1*03:02 in cancer group were lower than control group (P HLA alleles and its haplotypes play an important role. B*58:01 allele may act as an independent predictor for DSS.

  7. Cervical cancer control, priorities and new directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsonego, J; Bosch, F.X.; Coursaget, P.; Cox, JT; Franco, E; Frazer, I; Sankaranarayanan, R; Schiller, J; Singer, A; Wright, TCJr; Kinney, W; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Linder, J

    2004-01-01

    99% of cervical cancer is initiated by HPV infection. The estimated lifetime risk of cervical cancer is nevertheless relatively low (less than 1 in 20 for most community based studies). Although sensitivity and specificity of the available diagnostic techniques are suboptimal, screening for

  8. Cervical cancer incidence in elderly women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Lönnberg, Stefan; Törnberg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    was to determine whether this bipolar pattern in age-specific incidence of cervical cancer reflects underlying biology or can be explained by the fact that the data come from birth cohorts with different screening histories. Methods: Combination of historical data on cervical screening and population-based cancer...

  9. Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarthigeyan, K

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine's efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context.

  10. Cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancer in black and white patients. J. T. NEL, L. DE LANGE, P. J. MEIRING ... cervical cancer. This serious yet preventable disease is still very prevalent in South Africa, especially among black women. S AIr Med J 1994; 84: 18-19. Aanalysis of rime trends in .... therapy in users of oral contraceptives. Am J Clill Nucr 1982; 35:.

  11. Clinical Implementation of an Online Adaptive Plan-of-the-Day Protocol for Nonrigid Motion Management in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijkoop, Sabrina T., E-mail: s.heijkoop@erasmusmc.nl; Langerak, Thomas R.; Quint, Sandra; Bondar, Luiza; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical implementation of an online adaptive plan-of-the-day protocol for nonrigid target motion management in locally advanced cervical cancer intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Each of the 64 patients had four markers implanted in the vaginal fornix to verify the position of the cervix during treatment. Full and empty bladder computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired prior to treatment to build a bladder volume-dependent cervix-uterus motion model for establishment of the plan library. In the first phase of clinical implementation, the library consisted of one IMRT plan based on a single model-predicted internal target volume (mpITV), covering the target for the whole pretreatment observed bladder volume range, and a 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) motion-robust backup plan based on the same mpITV. The planning target volume (PTV) combined the ITV and nodal clinical target volume (CTV), expanded with a 1-cm margin. In the second phase, for patients showing >2.5-cm bladder-induced cervix-uterus motion during planning, two IMRT plans were constructed, based on mpITVs for empty-to-half-full and half-full-to-full bladder. In both phases, a daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired to first position the patient based on bony anatomy and nodal targets and then select the appropriate plan. Daily post-treatment CBCT was used to verify plan selection. Results: Twenty-four and 40 patients were included in the first and second phase, respectively. In the second phase, 11 patients had two IMRT plans. Overall, an IMRT plan was used in 82.4% of fractions. The main reasons for selecting the motion-robust backup plan were uterus outside the PTV (27.5%) and markers outside their margin (21.3%). In patients with two IMRT plans, the half-full-to-full bladder plan was selected on average in 45% of the first 12 fractions, which was reduced to 35% in the last treatment fractions. Conclusions: The implemented

  12. Clinical Implementation of an Online Adaptive Plan-of-the-Day Protocol for Nonrigid Motion Management in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijkoop, Sabrina T.; Langerak, Thomas R.; Quint, Sandra; Bondar, Luiza; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical implementation of an online adaptive plan-of-the-day protocol for nonrigid target motion management in locally advanced cervical cancer intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Each of the 64 patients had four markers implanted in the vaginal fornix to verify the position of the cervix during treatment. Full and empty bladder computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired prior to treatment to build a bladder volume-dependent cervix-uterus motion model for establishment of the plan library. In the first phase of clinical implementation, the library consisted of one IMRT plan based on a single model-predicted internal target volume (mpITV), covering the target for the whole pretreatment observed bladder volume range, and a 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) motion-robust backup plan based on the same mpITV. The planning target volume (PTV) combined the ITV and nodal clinical target volume (CTV), expanded with a 1-cm margin. In the second phase, for patients showing >2.5-cm bladder-induced cervix-uterus motion during planning, two IMRT plans were constructed, based on mpITVs for empty-to-half-full and half-full-to-full bladder. In both phases, a daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired to first position the patient based on bony anatomy and nodal targets and then select the appropriate plan. Daily post-treatment CBCT was used to verify plan selection. Results: Twenty-four and 40 patients were included in the first and second phase, respectively. In the second phase, 11 patients had two IMRT plans. Overall, an IMRT plan was used in 82.4% of fractions. The main reasons for selecting the motion-robust backup plan were uterus outside the PTV (27.5%) and markers outside their margin (21.3%). In patients with two IMRT plans, the half-full-to-full bladder plan was selected on average in 45% of the first 12 fractions, which was reduced to 35% in the last treatment fractions. Conclusions: The implemented

  13. Trends of cervical cancer in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Bente B; Rebolj, Matejka; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2014-01-01

    . Nevertheless, little has been reported about long-term cancer trends in Greenland. Our aim was to describe and interpret the incidence of cervical cancer from 1950 to 2009. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed for articles reporting the incidence of cervical cancer in Greenland. We...... with the introduction of screening. The data strongly suggested that the increased burden of cervical cancer in Greenlandic women was real and followed earlier changes in sexual behaviour; these changes were likely a consequence of the tremendous societal changes....

  14. Increasing Cervical Cancer Screening in Underserved Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsainvil, Merlyn A

    The incidence of cervical cancer has declined dramatically due to Papanicolaou smear testing. However, some minority populations continue to suffer with high incidences and/or death rates of cervical cancer, due to lack of screening. This article updates on cervical cancer screening and prevention and discusses cultural impacts on screening. Knowledge deficits disproportionately affect ethnic minority groups and contribute to cancer incidence, whereas lack of healthcare coverage and low socioeconomic status contribute to screening disparities. Although minority women have cultural beliefs and practices that influence screening, recommendation and/or education from a provider often lead to screening.

  15. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Rai, Bhavana; Cooper, Rachel; Dörr, Wolfgang; Nout, Remi A.; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars; Van Der Steen Banasik, Elzbieta; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dumas, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials: In total, 744 patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results: General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired at baseline but improved during the first 6 months after treatment, to reach a level comparable to that of the reference population, whereas cognitive functioning remained impaired. Both social and role functioning showed the lowest scores at baseline but which increased after treatment to reach a plateau at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema and dyspnea). Conclusions: This longitudinal prospective QoL analysis showed that patients' general QoL and functioning were impaired before treatment compared to

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Including Image Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rai, Bhavana [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Cooper, Rachel [Leeds Cancer Centre, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dörr, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna and General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars; Van Der Steen Banasik, Elzbieta; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dumas, Isabelle; and others

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed functioning and symptom scores for longitudinal quality of life (QoL) from patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy with image guided adaptive brachytherapy in the EMBRACE study. Methods and Materials: In total, 744 patients at a median follow-up of 21 months were included. QoL was prospectively assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life core module 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC cervical cancer module 24 (CX24) questionnaires at baseline, then every 3 months during the first year, every 6 months in the second and third years, and finally yearly thereafter in patients with no evidence of disease. Outcomes were evaluated over time and compared to those from an age-matched female reference population. Results: General QoL and emotional and social functioning were impaired at baseline but improved during the first 6 months after treatment, to reach a level comparable to that of the reference population, whereas cognitive functioning remained impaired. Both social and role functioning showed the lowest scores at baseline but which increased after treatment to reach a plateau at 6 months and then declined slightly at 3 and 4 years. The overall symptom experience was elevated at baseline and decreased to a level within the range of that of the reference population. Similarly, tumor-related symptoms (eg, pain, appetite loss, and constipation), which were present before treatment, decreased substantially at the first follow-up after treatment. Several treatment-related symptoms developed either immediately after and persisted over time (diarrhea, menopausal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and sexual functioning problems) or developed gradually after treatment (lymphedema and dyspnea). Conclusions: This longitudinal prospective QoL analysis showed that patients' general QoL and functioning were impaired before treatment compared to

  17. Overview and Prevention of Cervical Cancer | Ogu | Nigerian Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer though a preventable disease, still has an estimated mortality of 80% from invasive cervical cancer in developing countries. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of cervical cancer and the various modalities available for screening and prevention of cervical cancer. Methodology: ...

  18. Immunosuppression and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Rebolj, Matejka; Garred, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A markedly increased risk of cervical cancer is known in women immunosuppressed due to AIDS or therapy following organ transplantation. The aim of this review is to determine the association between other conditions affecting the immune system and the risk of cervical cancer. Patients with end......-stage renal disease seem to be at an increased risk of cervical cancer. A higher risk of cervical precancerous lesions was found in patients with some autoimmune diseases; particularly if treated with immunosuppressants. Among behavioral factors weakening the immune system, smoking appeared to strongly...... increase the risk of cervical cancer, while poor diet only moderately increased the risk. It is difficult to determine whether sexually transmitted infections other than human papillomavirus infection are independent risk factors. Identifying those groups of women likely to fail in clearing persistent...

  19. Cervical Cancer Screening with HPV Test

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Stewart Massad, a professor in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at Washington University in Saint Louis and a board member of the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Cancer Prevention (ASCCP), talks about cotesting with human papillomavirus (HPV) as part of a cervical cancer screening program.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  20. Cervical cytology and the diagnosis of cervical cancer in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Rebecca; Castanon, Alejandra; Dudding, Nick; Lim, Anita Wey Wey; Hollingworth, Antony; Hamilton, Willie; Sasieni, Peter D

    2015-12-01

    Most non-screen-detected cervical cancers are advanced stage. We assess the potential for cytology to expedite diagnosis when used outside of routine call and recall screening for cervical cancer. Two cohorts of women with cytology that did not appear to have been taken as part of routine screening, nested within a census of cervical cytology, in England between April 2007 and March 2010 were studied: 93,322 women aged 40-69 at first cytology, and 14,668 women aged ≥70. The diagnostic performance of high grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) or worse cytology was estimated. We also estimated case-fatality from stage distribution in women aged ≥66 with and without cytology in the year prior to diagnosis. There were 259 cancers diagnosed in women aged 40-69 at first cytology, and 78 in women aged ≥70. The sensitivity of cytology ≥ HSIL for cancer was 89% and 83% respectively, and the number of women needed to test to identify one cancer was 404 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 355-462) and 226 (95% CI: 177-292) respectively. Women aged ≥66 with cytology within a year of diagnosis had earlier stage cancers than those without, corresponding to a 17-22% reduction in case fatality. Cervical cytology is an excellent identifier of cancer among women tested outside routine screening call and recall. Its use as a triage tool, for instance in women with vague gynaecological symptoms, could facilitate earlier stage diagnosis and reduce cervical cancer mortality. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. [Dilemmas in the surgical treatment of cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdević, Srdan

    2004-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer of the female genital tract. There are 2200 newly registered cases of cervical cancer each year in Serbia, out of which 650 women die. The incidence of invasive, advanced cervical cancer has been on decrease, whereas the incidence of "in situ" stage carcinoma increases by 2% per year with tendency of increase in the younger age groups. The first radical abdominal hysterectomy was performed by Ernst Wertheim from Wienna in 1898, whereas Schauta performed the first vaginal hysterectomy in 1902. It was in 1995 when Daniel Dargent introduced radical vaginal trachelectomy combined with laparoscopic lymphadenectomy in order to preserve fertility in cases of initial-invasive stages of cervical cancer (FIGO I A2, I B1). Before choosing the surgical procedure, it is necessary to make a correct preoperative estimation of the stage of disease according to FIGO classification. Apart from gynecologic and rectovaginal examinations, in some cases it is necessary to perform additional examinations such as: cystoscopy, rectoscopy, CT or MRI examination of the pelvis, IVU, chest X-ray etc. The decision can be made only by an experienced gynecologist-surgeon who is able to solve all complications of treatment by himself. There are different surgical procedures for cervical cancer: abdominal, vaginal and combined. Introduction of laparoscopic lymphadenectomy combined with vaginal radical operations, to decrease surgical trauma and preserve fertility, has been of great significance.

  2. Treatment Extends Survival for Women with Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received gemcitabine (Gemzar®) both as part of initial treatment and as part of therapy following primary treatment had improved survival compared with patients whose treatment did not include gemcitabine, according to findings presented at the 2009 ASCO meeting in Orlando.

  3. Presentations of endometrial activity after curative radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hullu, JA; Pras, E; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ; Bogchelman, DH; Mourits, MJE

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The treatment of choice for patients with advanced stage cervical cancer is (chemo)radiotherapy. Gynaecologic side effects consist of loss of ovarian function and destruction of the endometrium, resulting in infertility and premature ovarian failure. In premenopausal patients estrogens

  4. Cervical Cancer is Preventable! PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-05

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement is based on the November 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every visit to a doctor or nurse is an opportunity to prevent cervical cancer. Women can get a Pap test and HPV test to help prevent cervical cancer and adolescent boys and girls can get the HPV vaccination series to help prevent cervical and other cancers.  Created: 11/5/2014 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 11/5/2014.

  5. Vital Signs-Cervical Cancer is Preventable!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-05

    This podcast is based on the November 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every visit to a doctor or nurse is an opportunity to prevent cervical cancer. Women can get a Pap test and HPV test to help prevent cervical cancer and adolescent boys and girls can get the HPV vaccination series to help prevent cervical and other cancers.  Created: 11/5/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/5/2014.

  6. Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingo, Alicea M.; Panozzo, Catherine A.; DiAngi, Yumi Taylor; Smith, Jennifer S.; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Ramogola-Masire, Doreen; Brewer, Noel T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cervical cancer remains a leading cause of death in many developing countries due to limited screening by Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. We sought to better understand women’s beliefs about cervical cancer and screening in Botswana, a middle income African country with high rates of cervical cancer. Methods We interviewed 289 women attending general medicine or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics, where Pap testing was available, in Gaborone, Botswana in January 2009. Results About three-quarters (72%) of respondents reported having ever had a Pap smear. HIV-positive women were more likely to have had a Pap smear than HIV-negative women (80% vs. 64%, OR=1.97, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.55). Screening was also more common among women who were older, had higher incomes, or had heard of cervical cancer. Almost all participants reported a desire to have a Pap smear. Reasons included to determine cervical health (56%), to improve overall health (33%), and to obtain early treatment (34%). About half (54%) of respondents said they did not know what causes cervical cancer, and almost none attributed the disease to HPV infection. Conclusion Study findings can inform interventions that seek to increase cervical cancer awareness and uptake of screening as it becomes more widely available. PMID:22367370

  7. The Korean guideline for cervical cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Yoon Jae; Suh, Mina; Yoo, Chong Woo; Lim, Myong Cheol; Choi, Jaekyung; Ki, Moran; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Jea-Hoon; Park, Eal Whan; Lee, Hoo-Yeon; Lim, Sung-Chul; Cho, Chi-Heum; Hong, Sung Ran; Dang, Ji Yeon; Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Yeol; Lee, Won-Chul

    2015-01-01

    The incidence rate of cervical cancer in Korea is still higher than in other developed countries, notwithstanding the national mass-screening program. Furthermore, a new method has been introduced in cervical cancer screening. Therefore, the committee for cervical cancer screening in Korea updated the recommendation statement established in 2002. The new version of the guideline was developed by the committee using evidence-based methods. The committee reviewed the evidence for the benefits and harms of the Papanicolaou test, liquid-based cytology, and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, and reached conclusions after deliberation. The committee recommends screening for cervical cancer with cytology (Papanicolaou test or liquid-based cytology) every three years in women older than 20 years of age (recommendation A). The cervical cytology combined with HPV test is optionally recommended after taking into consideration individual risk or preference (recommendation C). The current evidence for primary HPV screening is insufficient to assess the benefits and harms of cervical cancer screening (recommendation I). Cervical cancer screening can be terminated at the age of 74 years if more than three consecutive negative cytology reports have been confirmed within 10 years (recommendation D). PMID:26197860

  8. Bevacizumab for advanced cervical cancer: patient-reported outcomes of a randomised, phase 3 trial (NRG Oncology-Gynecologic Oncology Group protocol 240).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penson, Richard T; Huang, Helen Q; Wenzel, Lari B; Monk, Bradley J; Stockman, Sharon; Long, Harry J; Ramondetta, Lois M; Landrum, Lisa M; Oaknin, Ana; Reid, Thomas J A; Leitao, Mario M; Method, Michael; Michael, Helen; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2015-03-01

    GOG 240 was a practice-changing randomised phase 3 trial that concluded that chemotherapy plus bevacizumab for advanced cervical cancer significantly improves overall and progression-free survival, and the proportion of patients achieving an overall objective response, compared with chemotherapy alone. In this study, we aimed to analyse patient-reported outcomes in GOG 240. Eligible adult participants (aged ≥18 years) had primary stage IVB or recurrent or persistent carcinoma of the cervix with measurable disease and GOG performance status of 0-1. Participants were randomly assigned by web-based permuted block randomisation (block size 4) in a 1:1:1:1 ratio to the four treatment groups: cisplatin (50 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 1 or 2 of the treatment cycle) and paclitaxel (135 mg/m(2) intravenously over 24 h or 175 mg/m(2) intravenously over 3 h on day 1), with or without bevacizumab (15 mg/kg intravenously on day 1 or 2), or paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2) over 3 h on day 1) and topotecan (0·75 mg/m(2) for 30 min on days 1-3) with or without bevacizumab (15 mg/kg intravenously on day 1). Treatment assignment was concealed at randomisation (everyone was masked to treatment assignment, achieved by the use of a computer encrypted numbering system at the National Cancer Institute) and became open-label when each patient was registered to the trial. Treatment cycles were repeated every 21 days until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, whichever occurred first. The coprimary endpoints of the trial were overall survival and safety; the primary quality-of-life endpoint was the score on the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cervix Trial Outcome Index (FACT-Cx TOI). For our analysis of patient-reported outcomes, participants were assessed before treatment cycles 1, 2, and 5, and at 6 and 9 months after the start of cycle 1, with the FACT-Cx TOI, items from the FACT-GOG-Neurotoxicity subscale, and a worst pain item from the Brief Pain Inventory. All patients who

  9. Cervical cancer and pregnancy: treatment management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, I.; Toth, R.

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy and cervical carcinoma occurring concomitantly causes therapeutic and ethical dilemmas. The management for this situation will depend on the gestational age at the time of diagnosis, disease staging, size of the lesion and the patient’s wish to maintain pregnancy and fertility. Review of the literature suggest that pregnancy does not seem to influence the prognosis of cervical cancer. (author)

  10. cd4 t-lymphocyte subsets in women with invasive cervical cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... Invasive cervical cancer (ICC) is common in populations with high HIV prevalence in sub-Sahara. Africa (1,2). Depressed systemic as well as local immune responses have been observed in patients with advanced cervical cancer (3,4). Patients with iatrogenic CD4 cell depression following organ.

  11. Cervical Cancer as a silent killer: A rare case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced-stage cervical cancer almost always presents either with abnormal vaginal bleeding or with foul-smelling vaginal discharge. We present here a rare case, where a postmenopausal lady presented almost silently with stage IVA cervical cancer. Fortunately, timely referral, correct diagnosis, and multispecialty team work could save her life.

  12. Colposcopy and High Resolution Anoscopy in Screening For Anal Dysplasia in Patients With Cervical, Vaginal, or Vulvar Dysplasia or Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 1; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Vaginal Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  13. Stomach Cancer Following Hodgkin Lymphoma, Testicular Cancer and Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Ethel S; Curtis, Rochelle E; Hauptmann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    To further understand the risk of stomach cancer after fractionated high-dose radiotherapy, we pooled individual-level data from three recent stomach cancer case-control studies. These studies were nested in cohorts of five-year survivors of first primary Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), testicular cancer...... (TC) or cervical cancer (CX) from seven countries. Detailed data were abstracted from patient records and radiation doses were reconstructed to the site of the stomach cancer for cases and to the corresponding sites for matched controls. Among 327 cases and 678 controls, mean doses to the stomach were...... 15.3 Gy, 24.7 Gy and 1.9 Gy, respectively, for Hodgkin lymphoma, testicular cancer and cervical cancer survivors, with an overall mean dose of 10.3 Gy. Risk increased with increasing radiation dose to the stomach cancer site (P

  14. Targeted treatments for cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta-Zaragoza O

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Peralta-Zaragoza,1 Víctor Hugo Bermúdez-Morales,1 Carlos Pérez-Plasencia,2,3 Jonathan Salazar-León,1 Claudia Gómez-Cerón,1 Vicente Madrid-Marina11Direction of Chronic Infections and Cancer, Research Center in Infection Diseases, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México; 2Oncogenomics Laboratory, National Cancer Institute of Mexico, Tlalpan, México; 3Biomedicine Unit, FES-Iztacala UNAM, México City, MéxicoAbstract: Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide and the development of new diagnosis, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80%–95% of women with early stage cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop gene therapies to treat cervical cancer. In recent decades, research on treatment strategies has proposed several options, including the role of HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which are retained and expressed in most cervical cancers and whose respective oncoproteins are critical to the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Other efforts have been focused on antitumor immunotherapy strategies. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, perturbation of antitumor immune response, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, in this review article we discuss potential targets for the treatment of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, with special attention to immunotherapy approaches, clinical trials, siRNA molecules, and their implications as gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer development.Keywords: Cervical cancer, clinical trials, gene therapy, HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, siRNAs

  15. Cervical cancer screening in the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Turið; Lynge, Elsebeth; Djurhuus, Gisela W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Faroe Islands have had nationally organised cervical cancer screening since 1995. Women aged 25-60 years are invited every third year. Participation is free of charge. Although several European overviews on cervical screening are available, none have included the Faroe Islands. Ou...... the difficult geographical setting, the organised cervical cancer screening programme in the Faroe Islands has achieved a relatively high coverage rate. Nevertheless, challenges, e.g. consistent histology registration and sending reminders, still exist.......BACKGROUND: The Faroe Islands have had nationally organised cervical cancer screening since 1995. Women aged 25-60 years are invited every third year. Participation is free of charge. Although several European overviews on cervical screening are available, none have included the Faroe Islands. Our...... aim was to provide the first description of cervical cancer screening, and to determine the screening history of women diagnosed with cervical cancer in the Faroe Islands. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Screening data from 1996 to 2012 were obtained from the Diagnostic Centre at the National Hospital...

  16. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nubia Muñoz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the incidence, mortality, time trends and prognostic factors for cervical cancer in Cali, Colombia, and to review the molecular epidemiological evidence showing that HPV is the major and necessary cause of cervical cancer and the implications of this discovery for primary and secondary prevention. Materials and methods. Incidence rates of cervical cancer during a 45-year period (1962-2007 were estimated based on the population-based cancer registry of Cali and the mortality statistics from the Municipal Health Secretariat of Cali. Prognostic factors were estimated based on relative survival. Review of the molecular epidemiological evidence linking HPV to cervical cancer was focused on the studies carried out in Cali and in other countries. Results. Incidence rates of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC declined from 120.4 per 100 000 in 1962-1966 to 25.7 in 2003-2007 while those of adenocarcinoma increased from 4.2 to 5.8. Mortality rates for cervical cancer declined from 18.5 in 1984-1988 to 7.0 per 100 000 in 2009-2011. Survival was lower in women over 65 years of age and in clinical stages 3-4. Review of the molecular epidemiological evidence showed that certain types of HPV are the central and necessary cause of cervical cancer. Conclusions. A decline in the incidence and mortality of SCC and an increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma during a 45-year period was documented in Cali, Colombia

  17. Eradication of cervical cancer in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Xavier Bosch

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer remains within the three most common cancer in women worldwide and is still the commonest female cancer in 41 of 184 countries. Within Latin America, cervical ranks as the most common cancer among women in Bolivia and Peru and the second most frequent in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay, The Guyanas, Surinam and Venezuela. Due to its relatively early age at onset, it ranks among the three most frequent cancers in women aged below 45 years in 82% of all countries in the world irrespective of their screening practices.   DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21149/spm.v58i2.7777

  18. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  19. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkman, Joeli A.; Hughes, Sarah H.; Stone, Pamela; Caffrey, Angela S.; Muderspach, Laila I.; Roman, Lynda D.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Kast, W. Martin

    2007-01-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining th...

  20. Costs Associated with Cervical Cancer Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Tom Cox, a practicing gynecologist and president of the American Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, provides a brief introduction to cervical cancer screening guidelines and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  1. High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Two 9 Gy Fractions in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer - a South Indian Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Rao, Pamidimukkala Bramhananda; Kotne, Sivasankar

    2015-01-01

    Although 3D image based brachytherapy is currently the standard of treatment in cervical cancer, most of the centres in developing countries still practice orthogonal intracavitary brachytherapy due to financial constraints. The quest for optimum dose and fractionation schedule in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is still ongoing. While the American Brachytherapy Society recommends four to eight fractions of each less than 7.5 Gy, there are some studies demonstrating similar efficacy and comparable toxicity with higher doses per fraction. To assess the treatment efficacy and late complications of HDR ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions. This is a prospective institutional study in Southern India carried on from 1st June 2012 to 31st July 2014. In this period, 76 patients of cervical cancer satisfying our inclusion criteria were treated with concurrent chemo-radiation following ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions, five to seven days apart. The median follow-up period in the study was 24 months (range 10.6 - 31.2 months). The 2 year actuarial local control rate, disease-free survival and overall survival were 88.1%, 84.2% and 81.8% respectively. Although 38.2% patients suffered from late toxicity, only 3 patients had grade III late toxicity. In our experience, HDR brachytherapy with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions is an effective dose fractionation for the treatment of cervical cancer with acceptable toxicity.

  2. Breaking the DNA damage response to improve cervical cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Hylke W; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-01-01

    Every year, cervical cancer affects ∼500,000 women worldwide, and ∼275,000 patients die of this disease. The addition of platin-based chemotherapy to primary radiotherapy has increased 5-year survival of advanced-stage cervical cancer patients, which is, however, still only 66%. One of the factors thought to contribute to treatment failure is the ability of tumor cells to repair chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy via inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) as a novel strategy to improve therapy effect, is currently studied pre-clinically as well as in the clinic. Almost invariably, cervical carcinogenesis involves infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), which inactivates part of the DNA damage response. This HPV-mediated partial inactivation of the DDR presents therapeutic targeting of the residual DDR as an interesting approach to achieve chemoradio-sensitization for cervical cancer. How the DDR can be most efficiently targeted, however, remains unclear. The fact that cisplatin and radiotherapy activate multiple signaling axes within the DDR further complicates a rational choice of therapeutic targets within the DDR. In this review, we provide an overview of the current preclinical and clinical knowledge about targeting the DDR in cervical cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Human Papilloma Virus-Related Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  4. Knowledge and attitude towards cervical cancer screening among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is a largely preventable disease. In western countries, the incidence of and mortality associated with cervical cancer has reduced substantially following the introduction of effective cervical screening programmes. This is in contrast to what is obtained in Africa including Nigeria where cervical ...

  5. Management of recurrent cervical cancer: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiretti, M; Zapardiel, I; Zanagnolo, V; Landoni, F; Morrow, C P; Maggioni, A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to update the current knowledge on the treatment of recurrent cervical cancer based on a literature review. A web based search in Medline and CancerLit databases has been carried out on recurrent cervical cancer management and treatment. All relevant information has been collected and analyzed, prioritizing randomized clinical trials. Cervical cancer still represents a significant problem for public health with an annual incidence of about half a million new cases worldwide. Percentages of pelvic recurrences fluctuate from 10% to 74% depending on different risk factors. Accordingly to the literature, it is suggested that chemoradiation treatment (containing cisplatin and/or taxanes) could represent the treatment of choice for locoregional recurrences of cervical cancer after radical surgery. Pelvic exenteration is usually indicated for selected cases of central recurrence of cervical cancer after primary or adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy with bladder and/or rectum infiltration neither extended to the pelvic side walls nor showing any signs of extrapelvic spread of disease. Laterally extended endopelvic resection (LEER) for the treatment of those patients with a locally advanced disease or with a recurrence affecting the pelvic wall has been described. The treatment of recurrences of cervical carcinoma consists of surgery, and of radiation and chemotherapy, or the combination of different modalities taking into consideration the type of primary therapy, the site of recurrence, the disease-free interval, the patient symptoms, performance status, and the degree to which any given treatment might be beneficial. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Screening for cervical cancer in imprisoned women in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Albert Schiaveto; de Souza, Taiana Gabriela Barbosa; Tsuha, Daniel Henrique; Barbieri, Ana Rita

    2017-01-01

    Context and objective Incarcerated women are more vulnerable to developing cervical cancer than women in general; therefore, screening and intervention programs must be included in their healthcare provision. We therefore aimed to investigate the state of cervical cancer screening for imprisoned women in Mato Grosso do Sul, and to analyze the interventions geared toward the control of cervical cancer. Materials and methods This was a cross-sectional study with analysis of primary and secondary data. Interviews were held with 510 women in seven prisons in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul. The data for 352 medical records were analyzed statistically with the significance level set at 5%. Associations were assessed by the chi-squared test, adjusted by the Bonferroni correction. Results Most female prisoners had limited education, used tobacco, and had key risk factors for the development of cervical cancer. Half of the women interviewed (n = 255) stated that they had received a Papanicolaou (Pap) test in prison, but 134 (52.5%) of these did not know the result. Of those who had not received a Pap test, 149 (58.4%) stated that this was because of a lack of opportunity. There was no information regarding the provision of Pap tests or subsequent treatment in the medical records of 211 (59.9%) women. No protocols were in place for the provision of Pap tests in prison. There were statistical differences between prisons in terms of test frequency, the information provided to women, and how information was recorded in medical records. Conclusion The screening of cervical cancer in prisons is neither systematic nor regular, and the results are not communicated to women in a significant number of cases. It is necessary to organize health services within the prison environment, ensuring that tests are done and that there is investigation for human papillomavirus. This could increase the diagnosis of cervical cancer at less advanced stages of the disease. PMID:29252994

  7. Voxelwise comparison of perfusion parameters estimated using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) computed tomography and DCE-magnetic resonance imaging in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallehauge; Jesper; Nielsen, Thomas; Haack, Soeren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging has gained interest as an imaging modality for assessment of tumor characteristics and response to cancer treatment. However, for DCE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue contrast enhancement may vary depending on imaging sequence and temporal resolution. The aim of this study is to compare DCE-MRI to DCE-computed tomography (DCE-CT) as the gold standard. Material and methods: Thirteen patients with advanced cervical cancer were scanned once prior to chemo-radiation and during chemo-radiation with DCE-CT and -MRI in immediate succession. A total of 22 paired DCE-CT and -MRI scans were acquired for comparison. Kinetic modeling using the extended Tofts model was applied to both image series. Furthermore the similarity of the spatial distribution was evaluated using a G analysis. The correlation between the two imaging techniques was evaluated using Pe arson's correlation and the parameter means were compared using a Student's t-test (p trans (r = 0.9), flux rate constant k ep (r = 0.77), extracellular volume fraction v e (r = 0.58) and blood plasma volume fraction v p (r = 0.83). All quantitative parameters were found to be significantly different as estimated by DCE-CT and -MRI. The G analysis in normalized maps revealed that 45 % of the voxels failed to find a voxel with the corresponding value allowing for an uncertainty of 3 mm in position and 3 % in value (G 3,3 ). By reducing the criteria, the G-failure rates were: G 3,5 (37 % failure), G 3,10 (26% failure) and at G 3,15 (19 % failure). Conclusion: Good to excellent correlations but significant bias was found between DCE-CT and -MRI. Both the Pearson's correlation and the G analysis proved that the spatial information was similar when analyzing the two sets of DCE data using the extended Tofts model. Improvement of input function sampling is needed to improve kinetic quantification using DCE-MRI

  8. Socioeconomic status as an independent risk factor for severe late bowel toxicity after primary radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, J. J.; van Lonkhuijzen, L. R. C. W.; van Os, R. M.; Tytgat, K. M.; Dávila Fajardo, R.; Pieters, B. R.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Westerveld, G. H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the frequency of and risk factors for severe late bowel toxicity after curative radiotherapy in women treated for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods. Included were 515 women treated for locally advanced cervical cancer with primary radiotherapy with curative intent from

  9. NHERF1 Enhances Cisplatin Sensitivity in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tao; Yang, Xiaomei; Qin, Qiong; Shi, Wen; Wang, Qiqi; Yang, Ying; He, Junqi

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common female malignancies, and cisplatin-based chemotherapy is routinely utilized in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. However, resistance has been the major limitation. In this study, we found that Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1) was downregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells. Analysis based on a cervical cancer dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed association of NHERF1 expression with disease-free survival of patients received cisplatin treatment. NHERF1 overexpression inhibited proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant HeLa cells, whereas NHERF1 knockdown had inverse effects. While parental HeLa cells were more resistant to cisplatin after NHERF1 knockdown, NHERF1 overexpression in CaSki cells promoted cisplatin sensitivity. Overexpression and knockdown studies also showed that NHERF1 significantly inhibited AKT and extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways in cisplatin-resistant cells. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that NHERF1 can sensitize cisplatin-refractory cervical cancer cells. This study may help to increase understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in tumors. PMID:28085111

  10. NHERF1 Enhances Cisplatin Sensitivity in Human Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tao; Yang, Xiaomei; Qin, Qiong; Shi, Wen; Wang, Qiqi; Yang, Ying; He, Junqi

    2017-01-12

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common female malignancies, and cisplatin-based chemotherapy is routinely utilized in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. However, resistance has been the major limitation. In this study, we found that Na⁺/H⁺ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1) was downregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells. Analysis based on a cervical cancer dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed association of NHERF1 expression with disease-free survival of patients received cisplatin treatment. NHERF1 overexpression inhibited proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant HeLa cells, whereas NHERF1 knockdown had inverse effects. While parental HeLa cells were more resistant to cisplatin after NHERF1 knockdown, NHERF1 overexpression in CaSki cells promoted cisplatin sensitivity. Overexpression and knockdown studies also showed that NHERF1 significantly inhibited AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways in cisplatin-resistant cells. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that NHERF1 can sensitize cisplatin-refractory cervical cancer cells. This study may help to increase understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in tumors.

  11. TRAILs towards improved cervical cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, John

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a life threatening disease occurring world-wide, but affecting especially women in developing countries. Standard treatment for cevical cancer varies per FIGO stage and patient related factors. In general patients with non bulky (<4 cm) FIGO stage IB and IIA are treated with a

  12. Cervical cancer management in Zaria, Nigeria SUMMARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    24 patients who needed blood transfusion were adequately transfused and only 21.74% of all patients had complete treatment). ... cancer management in this centre with a view to finding ways to improve its management. Methods. All case notes for patients managed for cervical cancer in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching ...

  13. Urothelial cancers following radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Seiji; Hasumi, Masaru; Sato, Jin; Mayuzumi, Takuji; Kumasaka, Fuminari; Shimizu, Toshihiro.

    1996-01-01

    Some reports have indicated that bladder cancer is induced by radiation therapy for cervical cancer. We encountered 6 cases of urothelial cancer (5 cases of bladder cancer and 1 case of ureter cancer) following radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Age at the time of diagnosis of cervical cancer ranged from 38 to 66 years, and the average was 51.2±11.0 (S.D.) years old. Age at the time of diagnosis of urothelial cancer ranged from 53 to 83 years, and the average was 67.5±10.3 years old. The interval between the diagnosis of cervical cancer and urothelial cancer ranged from 3 to 25 years, averaging 16.3 years. It is impossible to evaluate the risk of development of urothelial cancer after radiation therapy based on our data. However, it is important to make an effort to diagnose urothelial cancer at an early stage by educating patients (e.g., advising regular urine tests) after the follow-up period to cervical cancer. (author)

  14. Effect of endostar combined with paclitaxel liposome and radiotherapy simultaneously on serum CYFRA21-1, CEA, SCCA, CA125, IL-8 and T lymphocyte subsets in patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jing Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of endostar combined with paclitaxel liposome and radiotherapy simultaneously on serum CYFRA21-1, CEA, SCCA, CA125, IL-8 and T lymphocyte subsets in patients with advanced cervical cancer. Methods: A total of 72 patients with advanced cervical cancer in our hospital from January 2014 to February 2016 were enrolled in this study. The subjects were divided into control group (n=36 and experiment group (n=36 randomly. The control group were treated with radiotherapy, the experiment group were treated with endostar combined with paclitaxel liposome and radiotherapy simultaneously. 3 weeks for a period of treatment and the two groups were treated for 4 periods. The serum CYFRA21-1, CEA, SCCA, CA125, IL-8 levels and peripheral blood CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells of the two groups before and after treatment were compared. Results: There were no significantly differences of the serum CYFRA21-1, CEA, SCCA, CA125, IL-8 levels and peripheral blood CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells of the two groups before treatment. The serum CYFRA21-1, CEA, SCCA, CA125 and IL-8 levels of the two groups after treatment were significantly lower than before treatment, and that of experiment were significantly lower than control group. The peripheral blood CD3+, CD4+ cells of the two groups after treatment were significantly lower than before treatment, CD8+ cells of the two groups after treatment were significantly higher than before treatment, and that of experiment group were significantly better than control group. Conclusion: Endostar combined with paclitaxel liposome and radiotherapy simultaneously can significantly reduce the serum CYFRA21-1, CEA, SCCA, CA125 and IL-8 levels, improve peripheral blood CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ levels of patients with advanced cervical cancer, and it was worthy clinical application.

  15. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jae-Weon

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, 9 topics were selected as major advances in clinical research for gynecologic oncology: 2 each in cervical and corpus cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and 1 in breast cancer. For cervical cancer, several therapeutic agents showed viable antitumor clinical response in recurrent and metastatic disease: bevacizumab, cediranib, and immunotherapies including human papillomavirus (HPV)-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and Z-100. The HPV test received FDA approval as the primary screening tool of...

  16. Virus and Cervical Cancer: Role and implication: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyani Raju

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading cancers in women worldwide especially in developing countries. Various etiological factors are described, of which Human papiloma virus (HPV) is proved by various molecular epidemiological studies to play a major role. However many co-factors are required and thought to facilitate the action of HPV in cervical carcinogenesis. Here the role of various viruses in cervical cancer and its implication in screening and diagnosis of cervical cancer is highlighte...

  17. HPV genotypes in invasive cervical cancer in Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirschner, Benny; Junge, Jette; Holl, Katsiaryna

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in invasive cervical cancers may differ by geographic region. The primary objective of this study was to estimate HPV-genotype distribution in Danish women with a diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer.......Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in invasive cervical cancers may differ by geographic region. The primary objective of this study was to estimate HPV-genotype distribution in Danish women with a diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer....

  18. Phase one dose finding study of capecitabine (Xeloda), radiotherapy and cisplatin in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Zuzana; Symonds, Paul; Habeshaw, Tim; Reed, Nick; Curto, Jorge; Joynson, Claire; Chan, Steve

    2005-06-01

    A dose escalation study was performed for patients with locally advanced squamous carcinoma of cervix to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of daily capecitabine when combined with weekly cisplatin and radiotherapy. MTD would be reached if at least 2 out of 6 at any particular dose level developed Grade 3 or 4 diarrhoea, mucositis, skin or bladder toxicity or Grade 4 neutropenia associated with fever lasting more than 7 days or Grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia. The secondary endpoints were to define the toxicity profile, compliance with treatment, late radiation effects and to determine the tumour responses. Thirteen patients were enrolled (7 Stage II(b), 6 Stage III(b)). Cisplatin was given weekly at 40 mg/m2 (maximum 70 mg) concurrently with radiotherapy. Two doses of capecitabine were studied 300 mg/m2 bid (cohort 1) and 450 mg bid (cohort 2). One patient in cohort 1 developed Grade 3 diarrhoea and 2 patients had Grade 3 leucopenia. Two patients in cohort 2 developed Grade 4 leucopenia and neutropenic fever; one of these patients also had Grade 3 diarrhoea and thrombocytopenia. Only 1 patient had Grade 1 palmar-plantar erysthrodysesthesia. Three patients have developed late (RTOG/ECOG) Grade 3 toxicity bladder or vaginal mucosa at 6, 9 and 15 months. The MDT of continuous capecitabine, when given with pelvic radiotherapy and weekly cisplatin, is 450 mg m2 bid. The recommended dose of capecitabine in this combination is 300 mg/m2 bid. The regimen was well tolerated and the compliance was high. Progression-free survival at 12 months was 69.2%, and at 24 months, it was 49.2% (SE 15.4%) with an overall survival of 57.7% (SE 15.0%) at 24 months. Further evaluation of this regimen in a phase II/III study is warranted.

  19. the need to implement population based cervical cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In developed countries, the incidence and prevalence of cervical cancer has been declining due to accessible organized cervical cancer screening using conventional cytology (Pap smear) and treatment of precancers. Available published data shows that cervical cancer mortality has decreased by 70 % over the past five.

  20. Cervical cancer screening among certified nurses in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is to a large extent preventable by effective screening. The effectiveness of such screening depends on the knowledge and attitude of the women. Objectives: To ascertain the knowledge of the certified nurses in a teaching hospital in Nigeria to cervical cancer, their attitude to cervical cancer screening and ...

  1. Cervical cancer control and prevention in Malawi: need for policy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Malawi has the highest incidents of cervical cancer followed by Mozambique and Comoros thus according to the 2014 Africa cervical cancer multi indicator incidence and mortality score card. Despite having an established cervical cancer prevention program, there is low screening coverage. Studies have been ...

  2. Breast and Cervical Cancers Awareness and Screening Practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 4/11(36.4%) of those who knew something about cervical cancer mentioned vaginal examination for cervical cancer screening and only one (0.1%) respondent mentioned Pap smear. The poor level of awareness and screening practices for breast and cervical cancers among women in these rural communities ...

  3. THE EFFECT OF EARLY CERVICAL CANCER DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Haller

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment effectiveness and clinical outcome of patients with cervical carcinoma FIGO stage IA1 and IA2 are analyzed in three different time period at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Rijeka, Croatia. Method: Retrospective analysis of the hospital chart of all cervical cancer patients between 1991 and 2005 was conducted with five-year follow up. Results: Data on cervical cancer distribution by stage and five-year survival are presented. Separately analyzed age, histology type and treatment modalities in stage FIGO IA1 and IA2 during three consecutive five-year periods are presented. Conclusions: Conservative surgical approach – conization alone in stage IA1 of the squamous cell car- cinoma is reasonable and safe treatment option for reproductive active women. During observed periods conization became the most used surgical technique applied in almost two third of FIGO IA1 cervical cancer patients. Lymph vascular space invasion in stage IA1 lead to adjunct pelvic lymphadenectomy with unclear clinical benefit. In cervical cancer patients stage IA2 simple hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy could be accepted as a standard treatment. In these patients further studies are recommended to evaluate other less radical surgical techniques – simple and radical trachelectomy with or without pelvic lymphadenectomy. Radical hysterectomy in both stages IA1 and IA2, based on personal experience and literature data represents a surgical overtreatment and should be abandoned.

  4. Identifying Molecular Culprits of Cervical Cancer Progression | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is found in 99.7% of invasive cervical carcinomas, providing strong evidence that the virus is a causative agent in the development of this disease. However, most women who become infected with HPV do not develop invasive cervical lesions, indicating that additional exogenous or genetic factors may determine whether HPV preclinical lesions will progress to cancer. Identification of these factors would be facilitated by a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular changes that accompany progression to malignancy. In addition, knowledge of which women are at greatest risk for disease progression would be a significant clinical advancement in the management of patients with premalignant cervical lesions.

  5. Overview of Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression and its Applications to Cervical Cancer Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Chao

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the leading female cancers in Taiwan and ranks as the fifth cause of cancer death in the female population. Human papillomavirus has been established as the causative agent for cervical neoplasia and cervical cancer. However, the tumor biology involved in the prognoses of different cell types in early cancers and tumor responses to radiation in advanced cancers remain largely unknown. The introduction of microarray technologies in the 1990s has provided genome-wide strategies for searching tens of thousands of genes simultaneously. In this review, we first summarize the two types of microarrays: oligonucleotides microarray and cDNA microarray. Then, we review the studies of functional genomics in cervical cancer. Gene expression studies that involved cervical cancer cell lines, cervical cells of cancer versus normal ectocervix, cancer tissues of different histology, radioresistant versus radiosensitive patients, and the combinatorial gene expression associated with chromosomal amplifications are discussed. In particular, CEACAM5, TACSTD1, S100P, and MSLN have shown to be upregulated in adenocarcinoma, and increased expression levels of CEACAM5 and TACSTD1 were significantly correlated with poorer patient outcomes. On the other hand, 35 genes, including apoptotic genes (e.g. BIK, TEGT, SSI-3, hypoxia-inducible genes (e.g. HIF1A, CA12, and tumor cell invasion and metastasis genes (e.g. CTSL, CTSB, PLAU, CD44, have been noted to echo the hypothesis that increased tumor hypoxia leads to radiation resistance in cervical cancer during radiation.

  6. Natural History of HPV and Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-12

    Dr. Phil Castle, an intramural research scientist at the National Institutes of Health, talks about the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, and cervical cancer and other anogenital cancers.  Created: 10/12/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  7. Why southeastern Nigerian women who are aware of cervical cancer screening do not go for cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigbu, Chibuike Ogwuegbu; Aniebue, Uzochukwu

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate reasons behind nonuptake of cervical cancer screening by women who are aware of cervical cancer screening in southeast Nigeria. Women attending gynecologic clinics of 3 health institutions in Enugu, Nigeria, were interviewed by means of a questionnaire to determine those who were aware of cervical cancer screening. The biodemographic characteristics and level of knowledge of cervical cancer screening of women who underwent a previous screen were compared with those of women who did not undergo a previous screen. Reasons for nonuptake of cervical cancer screening as well as potential reasons for undertaking cervical cancer screening were also extracted. A total of 3712 women were interviewed. Of these respondents, 2048 (55.2%) were aware of cervical cancer screening.Only 19.0% of those who were aware of cervical cancer screening underwent a previous screen. Level of knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, university education, and age had a significant impact on the uptake of cervical cancer screening. Poor health-seeking behavior and fear of violation of privacy are the major reasons for nonuptake of cervical cancer screening. Potential reasons for uptake of cervical cancer screening include development of symptoms, adequate educative information, and physician's recommendation. Women in southern Nigeria do not go for cervical cancer screening because of poor understanding of cervical cancer prevention, feeling of violation of the privacy of their genitals, and poor health-seeking behavior. There is a need to modify current policy approaches to cervical cancer prevention in Nigeria. Policies that will address the privacy violation fears and poor health-seeking behavior of the Nigerian woman as well improve the level of educative information on cervical cancer prevention need to be evolved.

  8. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Basics: Cervical Screening Tests What happens during a Pap test? A Pap test takes about 2 to 5 minutes. It may ... uterus, ovaries, and other organs. Learn more about Pap tests. What happens if I’m also having an ...

  9. Effects of irradiation for cervical cancer on subsequent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harlan, L.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous research suggests that cervical cancer patients have a lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population. Possible explanations include opposing risk factors for cervical cancer and breast cancer, the effect of irradiation used to treat cervical cancer, or both. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between irradiation for cervical cancer and the subsequent development of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant relationship between radiation to the ovarian area and the risk of breast cancer in this study. However, the results were consistent with a 19% reduction in risk for women irradiated for cervical cancer when compared to nonirradiated women. In a dose-response analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend of decreased risk of breast cancer with increased radiation up to 1800 rad. There was no consistent pattern for higher doses. The trend, although nonsignificant, differed by age. Women <60 years of age at irradiation were generally at a lower risk of breast cancer than nonirradiated women. Women over 59 years were at an increased risk. There are some potentially important findings from this study which might influence medical care. These should be examined in the larger International Radiation Study

  10. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella, E-mail: gabriella.ferrandina@libero.it [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Antonietta [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Gallotta, Valerio [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Smaniotto, Daniela [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Fagotti, Anna [Gynecologic Surgery, University of Perugia, Terni (Italy); Tagliaferri, Luca [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Autorino, Rosa [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Scambia, Giovanni [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Valentini, Vincenzo [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very

  11. Impact of bowel gas and body outline variations on total accumulated dose with intensity-modulated proton therapy in locally advanced cervical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Tanderup, Kari

    2017-11-01

    Density changes occurring during fractionated radiotherapy in the pelvic region may degrade proton dose distributions. The aim of the study was to quantify the dosimetric impact of gas cavities and body outline variations. Seven patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) were analyzed through a total of 175 daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Four-beams intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) dose plans were generated targeting the internal target volume (ITV) composed of: primary tumor, elective and pathological nodes. The planned dose was 45 Gy [Relative-Biological-Effectiveness-weighted (RBE)] in 25 fractions and simultaneously integrated boosts of pathologic lymph nodes were 55-57.5 Gy (RBE). In total, 475 modified CTs were generated to evaluate the effect of: 1/gas cavities, 2/outline variations and 3/the two combined. The anatomy of each fraction was simulated by propagating gas cavities contours and body outlines from each daily CBCT to the pCT. Hounsfield units corresponding to gas and fat were assigned to the propagated contours. D98 (least dose received by the hottest 98% of the volume) and D99.9 for targets and V43Gy(RBE) (volume receiving ≥43 Gy(RBE)) for organs at risk (OARs) were recalculated on each modified CT, and total dose was evaluated through dose volume histogram (DVH) addition across all fractions. Weight changes during radiotherapy were between -3.1% and 1.2%. Gas cavities and outline variations induced a median [range] dose degradation for ITV45 of 1.0% [0.5-3.5%] for D98 and 2.1% [0.8-6.4%] for D99.9. Outline variations had larger dosimetric impact than gas cavities. Worst nodal dose degradation was 2.0% for D98 and 2.3% for D99.9. The impact on bladder, bowel and rectum was limited with V43Gy(RBE) variations ≤3.5 cm 3 . Bowel gas cavities and outline variations had minor impact on accumulated dose in targets and OAR of four-field IMPT in a LACC population of moderate weight changes.

  12. Apolipoprotein C-II Is a Potential Serum Biomarker as a Prognostic Factor of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer After Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harima, Yoko; Ikeda, Koshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kanno, Shohei; Shiga, Toshiko; Tanigawa, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine pretreatment serum protein levels for generally applicable measurement to predict chemoradiation treatment outcomes in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma (CC). Methods and Materials: In a screening study, measurements were conducted twice. At first, 6 serum samples from CC patients (3 with no evidence of disease [NED] and 3 with cancer-caused death [CD]) and 2 from healthy controls were tested. Next, 12 serum samples from different CC patients (8 NED, 4 CD) and 4 from healthy controls were examined. Subsequently, 28 different CC patients (18 NED, 10 CD) and 9 controls were analyzed in the validation study. Protein chips were treated with the sample sera, and the serum protein pattern was detected by surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). Then, single MS-based peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and tandem MS (MS/MS)-based peptide/protein identification methods, were used to identify protein corresponding to the detected peak. And then, turbidimetric assay was used to measure the levels of a protein that indicated the best match with this peptide peak. Results: The same peak 8918 m/z was identified in both screening studies. Neither the screening study nor the validation study had significant differences in the appearance of this peak in the controls and NED. However, the intensity of the peak in CD was significantly lower than that of controls and NED in both pilot studies (P=.02, P=.04) and validation study (P=.01, P=.001). The protein indicated the best match with this peptide peak at 8918 m/z was identified as apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) using PMF and MS/MS methods. Turbidimetric assay showed that the mean serum levels of ApoC-II tended to decrease in CD group when compared with NED group (P=.078). Conclusion: ApoC-II could be used as a biomarker for detection in predicting and estimating the radiation treatment outcome of patients with CC

  13. Apolipoprotein C-II Is a Potential Serum Biomarker as a Prognostic Factor of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer After Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harima, Yoko, E-mail: harima@takii.kmu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Takii Hospital, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan); Ikeda, Koshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kanno, Shohei; Shiga, Toshiko [Department of Radiology, Takii Hospital, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan); Tanigawa, Noboru [Department of Radiology, Hirakata Hospital, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine pretreatment serum protein levels for generally applicable measurement to predict chemoradiation treatment outcomes in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma (CC). Methods and Materials: In a screening study, measurements were conducted twice. At first, 6 serum samples from CC patients (3 with no evidence of disease [NED] and 3 with cancer-caused death [CD]) and 2 from healthy controls were tested. Next, 12 serum samples from different CC patients (8 NED, 4 CD) and 4 from healthy controls were examined. Subsequently, 28 different CC patients (18 NED, 10 CD) and 9 controls were analyzed in the validation study. Protein chips were treated with the sample sera, and the serum protein pattern was detected by surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). Then, single MS-based peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and tandem MS (MS/MS)-based peptide/protein identification methods, were used to identify protein corresponding to the detected peak. And then, turbidimetric assay was used to measure the levels of a protein that indicated the best match with this peptide peak. Results: The same peak 8918 m/z was identified in both screening studies. Neither the screening study nor the validation study had significant differences in the appearance of this peak in the controls and NED. However, the intensity of the peak in CD was significantly lower than that of controls and NED in both pilot studies (P=.02, P=.04) and validation study (P=.01, P=.001). The protein indicated the best match with this peptide peak at 8918 m/z was identified as apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) using PMF and MS/MS methods. Turbidimetric assay showed that the mean serum levels of ApoC-II tended to decrease in CD group when compared with NED group (P=.078). Conclusion: ApoC-II could be used as a biomarker for detection in predicting and estimating the radiation treatment outcome of patients with CC.

  14. Detecting cervical cancer by quantitative promoter hypermethylation assay on cervical scrapings : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink-Peters, N; Wisman, G.B.A.; Jeronimo, C; Tokumaru, CY; Cohen, Y; Dong, SM; Klip, HG; Buikema, HJ; Suurmeijer, AJH; Hollema, H; Boezen, HM; Sidransky, D; van der Zee, AGJ

    Current morphology-based cervical cancer screening is associated with significant false-positive and false-negative results. Tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation is frequently present in cervical cancer. It is unknown whether a cervical scraping reflects the methylation status of the underlying

  15. Salvage Surgery for Cervical Cancer Recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rema, P; Mathew, Arun Peter; Suchetha, S; Ahmed, Iqbal

    2017-06-01

    Cervical cancer usually presents in advanced stages and is treated with chemoradiation. About 15-20 % patients present with local recurrence after chemoradiation. Radical surgical resection is the only treatment modality offering long term survival benefit in recurrent cervical cancer. The most common surgical option for these patients is pelvic exenteration. Radical hysterectomy may be done for patients with a small centrally located recurrence in the cervix with no infiltration of adjacent structures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morbidity and survival outcome following radical hysterectomy and pelvic exenteration for recurrent cancer cervix. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of our patients who underwent surgery for cancer cervix recurrence from January 2010 to December 2014. The postoperative morbidity was considered early if it happened in the initial 30 days of surgery and late if it occurred after 30 days. All patients were followed up till February 2015. Survival analysis was done using Kaplan- Meir method. Between January 2010 and December 2014, 20 patients with recurrent cervical cancer underwent radical surgical resection. The median age of the study group was 43 years (range 28-63 years). Seventeen patients had squamous cell carcinoma and 3 had adenocarcinoma. 13 underwent pelvic exenteration and 7 patients underwent radical type 2 hysterectomy with bilateral pelvic lymphnode dissection. In the exenteration group, 8 patients had anterior exenteration, 4 had total exenteration and one had posterior exenteration. Urinary diversion was done by ileal conduit in 8 patients, double barrel colostomy in two and wet colostomy in two patients. There were no immediate postoperative deaths. Operating time, blood transfusions needed and hospital stay was more in the exenteration group compared to radical hysterectomy patients. After pelvic exenteration post-operative complications were seen in 76.9 % of which the most common was of

  16. Radiation dose and subsequent risk for stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A; Smith, Susan A; Holowaty, Eric

    2013-01-01

    To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer.......To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer....

  17. [Chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Santos-Munive, Victoria; Alonso-Avelino, Juan Angel

    2013-01-01

    In order to spot common chromosomal imbalances in early and late lesions of cervical cancer that might be used as progression biomarkers, we made a search of literature in PubMed from 1996 to 2011. The medical subject headings employed were chromosomal alterations, loss of heterozygosis, cervical cancer, cervical tumorigenesis, chromosomal aberrations, cervical intraepithelial neoplasm and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. The common chromosomal imbalances were gains in 8q24 (77.7 %), 20q13 (66.9 %), 3q26 (47.1 %), Xp22 (43.8 %), and 5p15 (60 %), principally. On the other hand, integration of the high-risk human papillomavirus genome into the host chromosome has been associated with the development of neoplasia, but the chromosomal imbalances seem to precede and promote such integration. Chromosomal imbalances in 8q24, 20q13, 3q21-26 and 5p15-Xp22, determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization assay or comparative genomic hybridization assay for early detection of the presence of high-risk human papillomavirus, are promising markers of cervical cancer progression.

  18. Sexual Function in Cervical Cancer Survivors after Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Daga

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study evaluated sexual function in cervical cancer survivors after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods: Study participants comprised survivors of locally advanced cervical cancer (stages IIB-IVA who completed concurrent chemoradiotherapy along with intracavitary brachytherapy at least two years prior at Dr S.N.Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. We used the Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire to assess sexual function. The cut-off score of the Female Sexual Function Index that identified female sexual arousal disorder was 26.55. A score less than 26.55 indicated the presence of female sexual arousal disorder. Results:A total of 48 locally advanced cervical cancer survivors enrolled in the study. Survivors had a mean age of 46.5 years. All received chemoradiotherapy along with intracavitary brachytherapy. The average time for treatment was 53.5 days. Patients had an average score for sexual desire of 2, 2.3 for arousal, 2.3 for sexual satisfaction, and 2.1 for pain during intercourse. The overall average score was 11.84 (range: 3.2-19.5 with a cut-off of 26.55. All survivors suffered from female sexual arousal disorder. Conclusion: Cervical cancer survivors had decreased sexual function which indicated female sexual arousal disorder. Patient education and active treatment of complications related to cancer treatments is a must for improvement of sexual function among survivors. Long-term complications should be considered in terms of treatment planning and follow-up treatment to improve the quality of life of cancer survivors.

  19. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American women this year, more than twice the number of women who will be diagnosed with cervical (lower part of the uterus) and ovarian (female reproductive glands) cancers combined. However, in terms of 2007 ...

  20. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  1. Cervical cancer and the human immunodeficiency virus: a review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globally cervical cancer is one of the commonest cancers in women. It comprises approximately 12% of all cancers and is the commonest cancer in women in developing countries. The most recent compilation of global data indicates that an estimated 490 000 new cases of cervical cancer occur annually worldwide and ...

  2. Long-term Follow-up Results of a Multi-institutional Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in East and Southeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Chansilpa, Yaowalak; Cao, Jianping; Xu, Xiaoting; Devi, C. R. Beena; Swee, Tang Tieng; Calaguas, Miriam J.C.; Reyes, Rey H. de los; Cho, Chul-Koo; Dung, To Anh; Supriana, Nana; Erawati, Dyah; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term survival and toxicity of a multi-institutional phase 2 study of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. Methods and Materials: Ten institutions from 8 Asian countries participated in the study. Between April 2003 and March 2006, 120 patients (60 with bulky stage IIB and 60 with stage IIIB) were treated with CCRT. Radiation therapy consisted of pelvic external beam radiation therapy and either high-dose-rate or low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Five cycles of weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m 2 ) were administered during the course of radiation therapy. Treatment results were evaluated by the rates of local control, overall survival, and late toxicities. Results: Median follow-up was 63.7 months, and the follow-up rate at 5 years was 98%. The 5-year local control and overall survival rates for all patients were 76.8% and 55.1%, respectively. The 5-year rates of major late toxicities of the rectum and bladder were 7.9% and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: The long-term results have suggested that CCRT is safe and effective for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. However, further efforts are needed to improve overall survival

  3. Gene expression in early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, Petra; Buist, Marrije R.; Moerland, Perry D.; van Thernaat, Emiel Ver Loren; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Baas, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Pelvic lymph node metastases are the main prognostic factor for survival in early stage cervical cancer, yet accurate detection methods before surgery are lacking. In this study, we examined whether gene expression profiling can predict the presence of lymph node metastasis in early stage

  4. Cervical Cancer: paradigms at home and abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI funded a clinical trial that will have an impact on the treatment of late-stage cervical cancer, and also supported a screening trial in India using a network of community outreach workers offering low tech-screening by direct visualization of the cer

  5. New Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Human Papillomavirus (HPV): The name for a group of related viruses, some of which cause genital warts and some of which are linked to cervical changes and cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and ...

  6. Awareness and risk factors for cervical cancer among Women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Cervical cancer is the commonest genital tract malignancy in Nigeria. Previous evidence reported a high awareness but a low practice in cervical screening amongst Nigerian woman. Respondents attributed this to poor physician referral. Objective: To determine the level of cervical cancer awareness amongst out ...

  7. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of death among women worldwide. It is characterized by a well-defined premalignant phase that can be suspected on cytological examination of exfoliated cervical cells and confirmed on histological examination of cervical material. However, this is ...

  8. The therapy of the cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bártová, Lenka

    2010-01-01

    Charles University in Prague Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové Department of farmakology and toxikology Author: Lenka Bártová Director of my diploma work: PharmDr. Ludmila Melicharová Title of diploma work: The therapy of the cervical cancer This diploma work describes the possibilities of prevention and medical treatment of the cancer of the uterine uvula. The theoretical part contains the fundamental information about this disease, prevention and medical procedures. The inseparable part...

  9. Cervical Cancer Screening in Underserved Populations

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Lisa Flowers, a specialist in human papillovarius (HPV)-related diseases and Director of Colposcopy at Emory University School of Medicine, talks about cervical cancer screening in underinsured or uninsured women.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  10. The impact of anti HPV vaccination on cervical cancer incidence and HPV induced cervical lesions: consequences for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, J A; Caffrey, A S; Muderspach, L I; Roman, L D; Kast, W M

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Screening for cervical cancer is accomplished utilizing a Pap smear and pelvic exam. While this technology is widely available and has reduced cervical cancer incidence in industrialized nations, it is not readily available in third world countries in which cervical cancer incidence and mortality is high. Development of cervical cancer is associated with infection with high risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) creating a unique opportunity to prevent or treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination strategies. Several strategies have been examined in clinical trials for both the prevention of HPV infection and the treatment of pre-existing HPV-related disease. Clinical trials utilizing prophylactic vaccines containing virus-like particles (VLPs) indicate good vaccine efficacy and it is predicted that a prophylactic vaccine may be available within the next five years. But, preclinical research in this area continues in order to deal with issues such as cost of vaccination in underserved third world populations. A majority of clinical trials using therapeutic agents which aim to prevent the progression of pre-existing HPV associated lesions or cancers have shown limited efficacy in eradicating established tumors in humans possibly due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Future trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents will examine patients with early stage cancers or pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field continue and include the further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. Given that cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions and prophylactic vaccination to

  11. Robot-assisted laparoscopic transperitoneal infrarenal lymphadenectomy in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer by single docking: Do we need a backup procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucer, Fatih; Misirlioglu, Selim; Ceydeli, Nuri; Taskiran, Cagatay

    2018-03-01

    To present our initial experience on the feasibility of robotic transperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy up to left renal vein via single docking approach by high port insertion technique followed by left shoulder docking as a rescue backup procedure in surgically obstructed patients undergoing surgical staging because of locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Prospective observational preliminary study. Canadian Task Force classification II-3. Tertiary-care academic affiliated private hospital. Ten patients with LACC who underwent robotic transperitoneal infrarenal para-aortic lymphadenectomy between January 2012 and December 2014. All patients with pathologically proven cervical cancer underwent a PET/CT scanning in a similar fashion at the department of nuclear medicine. PET/CT scans were evaluated by the nuclear medicine specialist. Following pre-operative work-up, robot-assisted transperitoneal infrarenal para-aortic lymphadenectomy was performed up to left renal vein by the same experienced surgeon. Sections of 5 mm were performed and stained with routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), and node count was done separately by experienced gynecopathologist. During the study period, 12 consecutive patients with LACC were counseled for pre-therapeutic robot-assisted transperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy. Two patients declined the procedure and underwent standardized chemo-radiation therapy whereas remaining ten patients constituted the study group. In the study group, the median age was 46 years (range 33-59 years), and the median body mass index 28.5 kg/m 2 (range 18.5-35.1 kg/m 2 ). Clinical staging was stage IIB in four patients, IIIB in four, and IVA in one. Histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma in nine patients, and adenocarcinoma in one. On PET/CT scans, seven out of ten patients were positive for pelvic lymph node metastasis. With respect to para-aortic area, only one of the ten patients had suspected metastasis in PET/CT. For

  12. Prophylactic lower para-aortic irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy mitigates the risk of para-aortic recurrence in locally advanced cervical cancer: A 10-year institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jie; Lin, Jhen-Bin; Chang, Chih-Long; Jan, Ya-Ting; Sun, Fang-Ju; Wu, Meng-Hao; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of prophylactic sub-renal vein radiotherapy (SRVRT) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer. A total of 206 patients with FIGO stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer and negative para-aortic lymph nodes (PALNs) who underwent pelvic IMRT (PRT) or SRVRT between 2004 and 2013 at our institution were reviewed. SRVRT cranially extended the PRT field for PALNs up to the left renal vein level. The prescribed dose was consistent 50.4Gy in 28 fractions. Overall, 110 and 96 patients underwent PRT and SRVRT, respectively. The SRVRT group had more advanced disease based on FIGO stage and positive pelvic lymph nodes (PLNs). The median follow-up time was 60months (range, 7-143). For the total study population, the 5-year PALN recurrence-free survival (PARFS) and overall survival (OS) for PRT vs. SRVRT were 87.6% vs. 97.9% (p=0.03) and 74.5% vs. 87.8% (p=0.04), respectively. In patients with FIGO III-IVA or positive PLNs, the 5-year PARFS and OS for PRT vs. SRVRT were 80.1% vs. 96.4% (p=0.02) and 58.1% vs. 83.5% (p=0.012), respectively. However, there were no significant differences in these outcomes for patients with FIGO IB-IIB and negative PLNs. In a multivariate analysis, only SRVRT was associated with better PARFS (HR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.06-0.78; p=0.02). The SRVRT did not significantly increase severe late toxicities. Prophylactic SRVRT using IMRT reduced PALN recurrence with tolerable toxicities, supporting the application of risk-based radiation fields for cervical cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Concurrent weekly cisplatin plus external beam radiotherapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy for advanced cervical cancer: A control cohort comparison with radiation alone on treatment outcome and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.-W.; Liang, J.-A.; Hung, Y.-C.; Yeh, L.-S.; Chang, W.-C.; Lin, W.-C.; Yang, S.-N.; Lin, F.-J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test, though a control-cohort study, the hypothesis that concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using weekly cisplatin, plus high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB) is superior to radiation (RT) alone in patients with advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 171 patients with Stage IIB-III cervical cancer were enrolled in this study. Seventy patients were treated with CCRT and the results were compared with those of 101 patients who had been treated with RT using the same protocol at an early period. RT consisted of 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the whole pelvis, followed by a 12.6-Gy boost to the parametrium. Four courses of HDRICB using 6.0 Gy to Point A were performed. Chemotherapy consisted of weekly cisplatin at a dose of 40 mg/m 2 for 5-6 cycles. Results: The 4-year actuarial survival was 74% for the CCRT group and 68% for the RT group (p = 0.60). The 4-year pelvic relapse-free survival was 87% for the CCRT group and 85% for the RT group (p = 0.37). The 4-year distant metastases-free survival was 75% for the CCRT group and 76% for the RT group (p = 0.44). The cumulative incidence of gastrointestinal and genitourinary injuries of grade 3 or above was 14.3% for the CCRT group and 7.9% for the RT group (p = 0.19). Conclusion: This study did not show a survival benefit of CCRT with weekly cisplatin and HDRICB for Stage II-III cervical cancer, nor did it demonstrate a significant increase of late complications when comparing with RT alone

  14. Cervical cancer incidence and mortality in Fiji 2003-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Rebecca; Fong, James; Taylor, Richard; Gyaneshwar, Rajanishwar; Carter, Karen

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies indicate that cervical cancer is the second most frequent cancer and most common cause of cancer mortality among women in Fiji. There is little published data on the epidemiology of cervical cancer in Pacific countries. To determine the incidence 2003-2009 of, and mortality 2003-2008 from, cervical cancer by ethnicity and period in Fiji, identify evidence of secular change and relate these data to other Pacific countries, Australia and New Zealand. Counts of incident cervical cancer cases (2003-2009) and unit record mortality data (2003-2008) from the Fiji Ministry of Health were used to calculate age-standardised (to the WHO World Population) cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates, and cervical or uterine cancer mortality rates, by ethnicity, with 95% confidence intervals. On the basis of comparison of cervical cancer mortality with cervical or uterine cancer mortality in Fiji with similar populations, misclassification of cervical cancer deaths is unlikely. There is no evidence of secular change in cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates for the study period. For women of all ages and ethnicities, the age-standardised incidence rate of cervical cancer (2003-2009) was 27.6 per 100,000 (95% CI 25.4-29.8) and the age-standardised mortality rate (2003-2008) was 23.9 per 100,000 (95% CI 21.5-26.4). The mortality/incidence ratio was 87%. Fijians had statistically significant higher age-standardised incidence and mortality rates than Indians. Fiji has one of the highest estimated rates of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in the Pacific region. Cervical cancer screening in Fiji needs to be expanded and strengthened. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of adriamycin vaginal suppository on uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Tsuneo; Kiyozuka, Yasuhiko; Katakami, Yoshiaki

    1986-01-01

    Vaginal suppositories of Adriamycin (ADM, 5 mg), for reducing the capacity for repair from sublethal damage of X-ray-irradiated cells, were prepared using Wipepsol S-55 as the vehicle, and were intravaginally administered to patients with advanced uterine cervical cancer, and their pharmacokinetics and clinical effects were studied. The ADM concentration in the uterine cervical cancer tissues indicated high levels (17 to 566 μg/g), and migration into the cardinal ligament and regional lymph nodes was noted. However, little ADM was detected in serum (0 to 0.14 μg/g), probably because of its molecular weight and excellent tissue absorbance, and no side effects, such as cardiotoxicity and myelosuppression due to consecutive administration were detected. Histologically, the effect obtained when administered alone was limited, administration in combination with radiotherapy being more effective. Accordingly, radiotherapy of advanced uterine cervical cancer with concomitant administration of ADM vaginal suppositories seems to bring about a more powerful antitumoral effect with fewer systemic side effects. (author)

  16. Study to Understand Cervical Cancer Early Endpoints and Determinants (SUCCEED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study to comprehensively assess biomarkers of risk for progressive cervical neoplasia, and thus develop a new set of biomarkers that can distinguish those at highest risk of cervical cancer from those with benign infection

  17. dose in cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Siavashpour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the optimum organ filling point for organs at risk (OARs dose in cervical cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. Material and methods : In a retrospective study, 32 locally advanced cervical cancer patients (97 insertions who were treated with 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy during 2010-2013 were included. Rotterdam HDR tandem-ovoid applicators were used and computed tomography (CT scanning was performed after each insertion. The OARs delineation and GEC-ESTRO-based clinical target volumes (CTVs contouring was followed by 3D forward planning. Then, dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of organs were recorded and patients were classified based on their OARs volumes, as well as their inserted tandem length. Results : The absorbed dose to point A ranged between 6.5-7.5 Gy. D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³ of the bladder significantly increased with the bladder volume enlargement (p value < 0.05. By increasing the bladder volume up to about 140 cm3, the rectum dose was also increased. For the cases with bladder volumes higher than 140 cm3, the rectum dose decreased. For bladder volumes lower than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose decreased; however, for bladder volumes higher than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose increased. The D 2cm ³ of the bladder and rectum were higher for longer tandems than for shorter ones, respectively. The divergence of the obtained results for different tandem lengths became wider by the extension of the bladder volume. The rectum and sigmoid volume had a direct impact on increasing their D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³, as well as decreasing their D 10 , D 30 , and D 50 . Conclusions : There is a relationship between the volumes of OARs and their received doses. Selecting a bladder with a volume of about 70 cm3 or less proved to be better with regards to the dose to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid.

  18. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy

  19. Knowledge, perceptions and practice of cervical cancer prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Cervical cancer is the most common gynecological cancer and a leading cause of cancer death in women in Nigeria. This study was aimed to assess the knowledge, perception, and practice of cervical cancer prevention among female public secondary school teachers in Mushin, Lagos. Methods: This was a ...

  20. Cervical Cancer Screening by Female Workers in South East Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is the commonest genital tract cancer worldwide and one of the leading causes of death from cancer among women in developing countries . It is therefore a major female reproductive health problem. Roughly 80% of newly diagnosed cases of cervical cancer are in developing countries. Rates are highest ...

  1. Cervical cancer: a missed health priority in Tanzania | Saleh | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is a malignant neoplasm of the cervix uteri. It is the second commonest cancer in women worldwide and is among the largest causes of global cancer mortality. Human papilloma virus (HPV) which is transmitted sexually, particularly subtypes 16 and 18 are responsible for causing majority of cervical cancer ...

  2. Abnormal pap smear and cervical cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kathleen Y

    2012-09-01

    Pregnancy represents a unique opportunity to screen reproductive age women for cervical cancer and abnormal cervical cytology is relatively common in this population. In the absence of large, prospective clinical trials investigating the optimal management strategies for cervical dysplasia in pregnant women, consensus guidelines established by the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology is available with considerations to this special patient population. Modalities for evaluation and management algorithms are reviewed and summarized from largely case series of pregnant women with cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer.

  3. Optical coherence tomography in diagnosing cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetzova, Irina A.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kachalina, Tatiana S.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Myakov, Alexey V.; Iksanov, Rashid R.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    2000-05-01

    Cervical cancer remains one of the most significant problem in oncogynecology. It tends towards treatment approaches that provide termination of pathological processes along with preservation of the patient's life quality. There is a need in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of pathological states, objective assessment of physiological processes, and adequate monitoring of the course of treatment. In our previous publications we have reported unique capabilities of the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) to image in vivo the mucosa structure of the cervix and to monitor various physiological and pathological alterations. In this report, we present results of OCT application to diagnose different stages of cervical cancer and to control its treatment at early stages. We have performed OCT-colposcopy in 11 female patients with cervical cancer to derive OCT criteria of this disease, to provide exact demarcation of a pathological area, and to determine a real size of a tumor. We have found that, in general, borders of a tumor, defined visually and detected with OCT by violation of the basement membrane in exocervix, do not coincide. The mismatch depends on a stage of cancer and can be as much as several millimeters. This information is especially important for evaluation of linear dimension of tumors with 3 - 5 mm invasion and also for differential diagnosis between the T1 and T2 stages with cancer extension onto vagina.

  4. Self-Advocacy Serious Game in Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-12

    Ovarian Cancer Stage III; Ovarian Cancer Stage IV; Breast Cancer Stage IV; Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB; Cervical Cancer Stage IVA; Cervical Cancer Stage IVB; Endometrial Cancer Stage III; Endometrial Cancer Stage IV; Vulvar Cancer, Stage III; Vulvar Cancer, Stage IV; Vaginal Cancer Stage III; Vaginal Cancer Stage IVA; Vaginal Cancer Stage IVB

  5. Exploring the barriers to health care and psychosocial challenges in cervical cancer management in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngutu M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mariah Ngutu, Isaac K Nyamongo Institute of Anthropology, Gender and African Studies (IAGAS, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya Abstract: Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women aged between 15 years and 44 years in Kenya, resulting in an estimated 4,802 women being diagnosed with cervical cancer and 2,451 dying from the disease annually. It is often detected at its advanced invasive stages, resulting in a protracted illness upon diagnosis. This qualitative study looked at the illness trajectories of women living with cervical cancer enrolled for follow-up care at Kenyatta National Hospital cancer treatment center and the Nairobi Hospice, both in Nairobi county, Kenya. Using the qualitative phenomenological approach, data were collected through 18 in-depth interviews with women living with cervical cancer between April and July 2011. In-depth interviews with their caregivers, key informant interviews with health care workers, and participant observation field notes were used to provide additional qualitative data. These data were analyzed based on grounded theory’s inductive approach. Two key themes on which the data analysis was then anchored were identified, namely, psychosocial challenges of cervical cancer and structural barriers to quality health care. Findings indicated a prolonged illness trajectory with psychosocial challenges, fueled by structural barriers that women were faced with after a cervical cancer diagnosis. To address issues relevant to the increasing numbers of women with cervical cancer, research studies need to include larger samples of these women. Also important are studies that allow in-depth understanding of the experiences of women living with cervical cancer. Keywords: qualitative, illness trajectories, women, cervical cancer

  6. Cervical cancer control in HIV-infected women: Past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahel G. Ghebre

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the initial recognition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in 1981, an increased burden of cervical cancer was identified among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive women. Introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART decreased risks of opportunistic infections and improved overall survival. HIV-infected women are living longer. Introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine, cervical cancer screening and early diagnosis provide opportunities to reduce cervical cancer associated mortality. In line with 2030 Sustainable Development Goals to reduce mortality from non-communicable diseases, increased efforts need to focus on high burden countries within sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. Despite limitations of resources in SSA, opportunities exist to improve cancer control. This article reviews advancements in cervical cancer control in HIV-positive women.

  7. [Papillomavirus and cervical cancer in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela, María Teresa

    2008-11-01

    Molecular, clinical and epidemiological studies have established beyond doubt that human papiloma viruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer. The virus is also associated with genital warts and other less common cancers in oropharynx, vulva, vagina and penis. Worldwide, VPH genotypes 16 and 18 are the most common high risk genotypes, detected in near 70% of women with cervical cancer. The discovery of a cause-effect relationship between several carcinogenic microorganisms and cancer open avenues for new diagnostic, treatment and prevention strategies. In this issue of Revista Médica de Chile, two papers on HPV are presented. Guzman and colleagues demonstrate that HPV can be detected in 66% to 77% of healthy male adolescents bypolymerase chain reaction and that positivity depends on the site of the penis that is sampled. These results support the role of male to female transmission of high risk HPVs in Chile and should lead to even more active educational campaigns. The second paper provides recommendations for HPV vaccine use in Chile, generated by the Immunization Advisory Committee of the Chilean Infectious Disease Society. To issue these recommendations, the Committee analyzes the epidemiological information available on HPV infection and cervical cancer in Chile, vaccine safety and effectiveness data, and describes cost-effectiveness studies. Taking into account that universal vaccination is controversial, the Committee favors vaccine use in Chile and it's incorporation into a national program. However, there is an indication that the country requires the implementation of an integrated surveillance approach including cross matching of data obtained from HPV genotype surveillance, monitoring of vaccination coverage, and surveillance of cervical cancer. The final decision of universal vaccine use in Chile should be based on a through analysis of information.ev Mid Chile

  8. Quality of life measurement in women with cervical cancer: implications for Chinese cervical cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Shirley SY

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women with cervical cancer now have relatively good 5-year survival rates. Better survival rates have driven the paradigm in cancer care from a medical illness model to a wellness model, which is concerned with the quality of women's lives as well as the length of survival. Thus, the assessment of quality of life among cervical cancer survivors is increasingly paramount for healthcare professionals. The purposes of this review were to describe existing validated quality of life instruments used in cervical cancer survivors, and to reveal the implications of quality of life measurement for Chinese cervical cancer survivors. Methods A literature search of five electronic databases was conducted using the terms cervical/cervix cancer, quality of life, survivors, survivorship, measurement, and instruments. Articles published in either English or Chinese from January 2000 to June 2009 were searched. Only those adopting an established quality of life instrument for use in cervical cancer survivors were included. Results A total of 11 validated multidimensional quality of life instruments were identified from 41 articles. These instruments could be classified into four categories: generic, cancer-specific, cancer site-specific and cancer survivor-specific instruments. With internal consistency varying from 0.68-0.99, the test-retest reliability ranged from 0.60-0.95 based on the test of the Pearson coefficient. One or more types of validity supported the construct validity. Although all these instruments met the minimum requirements of reliability and validity, the original versions of these instruments were mainly in English. Conclusion Selection of an instrument should consider the purpose of investigation, take its psychometric properties into account, and consider the instrument's origin and comprehensiveness. As quality of life can be affected by culture, studies assessing the quality of life of cervical cancer survivors in

  9. The investment case for cervical cancer elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsu, Vivien Davis; Ginsburg, Ophira

    2017-07-01

    We already know what causes cervical cancer, how to prevent it, and how to treat it, even in resource-constrained settings. Inequitable access to human papillomavirus vaccine for girls and screening and precancer treatment for women in low- and middle-income countries is unacceptable on ethical, social, and financial grounds. The burden of cervical cancer falls on the poor and extends beyond the narrow bounds of the family, affecting national economic development and community life, as family resources are drained and poverty tightens its grip. Proven solutions are available and the priorities for the next few years are clear, as shown by the papers in this Supplement. Sustained political commitment and strategic investments in cervical cancer prevention can not only save millions of lives over the next 10 years, but can also pave the way for the broader fight against all cancers. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  10. The male role in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellsagué Xavier

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental, clinical, and epidemiological evidence strongly suggests that genital Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs are predominantly sexually transmitted. Epidemiological studies in virginal and HPV-negative women clearly indicate that sexual intercourse is virtually a necessary step for acquiring HPV. As with any other sexually transmitted disease (STD men are implicated in the epidemiological chain of the infection. Penile HPVs are predominantly acquired through sexual contacts. Sexual contacts with women who are prostitutes play an important role in HPV transmission and in some populations sex workers may become an important reservoir of high-risk HPVs. Acting both as "carriers" and "vectors" of oncogenic HPVs male partners may markedly contribute to the risk of developing cervical cancer in their female partners. Thus, in the absence of screening programs, a woman's risk of cervical cancer may depend less on her own sexual behavior than on that of her husband or other male partners. Although more rarely than women, men may also become the "victims" of their own HPV infections as a fraction of infected men are at an increased risk of developing penile and anal cancers. Male circumcision status has been shown to reduce the risk not only of acquiring and transmitting genital HPVs but also of cervical cancer in their female partners. More research is needed to better understand the natural history and epidemiology of HPV infections in men.

  11. Cervical cancer: evaluation of our results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Cola, A.; Suárez, L.; Castillo, C.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Cervical cancer in women occupies 3rd place in incidence and 5th as a cause of cancer death in our country. The evolution is mainly determined by the stage, nodal status and histological type. The treatment of these tumors is surgical, radiant and / or systemic, depending on your choice mainly Stadium. Objective: To analyze the characteristics, evolution, treatment and survival of patients carriers of cervical cancer. Patients and Methods: The medical records were retrospectively analyzed for patients with cervical cancer treated at the Department of Oncology the Clinical Hospital in the period 1994-2004. Curves were constructed survival (sv) of total and free enfemedad sv sv by stage and after relapse by the method of Kaplan-Meier. Results: n = 75 patients, median age 45 years (24-90 years). Histological type: Epidermoid carcinomas 93% 5% 2% adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous. stadium (E) Initial: 31% IE, 38% EII, EIII 25%, 6% EIVA. Treatment was according to the stadium, considering that until 1999 was not standard concurrent chemoradiation. The median sv considering all stages was 124 months. The sv to 5 years for EI was 90% (median 188 sv months), for the ISI 65% (95 months) and the median sv CIRTs was 24 months. Followed for 13 months, 12 patients relapsed and the median after sv relapse was 8 months (95% CI 4-13 months) Conclusions: Although cervical cancer is a preventable disease, remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Our results are consistent with those reported in the literature, however far from the optimal, so it is necessary to continue clinical trials in this regard

  12. Standardized uptake value in para-aortic lymph nodes is a significant prognostic factor in patients with primary advanced squamous cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Molecular Imaging Center and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taoyuan (China); See, Lai-Chu [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Biostatistics Consulting Center, Department of Public Health, Taoyuan (China); Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chao, Angel; Chang, Ting-Chang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taoyuan (China); Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Hong, Ji-Hong [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Taoyuan (China); Hsueh, Swei [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Taoyuan (China); Ng, Koon-Kwan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Taoyuan (China)

    2008-03-15

    We sought to identify prognostic factors - including positron emission tomography (PET) parameters - in patients with previously untreated squamous carcinoma of the uterine cervix and MRI- or CT-defined pelvic or para-aortic lymph node (PLN or PALN) metastasis. Patients with untreated squamous cell cervical cancer and PLN or PALN metastasis detected by CT/MRI were enrolled. FDG-PET scans were performed for primary staging. Prognostic variables were investigated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Five-year recurrence-free and 5-year overall survivals (RFS and OS) were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 70 patients [54 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I or II, and 16 patients with stage III or IV] were eligible. Follow-up ranged from 26.1 to 71.6 months. In multivariate analysis, FIGO stage {>=}III (5-year RFS, p = 0.008; 5-year OS, p = 0.008) was a significant prognostic factor for both RFS and OS. In addition, SUV{sub max} for PALN (dichotomized by 3.3) was significantly associated with OS (p = 0.012) and marginally with RFS (p = 0.078). The presence of SUV{sub max} {>=} 3.3 at PALN or FIGO stage {>=}III were significantly associated with both recurrence [5-year RFS; HR = 4.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.73-11.80] and death (5-year OS; HR = 6.04, 95% CI = 1.97-18.57). SUV{sub max} {>=} 3.3 for PALN and FIGO stage {>=}III were significant adverse factors in patients with primary squamous cervical carcinoma and PLN or PALN metastasis detected by CT/MRI. (orig.)

  13. Low adherence to cervical cancer screening after subtotal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lea Laird; Møller, Lars Mikael Alling; Gimbel, Helga Margrethe

    2015-01-01

    have unnecessary tests performed after total hysterectomy. Clarification of the use of cervical/vaginal smears after hysterectomy is needed to identify women at risk of cervical dysplasia or cancer. FUNDING: Research Foundation of Region Zealand, University of Southern Denmark, Nykøbing Falster......INTRODUCTION: A reason for not recommending subtotal hysterectomy is the risk of cervical pathology. We aimed to evaluate cervical cancer screening and to describe cervical pathology after subtotal and total hysterectomy for benign indications. METHODS: Data regarding adherence to screening.......7% were not screened. We found a minimum of one abnormal test in 28 (10.8%) after subtotal hysterectomy and one after total hysterectomy. No cervical cancers were found. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to cervical cancer screening after subtotal hysterectomy in a Danish population is suboptimal and some patients...

  14. Dyspnea during Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when the information is about children. Dyspnea During Advanced Cancer Key Points Many conditions can cause dyspnea. ... Echocardiography : A procedure in which high-energy sound waves ( ultrasound ) are bounced off internal tissues or organs ...

  15. Second cancer after radiotherapy of the uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Tadashi; Soejima, Toshinori; Hirota, Saeko; Obayashi, Kayoko; Ishida, Teruko; Takada, Yoshiki; Yoshida, Shoji; Kimura, Shuji

    1993-01-01

    To study the relative risk of second cancer after radiotherapy, we reviewed 2465 cases of uterine cervical cancer who were treated in our institute from 1962 to 1986 and were followed up for more than 5 years. Among them, 1502 cases were treated by radiotherapy with or without surgery (radiotherapy group), and the remainder were treated by surgery only (surgery only group). We defined second cancer as malignancy that occurred in another organ after an interval of 5 years or more from the end of treatment of the first cancer. The relative risk of second cancer was computed by the person-year method advocated by Schoenberg. Second cancer was observed among 8 cases of the surgery group, whereas 43 cases were observed among the radiotherapy group. The cases were: rectal cancer, 6 cases; bladder cancer, 4 cases. The observed and expected ratio (O/E ratio) was 4.02 in rectal cancer and 7.98 in bladder cancer. This incidence of the both cancers was significantly high in the radiotherapy group. Three of the 6 cases with rectal cancer underwent operation in our institute. The incubation periods between the first and second cancers were from 9 to 21 years. Each case exhibited symptoms of chronic radiation proctitis after radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. It is thought necessary to follow up such cases carefully to detect radiation induced cancer. (author)

  16. COEXISTANCE OF CERVICAL CANCER AND MISSED ABORTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. L. Chernyshova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the most common malignancy associated with pregnancy. The clinical case presented in this paper is of interest for several reasons. First, human chorionic trophoblast was shown to be a target for HPV, resulting in termination of pregnancy, as evidenced by the analysis of HPV of the abortion material (high HPV 16 viral load. In addition, iliac lymph node metastasis occurred in minimal tumor invasion, significantly affecting the rate of survival.

  17. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Erickson, Beth [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Beriwal, Sushil [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bhatia, Sudershan K. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Lee Burnett, Omer [University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); D' Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh [London Health Sciences Centre and Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Haddock, Michael G. [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Ellen L. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kunos, Charles A. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Lee, Larissa J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lin, Lilie L. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mayr, Nina A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petric, Primoz [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Small, William [Loyola University Strich School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Strauss, Jonathan B. [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  18. Cervical Cancer Awareness and Preventive Practices: A Challenge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is the commonest gynaecological cancer in Nigeria and women of low socio-economic status are at high risk of this condition. A study was conducted on the awareness of cervical cancer, attitude towards the disease and screening practice of women residing in two urban slums of Lagos, Nigeria.

  19. Clinico-pathological characteristics of cervical cancer in Ghanaian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of cancer related mortality in the developing countries, although preventable. The aim of this study was to use a retrospective descriptive study to determine the prevalence and the clinico-pathological characteristics of cervical cancer among genital tract ma-lignancies. This study reviewed ...

  20. Barriers to utilization of cervical cancer screening services among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among women of reproductive age group; yet screening for early detection of the disease among them is not a common practice in Nigeria. This study therefore, investigated the barriers to utilization of cervical cancer screening service among women of ...

  1. The Need for Societal Investment to Improve Cervical Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although cervical cancer is a preventable cancer with a well-known natural history, it remains a huge burden in developing countries of sub-Saharan Africa where organized cervical cancer screening services are lacking. Developed countries that have invested on providing organized screening programs have made ...

  2. Awareness and perception of risk for cervical cancer among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer, though preventable, remains the leading cause of cancer death among women in developing countries after breast. Lack of awareness and access to preventive methods remains a key factor contributing to high levels of cervical cancer in these populations. Objectives: The study aimed to ...

  3. Drug Delivery Approaches for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Ordikhani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent research in systematic and localized drug delivery systems and compared the advantages and disadvantages of these methods.

  4. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  5. Cervical syphilitic lesions mimicking cervical cancer: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A woman presented to the hospital due to postcoital vaginal bleeding. The patient was initially diagnosed with cervical carcinoma by clinicians at a local hospital. However, a biopsy of the cervical lesions revealed chronic inflammation and erosion of the cervical mucosa, and the rapid plasma reagin ratio titer was 1:256. The patient was eventually diagnosed with syphilitic cervicitis and treated with minocycline 0.1 g twice a day. The patient was cured with this treatment.

  6. Exploration of knowledge of cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening amongst HIV-positive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna E. Maree

    2014-10-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine what women being treated for HIV and AIDS at a specific healthcare centre in Johannesburg knew about cervical cancer and cervical screening. Method: A survey design was used, with data gathered by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Convenience sampling selected 315 women to participate (n = 315. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data and chi-square testing found associations between categorical variables. Results: The majority of respondents (78.7%; n = 248 indicated that they had heard of cervical cancer and 62.9% (n = 198 knew about the Pap smear, with nurses and doctors being the primary source of information. Of the women who knew about the Pap smear, less than one-third had had a smear done, the main reason being fear of the procedure. Conclusion: The study provided evidence that women attending the specific HIV clinic were more knowledgeable about cervical cancer and screening than those of unknown HIV status involved in previous studies. Knowledge was still at a low level, especially when their exceptionally high risk was taken into account. Once again it was found that having knowledge did not necessarily mean having had a Pap smear, which remains a huge challenge in the prevention of cervical cancer.

  7. Biologia molecular do câncer cervical Molecular biology of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Augusto Rivoire

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A carcinogênese é um processo de múltiplas etapas. Alterações no equilíbrio citogenético ocorrem na transformação do epitélio normal a câncer cervical. Numerosos estudos apoiam a hipótese de que a infecção por HPV está associada com o desenvolvimento de alterações malignas e pré-malignas do trato genital inferior. Neste trabalho são apresentadas as bases para a compreensão da oncogênese cervical. O ciclo celular é controlado por proto-oncogenes e genes supressores. Quando ocorrem mutações, proto-oncogenes tornam-se oncogenes, que são carcinogênicos e causam multiplicação celular excessiva. A perda da ação de genes supressores funcionais pode levar a célula ao crescimento inadequado. O ciclo celular também pode ser alterado pela ação de vírus, entre eles o HPV (Human Papiloma Virus, de especial interesse na oncogênese cervical. Os tipos de HPV 16 e 18 são os de maior interesse, freqüentemente associados a câncer cervical e anal. O conhecimento das bases moleculares que estão envolvidas na oncogênese cervical tem sido possível devido a utilização de técnicas avançadas de biologia molecular. A associação destas técnicas aos métodos diagnósticos clássicos, poderão levar a uma melhor avaliação das neoplasias cervicais e auxiliar no desenvolvimento de novas terapias, talvez menos invasivas e mais efetivas.Carcinogenesis involves several steps. Disorders of the cytogenetic balance occur during the evolution from normal epithelium to cervical cancer. Several studies support the hypothesis that the Human Papiloma Virus (HPV infection is associated to development of premalignant and malignant lesions of cervical cancer. In this review we show the basis to understand cervical oncogenesis. The cell cycle is controlled by protooncogenes and supressive genes. This orchestrated cell cycle can be affected by virus such as HPV. Of special interest in the cervical carcinogenesis are the HPV subtypes 16 and 18

  8. Human papillomavirus infection, cervical dysplasia and invasive cervical cancer in Honduras: a case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrera, A.B.; Velema, J.P.; Figueroa, M.; Bulnes, R.; Toro, L.A.; Claros, J.M.; Barahona, O. de; Melchers, W.J.G.

    1999-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence has confirmed human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as the central etiological agents in human cervical carcinogenesis. In Honduras, cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women, with a high annual incidence. We conducted a population-based, case-control study

  9. Manifestation pattern of early-late vaginal morbidity after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: an analysis from the EMBRACE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Nout, Remi A; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Westerveld, Henrike; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study (www.embracestudy.dk) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity is still pronounced with currently applied IGABT, and it needs further attention

  10. Impact of bowel gas and body outline variations on total accumulated dose with intensity-modulated proton therapy in locally advanced cervical cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Thomas; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2017-01-01

    cervical cancer (LACC) were analyzed through a total of 175 daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Four-beams intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) dose plans were generated targeting the internal target volume (ITV) composed of: primary tumor, elective and pathological nodes. The planned...... induced a median [range] dose degradation for ITV45 of 1.0% [0.5-3.5%] for D98 and 2.1% [0.8-6.4%] for D99.9. Outline variations had larger dosimetric impact than gas cavities. Worst nodal dose degradation was 2.0% for D98 and 2.3% for D99.9. The impact on bladder, bowel and rectum was limited with V43Gy......(RBE) variations ≤3.5 cm3. CONCLUSION: Bowel gas cavities and outline variations had minor impact on accumulated dose in targets and OAR of four-field IMPT in a LACC population of moderate weight changes....

  11. Patterns of Failure and Treatment-Related Toxicity in Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients Treated Using Extended Field Radiotherapy With Curative Intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Bernshaw, David; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Barkati, Maroie; Narayan, Kailash

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of failure and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates in cervical cancer patients who had metastatic disease in common iliac or para-aortic lymph nodes and were treated with curative intent, using extended field radiotherapy (EFRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study involving 39 patients treated from January 1996 to June 2007, using EFRT with concurrent chemotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. EFRT consisted of 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Radiation to involved nodes was boosted to a total dose of 50.4 to 54 Gy. Primary tumor radiation was boosted to a dose of 80 Gy using brachytherapy. Results: Overall, 30 patients (77%) have relapsed. The 5-year OS rate was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11-44). The 5-year DFS rate was 19.4% (95% CI, 8-35). Only 3 patients (7.5%) experienced treatment failure exclusively within the treatment field, and 2 patients underwent salvage treatment. Grade 3 to 4 acute bone marrow and gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in 10 (26%) and 7 (18%) patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemotherapy and EFRT treatment was well tolerated. Most patients showed failure at multiple sites and outside the treatment field. Only 3/39 patients had failures exclusively within the treatment field, and 2 underwent salvage treatment.

  12. Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Screening and Treatment of Precancerous Lesions for Cervical Cancer Prevention in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mandeel, Hazem Mahmoud; Sagr, Emad; Sait, Khalid; Latifah, Hassan Mohamed; Al-Obaid, Abdulaziz; Al-Badawi, Ismail A; Alkushi, Abdulmohsen O; Salem, Hany; Massoudi, Nada S; Schunemann, Holger; Mustafa, Reem A; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common gynecological malignancy in Saudi women with an estimated incidence rate of 1.9 cases per 100 000 women-years. More than 40% of cervical cancer cases are diagnosed at advanced stages due to lack of a routine screening program in Saudi Arabia. Thus, national guidelines for routine screening and treatment of precancerous cervical lesions are needed. The Saudi Centre for Evidence-Based Healthcare invited a panel of local experts and partnered them with a team from McMaster University in Canada for methodological support, to develop national clinical practice guidelines on the screening and treatment of precancerous lesions for cervical cancer. After the panel identified key clinical questions, the McMaster University working group updated existing systematic reviews that had been used for the 2013 WHO Guidelines for screening and treatment of precancerous lesions for cervical cancer prevention. Recommendations were based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. Those recommendations took into account the available evidence, patient values and preferences, and resource use in the Saudi context. The panel provided recommendations on two major issues: screening for precancerous lesions (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 & 3) and treatment of those lesions to prevent cervical cancer in women who tested positive after screening. The Saudi expert panel recommends using the HPV DNA test followed by colposcopy or cytology (Pap test) followed by colposcopy to screen for CIN2+ in women at risk of cervical cancer. The panel recommends cryotherapy or loop excision electrosurgery procedure (LEEP) over cold knife cone biopsy to treat women at risk of cervical cancer that tests positive for CIN2+. Universal screening for precancerous cervical dysplasia in women in Saudi Arabia is recommended using HPV testing and or cytology. Either cryotherapy or LEEP are preferred for treatment. National

  13. Molecular tests potentially improving HPV screening and genotyping for cervical cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradíssimo, Ana; Burk, Robert D

    2017-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers can be averted by type-specific vaccination (primary prevention) and/or through detection and ablation of precancerous cervical lesions (secondary prevention). This review presents current challenges to cervical cancer screening programs, focusing on recent molecular advances in HPV testing and potential improvements on risk stratification. Areas covered: High-risk (HR)-HPV DNA detection has been progressively incorporated into cervix cancer prevention programs based on its increased sensitivity. Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) are being rapidly applied to HPV typing. However, current HPV DNA tests lack specificity for identification of cervical precancer (CIN3). HPV typing methods were reviewed based on published literature, with a focus on these applications for screening and risk stratification in the emerging complex clinical scenario post-vaccine introduction. In addition, the potential for NGS technologies to increase specificity is discussed in regards to reflex testing of specimens for emerging biomarkers for cervix precancer/cancer. Expert commentary: Integrative multi-disciplinary molecular tests accurately triaging exfoliated cervical specimens will improve cervical cancer prevention programs while simplifying healthcare procedures in HPV-infected women. Hence, the concept of a 'liquid-biopsy' (i.e., 'molecular' Pap test) highly specific for early identification of cervical precancerous lesions is of critical importance in the years to come.

  14. A review of californium-252 neutron brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Y; van Nagell, J R; Yoneda, J; Donaldson, E S; Gallion, H H; Powell, D; Kryscio, R J

    1991-09-15

    Since 1976 a clinical trial has been conducted to test the feasibility, the potential, and to develop methods for using the neutron-emitting radioactive isotope, californium-252 (Cf-252), for the treatment of cervical cancer. A total of 218 patients were treated in the initial study period from 1976 until 1983. The trials initially treated advanced (Stages III and IV) cervical cancer patients using different doses and schedules; they were extended to include unfavorable presentations of Stages I and II because of favorable results in the initial trials. The authors began to treat patients with Stage IB bulky or barrel-shaped tumors and the majority were treated with both radiation and hysterectomy. Actuarial survival was determined for Stage IB disease and was 87% at 5 years and 82% at 10 years. For those tested with preoperative radiation it was 92% at 5 and 87% at 10 years. For Stage II, it was 62% 5 years and 61% at 10. Survival 5 years after combined radiation and surgical therapy for Stage II disease was 68%. For Stage III, it was 33% at 5 years and 25% at 10. However, 5-year survival using the early neutron implant was 46% versus approximately 19% for delayed Cf-252 or cesium 137. Different schedules and sequences of neutrons and photons greatly altered outcome. Neutron treatment before external photon therapy was better for all stages of disease. Only about 5% of all patients developed complications after neutron therapy. No hematologic or mesenchymal second tumors were observed. Neutron brachytherapy was found to be very effective for producing rapid response and greatly improved local control of bulky, barrel, or advanced cervical cancers. The clinical trial identified and evolved schedules, doses, doses per session, and developed methods different from standard photon therapy but highly effective for local control and cure of cervical cancers of all stages. Clinical and radiobiologic understanding for the use of neutron therapy was greatly advanced by

  15. Screening history of cervical cancers in Emilia-Romagna, Italy: defining priorities to improve cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Paolo Giorgi; Caroli, Stefania; Mancini, Silvia; de' Bianchi, Priscilla Sassoli; Finarelli, Alba C; Naldoni, Carlo; Bucchi, Lauro; Falcini, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    Most invasive cervical cancers in industrialized countries are due to the lack of Pap test coverage, very few are due to screening failures. This study aimed at quantifying the proportion of invasive cancers occurring in nonscreened or underscreened women and that in women with a previous negative screening, that is, screening failure, during the first two screening rounds (1996-2002) and in the following rounds (2003-2008) in the Emilia-Romagna region. All cases of invasive cancers registered in the regional cancer registry between 1996 and 2008 were classified according to screening history through a record linkage with the screening programme registry. The incidence significantly decreased from 11.6/100 000 to 8.7/100 000; this decrease is due to a reduction in squamous cell cancers (annual percentage change -6.2; confidence interval: -7.8, -4.6) and advanced cancers (annual percentage change -6.6; confidence interval: -8.8, -4.3), whereas adenocarcinomas and microinvasive cancers were essentially stable. The proportion of cancers among women not yet invited and among nonresponders decreased over the two periods, from 45.5 to 33.3%. In contrast, the proportion of women with a previous negative Pap test less than 5 years and 5 years or more before cancer incidence increased from 5.7 to 13.3% and from 0.3 to 5.5%, respectively. Although nonattendance of the screening programme remains the main barrier to cervical cancer control, the introduction of a more sensitive test, such as the human papillomavirus DNA test, could significantly reduce the burden of disease.

  16. Human Papillomavirus Testing in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C.; Castle, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment. PMID:21282563

  17. Prognostic significance of annexin A2 and annexin A4 expression in patients with cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chel Hun; Chung, Joon-Yong; Chung, Eun Joo; Sears, John D.; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo; Hewitt, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    The annexins (ANXs) have diverse roles in tumor development and progression, however, their clinical significance in cervical cancer has not been elucidated. The present study was to investigate the clinical significance of annexin A2 (ANXA2) and annexin A4 (ANXA4) expression in cervical cancer. ANXA2 and ANXA4 immunohistochemical staining were performed on a cervical cancer tissue microarray consisting of 46 normal cervical epithelium samples and 336 cervical cancer cases and compared the data with clinicopathological variables, including the survival of cervical cancer patients. ANXA2 expression was lower in cancer tissue (p = 0.002), whereas ANXA4 staining increased significantly in cancer tissues (p < 0.001). ANXA2 expression was more prominent in squamous cell carcinoma (p < 0.001), whereas ANXA4 was more highly expressed in adeno/adenosquamous carcinoma (p < 0.001). ANXA2 overexpression was positively correlated with advanced cancer phenotypes, whereas ANXA4 expression was associated with resistance to radiation with or without chemotherapy (p = 0.029). Notably, high ANXA2 and ANXA4 expression was significantly associated with shorter disease-free survival (p = 0.004 and p = 0.033, respectively). Multivariate analysis indicated that ANXA2+ (HR = 2.72, p = 0.003) and ANXA2+/ANXA4+ (HR = 2.69, p = 0.039) are independent prognostic factors of disease-free survival in cervical cancer. Furthermore, a random survival forest model using combined ANXA2, ANXA4, and clinical variables resulted in improved predictive power (mean C-index, 0.76) compared to that of clinical-variable-only models (mean C-index, 0.70) (p = 0.006). These findings indicate that detecting ANXA2 and ANXA4 expression may aid the evaluation of cervical carcinoma prognosis. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2459-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed. These procedures are done using a low transverse incision or a vertical incision. Radical hysterectomy : Surgery ... tubes. Pelvic exenteration : Surgery to remove the lower colon , ... Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or ...

  19. General Information about Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed. These procedures are done using a low transverse incision or a vertical incision. Radical hysterectomy : Surgery ... tubes. Pelvic exenteration : Surgery to remove the lower colon , ... Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or ...

  20. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Lee, Kyung Hun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jae Weon

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, 9 topics were selected as major advances in clinical research for gynecologic oncology: 2 each in cervical and corpus cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and 1 in breast cancer. For cervical cancer, several therapeutic agents showed viable antitumor clinical response in recurrent and metastatic disease: bevacizumab, cediranib, and immunotherapies including human papillomavirus (HPV)-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and Z-100. The HPV test received FDA approval as the primary screening tool of cervical cancer in women aged 25 and older, based on the results of the ATHENA trial, which suggested that the HPV test was a more sensitive and efficient strategy for cervical cancer screening than methods based solely on cytology. For corpus cancers, results of a phase III Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) 249 study of early-stage endometrial cancer with high-intermediate risk factors are followed by the controversial topic of uterine power morcellation in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Promising results of phase II studies regarding the effectiveness of olaparib in various ovarian cancer settings are summarized. After a brief review of results from a phase III study on pazopanib maintenance therapy in advanced ovarian cancer, 2 outstanding 2014 ASCO presentations cover the topic of using molecular subtypes in predicting response to bevacizumab. A review of the use of opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer preventive strategy in the general population is presented. Two remarkable studies that discussed the effectiveness of adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal early breast cancer have been selected as the last topics covered in this review.

  1. Bladder accumulated dose in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer and its relation to urinary toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariaee, Roja; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Brown, Colin J.; Gaudet, Marc; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate locally accumulated dose to the bladder in multi-fraction high-dose-date (HDR) image-guided intracavitary brachytherapy (IG-ICBT) for cervical cancer, and study the locally-accumulated dose parameters as predictors of late urinary toxicity. A retrospective study of 60 cervical cancer patients who received five HDR IG-ICBT sessions was performed. The bladder outer and inner surfaces were segmented for all sessions and a bladder-wall contour point-set was created in MATLAB. The bladder-wall point-sets for each patient were registered using a deformable point-set registration toolbox called coherent point drift (CPD), and the fraction doses were accumulated. Various dosimetric and volumetric parameters were calculated using the registered doses, including r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum dose to the most exposed n-cm3 volume of bladder wall), r V n Gy (wall volume receiving at least m Gy), and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum equivalent biologically weighted dose to the most exposed n-cm3 of bladder wall), where n  =  1/2/5/10 and m  =  3/5/10. Minimum dose to contiguous 1 and 2 cm3 hot-spot volumes was also calculated. The unregistered dose volume histogram (DVH)-summed equivalent of r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} parameters (i.e. s{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} and s\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} ) were determined for comparison. Late urinary toxicity was assessed using the LENT-SOMA scale, with toxicity Grade 0-1 categorized as Controls and Grade 2-4 as Cases. A two-sample t-test was used to identify the differences between the means of Control and Case groups for all parameters. A binomial logistic regression was also performed between the registered dose parameters and toxicity grouping. Seventeen patients were in the Case and 43 patients in the Control group. Contiguous

  2. Towards improving cervical cancer screening in Nigeria: A review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer screening is the key to reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer in developing countries. In the absence of a national screening program, healthcare givers in Nigeria are encouraged to routinely inform and screen eligible women. This review aims at equipping health workers for this task by ...

  3. Social Construction of Cervical Cancer Screening among Panamanian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Arlene; Brown, Kelli McCormack; McDermott, Robert J.; Bryant, Carol A.; Coreil, Jeanine; Loseke, Donileen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Understanding how "health issues" are socially constructed may be useful for creating culturally relevant programs for Hispanic/Latino populations. Purpose: We explored the constructed meanings of cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening among Panamanian women, as well as socio-cultural factors that deter or encourage…

  4. Effect of training on knowledge about cervical cancer and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of training on knowledge about cervical cancer and Human Papiloma Virus vaccine among health care personnel in Benin City. ... This study assessed the effect of training on health care workers' knowledge of HPV, its relationship with cervical cancer and the role of HPV vaccine in prevention. Methods: This ...

  5. Perception and risk factors for cervical cancer among women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study assessed the perception of risk of cervical cancer and existence of risk factors for cervical cancer based on five known risk factors among women attending the Tamale Teaching Hospital in Tamale, Ghana. Methods: A consecutive sample of 300 women was interviewed using a semi structured ...

  6. Cervical cancer prevention practices amongst flower farm workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The screening rate amongst the workers was very low. The findings of this survey warrant a very strong recommendation for the setting-up of workplace policies and mechanisms for cervical cancer education, screening and prevention interventions. Keywords: Cervical cancer, Awareness, Prevention, Workplace ...

  7. Targeting women with free cervical cancer screening: challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: the study was conducted to determine the challenges and suggest solutions to conducting free cervical cancer screening among Nigerian women. Methods: awareness was created among women groups and mass media in Osun State for women to undergo free cervical cancer screening programme.

  8. An overview of innovative techniques to improve cervical cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, Esther R.; Reesink-Peters, Nathalie; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Nijman, Hans W.; van Zanden, Jelmer; Volders, Haukeline; Hollema, Harry; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.; Schuuring, Ed; van der Zee, Ate G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Although current cytomorphology-based cervical cancer screening has reduced the incidence of cervical cancer, Pap-smears are associated with high false positive and false negative rates. This has spurred the search for new technologies to improve current screening. New methodologies are automation

  9. Knowledge of Cervical Cancer Risk Factors Among Refugee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Less than 20% knew that cervical cancer could be detected early and 6.8% had had Pap smears done. Knowledge of risk factors, signs and symptoms was low, although there was a statistically significant relationship between the educational level of the women and risk factors for cervical cancer. The paper discusses the ...

  10. Women's perceived susceptibility to and utilisation of cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-24

    Oct 24, 2014 ... and their intentions to be screened? Which modifying factors influence women's decisions to use cervical cancer screening services in Malawi? The objective of the study was to describe the association between perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer in women aged 42 and older and their intentions to ...

  11. The Vaccine and Cervical Cancer Screen project 2 (VACCS 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is a preventable disease with a high prevalence in South Africa (SA), where screening is opportunistic. Primary prevention is now possible through HPV vaccination. In VACCS 1 the feasibility of linking cervical cancer with HPV vaccination was demonstrated. Objectives: To investigate the ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Screening: A Survey of Current Practice Amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the attitude toward and practice of cervical cancer screening amongst Nigerian gynaecologists, on whom the burden of treating cervical cancer rests. Study Design, Setting and Subjects: A self-administered, questionnaire survey of 113 Nigerian gynaecologists who attended the Annual General Meeting ...

  13. Cervical cancer management in Zaria, Nigeria | Sule | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper\\'s objective was to identify factors influencing cervical cancer management in Zaria with a view to improving the outcome of management. Case notes of patients managed for cervical cancer in Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH), Zaria between January 1 1999 and December 31 2003, were ...

  14. Cervical cancer knowledge and screening practices among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer remains a major public health challenge in developing countries including Nigeria and contributes signi cantly as a major cause of death among women of reproductive age. This study was conducted to assess knowledge and cervical cancer screening practices among women of reproductive ...

  15. Immunology and Immunotherapy of high grade cervical lesions and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos van Steenwijk, Peggy Jacqueline de

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). The immune system plays an important role in the protection against HPV and failure of the immune system can lead to the development of cervical cancer. Immunotherapy aims at the restoration of an effective anti-tumour immunity. This

  16. Apoptosis induction of epifriedelinol on human cervical cancer cell line

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Present investigation evaluates the antitumor activity of epifriedelinol for the management of cervical cancer by inducing process of apoptosis. Methods: Human Cervical Cancer Cell Line, C33A and HeLa were selected for study and treated with epifriedelinol at a concentration of (50-1000 μg/ml). Cytotoxicity of ...

  17. Knowledge, Attitude And Practice Of Screening For Cervical Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This low participation in screening for cervical cancer was attributed to several reasons including ignorance of the existence of such a test, lack of awareness of centers where such services are obtainable, ignorance of the importance of screening and the risk factors to the development of cervical cancer. Conclusion: There ...

  18. Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most respondents were aware of cervical cancer (95.4%), HPV (85.4%) and HPV vaccination (69.3%) and the most common source of information was school teaching. Good knowledge of cervical cancer, HPV and HPV vaccination was demonstrated by 51.8%, 67.1% and 21.1% respectively; only 39.6% fully accepted HPV ...

  19. TCGA study identifies genomic features of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have identified novel genomic and molecular characteristics of cervical cancer that will aid in subclassification of the disease and may help target therapies that are most appropriate for each patient.

  20. Role of percutaneous nephrostomy in advanced cervical carcinoma with obstructive uropathy: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Mishra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: Over 70% of the cases present in advanced stages of the disease and are associated with poor prognosis and high mortality rates. In many of them, it is difficult to offer definitive treatment as they present in uremia due to associated obstructive uropathy. There are no clear-cut guidelines for performing percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN in patients of advanced cervical cancer. The results are unpredictable in terms of benefits achieved in these cases. Thus, we evaluated our experiences with PCN in the management of cervical cancer patients presenting with obstructive uropathy. Material and Methods: 15 patients of cervical cancer with obstructive uropathy and deranged renal functions were retrospectively evaluated for the role of PCN in their management Results: PCN was done in 15 patients of advanced cervical cancer. The mean age of patients was 44.5 years. Twelve (80% patients presented primarily with advanced cervical carcinoma and obstructive uropathy. Three (20% were already treated. Symptomatic improvement and significant fall of mean serum creatinine value from 7.5 mg% to 0.9 mg% over a period of 1-3 weeks was noted post PCN. Out of 12 patient with primary untreated advanced disease, curative treatment was possible in 3, palliative radiotherapy/chemo-therapy in 7 and only symptomatic treatment in 2 cases, after obstructive uropathy was managed with PCN insertion. Out of 3 already treated patients, 2 were disease free after curative radiotherapy/surgery. PCN was done to prevent permanent kidney damage in them. One patient was defaulter of curative radiotherapy. She had progressive residual disease. Complications like hemorrhage (20%, infection (26%, reinsertion for dislodgment/misplacement (53%, percutaneous leak or perinephric leak (20%, blockage of PCN (33% were noticed. Conclusion: In spite of inherent, albeit manageable complications, PCN is a simple and safe technique. One of the major benefits observed was

  1. Association between cervical screening and prevention of invasive cervical cancer in Ontario: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicus, Danielle; Sutradhar, Rinku; Lu, Yan; Kupets, Rachel; Paszat, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of cervical screening in the prevention of invasive cervical cancer among age groups, using a population-based case-control study in the province of Ontario, Canada. Exposure was defined as cervical cytology history greater than 3 months before the diagnosis date of cervical cancer (index date). Cases were women who were diagnosed with cervical cancer between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2008. Controls were women without a diagnosis of cervical cancer on, or before, December 31, 2008. Two controls were matched to each case on year of birth and income quintile, as of the index date. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio for having been screened among those with cervical cancer. Cervical cancer screening performed between 3 and 36 months before the index date was protective against invasive cervical cancer in women aged 40 through 69 years. In women younger than 40 years, cervical cancer screening performed 3 to 36 months before the index date was not protective. Cervical screening is associated with a reduced risk for invasive cervical cancer among women older than 40 years. Cervical cancer resources should be focused on maximizing the risk reduction.

  2. Common filaggrin gene mutations and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Sørensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations may have a compromised cervical mucosal barrier against human papillomavirus infection, our primary objective was to study their risk of cervical cancer. METHODS: We genotyped 586 cervical cancer patients for the two most common FLG...... mutations, R501X and 2282del4, using blood from the Copenhagen Hospital Biobank, Denmark. Controls (n = 8050) were genotyped in previous population-based studies. Information on cervical cancer, mortality and emigration were obtained from national registers. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic...... and stratification by cancer stage. RESULTS: The primary results showed that FLG mutations were not associated with the risk of cervical cancer (6.3% of cases and 7.7% of controls were carriers; OR adjusted 0.81, 95% CI 0.57-1.14; OR adjusted+ weighted 0.96, 95% CI 0.58-1.57). Among cases, FLG mutations increased...

  3. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2014-07-01

    In 2013, 10 topics were selected for major clinical research advances in gynecologic oncology; these included three topics regarding cervical cancer, three regarding ovarian cancer, two regarding endometrial cancer, and one each regarding breast cancer and radiation oncology. For cervical cancer, bevacizumab was first demonstrated to exhibit outstanding clinical efficacy in a recurrent, metastatic setting. Regarding cervical cancer screening, visual inspections with acetic acid in low-resource settings, p16/Ki-67 double staining, and the follow-up results of four randomized controlled trials of human papillomavirus-based screening methods were reviewed. Laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy before chemoradiation for locally advanced cervical cancer was the final topic for cervical cancer. Regarding front-line ovarian cancer therapies, dose-dense paclitaxel and carboplatin, intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and other targeted agents administered according to combination or maintenance schedules were discussed. Regarding recurrent ovarian cancer treatment, cediranib, olaparib, and farletuzumab were discussed for platinum-sensitive disease. The final overall survival data associated with a combination of bevacizumab and chemotherapy for platinum-resistant disease were briefly summarized. For endometrial cancer, the potential clinical efficacy of metformin, an antidiabetic drug, in obese patients was followed by integrated genomic analyses from the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network. For breast cancer, three remarkable advances were reviewed: the long-term effects of continued adjuvant tamoxifen for 10 years, the effects of 2-year versus 1-year adjuvant trastuzumab for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive disease, and the approval of pertuzumab in a neoadjuvant setting with a pathologic complete response as the surrogate endpoint. Finally, the recent large studies of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer were briefly summarized.

  4. Mapping HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening Practice in the Pacific Region-Strengthening National and Regional Cervical Cancer Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, J; McKenzie, J; Buenconsejo-Lum, L E

    2015-01-01

    guidelines and policies for HPV vaccination. CONCLUSION: Current practices to prevent cervical cancer in the Pacific Region do not match the high burden of disease from cervical cancer. A regional approach, including reducing vaccine prices by bulk purchase of vaccine, technical support for implementation...

  5. Changes in knowledge of cervical cancer following introduction of human papillomavirus vaccine among women at high risk for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Stewart Massad

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Substantial gaps in understanding of HPV and cervical cancer prevention exist despite years of health education. While more effective educational interventions may help, optimal cancer prevention may require opt-out vaccination programs that do not require nuanced understanding.

  6. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinerman, R.A.; Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Flannery, J.T.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Incidence of second primary cancers was evaluated in 7,127 women with invasive cancer of the cervix uteri, diagnosed between 1935 and 1978, and followed up to 38 years (average, 8.9 yr) in Connecticut. Among 5,997 women treated with radiation, 449 developed second primary cancers compared with 313 expected (relative risk . 1.4) on the basis of rates from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Excess incidence was noticeable 15 years or more after radiotherapy and attributed mostly to cancers of sites in or near the radiation field, especially the bladder, kidneys, rectum, corpus uteri, and ovaries. No excess was found for these sites among the 1,130 nonirradiated women. The ratio of observed to expected cancers for these sites did not vary appreciably by age at irradiation. The data suggested that high-dose pelvic irradiation was associated with increase in cancers of the bladder, kidneys, rectum, ovaries, corpus uteri, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma but, apparently, not leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, breast cancer, or colon cancer

  7. Can routine gynecologic examination contribute to the diagnosis of cervical involvement by primary endometrial cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristauz, G; Winter, R; Fischerauer, E; Haas, J; Bjelic-Radisic, V; Bader, A A; Petru, E

    2009-01-01

    There are few data in the literature as to whether findings at routine preoperative gynecologic examination of patients with primary endometrial cancer including cervical cytology, colposcopy and rectovaginal bimanual pelvic exam could predict cervical extension of the disease. The present retrospective study was undertaken to preoperatively identify potential clinical parameters associated with the histological diagnosis of cervical involvement by primary endometrial cancer in the hysterectomy specimen. We reviewed the records of 104 patients with Stage II endometrial cancer treated at our institution between 1985 and 2005 by simple or radical abdominal hysterectomy with special emphasis on cervical Pap smear, colposcopy, cervical palpation as well as rectal parametrial assessment. Patients with Stage I disease operated on before and after each study patient were selected as controls (n = 208). Patients with more advanced disease were excluded. Overall, 312 records of patients with primary endometrial cancer were reviewed. Patients with Stage II disease had a significantly lower prevalence (p examination are significantly more often pathologic in patients with Stage II than in Stage I disease. The majority of patients with Stage II disease had at least one of these tests positive. Thus they may be useful to preoperatively detect cervical involvement by primary endometrial cancer.

  8. Risk of cervical cancer after completed post-treatment follow-up of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Helmerhorst, Theo; Habbema, Dik

    2012-01-01

    To compare the risk of cervical cancer in women with histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia who returned to routine screening after having completed post-treatment follow-up with consecutive normal smear test results with women with a normal primary smear test result....

  9. Renal Metastasis from Primary Cervical Cancer: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Seong Woo; Kim, See Hyung; Kwon, Sun Young

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis of malignant tumors to the kidney is clinically rare and often discovered by autopsy. Primary lymphoma and lung cancer are known that can metastasize to the kidney. Other malignant tumor metastasis to the kidney is very unusual. Primary cervical cancer metastasis to adjacent pelvic organs and lymph nodes are well known followed by abdominal solid organs such as the liver and adrenal glands. However, reported primary cervical cancer metastasis to the kidney is extremely rare and mostly appeared as bilateral multiple renal masses. We report here on a rare case of unilateral single renal metastasis from primary cervical cancer after concur- rent chemoradiotherapy.

  10. Simultaneous radiochemotherapy in cervical cancer: recommendations for chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, J.; Haensgen, G.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Simultaneous radiochemotherapy has recently been demonstrated to be superior to radiation alone in the treatment of cervical cancer. The objective of this article is to summarize the data of major randomized trials and to derive recommendations for daily clinical practice. Materials and Methods: We have analyzed the data from seven randomized trials in the recent literature in which radiotherapy alone as standard treatment has been compared to simultaneous radiochemotherapy. Four trials used cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens, 5-FU, mitomycin C and epirubicin were used each in one trial. Results: All trials demonstrated some improvement in survival which was significant in the studies with cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens. The survival benefit resulted mainly from an improvement in local control whereas chemotherapy had only a small and insignificant effect on distant metastases. Thus, the main action of chemotherapy is ''radiosensitization''. Cisplatin as single drug yielded comparable results as compared to combined regimens although the cisplatin dose was lower in the studies with combination chemotherapy. For the definitive treatment of locally advanced cancers, monotherapy with cisplatin can be recommended. Mitomycin C offers an attractive alternative to cisplatin in patients with contraindications for cisplatin. For postoperative radiochemotherapy, a combination of cisplatin/5-FU should be used because data with cisplatin alone are lacking so far. Simultaneous radiochemotherapy should also be considered for the curative treatment of local recurrences. Conclusions: The addition of simultaneous chemotherapy to radiotherapy is indicated in the vast majority of patients with cervical cancers who are treated with curative intent. (orig.) [de

  11. Knowledge, attitudes and practices on cervical cancer screening among the medical workers of Mulago Hospital, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiderpass Elisabete

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is the commonest cancer of women in Uganda. Over 80% of women diagnosed in Mulago national referral and teaching hospital, the biggest hospital in Uganda, have advanced disease. Pap smear screening, on opportunistic rather than systematic basis, is offered free in the gynaecological outpatients clinic and the postnatal/family planning clinics. Medical students in the third and final clerkships are expected to learn the techniques of screening. Objectives of this study were to describe knowledge on cervical cancer, attitudes and practices towards cervical cancer screening among the medical workers of Mulago hospital. Methods In a descriptive cross-sectional study, a weighted sample of 310 medical workers including nurses, doctors and final year medical students were interviewed using a self-administered questionnaire. We measured knowledge about cervical cancer: (risk factors, eligibility for screening and screening techniques, attitudes towards cervical cancer screening and practices regarding screening. Results Response rate was 92% (285. Of these, 93% considered cancer of the cervix a public health problem and knowledge about Pap smear was 83% among respondents. Less than 40% knew risk factors for cervical cancer, eligibility for and screening interval. Of the female respondents, 65% didn't feel susceptible to cervical cancer and 81% had never been screened. Of the male respondents, only 26% had partners who had ever been screened. Only 14% of the final year medical students felt skilled enough to use a vaginal speculum and 87% had never performed a pap smear. Conclusion Despite knowledge of the gravity of cervical cancer and prevention by screening using a Pap smear, attitudes and practices towards screening were negative. The medical workers who should be responsible for opportunistic screening of women they care for are not keen on getting screened themselves. There is need to explain/understand the cause

  12. Upregulation of long noncoding RNA TUG1 promotes cervical cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingying; Sun, Xiangwei; Mao, Chenchen; Guo, Gangqiang; Ye, Sisi; Xu, Jianfeng; Zou, Ruanmin; Chen, Jun; Wang, Ledan; Duan, Ping; Xue, Xiangyang

    2017-02-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a novel class of transcripts that have critical roles in carcinogenesis and progression, have emerged as important gene expression modulators. Recent evidence indicates that lncRNA taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) functions as an oncogene in numerous types of human cancers. However, its function in the development of cervical cancer remains unknown. The aim of this research was to investigate the clinical significance and biological functions of TUG1 in cervical cancer. TUG1 was found to be significantly upregulated in cervical cancer tissues and four cervical cancer cell lines by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Elevated TUG1 expression was correlated with larger tumor size, advanced international federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO) stage, poor differentiation, and lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, knockdown of TUG1 suppressed cell proliferation with activation of apoptosis, in part by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3. Silencing of TUG1 inhibited cell migration and invasion via the progression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Taken together, our findings indicate that TUG1 acts as an oncogene in cervical cancer and may represent a novel therapeutic target. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Gene expression profiling in cervical cancer: identification of novel markers for disease diagnosis and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Cara M

    2012-02-01

    Cervical cancer, a potentially preventable disease, remains the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus is the single most important etiological agent in cervical cancer. HPV contributes to neoplastic progression through the action of two viral oncoproteins E6 and E7, which interfere with critical cell cycle pathways, p53, and retinoblastoma. However, evidence suggests that HPV infection alone is insufficient to induce malignant changes and other host genetic variations are important in the development of cervical cancer. Advances in molecular biology and high throughput gene expression profiling technologies have heralded a new era in biomarker discovery and identification of molecular targets related to carcinogenesis. These advancements have improved our understanding of carcinogenesis and will facilitate screening, early detection, management, and personalised targeted therapy. In this chapter, we have described the use of high density microarrays to assess gene expression profiles in cervical cancer. Using this approach we have identified a number of novel genes which are differentially expressed in cervical cancer, including several genes involved in cell cycle regulation. These include p16ink4a, MCM 3 and 5, CDC6, Geminin, Cyclins A-D, TOPO2A, CDCA1, and BIRC5. We have validated expression of mRNA using real-time PCR and protein by immunohistochemistry.

  14. Preprocessing for Automating Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Abhishek; Kar, Avijit; Bhattacharyya, Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Uterine Cervical Cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in women worldwide. Most cases of cervical cancer can be prevented through screening programs aimed at detecting precancerous lesions. During Digital Colposcopy, colposcopic images or cervigrams are acquired in raw form. They contain specular reflections which appear as bright spots heavily saturated with white light and occur due to the presence of moisture on the uneven cervix surface and. The cervix region occupies about hal...

  15. Patient, Physician, and Nurse Factors Associated With Entry Onto Clinical Trials and Finishing Treatment in Patients With Primary or Recurrent Uterine, Endometrial, or Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  16. Manifestation Pattern of Early-Late Vaginal Morbidity After Definitive Radiation (Chemo)Therapy and Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark); Westerveld, Henrike [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiotherapy, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-01

    Background and Purpose: Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study ( (www.embracestudy.dk)) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. Results: At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Conclusion: Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity

  17. High-Grade Cervical Dysplasia following Radiation Therapy for Invasive Cervical Cancer: A Report of Four Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, Mila Pontremoli; Milbourne, Andrea M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiation, with the majority of patients having a complete response to the therapy. The current surveillance recommendations from the Society of Gynecologic Oncology include annual cytology, with a small proportion of patients subsequently diagnosed with high-grade cervical dysplasia (CIN 2/3). To date, there is limited information regarding the optimal treatment and outcome for patients diagnosed with CIN 2/3. The current report describes the diagnosis, management and outcome of 4 patients diagnosed with CIN 2/3 following chemoradiation. Case Description We describe 4 patients who developed CIN 2/3 seven months to 8 years following radiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer. All 4 patients were asymptomatic and the abnormalities were first detected by a Pap test. Three of the patients were managed conservatively with observation, and the CIN 2/3 resolved without intervention. One patient underwent 2 cervical conizations followed by a hysterectomy with no residual dysplasia noted on the hysterectomy specimen. Conclusion The majority of patients with recurrent cervical cancer after chemoradiation are symptomatic, and most cases are detected by a physical examination. The role of cytology, colposcopy and biopsies may be of limited value. Furthermore, the significance of the diagnosis of CIN 2/3 in patients previously treated with radiation therapy was not associated with recurrent disease in the 4 patients described. Our results suggest that cytology may be of limited value in detecting recurrence in patients following radiation therapy, even when CIN 2/3 is detected. PMID:26078740

  18. The development of genes associated with radiosensitivity of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyan; Chen Zhihua; He Guifang

    2007-01-01

    It has a good application prospect to predict effects of radiotherapy by examining radiosensitivity of patients with cervical cancers before their radiotherapy. Prediction of tumor cell radiosensitivity according to their level of gene expression and gene therapy to reverse radio-resistance prior to radiation on cervical cancers are heated researches on tumor therapy. The expression of some proliferation-related genes, apoptosis-related genes and hypoxia-related genes can inerease the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer. Microarray technology may have more direct applications to the study of biological pathway contributing to radiation resistance and may lead to development of alternative treatment modalities. (authors)

  19. Needs and priorities of women with endometrial and cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Mette Moustgaard; Mogensen, Ole; Dehn, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rehabilitation after cancer is important, and efficient rehabilitation requires knowledge of patient's needs. This study aimed to identify short-term rehabilitation needs of women with endometrial and cervical cancer. METHODS: Ninety-six women (82.6%) were included in an exploratory...... with endometrial cancer. Of these, 38 had FIGO-stage 1 disease (73.1%) and 25 were treated with laparoscopic surgery (48.1%). Emotional functioning was significantly worse prior to treatment in both the cancers (p endometrial) and worry constituted an unmet need in 70.7% of cervical...... and 34.7% of endometrial cancer patients. Both the patient groups experienced significant lymphedema post-treatment [endometrial cancer (p = 0.006) and cervical cancer (p = 0.002)]. Further, urological problems were more prevalent post-treatment in endometrial cancer patients (p = 0.018), while sexual...

  20. Diffusion-weighted MRI in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVeigh, Patrick Z.; Haider, Masoom A.; Syed, Aejaz M.; Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the potential value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement with MRI in the assessment of cervix cancer. Diffusion-weighted MRI was performed in 47 patients with cervical carcinoma undergoing chemoradiation therapy and 26 normal controls on a 1.5-T system with a b-value of 600 s/mm 2 . FIGO stage, tumor volume, nodal status, interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and oxygen measurements were recorded. Response was defined as no visible tumor 3-6 months following completion of therapy. The average median ADC (mADC) of cervical carcinomas (1.09±0.20 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) was significantly lower than normal cervix (2.09±0.46 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) (P -3 mm 2 /s) compared to T2b (1.21 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and T3/T4 (1.10 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) (P<0.001). In patients with squamous carcinomas the 90th percentile of ADC values was lower in responders than non-responders (P<0.05). Median ADC in cervix carcinoma is significantly lower compared to normal cervix. ADC may have predictive value in squamous tumors, but further long-term study will determine the ultimate clinical utility. (orig.)

  1. Cervical cancer screening and practice in low resource countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While developed countries have recorded significant reduction in the incidence of cervical cancer owing to organized screening programs, treatment of premalignant cervical lesions, and follow-up of treated cases, developing countries including Nigeria are yet to optimally utilize screening services due to lack of organized ...

  2. Cervical cancer screening and practice in low resource countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While developed countries have recorded significant reduction in the incidence of cervical cancer owing to organizedscreening programs, treatment of premalignant cervical lesions, and follow‑up of treated cases, developing countries including Nigeria are yet to optimally utilize screening services due to lack of organized ...

  3. CLINIC VISITS AND CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING IN ACCRA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-06-01

    Pap) smear and visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid (VIA).3,4. Cervical cancer screening procedures are able to detect pre-malignant lesions of the cervix which can be treated and so pre- vent progress to cervical ...

  4. Screening for Cervical Cancer: Experience from a University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (12/121) of them were high grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions while invasive carcinoma was seen in 3.3% (4/121) of the smears. Conclusion: Presence of abnormal cervical smear in 20% of the study subjects underscores the need for routine screening for cervical cancer. While organized national screening policy is ...

  5. Cervical Cancer in Women with Unhealthy Cervix in a Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mubeen

    Journal of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences ・ July - December 2013 ・ Vol 2 ・ Issue 2. 97. Cervical ... Background:Cervical cancer, the most common malignancy among Indian women, is the second most common and fifth most ... biomedical spectrum, but also has a wide cultural and socio-economic background.

  6. Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic profile of cervical cancer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study revealed a dramatic figure of cervical cancer in Butembo city. Effort should be made by the government and other health agencies to organize mass campaign to practice cervical screening as well as education on the various risk factors. Access to the vaccines (anti-HPV 16-18) and the precocious ...

  7. Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the commonest viral sexually transmitted infection in the world and the leading cause of cervical cancer. Medical students as future healthcare providers will play a role in influencing patients' decision to receive HPV vaccination. This study was aimed at determining the knowledge of cervical ...

  8. Knowledge and practice of cervical cancer screening at the Imo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Those who were aware of cervical cancer were 13.6% as against 6% who were aware of Pap smear. Only 2.4% of the 450 respondents had ever had a cervical cytology performed on them. The most frequent reason given for not using the service was lack of physician referral. Culture was found to negatively impact on the ...

  9. Survival of a cohort of women with cervical cancer diagnosed in a Brazilian cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Calazan do Carmo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess overall survival of women with cervical cancer and describe prognostic factors associated. METHODS: A total of 3,341 cases of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed at the Brazilian Cancer Institute, Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil, between 1999 and 2004 were selected. Clinical and pathological characteristics and follow-up data were collected. There were performed a survival analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves and a multivariate analysis through Cox model. RESULTS: Of all cases analyzed, 68.3% had locally advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. The 5-year overall survival was 48%. After multivariate analysis, tumor staging at diagnosis was the single variable significantly associated with prognosis (p<0.001. There was seen a dose-response relationship between mortality and clinical staging, ranging from 27.8 to 749.6 per 1,000 cases-year in women stage I and IV, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that early detection through prevention programs is crucial to increase cervical cancer survival.

  10. Vaccines for Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahomed, M.F.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of two prophylactic Human Papilloma Virus HPV vaccines and ethical issues related to HPV vaccination are reviewed in this paper. These vaccines have the potential of substantially reducing HPV-related morbidity and mortality, and in particular cervical cancer. The vaccines cannot treat women with current HPV infection or HPV related disease. They should be administered before the commencement of sexual activity. The ideal age group is adolescent girls between the ages 9-13. Both vaccines are highly efficacious and immunogenic and induce high levels of serum antibodies after three doses for all vaccine-related HPV types. School-based vaccination is considered as a costeffective method for its delivery. Adequate education of both clinicians and patients is an essential to ensure effective implementation when considering a national vaccination program. (author)

  11. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-14

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  12. Extensive Tattoos Mimicking Lymphatic Metastasis on Positron Emission Tomography Scan in a Patient With Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Narine; Zheng, Ma; Bristow, Robert E; Eskander, Ramez N

    2015-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) fused with computed tomography (CT) imaging is common in the clinical assessment of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. Limitations to the utilization and interpretation of PET-CT scans in patients with cervical cancer have been described, including false-positive findings secondary to tattoo ink. A 32-year-old woman presented with clinical stage 1B1 cervical cancer and extensive tattoos of the lower extremities. Preoperative PET-CT scan identified two ileac lymph nodes with increased fluorine-18-deoxyglucose uptake suspicious for metastatic disease. At the time of surgical resection, bilateral pigmented lymph nodes were identified with histologic examination showing deposition of tattoo ink and no malignant cells. Physicians should be cognizant of the possible effects of tattoos on PET-CT findings while counseling patients and formulating a treatment program.

  13. Pelvic inflammatory disease is a risk factor for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapinyecz, J; Smid, I; Horváth, A; Jeney, Cs; Kardos, L; Kovács, P

    2003-01-01

    The acquisition of human papillomavirus (HPV), the most important etiological agent of cervical cancer, does not cause clinical complaints. Although HPV spreads together with agents causing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) with complaints forcing the patient to seek medical advice, PID has not yet been evaluated as a predictor of cervical cancer. The present study aimed to determine the relationship between PID and HPV in order to evaluate the possible risk factor role of PID for cervical cancer. Two groups of patients were studied: (i) 2,215 women with PID; (ii) 4,217 women participating in a cervical cancer screening programme who were found to have cytological atypia, mucopurulent cervicitis or other colposcopically detected disorders but were free of symptoms of PID. The presence of HPV and other STD agents in cervical smears was detected with polymerase-chain reaction. HPV prevalence was 33.74% in patients with PID and 26.40% in the group of women without PID (p cervical cancer.

  14. Provider Perspectives on Promoting Cervical Cancer Screening Among Refugee Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Ornelas, India J; Do, H Hoai; Magarati, Maya; Jackson, J Carey; Taylor, Victoria M

    2017-06-01

    Many refugees in the United States emigrated from countries where the incidence of cervical cancer is high. Refugee women are unlikely to have been screened for cervical cancer prior to resettlement in the U.S. National organizations recommend cervical cancer screening for refugee women soon after resettlement. We sought to identify health and social service providers' perspectives on promoting cervical cancer screening in order to inform the development of effective programs to increase screening among recently resettled refugees. This study consisted of 21 in-depth key informant interviews with staff from voluntary refugee resettlement agencies, community based organizations, and healthcare clinics serving refugees in King County, Washington. Interview transcripts were analyzed to identify themes. We identified the following themes: (1) refugee women are unfamiliar with preventive care and cancer screening; (2) providers have concerns about the timing of cervical cancer education and screening; (3) linguistic and cultural barriers impact screening uptake; (4) provider factors and clinic systems facilitate promotion of screening; and (5) strategies for educating refugee women about screening. Our findings suggest that refugee women are in need of health education on cervical cancer screening during early resettlement. Frequent messaging about screening could help ensure that women receive screening within the early resettlement period. Health education videos may be effective for providing simple, low literacy messages in women's native languages. Appointments with female clinicians and interpreters, as well as clinic systems that remind clinicians to offer screening at each appointment could increase screening among refugee women.

  15. Effect of Training on Knowledge about Cervical Cancer and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UNIBEN

    , Ezeanochie M2, Nwaneri ... to HPV, cervical cancer and HPV vaccines at a workshop organized to create awareness on the subject matter. Results: Of the 53 ..... reported resistance to giving the vaccines to adolescent girls and the reasons ...

  16. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees (Ethiopians, Nigerians, and Somalis) in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  17. Awareness, perceived risk and practices related to cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness, perceived risk and practices related to cervical cancer and Pap smear screening: A crosssectional study among HIV-positive women attending an urban HIV clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa.

  18. Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    =current) and cited as : Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and Acceptance of Vaccination among Medical Students in Southwest Nigeria. Funmilayo F. Adejuyigbe , Balogun R. Balogun , Adekemi. O. Sekoni and ...

  19. Fluorescence spectra of blood and urine for cervical cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilamani, Vadivel; AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Vijmasi, Trinka; Govindarajan, Kanaganaj; Rathan Rai, Ram; Atif, Muhammad; Prasad, Saradh; Aldwayyan, Abdullah S.

    2012-09-01

    In the current study, the fluorescence emission spectra (FES) and Stokes shift spectra (SSS) of blood and urine samples of cervical cancer patients were obtained and compared to those of normal controls. Both spectra showed that the relative intensity of biomolecules such as porphyrin, collagen, Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin were quite out of proportion in cervical cancer patients. The biochemical mechanism for the elevation of these fluorophores is not yet definitive; nevertheless, these biomolecules could serve as tumor markers for diagnosis, screening, and follow-up of cervical cancers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on FES and SSS of blood and urine of cervical cancer patients to give a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 78%.

  20. A Literature Review of Cervical Cancer Screening in Transgender Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatos, Kayla C

    2018-02-01

    Most female-to-male (FTM) transgender men retain their cervixes and need comprehensive sexual health care, including cervical cancer screening. According to the literature, FTM individuals obtain cervical cancer screening less frequently and are less likely to be up to date on their Pap tests compared with cisgender women. Misinformation related to human papillomavirus and cervical cancer risk was noted for health care providers and FTM individuals. Absence of transgender-specific guidelines or trained health care providers presents barriers to cervical cancer screening for FTM individuals, and further research is indicated to develop comprehensive guidelines unique to the needs and experiences of this population. © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  1. The Vaccine and Cervical Cancer Screen (VACCS) project ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HPV) vaccination, as well as the information provided, methods of obtaining consent and assent, and completion rates achieved. Methods. Information on cervical cancer and HPV vaccination was provided to 19 primary schools in Western Cape ...

  2. Quality of life characteristics inpatients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelic-Radisic, Vesna; Jensen, Pernille T; Vlasic, Karin Kuljanic

    2012-01-01

    Annually about 500,000 women worldwide are diagnosed with cervical cancer. For many patients, young age at the time of diagnosis and a good prognosis regarding the disease imply a long life with the side-effects and sequels of various treatment options. The present study investigated the extent...... to which different quality of life (QoL) domains in patients during and after treatment for cervical cancer are affected according to menopausal status, treatment status and treatment modality....

  3. Epidemiology and costs of cervical cancer screening and cervical dysplasia in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Sabrina

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We estimated the number of women undergoing cervical cancer screening annually in Italy, the rates of cervical abnormalities detected, and the costs of screening and management of abnormalities. Methods The annual number of screened women was estimated from National Health Interview data. Data from the Italian Group for Cervical Cancer Screening were used to estimate the number of positive, negative and unsatisfactory Pap smears. The incidence of CIN (cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia was estimated from the Emilia Romagna Cancer Registry. Patterns of follow-up and treatment costs were estimated using a typical disease management approach based on national guidelines and data from the Italian Group for Cervical Cancer Screening. Treatment unit costs were obtained from Italian National Health Service and Hospital Information System of the Lazio Region. Results An estimated 6.4 million women aged 25–69 years undergo screening annually in Italy (1.2 million and 5.2 million through organized and opportunistic screening programs, respectively. Approximately 2.4% of tests have positive findings. There are approximately 21,000 cases of CIN1 and 7,000–17,000 cases of CIN2/3. Estimated costs to the healthcare service amount to €158.5 million for screening and €22.9 million for the management of cervical abnormalities. Conclusion Although some cervical abnormalities might have been underestimated, the total annual cost of cervical cancer prevention in Italy is approximately €181.5 million, of which 87% is attributable to screening.

  4. Incidence of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer in women living with HIV in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Women living with HIV (WLWH) are reportedly at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). WLWH in Denmark attend the National ICC screening program less often than women in the general population. We aimed to estimate the incidence of cervical dysplasia and ICC in WLWH...... and hazard ratios (HRs) for time from inclusion to first cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)/ICC and time from first normal cervical cytology to first CIN/ICC were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to include prior screening outcome, screening intensity and treatment of CIN...... with normal baseline cytology, incidences of CIN1+ and CIN2+ were higher in WLWH. However, incidences were comparable between WLWH and controls adherent to the National ICC screening program. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, WLWH develop more cervical disease than controls. However, incidences of CIN are comparable...

  5. Incidence of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer in women living with HIV in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, K; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Women living with HIV (WLWH) are reportedly at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). A recent publication found that WLWH in Denmark attend the national ICC screening programme less often than women in the general population. We aimed to estimate the incidence of cervical......, which contains nationwide records of all pathology specimens. The cumulative incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) for time from inclusion to first cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)/ICC and time from first normal cervical cytology result to first CIN/ICC were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were...... in both groups were adherent to the national ICC screening programme and had a normal baseline cytology, incidences of CIN and ICC were comparable. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, WLWH developed more cervical disease than controls. Yet, in WLWH and controls adherent to the national ICC screening programme...

  6. Barriers to utilization of cervical cancer screening services among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women and contributes significantly to cancer related deaths among women worldwide. Women knowledge and practice of screening for pre malignant lesions vary significantly. Studies on this subject had focused mostly on either medically informed ...

  7. Breast and cervical cancer screening programme implementation in 16 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowling, Emily C; Klabunde, Carrie; Patnick, Julietta

    2010-01-01

    There is a continuing need to monitor and evaluate the impact of organized screening programmes on cancer incidence and mortality. We report results from a programme assessment conducted within the International Cancer Screening Network (ICSN) to understand the characteristics of cervical screening...... programmes within countries that have established population-based breast cancer screening programmes....

  8. The challenges of human papillomavirus and cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the changing paradigm in disease trends, Nigeria may be faced with serious challenges in terms of healthcare and disease management. Cervical cancer, which is one of the cancers that is vaccine preventable, remain the most frequently reported and the leading cause of mortality from cancer in Nigeria. More than ...

  9. Knowledge and practice of cervical cancer screening among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer affecting women worldwide. It is a preventable disease but still remains a leading cause of cancer deaths in developing countries like Nigeria despite the availability of preventive and curative protocols. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  10. Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening Uptake among Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is the most common cause of female genital cancer and female cancer deaths in developing countries such as Nigeria. The most recent government estimates put the number of new cases at 25,000 per year. According to the latest global estimates, 493, 000 new cases occur each year and ...

  11. Women's Attitude Towards Cervical Cancer Screening in North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer of the cervix is the leading cancer in women in sub Saharan Africa. The aim of this study is to document the views of respondents on how to increase the uptake of cervical cancer screening. This was a cross sectional study of women attending the outpatient clinics of obstetrics and gynaecology in two tertiary ...

  12. Assessment of psychological barriers to cervical cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    acetic acid wash are widely available throughout Ghana, yet less that 3% of Ghanaian women get a cervical cancer screening at regular ... Results: The results of the quantitative analysis indicated that cancer patients where not more likely to have greater knowledge of cancer ... School of Public Health, Ryals Public Health.

  13. Advanced Cancer Of The Cervix Coexisting With Multiple Fibroids In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of a 47 year old nulliparous woman with advanced cervical cancer coexisting with uterine fibroid is presented. The nulliparity and the presence of Fibroids presented diagnostic challenges especially because epidemiologically the factors present are not commonly associated. Diagnosis was assisted by a thorough ...

  14. Pathways of cervical cancer screening among Chinese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma GX

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Grace X Ma,1 Min Qi Wang,2 Xiang S Ma,3 Steven E Shive,4 Yin Tan,5 Jamil I Toubbeh51Department of Public Health, College of Health Professions, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 2Department of Public and Community Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 3College of Health Professions and School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 4Center for Asian Health, Temple University, and Department of Health, East Stroudsburg University, East Stroudsburg, PA, 5Center for Asian Health, Department of Public Health, College of Health Professions, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USABackground: The purpose of this community-based study was to develop a structural equation model for factors contributing to cervical cancer screening among Chinese American women.Methods: A cross-sectional design included a sample of 573 Chinese American women aged 18 years and older. The initial step involved use of confirmatory factor analysis, that included the following variables: access to and satisfaction with health care, and enabling and predisposing cultural and health beliefs. Structural equation model analyses were conducted on factors related to cervical cancer screening.Results: Age, marital status, employment, household income, and having health insurance, but not educational level, were significantly related to cervical screening status. Predisposing and enabling factors were positively associated with cervical cancer screening. The cultural factor was significantly related to the enabling factor or the satisfaction with health care factor.Conclusion: This model highlights the significance of sociocultural factors in relation to cervical cancer screening. These factors were significant, with cultural, predisposing, enabling, and health belief factors and access to and satisfaction with health care reinforcing the need to assist Chinese American women with poor English fluency in translation and awareness of the importance of cervical

  15. Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza-Catalán, Miguel A; Castañeda-Saucedo, Eduardo; Cristóbal-Mondragón, Gema R; Adame-Gómez, Jesús; Valle-Flores, Heidi N del; Coppe, José Fco; Sierra-López, Laura; Romero-Hernández, Mirna A; Carmen Alarcón-Romero, Luz del; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression

  16. Validation of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer cervical cancer module for Chinese patients with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua CH

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cai-Hong Hua, Hui-Min Guo, Xin-Lei Guan, Fan-Jing Kong, Rui-Jie Hou, Xue-Ying Zhang, Shao-Ru Li Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Weihui City, Henan Province, People’s Republic of China Purpose: The aim of our study was to assess, for the first time, the validity, reliability, and acceptability of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Quality Of Life questionnaire (QLQ cervical cancer module (CX24 in Chinese cervical cancer patients. Patients and methods: One hundred fifteen outpatients with cervical cancer in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University from May 2013 to July 2013 were included in this study. All participants self-administered the EORTC QLQ-CX24 and the core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30, and the Karnofsky Performance Scale was performed to evaluate scores. Data were analyzed with Cronbach’s α coefficient, Pearson correlation test, multitrait scaling analysis, and Mann–Whitney U test. Results: Scale reliability was confirmed by Cronbach’s α coefficients for internal consistency, which ranged from 0.71 to 0.82. Convergent and discriminant validity were confirmed by multitrait scaling analysis, which revealed three (3.4% scaling errors for symptom experience scales and zero (0% for body image as well as sexual/vaginal functioning scales. Higher missing value rate occurred in sexuality-related items. The clinical validity of the Chinese version of the EORTC QLQ-CX24 was demonstrated by the ability to discriminate among patients in different International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages. Conclusion: The EORTC QLQ-CX24 was proved to be a reliable and valid instrument with which to measure the quality of life in cervical cancer patients in the People’s Republic of China. Keywords: cervical cancer, quality of life, EORTC QLQ-CX24, People’s Republic of China

  17. Surface activity, lipid profiles and their implications in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The profiles of lipids in normal and cancerous tissues may differ revealing information about cancer development and progression. Lipids being surface active, changes in lipid profiles can manifest as altered surface activity profiles. Langmuir monolayers offer a convenient model for evaluating surface activity of biological membranes. Aims: The aims of this study were to quantify phospholipids and their effects on surface activity of normal and cancerous human cervical tissues as well as to evaluate the role of phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin (SM in cervical cancer using Langmuir monolayers. Methods and Materials: Lipid quantification was done using thin layer chromatography and phosphorus assay. Surface activity was evaluated using Langmuir monolayers. Monolayers were formed on the surface of deionized water by spreading tissue organic phase corresponding to 1 mg of tissue and studying their surface pressure-area isotherms at body temperature. The PC and SM contents of cancerous human cervical tissues were higher than those of the normal human cervical tissues. Role of PC and SM were evaluated by adding varying amounts of these lipids to normal cervical pooled organic phase. Statistical analysis: Student′s t-test (p < 0.05 and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used. Results: Our results reveals that the phosphatidylglycerol level in cancerous cervical tissue was nearly five folds higher than that in normal cervical tissue. Also PC and sphingomyelin SM were found to be the major phospholipid components in cancerous and normal cervical tissues respectively. The addition of either 1.5 µg DPPC or 0.5 µg SM /mg of tissue to the normal organic phase changed its surface activity profile to that of the cancerous tissues. Statistically significant surface activity parameters showed that PC and SM have remarkable roles in shifting the normal cervical lipophilic surface activity towards that of cancerous lipophilic

  18. Black and white women in Maryland receive different treatment for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Saroj; Schluterman, Nicholas H; Tracy, J Katthleen; Temkin, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    Despite an overall decrease in incidence, the death rate from cervical cancer in the United States remains higher in black women than their white counterparts. We examined the Maryland Cancer Registry (MCR) to determine treatment factors that may explain differences in outcomes between races in the state of Maryland. Incident cervical cancers in the MCR 1992-2008 were examined. Demographics, tumor characteristics and treatments were compared between races and over time. Our analysis included 2034 (1301 white, 733 black) patients. Black women were more likely to have locally advanced or metastatic disease at diagnosis (p<0.01). They were more likely to receive any radiation or chemotherapy combined with radiation and less likely to receive surgery (p<0.01). When adjusted for stage and insurance status black women had 1.50 (95% CI 1.20-1.87) times the odds of receiving radiation and 1.43 (95% CI 1.11-1.82) times the odds of receiving chemotherapy. Black women with cervical cancer had 0.51 times the adjusted odds (95% CI 0.41-0.65) of receiving surgery compared to white women. Racial differences in treatment did not change significantly over time. Surgical treatment for newly diagnosed cervical cancer in the state of Maryland was significantly less common amongst black women than white during our study period. Equivalent treatments are not being administered to white and black patients with cervical cancer in Maryland. Differences in care may contribute to racial disparities in outcomes for women with cervical cancer.

  19. Small cell cervical cancer: an unusual finding at cholecystectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, Emily

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Small cell carcinoma of the cervix is a rare cancer, comprising less than 3% of all cervical neoplasms. It uniformly has a poor prognosis, and has a high mortality even with early stage disease. It can metastasise rapidly and metastatic sites include lung, liver, brain, bone, pancreas and lymph nodes. CASE: Here, we report the case of a 60-year-old woman with no symptoms of cervical pathology who developed post-renal failure following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The cause was bilateral ureteric obstruction from metastatic small cell cervical cancer and metastases were subsequently found on her gallbladder specimen. CONCLUSION: This is an unusual presentation of small cell cervical cancer and demonstrates the aggressive nature of this disease.

  20. Knowledge about cervical cancer and barriers of screening program among women in Wufeng County, a high-incidence region of cervical cancer in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yao; Li, Shuang; Yang, Ru; Zhou, Hang; Xiang, Qunying; Hu, Ting; Zhang, Qinghua; Chen, Zhilan; Ma, Ding; Feng, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer screening is an effective method for reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer, but the screening attendance rate in developing countries is far from satisfactory, especially in rural areas. Wufeng is a region of high cervical cancer incidence in China. This study aimed to investigate the issues that concern cervical cancer and screening and the factors that affect women's willingness to undergo cervical cancer screening in the Wufeng area. A cross-sectional survey of women was conducted to determine their knowledge about cervical cancer and screening, demographic characteristics and the barriers to screening. Women who were willing to undergo screenings had higher knowledge levels. "Anxious feeling once the disease was diagnosed" (47.6%), "No symptoms/discomfort" (34.1%) and "Do not know the benefits of cervical cancer screening" (13.4%) were the top three reasons for refusing cervical cancer screening. Women who were younger than 45 years old or who had lower incomes, positive family histories of cancer, secondary or higher levels of education, higher levels of knowledge and fewer barriers to screening were more willing to participate in cervical cancer screenings than women without these characteristics. Efforts are needed to increase women's knowledge about cervical cancer, especially the screening methods, and to improve their perceptions of the screening process for early detection to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates.

  1. Knowledge about cervical cancer and barriers of screening program among women in Wufeng County, a high-incidence region of cervical cancer in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Jia

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer screening is an effective method for reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer, but the screening attendance rate in developing countries is far from satisfactory, especially in rural areas. Wufeng is a region of high cervical cancer incidence in China. This study aimed to investigate the issues that concern cervical cancer and screening and the factors that affect women's willingness to undergo cervical cancer screening in the Wufeng area.A cross-sectional survey of women was conducted to determine their knowledge about cervical cancer and screening, demographic characteristics and the barriers to screening.Women who were willing to undergo screenings had higher knowledge levels. "Anxious feeling once the disease was diagnosed" (47.6%, "No symptoms/discomfort" (34.1% and "Do not know the benefits of cervical cancer screening" (13.4% were the top three reasons for refusing cervical cancer screening. Women who were younger than 45 years old or who had lower incomes, positive family histories of cancer, secondary or higher levels of education, higher levels of knowledge and fewer barriers to screening were more willing to participate in cervical cancer screenings than women without these characteristics.Efforts are needed to increase women's knowledge about cervical cancer, especially the screening methods, and to improve their perceptions of the screening process for early detection to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates.

  2. Second primary cancers in survivors of cervical cancer in the Netherlands: Implications for prevention and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Melina; Liu, Lifang; Kenter, Gemma G.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Coebergh, Jan Willem; Soerjomataram, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: We investigated the effects of socio-demographic, treatment- and tumor-specific determinants on the risk of developing a second malignancy among patients treated for cervical cancer. Material and methods: We included patients with a first cervical cancer (N = 12,048) from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR), 1989–2008. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and absolute excess risks (AER) per 10,000 person-years were calculated to estimate the burden of second cancers in cervical cancer survivors. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were computed to identify predictors for second cancers among cervical cancer survivors. Results: During the study period, 676 (5.6%) patients were diagnosed with a second cancer. Smoking-related cancers contributed the most to the overall burden of second cancers (AER = 21) and risks remained elevated after 10 years of follow-up (SIR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.4–2.2), yet it decreased markedly in the younger birth cohorts. Cervical cancer survivors who underwent radiotherapy were at higher risk for a second tumor when compared to those without radiotherapy, especially at smoking-related sites (IRR = 1.6 (1.2–2.3)). Conclusion: Patients with cervical cancer had a significantly increased risk for a second cancer compared to the general population, especially for smoking- and irradiation-related tumors. Long-term follow-up suggested the importance of smoking cessation and the benefits of counseling cervical cancer patients accordingly, particularly those who received radiotherapy

  3. Prospects for primary prevention of cervical cancer in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceschi Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The HPV types that cause cervical cancer are sexually transmitted, but there is little evidence that infection can be avoided by behavioural changes, such as condom use. In contrast, prophylactic vaccines against HPV infection are likely to have high efficacy. In principle, the effectiveness of HPV vaccination as a strategy for cervical cancer control can be measured either by monitoring secular trends in cervical cancer incidence or by conducting randomized trials. The former approach is unlikely to provide convincing evidence of effectiveness, since cervical cancer rates are subject to strong secular trends that are independent of intervention measures. A few phase III trials of HPV prophylactic vaccines are now being started. Such trials are very expensive studies involving frequent and complicated investigations. It is important, however, to start as soon as possible simpler trials designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of HPV vaccine in field conditions, i.e. in developing or intermediate countries which suffer the major burden of mortality from cervical cancer. Such trials may capture a difference in the most severe, and rarest, preinvasive cervical lesions (i.e., the real target of any HPV vaccine over a prolonged follow-up (20 years at least. The design of such studies is briefly considered for two areas: Southern India and South Korea.

  4. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  5. Somatic LKB1 mutations promote cervical cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana N Wingo

    Full Text Available Human Papilloma Virus (HPV is the etiologic agent for cervical cancer. Yet, infection with HPV is not sufficient to cause cervical cancer, because most infected women develop transient epithelial dysplasias that spontaneously regress. Progression to invasive cancer has been attributed to diverse host factors such as immune or hormonal status, as no recurrent genetic alterations have been identified in cervical cancers. Thus, the pressing question as to the biological basis of cervical cancer progression has remained unresolved, hampering the development of novel therapies and prognostic tests. Here we show that at least 20% of cervical cancers harbor somatically-acquired mutations in the LKB1 tumor suppressor. Approximately one-half of tumors with mutations harbored single nucleotide substitutions or microdeletions identifiable by exon sequencing, while the other half harbored larger monoallelic or biallelic deletions detectable by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA. Biallelic mutations were identified in most cervical cancer cell lines; HeLa, the first human cell line, harbors a homozygous 25 kb deletion that occurred in vivo. LKB1 inactivation in primary tumors was associated with accelerated disease progression. Median survival was only 13 months for patients with LKB1-deficient tumors, but >100 months for patients with LKB1-wild type tumors (P = 0.015, log rank test; hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.083 to 0.77. LKB1 is thus a major cervical tumor suppressor, demonstrating that acquired genetic alterations drive progression of HPV-induced dysplasias to invasive, lethal cancers. Furthermore, LKB1 status can be exploited clinically to predict disease recurrence.

  6. Disparities in cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girianelli, Vania Reis; Gamarra, Carmen Justina; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil according to socioeconomic and welfare indicators. METHODS Data on breast and cervical cancer mortality covering a 30-year period (1980-2010) were analyzed. The data were obtained from the National Mortality Database, population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics database, and socioeconomic and welfare information from the Institute of Applied Economic Research. Moving averages were calculated, disaggregated by capital city and municipality. The annual percent change in mortality rates was estimated by segmented linear regression using the joinpoint method. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were conducted between average mortality rate at the end of the three-year period and selected indicators in the state capital and each Brazilian state. RESULTS There was a decline in cervical cancer mortality rates throughout the period studied, except in municipalities outside of the capitals in the North and Northeast. There was a decrease in breast cancer mortality in the capitals from the end of the 1990s onwards. Favorable socioeconomic indicators were inversely correlated with cervical cancer mortality. A strong direct correlation was found with favorable indicators and an inverse correlation with fertility rate and breast cancer mortality in inner cities. CONCLUSIONS There is an ongoing dynamic process of increased risk of cervical and breast cancer and attenuation of mortality because of increased, albeit unequal, access to and provision of screening, diagnosis and treatment.  PMID:25119941

  7. Barriers and Motivators Related to Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bokaee

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: modern knowledge could protect against cancer for individuals in community with early stage and premalignat state. Screening of cancer is best instrument for early detection of malignancy. Between women’s cancers breast and cervical cancer have more incidence and mortality than other cancers . But could be prevented by simple and cheep screening programs. Despite specific statistics in Iran evidence shows that women’s participation in screening program is poor , so cancers are diagnosed in advanced stage. The purpose of this study was to identify major barriers and motivators for breast and cervical screening . Methods: This survey was a descriptive study in which 400 women participated in health and treatment centers in Yazd. Sampling method was done in two simple and random stages. Data was collected by inventory and questionnaire . Then data were analyzed by SPSS soft ware . Results: Findings showed that 80% of them never refereed to a health provider for clinical breast exam (C B E and only 3% of them did regularly C B E . 46% of them had never done pap smear and only 14.5 % of them did regularly pap smear. The findings showed that major motivators were as follow: advice of health’s personnel , using of contraceptive methods , and awareness of media. Also the major barriers were as follow : Not having knowledge of these exams , not having knowledge of the existence of these centers of education and practice , not having precious health problems , fear of examination , Embarrassment of examination and health providers not to teach them . to consider the most important barriers were propounded which showed that health education role to eliminate barriers for referring women for screening . Discussion: Based on the results of this sample , screening was the least expected . considering barriers and motivators observed it was revealed that health education was required for prevention of common women’s cancers. Also

  8. Large scale study of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer and different cytological cervical specimens in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansaenroj, Jira; Junyangdikul, Pairoj; Chinchai, Teeraporn; Swangvaree, Sukumarn; Karalak, Anant; Gemma, Nobuhiro; Poovorawan, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Identification of high-risk HPV genotypes in patients is essential for vaccination and prevention programs while the geographic distribution of cervical cancer varies widely. HPV 16 is the major cause of cervical cancer followed by HPV 18, HPV 31, HPV 52, or HPV 58 depending on geographic area. In this study, the distribution of HPV genotypes in cervical specimens from women living in Thailand was analyzed by HPV testing with electrochemical DNA chip and PCR direct sequencing. The 716 specimens were grouped according to their cytological grades; 100 normal, 100 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, 100 high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and 416 specimens of cervical cancer. The results showed that HPV 16, HPV 18, HPV 52, and HPV 58 are the most common HPV genotypes in Thailand, respectively. With respect to age, women below the age of 26 years were almost negative for high-risk HPV DNA exclusively. Conversely, high prevalence of high-risk HPV DNA and abnormal cytology were usually found in women between 26 and 45 years while cervical cancer was detected mainly in women above the age of 45 years. To increase protection efficiency, a vaccine including HPV 52 and HPV 58 should be offered to Asian women, and primary HPV screening should start at 26-30 years of age. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Emergence of fractal geometry on the surface of human cervical epithelial cells during progression towards cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dokukin, M E; Sokolov, I; Guz, N V; Woodworth, C D

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in understanding the molecular nature of cancer, many biophysical aspects of malignant development are still unclear. Here we study physical alterations of the surface of human cervical epithelial cells during stepwise in vitro development of cancer (from normal to immortal (premalignant), to malignant). We use atomic force microscopy to demonstrate that development of cancer is associated with emergence of simple fractal geometry on the cell surface. Contrary to the previously expected correlation between cancer and fractals, we find that fractal geometry occurs only at a limited period of development when immortal cells become cancerous; further cancer progression demonstrates deviation from fractal. Because of the connection between fractal behaviour and chaos (or far from equilibrium behaviour), these results suggest that chaotic behaviour coincides with the cancer transformation of the immortalization stage of cancer development, whereas further cancer progression recovers determinism of processes responsible for cell surface formation. (paper)

  10. Internet-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilbur, David C; Crothers, Barbara A; Eichhorn, John H; Ro, Min S; Gelfand, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    This project explores the combination of computerized automated primary screening of cervical cytology specimens in remote sites with interpretation of device-selected images transmitted via the Internet...

  11. A cohort analysis of cervical cancer in Israeli Jewish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heering, S L; Beller, U; Baras, M; Ben-Shlomo, I; Steinitz, R; Harlap, S

    1990-12-01

    The incidence of squamous cell cervical cancer was studied in Jewish Israeli women between 1961 and 1981. The 1052 cases and the 27,832,272 women-years of observation were divided according to continent-of-origin, year-of-birth, and immigration-wave cohorts. Age-adjusted odds ratios were calculated for each cohort and compared. The incidence of cervical cancer was shown to have changed according to cohort year of birth, most significantly in women born in Europe and America. The highest risk in this group was seen in women born in 1891-1895 and 1941-1945 and the lowest in women born between 1926 and 1935. A high risk was also observed in all cohorts of North African women. There was a sharp rise in risk for women of all origins born after 1940. Immigration to Israel at a younger age was correlated with reduced risk for cervical cancer. It has been shown that epidemics of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are followed in time by epidemics of cervical cancer. Since there was an epidemic of STDs in Israel between 1967 and 1970, our results also suggest that there is a rise in the risk for cervical cancer in women who were sexually active during the epidemic of STDs. Because of the low rates for cervical cancer traditionally observed in Israeli women, routine screening was not done in Israel in the past. Should the relative risk for cervical cancer in women exposed during the 1967-1970 epidemic continue to be high, screening may prove worthwhile.

  12. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, 9 topics were selected as major advances in clinical research for gynecologic oncology: 2 each in cervical and corpus cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and 1 in breast cancer. For cervical cancer, several therapeutic agents showed viable antitumor clinical response in recurrent and metastatic disease: bevacizumab, cediranib, and immunotherapies including human papillomavirus (HPV)-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and Z-100. The HPV test received FDA approval as the primary screening tool of cervical cancer in women aged 25 and older, based on the results of the ATHENA trial, which suggested that the HPV test was a more sensitive and efficient strategy for cervical cancer screening than methods based solely on cytology. For corpus cancers, results of a phase III Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) 249 study of early-stage endometrial cancer with high-intermediate risk factors are followed by the controversial topic of uterine power morcellation in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Promising results of phase II studies regarding the effectiveness of olaparib in various ovarian cancer settings are summarized. After a brief review of results from a phase III study on pazopanib maintenance therapy in advanced ovarian cancer, 2 outstanding 2014 ASCO presentations cover the topic of using molecular subtypes in predicting response to bevacizumab. A review of the use of opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer preventive strategy in the general population is presented. Two remarkable studies that discussed the effectiveness of adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal early breast cancer have been selected as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:25872896

  13. [Balloon occlusion test of the internal carotid artery for evaluating resectability of blood vessel infiltrating cervical metastasis of advanced head and neck cancers--Heidelberg experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, A; von Kummer, R; Adams, H P; Kneip, M; Galito, P; Maier, H

    1993-11-01

    During the last two years 17 patients of the ENT-Department of the University of Heidelberg suffering from squamous-cell carcinomas of the head and neck underwent a balloon occlusion test of the internal carotid artery (ICA). The investigation was performed because of tumorous infiltration of the large cervical vessels. The balloon occlusion of the ICA was accomplished at the Department of Neuroradiology of the University of Heidelberg. While stopping bloodflow in the ICA of one side for 15-20 min, clinical, electrophysiological and Doppler sonographic monitoring was performed, to detect severe cerebral complications. The specific electrophysiological monitoring contained the detection of MSSEP's (median nerve stimulated somatosensorial evoked potentials) and TCMEP's (transcortical motor evoked potentials) during test occlusion. Balloon occlusion was not possible in three patients because of severe arteriosclerosis. Test occlusion had to be discontinued in three patients because of clinical complications (temporary amaurosis, orthostatic complications). Finally, seven patients showed contraindications during test occlusion for permanent occlusion of the ICA. Four patients had a permanent occlusion of the ICA after tumour resection. In two patients the ICA was removed without problems in test occlusion. The third patient underwent a permanent carotid occlusion because of bleeding complications (in spite of poor clinical tolerance of the test occlusion). In the fourth patient, only intraoperative neuromonitoring with MSSEP's was conducted before permanent carotid occlusion. All four patients did not show any neurological deficits after resection of the ICA. Neurophysiological monitoring played an important role in predicting cerebral complications after permanent occlusion of the ICA.

  14. Detection of circulating tumor cells in cervical cancer using a conditionally replicative adenovirus targeting telomerase-positive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Takeo; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mizumoto, Yasunari; Myojyo, Subaru; Yamazaki, Rena; Iwadare, Jyunpei; Bono, Yukiko; Orisaka, Shunsuke; Obata, Takeshi; Iizuka, Takashi; Kagami, Kyosuke; Nakayama, Kentaro; Hayakawa, Hideki; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Kyo, Satoru; Sasagawa, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are newly discovered biomarkers of cancers. Although many systems detect CTC, a gold standard has not yet been established. We analyzed CTC in uterine cervical cancer patients using an advanced version of conditionally replicative adenovirus targeting telomerase-positive cells, which was enabled to infect coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor-negative cells and to reduce false-positive signals in myeloid cells. Blood samples from cervical cancer patients were hemolyzed and infected with the virus and then labeled with fluorescent anti-CD45 and anti-pan cytokeratin antibodies. GFP (+)/CD45 (-) cells were isolated and subjected to whole-genome amplification followed by polymerase chain reaction analysis of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. CTC were detected in 6 of 23 patients with cervical cancers (26.0%). Expression of CTC did not correlate with the stage of cancer or other clinicopathological factors. In 5 of the 6 CTC-positive cases, the same subtype of HPV DNA as that of the corresponding primary lesion was detected, indicating that the CTC originated from HPV-infected cancer cells. These CTC were all negative for cytokeratins. The CTC detected by our system were genetically confirmed. CTC derived from uterine cervical cancers had lost epithelial characteristics, indicating that epithelial marker-dependent systems do not have the capacity to detect these cells in cervical cancer patients. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. The cervical cancer prevention programme in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Ileana Quirós

    2015-01-01

    Cervical and uterine cancer continues to be an important issue for women around the world, although neoplasia has the greatest demonstrated potential for prevention. Costa Rica has achieved important advances in the reduction of the incidence and mortality of these cancers since the last century. This is the result of a series of policies, programmes, and plans, not only at the level of the health care system, but also in other areas. Increased access for women to care in health centres, fundamentally at the primary level, has been vital, as has ensuring the quality of cytology readings and access to diagnosis and treatment for precursor lesions for in situ and invasive cancers. Despite all of these achievements, there are still challenges to be overcome, which are widespread in many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. It is important to learn from the experiences of other countries in order to improve women’s health not only as a health objective, but also as an ethical imperative to promote the exercise of women’s rights to life and health. PMID:26557876

  16. Nominated Texture Based Cervical Cancer Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Jayasingh Mariarputham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate classification of Pap smear images becomes the challenging task in medical image processing. This can be improved in two ways. One way is by selecting suitable well defined specific features and the other is by selecting the best classifier. This paper presents a nominated texture based cervical cancer (NTCC classification system which classifies the Pap smear images into any one of the seven classes. This can be achieved by extracting well defined texture features and selecting best classifier. Seven sets of texture features (24 features are extracted which include relative size of nucleus and cytoplasm, dynamic range and first four moments of intensities of nucleus and cytoplasm, relative displacement of nucleus within the cytoplasm, gray level cooccurrence matrix, local binary pattern histogram, tamura features, and edge orientation histogram. Few types of support vector machine (SVM and neural network (NN classifiers are used for the classification. The performance of the NTCC algorithm is tested and compared to other algorithms on public image database of Herlev University Hospital, Denmark, with 917 Pap smear images. The output of SVM is found to be best for the most of the classes and better results for the remaining classes.

  17. Improving cervical cancer screening attendance in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Anni; Anttila, Ahti; Luostarinen, Tapio; Malila, Nea; Nieminen, Pekka

    2015-03-15

    High attendance is essential to cervical cancer screening results. Attendance in the Finnish program is currently at 70%, but extensive opportunistic screening occurs beside the organized. A shift from opportunistic to organized screening is imperative to optimize the costs and impact of screening and minimize potential harms. We evaluated the effect of reminder letters (1st reminder) and self-sampling test (2nd reminder) on program attendance. The study population consisted of 31,053 screening invitees in 31 Finnish municipalities. 8,284 non-attendees after one invitation received a reminder letter and 4,536 further non-attendees were offered a self-sampling option. Socioeconomic factors related to participation were clarified by combining screening data to data from Statistics Finland. Reminder letters increased participation from 72.6% (95% CI 72.1, 73.1) to 79.2% (95% CI 78.8, 79.7) and self-sampling further to 82.2% (95% CI 81.8, 82.7). Reminder letters with scheduled appointments resulted in higher increase than open invitations (10 vs. 6%). Screening of original non-attendees increased the yield of CIN3+ lesions by 24%. Non-attendance was associated with young age, immigrant background, lower education level and having never been married. We showed that a total attendance of well over 80% can be achieved within an organized program when the invitational protocol is carefully arranged. © 2014 UICC.

  18. Results of radiation therapy on cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagai, Teruo; Yamakawa, Michitaka; Tsuchiya, Miwako; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Niibe, Hideo

    1989-01-01

    Between 1969 and 1985, a total of 298 patients with cervical cancer were treated by radiation therapy at the Department of Radiology, Gunma University Hospital. Another 111 patients were treated with irradiation as a follow up to surgery; 69 for prophylactic reasons and 42 to treat residual tumors. Patients treated with irradiation alone were given a combination of external irradiation to the pelvis and low dose rate intracavitary irradiation. Patients treated post-operatively were given intracavitary electron beam irradiation of the resected end of the vagina, and external irradiation of the entire pelvis. The following results were obtained: In patients treated by radiation therapy alone, the relative 5-year survival rates according to clinical stage were: 108% for patients with stage I cancer, 90% for stage II, 62% for stage III, and 31% for stage IV. Stage IV patients with no evidence of hematogenous metastasis could be candidates for radical therapy. Local recurrence was observed in 13% of stage II and III patients, attributed to inadequate intracavitary treatment and the histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Severe complications occurred in only 12 (4%) of the 298 patients treated with irradiation alone. The relative 5-year survival rates for patients treated with post-operative irradiation were 91% for patients treated prophylactically and 49% for patients treated for residual tumor. Patients treated with post-operative irradiation for residual tumor at the resected end of the vagina showed a high cumulative survival rate of 77%. Since urinary sequelae developed in only 4 patients, it would seem that electron beam irradiation of the resected end of the vagina is a safe and effective method of therapy. (author)

  19. Dose-effect relationship and risk factors for vaginal stenosis after definitive radio(chemo)therapy with image-guided brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer in the EMBRACE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Nout, Remi A; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Haie-Meder, Christine; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Segedin, Barbara; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M; Hoskin, Peter J; Rai, Bhavana; Dörr, Wolfgang; Kirisits, Christian; Bentzen, Søren M; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    To identify risk factors for vaginal stenosis and to establish a dose-effect relationship for image-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Patients from the ongoing EMBRACE study with prospectively assessed morbidity (CTCAEv3.0) at baseline and at least one follow-up were selected. Patient-, disease- and treatment characteristics were tested as risk factors for vaginal stenosis G ⩾ 2 in univariate and multivariable analyses (Cox proportional hazards model) and a dose-effect curve was deduced from the estimates. The ICRU rectum point was used to derive the recto-vaginal reference point dose. In 630 patients included (median follow-up 24months), 2-year actuarial estimate for vaginal stenosis G ⩾ 2 was 21%. Recto-vaginal reference point dose (HR=1.025, p=0.029), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose >45 Gy/25 fractions (HR=1.770, p=0.056) and tumor extension in the vagina (HR=2.259, p ⩽ 0.001) were risk factors for vaginal stenosis, adjusted for center reporting effects. Based on the model curve, the risk was 20% at 65 Gy, 27% at 75 Gy and 34% at 85 Gy (recto-vaginal reference point dose). Keeping the EBRT dose at 45 Gy/25 fractions and decreasing the dose contribution of brachytherapy to the vagina decrease the risk of stenosis. A planning aim of ⩽65 Gy EQD2 (EBRT+brachytherapy dose) to the recto-vaginal reference point is therefore proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Secondary peritonitis due to rupture of pyometra in cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeferino Toquero, Moisé; Bañuelos Flores, Joel

    2005-11-01

    Only 8 cases of spontaneous uterine rupture in untreated cervical cancer have been reported in the literature. We present the case of a 52-year-old female, who was admitted to the emergency room due to hypovolemic shock and signs of peritonitis. A 6x4x4 cm cervical tumor was detected at physical exam. At laparotomy 2000 mL of purulent material were found and a 1-cm perforation in the posterior portion of the uterine segment was identified. A subtotal hysterectomy was performed. The patient received antibiotic and support at Intensive Care Unit. Finally, the patient presented ascendant flaccid paralysis and died due to bronchoaspiration. Spontaneous pyometra rupture in untreated cervical cancer is a rare condition and must be considered in postmenopausal women with cervical tumors and peritonitis signs.

  1. Pelvic nodal CTV from L4-L5 or aortic bifurcation? An audit of the patterns of regional failures in cervical cancer patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Bhavana; Bansal, Anshuma; Patel, Firuza; Gulia, Abhishek; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Suresh C

    2014-10-01

    To assess the patterns of recurrence in cervical cancer patients treated with pelvic nodal clinical target volume at L4-L5 junction instead of aortic bifurcation. Records of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemo-radiation were reviewed. Patients treated with standard pelvic fields (superior border of the field at L4/L5 junction), without any radiological evidence of regional lymphadenopathy (advanced cervical cancer. Radiotherapy fields need to be defined cautiously in patients with subcentimeter pelvic lymph nodes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. On adequate treatment for stage 1 cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkviani, L.I.; Kharaishvili, Ts.N.

    1985-01-01

    Expansive extirpation of the uterus was performed in 726 cases of stage TIbNXMO cervical cancer. 19.3% of 600 cases of pTIb cancer showed metastatic involvement of lymph nodes. Metastases into regional lymph nodes were found to be resistant to preoperative large-fraction irradiation. The long-term results of treatment of 484 patients with pTIbNOMO cervical cancer receiving 3 different treatment modalities (operation alone, surgery+preoperative irradiation and surgery+postoperative distant irradiation) did not show any significant difference. Complications and relapse were rarer in patients who received surgery only. Therefore, expansive extirpation of the uterus unaccompanied by distant radiotherapy should be a Method of choice in treatment of stage I cervical cancer (pTIbNOMO)

  3. Physical Activity and Cervical Cancer Testing among American Indian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla B.; Bogart, T. Andy; Duncan, Glen E.; Jacobsen, Clemma; Buchwald, Dedra S.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have shown that women who engage in high levels of physical activity have higher rates of cancer screening, including Papanicalaou (Pap) tests. Because American Indian (AI) women are at high risk for cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, we examined Pap screening prevalence and assessed whether physical activity was associated…

  4. Uptake of cervical cancer screening: awareness, willingness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer remains the commonest genital tract cancer and yet it is preventable through cytologic screening with Pap smear. Awareness and willingness among target population is an imperative for uptake of screening services. Aim: To contribute to the existing knowledge base, and in particular, bridge ...

  5. Knowledge of Cervical Cancer and its Screening Amongst Female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is an important women's reproductive health problem, especially in developing countries. Efforts towards its prevention worldwide have focused on screening women at risk of disease using Pap smears and treating pre-cancerous lesions. A good knowledge and understanding of the level of ...

  6. Design The Cervical Cancer Detector Use The Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intan Af'idah, Dwi; Didik Widianto, Eko; Setyawan, Budi

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is one of the contagious diseases that become a public health issue, both in the world and in Indonesia. In the world, 12% of all deaths caused by cancer and is the second killer after cardiovascular disease. Early detection using the IVA is a practical and inexpensive (only requiring acetic acid). However, the accuracy of the method is quite low, as it can not detect the stage of the cancer. While other methods have a better sensitivity than the IVA method, is a method of PAP smear. However, this method is relatively expensive, and requires an experienced pathologist-cytologist. According to the case above, Considered important to make the cancer cervics detector that is used to detect the abnormality and cervical cancer stage and consists of a digital microscope, as well as a computer application based on artificial neural network. The use of cervical cancer detector software and hardware are integrated each other. After the specifications met, the steps to design the cervical cancer detection are: Modifying a conventional microscope by adding a lens, image recording, and the lights, Programming the tools, designing computer applications, Programming features abnormality detection and staging of cancer.

  7. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    medical care, especially in the field of clinical oncology. As SAHA has shown good results in human cancer therapy, we used HeLa cells as a model to identify whether SAHA would be effective in cervical cancer. We took the proteomics approach, particularly 2-DE and MS, to identify the altered proteins in HeLa cells before ...

  8. Assessment of psychological barriers to cervical cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    among women in Kumasi, Ghana using a mixed methods approach. *Williams M1 .... market, pharmacies, trotro (public transportation) stops, and from the ..... Malaysia. Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev. 2009;10(5):747–. 752. 27. Lin S-J. Factors influencing the uptake of screening services for breast and cervical cancer in Taiwan.

  9. Preferences for cervical cancer screening: The role of implicit associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, I.J.; Kwaadsteniet, E.W. de; Voorst, A. van; Stiggelbout, A.M.; Vries, M. de; Pieterse, A.H.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Implicit associations influence behaviour, but their impact on cancer screening intentions is unknown. Methods: We assessed implicit associations with cervical cancer screening using an evaluative priming task. Participants were shown primes ('Pap test', neutral or non-word) followed by

  10. Awareness of cervical cancer and its prevention among young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cancer of the cervix is a major public health issue in the developing countries. The burden of the disease is considerable with associated morbidity and mortality among women in their productive years. The lack of awareness and adequate information about cervical cancer and its prevention may be ...

  11. Factors associated with management of cervical cancer patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Cervical cancer is an important public health problem among adult women worldwide. It is the second commonest malignancy in female worldwide and the leading malignancy among women in Tanzania. In most developing countries, cancer of the cervix tends to be diagnosed in its later stages when is less ...

  12. Knowledge, Practices and Education of Clients on Cervical Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Most patients with cancer of the cervix present late with poor prognosis. Health workers' knowledge and utilization of the screening services might influence their clients. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge, practice and education of clients on cervical cancer and its screening among female ...

  13. Awareness and perception of risk for cervical cancer among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    about their sociodemographic characteristics, marital and reproductive history, and awareness and perception of risk for cervical cancer. Data were .... Data were entered into a computer and analyzed using. Statistical Package for the Social ..... Information Centre). Human Papilloma Virus and Related Cancers in. Nigeria.

  14. Cervical cancer screening in Greenland, 1997-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Signe; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In spite of the high incidence of cervical cancer in Greenland, no assessment has been made of the impact of organized cervical screening, introduced in 1998, in relation to occurrence of high-grade cervical lesions. The objectives of the present study were to estimate coverage...... of the screening program was low during 1997-2011 with the highest level of 54% observed in 2011. Peaks in CIN3 incidence of around 300 per 100,000 person-years were observed in 1999 and between 2009 and 2011, while the incidence was lower of approximately 100 per 100,000 person-years between 2000 and 2008. During...

  15. Inadequate cervical cancer screening among mid-aged Australian women who have experienced partner violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loxton, Deborah; Powers, Jennifer; Schofield, Margot; Hussain, Rafat; Hosking, Stacey

    Objectives. Partner violence is linked to cervical cancer and other gynaecological conditions. However, results of current research into associations between partner violence and cervical cancer screening have been inconclusive. Therefore, the current research investigates the association between

  16. Analysis of clinical characteristics of 950 cases of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-li ZHU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the clinical features of the patients suffering from cervical cancer who visited Daping Hospital affiliated to Third Military Medical University in recent 10 years. Methods The clinical data of the patients who were pathologically diagnosed as invasive cervical cancer in Daping Hospital of TMMU from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into different age groups and analyzed according to age, clinical features, pathological type, and surgical approach. Results Clinical data of 950 patients with invasive cervical cancer were reviewed in this study. The mean age of the patients was 46.9 years. The clinical features, pathological type, and surgical approaches were different in different age groups. Analysis of the age structure of the patients, the onset age of cervical cancer seemed to increase year by year. Conclusion The clinical features of cervical cancer are diversity in different age, and the strategy for controlling its development should be varied according to age. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.09

  17. A joint model of persistent human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer risk: Implications for cervical cancer screening

    OpenAIRE

    Katki, Hormuzd A.; Cheung, Li C.; Fetterman, Barbara; Castle, Philip E.; Sundaram, Rajeshwari

    2015-01-01

    New cervical cancer screening guidelines in the US and many European countries recommend that women get tested for human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform decisions about screening intervals, we calculate the increase in precancer/cancer risk per year of continued HPV infection. However, both time to onset of precancer/cancer and time to HPV clearance are interval-censored, and onset of precancer/cancer strongly informatively censors HPV clearance. We analyze this bivariate informatively interv...

  18. Prevalence of micronuclei in exfoliated uterine cervical cells from patients with risk factors for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lízia Maria Franco dos Reis Campos

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Pap smears are the most common and inexpensive screening method for cervical cancer. We analyzed micronucleus prevalence in exfoliated cervical mucosa cells, to investigate associations between increased numbers of micronuclei and risk factors for cervical cancer. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study, at Instituto de Pesquisa em Oncologia (IPON. METHODS: Exfoliated cervical cells were obtained from 101 patients between September 2004 and November 2005. Patients' ages, habits (passive or active smoking, alcoholism and numbers of sexual partners, age at first sexual intercourse, contraceptive methods used, histories of sexually transmitted diseases, use of hormone replacement therapy, numbers of pregnancies and abortions, inflammatory cytology and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN were obtained. Cells were collected using Ayre spatulas, transferred to vials containing 0.9% saline solution for micronucleus tests and analyzed at 1000x magnification. The number of micronuclei in 1,000 epithelial cells per patient sample was counted. RESULTS: Comparisons between groups with active (7.9 ± 7.8 and passive (7.2 ± 10.6 smoking versus no smoking (3.7 ± 5.1; with/without alcoholism (7.8 ± 1.4 and 6.9 ± 10.1; with/without inflammatory cytology (10.7 ± 10.5 and 1.3 ± 1.7; and with CIN I, II and III and no CIN (respectively 4.3 ± 4.3, 10.6 ± 5.3, 22.7 ± 11.9 and 1.3 ± 1.4 found elevated micronucleus prevalence (P < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the prevalence of micronuclei in exfoliated uterine cervical cells was greater in patients with one or more risk factors for uterine cervical cancer than in patients without risk factors.

  19. Phase I Study of Intravenous Triapine (IND # 68338) in Combination With Pelvic Radiation Therapy With or Without Weekly Intravenous Cisplatin Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical, Vaginal, or Pelvic Gynecologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  20. Factors Associated with the Uptake of Cervical Cancer Screening Among Women in Portland, Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Ncube, Butho; Bey, Amita; Knight, Jeremy; Bessler, Patricia; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and is the leading cause of deaths in developing countries. Despite the strong evidence that cervical cancer screening results in decreased mortality from this disease, the uptake for cervical screening among Jamaican women remains low. Aims : This study was carried out to identify factors associated with Jamaican women′s decisions to screen for cervical cancer. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional descriptiv...

  1. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Siegel

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2. A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003. Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  2. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  3. HPV in genital cancers (at the exception of cervical cancer) and anal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bruni, Laia; Alemany, Laia

    2014-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been firmly established as a central and necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer and it has been etiologically linked to other anogenital (vulva, vagina, anus and penis) and head and neck cancers, particularly oropharyngeal. Although being rare, the incidence of some of these cancers in some countries has increased in the last decades. HPV-related anogenital tumors share many risk factors with cervical cancer. The HPV aetiological contribution differs in each anatomical location reflecting differences in the natural history and viral tissue tropism. The highest prevalence of HPV DNA in cancers other than cervix has been described for anal, followed by vagina, penile and vulvar cancers. HPV16 has been described as the most common type detected in all cancer sites with different contributions being the highest in anal carcinoma (around 80% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers) and the lowest in vaginal cancers with a contribution similar to that found in cervical cancers (around 60%). Current HPV vaccines have already demonstrated their efficacy in preventing anogenital pre-neoplastic lesions caused by vaccine HPV types. HPV-based prevention tools like HPV vaccination and to a lesser extend screening (e.g. for anal cancer) can be useful measures for reducing the burden of these anogenital cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Strategies for the prevention and control of cervical cancer in rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority of “most-at-risk” women for cervical cancer disease who reside in rural communities of low and middle income countries (LMIC) do not have access to cervical cancer prevention programmes. This paper reviews epidemiology, recommendations, implementation strategies for prevention and control of cervical cancer ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Screening Interventions for U.S. Latinas: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Jacqueline; Dattalo, Patrick; Crowley, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    The high cervical cancer mortality rate among Latinas compared with other ethnic groups in the United States is of major concern. Latina women are almost twice as likely to die from cervical cancer as non-Hispanic white women. To improve Latina cervical cancer screening rates, interventions have been developed and tested. This systematic review…

  6. Does lowering the screening age for cervical cancer in The Netherlands make sense?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Maaike A.; de Kok, Inge M.C.M.; Siesling, Sabine; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2008-01-01

    Recommendations for the age to initiate cervical cancer screening should be directed towards maximum detection of early cervical cancer. However, the screening programme should do more good than harm. The aim of this analysis was to determine whether the target age for cervical cancer screening

  7. 75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations regarding national program goals and objectives... Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of the revised clinical screening...

  8. 77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... meeting of the aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control..., regarding the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations...

  9. Therapeutic immunization strategies against cervical cancer : induction of cell-mediated immunity in murine models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bungener, Laura Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study described in this thesis is the development of a therapeutic immunization strategy against cervical cancer and pre-malignant precursor lesions of cervical cancer (CIN lesions). Cervical cancer is caused by high risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Two of the early proteins of high

  10. Epidemiological and clinical aspects of human papillomavirus detection in the prevention of cervical cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.L.M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bulten, J.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of death, and the second most frequent cancer in women worldwide. Many studies have indicated a causal relation between genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and cervical cancer. High-risk HPV genotypes have been detected in almost 100% of all cervical

  11. Strategies for the Prevention and Control of Cervical Cancer in Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Majority of “most-at-risk” women for cervical cancer disease who reside in rural communities of low and middle income countries (LMIC) do not have access to cervical cancer prevention programmes. This paper reviews epidemiology, recommendations, implementation strategies for prevention and control of cervical cancer ...

  12. HPV-related cervical disease and oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozza, Virginia; Pieralli, Annalisa; Corioni, Serena; Longinotti, Manuela; Bianchi, Claudia; Moncini, Daniela; Fallani, Maria Grazia

    2014-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV 16, is associated with the development of both cervical and oral cancer. We show the case of a woman affected by HPV-related cervical disease and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). A 41-year-old woman arrived at our Colposcopy Center following an abnormal Pap smear result (ASC-H) and a diagnosis of moderate cervical dysplasia obtained by a cervical biopsy. She underwent a colposcopy that showed a cervical abnormal transformation zone grade 2. A laser conization was performed in November 2010. Histology reported a moderate/severe dysplasia. The cone resection margins were free. Follow-up colposcopy and cytology were negative. The HPV testing showed an infection by HPV 16. In October 2012, the patient presented to the Head-Neck ER after episodes of hemoptysis; a lesion was found in the left tonsillar lodge. A biopsy was performed with a result of squamous cell carcinoma with low-grade differentiation. The HPV testing detected a high-risk HPV and the immunohistochemical analysis was positive for p16. She was treated by chemotherapy and brachytherapy. She was followed at the head-neck center with monthly visits with oral visual inspection that showed complete absence of mucosal abnormalities. HPV-related OPSCC and cervical precancerous/cancerous lesions have significant similarities in terms of pathogenesis. They are both caused largely by HPV 16, as in the present case. In conclusion, because of this association found in literature and in our case, we think that women with HPV cervical lesions should have regular surveillance for oropharyngeal cancer, whereas women with OPSCC should be encouraged to have diligent cervical screening.

  13. [Cigarette smoking among women attending cervical cancer screening program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walentowicz-Sadłecka, Małgorzata; Sadłecki, Paweł; Marszałek, Andrzej; Grabiec, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is recognized as tobacco-related malignancy. HPV vaccination and introducing screening protocols were found as the best way to decrease cervical cancer related mortality. Besides the cytological screening programs of the uterine cervix smear, nowadays co-factors of carcinogenesis are taken into consideration, also. The aim of our study was to analyse data included in questionnaire of 310 women who underwent cytological examination wi thin cervical cancer screening program in our Department in 2011. There were no differences found between studied groups on rate of oral contraceptive or hormonal therapy use, as well as age and tobacco smoking. However, taking into account education and smoking, there was a significant correlation observed. Patients with higher education level smoked less often. The special attention should be paid to promote smoking cessation in the group of women who finished education on elementary level.

  14. Prediction of rehabilitation needs after treatment of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Tina Broby; Sørensen, Bente; Dieperink, Karin B

    2017-01-01

    showed impaired quality of life, e.g., a lower body image and self-efficacy score, correlated with increasing BMI. Women who had surgery had greater risk of lymphedema, and women who received chemotherapy during treatment had a lower quality of life. All but one received radiotherapy. CONCLUSION......PURPOSE: Women treated for cervical cancer with radiotherapy and chemotherapy have reported serious bowel, vaginal, and sexual late effects. The purpose of this study was to describe late adverse effects, health-related quality of life, and self-efficacy in a representative Danish cervical cancer...... population in order to describe rehabilitation needs. METHODS: Women, mean age 55 years, treated for cervical cancer from January 2010 to July 2013, who were alive and without known relapse/metastases were included in this cross-sectional study. EORTC QLQ C30 and CX24 and self-efficacy questionnaires were...

  15. Cervical cancer screening continues to limit provision of contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Saint, Mona; Gildengorin, Ginny; Weitz, Tracy A; Stewart, Felicia H; Sawaya, George F

    2005-09-01

    Balancing needs for contraception and cervical cancer screening is challenging for clinicians. We assessed US obstetrician/gynecologists' practices regarding requirement of Pap testing before prescribing oral contraceptive or emergency contraceptive pills. Questionnaires structured as clinical vignettes describing women desiring contraception with different risks of cervical dysplasia were mailed to a national sample of 355 obstetrician/gynecologists. A minority (3%) of the 185 obstetrician/gynecologists who responded would refill 12 months of oral contraceptives without requiring Pap testing. However, most would provide a limited supply of oral contraceptives until Pap testing could be performed. A substantial proportion (11-16%) would refuse to prescribe emergency contraception to women who they felt required Pap testing. Younger physicians, those practicing in academic settings and those who follow American Cancer Society guidelines were more willing to prescribe contraceptives without Pap testing. Cervical cancer screening continues to limit prescription of routine and emergency contraception by many US obstetrician/gynecologists.

  16. Cervical cancer screening policies and coverage in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Ahti; von Karsa, Lawrence; Aasmaa, Auni

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare current policy, organisation and coverage of cervical cancer screening programmes in the European Union (EU) member states with European and other international recommendations. According to the questionnaire-based survey, there are large variations in cervical...... cancer screening policies and inadequacies in the key organisational elements of the programme such as registration and monitoring required for quality-assurance and fail-safe mechanisms. Based on data from available screening registers, coverage of the screening test taken within the population...... with education, training and communication among women, medical professionals and authorities are required, accordingly. The study indicates that, despite substantial efforts, the recommendations of the Council of the EU on organised population-based screening for cervical cancer are not yet fulfilled. Decision...

  17. The Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier Bosch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer has been recognized as a rare outcome of a common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI. The etiologic association is restricted to a limited number of viral types of the family of the Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs. The association is causal in nature and under optimal testing systems, HPV DNA can be identified in all specimens of invasive cervical cancer. As a consequence, it has been claimed that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The evidence is consistent worldwide and implies both the Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC, the adenocarcinomas and the vast majority (i.e. > 95% of the immediate precursors, namely High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL/Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3/Carcinoma in situ. Co-factors that modify the risk among HPV DNA positive women include the use of oral contraceptives (OC for five or more years, smoking, high parity (five or more full term pregnancies and previous exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT and Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2. Women exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV are at high risk for HPV infection, HPV DNA persistency and progression of HPV lesions to cervical cancer.

  18. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Cervical, Vaginal, or Uterine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-19

    Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage I Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer AJCC v7

  19. Project ECHO: A Telementoring Program for Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment in Low-Resource Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Lopez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates are significantly higher in low- and middle-income countries compared with the United States and other developed countries. This disparity is caused by decreased access to screening, often coupled with low numbers of trained providers offering cancer prevention and treatment services. However, similar disparities are also found in underserved areas of the United States, such as the Texas-Mexico border, where cervical cancer mortality rates are 30% higher than in the rest of Texas. To address these issues, we have adopted the Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes program, a low-cost telementoring model previously proven to be successful in increasing local capacity, improving patient management skills, and ultimately improving patient outcomes in rural and underserved areas. We use the Project ECHO model to educate local providers in the management of cervical dysplasia in a low-resource region of Texas and have adapted it to inform strategies for the management of advanced cervical and breast cancer in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. This innovative approach, using ECHO, is part of a larger strategy to enhance clinical skills and develop collaborative projects between academic centers and partners in low-resource regions.

  20. The role of interstitial brachytherapy in the management of primary radiation therapy for uterine cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Murakami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The aim of this study was to report the clinical results of uterine cervical cancer patients treated by primary radiation therapy including brachytherapy, and investigate the role of interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT. Material and methods: All consecutive uterine cervical cancer patients who were treated by primary radiation therapy were reviewed, and those who were treated by ISBT were further investigated for clinical outcomes and related toxicities. Results : From December 2008 to October 2014, 209 consecutive uterine cervical cancer patients were treated with primary radiation therapy. Among them, 142 and 42 patients were treated by intracavitary and hybrid brachytherapy, respectively. Twenty-five patients (12% were treated by high-dose-rate (HDR-ISBT. Five patients with distant metastasis other than para-aortic lymph node were excluded, and 20 patients consisted of the analysis. Three-year overall survival (OS, progression-free survival (PFS, and local control (LC rate were 44.4%, 38.9%, and 87.8%, respectively. Distant metastasis was the most frequent site of first relapse after HDR-ISBT. One and four patients experienced grade 3 and 2 rectal bleeding, one grade 2 cystitis, and two grade 2 vaginal ulcer. Conclusions : Feasibility and favorable local control of interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer was demonstrated through a single institutional experience with a small number of patients.

  1. Variable TERRA abundance and stability in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Bong-Kyeong; Keo, Ponnarath; Bae, Jaeman; Ko, Jung Hwa; Choi, Joong Sub

    2017-06-01

    Telomeres are transcribed into long non-coding RNA, referred to as telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), which plays important roles in maintaining telomere integrity and heterochromatin formation. TERRA has been well characterized in HeLa cells, a type of cervical cancer cell. However, TERRA abundance and stability have not been examined in other cervical cancer cells, at least to the best of our knowledge. Thus, in this study, we measured TERRA levels and stability, as well as telomere length in 6 cervical cancer cell lines, HeLa, SiHa, CaSki, HeLa S3, C-33A and SNU-17. We also examined the association between the TERRA level and its stability and telomere length. We found that the TERRA level was several fold greater in the SiHa, CaSki, HeLa S3, C-33A and SNU-17 cells, than in the HeLa cells. An RNA stability assay of actinomycin D-treated cells revealed that TERRA had a short half-life of ~4 h in HeLa cells, which was consistent with previous studies, but was more stable with a longer half-life (>8 h) in the other 5 cell lines. Telomere length varied from 4 to 9 kb in the cells and did not correlate significantly with the TERRA level. On the whole, our data indicate that TERRA abundance and stability vary between different types of cervical cancer cells. TERRA degrades rapidly in HeLa cells, but is maintained stably in other cervical cancer cells that accumulate higher levels of TERRA. TERRA abundance is associated with the stability of RNA in cervical cancer cells, but is unlikely associated with telomere length.

  2. Association between B7-H1 and cervical cancer: B7-H1 impairs the immune response in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianying; Dai, Jianrong; Hou, Shunyu

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the preliminary mechanism of action of B7 homolog 1 (B7-H1) and investigate the association between B7-H1 and cervical cancer. The expression of B7 family proteins was measured in cervical cancer cells. Cervical cancer cells were co-cultured with T lymphocytes. An ELISA assay was subsequently conducted to analyze cytokine concentrations in the supernatants of the cultured T cells in cervical cancer cells and B7-H1 downregulated cells. Levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA in mice injected with cervical cancer cells or B7-H1 downregulated cells were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. It was determined that cervical cancer cells express high levels of B7-H1, whereas the normal cervical epithelium does not express B7-H1. When co-cultured with T lymphocytes, cervical cancer cells were involved in the inhibition of lymphocyte activation. When B7-H1 was downregulated using a lentivirus, the proliferation ability did not change compared with cervical cancer cells, whereas the soluble factors secreted by T cells differed between cervical cancer cells and B7-H1 downregulated cells. In an animal model, injected B7-H1 downregulated cervical cancer cells elicited a more intense immune response, whereas cervical cancer cells had the wild immune response. Therefore, the results of the present study demonstrate that B7-H1 mediates the low immunogenicity of cervical cancer and is not attacked by the immune system.

  3. Nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phanida Jarruwale

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A new technique of extensive surgical intervention, namely nerve sparing radical hysterectomy (NSRH, was introduced as one of the treatment options for early stage cervical cancer patients because cervical cancer patients suffer from postoperative complications following radical hysterectomy procedure. The step of nerve preservation can reduce postoperative complications, such as bladder or sexual dysfunction problems that occur after a traditional radical hysterectomy procedure. The surgical outcomes seem to be favorable and no serious morbidity was noted. However, further study of the nerve sparing technique is necessary to improve this surgical advantage in the future.

  4. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits

  5. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti [Faculty of Industrial Sciences and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Lebuhraya Tun Razak, 26300 Gambang, Pahang (Malaysia); Bahar, Arifah [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor and UTM Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (UTM-CIAM), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  6. Sex, drugs, and politics: the HPV vaccine for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Monica J; Carpenter, Laura M

    2008-09-01

    HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the world. While most strains are relatively harmless, some increase a woman's risk of developing cervical cancer. This article explores the intimate, contested relationships among etiologies of cervical cancer, development and use of the new HPV vaccine, and contested notions of sexuality. We particularly focus on shifts in US health care and sexual politics, where the vaccine has animated longstanding concerns about vaccination (e.g. parental rights, cost, specialisation) and young women's bodies and behaviour. We conclude that vaccines are a distinctive kind of pharmaceutical, invoking notions of contagion and containment, and that politics shape every aspect of the pharmaceutical life course.

  7. Disease-related needs of black patients with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Treadwell

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of cervical cancer amongst South African black women is complicated by late presentation for treatment as well as by misconceptions and ignorance which adversely affect the quality of their lives. The aim of the research was to determine the disease-related needs of patients suffering from cervical cancer which would serve as a basis for planning on providing for these needs. Needs for the following were identified: • Education on early detection in the community. • Education on nutrition and hygiene. • Information on and assistance in obtaining financial relief by means of subsidised transport and disability pensions.

  8. WHY SHOULD WE PERFORM EXTENDED SURGERIES FOR CERVICAL CANCER?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ungar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A surgical technique for the complete removal of the connective tissue content of the pelvis was introduced in 1993 to improve oncological outcome of the surgical treatment of operable cervical cancer by reducing the risk of recurrence from the pelvis. Our results suggest that complete excision of the connective tissue content of the pelvis provides equal or better survival chances without any adjuvant treatment for almost 90 % of operable stage IB cervical cancer patients than less radical surgery with or without adjuvant treatment.

  9. HIV serostatus and tumor differentiation among patients with cervical cancer at Bugando Medical Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matovelo Dismas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence for the association between Human immunodeficiency virus infection and cervical cancer has been contrasting, with some studies reporting increased risk of cervical cancer among HIV positive women while others report no association. Similar evidence from Tanzania is scarce as HIV seroprevalence among cervical cancer patients has not been rigorously evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between HIV and tumor differentiation among patients with cervical cancer at Bugando Medical Centre and Teaching Hospital in Mwanza, North-Western Tanzania. Methods This was a descriptive analytical study involving suspected cervical cancer patients seen at the gynaecology outpatient clinic and in the gynaecological ward from November 2010 to March 2011. Results A total of 91 suspected cervical cancer patients were seen during the study period and 74 patients were histologically confirmed with cervical cancer. The mean age of those confirmed of cervical cancer was 50.5 ± 12.5 years. Most patients (39 of the total 74–52.7% were in early disease stages (stages IA-IIA. HIV infection was diagnosed in 22 (29.7% patients. On average, HIV positive women with early cervical cancer disease had significantly more CD4+ cells than those with advanced disease (385.8 ± 170.4 95% CI 354.8-516.7 and 266.2 ± 87.5, 95% CI 213.3-319.0 respectively p = 0.042. In a binary logistic regression model, factors associated with HIV seropositivity were ever use of hormonal contraception (OR 5.79 95% CI 1.99-16.83 p = 0.001, aged over 50 years (OR 0.09 95% CI 0.02-0.36 p = 0.001, previous history of STI (OR 3.43 95% CI 1.10-10.80 p = 0.035 and multiple sexual partners OR 5.56 95% CI 1.18-26.25 p = 0.030. Of these factors, only ever use of hormonal contraception was associated with tumor cell differentiation (OR 0.16 95% CI 0.06-0.49 p = 0.001. HIV seropositivity was weakly associated with

  10. [La protein expression in cervical cancer tissues and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunlun; Wu, Yi; Li, Mu; Li, Lan; Gao, Yane; Gao, Qing

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the expression of La protein in cervical cancer tissues and explore its role in the occurrence and progression of cervical cancer. The expression of La protein in cervical cancer and normal cervical tissues was detected by immunohistochemical staining. RNA interference technology was used to silence La protein expression in HeLa cells and the changes in cell proliferation, tumor sphere formation and cell cycles were investigated. The expression of La protein was significantly higher in cervical cancer tissues than in normal cervical tissues (61% vs 9%, PLa protein expression in HeLa cells caused significantly reduced the cell proliferation and lowered the tumor sphere formation rate from the control level of (17.1=1.92)% to (6.3=0.45)% (PLa can promote the development of cervical cancer and may play a critical role in the carcinogenesis and progression of cervical cancer.

  11. Five Years' Experience Treating Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer With Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy and High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Results From a Single Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Kate; Gallop-Evans, Eve; Hanna, Louise; Adams, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcomes after concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) followed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix and perform a multivariate analysis of the prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: The outcomes were analyzed for all women treated between 1999 and 2004 with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy and RT followed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for overall survival (OS), local control (LC), and distant control (DC). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to perform multivariate analysis of the prognostic variables. Results: The standard regimen comprised whole pelvic external RT 45 Gy in 25 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m 2 , followed by four high-dose-rate brachytherapy insertions of 6 Gy. Patients with radiologically enlarged para-aortic lymph nodes underwent extended-field RT. Of 92 patients, the OS rate was 72% at 2 years and 55% at 5 years. The LC rate was 76% at 2 years and 67% at 5 years. The DC rate was 68% at 2 years and 48% at 5 years. The most important prognostic factor for OS, LC, and DC was the pretreatment hemoglobin. For OS, the tumor size and the presence of enlarged lymph nodes were also important. For LC, the number of brachytherapy insertions was important; and for DC, the number of chemotherapy treatments was important. Of the patients, 4% experienced late Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the regimen is effective, with acceptable long-term side effects. In this cohort, the most important prognostic factor was the pretreatment hemoglobin level, a disease-related factor. However, more effective systemic treatments are needed.

  12. Illness Perception, Knowledge and Self-Care about Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Kern de Castro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevention plays a central role in early detection of cervical cancer. Common Sense Model proposes that the nature and organization of illness representations can guide actions related to health and how self-care is exercised. The aim of this study was to describe and compare illness perception, knowledge and self-care in women with and without cancer precursor lesions. Participants were 92 women (aged 18-59 from primary care unity divided into two groups: women with and without premalignant lesion. Measures for illness perception, knowledge and self-care were used. There was no statistically significant difference (t test e chi-square test between groups in the variables analyzed. Despite the risk for cervical cancer, women with precursor lesions do not adjust their illness perceptions, knowledge and self-care to the situation. These data show the need to warn women against the cervical cancer risks, because their distorted perceptions and lack of knowledge about the disease may hamper the screening and control of cervical cancer.

  13. Radiotherapy-induced vaginal fibrosis in cervical cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsjö, Alexandra; Bohm-Starke, Nina; Blomgren, Bo; Jahren, Helen; Steineck, Gunnar; Bergmark, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Cervical cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy report vaginal inelasticity and decreased lubrication that may affect their sexual health, but it is unknown which normal tissue reactions mediate these symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphology of the connective tissue of the vaginal wall in cervical cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy. We recruited 34 cervical cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy and 37 age-matched controls. Via clinical examination the degree of vaginal atrophy and pelvic fibrosis were estimated. We collected vaginal biopsies, which underwent morphometric analysis focused on elastin and collagen. Additionally, radiation dose at biopsy site were calculated and correlated to the clinical and morphological findings. The survivors had marked morphological vaginal changes, most prominent in the survivors that had received the highest radiation dose at the biopsy site. Mucosal atrophy was observed in 91% and pelvic fibrosis in 97%. A shorter vagina was measured; 7.0 cm versus 10.3 cm in controls (p cancer survivors that had received external radiation. We found drastic differences in the vaginal wall between the irradiated cervical cancer survivors and the controls, indicating that radiotherapy-induced vaginal symptoms are mediated by connective tissue fibrosis and elastosis. Our results also support that patients treated with external radiation have the highest risk of developing vaginal fibrosis with impairment of their sexual health.

  14. Cervical cancer cells (HeLa) response to photodynamic therapy using a zinc phthalocyanine photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Natasha; Kruger, Cherie Ann; Mokwena, Mpho; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2017-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy worldwide, and the leading cause of cancer related deaths among females. Conventional treatment for early cervical cancer is radical hysterectomy. In locally advanced cancer the treatment of choice is concurrent chemo radiation. Although such treatment methods show promise, they do have adverse side effects. To minimize these effects, as well as prevent cancer re-occurrence, new treatment methods are being investigated. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the selective uptake of a photosensitizer (PS) by cancer cells, illumination with light of an appropriate wavelength that triggers a photochemical reaction leading to the generation of reactive oxygen and subsequent tumor regression. The effect of PDT on a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) was assessed by exposing cultured cells to a sulphonated zinc phthalocyanine PS (ZnPcS mix ) and irradiating the cells using a 673nm diode laser. The effects were measured using the Trypan blue viability assay, adenosine triphosphate assay (ATP) luminescence assay for proliferation, Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) membrane integrity cytotoxicity assay, and fluorescent microscopy to assess PS cellular localization and nuclear damage. Fluorescent microscopy revealed localization of the PS in the cytoplasm and perinuclear region of HeLa cells. PDT treated cellular responses showed dose dependent structural changes, with decreased cell viability and proliferation, as well as considerable membrane damage. Hoechst stained cells also revealed DNA damage in PDT treated cells. The final findings from this study suggest that ZnPcS mix is a promising PS for the PDT treatment of cervical cancer in vitro, where a significant 85% cellular cytotoxicity with only 25% cellular viability was noted in cells which received 1μM ZnPcS mix when an 8J/cm 2 fluence was applied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruckdeschel, John

    1999-01-01

    ... through screening, and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. In addition, the Center created and supports education programs to provide increased cancer awareness and established working collaborations with the James...

  16. Cervical cancer: the route from signs and symptoms to treatment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Susarie Louise; Maree, Johanna Elizabeth; Wright, Susanna Catharina Dreyer

    2008-11-01

    In South Africa, in 2005-06, 100% of primary health care clinics in South Africa had health professionals trained to conduct Pap smears, yet the screening rate was only 1.3% and one in 26 women develop cervical cancer during their lifetime. Many women admitted to oncology wards are at such an advanced stage of disease that palliation is the only treatment option left. The purpose of this qualitative study in 2007, using semi-structured interviews with 15 women with advanced cervical cancer, was to understand the routes they followed from first signs and symptoms of disease to receiving treatment. The willingness of the women to be diagnosed was a positive finding of the study. The women did seek treatment, often more than once, and were not solely responsible for presenting late. The average number of months from first contact with a health care professional until diagnosis was 17.3, ranging from 11.8 months for urban participants to 28.4 months for rural participants, and three to seven months from diagnosis to referral for treatment. Lack of knowledge and awareness among health care professionals resulted in a low suspicion of cancer and misdiagnosis. A national cervical cancer strategy, including health education and re-training of health professionals, should be made a priority.

  17. Women’s perceived susceptibility to and utilisation of cervical cancer screening services in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Y. Hami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malawi provides cervical cancer screening services free of charge at some public health facilities. Few women make use of these cancer screening services in Malawi and many women continue to be diagnosed with cervical cancer only during the late inoperable stages of the condition. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to discover whether the perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer, amongst Malawian women aged 42 and older, influenced their intentions to utilise the available free cervical cancer screening services. Method: A quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive study design was adopted. Structured interviews were conducted with 381 women who visited 3 health centres in the Blantyre District of Malawi. Results: A statistically-significant association existed between women’s intentions to be screened for cervical cancer and their knowledge about cervical cancer (X² = 8.9; df = 1; p = 0.003 and with having heard about HPV infection (X² = 4.2; df = 1; p = 0.041 at the 5% significance level. Cervical cancer screening services are provided free of charge in government health institutions in Malawi. Nevertheless, low perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer amongst women, aged 42 and older, might contribute to limited utilisation of cervical screening services, explaining why 80% of cervical cancer patients in Malawi were diagnosed during the late inoperable stages. Conclusion: Malawian women lacked awareness regarding their susceptibility to cervical cancer and required information about the available cervical cancer screening services. Malawi’s women, aged 42 and older, must be informed about the advantages of cervical cancer screening and about the importance of effective treatment if an early diagnosis has been made. Women aged 42 and older rarely attend antenatal, post-natal, well baby or family-planning clinics, where health education about cervical cancer screening is often provided. Consequently, these women

  18. Two cytological methods for screening for cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirschner, B.; Simonsen, K.; Junge, J.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Denmark has had an organized screening programme for cervical cancer since the 1960s. In spite of this, almost 150 Danish women die from the disease each year. There are currently two different methods for preparation of cervical samples: conventional Papanicolaou smear and liquid......-based cytology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 2002, the Department of Pathology, Hvidovre Hospital changed over from the conventional Papanicolaou smear screening method to SurePath liquid-based cytology. This article is based on a retrospective comparison on data from the population screening programme for cervical...... cancer in the Municipality of Copenhagen. RESULTS: The number of tests with the diagnosis of "normal cells" decreased 1% after the conversion to liquid-based cytology, whilst the number of tests with "atypical cells" and "cells suspicious for malignancy" increased by 64.3% and 41.2% respectively...

  19. Clinical feasibility of combined intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer employing MRI with a tandem/ring applicator in situ and virtual preplanning of the interstitial component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokdal, Lars; Tanderup, Kari; Hokland, Steffen Bjerre; Røhl, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Paludan, Merete; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the reproducibility of virtually planned needles, changes in DVH parameters and clinical feasibility of combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT) for locally advanced cervical cancer based on 3D MRI preplanning. Material and methods: Fifty-eight consecutively patients accrued in the EMBRACE study were included. Treatment was initiated with external beam radiotherapy and cisplatin. Three BT implants and MRI with the applicator in situ were performed in all patients, i.e. week 5 (BT0), week 6 (BT1) and week 7 (BT2) of the treatment. BT0 was only used for preplanning of subsequent implantations, whereas BT1 and BT2 comprised 2 equal sized fractions of PDR BT. Results: Based on BT0, 24 patients (41%) were selected for a combined IC/IS implant at BT1 and BT2. Patients treated with IC/IS BT had significantly larger tumours compared with patients treated with IC BT only (p < 0.03). Additional time in general anaesthesia for the IC/IS component was on average 16 min. The number of preplanned virtual needles was 5.3 ± 2.7 compared to 5.3 ± 2.9 and 5.4 ± 3.0 needles implanted at BT1 and BT2, respectively (p = 0.72). Planned needle implantation depth was 33 ± 15 mm compared to 30 ± 10 mm at BT1 and 29 ± 11 mm at BT2 (p = 0.04). In the 24 patients selected for IC/IS BT both the virtual IC/IS plan (BT0) and the actually delivered plan (BT1 + BT2) significantly increased D90 and D100 for HR CTV (p < 0.01) and reduced D2cc for sigmoid (p < 0.01) and bowel (p = 0.04) compared to the optimised IC preplan (BT0). IC/IS BT was only associated with minor morbidity, which was resolved at a 3-month follow up. Conclusion: Combined IC/IS BT based on full 3D MRI preplanning is clinically feasible. The virtual preplanned needle positions are reproducible at subsequent BT applications leading to significantly improved DVH parameters and a clinically feasible and fast implant procedure

  20. Human Papilloma Virus 16 and 18 Association in Cervical Intraepithelial Lesions and Cervical Cancers by In Situ Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanty Manisa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To correlate the association of high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV 16, 18 in cervical intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancers by in-situ hybridization (ISH technique. Study Group: Cervical biopsy and hysterectomy specimen of 78 young and adult women, attending Hi-Tech Medical College and Hospital, Bhubaneswar, who were clinically or cytologically suspected of cervical intraepithelial lesion or cervical cancer were taken as source of target viral DNA. Material: Formalin 10% as fixative H & E stain as routine staining agent In-situ hybridization kit for HPV 16 and 18 DNA. Method: After following standard protocol for surgical grossing, HPV 16, 18 In-situ hybridization kit was used on paraffin embedded tissue sections. Results: The percentage of positive cases was highest in cervical cancer patients followed by cervical intraepithelial lesions, high grade, and low grade. Conclusion: This study has been carried out for the first in our state and our results show high degree of positivity of HPV 16/18 in females with cervical intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancers attending our tertiary care hospital.

  1. Human papillomavirus in cervical cancer and oropharyngeal cancer: One cause, two diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Tara A; Schiller, John T

    2017-06-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes greater than 5% of cancers worldwide, including all cervical cancers and an alarmingly increasing proportion of oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). Despite markedly reduced cervical cancer incidence in industrialized nations with organized screening programs, cervical cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide, as developing countries lack resources for universal, high-quality screening. In the United States, HPV-related OPC is only 1 of 5 cancers with a rising incidence since 1975 and now has taken over the cervix as the most common site of HPV-related cancer. Similar trends follow throughout North America and Europe. The need for early detection and prevention is paramount. Despite the common etiologic role of HPV in the development of cervical cancer and HPV-associated OPC, great disparity exists between incidence, screening modalities (or lack thereof), treatment, and prevention in these 2 very distinct cohorts. These differences in cervical cancer and HPV-associated OPC and their impact are discussed here. Cancer 2017;123:2219-2229. © 2017 American Cancer Society. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Influences on uptake of reproductive health services in Nsangi community of Uganda and their implications for cervical cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirembe Florence

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is the most common female cancer in Uganda. Over 80% of women diagnosed or referred with cervical cancer in Mulago national referral and teaching hospital have advanced disease. Plans are underway for systematic screening programmes based on visual inspection, as Pap smear screening is not feasible for this low resource country. Effectiveness of population screening programmes requires high uptake and for cervical cancer, minimal loss to follow up. Uganda has poor indicators of reproductive health (RH services uptake; 10% postnatal care attendance, 23% contraceptive prevalence, and 38% skilled attendance at delivery. For antenatal attendance, attendance to one visit is 90%, but less than 50% for completion of care, i.e. three or more visits. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using eight focus group discussions with a total of 82 participants (16 men, 46 women and 20 health workers. We aimed to better understand factors that influence usage of available reproductive health care services and how they would relate to cervical cancer screening, as well as identify feasible interventions to improve cervical cancer screening uptake. Results Barriers identified after framework analysis included ignorance about cervical cancer, cultural constructs/beliefs about the illness, economic factors, domestic gender power relations, alternative authoritative sources of reproductive health knowledge, and unfriendly health care services. We discuss how these findings may inform future planned screening programmes in the Ugandan context. Conclusion Knowledge about cervical cancer among Ugandan women is very low. For an effective cervical cancer-screening programme, awareness about cervical cancer needs to be increased. Health planners need to note the power of the various authoritative sources of reproductive health knowledge such as paternal aunts (Sengas and involve them in the awareness campaign. Cultural and economic

  3. Autophagy regulates the stemness of cervical cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Y

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Yi Yang,1,2 Li Yu,1 Jin Li,1 Ya Hong Yuan,1 Xiao Li Wang,1 Shi Rong Yan,1 Dong Sheng Li,1 Yan Ding1 1Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, 2Reproductive Center, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a rare population of multipotent cells with the capacity to self-renew. It has been reported that there are CSCs in cervical cancer cells. Pluripotency-associated (PA transcription factors such as Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44 have been used to isolate CSCs subpopulations. In this study, we showed that autophagy plays an important role in the biological behavior of cervical cancer cells. The expression of the autophagy protein Beclin 1 and LC3B was higher in tumorspheres established from human cervical cancers cell lines (and CaSki than in the parental adherent cells. It was also observed that the basal and starvation-induced autophagy flux was higher in tumorspheres than in the bulk population. Autophagy could regulate the expression level of PA proteins in cervical CSCs. In addition, CRISPR/Cas 9-mediated Beclin 1 knockout enhanced the malignancy of HeLa cells, leading to accumulation of PA proteins and promoted tumorsphere formation. Our findings suggest that autophagy modulates homeostasis of PA proteins, and Beclin 1 is critical for CSC maintenance and tumor development in nude mice. This demonstrates that a prosurvival autophagic pathway is critical for CSC maintenance. Keywords: cervical cancer, autophagy, cancer stem cell, LC3, Oct4

  4. Immunologic treatments for precancerous lesions and uterine cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Development of HPV-associated cancers not only depends on efficient negative regulation of cell cycle control that supports the accumulation of genetic damage, but also relies on immune evasion that enable the virus to go undetected for long periods of time. In this way, HPV-related tumors usually present MHC class I down-regulation, impaired antigen-processing ability, avoidance of T-cell mediated killing, increased immunosuppression due to Treg infiltration and secrete immunosuppressive cytokines. Thus, these are the main obstacles that immunotherapy has to face in the treatment of HPV-related pathologies where a number of different strategies have been developed to overcome them including new adjuvants. Although antigen-specific immunotherapy induced by therapeutic HPV vaccines was proved extremely efficacious in pre-clinical models, its progression through clinical trials suffered poor responses in the initial trials. Later attempts seem to have been more promising, particularly against the well-defined precursors of cervical, anal or vulvar cancer, where the local immunosuppressive milieu is less active. This review focuses on the advances made in these fields, highlighting several new technologies (such as mRNA vaccine, plant-derived vaccine). The most promising immunotherapies used in clinical trials are also summarized, along with integrated strategies, particularly promising in controlling tumor metastasis and in eliminating cancer cells altogether. After the early promising clinical results, the development of therapeutic HPV vaccines need to be implemented and applied to the users in order to eradicate HPV-associated malignancies, eradicating existing perception (after the effectiveness of commercial preventive vaccines) that we have already solved the problem. PMID:24667138

  5. Utilisation and outcomes of cervical cancer prevention services ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proportion of women undergoing cervical cancer screening after HIV diagnosis at primary health clinics, demographic characteristics of women referred for colposcopy at a tertiary centre, and outcomes of therapy for precancerous lesions of the cervix. Results. The proportion of women undergoing at least one Pap ...

  6. Acceptability of human papilloma virus vaccine and cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-14

    Jul 14, 2012 ... first sexual exposure, and secondarily through screening and treatment of identified precancerous lesions. Aim: To determine the awareness and acceptability of the HPV vaccine and screening for cervical cancer among female health-care workers in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: ...

  7. Cervical Cancer: A Review of the Psychosocial Factors Following Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Kevin Clark

    Cervical cancer is a diagnosis that has a profound psychosocial impact, constituting a physical and emotional crisis for patients as well as family. In general, research indicates that the choice of treatment and the stage of the disease are instrumental in determining the psychosocial adjustment. Disruptions are likely to occur in self-esteem,…

  8. Acceptability of Cervical Cancer Screening in Rural Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Carolyn M.; Matos, Carla Silva; Blevins, Meridith; Cardoso, Aventina; Moon, Troy D.; Sidat, Mohsin

    2012-01-01

    In Zambezia province, Mozambique, cervical cancer (CC) screening was introduced to rural communities in 2010. Our study sought to determine whether women would accept screening via pelvic examination and visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) at two clinical sites near the onset of a new CC screening program. A cross-sectional descriptive study…

  9. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Abe, Madoka; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. (author)

  10. Hypoxia stimulates invasion and migration of human cervical cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hao Xu

    2017-07-25

    Jul 25, 2017 ... cervical cancer cell lines invasion and migration are not yet clearly understood. Furthermore, and perhaps more importantly, tumour cells must survive in environmental conditions not present in normal tissue (Brown 1999). One of the most formidable barriers to their survival is hypoxia (Yoon et al. 2005).

  11. Knowledge and practice of cervical cancer screening among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is the commonest genital tract malignancies in the females and its burden is enormous, to the patient and her community. It is largely preventable or curable when detected at the very early stage through effective screening programme. Very poor clients' attendance has been noticed at the services provided ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening Uptake among Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    femi oloka

    Univariate and bivariate analyses were done with Statistical Package for Social. Sciences ... cervical cancer, 66.7% got the information from the media. Only a .... Overall, the impact on women, their families, and the communities in developing countries is devastating. If early detection of precursor lesions by screening and.

  13. A Study on Knowledge and Screening for Cervical Cancer among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Majority of women had poor knowledge. Mass media could be used to educate the women. There is a need to conduct community based study to know the practices of doctors and assess if they are educating and offering suggestions for screening. Keywords: Cervical cancer, Knowledge, Screening.

  14. A Study on Knowledge and Screening for Cervical Cancer among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 6 out of 83 women had undergone screening. Though women had come into contact with doctors earlier, they were neither educated about cervical cancer nor were they told about the screening. Whatever little knowledge the women had was obtained from mass media. Conclusions: Majority of women had poor ...

  15. Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic profile of cervical cancer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-08-21

    existent in some provinces. However, Lubumbashi onset of cervical cancer of the uterus was observed earlier for respondents (30-45 years at 52.5%) and this seems to be linked to several risk factors including poor socio-economic ...

  16. Acceptability of human papilloma virus vaccine and cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the awareness and acceptability of the HPV vaccine and screening for cervical cancer among female health-care workers in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were administered to a cross-section of 177 female health-care workers selected systematically from the ...

  17. Knowledge and attitude towards cervical cancer screening among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    association between awareness and practice of cervical cancer screening amongst respondents. Overall, a greater proportion of the .... Ethical Committee of the Niger Delta. University. Inclusion and exclusion criteria. The study ..... physician/health (35.5%) accounting for the highest source of information amongst students.

  18. a survey on drug related problems in cervical cancer patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    Cisplatin/5FU/paclitaxel. 6. 9.23. 6. Seizure. Cisplatin. 2. 3.08. 7. Loss of hair. Cisplatin/5FU/Paclitaxel. 3. 4.62. 8. Nephrotoxicity. Cisplatin. 3. 4.62. 9. Hypotension. Paclitaxel. 3. 4.62. TOTAL. 65. 100. Table 3: Relationship between cervical cancer patients' factors and DRPs. Patients Factor. Drug Related Problems (DRPs).

  19. Clinic visits and cervical cancer screening in Accra | Adanu | Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A representative sample of women in Accra, Ghana was interviewed and the clinical and demographic factors influencing cervical cancer screening was ... high socioeconomic status and a history over the past month of postmenopausal or intermenstrual bleeding significantly increased the odds of ever having a ...

  20. Determinants of cervical cancer knowledge and the utilisation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identified determinants of awareness of cervical cancer and pap smear were age, marital status and level of education while utilisation of the screening test depended on the first two factors. Conclusion: There is need for more intensive awareness campaign among market women and the general population, especially ...

  1. Awareness and knowledge level of cervical cancer among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the awareness and knowledge level of cervical cancer among reproductive women in the Bolgatanga Municipality of the Upper East Region of Ghana. A structured question-naires was used to gather data from one hundred and fifty (150) women. The participants were re-cruited using the convenient ...

  2. Cervical Cancer Screening in Enugu, Nigeria. | Chukwuali | Tropical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Though preventable by early detection and treatment of the pre-invasive stage, carcinoma of the cervix remains the commonest gynaecological malignancy in Nigeria and a leading cause of death among women. The preventive role of cervical cancer screening is directly related to the proportion of the population ...

  3. [Use of oral contraceptives and increased risk of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmeink, C.E.; Lenselink, C.H.; Bekkers, R.L.M.

    2008-01-01

    A recently published meta-analysis and a large cohort study showed independently that use of oral contraceptives (OC) leads to an increased relative risk (RR) of cervical cancer. This RR increased with the duration of OC use and was 1.90 after 5 years or more (95% CI: 1.69-2.13). The increased RR

  4. Evaluation Of Cervical Cancer Screening Program At A Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But the condition is preventable through regular screening of women those are 'at risk\\' for abnormal changes in the cervix and treating them who have positive results. Although screening facilities are ... Keywords: Cervical cancer, Pap smear test, knowledge, practice, programme coverage. East African Journal of Public ...

  5. The Need for Societal Investment to Improve Cervical Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    in reducing premature deaths of women at the prime of their productive lives. From a societal perspective ... compared to about 6,000 in 19802. Also, approximately 6,000 deaths were attributed to cervical cancer in 2010 compared to about 3,000 deaths in 19802. ... bear the cost for such lifesaving preventive and therapeutic ...

  6. Effects of recombinant human nerve growth factor on cervical cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... systems. However, the roles of NGF to cervical cancer remain deeply unknown. This study investigated the effect of recombinant human nerve growth factor ... In addition, the immune abilities of thymus and spleen were improved by rhNGF. Finally ... polypeptide neurotrophin, plays a crucial role in the life of.

  7. Knowledge and attitudes towards cervical cancer and human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and attitudes towards cervical cancer and human papillomavirus: A Nigerian pilot study. O Nnodu, L Erinosho, M Jamda, O Olaniyi, R Adelaiye, L Lawson, F Odedina, F Shuaibu, T Odumuh, N Isu, H Imam, O Owolabi, N Yaqub, A Zamani ...

  8. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins in human cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, Magali; Cantú, David; Herrera, Norma; Lopez, Carlos M; De la Garza, Jaime G; Maldonado, Vilma; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that IAPs, in particular XIAP, survivin and c-IAP1, are overexpressed in several malignancies. In the present study we investigate the expression of c-IAP1, c-IAP2, XIAP and survivin and its isoforms in cervical cancer. We used semiquantitative RT-PCR assays to analyze 41 cancer and 6 normal tissues. The study included 8 stage I cases; 16 stage II; 17 stageIII; and a control group of 6 samples of normal cervical squamous epithelial tissue. c-IAP2 and XIAP mRNA levels were similar among the samples, cervical tumors had lower c-IAP1 mRNA levels. Unexpectedly, a clear positive association was found between low levels of XIAP and disease relapse. A log-rank test showed a significant inverse association (p = 0.02) between XIAP expression and tumor aggressiveness, as indicated by disease relapse rates. There were no statistically significant differences in the presence or expression levels of c-IAP1 and c-IAP2 among any of the clinical variables studied. Survivin and its isoforms were undetectable in normal cervical tissues, in contrast with the clear upregulation observed in cancer samples. We found no association between survivin expression and age, clinical stage, histology or menopausal state. Nevertheless, we found that adenocarcinoma tumors expressed higher levels of survivin 2B and DeltaEx3 (p = 0.001 and p = 0.04 respectively, by Kruskal-Wallis). A multivariate Cox's partial likelihood-based analysis showed that only FIGO stage was an independent predictor of outcome. There are no differences in the expression of c-IAP2 and XIAP between normal vs. cancer samples, but XIAP expression correlate in cervical cancer with relapse of this disease in the patients. Otherwise, c-IAP1 was downregulated in the cervical cancer samples. The expression of survivin was upregulated in the patients with cervical cancer. We have found that adenocarcinoma presented higher levels of survivin isoforms 2B and DeltaEx3

  9. A Population-based Study of Invasive Cervical Cancer Patients in Beijing: 1993-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wang

    2015-01-01

    .7%, respectively. The percentage of patients with stage I was 7.6% (13/171 in 1993-1996, but the percentage increased to 51.6% (643/1247 in 2005-2008 (P < 0.01. Otherwise the percentage of advanced stage (stage III-IV during the same period was dropped down significantly from 52.0% (89/171 to 22.5% (280/1247 (P < 0.01. Unemployed and housewife ranked first accounting for 27.3% of the total (607/2224. Urban low-income people such as worker ranked the second accounting for 17.0% (377/2224, the third place was farmer accounting for 14.0% (312/2224. Only 381 (17.1%, 381/2224 women in 2224 were first detected cervical cancer by routine screenings. Company staff (36.5%, 139/381, professional and technical personnel (22.6%, 86/381, national official (22.0%, 84/381 occupied the top three (total 81.1% in the 381 patients detected cervical cancer by screening. Conclusions: The cervical cancer incidence has showed a continuous rise in Beijing since 1999. Government-led mass screening should target the low socioeconomic population primarily. Meanwhile the government should enhance public health education of cancer screening to increase the rate of screening.

  10. Determinants of a GP visit and cervical cancer screening examination in Great Britain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Michael Labeit

    Full Text Available In the UK, women are requested to attend a cervical cancer test every 3 years as part of the NHS Cervical Screening Programme. This analysis compares the determinants of a cervical cancer screening examination with the determinants of a GP visit in the same year and investigates if cervical cancer screening participation is more likely for women who visit their GP.A recursive probit model was used to analyse the determinants of GP visits and cervical cancer screening examinations. GP visits were considered to be endogenous in the cervical cancer screening examination. The analysed sample consisted of 52,551 observations from 8,386 women of the British Household Panel Survey.The analysis showed that a higher education level and a worsening self-perceived health status increased the probability of a GP visit, whereas smoking decreased the probability of a GP visit. GP visits enhanced the uptake of a cervical cancer screening examination in the same period. The only variables which had the same positive effect on both dependent variables were higher education and living with a partner. The probability of a cervical cancer screening examination increased also with previous cervical cancer screening examinations and being in the recommended age groups. All other variables had different results for the uptake of a GP visit or a cervical cancer screening examination.Most of the determinants of visiting a GP and cervical cancer screening examination differ from each other and a GP visit enhances the uptake of a smear test.

  11. Evaluation of Cervicography Screening for Cervical Cancer in a High Risk Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-16

    cervicography in cervical screening. lnt J Gynecol Cancer 1993~ 3:395-398. 16. Urdaneta H. Detecci6n de patologia cervical no diagnosticada por citologia...cervical screening. lnt J Gynecol Cancer 1993; 3:395-398. 24 Urdaneta H. Detecci6n de patologia cen,-ical no diagnosticada por citologia vaginal

  12. Current research into novel therapeutic vaccines against cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Marcelo Nazário; De Lima, Rita de Cássia Pereira; Paolini, Francesca; Melo, Alanne Rayssa da Silva; Campos, Ana Paula Ferreira; Venuti, Aldo; De Freitas, Antonio Carlos

    2018-03-13

    Cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) are well-known outcomes of a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Viral oncogenes expressions like E6, E7, and, recently recognized E5, lead to HPV-related malignant progression. Although HPV prevention by powerful vaccines against most frequent and oncogenic genotypes is feasible, current treatment against cervical neoplasia is distant from an ideal one. In addition, late diagnosis is commonly associated with a poor prognosis. On top of that, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or surgery are less effective in high-grade lesions. Areas covered: Due to their peculiarities, HPV oncogenes represent an excellent target for cancer immunotherapy. Safety, efficacy, and potential immunogenicity are features achieved by DNA vaccines targeting HPV. The literature search has indicated that genetic immunotherapy is becoming a pharmacological tool and therapeutic option against cervical disease, as more and more DNA vaccines are reaching clinical trial phases. Expert commentary: Among some of the promising results, a phase II randomized trial showed a clinical activity of a nucleic acid-based vaccine in HPV16 or HPV18 positive CIN patients. The concept of a synergic combination of anti-HPV DNA vaccines with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, sophisticated delivery methods, immunomodulators or immune adjuvants opens a new and interesting perspective in cervical malignancy treatment.

  13. Human papillomavirus genotypes associated with mucopurulent cervicitis and cervical cancer in Hangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xing-Hang; Liu, Shu-Hua

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the infection status and predominant genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among Chinese patients with mucopurulent cervicitis (MPC) or cervical cancer (CC) in Hangzhou. Initially, 217 cases of healthy cervix controls (n=50), acute MPC (n=89), and CC (n=78) were included; samples were collected between January 1, 2010, and January 30, 2013. Cervical specimens were screened for HPV using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay and DNA sequencing. Overall prevalence of HPV infection was 16.7% in the control group, 51.9% in the MPC group, and 84.4% in the CC group. The predominant genotype detected in all 3 groups was the oncogenic variant HPV 16 (55.8%, 17.3%, and 6.3% in the CC, MPC and control specimens, respectively), HPV58 was the second most predominant HPV type in CC (9.1%), MPC (8.6%), and control group (4.2%). Most or all of the genotypes were oncogenic in the three groups. Infection with HPV was found to be prevalent among Chinese women with MPC or CC and oncogenic variants were in the majority. Therefore, peoples who suffered MPC with HPV DNA positive should be regularly followed-up, for prevention and early treatment of cervical cancer.

  14. ACOG Recommendations and Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening and Management

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about ACOG's recommendations for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  15. [New guidelines in regard to cervical cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adán; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Cancer screening programs have been successful in reducing the incidence and mortality due to cervical cancer. For more than a decade, the human papillomavirus test has been recommended as part of these programs, however, Pap tests is not currently recommended for women 65 years of age who participated adequately in screening programs, continuing with these screening programs is not needed. Screening programs will be different in special populations at greatest risk where tests are frequently needed or use of alternative methods.

  16. Cytokine profile of cervical cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazelbag, S.; Fleuren, G. J.; Baelde, J. J.; Schuuring, E.; Kenter, G. G.; Gorter, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In patients with cervical carcinoma, the presence of cytokines produced by T(H)2 cells, and the presence of an eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate, has been associated with a less effective immune response and tumor progression. In the present study, we have investigated the cytokine

  17. Cytokine profile of cervical cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazelbag, S; Fleuren, GJ; Baelde, JJ; Schuuring, E; Kenter, GG; Gorter, A

    2001-01-01

    Objective. In patients with cervical carcinoma, the presence of cytokines produced by T(H)2 cells, and the presence of an eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate, has been associated with a less effective immune response and tumor progression. In the present study, we have investigated the cytokine

  18. Clinicopathological analysis of cervical cancer seen in a tertiary health facility in Nnewi, south-east Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikechebelu, J I; Onyiaorah, I V; Ugboaja, J O; Anyiam, D C D; Eleje, G U

    2010-04-01

    Cervical cancer remains the commonest gynaecological cancer among women in the developing countries. The records of all the histologically confirmed cervical cancer patients managed in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, over a 5 year period were analysed for the clinical presentation and histological pattern of the malignancy. A total of 75 cases of cervical cancer were managed over the period giving an incidence of 65.2% of all gynaecological cancers and 13.4% of all gynaecological admissions. The majority of the patients were grandmultiparous women (81.3%) with a mean parity of 6.8. The modal age range was 60-69 years (38.7%) and the majority (94.7%) of the patients belonged to the low socioeconomic class. Squamous cell carcinoma of varying differentiation (89.3%) was the commonest histological type seen and adenocarcinoma accounted for only 8.0%. The common clinical features were post-menopausal bleeding (84.0%), vaginal discharge (72.0%), contact bleeding (63.9%) and abdominal pain (56.2%). Most (89.3%) of the patients presented late, in advanced stages of the disease, and almost all (97.3%) were referred for radiotherapy. The incidence of cervical cancer is high in our environment. Community sensitisation and provision of free cervical screening is recommended for early detection and treatment.

  19. Breast and cervical cancer screening disparities associated with disability severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner-Johnson, Willi; Dobbertin, Konrad; Andresen, Elena M; Iezzoni, Lisa I

    2014-01-01

    Prior research has noted disparities between women with and without disabilities in receipt of timely screening for breast and cervical cancer. Some studies suggest greater disparities for women with more severe disabilities, but the research to date has yielded inconsistent findings. Our purpose was to further examine differences in receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening in relation to severity of disability. We analyzed Medical Expenditure Panel Survey annual data files from 2002 to 2008. Logistic regression analyses examined whether Pap smears and mammograms had been received within the recommended timeframe according to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Guidelines. We compared four groups of women aged 18 to 64 years, categorized by presence and complexity of disability: 1) No limitations, 2) basic action difficulties only, 3) complex activity limitations only, and 4) both basic and complex activity limitations. Women both with and without disabilities fell short of Healthy People 2020 goals for breast and cervical cancer screening. Overall, women with disabilities were less likely to be up to date with both mammograms and Pap tests. The magnitude of disparities was greater for women with complex limitations. Disparities in Pap testing, but not mammography, remained significant when controlling for demographic, geographic, and socioeconomic factors. Women with more complex or severe disability were less likely to be up to date with breast and cervical cancer screenings. Targeted efforts are needed to reduce barriers to breast and cervical cancer screening for women with significant disabilities, especially those who also experience other socioecological disadvantages. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictors of cervical lymph node metastasis in salivary gland cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettl, Tobias; Gosau, Martin; Brockhoff, Gero; Schwarz-Furlan, Stephan; Agaimy, Abbas; Reichert, Torsten E; Rohrmeier, Christian; Zenk, Johannes; Iro, Heinrich

    2014-04-01

    This study compares clinicopathological parameters with novel molecular markers for predicting cervical lymph node metastasis in salivary gland cancer. Three hundred sixteen salivary gland carcinomas were included in this study. Genomic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), and hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET) was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Chi-square tests, multivariate regression, and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were used for statistics. Nodal staging determines long-term survival. Clinicopathological parameters associated with positive neck nodes are advanced age (p = .006), T3/T4 classification, histological high-grade malignancy, and diagnosis of salivary duct carcinoma (p < .001 each). Neck node metastases also correlate with copy number gain of EGFR (p = .004) and HER2, aberration of MET, and deletion of PTEN (p < .001 each). Multivariate analysis showed SDC (p = .002) to be the strongest predictor of lymph node metastasis, followed by MET aberration (p = .009), T3/T4 classification (p = .017), PTEN deletion (p = .042), and adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified (NOS; p = .047). The histological subtype is crucial for decisions regarding neck dissection. New molecular parameters may also indicate elective treatment of the neck. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.