WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced cancer patients

  1. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G;

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion, and not...

  2. EXPRESSING DISTRESS IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Gabriela FELEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative emotions (distress are recognized as part of the psychological profile of patients diagnosed with advanced stage cancer. However, most patients are not accustomed to verbalize feelings towards their physician, and generally towards family and medical care personnel. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the expression of emotions by patients in advanced stages of cancer, respectively the means by which they get to express emotions. To this respect, we identified the most common types of emotions expressed, or metaphors used by patients to describe their emotions and topics that trigger emotions. Words and phrases most commonly used are in relation to: fear, anxiety, depression, guilt, negligence, concern. They are uttered in order to depict the network created between disclosed emotions and topics on health status, symptoms, adverse effects and therapeutic choice, patient privacy, and social and family issues.

  3. Conditional Survival in Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Kasenda; Annatina Bass; Dieter Koeberle; Bernhard Pestalozzi; Markus Borner; Richard Herrmann; Lorenz Jost; Andreas Lohri; Viviane Hess

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer registry data suggest that conditional survival prognosis in patients with aggressive malignancies improves over time. We investigated conditional survival in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods In this retrospective study, we included all patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated at four Swiss hospitals between 1994 and 2004. Main outcome was 6-month conditional survival, defined as the probability of surviving an additional 6 months condit...

  4. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  5. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Stage, M; Laursen, J;

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home...... exercise and relaxation intervention showed an adherence rate of 76%, whereas the patients failed to comply with the home-based exercise. The hospital-based intervention initiated at time of diagnosis encouraged former sedentary lung cancer patients to participation and was undertaken safely by cancer...

  6. Radium-223 Improves Survival in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and data sets for researchers Research by Cancer Type Find research about a specific cancer type Progress Annual Report ... Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Prostate Cancer Research Prostate Cancer Patient Prostate Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer ...

  7. Chemotherapy of the patients with advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Treatment of advanced head and neck carcinomas are a problem of worldwide. Cancer remains incurable when it is metastatic or unresectable, and only palliative treatment can improve quality of life of these patients. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare patients treated by radio / chemotherapy with a group of patients treated by radiotherapy alone. Patients and methods: 26 patients with advanced inoperable head and neck cancer were treated at our clinic between the years 1991-1995. Medium age was 62 (range 41-78). Primary tumor sites were: oropharynx in 4 cases, hypopharynx in 4 cases, larynx in 8 cases, oral cavity in 6 cases and parotid gland in 2 cases. The primary treatment consisted of radiotherapy alone in 13 patients, and a combination of radio / chemotherapy in 13 patients. Tumor size was T3 (8 patients) and T4 (18 patients), all of patients had metastases in regional lymph nodes (N1-N3). Chemotherapy was started after radiotherapy course and cisplatin was always included. The main side effects were myelotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, nausea and vomiting. Results: There are five patients with partial respons, four patients with stable disease and four patients with progressive disease. Medial stable disease time was 3,5 month in radio / chemotherapy group and 2,7 months in radiotherapy group. Median survival was 13,2 months for patients of radio / chemotherapy group and 11,5 months for patients of radiotherapy group. Conclusion: Addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy improves survival of patients with advanced head and neck carcinoma and reliefs pain. (Full text)

  8. Spinal analgesia for advanced cancer patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Porzio, Giampiero; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2012-05-01

    In the nineties, spinal analgesia has been described as an useful means to control pain in advanced cancer patients. The aim of this review was to update this information with a systematic analysis of studies performed in the last 10 years. 27 papers pertinent with the topic selected for review were collected according to selection criteria. Few studies added further information on spinal analgesia in last decade. Despite a lack of a clinical evidence, spinal analgesia with a combination of opioids, principally morphine, and local anesthetics may allow to achieve analgesia in patients who had been intensively treated unsuccessfully with different trials of opioids. Some adjuvant drugs such as clonidine, ketamine, betamethasone, meperidine, and ziconotide may be promising agents, but several problems have to be solved before they can be used in the daily practice. In complex pain situations, spinal analgesia should not be negated to cancer patients, and oncologists should address this group of patients to other specialists. PMID:21684173

  9. Palliative care in advanced cancer patients in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand

    OpenAIRE

    Manisha Bisht; Bist, S. S.; Dhasmana, D. C.; Sunil Saini

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Advanced cancer, irrespective of the site of the cancer, is characterized by a number of associated symptoms that impair the quality of life of patients. The management of these symptoms guides palliative care. The present study aims to describe the symptoms and appropriate palliation provided in patients with advanced cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 100 patients with advanced cancer were included in the study. T...

  10. Integrative and complementary therapies for patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Lucille

    2014-07-01

    In integrative medicine, well-being is emphasized, and in palliative care, quality of life (QOL) is a similar concept or goal. Both can occur despite advanced cancer. Integrative medicine serves to combine the best of alternative, complementary and conventional therapies to optimize well-being and QOL, whether or not a person is at the end of their life. When integrative medicine is combined with palliative care modalities, the toolbox to provide symptom control and well-being or QOL is increased or broadened. Palliative care and integrative medicine are best provided early in the trajectory of illness such as cancer, and increase in amount as the illness progresses toward end of life. In cancer care, symptoms of the cancer, as well as symptoms produced by cancer therapies, are addressed with conventional and integrative therapies. Goals of care change as the disease progresses, and a patient's unique situation creates a different balance of integrative and conventional therapies. Integrative therapies such as music, aromatherapy, and massage might appeal to more patients than more specific, less common integrative therapies that might be more expensive, or seem more unusual such as Ayurvedic medicine and energy modalities. Each person may be drawn to different integrative modalities depending on factors such as cultural traditions, beliefs, lifestyle, internet information, advice from family and friends, books, etc. This review focuses on how integrative and complementary modalities can be included in comprehensive palliative care for patients with advanced malignancies. Nutrition and movement, often neglected in conventional treatment strategies, will also be included in the larger context of integrative and palliative modalities. Both conventional and integrative modalities in palliative care help patients live with empowerment, hope, and well-being no matter how long their lives last. A comprehensive review of all integrative and complementary therapies is

  11. Differential Patient-Caregiver Opinions of Treatment and Care For Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Amy Y.; Zyzanski, Stephen J.; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the differences of opinion between cancer patients and caregivers with regard to treatment and care decisions. 184 advanced lung cancer patients and 171 primary caregivers were recruited as a convenience sample from clinics in Cleveland, Ohio. A telephone interview was conducted to collect data using a semi-structured questionnaire. Nonparametric tests and regression analysis were performed. The findings showed that patients and caregivers reported significant disagreement...

  12. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  13. Cancer Pain Control for Advanced Cancer Patients by Using Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwi-joong Kang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a case series of advanced cancer patients whose cancer pain was relieved by using autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP treatment. ANP is a subcutaneous injection therapy of mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP along the acupoints on the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue; 0.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of vertebrae to enhance the immune system and to balance autonomic nerve function. Methods: Patients with three different types of cancer (gastric cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer with distant metastases with cancer pain were treated with ANP. 1 mL of MGP was injected into the bilateral Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue on the T1-L5 sites (total 12 ─ 20 mL injection of each patient’s dorsum by using the principle of symptom differentiation. During ANP treatment, the visual analogue scale (VAS for pain was used to assess their levels of cancer pain; also, the dosage and the frequency of analgesic use were measured. Results: The cancer pain levels of all three patients improved with treatment using ANP. The VAS scores of the three patients decreased as the treatment progressed. The dosage and the frequency of analgesics also gradually decreased during the treatment period. Significantly, no related adverse events were found. Conclusion: ANP has shown benefit in controlling cancer pain for the three different types of cancer investigated in this study and in reducing the dosage and the frequency of analgesics. ANP is expected to be beneficial for reducing cancer pain and, thus, to be a promising new treatment for cancer pain.

  14. A prospective study of the incidence of falls in patients with advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stone, Carol

    2011-10-01

    The association between aging and falls risk, and the morbidity and mortality resulting from falls in older persons, is well documented. Results from a small number of studies of patients with cancer in inpatient settings suggest that patients with advanced cancer may be at high risk of falling. We present preliminary results pertaining to the incidence of falls in patients with advanced cancer from an ongoing study of risk factors for falls.

  15. The "liver-first approach" for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, C.; Pool, A.E. van der; Nuyttens, J.J.; Planting, A.S.; Eggermont, A.M.M.; Wilt, J.H.W. de

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to investigate the outcome of "the liver-first" approach in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases. METHODS: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases were primarily treated for their liver me

  16. Integrating Palliative Care Into the Care of Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapo, Jennifer M; Akgün, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to malignancy. Although lung cancer mortality has been decreasing in recent years, it remains substantially higher than other causes of cancer death. Median survival for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, defined as lung cancer involving regional lymph nodes, is estimated to be approximately 10 to 17 months, and median survival for patients with metastatic disease is only 6 to 9 months. In addition, patients with advanced lung cancer often experience debilitating symptoms and poor quality of life. Pain, dyspnea, and fatigue are most frequently reported and affect at least 65% of patients with advanced lung cancer. Given this burden of symptoms and high mortality, patients and their families facing a diagnosis of advanced lung cancer are in need of support. Palliative care, with its focus on addressing the emotional, physical, and spiritual sources of suffering utilizing the expertise of an interdisciplinary team, can provide this comprehensive support. This review describes the role of supportive and palliative care integrated into the treatment of patients with a diagnosis of advanced lung cancer with sections focused on the evaluation and treatment of pain and dyspnea, approaches to challenging communication tasks, and the support of caregivers who care for patients with advanced lung cancer. PMID:26389769

  17. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S;

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  18. How do in-patients with advanced terminal cancer feel ?

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Aiko; Iwamoto, Teruyo; Kaneyasu, Hisae

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know how in-patients with advanced terminal lcancer feel, thereby, determining ways that nurses in he hospital who care for patients who are terminally ill can improve their care for patient who are terminally ill.

  19. Correlation between Pulmonary Function Indexes and Survival Time 
in Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Hui; Jiang, Zhenghua; Huang, Qian; Muyun ZHU; Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective To those patients with advanced lung cancer, the ultimate objective is to improve the curative effect and quality of life, lung function indexes are an important factor. We investigate the change of lung function and the relationship between pulmonary function indexs and survival time in patients with advanced lung cancer. Methods Lung function was detected in 59 cases with lung cancer and 63 normal controls. The relationship between pulmonary function indexs and surv...

  20. Differential patient-caregiver opinions of treatment and care for advanced lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Amy Y; Zyzanski, Stephen J; Siminoff, Laura A

    2010-04-01

    This study examined the differences of opinion between cancer patients and caregivers with regard to treatment and care decisions. 184 advanced lung cancer patients and 171 primary caregivers were recruited as a convenience sample from hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio. A telephone interview was conducted to collect data using a semi-structured questionnaire. Nonparametric tests and regression analysis were performed. The findings showed that patients and caregivers reported significant disagreement on three main issues: trade-off between treatment side effects and benefits; reporting treatment side effects to physicians, and hospice care. Caregivers were more concerned about patient's quality of life and more willing to discuss hospice issues than were patients (p caregivers (p caregiver disagreement about treatment and care decisions and its significant adverse impact on both patients and caregivers. PMID:20137849

  1. A decision exercise to engage cancer patients and families in Deliberation about Medicare Coverage for advanced Cancer Care

    OpenAIRE

    Danis, Marion; Abernethy, Amy P; Zafar, S Yousuf; Samsa, Gregory P.; Wolf, Steven P; Howie, Lynn; Taylor, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns about unsustainable costs in the US Medicare program loom as the number of retirees increase and experiences serious and costly illnesses like cancer. Engagement of stakeholders, particularly cancer patients and their families, in prioritizing insured services offers a valuable strategy for informing Medicare coverage policy. We designed and evaluated a decision exercise that allowed cancer patients and family members to choose Medicare benefits for advanced cancer patient...

  2. Determining patient preferences for improved chemotoxicity during treatment for advanced bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aristides, M.; Maase, Hans von der; Roberts, T.;

    2005-01-01

    Determining patient preferences for improved chemotoxicity during treatment for advanced bladder cancer Conventional treatment for advanced bladder cancer is methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin plus cisplatin (MVAC), with a median survival of 1 year but significant toxicity. The newer...... combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) has demonstrated comparable survival and an improved toxicity profile (Von der Maase et al. 2000). At present, the importance to patients of the toxicity of chemotherapy has not been widely studied. An earlier study in bladder cancer indicated that toxicity was...... an important determinant of treatment preference (Davey et al. 2000). A study of preferences for advanced bladder cancer therapy in the UK was proposed....

  3. Depression and demoralization as distinct syndromes: Preliminary data from a cohort of advanced cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen Juliet; Vanderwerker Lauren; Block Susan; Friedlander Robert; Maciejewski Paul; Prigerson Holly

    2006-01-01

    The term demoralization has been used to describe existential distress and despair of patients with advanced disease. Aim: This study sought to determine whether a cluster of symptoms interpreted as demoralization could be identified and distinguished from a cluster of depressive symptoms. Materials and Methods: As part of the Coping with Cancer Study, a federally funded multi-site study of advanced cancer patients, 242 patients were interviewed on a broad range of mental health parameter...

  4. Advances in cancer therapeutics and patient access to new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranitsaris, George; Truter, Ilse; Lubbe, Martie S; Amir, Eitan; Evans, William

    2011-03-01

    Globally, there are approximately 7.4 million cancer deaths annually, approximately 13% of deaths from all causes. Cancer is a disease of older people and, as the population ages over the next 10-20 years, we can expect an increase in the cancer incidence. Encouragingly, cancer mortality has stabilized in many countries. Part of this success may be attributed to the development of new cancer agents, collectively called 'targeted therapies', that are more specific to key components of tumour growth. Worldwide, however, one of the main factors that limit patient access to these important new drugs is their cost, which is higher than traditional chemotherapy. In this review, the clinical and pharmacoeconomic data of selected targeted agents are discussed. In the second part of this article, the challenges faced by healthcare systems in making such drugs available to patients is reviewed. Current strategies used by many countries around the world to manage cancer drug budgets are presented, along with a proposed approach using pharmacoeconomic methodology that may increase patient access. PMID:21184619

  5. Why are some patients in treatment for advanced cancer reluctant to consult their GP?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åbom, Birgit; Pfeiffer, Per

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse cancer patients' views and perspectives on mechanisms and barriers to involving the GP in the late treatment phase of advanced cancer. DESIGN: Qualitative, semi-structured interview study of 16 patients with advanced cancer and their next of kin. Seven patients were re......-interviewed after six months and three after 12 months. SETTING: Patients' home in Region South, Denmark. RESULTS: The cancer patients described how they developed a personal relationship with the staff at the cancer treatment centre. They also described some kind of dependability towards the hospital staff and...... therefore consulted the doctor or the staff at the cancer treatment centre before seeking advice from their GP. Some patients found that the GP was not familiar enough with the treatments given; others that they did not want to inconvenience the busy GP with what they perceived to be minor non-treatment...

  6. Hospitalists caring for patients with advanced cancer: An experience-based guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Douglas J; Tonorezos, Emily S; Kumar, Chhavi B; Goring, Tabitha N; Salvit, Cori; Egan, Barbara C

    2016-04-01

    Every year, nearly 5 million adults with cancer are hospitalized. Limited evidence suggests that hospitalization of the cancer patient is associated with adverse morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization of the patient with advanced cancer allows for an intense examination of health status in the face of terminal illness and an opportunity for defining goals of care. This experience-based guide reports what is currently known about the topic and outlines a systematic approach to maximizing opportunities, improving quality, and enhancing the well-being of the hospitalized patient with advanced cancer. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:292-296. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26588430

  7. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S; Munksgaard, Signe B; Zocca, Mai-Britt; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of...

  8. Palliative care in advanced cancer patients in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Bisht

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Advanced cancer, irrespective of the site of the cancer, is characterized by a number of associated symptoms that impair the quality of life of patients. The management of these symptoms guides palliative care. The present study aims to describe the symptoms and appropriate palliation provided in patients with advanced cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 100 patients with advanced cancer were included in the study. The data obtained from the patients included symptoms reported by the patients, currently prescribed treatments and the site of cancer. Results: The average number of symptoms reported per patient was 5.33 ± 0.67 (mean ± SE. The most common symptoms were pain, weakness/fatigue, anorexia, insomnia, nausea/vomiting, dyspnea, constipation and cough. Polypharmacy was frequent. Patients consumed approximately 8.7 ± 0.38 (mean ± SE drugs on average during the 2-month period of follow-up. Conclusion: The result gives insight into the varied symptomatology of patients with advanced cancer. Polypharmacy was quite common in patients with advanced cancer, predisposing them to complicated drug interactions and adverse drug reactions.

  9. Distinguishing Symptoms of Grief and Depression in a Cohort of Advanced Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Juliet C.; Zhang, Baohui; Block, Susan D.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the symptoms of grief are different from symptoms of depression among bereaved family members. This study is an attempt to replicate this finding among advanced cancer patients and examine clinical correlates of patient grief and depression. Analyses were conducted on data from interviews with 123 advanced cancer…

  10. ONCOLOGICAL RESULTS OF RADICAL SURGICAL TREATMENT IN PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    O. B. Loran; E. I. Veliyev; S. V. Kotov

    2014-01-01

    The authors consider and prove the efficiency of radical prostatectomy used in the treatment of patients with locally advanced prostate cancer as monotherapy and as a component of multimodality therapy.

  11. Do advanced cancer patients in Denmark receive the help they need?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Pedersen, Lise; Houmann, Lise Jul; Grønvold, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the adequacy of help delivered by the healthcare system for 12 symptoms/problems in a national, randomly selected sample of advanced cancer patients in Denmark....

  12. Transferrin-bound proteins as potential biomarkers for advanced breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dowling

    2014-12-01

    General significance: Mass spectrometry profiling of Transferrin-bound proteins has revealed serum proteins that can distinguish between serum from advanced breast cancer patients and healthy control subjects with high confidence.

  13. Long-term results of concurrent radiotherapy and UFT in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Jon K; Mortensen, Michael B; Jensen, Helle A;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Definition and treatment options for locally advanced non-resectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) vary. Treatment options range from palliative chemotherapy to chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Several studies have shown that a number of patients become resectable after complementary treatment prior...

  14. Patient and caregiver perspectives on managing pain in advanced cancer: A qualitative longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Hackett, J; Godfrey, M.; Bennett, MI

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in treatment of pain in advanced cancer, it remains a major source of suffering with adverse effects on patients’ life quality. There is increasing understanding of its multi-dimensional nature and the variable responsiveness of medication to complex pain. Less clear is how patients and their caregivers respond to, and manage pain complexity. Aim: To explore patients’ and carers’ experiences of advanced cancer pain and the processes that they engage in to manage p...

  15. Motexafin Gadolinium and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Colorectal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Prostate Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Nomogram to predict ypN status after chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jwa, E; Kim, J. H.; HAN, S; Park, J-h; Lim, S-B; Kim, J. C.; Hong, Y S; Kim, T. W.; Yu, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pelvic lymph node (LN) status after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is an important indicator of oncologic outcome in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to develop a nomogram to predict LN status after preoperative CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods: The nomogram was developed in a training cohort (n=891) using logistic regression analyses and validated in a validation cohort (n=258) from a prospectively registered...

  17. Correlation between Pulmonary Function Indexes and Survival Time 
in Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui GE

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective To those patients with advanced lung cancer, the ultimate objective is to improve the curative effect and quality of life, lung function indexes are an important factor. We investigate the change of lung function and the relationship between pulmonary function indexs and survival time in patients with advanced lung cancer. Methods Lung function was detected in 59 cases with lung cancer and 63 normal controls. The relationship between pulmonary function indexs and survival time was analyzed. Results There was significant difference in ventilation function and diffusing capacity between in lung cancer group and control group. Vital capacity (VC, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, peak expiratory flow (PEF, peak expiratory flow% (PEF%, maximal ventilatory volume (MVV were positively correlated with survival time in patients with advanced lung cancer (r=0.29, 0.28, 0.28, 0.27, 0.26, 0.28, P<0.05, residual volume/total lung capacity was negatively correlated with survival time (r=-0.31, P<0.05. Conclusion The lung function decreases in the patients with lung cancer. VC, FEV1, FVC, PEF, PEF%, MVV, residual volume/total lung capacity were correlated with survival time in patients with advanced lung cancer. The pulmonary function indexs were important marker of prognosis in patients with lung cancer.

  18. HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND ABLATION OF PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    L. V. Shaplygin; V. A. Solovov; M. O. Vozdvizhenskiy; Yа. S. Matyash; R. Z. Khametov; D. V. Fesenko

    2014-01-01

    In this study the results of retrospective analysis of treatment of 311 patients in Samara Oncology Center in 2008–2011 with locally advanced prostate cancer are presented. According to the received treatment patients were divided into 3 groups: 103 underwent HIFU, 101 patients had a course of EBRT, 107 patients received only hormone therapy (HT). Overall survival in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer after HIFU therapy was 86.2 %, after EBRT and HT – 66.3% and 18.1 %, respectivel...

  19. HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND ABLATION OF PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Shaplygin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the results of retrospective analysis of treatment of 311 patients in Samara Oncology Center in 2008–2011 with locally advanced prostate cancer are presented. According to the received treatment patients were divided into 3 groups: 103 underwent HIFU, 101 patients had a course of EBRT, 107 patients received only hormone therapy (HT. Overall survival in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer after HIFU therapy was 86.2 %, after EBRT and HT – 66.3% and 18.1 %, respectively. These data indicate a high clinical efficacy of ultrasound ablation. 

  20. HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND ABLATION OF PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Shaplygin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study the results of retrospective analysis of treatment of 311 patients in Samara Oncology Center in 2008–2011 with locally advanced prostate cancer are presented. According to the received treatment patients were divided into 3 groups: 103 underwent HIFU, 101 patients had a course of EBRT, 107 patients received only hormone therapy (HT. Overall survival in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer after HIFU therapy was 86.2 %, after EBRT and HT – 66.3% and 18.1 %, respectively. These data indicate a high clinical efficacy of ultrasound ablation. 

  1. Serum vitamin B12 and folate status among patients with chemotherapy treatment for advanced colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Byström, Per; Björkegren, Karin; Larsson, Anders; Johansson, Linda; Berglund, Åke

    2009-01-01

    Background There are conflicting results on the role of cobalamin and folate for epidemiology and carcinogenesis in colorectal cancer patients and the need of supplementation for prevention of chemotherapy toxicity. Patients and methods Serum cobalamin, folate, and homocysteine were analysed before and during the treatment of 93 patients with advanced colorectal cancer (ACRC) with first-line chemotherapy treatment. This cohort was compared with a healthy control group of 224 individuals. Resu...

  2. A Laboratory Prognostic Index Model for Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Arife Ulas; Fatma Paksoy Turkoz; Kamile Silay; Saadet Tokluoglu; Nilufer Avci; Berna Oksuzoglu; Necati Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to establish a laboratory prognostic index (LPI) in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients based on hematologic and biochemical parameters and to analyze the predictive value of LPI on NSCLC survival. Patients and Methods The study retrospectively reviewed 462 patients with advanced NSCLC diagnosed between 2000 and 2010 in a single institution. We developed an LPI that included serum levels of white blood cells (WBC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), albumin, calciu...

  3. Breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced cancer. Preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    VERGINE, M.; SCIPIONI, P.; GARRITANO, S.; COLANGELO, M.; Di Paolo, A; LIVADOTI, G.; MATURO, A.; Monti, M

    2013-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in locally advanced breast tumors may allow an adequate control of the disease impossible with surgery alone. Moreover, NACT increases the chance of breast-conserving surgery. Between 2008 and 2012, we treated with NACT 83 patients with locally advanced breast cancer. We report the preliminary results evaluating the impact of NACT on the type of surgery.

  4. Caregiver assessment of patients with advanced cancer: concordance with patients, effect of burden and positivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Wei

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinicians and researchers often have to rely on information from caregivers to assess patients with advanced cancer. This study aims to assess the validity (using patients' assessment as the gold standard of caregiver reports of patient concerns and the roles of caregiver burden and positivity. Methods A total of 64 advanced cancer patient and informal caregiver dyads were recruited from regional palliative care services and interviewed. Patients' outcomes were assessed with both the patient and the caregiver version of the Palliative Outcome Scale (POS; caregiver burden and positivity were collected with the Zarit Burden interview (ZBI and three questions on achievements and relationships. The agreement between patient- and caregiver-rated POS was measured with weighted kappa statistics. The roles of caregiver burden and positivity in POS agreement were studied with logistic regression controlling for potential confounders; adjusted odds ratios were estimated from the models. Results Agreement was substantial for pain, moderate for four items, fair for three items and slight for two items. Compared with patients self-ratings, caregivers described more problems with information given and sharing feelings and were less likely to assess the patient felt their life was worthwhile or felt good about themselves. Disagreement for three POS item ratings was significantly associated with higher caregiver burden: "feeling anxious"(OR: 4.5; 95%CI: 1.3 to 15.6, "life worthwhile"(OR: 12.4; 95%CI: 2.9 to 54.3 and "felt good" (OR: 7.7; 95%CI: 2.0 to 29.6. Caregivers with higher positivity scores were more likely to agree patients' rating of "felt good"(OR: 0.3; 95%CI: 0.1–0.9 but at increased risk of disagreeing about patient's "practical problems"(OR: 4.2; 95%CI: 1.1 to 16.6. Conclusion Caregiver burden and positivity affect their assessments, especially of psychological patient domains and whether patients assess their life as

  5. Pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel in a hemodialysis patient with advanced gastric cancer: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kawate, Susumu; Takeyoshi, Izumi; Morishita, Yasuo

    2006-01-01

    We report for the first time the possibility of weekly paclitaxel chemotherapy for a patient with advanced, nonresectable gastric cancer undergoing hemodialysis. A 50-year-old man with chronic renal failure due to bilateral polycystic kidneys, who had undergone hemodialysis three times a week for 5 years, presented with hematemesis in December 2004. Based on the diagnosis of gastric cancer with lymph node metastases, surgery was performed. On the 15th postoperative day, the patient was treate...

  6. Predicting cetuximab efficacy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin IH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim H Sahin, Christopher R Garrett Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Cetuximab has demonstrated activity, both as monotherapy, and in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy, albeit modest. Efforts over the last decade have focused on determining which patient populations are most likely to benefit from this chimeric monoclonal antibody therapy. As the antibody targets the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, cell surface expression by immunohistochemistry was hypothesized to be a biomarker of clinical efficacy; subsequent clinical trials have shown that this was not the case. Tumor KRAS mutation (the most frequently observed site is at codon 12 has been shown to be a negative biomarker (ie, a marker of cetuximab resistance; since 2008, treatment of patients with cetuximab has been restricted to those whose tumors do not harbor a KRAS mutation. There is considerable heterogeneity of KRAS mutations, and studies are ongoing to determine whether cetuximab resistance extends to those patients whose tumors have a KRAS codon 13, 61, and 164, mutation. EGFR gene copy, or more precisely a lack of increase in EGFR gene copy number, has been demonstrated to be a negative biomarker of EGFR efficacy; currently, it is not in routine use as a clinical standard of care. Tumor BRAF status, NRAS status, and PIK3CA mutation status are being evaluated as additional potential negative biomarkers of treatment efficacy. High expression of the receptor ligands epiregulin and amphiregulin has been shown to be a positive biomarker for treatment efficacy and is continuing to be studied clinically. After almost 10 years following the widespread introduction of cetuximab into the clinic as a treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer, the story of identifying suitable biomarkers of efficacy is still evolving. The tremendous tumor heterogeneity at the molecular level and the cell

  7. Effectiveness of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese Patients with Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Michiyo; Kira, Haruko; Hayashida, Shigeru; Ito, Sayoko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese patients with advanced cancer. Patients learned mindfulness practices and then made art to express their feelings in the first session. After receiving instruction on practicing mindfulness 2 weeks later, they participated in a second…

  8. Organoid cultures derived from patients with advanced prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Dong; Vela, Ian; Sboner, Andrea; Iaquinta, Phillip J; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gopalan, Anuradha; Dowling, Catherine; Wanjala, Jackline N; Undvall, Eva A; Arora, Vivek K; Wongvipat, John; Kossai, Myriam; Ramazanoglu, Sinan; Barboza, Luendreo P; Di, Wei; Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Qi Fan; Sirota, Inna; Ran, Leili; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Beltran, Himisha; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Touijer, Karim A; Scardino, Peter T; Laudone, Vincent P; Curtis, Kristen R; Rathkopf, Dana E; Morris, Michael J; Danila, Daniel C; Slovin, Susan F; Solomon, Stephen B; Eastham, James A; Chi, Ping; Carver, Brett; Rubin, Mark A; Scher, Howard I; Clevers, Hans; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The lack of in vitro prostate cancer models that recapitulate the diversity of human prostate cancer has hampered progress in understanding disease pathogenesis and therapy response. Using a 3D organoid system, we report success in long-term culture of prostate cancer from biopsy specimens and circu

  9. Physical activity in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tara A; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-06-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives. PMID:22641322

  10. Physical Activity in Patients With Advanced-Stage Cancer: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tara A.; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2014-01-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives. PMID:22641322

  11. The relationship between pain management and psychospiritual distress in patients with advanced cancer following admission to a palliative care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ya-Ping; Wu, Chih-Hsun; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Ching-Yu; Morita, Tatsuya; Hung, Shou-Hung; Huang, Sin-Bao; Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Tsai, Jaw-Shiun

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cross-sectional studies have demonstrated the association between cancer pain and psychospiritual distress, the time-dependent relationship has not been fully explored. For that reason, this study aims to investigate the time-dependent relationship between psychospiritual distress and cancer pain management in advanced cancer patients. Methods This is a prospective observational study. Two hundred thirty-seven advanced cancer patients were recruited from a palliative ...

  12. Comparison of postoperative complications in advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery versus surgery alone

    OpenAIRE

    Poonam Joshi; Amit Joshi; Kumar Prabhash; Vanita Noronha; Pankaj Chaturvedi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Head and neck cancer is the third most common cancer in India with 60% presenting in advanced stages. There is the emerging role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in the management of these advanced cancers. There is a general perception that complication rates are higher with the use of NACT. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospectively collected data of head and neck cancer patients operated at our hospital from March 2013 to September 2014. A total of 205 patients were inc...

  13. Long-term oropharyngeal and laryngeal function in patients with advanced head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kraaijenga, S.A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy or combined chemoradiotherapy (CRT) regimens are increasingly used as primary treatment for patients with advanced head and neck cancer (HNC). Unfortunately, these organ-preserving protocols are associated with substantial adverse functional events. Previous research has shown that preventive swallowing rehabilitation can significantly reduce the functional disabilities. This thesis focuses on oropharyngeal and laryngeal function following CRT for advanced HNC, including long-ter...

  14. Lapatinib : clinical benefit in patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroep, J. R.; Linn, S. C.; Boven, E.; Bloemendal, H. J.; Baas, J.; Mandjes, I. A. M.; Smit, W. M.; de Graaf, H.; Schroder, C. P.; Vermeulen, G. J.; Hop, W. C. J.; Nortier, J. W. R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Lapatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), has shown activity in combination with capecitabine in patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer progressive on standard treatment regimens. We present results on preapproval drug access f

  15. Management of radiation necrosis and advanced cancer of the chest wall in patients with breast malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggressive resection, with individualized reconstruction by several methods, is of value in many patients with radiation necrosis and/or advanced breast cancer of the chest wall. Although this does not always significantly lengthen survival, it can improve the quality of life markedly in many instances. Remarkably large defects can be reconstructed with single-stage procedures

  16. Induction chemotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin followed by chemoradiotherapy before total mesorectal excision in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, J.V.; Larsen, F O; Rasch, L;

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer has no impact on overall survival (OS) and distant recurrences. The aim of the study was to evaluate local downstaging, toxicity and long-term outcome in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer after induction therapy...

  17. Predictors of psychological distress in advanced cancer patients under palliative treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Frutos, D; Baca-Garcia, E; García-Foncillas, J; López-Castroman, J

    2016-07-01

    This work aims to investigate the factors associated with psychological distress in advanced cancer patients under palliative treatment. We comprehensively assessed the demographic, psychosocial and health factors of 158 advanced cancer patients. Patients with high and low distress, according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, were compared. A regression analysis was built to identify the best predictors of distress. Patients with high psychological distress (81%) were more likely to have lung cancer, suicidal ideation, hopelessness, low quality of life and poor body image than those without. In the multivariate model, only poor emotional functioning (OR = .89; 95% CI = .83-.95; p ≤ .001), hopelessness (OR = .86; 95% CI = .78-.94; p ≤ .001) and body image distortions (OR = .77; 95% CI = .68-.85; p = .005) were retained. High levels of hopelessness, impaired emotional functioning and body image distortions are the main factors associated with psychological distress in patients with advanced cancer. Potential interventions to modify these factors in palliative units are discussed. PMID:27271213

  18. Quantitative evaluation of bone metastases in patients with advanced prostate cancer during endocrine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahara, Jyunro [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-02-01

    A well-recognized difficulty in assessing the response to therapy for advanced prostate cancer is the infrequency of measurable metastatic disease. The most common metastatic site is bone, and it is manifested by diffuse ostoblastic lesions that cannot be measured reliably to allow for assessments of therapeutic benefits. We assessed the clinical usefulness of quantifying the extent of disease on bone scans in monitoring treatment response in patients with advance prostate cancer using computer-assisted image analysis. Percentage of the positive area on the bone scan (%PABS) was quantified automatically using a personal computer with the NIH Image program. Serial measurements of %PABS in 44 patients with bone metastasis from prostate cancer followed for a mean of 33 month (range 4 to 72) with hormonal therapy were compared with those of the extent of disease (EOD) grades in bone lesions and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels according to treatment response. Serial measurements of EOD grades and %PABS in 13 patients with partial response (PR) disease and those in 12 patients with progressive disease (PD) who did not show bone metastasis progression demonstrated a downward trend during the treatment. On the other hand, changes of EOD grades and %PABS in the remaining 19 patients with PD who showed bone metastasis progression demonstrated an upward trend. Estimated survival curves showed that %PABS was a useful prognostic indicator, with the patients who showed a 25% decline in %PABS surviving longer than the patients who showed a less than 25% decline in %PABS after treatment (p=0.0207). The %PABS is a simple and reproducible estimate of the percentage of the skeleton involving tumors in patients with advanced prostate cancer, and serial measurements of %PABS can assist in monitoring the treatment response in patients with bone metastatic prostate cancer. (author)

  19. Recent advances in the surgical care of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitelli Carlo E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A tremendous improvement in every aspect of breast cancer management has occurred in the last two decades. Surgeons, once solely interested in the extipartion of the primary tumor, are now faced with the need to incorporate a great deal of information, and to manage increasingly complex tasks. As a comprehensive assessment of all aspects of breast cancer care is beyond the scope of the present paper, the current review will point out some of these innovations, evidence some controversies, and stress the need for the surgeon to specialize in the various aspects of treatment and to be integrated into the multisciplinary breast unit team.

  20. The first report from Sapporo Tsukisamu Hospital. Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The remedy, especially chemotherapy, for advanced pancreatic cancer is hardly ever successful in terms of efficacy rate and survival period, because it is virtually unable to contribute to the improvement of median survival time (MST). Thus, we devised a new intermittent dosage regimen utilizing the cell cycle difference of normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract, bone marrow cell and pancreatic cancer cell, making use of 5-FU (→S-1), cisplatin (CDDP) and paclitaxel in March 2002. Ten patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (4 in Stage IVa and 6 in Stage IVb) were treated with this new regimen. As a result, an efficacy ratio of 50.0% and a 1-year survival ratio of 60.0% were achieved. However, 2-year survival ratio of 12.0% was low, and there was no 3-year survivor. The MST was 19 months as of December 31, 2006. All of the non-hematological toxicities were under grade 2. Eight patients had hematological toxicities over grade 3 and most of them were anemia and neutropenia. Only 2 cases had thrombocytopenia. Although adverse effects related to this regimen were clinically manageable, it was difficult to improve MST of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer with chemotherapy alone including this regimen. Hence, we devised another regimen with the joint use of radiotherapy along with the same chemotherapy regimen in January 2003. Twenty patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (Stage IV) were treated with this regimen. It is presently under way, and an efficacy ratio of 35.0%, 1-year survival ratio of 86.3% and 2-year survival ratio of 64.0% were obtained by May 2005, showing that this may contribute to the extension of survival time of Stage IV pancreatic cancer patients. (author)

  1. Clinical observation of capecitabine monotherapy in elderly patients with advanced breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Zhang; Zhaozhe Liu Co-first author; Zhendong Zheng; Tao Han; Yaling Han; Min Song; Xiaodong Xie

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the safety and ef icacy of capecitabine mono-chemo-therapy in elderly patients with advanced breast cancer. Methods The data from 36 cases of capecitabine monotherapy in elderly patients with advanced breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Oral administration of capecitabine 2000 mg/m2 twice daily (D1–14) for 21 days constituted a cycle. The ef ect of the disease and main adverse reactions were evaluated every 2 cycles. Results The data from 36 elderly patients were studied. The median number of chemotherapy cycles was 4. The total ef ective rate was 30.6% (11/36) and the disease control rate was 72.2% (26/36). The number of patients with clinical complete remission was 2, clinical partial response was 9, stable disease was 15, and progressive disease was 10. Where treatment was ef ective, the median time to progression was 6 months and the median overal survival was 9.5 months. The main adverse events were gastroin-testinal reactions, bone marrow suppression, and oral mucositis; most of the reactions were grade 1 to 2. Grade 3 to 4 adverse reactions included granulocytopenia in 2 patients (12.5%) and hand-foot syndrome in 1 patient (6.7%). Conclusion Capecitabine monotherapy was ef ective in control ing disease progression, and adverse reactions were tolerated by elderly patients with advanced breast cancer.

  2. Nursing of advanced colorectal cancer patients treated with Cetuximab combined with chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Zhu; Chunli Wu

    2008-01-01

    Cetuximab is a new medication that has recently been approved for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. To date we have had tittle experience in using this targeted agent. Eleven patients in our hospital with advanced colorectal cancer were treated with cetuximab and chemotherapy. Based on the curative effect of this combination therapy, we have concluded that the following nursing practices make an important contribution to the patients' prognosis and wellbeing: to establish a good nurse-patient relationship, to increase patient understanding of the side effects, to standardize the medications, to observe and to deal with the side effects of the medications(for example skin reaction, neutropenia, and diarrhea), and to provide continuous mental health care support and education.

  3. High risk factors of brain metastases in 295 patients with advanced breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Min; L(U) Hui-min; LIU Zhen-zhen; LIU Hui; ZHANG Meng-wei; SUN Xi-bin; CUI Shu-de

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of brain metastases in patients with breast cancer is approximately 10%-16%,and survival after diagnosis of brain metastases is usually short.This study was designed to evaluate the risk factors associated with brain metastases in advanced breast cancer patients,with a view to help predict patient groups with high risk of brain metastases.Methods In total,295 patients with advanced breast cancer were evaluated.All patients were pathologically confirmed and metastatic lesions were confirmed pathologically or by imaging.All patients were examined at least once every 6 months with head CT or MRI.Patients showing symptoms underwent immediate inspection,and brain metastatic lesions were confirmed by head CT and/or MRI.Results At a median follow-up of 12 months from the occurrence of metastases,brain metastases had occurred in 49 patients (16.6%).In our univariate analysis,variables significantly related to increased risk of brain metastases were hormone receptor-negative tumors,epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive tumors,and multiple distant metastases.Patients with dominant tumor sites in soft tissue,or defined as Luminal A subtype,tended to have a lower risk of brain metastases than patients with visceral metastases,Luminal B subtype,triple-negative subtype or HER2-enriched subtype tumors.Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that factors such as Luminal B,triple-negative,and HER2-enriched subtypes are high risk factors for brain metastases.These data,therefore,provide pivotal clinical evidence towards a comprehensive understanding of the risk factors of brain metastases in advanced breast cancer patients.

  4. An Epidemiological Survey of Cachexia in Advanced Cancer Patients and Analysis on Its Diagnostic and Treatment Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Quan, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Shiying

    2015-01-01

    Recently, an international consensus diagnostic criterion for cancer cachexia was proposed. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of cachexia in patients with advanced cancer and to assess the current status of the diagnosis and management of cancer cachexia. A total of 390 patients with advanced cancer were included. There were 140 patients with cachexia and the prevalence was 35.9%. The prevalence was highest in pancreatic cancer (88.9%), followed by gastric cancer (76.5%) and esophageal cancer (52.9%). Sixty-three patients with cancer cachexia have CT scans available for muscle mass evaluation and 98.4% were sarcopenic. Cachectic patients have a significantly lower overall quality of life and a higher symptom burden. According to oncology physicians, only 33 patients were considered to have cancer cachexia. The false negative rate amounted to 76.4%. The positive rate was related to the body mass index and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of the patients. There were few types of pharmacological approaches for cancer cachexia and more than half of cachectic patients did not receive any anticachexia treatment. These results indicate that the prevalence of cachexia in advanced cancer patients was high. However, cancer cachexia was rarely recognized and clinical management for cancer cachexia was very inadequate. PMID:26317149

  5. Ethical issues in the geriatric patient with advanced cancer 'living to the end'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, M

    2013-10-01

    Cancer incidence will increase as the population ages; there will be a 50% increase in new cancer cases over the next 20 years, and the biggest rates of increase will occur in the developing world. Owing to technical advances in the care of critical illness, as it is the case in elderly people with advanced cancer, physicians, patients and families are often confronted with ambiguous circumstances in which medical advances may inadvertently prolong suffering and the dying process rather than bring healing and recovery. In this review of the ethical issues confronting physicians who care for patients with advanced life-limiting illnesses like cancer, a philosophical debate continues in the medical community regarding the rightness or wrongness of certain actions (e.g. physician-assisted death, euthanasia), while at the same time there is a strong desire to find a common ground for moral discourse that could guide medical decision-making in this difficult period in the lives of our patients. We will discuss how a good palliative care can be an alternative to these ethical dilemmas. Although some issues (e.g. the role of physician-assisted death in addressing suffering) remain very controversial, there is much common ground based on the application of the four major principles of medical ethics, no malfeasance, beneficence, autonomy and justice. Thus, the physician's primary commitment must always be the patient's welfare and best interests, whether the physician is treating illness or helping patients to cope with illness, disability and death. A key skill here is the communication of bad news and to negotiate a treatment plan that is acceptable to the patient, the family and the healthcare team. Attention to psychosocial issues demands involvement of the patients and their families as partners. Physicians should be sensitive to the range of psychosocial distress and social disruption common to dying patients and their families. Spiritual issues often come to the

  6. Preferences for active and aggressive intervention among patients with advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennis Marguerite

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrinsic to "Patient-Centered Care" is being respectful and responsive to individual patient preferences, expressed needs, and personal values. Establishing a patient's preferences for active and aggressive intervention is imperative and foundational to the development of advance care planning. With the increasing awareness and acceptance of palliative philosophies of care, patients with advanced cancer are increasingly transitioning from active and aggressive medical management (AAMM to conservative palliative management (CPM. Methods A cross-sectional study based on a prospective and sequential case series of patients referred to a regional palliative medicine consultative program was assembled between May 1, 2005 and June 30, 2006. Patients and/or their substitute decision makers (SDM completed a questionnaire, at baseline, that assessed their preferences for AAMM en route to their eventual deaths. Seven common interventions constituting AAMM were surveyed: cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR & mechanical ventilation (MV, chemotherapy, antibiotics, anticoagulants, blood transfusions, feeding tubes, and artificial hydration. Multivariable analyses were conducted on the seven interventions individually as well as on the composite score that summed preferences for the seven interventions. Results 380 patients with advanced cancer agreed to participate in the study. A trend to desire a mostly conservative palliative approach was noted as 42% of patients desired one or fewer interventions. At baseline, most patients and their SDM's were relatively secure about decisions pertaining to the seven interventions as the rates of being "undecided" ranged from a high of 23.4% for chemotherapy to a low of 3.9% for feeding tubes. Multivariable modeling showed that more AAMM was preferred by younger patients (P Conclusions Although the majority of patients with advanced cancer in this study expressed preferences for CPM, younger age

  7. Deciding what information is necessary: do patients with advanced cancer want to know all the details?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell BJ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Bethany J Russell, Alicia M WardSouthern Adelaide Palliative Services, Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, SA, AustraliaAbstract: Communicating effectively with patients who have advanced cancer is one of the greatest challenges facing physicians today. Whilst guiding the patient through complex diagnostic and staging techniques, treatment regimens and trials, the physician must translate often imprecise or conflicting data into meaningful personalized information that empowers the patient to make decisions about their life and body. This requires understanding, compassion, patience, and skill. This narrative literature review explores current communication practices, information preferences of oncology patients and their families, and communication strategies that may assist in these delicate interactions. Overwhelmingly, the literature suggests that whilst the majority of patients with advanced cancer do want to know their diagnosis and receive detailed prognostic information, this varies not only between individuals but also for a given individual over time. Barriers to the delivery and understanding of information exist on both sides of the physician–patient relationship, and family dynamics are also influential. Despite identifiable trends, the information preferences of a particular patient cannot be reliably predicted by demographic, cultural, or cancer-specific factors. Therefore, our primary recommendation is that the physician regularly asks the patient what information they would like to know, who else should be given the information and be involved in decision making, and how that information should be presented.Keywords: metastatic, communication, prognosis, physician–patient relations

  8. The Quintessence of Traditional Chinese Medicine: Syndrome and Its Distribution among Advanced Cancer Patients with Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Wah Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Constipation is a common problem in advanced cancer patients; however, specific clinical guidelines on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM syndrome (Zhang are not yet available. In this cross-sectional study, the TCM syndromes distribution and their common symptoms and signs among 225 constipated advanced cancer patients were determined. Results showed that 127 patients (56.4% and 7 patients (3.1% were in deficient and excessive patterns, respectively, while 91 patients (40.4% were in deficiency-excess complex. The distributions of the five syndromes were: Qi deficiency (93.3%, Qi stagnation (40.0%, blood (Yin deficiency (28.9%, Yang deficiency (22.2%, and excess heat (5.8%. Furthermore, age, functional status, and level of blood haemoglobin were factors related to the type of TCM syndrome. A TCM prescription with the functions on replenishing the Deficiency, redirecting the flow of Qi stagnation and moistening the dryness caused by the blood (Yin deficiency can be made for the treatment of advance cancer patients with constipation. Robust trials are urgently needed for further justifying its efficacy and safety in evidence-based approaches.

  9. Chemotherapy in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quoix, Elisabeth; Westeel, Virginie; Zalcman, Gérard; Milleron, Bernard

    2011-12-01

    Because of increasing life expectancy and of higher risk of cancer with ageing, lung cancer in elderly is a frequent disease. For a long time nihilism influenced treatment decisions in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Since the beginning of the last decade single agent chemotherapy has been accepted as standard of care, vinorelbine and gemcitabine being the most frequently used drugs in Europe and US, docetaxel in Japan. Platinum-based doublets have been shown to be superior to monotherapy in young and fit patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Although there were some indications from subgroup analyses of clinical trials not specifically dedicated to elderly patients that a platinum-based doublet might also benefit to older patients, there was no definitive proof of concept until ASCO meeting 2010. At this meeting results of a phase 3 trial showed that PS 0-2 patients, aged 70-89 years drove a significant benefit from a treatment with carboplatin associated to weekly paclitaxel compared to a monotherapy. Thus, the paradigm of treatment in elderly patients should perhaps be modified from a single agent to doublet chemotherapy. Whether other platinum-based doublets would provide the same benefit as the specific one studied remains to be evaluated. PMID:21893363

  10. Outcome after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and correlation with nutritional status in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, P.; Habermehl, D.; Welzel, T.; Combs, S.E. [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Debus, J. [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    Background: Cancer patients commonly suffer from weight loss since rapid tumor growth can cause catabolic metabolism and depletion of energy stores such as abdominal fat. In locally advanced pancreatic cancer this is even more pronounced due to abdominal pain, fatigue, nausea or malnutrition. In the present article, we quantify this frequently observed weight loss and assess its impact on outcome and survival. Methods: Data on demographics, biometrics, toxicity and survival were collected for the last 100 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer at our department (45.0 Gy and boost up to 54.0 Gy plus concurrent and subsequent gemcitabine), and the subcutaneous fat area at the umbilicus level was measured by computer tomography before and after chemoradiation. Results: After chemoradiation, patients showed a highly statistically significant weight loss and reduction of the subcutaneous fat area. We could determine a very strong correlation of subcutaneous fat area to patient BMI. By categorizing patients according to their BMI based on the WHO classification as slender, normal, overweight and obese, we found improved but not statistically significant survival among obese patients. Accordingly, patients who showed less weight loss tended to survive longer. Conclusions: In this study, patients with pancreatic cancer lost weight during chemoradiation and their subcutaneous fat diminished. Changes in subcutaneous fat area were highly correlated with patients' BMI. Moreover, obese patients and patients who lost less weight had an improved outcome after treatment. Although the extent of weight loss was not significantly correlated with survival, the observed trend warrants greater attention to nutritional status in the future. (orig.)

  11. Outcome after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and correlation with nutritional status in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Cancer patients commonly suffer from weight loss since rapid tumor growth can cause catabolic metabolism and depletion of energy stores such as abdominal fat. In locally advanced pancreatic cancer this is even more pronounced due to abdominal pain, fatigue, nausea or malnutrition. In the present article, we quantify this frequently observed weight loss and assess its impact on outcome and survival. Methods: Data on demographics, biometrics, toxicity and survival were collected for the last 100 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer at our department (45.0 Gy and boost up to 54.0 Gy plus concurrent and subsequent gemcitabine), and the subcutaneous fat area at the umbilicus level was measured by computer tomography before and after chemoradiation. Results: After chemoradiation, patients showed a highly statistically significant weight loss and reduction of the subcutaneous fat area. We could determine a very strong correlation of subcutaneous fat area to patient BMI. By categorizing patients according to their BMI based on the WHO classification as slender, normal, overweight and obese, we found improved but not statistically significant survival among obese patients. Accordingly, patients who showed less weight loss tended to survive longer. Conclusions: In this study, patients with pancreatic cancer lost weight during chemoradiation and their subcutaneous fat diminished. Changes in subcutaneous fat area were highly correlated with patients' BMI. Moreover, obese patients and patients who lost less weight had an improved outcome after treatment. Although the extent of weight loss was not significantly correlated with survival, the observed trend warrants greater attention to nutritional status in the future. (orig.)

  12. OUR EXPERIENCE OF HYPERTHERMIC INTRAPERITONEAL CHEMOTHERAPY FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED GASTRIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Improvement of the results of treatment of patients with locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer. Material and methods. From the 2010–2014 we performed 30 surgeries using techniques HICT. Among patients there were 17 men and 13 women. The median of age was 50 years. Locally advanced gastric cancer (T4a-T4b was observed in 22 cases, including 4 patients in the emergency immunocytochemical study with peritoneal lavage detected cancer-free (Cyt + cells in the abdominal cavity. The group of patients with metastatic gastric cancer accounted for 8 patients. Narrow carcinomatosis (P1 was 4 cases, carcinomatosis (P2-P3 — 4. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in the study group was not carried out. In the control group No 1 (n = 51 performed surgery alone, without additional anticancer therapy. In the control group No 2 (n = 66, a combined treatment (surgery + chemotherapy. Results. Follow-up median was 25 months. Overall 1-year survival rate for all three groups was 55%, 39% and 52%, respectively. Median survival in the intervention group versus 21.4 months in the 8 and 12 months, respectively. The most effective HICT is shown for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. In the study group, median overall survival was 29 months. The survival rate of 1-, 2-, 3-year-old was equal to 68%, 61% and 42%. In the first control group, 1-year survival of 45%. None of the patients did not survive 2 years. In the second control group, one-year survival rate was 60%, 2-year survival is not. Results of treatment of metastatic gastric cancer proved to be more modest. In the main group the median survival was 10 months, compared with 6 and 7 months of the two control groups. There were no statistically significant differences. Conclusions. 1. Availability of limited dissemination, free cancer cells in the abdominal cavity, as well as a massive defeat of serous membrane of the stomach can be seen as indications for HICT in gastric cancer. 2. In

  13. Factors Associated with Response to Methylphenidate in Advanced Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yennurajalingam, Sriram; Palmer, J. Lynn; Chacko, Ray; Bruera, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the specific patient characteristics associated with response to methylphenidate and to compare day 1 response with day 8 response. Response to methylphenidate is associated with higher baseline fatigue but not with higher baseline depression or sedation. Additionally, day 1 improvement is highly sensitive as a predictor of long-term improvement.

  14. “EXHALE”: exercise as a strategy for rehabilitation in advanced stage lung cancer patients: a randomized clinical trial comparing the effects of 12 weeks supervised exercise intervention versus usual care for advanced stage lung cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Quist, Morten; Langer, Seppo W.; Rørth, Mikael; Christensen, Karl Bang; Adamsen, Lis

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in North America and Western Europe. Patients with lung cancer in general have reduced physical capacity, functional capacity, poor quality of life and increased levels of anxiety and depression. Intervention studies indicate that physical training can address these issues. However, there is a lack of decisive evidence regarding the effect of physical exercise in patients with advanced lung cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluat...

  15. Improvement of cancer cachexia with chemothermotherapy in a patient with advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultimate goal of cancer treatment is to achieve a complete eradication of the cancer. However, patients with terminal cancer are also treated to obtain an improvement in their quality of life (QOL). In this report, we describe the dramatic response of an end-stage pancreatic cancer patient with cachexia to a combination of hyperthermia (HT) and chemotherapy (CH). The patient was treated with a combination of intermittent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/cisplatin (CDDP) therapy and HT. Three months later, the local recurrent cancer had disappeared, the liver metastases were reduced by 80%, the lung metastatic lesion was markedly reduced, tumor markers had returned to normal, and the cachexia had been almost reversed. Performance status (PS) improved from 4 to 1, QOL improved, and the patient survived until his 258th hospital day. In this patient, the combination of CH and HT was useful not only for improvement of cachexia, but also for tumor reduction. A possible mechanism leading to this effect is discussed. (author)

  16. Chemotherapy options for the elderly patient with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennessy, B T

    2012-02-03

    Combination chemotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival compared with best supportive care in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The survival advantage is modest and was initially demonstrated with cisplatin-containing regimens in a large meta-analysis of randomized trials reported in 1995. Newer chemotherapy combinations have been shown to be better tolerated than older cisplatin-based combinations, and some trials have also shown greater efficacy and survival benefits with these newer combinations. Combination chemotherapy is, therefore, the currently accepted standard of care for patients with good performance statuses aged less than 70 years with advanced NSCLC. However, there are limited data from clinical trials to support the use of combination chemotherapy in elderly patients over 70 years of age with advanced NSCLC. Subgroup analyses of large randomized phase III trials suggest that elderly patients with good performance statuses do as well as younger patients treated with combination chemotherapy. There are few randomized trials reported that evaluate chemotherapy in patients aged greater than 70 years only. Based on data from trials performed by an Italian group, single-agent vinorelbine has been shown to have significant activity in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC and to be well tolerated by those patients with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance statuses of two or less, with associated improvements in measures of global health.

  17. Analgesic effect of high intensity focused ultrasound in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinjin Tan; Jian Chen; Li Ren; Ruilu Lin; Zailian Chen

    2013-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic ef ect of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods:A total of 106 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer accompanied by abdominal pain were treated by HIFU. Pain intensities and quantities of morphine consumption before and after treatment were observed and compared. Results:The average pain intensities before treatment, and at d3, d7 after treatment were 5.80 ± 2.14, 2.73 ± 2.68, 2.45 ± 2.43 respectively (P<0.01). Fifty-nine cases (55.7%) got to extremely ef ective, and 29 cases (27.4%) ef ective. Total ef icient rate was 83.0%. The average quantities of morphine consumption before and after treatment in the patients with grade III pain were 114.9 ± 132.5 mg, 16.8 ± 39.7 mg each person everyday respectively (P<0.01). Conclusion:HIFU can relieve pain suf ered by patients with pancreatic cancer ef ectively. It is a new adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer pain.

  18. Survival and treatment patterns in elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Manitoba

    OpenAIRE

    Baunemann Ott, C.L.; Ratna, N.; Prayag, R.; Nugent, Z; Badiani, K.; Navaratnam, S.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) is the most common form of lung cancer, with a median age at diagnosis of 70 years. These elderly patients are often underrepresented in the randomized clinical trials upon which chemotherapy plans are based. The objective of the present study was to determine the patterns of treatment and survival in elderly patients with advanced nsclc in Manitoba.

  19. Frequency and Outcome of Neuroleptic Rotation in the Management of Delirium in Patients with Advanced Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Seong Hoon; Hui, David; Chisholm, Gary; Kang, Jung Hun; Allo, Julio; Williams, Janet; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The response to haloperidol as a first-line neuroleptic and the pattern of neuroleptic rotation after haloperidol failure have not been well defined in palliative care. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of haloperidol as a first-line neuroleptic and the predictors associated with the need to rotate to a second neuroleptic. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective review of the charts of advanced cancer patients admitted to our acute palliative care unit...

  20. Evaluation of salivary function by sialoscintigraphy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer patients after intensity modulated radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    T. L. Chuang; Y.F. Wang; C H Tsai; J E Chiu; Lee, M. S.; W Y Chiou; Lin, H Y; W T Tsai; S K Hung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the salivary gland function changes by sialoscintigraphy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Materials And Methods: Salivary function was assessed by sialoscintigraphy. Quantitative sialoscintigraphy was performed in 24 NPC patients prior to and after IMRT. Results were categorized in four groups according to the duration of treatment. The sialoscintigraphy parameters were examined. Results: Sialo...

  1. Malignant bowel obstruction in advanced cancer patients: epidemiology, management, and factors influencing spontaneous resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuca A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Albert Tuca1, Ernest Guell2, Emilio Martinez-Losada3, Nuria Codorniu41Cancer and Hematological Diseases Institute, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Palliative Care Unit, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain; 3Palliative Care Unit, Institut Català Oncologia Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Medical Oncology Department, Institut Català Oncologia L'Hospitalet, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Malignant bowel obstruction (MBO is a frequent complication in advanced cancer patients, especially in those with abdominal tumors. Clinical management of MBO requires a specific and individualized approach that is based on disease prognosis and the objectives of care. The global prevalence of MBO is estimated to be 3% to 15% of cancer patients. Surgery should always be considered for patients in the initial stages of the disease with a preserved general status and a single level of occlusion. Less invasive approaches such as duodenal or colonic stenting should be considered when surgery is contraindicated in obstructions at the single level. The priority of care for inoperable and consolidated MBO is to control symptoms and promote the maximum level of comfort possible. The spontaneous resolution of an inoperable obstructive process is observed in more than one third of patients. The mean survival is of no longer than 4–5 weeks in patients with consolidated MBO. Polymodal medical treatment based on a combination of glucocorticoids, strong opioids, antiemetics, and antisecretory drugs achieves very high symptomatic control. This review focuses on the epidemiological aspects, diagnosis, surgical criteria, medical management, and factors influencing the spontaneous resolution of MBO in advanced cancer patients.Keywords: malignant bowel obstruction, cancer, intestinal obstruction, bowel occlusion

  2. Clinical outcome of hyperthermo-radio-chemotherapy combined with surgery for patients with advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Kokuriki; Fujimoto, Shigeru; Takahashi, Makoto; Nemoto, Kazuhisa; Mutou, Takaaki; Toyosawa, Tadashi [Social Insurance Funabashi Central Hospital, Chiba (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    For the patients with breast cancer that are locally advanced or metastatic, treatment to control not only local disease but also distant metastasis is desirable. Hyperthermo-radio-chemotherapy (HRC) combined with surgery was performed for 16 patients with stage III or stage IV breast cancer and the clinical outcomes of this multimodal treatment were analyzed. The size of the primary tumor was significantly reduced after preoperative HRC with the CR rate of 18.8% (3/16) and PR rate of 81.3% (13/16). Three- and 5-year overall survival rates for the stage III patients were 100% and 87.5%, respectively; their 3- and 5- year disease free rates were 78.8% and 52.5%, respectively. One- and 3-year survival rates for the stage IV patients were 80.0% and 20.0%, respectively. No loco-regional recurrence was observed. HRC combined with surgery for advanced breast cancer patients was effective for down-staging of the primary tumor and maintaining local control. (author)

  3. Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With mTOR Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Advanced Malignant Neoplasm; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Carcinoma; Malignant Uterine Neoplasm; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Bladder Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Bladder Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  4. Significance of Metabolic Super scan in Patients With Locally Advanced Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-metastatic metabolic related skeletal changes are predicted in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. Renal impairment may be a contributing factor in such abnormalities. The aim of this study was to verify the presence of metabolic bone disease in patients with different pathological subgroups of locally advanced bladder cancer and determine its clinical impact, and to correlate these metabolic super scan features with variable laboratory tests of bone bio markers and renal functions. In this study, a total of 350 patients (mean age = 58±8.4 y) with histopathologically proven locally advanced bladder cancer; 238 transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), 100 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 7 adenocarcinoma, 2 mucinous adenocarcinoma, 2 undifferentiated carcinoma and 1 leiomyosarcoma. The patients were referred to the Nuclear Medicine Unit, National Cancer Institute, Cairo, Egypt, between July 2006 and December 2009. Whole body bone scan was obtained 3 hours following IV administration of 555-925 MBq Tc-99m MDP. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), calcium and parathormone (PTH) levels were monitored as markers for bone metabolism while serum creatinine was used to monitor kidney function. The exclusion criteria included patients who had liver disease or those taking calcium or vitamin D supplement or any medication that affects bone metabolism. All bone scan results in the study were verified by correlation with other radiological imaging, laboratory data and follow-up for at least 12 months. According to bone scan results, patients were classified into four groups: group A: normal scan (n=223), group B: metabolic super scan features (MSS) (n=70), group C: metastatic bone disease (n=45) and group D: bone scan with indeterminate lesions (n=12). Osteomalacic MSS features were detected in 20 % of the studied patients (locally advanced bladder cancer) compared to 14.5% who had bone metastases. Contrary to metastases which showed high prevalence in TCC (P<0.001), MSS

  5. Inflammation-based prognostic scores and nutritional prognostic index in patients with locally-advanced unresectable colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeguchi, Masahide; Urushibara, Sho-ichi; Shimoda, Ryugo; Yamamoto, Manabu; MAETA, YOSHIHIKO; Ashida, Keigo

    2014-01-01

    Background Unresectable colorectal cancer has a poor prognosis. However, some patients survive intensive chemotherapy, and complete resection of primary and metastatic tumors may even be possible. In the present study, we examined the prognostic factors associated with survival after intensive chemotherapy in patients with unresectable colorectal cancer. Methods This retrospective study enrolled 61 patients diagnosed with unresectable locally advanced colorectal cancer between January 2004 an...

  6. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jonathan [University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); Xu, Beibei [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yeung, Heidi N.; Roeland, Eric J. [Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Division of Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Martinez, Maria Elena [Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Mell, Loren K. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Murphy, James D., E-mail: j2murphy@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  7. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  8. Opioid growth factor improves clinical benefit and survival in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill P Smith

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jill P Smith1, Sandra I Bingaman1, David T Mauger2, Harold H Harvey1, Laurence M Demers3, Ian S Zagon41Departments of Medicine, 2Public Health Sciences, 3Pathology, and 4Neurosciences and Anatomy, Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USABackground: Advanced pancreatic cancer carries the poorest prognosis of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Once the tumor has spread beyond the margins of the pancreas, chemotherapy is the major treatment modality offered to patients; however, chemotherapy does not significantly improve survival.Objective: Opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met5]-enkephalin is a natural peptide that has been shown to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer in cell culture and in nude mice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of OGF biotherapy on subjects with advanced pancreatic cancer who failed chemotherapy.Methods: In a prospective phase II open-labeled clinical trial, 24 subjects who failed standard chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer were treated weekly with OGF 250 μg/kg intravenously. Outcomes measured included clinical benefit, tumor response by radiographic imaging, quality of life, and survival.Results: Clinical benefit response was experienced by 53% of OGF-treated patients compared to historical controls of 23.8% and 4.8% for gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, respectively. Of the subjects surviving more than eight weeks, 62% showed either a decrease or stabilization in tumor size by computed tomography. The median survival time for OGF-treated patients was three times that of untreated patients (65.5 versus 21 days, p < 0.001. No adverse effects on hematologic or chemistry parameters were noted, and quality of life surveys suggested improvement with OGF. Limitations: Measurements other than survival were not allowed in control patients, and clinical benefit comparisons were made to historical controls.Conclusion: OGF biotherapy improves the

  9. Laser immunotherapy for treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer and melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiaosong [Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C [Immunophotonics Inc., 1601 South Providence Road, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Ferrel, Gabriela L [Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, Av. Edgardo Rebagliati 490 - Jesus Maria, Lima (Peru); Nordquist, Robert E [Wound Healing of Oklahoma, Inc., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Chen, Wei R, E-mail: wchen@uco.edu [Department of Engineering and Physics, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, Oklahoma (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) was developed for the treatment of metastatic tumors. It combines local selective photothermal interaction and active immunological stimulation to induce a long-term, systemic anti-tumor immunity. During the past sixteen years, LIT has been advanced from bench-top to bedside, with promising outcomes. In our pre-clinical and preliminary clinical studies, LIT has demonstrated the capability in inducing immunological responses, which not only can eradicate the treated primary tumors, but also can eliminate untreated metastases at distant sites. Specifically, LIT has been used to treat advanced melanoma and breast cancer patients during the past five years. LIT was shown to be effective in controlling both primary tumors and distant metastases in late-stage patients, who have failed conventional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and other more advanced approaches. The methodology and the development of LIT are presented in this paper. The patients' responses to LIT are also reported in this paper. The preliminary results obtained in these studies indicated that LIT could be an effective modality for the treatment of patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers, who are facing severely limited options.

  10. Laser immunotherapy for treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer and melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) was developed for the treatment of metastatic tumors. It combines local selective photothermal interaction and active immunological stimulation to induce a long-term, systemic anti-tumor immunity. During the past sixteen years, LIT has been advanced from bench-top to bedside, with promising outcomes. In our pre-clinical and preliminary clinical studies, LIT has demonstrated the capability in inducing immunological responses, which not only can eradicate the treated primary tumors, but also can eliminate untreated metastases at distant sites. Specifically, LIT has been used to treat advanced melanoma and breast cancer patients during the past five years. LIT was shown to be effective in controlling both primary tumors and distant metastases in late-stage patients, who have failed conventional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and other more advanced approaches. The methodology and the development of LIT are presented in this paper. The patients' responses to LIT are also reported in this paper. The preliminary results obtained in these studies indicated that LIT could be an effective modality for the treatment of patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers, who are facing severely limited options.

  11. Treatment results of different radiotherapy for 763 patients with advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of different radiotherapy protocols in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. Methods: From 1976 to 2006, 763 patients with stage III cervical cancer (722 with squamous cell carcinoma and 41 with adenocarcinoma) were treated by radiotherapy in our hospital. 113 patients were treated by two-field whole pelvic irradiation in conventional fractionation plus brachytherapy (CF group), 44 by four-field whole pelvic irradiation in accelerated hyperfractionation plus brachytherapy (AHF group), and 606 by concomitant four-field unconventional fractionation radiotherapy and brachytherapy( FRT group). Sixty-one patients were treated by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Among 350 patients who had complete data, the shore-term efficacy and toxicities were compared. Results: For patients in CF, AHF and FRT groups, the 3-year overall survival rates (OS) were 65.7%, 66.8% and 44.3%, respectively (P=0.000), and the 5-year OS were 65.7%, 66.8% and 36.3%, respectively (P=0.000). The 10-year OS were 43.3% and 31.9% in CF and FRT groups(P=0.200). For squamous cell carcinoma,the OS was higher of patients with chemotherapy than those without. In 350 patients who had complete data, the local control rates of CF, AHF and FRT groups were 83.0%, 93.2% and 86.1%, respectively (χ2=2.70, P =0.259); AHF group had the lowest side effect rate, especially skin reaction (9.1%, χ2=20.25, P= 0.002); CF group had the lowest acute bone marrow suppression rate (χ2=25.95, P=0.000); for squamous cell carcinoma, the OS was higher in patients with chemotherapy than those without; the acute bone marrow and intestinal toxicities were more in patients with chemotherapy than those without. Conclusions: CF and AHF groups have similar 5-year OS of patients with advanced cervical cancer. AHF group has less toxicities, shorter treatment course and a trend of better local control. Concurrent chemoradiation could improve survival and local control of the patients with

  12. Pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel in a hemodialysis patient with advanced gastric cancer: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susumu Kawate; Izumi Takeyoshi; Yasuo Morishita

    2006-01-01

    We report for the first time the possibility of weekly paclitaxel chemotherapy for a patient with advanced,nonresectable gastric cancer undergoing hemodialysis. A 50-year-old man with chronic renal failure due to bilateral polycystic kidneys, who had undergone hemodialysis three times a week for 5 years, presented with hematemesis in December 2004. Based on the diagnosis of gastric cancer with lymph node metastases, surgery was performed. On the 15th postoperative day, the patient was treated with chemotherapy using paclitaxel. Paclitaxel was administered at a dose of 60 mg/m2 as a 1 h iv infusion in 250 mL of saline. Hemodialysis was started 1 h after the completion of the paclitaxel infusion and was performed for 3 h. Paclitaxel was administered weekly on d 1, 8, and 15 on a 28-d cycle. The maximum plasma concentration of paclitaxel was 1390 μg/L. The Grade 2 leukopenia was encountered during the first cycle. The plasma concentrations of paclitaxel from 6to over 24 h after the infusion were 0.01 to 0.1 μmol/L in our patient, and these concentrations have been shown to be effective on inhibiting the growth of gastric cancer cells without producing adverse side effects in the patient. The plasma concentration of paclitaxel was not influenced by hemodialysis. We conclude that the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel is not altered in a patient with renal failure, and that weekly paclitaxel is a suitable treatment regimen for hemodialysis patients with advanced gastric cancer.

  13. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients with Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Jon K; Mortensen, Michael B; Jensen, Helle A;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results...

  14. Delay in referring and related factors in patients with advanced breast cancer - Emam Hospital (2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Ghaem Maghami F

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of study was to determine the frequency of delay referring and related factors in patients with advanced breast cancer, in Imam Khomeini Hospital in the 2000. Materials and Methods: Successively 200 patients were entered the study if they were consentient. A questionnaire was constructed and information was obtained through interviewing. Results: From the cases, 64 patients (32 percent referred without delay and 136 patients (68 percent referred tardily. The patients who were late in comparison with patients who didn’t late, had significantly higher mean age (P=0.004, lower education level (P=0.002, and lower economic status (P=0.001. The frequency rate of single were lower among them (P=0.001, fewer percent were residual of big cities (P=0.01 and they had less rate of available physician (P=0.004. 24.3 percent of delay referring patients and 53.1 percent of patients without delay has a positive family history of breast cancer (P=0.001. 62.5 percent of delay referring patients and 85 percent of patients without delay were aware about importance of Self Breast Examination (S.B.E (P=0.002 and respectively 84.4 percent and 98.4 percent were award about symptoms of breast cancer (P=0.01. 23.5 percent and 33 percent of patients with and without delay Knew the method of B.S.E respectively. It wasn’t a significant difference. Conclusion: Lack of awareness about necessity of medical consultation, fear, carelessly, unavailable physician and poverty were the major causes of delay in patients who referred late.

  15. A Phase I Open-Label Study Evaluating the Cardiovascular Safety of Sorafenib in Patients with Advanced Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tolcher, Anthony W.; Leonard J. Appleman; Mita, Alain C.; Cihon, Frank; Mazzu, Arthur; Sundaresan, Pavur R.; Shapiro, Geoffrey Ira

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the cardiovascular profile of sorafenib, a multitargeted kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced cancer. Methods: Fifty-three patients with advanced cancer received oral sorafenib 400 mg bid in continuous 28-day cycles in this open-label study. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was evaluated using multigated acquisition scanning at baseline and after 2 and 4 cycles of sorafenib. QT/QTc interval on the electrocardiograph (ECG) was measured in triplicate wit...

  16. Effect of cryoablation sequential chemotherapy on patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Hui Yao

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of cryoablation sequential chemotherapy on patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.Methods:A total of 39 cases with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who received cryoablation sequential chemotherapy and 39 cases with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who received chemotherapy alone were selected and enrolled in sequential group and control group, disease progression and survival of two groups were followed up, and contents of tumor markers and angiogenesis molecules in serum as well as contents of T-lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood were detected.Results:Progression-free survival and median overall survival (mOS) of sequential group were longer than those of control group, and cumulative cases of tumor progression at various points in time were significantly less than those of control group (P<0.05); 1 month after treatment, serum tumor markers CEA, CYFRA21-1 and NSE contents, serum angiogenesis molecules PCDGF, VEGF and HDGF contents as well as CD3+CD4-CD8+CD28-T cell content in peripheral blood of sequential group were significantly lower than those of control group (P<0.05), and contents of CD3+CD4+CD8-T cell and CD3+CD4-CD8+CD28+T cell in peripheral blood were higher than those of control group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Cryoablation sequential chemotherapy can improve the prognosis of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, delay disease progression, prolong survival time, inhibit angiogenesis and improve immune function.

  17. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. PMID:27564279

  18. Consideration of therapeutic approach to advanced colorectal cancer in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Inoue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is predominantly a disease of elderly and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. The increased availability of treatment options for CRC has made it more difficult for clinicians to decide on the optimal therapeutic approach in elderly patients, because of the potential for poorer outcomes due to an increased burden of comorbidities, functional dependency, and limited life expectancy. It is necessary to determine which elderly patients are likely to benefit from active cancer therapy, and the establishment of treatment markers for multimodality approaches is eagerly awaited. Elderly cancer patients are at risk of exposure to various intrinsic inflammatory mediators, such as tumor-generating cytokines and surgery-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is therefore important to understand the immunological changes occurring in the elderly and to adjust treatment strategies accordingly to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with multimodality therapy for CRC that induce systemic inflammation. Several inflammation-based factors such as the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS may reflect the balance between tumor progression and host-related immunity, especially in elderly CRC patients. Appropriate selection criteria for multimodality therapy in elderly CRC patients may include not only tumor characteristics, but also host- and/or treatment-related factors such as comorbidities or surrogate markers using inflammation-based factors.----------------------------------------------Cite this article as: Inoue Y, Toiyama Y, Tanaka K, Mohri Y, Kusunoki M. Consideration of therapeutic approach to advanced colorectal cancer in elderly patients. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(1:02014.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0201.4

  19. The facilitating role of chemotherapy in the palliative phase of cancer: qualitative interviews with advanced cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde M Buiting

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To explore the extent to which patients have a directing role in decisions about chemotherapy in the palliative phase of cancer and (want to anticipate on the last stage of life. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study. METHODS: In depth-interviews with 15 patients with advanced colorectal or breast cancer at the medical oncology department in a Dutch teaching hospital; interviews were analysed following the principles of thematic content-analysis. RESULTS: All patients reported to know that the chemotherapy they received was with palliative intent. Most of them did not express the wish for information about (other treatment options and put great trust in their physicians' treatment advice. The more patients were aware of the severity of their disease, the more they seemed to 'live their life' in the present and enjoy things besides having cancer. Such living in the present seemed to be facilitated by the use of chemotherapy. Patients often considered the 'chemotherapy-free period' more stressful than periods when receiving chemotherapy despite their generally improved physical condition. Chemotherapy (regardless of side-effects seemed to shift patients' attention away from the approaching last stage of life. Interestingly, although patients often discussed advance care planning, they were reluctant to bring on end-of-life issues that bothered them at that specific moment. Expressing real interest in people 'as a person' was considered an important element of appropriate care. CONCLUSIONS: Fearing their approaching death, patients deliberately focus on living in the present. Active (chemotherapy treatment facilitates this focus, regardless of the perceived side-effects. However, if anxiety for what lies ahead is the underlying reason for treatment, efforts should be made in assisting patients to find other ways to cope with this fear. Simultaneously, such an approach may reduce the use of burdensome and sometimes costly treatment in the

  20. Effectiveness of prophylactic retropharyngeal lymph node irradiation in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study is to assess the effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for the prevention of retropharyngeal nodal recurrences in locally advanced head and neck cancer. A retrospective review of 76 patients with head and neck cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiation or postoperative radiotherapy with IMRT or IGRT who were at risk for retropharyngeal nodal recurrences because of anatomic site (hypopharynx, nasopharynx, oropharynx) and/or the presence of nodal metastases was undertaken. The prevalence of retropharyngeal nodal recurrences was assessed on follow-up positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scans. At a median follow-up of 22 months (4–53 months), no patient developed retropharyngeal nodal recurrences. Prophylactic irradiation of retropharyngeal lymph nodes with IMRT or IGRT provides effective regional control for individuals at risk for recurrence in these nodes

  1. Acceptable Safety of Bevacizumab Therapy in Combination with Chemotherapy in Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WU

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal IgG1 antibody that selectively binds to and neutralizes the biologic activity of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Bevacizumab was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA in October 2006 for use in combination withcarboplatin and paclitaxel for the initial treatment of patients with unresectable, locally advanced, recurrent, or metastatic,nonsquamous, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of this study is to observe the safety of bevacizumab therapy in combination with chemotherapy in Chinese patients with NSCLC. Methods Patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC were treated with Bevacizumab 15 mg/kg, d1, repeated every 21 days until PD; Plus paclitaxel 175 mg/m2, on dl and carboplatin AUC=6 on dl. The cycle was repeated every 21 days. Results One grade 3 epistaxis was observed in onepatient. One grade 4 thrombosis was observed in one patient. 3/4-grade epistaxis and thrombosis was the most significant adverse events. Other adverse effects, such as hemoptysis, hypertension and proteinuria, were not severe and could be well tolerated. Conclusion Most chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC treated with bevacizumab in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin have little adverse effects that can be well tolerated.

  2. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  3. Optimal pharmacotherapeutic strategies for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quoix, Elisabeth

    2011-11-01

    Increases in both life expectancy and cancer incidence with age result in a significant rise in lung cancer rates among elderly patients, with a median age at diagnosis of between 63 and 70 years. However, elderly patients are under-represented in clinical trials and generally receive suboptimal treatment, mainly because of fears about increased toxicity of chemotherapy. Indeed, physiological modification of renal and haematopoietic functions with age together with co-morbidity and associated polypharmacy may alter the metabolism of chemotherapy drugs, resulting in greater toxicity. Moreover, performance status (PS), the main prognostic factor in younger patients, does not correlate well with geriatric indexes such as activities of daily living, cognition and physical performance, and comprehensive geriatric assessment is important in elderly patients. Until 2010, based on the small number of clinical trials designed for elderly patients, monotherapy was the recommended treatment for those with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), whereas for fit younger patients, a platinum-based doublet was and continues to be the recommended first-line therapy. However, at the plenary session of the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, results were presented from a randomized controlled trial conducted by the French Intergroup of Thoracic Oncology that demonstrated that in PS 0-2 patients aged≥70 years with advanced NSCLC, monthly carboplatin with weekly paclitaxel resulted in significantly longer survival than single-agent therapy (vinorelbine or gemcitabine). It should be noted that even in a priori unfavourable prognostic subgroups (patients with a PS score of 2, those aged>80 years or those with an activities of daily living scale score of nihilism in the treatment of elderly patients with advanced NSCLC. Such patients should be evaluated carefully by geriatric indexes and, if they have a PS score of 0-2, may be treated with platinum

  4. Feasibility and efficacy of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Investigate the feasibility and effcacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer.Methods: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with 50/45 Gy in 25 fractions. The concurrent chemotherapy regimens included oral TS-1 plus oxaliplatin 40 mg/m2 intravenously weekly (10 patients) or TS-1 alone (120 mg/day, 25 patients). Surgical resection was performed within 6~8 weeks atfer the last day of radiotherapy. Results:No grade 4 toxicity recorded. hTe incidence of grade 3 toxicity is 11.4%: thrombocytopenia (5.7%), neutropenia (2.9%) and radiation esophagitis (2.9%). Pathological complete response 8.6% (3/35).Surgery-related complications consisted of anastomotic leakage in 2 patients (7.1%), infection in 3 (10.7%) and hemorrhage in 2 (7.1%). No postoperative mortality was recorded. hTe 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 88.3% and 59.6%respectively.Conclusion:In this study, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy showed an acceptable toxicity and promising efficacy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer.

  5. Managing locally advanced prostate cancer: a urologist's and a patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Roger; Offen, Nigel

    2006-03-01

    A 60-year-old man presented to his general practitioner with prostatic symptoms and high blood pressure. Based upon a prostate-specific antigen level of 44 ng/ml and further investigations (digital rectal examination, transrectal ultrasound-guided needle biopsy, and magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and bone scans), the patient was diagnosed with locally advanced (cT3, N0, M0) prostate cancer. Here, the urologist and the patient describe treatment from their respective viewpoints. Following discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the various therapeutic options, radiotherapy plus hormonal therapy (bicalutamide 150 mg) was chosen as the approach that best suited the patient's lifestyle. In this review, the patient and the urologist consider the impact of the chosen treatment in terms of efficacy, tolerability and quality of life. PMID:16520652

  6. Improving chemotherapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    to incurable patients who spend a lot of their limited time at oncology outpatient clinics. Staffing, infrastructure and organisation of these units are often suboptimal to serve patients with palliative needs and reports of improvement projects can inspire and guide clinicians in improving their...... over time were effective tools in our project. The description of the experiences can serve as an example for the improvement of microsystems in settings with similar problems. Finally, in the registry study of Norwegian patients with lung cancer, we found significant geographical and temporal...... and patients with higher performance status have usually been under-represented in these trials and population studies of the effectiveness of chemotherapy are needed. OBJECTIVES: (i) To establish the optimal duration of platinum-based first line chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC; (ii) To improve the...

  7. Body composition, symptoms, and survival in advanced cancer patients referred to a phase I service.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique A Parsons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Body weight and body composition are relevant to the outcomes of cancer and antineoplastic therapy. However, their role in Phase I clinical trial patients is unknown. METHODS: We reviewed symptom burden, body composition, and survival in 104 patients with advanced cancer referred to a Phase I oncology service. Symptom burden was analyzed using the MD Anderson Symptom Assessment Inventory(MDASI; body composition was evaluated utilizing computerized tomography(CT images. A body mass index (BMI≥25 kg/m² was considered overweight. Sarcopenia, severe muscle depletion, was assessed using CT-based criteria. RESULTS: Most patients were overweight (n = 65, 63%; 53 patients were sarcopenic (51%, including 79% of patients with a BMI<25 kg/m² and 34% of those with BMI≥25 kg/m². Sarcopenic patients were older and less frequently African-American. Symptom burden did not differ among patients classified according to BMI and presence of sarcopenia. Median (95% confidence interval survival (days varied according to body composition: 215 (71-358 (BMI<25 kg/m²; sarcopenic, 271 (99-443 (BMI<25 kg/m²; non-sarcopenic, 484 (286-681 (BMI≥25 kg/m²; sarcopenic; 501 d (309-693 (BMI≥25 kg/m²; non-sarcopenic. Higher muscle index and gastrointestinal cancer diagnosis predicted longer survival in multivariate analysis after controlling for age, gender, performance status, and fat index. CONCLUSIONS: Patients referred to a Phase I clinic had a high frequency of sarcopenia and a BMI≥25 kg/m², independent of symptom burden. Body composition variables were predictive of clinically relevant survival differences, which is potentially important in developing Phase I studies.

  8. Targeting Bone Metabolism in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer: Current Options and Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Todenhöfer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining bone health remains a clinical challenge in patients with prostate cancer (PC who are at risk of developing metastatic bone disease and increased bone loss due to hormone ablation therapy. In patients with cancer-treatment induced bone loss (CTIBL, antiresorptive agents have been shown to improve bone mineral density (BMD and to reduce the risk of fractures. For patients with bone metastases, both zoledronic acid and denosumab delay skeletal related events (SREs in the castration resistant stage of disease. Novel agents targeting the Wnt inhibitors dickkopf-1 and sclerostin are currently under investigation for the treatment of osteoporosis and malignant bone disease. New antineoplastic drugs such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, and Radium-223 are capable of further delaying SREs in patients with advanced PC. The benefit of antiresorptive treatment for patients with castration sensitive PC appears to be limited. Recent trials on the use of zoledronic acid for the prevention of bone metastases failed to be successful, whereas denosumab delayed the occurrence of bone metastases by a median of 4.1 months. Currently, the use of antiresorptive drugs to prevent bone metastases still remains a field of controversies and further trials are needed to identify patient subgroups that may profit from early therapy.

  9. Targeting bone metabolism in patients with advanced prostate cancer: current options and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todenhöfer, Tilman; Stenzl, Arnulf; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rachner, Tilman D

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining bone health remains a clinical challenge in patients with prostate cancer (PC) who are at risk of developing metastatic bone disease and increased bone loss due to hormone ablation therapy. In patients with cancer-treatment induced bone loss (CTIBL), antiresorptive agents have been shown to improve bone mineral density (BMD) and to reduce the risk of fractures. For patients with bone metastases, both zoledronic acid and denosumab delay skeletal related events (SREs) in the castration resistant stage of disease. Novel agents targeting the Wnt inhibitors dickkopf-1 and sclerostin are currently under investigation for the treatment of osteoporosis and malignant bone disease. New antineoplastic drugs such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, and Radium-223 are capable of further delaying SREs in patients with advanced PC. The benefit of antiresorptive treatment for patients with castration sensitive PC appears to be limited. Recent trials on the use of zoledronic acid for the prevention of bone metastases failed to be successful, whereas denosumab delayed the occurrence of bone metastases by a median of 4.1 months. Currently, the use of antiresorptive drugs to prevent bone metastases still remains a field of controversies and further trials are needed to identify patient subgroups that may profit from early therapy. PMID:25802521

  10. Palliative radiotherapy in asymptomatic patients with locally advanced, unresectable, non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1983 and 1990, 332 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were referred to short-time, split-course palliative thoracic radiotherapy. The group consisted of patients with locally advanced (IIIo), unresectable cancer, not suitable for curative radiotherapy, asymptomatic or having only minimal symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The therapeutic plan involved two series of irradiation. Tumor dose delivered in each series was 20 Gy given in five daily fractions over five treatment days. There were four weeks interval between series. Of 332 patients initially qualified to thoracic radiotherapy only 170 patients received the treatment; the other 162 patients were not irradiated because of treatment refusal or logistic problems concerning therapy. They made the control group of the study, receiving the best possible symptomatic care. Twelve-month survivals in the radiotherapy and control groups were 32.4% and 9.3%, respectively; 24-month survivals 11.2% and 0%, respectively. Improvement of survival after palliative thoracic radiotherapy was observed only in patients with clinical stage IIIA and Karnofsky's performance status (KPS) ≥ 70. (orig.)

  11. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m2/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m2) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p 2/wk vs. 296 ± 15 mg/m2/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP

  12. Airway and esophageal stenting in patients with advanced esophageal cancer and pulmonary involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Paganin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most inoperable patients with esophageal-advanced cancer (EGC have a poor prognosis. Esophageal stenting, as part of a palliative therapy management has dramatically improved the quality of live of EGC patients. Airway stenting is generally proposed in case of esophageal stent complication, with a high failure rate. The study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of scheduled and non-scheduled airway stenting in case of indicated esophageal stenting for EGC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The study is an observational study conducted in pulmonary and gastroenterology endoscopy units. Consecutive patients with EGC were referred to endoscopy units. We analyzed the outcome of airway stenting in patients with esophageal stent indication admitted in emergency or with a scheduled intervention. Forty-four patients (58+/-\\-8 years of age with esophageal stenting indication were investigated. Seven patients (group 1 were admitted in emergency due to esophageal stent complication in the airway (4 fistulas, 3 cases with malignant infiltration and compression. Airway stenting failed for 5 patients. Thirty-seven remaining patients had a scheduled stenting procedure (group 2: stent was inserted for 13 patients with tracheal or bronchial malignant infiltration, 12 patients with fistulas, and 12 patients with airway extrinsic compression (preventive indication. Stenting the airway was well tolerated. Life-threatening complications were related to group 1. Overall mean survival was 26+/-10 weeks and was significantly shorter in group 1 (6+/-7.6 weeks than in group 2 (28+/-11 weeks, p<0.001. Scheduled double stenting significantly improved symptoms (95% at day 7 with a low complication rate (13%, and achieved a specific cancer treatment (84% in most cases. CONCLUSION: Stenting the airway should always be considered in case of esophageal stent indication. A multidisciplinary approach with initial airway evaluation improved prognosis and decreased

  13. The Impact of Diabetes Mellitus and Metformin Treatment on Survival of Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Younak; Kim, Tae-Yong; OH, DO-YOUN; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Han, Sae-Won; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A causal relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and pancreatic cancer is well established. However, in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) who receive palliative chemotherapy, the impact of DM on the prognosis of APC is unclear. Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled APC patients who received palliative chemotherapy between 2003 and 2010. The patients were stratified according to the status of DM, in accordance with 2010 DM criteria (American Heart Associati...

  14. Scintigraphic evaluation of functional hepatic mass in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Virgolini, I; Kornek, G; Höbart, J; Li, S R; Raolerer, M.; Bergmann, H; Scheithauer, W.; Pantev, T.; Angelberger, P.; Sinzinger, H.

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a high specificity of 99mTc-galactosyl neoglycoalbumin (99mTc-NGA) receptor scanning in vivo by providing both morphological and functional diagnosis of liver disease. In 22 patients with advanced breast cancer 99mTc-NGA (150 MBq; 50 nmol) was exclusively trapped by the liver, the images showing 'cold spots' in areas of liver metastases formation. A two-tailed analysis was performed: the time activity curves recorded for the liver and precordial area were subjected to a...

  15. Nutritional variations during chemotherapy for patients suffering from a locally advanced oesophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As de-nutrition is frequently noticed for patients suffering from a locally advanced oesophagus cancer, the authors report a study of the variations of nutritional parameters during chemotherapy and of their impacts of the treatment process and efficiency. Thus, different parameters have been studied at the beginning, during and at the end of the treatment: weight, albumin range, body weight index, calorie survey, and the nutritional support type. The authors observe very important variations with a significant impact on treatment tolerance and efficiency. Short communication

  16. Symptom severity of patients with advanced cancer in palliative care unit: longitudinal assessments of symptoms improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Shu-Yu; Lee, Chung-Yin; Wu, Chien-Yi; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Huang, Joh-Jong; Huang, Chia-Tsuan; Chien, Chen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the symptom severity of patients with advanced cancer in a palliative care unit and explored the factors associated with symptom improvement. Methods This study was conducted in a palliative care unit in Taiwan between October 2004 and December 2009. Symptom intensity was measured by the “Symptom Reporting Form”, and graded on a scale of 0 to 4 (0 = none, and 4 = extreme). These measures were assessed on the 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 7th Day in the palliative care unit...

  17. Pharmacokinetic study of paclitaxel in malignant ascites from advanced gastric cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michiya Kobayashi; Junichi Sakamoto; Tsutomu Namikawa; Ken Okamoto; Takehiro Okabayashi; Kengo Ichikawa; Keijiro Araki

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the paclitaxel concentrations in plasma and ascites after its intravenous administration in patients with ascites due to peritonitis carcinomatosa resulting from advanced gastric cancer.METHODS: Two patients with ascites due to peritonitis carcinomatosa resulting from gastric cancer were included in this study. The paclitaxel concentrations in plasma and ascites were investigated for 72 h in case 1 and 168 h in case 2 after intravenous administration.RESULTS: The paclitaxel concentration in plasma peaked immediately after administration, followed by rapid decrease below the threshold value of 0.1 μmol (85 ng/mL) within 24 h. In contrast, the paclitaxel concentration in ascites increased gradually for 24 h after administration to a level consistent with the level found in plasma. After 24 h the level of paclitaxel in ascites and plasma became similar, with the optimal level being maintained up to 72 h following administration.CONCLUSION: The concentration of paclitaxel in ascites is maintained within the optimal level for the treatment of cancer cells for up to 72 h after intravenous administration. Paclitaxel is a promising drug for the treatment of malignant ascites of gastric cancer.

  18. Treatment outcome of advanced pancreatic cancer patients who are ineligible for a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Akira Ueda, Ayumu Hosokawa, Kohei Ogawa, Hiroki Yoshita, Takayuki Ando, Shinya Kajiura, Haruka Fujinami, Kengo Kawai, Jun Nishikawa, Kazuto Tajiri, Masami Minemura, Toshiro SugiyamaDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toyama, Toyama, JapanObjective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in clinical practice, and assess whether chemotherapy provided a clinical benefit for patients who did not meet the eligibility criteria of the clinical trial.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 75 patients who received first-line chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer between April 2006 and September 2011. Patients were treated with gemcitabine (GEM alone, S-1 (tegafur, gimeracil, and oteracil potassium alone, or GEM plus S-1. Patients were divided into the clinical trial eligible group (arm eligible or the ineligible group (arm ineligible. We evaluated the efficacy and the safety of the chemotherapy.Results: A total of 23 patients out of 75 (31% belonged to the ineligible group, for the following reasons: 20 patients had poor performance status, eight had massive ascites, one had synchronous malignancy, and one had icterus. The median progression-free survival (PFS was 3.5 months, and the median overall survival (OS was 6.7 months in all patients. In arm eligible, median PFS was 4.5 months, and median OS was 10.5 months. In arm ineligible, median PFS was 1.1 months, and median OS was 2.9 months.Conclusion: The outcome of the patients who did not meet the eligibility criteria was very poor. It is important to select the patients that could benefit from either chemotherapy or optimal supportive care.Keywords: gemcitabine, S-1, clinical practice

  19. Factors that affect response to chemotherapy and survival of patients with advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, M H; Al-Sarraf, M; Vaitkevicius, V K

    1979-06-01

    A review of 164 patients with far advanced head and neck cancer, treated by a cytotoxic chemotherapy over a ten year period, at WAyne State University, Detroit, Michigan, was done in an attempt to determine factors that may influence the response to chemotherapy and subsequent survival. Response rate to methotrexate was 28%, 5-FU 31%, and porfiromycin 13%. Improved responses were noted with combination chemotherapy. Patients who failed to first line therapy rarely responded to other single agent or combination chemotherapy. Those who did not have prior surgery and/or radiotherapy had better results from drug therapy. Patients with good performance status at the time of initial chemotherapy, had better response to treatment (32% vs. 13% PR & CR) and longer survival (28 weeks vs. 9 weeks, p = 0.01) when compared to those with poor status. Patients who responded to chemotherapy have better survival compared to nonresponders (29 weeks vs. 16 weeks, p = 0.002). This information may prove helpful in future planning of multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:455217

  20. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Forycka, Maria; Mess, Eleonora; Zdun-Ryzewska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study To assess quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU), and at a day care center (DCC). Patients and methods QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Karnofsky Perfor...

  1. Complications associated with pelvic intraarterial therapy in patients with recurrent and advanced gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the complications associated with pelvic intraarterial therapy in patients with recurrent and advanced gynecologic cancer and to discuss the causes, the prevention and management measures of the complications in details. Methods: One hundred and thirty procedures of pelvic intraarterial therapy were performed in 78 patients with pathologically confirmed recurrent and advanced gynecologic cancer, with one to six procedures per case. The Seldinger technique was used in all patients. The catheter was introduced via femoral artery on one side (mostly on the right side), and the combined antineoplastic agents were infused into contralateral internal iliac artery and (or) ipsilateral branches supplying the involved area. Common iliac arteries and inferior mesenteric arteries were also used in some cases. Results: Six patients (7.69%) developed severe skin and subcutaneous necrosis (erosion or ulceration) on the buttock and vulvae. Five of them recovered from the injuries after heteropathy in less than 2 months. One patient received surgical debridement 4 months after the pelvic chemotherapy, whose wound healed one month later. Conclusion: The causes of the severe complications of pelvic intraarterial therapy were as follows: the infusing chemotherapeutic agent was too large in dosage and too dense in concentration; the infusing time was too short; the internal iliac artery gave off a lot of abnormal skin branches; the catheter was placed too distal in small branches; the embolic pieces was too small; and the development of collateral arteries was poor especially in pretreated patients with pelvic surgery and (or) radiotherapy, etc. Heteropathy should be given in no time when the severe complications were encountered, and surgical debridement and (or) skin grafting was a need in some cases. So the interventional performers should be familiar with pelvic arteriograms to select the proper location of catheter, administer the suitable dosage of

  2. Disparities in the Use of Radiation Therapy in Patients With Local-Regionally Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radiation therapy (RT) is indicated for the treatment of local-regionally advanced breast cancer (BCa). Hypothesis: We hypothesized that black and Hispanic patients with local-regionally advanced BCa would receive lower rates of RT than their white counterparts. Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database was used to identify white, black, Hispanic, and Asian patients with invasive BCa and ≥10 metastatic lymph nodes diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression evaluated the relationship of race/ethnicity with use of RT. Multivariate models stratified for those undergoing mastectomy or lumpectomy. Results: Entry criteria were met by 12,653 patients. Approximately half of the patients did not receive RT. Most patients were white (72%); the remainder were Hispanic (10.4%), black (10.3%), and Asian (7.3%). On univariate analysis, Hispanics (odd ratio [OR] 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.00) and blacks (OR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70-0.89) were less likely to receive RT than whites. On multivariate analysis, blacks (OR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67-0.86) and Hispanics (OR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70-0.90) were less likely than whites to receive RT. Disparities persisted for blacks (OR 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.85) and Hispanics (OR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89) who received mastectomy, but not for those who received lumpectomy. Conclusions: Many patients with local-regionally advanced BCa do not receive RT. Blacks and Hispanics were less likely than whites to receive RT. This disparity was noted predominately in patients who received mastectomy. Future efforts at improving rates of RT are warranted. Efforts at eliminating racial/ethnic disparities should focus on black and Hispanic candidates for postmastectomy RT.

  3. Efficacy and safety evaluation of icotinib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiqin Gu; Chunlei Shi; Liwen Xiong; Tianqing Chu; Jun Pei; Baohui Han

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of icotinib hydrochloride in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).Methods:A total of 89 patients with stage ⅢB or Ⅳ NSCLC received icotinib at a dose of 125 mg admimstered 3 times a day.Icotinib treatment was continued until disease progression or development of unacceptable toxicity.Results:A total of 89 patients were assessable.In patients treated with icotinib,the overall response rate (RR) was 36.0% (32/89),and the disease control rate (DCR) was 69.7% (62/89).RR and DCR were significantly improved in patients with adenocarcinoma versus non-adenocarcinoma (P<0.05).The symptom improvement rate was 57.3% (51/89),and the main symptoms improved were cough,pain,chest distress,dyspnea,and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status.The main toxic effects were rash [30/89 (33.7 %)] and diarrhea [15/89 (16.9%)].The level of toxicity was typically low.Conclusions:The use of icotinib hydrochloride in the treatment of advanced NSCLC is efficacious and safe,and its toxic effects are tolerable.

  4. Breast Cancer Clinical Trials: Past Half Century Moving Forward Advancing Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerer, Henry M; van la Parra, Raquel F D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical trials in breast cancer have contributed immensely to the advancements of modern multimodal breast cancer treatment. Due to improved screening methods and more effective biologic-based tailored systemic therapies, the extent of surgery necessary for local and systemic control of disease is decreasing. Sequential trials for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) have changed the management of this disease and are culminating in randomized active surveillance studies in an effort potentially to prevent overtreatment of low- and intermediate-grade disease. For patients with initial node-positive disease, clipping and marking of the biopsy-proven nodal metastases before the start of neoadjuvant chemotherapy can allow for selective node dissection based on the axillary response. With the current advances in primary systemic therapy, feasibility trials are beginning to investigate the potential of nonoperative therapy for invasive cancers with percutaneously documented pathologic complete response. This article presents a review and update on landmark clinical trials related to DCIS, the extent of axillary surgery in node-positive disease, and the integration of systemic therapy with local therapy. PMID:27364503

  5. Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with locally advanced high-risk cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the outcome of patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated by adjuvant radiochemotherapy and to determine risk factors for local and distant relapse. Furthermore, acute and late effects of treatment were recorded. Patients and methods: A total of 72 patients with FIGO stages I-III cervical carcinoma were treated by radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and postoperative radiochemotherapy. Only patients with positive pelvic lymph nodes, parametrial involvement, positive margins, or tumor bulk were eligible. Patients were irradiated with a standard pelvic field (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). The majority of patients received platinum-based chemotherapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 37 months, estimated 1-, 2-, and 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 89%, 80%, 68% and 95%, 88%, 76%, respectively. Nine of the 72 patients had pelvic recurrences including only 1 isolated local failure; 23 of the 72 patients presented with distant relapse. The majority of relapses occurred within the first 3 years after adjuvant treatment. The number of positive pelvic lymph nodes (> 1) was the strongest prognostic factor for DFS. Treatment was well tolerated with transient acute hematologic (∝30%) and gastrointestinal (∝30%) grade 3 toxicity. Small bowel obstruction (∝6%) was the only important late sequelae. Conclusion: Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with advanced cervical cancer and several risk factors is highly effective to prevent local relapse. Future efforts to improve outcome should be placed on improvement of systemic control especially in subgroups with high-risk features for distant relapse. Combined treatment was well tolerated with moderate acute and late toxicity. (orig.)

  6. Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with locally advanced high-risk cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzelmann, F.; Henke, G.; Grafenstein, M. von; Weidner, N.; Paulsen, F.; Bamberg, M.; Weinmann, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Staebler, A. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Div. of Gynecologic Pathology; Brucker, S. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Gynecology

    2012-07-15

    Background and purpose: The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the outcome of patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated by adjuvant radiochemotherapy and to determine risk factors for local and distant relapse. Furthermore, acute and late effects of treatment were recorded. Patients and methods: A total of 72 patients with FIGO stages I-III cervical carcinoma were treated by radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and postoperative radiochemotherapy. Only patients with positive pelvic lymph nodes, parametrial involvement, positive margins, or tumor bulk were eligible. Patients were irradiated with a standard pelvic field (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). The majority of patients received platinum-based chemotherapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 37 months, estimated 1-, 2-, and 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 89%, 80%, 68% and 95%, 88%, 76%, respectively. Nine of the 72 patients had pelvic recurrences including only 1 isolated local failure; 23 of the 72 patients presented with distant relapse. The majority of relapses occurred within the first 3 years after adjuvant treatment. The number of positive pelvic lymph nodes (> 1) was the strongest prognostic factor for DFS. Treatment was well tolerated with transient acute hematologic ({proportional_to}30%) and gastrointestinal ({proportional_to}30%) grade 3 toxicity. Small bowel obstruction ({proportional_to}6%) was the only important late sequelae. Conclusion: Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with advanced cervical cancer and several risk factors is highly effective to prevent local relapse. Future efforts to improve outcome should be placed on improvement of systemic control especially in subgroups with high-risk features for distant relapse. Combined treatment was well tolerated with moderate acute and late toxicity. (orig.)

  7. Quality of life among advanced breast cancer patients with and without distant metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, G; Sikorskii, A; Tamkus, D; You, M

    2013-03-01

    This study presents the results of a secondary analysis of data collected during a trial of reflexology that aimed to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among women with advanced breast cancer in treatment. A comparison of HRQOL (functioning, symptoms, spirituality) of those with (n = 298) and without (n = 87) distant metastasis is presented. Following the intake interview, 385 women were randomised to reflexology, lay foot manipulation or conventional care control, and were interviewed again at weeks 5 and 11. Those with distant metastasis were older, had fewer comorbid conditions, and a smaller proportion were employed. Longitudinal analysis of HRQOL at intake, 5 and 11 weeks revealed that those with distant metastasis had lower functioning and more pain; however, no differences were found on fatigue, nausea, shortness of breath, sleep quality, anxiety, depressive symptoms or spirituality. Despite advanced disease, 56% of all women in this study were below the clinical screening cut-off for depressive symptoms. These findings may indicate that patients with advanced breast cancer have adapted emotionally and spiritually; however, the management of physical symptoms remains a priority. PMID:23252474

  8. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Junn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in locally advanced cervical cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation plus surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) could be a marker of clinical outcome in cervical cancer patients undergoing concomitant chemoradiation plus surgery. Methods and Materials: The study included 33 locally advanced cervical cancer patients; all underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation, and responsive patients underwent radical surgery. Immunohistochemistry was performed with rabbit antiserum against COX-2. Results: COX-2 integrated density values (IDVs) in the tumor component ranged from 1.4 to 72.3 (median 15.0); in stromal inflammatory cells, COX-2 IDVs ranged from 1.4 to 96.0 (median 16.0). A statistically significant inverse relation was found between the COX-2 IDVs of the tumor vs. the stromal inflammatory component (r=-0.52, p=0.0017). When the ratio between COX-2 IDV in the tumor vs. the stromal compartment was ≤1, it was considered to indicate cervical tumor with COX-2 expression in the tumor component lower or equivalent to COX-2 expression in the stroma. According to the chosen cutoff value, 17 (51.5%) of 33 were scored as having a high (>1) tumor/stroma COX-2 IDV ratio. Patients with a high tumor/stroma COX-2 IDV ratio had a shorter disease-free survival than did those with a low tumor/stroma COX-2 IDV ratio (p=0.030). Similarly, those with a high tumor/stroma COX-2 IDV ratio had a shorter overall survival (p=0.033). Conclusion: The assessment of COX-2 status in both the tumor and the stromal compartment could provide additional information in the prognostic characterization of cervical cancer patients administered concomitant chemoradiation plus surgery

  10. A retrospective study of the effectiveness of hemostatic radiotherapy with conventional fractionation in patients with advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomoto S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of hemostatic radiotherapy (HRT in patients with advanced cancer. Eighteen patients with advanced cancer treated with HRT at the Fukuoka University and Kyushu Rosai Hospitals in Japan between July 2010 and February 2015 were retrospectively assessed. The hemostatic effect of tumor-related bleeding was assessed by the clinical course of bleeding, laboratory data, the endoscopic study, and the number of blood transfusion units (BTRUs for one month before and after HRT. The median follow-up time was 2.6 months (range, 0.7 to 36.2 months. The median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 51 to 93. The primary diseases with tumor-related bleeding included gastric cancer, urinary bladder cancer, gynecological cancer, prostate cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. The median overall survival time was three months, and the one year survival rate was 22.9% of all patients. The HRT regimens ranged from 30 Gy in 10 fractions to 40 Gy in 20 fractions. In all patients, the anemia grade and the number of BTRUs decreased for 1 month after RT. The percentage of patients who were diagnosed as “successful” for hemostasis was 83% (15 of 18 patients. HRT is therefore strongly suggested as effective for the control of tumor-related bleeding in patients with advanced cancer. The optimal radiation doses and fractions are controversial; however, this treatment should be offered for patients with a poor life expectancy.

  11. A study of the relationships between perceived pain, social support, coping and quality of life in patients with advanced cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Shelagh

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the implications of perceived pain and social support for coping ability, levels of distress and quality of life in a group of patients with advanced cancer. A total of 98 patients who were undergoing palliative treatment and/or care and were aware of their cancer diagnosis, but not necessarily of their prognosis, consented verbally to participate. A questionnaire was administered to each participant comprised of scales to measure perceived pain intensity an...

  12. Actionable mutations in plasma cell-free DNA in patients with advanced cancers referred for experimental targeted therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Janku, Filip; Angenendt, Philipp; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Fu, Siqing; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald S.; David S Hong; Holley, Veronica R.; Cabrilo, Goran; Jennifer J Wheler; Piha-Paul, Sarina A.; Zinner, Ralph G.; Bedikian, Agop Y.; Overman, Michael J.; Kee, Bryan K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free (cf) DNA in the plasma of cancer patients offers an easily obtainable source of biologic material for mutation analysis. Plasma samples from 157 patients with advanced cancers who progressed on systemic therapy were tested for 21 mutations in BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, and PIK3CA using the BEAMing method and results were compared to mutation analysis of archival tumor tissue from a CLIA-certified laboratory obtained as standard of care from diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Results were ...

  13. Aged garlic extract prevents a decline of NK cell number and activity in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hideki; Saeki, Tomoko; Otani, Toru; Suzuki, Takaichiro; Shimozuma, Kojiro; Nishino, Hoyoku; Fukuda, Sanae; Morimoto, Kanehisa

    2006-03-01

    Aged garlic extract (AGE) has manifold biological activities including immunomodulative and antioxidative effects. It is used as a major component of nonprescription tonics and cold-prevention medicines or dietary supplements. Advanced-cancer patients decline in immune functions and quality of life (QOL). The study's subjects were patients with inoperable colorectal, liver, or pancreatic cancer. In a randomized double-blind trial, AGE was administered to one group and a placebo was administered to another for 6 mo. The primary endpoint was a QOL questionnaire based on the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT). The subendpoints were changes in the natural-killer (NK) cell activity the salivary cortisol level from before and after administering AGE. Out of 55 patients invited to participate in the trial, 50 (91%) consented to enroll. They consisted of 42 patients with liver cancer (84%), 7 patients with pancreatic cancer (14%), and 1 patient with colon cancer (2%). Drug compliance was relatively good in both the AGE and placebo groups. Although no difference was observed in QOL, both the number of NK cells and the NK cell activity increased significantly in the AGE group. No adverse effect was observed in either group. The study showed that administering AGE to patients with advanced cancer of the digestive system improved NK cell activity, but caused no improvement in QOL. PMID:16484572

  14. The characteristics of advanced cancer patients followed at home, but admitted to the hospital for the last days of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Masedu, Francesco; Valenti, Marco; Mercadante, Alessandro; Aielli, Federica

    2016-08-01

    Information regarding advanced cancer patients followed at home who are admitted to the hospital in the last days of life are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of patients who were hospitalized in the last days of life after being assisted by a home palliative care team. The secondary outcome was to identify possible risk factors for hospitalization. The charts were analyzed of a consecutive sample of advanced cancer patients admitted to hospital wards in the last days of life after being followed at home by a palliative care team. Of 550 consecutive patients followed at home, 138 (25.1 %) were admitted to the hospital. Younger patients were more likely to die in the hospital. In a logistic risk analysis adjusted for age, patients with lung and head-neck cancer were more likely to die in the hospital. Patients having a female relative or a female consort as a caregiver were more likely to die at home. CAGE-positive patients (7.25 %), and patients with a shorter period of home assistance were more likely transported to hospital before dying (p = 0.00 and p risk factors of hospitalization at the end of life for advanced cancer patients followed at home. PMID:26895033

  15. Analysis of Prognostic Factors in 541 Female Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina WU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective As there is a sharp increase in the incidence of lung cancer in women in recent years, it has brought broad concerns with its unique clinical and epidemiological characteristics and better prognosis. The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical data of women with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC retrospectively to explore the prognostic factors. Methods Clinical data of 541 female patients with advanced NSCLC were collected and followed up till death. The primary endpoint is overall survival (OS. SPSS 11.0 statistical analysis software was used for univariate and multivariate analysis. Results The mean age is 59 years (20 years-86 years, adenocarcinoma account for 80.2% (434/541. The median OS was 15 months (95%CI: 13.87-16.13, and 1, 2, 5-year survival rates were 58.8%, 23.7% and 3.20% respectively. Univariate analysis showed that clinical stage, ECOG score, weight loss, clinical symptoms, liver/bone/brain metastasis and received more than one chemotherapy regimen, good response to the first-line chemotherapy, EGFR-TKI targeted therapy and radiotherapy treatment were significantly correlated with the OS and survival rate (P < 0.05. Combined with multivariate analysis, weight loss before treatment, ECOG score, received EGFR-TKI targeted therapy and response to first-line chemotherapy were independent prognostic factor for survival (P < 0.05. Conclusion There is a higher percentage of adenocarcinoma in female NSCLC. Weight loss before treatment, ECOG score, EGFR-TKI targeted therapy and response to first-line chemotherapy may become independent prognostic factors for survival of female patients with advanced NSCLC.

  16. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-11

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  17. PHARMACOTHERAPY IN ADVANCED THYROID CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Voichiţa Mogoş

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are the most common carcinomas of the endocrine system. Their behavior depends of histology, extension of the disease and patients-related factors. Differentiated thyroid cancers arising from follicular epithelium may be cured with combined surgery and radioiodine therapy. In 10-15 % of cases patients may develop metastases which are cause of death. In advanced differentiated thyroid cancers of follicular origin combined therapy with radioiodine and TSH suppression may result ...

  18. Symptom burden and quality of life in advanced head and neck cancer patients: AIIMS study of 100 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeet Kumar Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Head and neck cancers (HNCa are the most common cancers among males in India and 70-80% present in advanced stage. The study aims to assess symptom burden and quality of life (QOL in advanced incurable HNCa patients at presentation. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients were asked to fill EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL questionnaire, which consisted of Global QOL, physical functioning (PF, emotional functioning (EF, fatigue (FA, nausea-vomiting (NV, pain (PA, dyspnea (DY, sleep (SL, appetite (AP, and constipation (CO. Additional questions pertaining to swallowing (SW, hoarseness (HO, cough (CG, weight loss (WL, using pain killers (PK, taste (TA, bleeding (BL, hearing (HE, pain in neck lump (PALMP, opening mouth (OM, and oral secretions (OS were asked based on a modified EORTC-HN35 questionnaire. Scoring was according to EORTC scoring manual. Mean, median and range were calculated for each item for the entire cohort. Results: The female:male ratio was 17:83.42% of them were ≥60 years of age. Sixty-six patients had T4, 25 had T3, 36 had N2, and 33 had N3 disease. Median QOL was 50 (range 0-83.33 and PF was 77.78 (0-100. Median score for EF and FA was 50. Median score for PA, PK, and SL was 66.67 while that for AP was 33.33. Median value for SW, HO, WL, BL, PALMP, OM, and OS was 33.33 (100-0 while TA, CG, NV, DY, and HE had a median score of 0.00. Conclusion: Advanced HNCa has a significant burden of symptoms. These results would help in giving patients better symptom directed therapies and improve their QOL.

  19. Depression and demoralization as distinct syndromes: Preliminary data from a cohort of advanced cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsen Juliet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The term demoralization has been used to describe existential distress and despair of patients with advanced disease. Aim: This study sought to determine whether a cluster of symptoms interpreted as demoralization could be identified and distinguished from a cluster of depressive symptoms. Materials and Methods: As part of the Coping with Cancer Study, a federally funded multi-site study of advanced cancer patients, 242 patients were interviewed on a broad range of mental health parameters related to depression, grief, quality of life, self-efficacy, coping and religiousness/spirituality. Results: A principal components analysis revealed separate depression and demoralization/despair factors. Seven symptoms constituted the demoralization/despair factor: loss of control, loss of hope, anger/bitterness, sense of failure, feeling life was a burden, loss of meaning and a belief that life′s meaning is dependent on health and were found to be internally consistent (Cronbach′s a = 0.78. Only 14.8% of subjects with "syndromal demoralization" met DSM-IV criteria for Major Depression (MDD; 7.4% for Minor Depression. Of those with MDD only 28.6% had syndromal level demoralization. Prior history of MDD predicted current MDD, but not syndromal demoralization. Demoralization, not MDD, was significantly associated with the patient′s reported level of inner peacefulness. When compared with MDD, syndromal demoralization was more strongly associated with wish to live and wish to die and equally predictive of mental health service use. Conclusion: The symptoms of demoralization are distinct from depressive symptoms and appear to be associated with the patient′s degree of inner peacefulness.

  20. Sequencing chemotherapy and radiotherapy in locoregional advanced breast cancer patients after mastectomy – a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined chemo- and radiotherapy are established in breast cancer treatment. Chemotherapy is recommended prior to radiotherapy but decisive data on the optimal sequence are rare. This retrospective analysis aimed to assess the role of sequencing in patients after mastectomy because of advanced locoregional disease. A total of 212 eligible patients had a stage III breast cancer and had adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary dissection between 1996 and 2004. According to concerted multi-modality treatment strategies 86 patients were treated sequentially (chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy) (SEQgroup), 70 patients had a sandwich treatment (SW-group) and 56 patients had simultaneous chemoradiation (SIM-group) during that time period. Radiotherapy comprised the thoracic wall and/or regional lymph nodes. The total dose was 45–50.4 Gray. As simultaneous chemoradiation CMF was given in 95.4% of patients while in sequential or sandwich application in 86% and 87.1% of patients an anthracycline-based chemotherapy was given. Concerning the parameters nodal involvement, lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular spread and extension of the irradiated region the three treatment groups were significantly imbalanced. The other parameters, e.g. age, pathological tumor stage, grading and receptor status were homogeneously distributed. Looking on those two groups with an equally effective chemotherapy (EC, FEC), the SEQ- and SW-group, the sole imbalance was the extension of LVI (57.1 vs. 25.6%, p < 0.0001). 5-year overall- and disease free survival were 53.2%/56%, 38.1%/32% and 64.2%/50%, for the sequential, sandwich and simultaneous regime, respectively, which differed significantly in the univariate analysis (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, log-rank test). Also the 5-year locoregional or distant recurrence free survival showed no significant differences according to the sequence of chemo- and radiotherapy. In the multivariate analyses the sequence had no

  1. ARCON: experience in 215 patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: 'ARCON' combines accelerated radiotherapy to counteract tumor repopulation with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide to reduce chronic and acute hypoxia. The aim of this Phase II study was to assess the feasibility, toxicity, and potential effectiveness of ARCON for advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 215 patients with head-and-neck carcinoma distributed as follows: larynx, n = 100; hypopharynx, n=50; oropharynx, n=52; oral cavity, n=13; Stage II, n=8, Stage III, n=71, and Stage IV, n=136. Accelerated radiotherapy was given to a total dose of 64-68 Gy in 2-Gy fractions within 36-38 days. This was combined with carbogen breathing during irradiation and administration of nicotinamide (60-80 mg/kg) 1-1.5 h before irradiation. Results: There was full compliance with carbogen breathing in 88% of the patients. A nicotinamide dose of 80 mg/kg produced severe nausea and vomiting, necessitating discontinuation of the drug, in 31% of the patients. Adjustment of the dose to 60 mg/kg and antiemesis prophylaxis reduced the discontinuation rate to 10%. Confluent mucositis was observed in 91% of the patients with a median duration of 6 weeks. Grade 4 late complications occurred in 5% of the patients. The actuarial 3-year local control rates were 80% for larynx, 69% for hypopharynx, 88% for oropharynx, and 37% for oral cavity tumors. For T3-4 tumors, the local control rates were 80% for larynx, 60% for hypopharynx, 87% for oropharynx, and 29% for oral cavity. Regional control rates were 100% for N0, 93% for N1, and 74% for N2 disease. Conclusion: ARCON yields high local and regional control rates in advanced head-and-neck carcinomas, and compliance is satisfactory and morbidity acceptable. The local control rate of 80% for T3 and T4 larynx carcinomas offers excellent possibilities for organ preservation

  2. A laboratory prognostic index model for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arife Ulas

    Full Text Available We aimed to establish a laboratory prognostic index (LPI in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients based on hematologic and biochemical parameters and to analyze the predictive value of LPI on NSCLC survival.The study retrospectively reviewed 462 patients with advanced NSCLC diagnosed between 2000 and 2010 in a single institution. We developed an LPI that included serum levels of white blood cells (WBC, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, albumin, calcium, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, based on the results of a Cox regression analysis. The patients were classified into 3 LPI groups as follows: LPI 0: normal; LPI 1: one abnormal laboratory finding; and LPI 2: at least 2 abnormal laboratory findings.The median follow up period was 44 months; the median overall survival (OS and median progression-free survival (PFS were 11 and 6 months, respectively. A multivariate analysis revealed that the following could be used as independent prognostic factors: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score (ECOG PS ≥2, a high LDH level, serum albumin 10.5 g/dL, number of metastases>2, presence of liver metastases, malignant pleural effusion, or receiving chemotherapy ≥4 cycles. The 1-year OS rates according to LPI 0, LPI 1, and LPI 2 were 54%, 34%, and 17% (p<0.001, respectively and 6-month PFS rates were 44%, 27%, and 15% (p<0.001, respectively. The LPI was a significant predictor for OS (Hazard Ratio (HR: 1.41; 1.05-1.88, p<0.001 and PFS (HR: 1.48; 1.14-1.93, p<0.001.An LPI is an inexpensive, easily accessible and independent prognostic index for advanced NSCLC and may be helpful in making individualized treatment plans and predicting survival rates when combined with clinical parameters.

  3. Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer them to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will be multiplied and infused into the patient to fight the cancer

  4. Treating advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients: focus on icotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang JL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jun-Li Liang,1 Xiao-Cang Ren,2 Qiang Lin2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Hebei Medical University Fourth Hospital, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology, North China Petroleum Bureau General Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Renqiu, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Icotinib hydrochloride is an orally administered small-molecule reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been independently researched and developed and has independent intellectual property rights in the People’s Republic of China. Clinical trials have demonstrated that the response to icotinib among advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients who received at least one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen was not inferior to gefitinib. Since being launched August 2011 in the People’s Republic of China, icotinib has been widely used in clinics, and has become an important treatment option for Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC. The present study presents the Phase I, II, and III clinical trials of icotinib and discusses current clinical applications in the People’s Republic of China and future research directions. Keywords: targeted therapy, EGFR-TKI, NSCLC

  5. AZD9291 in EGFR-mutant advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remon, Jordi; Planchard, David

    2015-11-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose tumors have an EGFR-activating mutation develop acquired resistance after a median of 9-11 months from the beginning of treatment with erlotinib, gefitinib and afatinib. T790M mutation is the cause of this resistance in approximately 60% of cases. AZD9291 is an oral, irreversible, mutant-selective EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) developed to have potency against EGFR mutations, including T790M mutation, while sparing wild-type EGFR. A Phase I trial of AZD9291 in EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients, demonstrated high activity, essentially among T790M-mutant tumors, with a manageable tolerability profile. Ongoing Phase III trials are evaluating AZD9291 in EGFR-mutant patients as first-line treatment compared with erlotinib and gefitinib; and as second-line treatment compared with chemotherapy after progression on EGFR TKI in T790M-mutant tumors. Better identification of T790M-mutant tumors post EGFR TKI relapse and mechanisms of resistance to AZD9291 are the future challenges. This article reviews the emerging data regarding AZD9291 in the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:26450446

  6. Efficacy of intraarterial chemoinfusion therapy for locally advanced breast cancer patients: a retrospective analysis of 28 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wei Zhang,1,* Rong Liu,1,* Yingying Wang,1 Sheng Qian,1 Jianhua Wang,1 Zhiping Yan,1 Hongwei Zhang21Department of Interventional Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of General Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of image-guided delivery of intraarterially infused chemotherapeutic drugs for patients with locally advanced breast cancer.Methods: Twenty-eight patients with pathologically proven, locally advanced breast cancer received intraarterial chemoinfusion therapy (chemoinfusion with docetaxel 75 mg/m2 and epirubicin 50 mg/m2. Digital subtraction angiography was performed to determine tumor arterial blood supply and to guide chemotherapy infusion. Patients were evaluated for complete remission (CR and partial remission (PR.Results: Twenty-eight patients received a total of 64 intraarterial chemoinfusions, 20 patients (71.4% received two infusions, and eight patients (28.6% received three infusions. One patient (3.6% had CR and 23 (82.1% had PR. The total effectiveness rate (CR and PR was 85.7% (24/28. All stage 3 patients underwent Phase II surgical resection after chemoinfusion, and the surgical resection participation rate was 100% (26/26. The mean time from the first chemoinfusion to surgery was 2 ± 1.2 months. Two patients with stage 4 cancer died of distant metastasis and cachexia, and the remaining 26 patients were still alive.Conclusion: Intraarterial chemoinfusion is a safe and effective therapy, achieving down-staging in a relatively short period for locally advanced breast cancer.Keywords: advanced breast cancer, intraarterial infusion, chemotherapy, therapeutic effect

  7. Circulating Biomarkers in Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients Randomly Assigned to Three Bevacizumab-Based Regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Martinetti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The need to identify biomarkers for bevacizumab-based treatment in advanced colorectal cancer is imperative. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of circulating VEGF, PDGF, SDF-1, osteopontin and CEA in patients randomly assigned to three bevacizumab-based regimens. Plasma samples from 50 patients treated at a single Institution were analysed using the multiplex assay BioPlex™ 2200 (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc, Berkeley, CA, USA at baseline, before first three cycles and subsequently every three cycles until disease progression. Prognostic analyses of baseline values were performed using multivariable Cox models, including disease extension >10 cm or ≤10 cm (measured as the sum of the diameters for all target lesions as adjustment factor. The association between progression-free and overall survival and biomarkers modulation during treatment was studied using multivariable Cox models, which included summary statistics synthesizing during-treatment modulation together with disease extension. The biomarkers significantly associated with disease extension were baseline CEA (p = 0.012 and SDF-1 (p = 0.030. High values of VEGF and SDF-1 tended to be associated with worse prognosis, especially in terms of overall survival. The negative prognostic trend was more marked for baseline CEA as compared to other biomarkers; increasing values during treatment was significantly related to worse prognosis independently of disease extension (p = 0.007 and 0.016 for progression-free and overall survival, respectively. VEGF is related to bevacizumab pharmacodynamics and is associated to other angiogenic cytokines; some of the proposed biomarkers such as SDF-1 and CEA should be further validated for prognosis assessment and monitoring of bevacizumab-based treatment of advanced colorectal cancer.

  8. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  9. Pharmacogenetic profiling and cetuximab outcome in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahan Laetitia

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We analyzed the influence of 8 germinal polymorphisms of candidate genes potentially related to EGFR signalling (EGFR, EGF, CCND1 or antibody-directed cell cytotoxicity (FCGR2A and FCGR3A on outcome of colorectal cancer (CRC patients receiving cetuximab-based therapy. Methods Fifty-eight advanced CRC patients treated with cetuximab-irinotecan salvage therapy between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed (mean age 60; 50 PS 0-1. The following polymorphisms were analyzed on blood DNA: EGFR (CA repeats in intron 1, -216 G > T, -191C > A, R497K, EGF (A61G, CCND1 (A870G, FCGR2A (R131H, FCGR3A (F158V. Statistical analyses were conducted on the total population and on patients with wt KRas tumors. All SNPs were considered as ternary variables (wt/wt vs wt/mut vs mut/mut, with the exception of -191C > A EGFR polymorphism (AA patient merged with CA patients. Results Analysis of skin toxicity as a function of EGFR intron 1 polymorphism showed a tendency for higher toxicity in patients with a low number of CA-repeats (p = 0.058. CCND1 A870G polymorphism was significantly related to clinical response, both in the entire population and in KRas wt patients, with the G allele being associated with a lack of response. In wt KRas patients, time to progression (TTP was significantly related to EGFR -191C > A polymorphism with a longer TTP in CC patients as compared to others, and to CCND1 A870G polymorphism with the G allele being associated with a shorter TTP; a multivariate analysis including these two polymorphisms only retained CCND1 polymorphism. Overall survival was significantly related to CCND1 polymorphism with a shorter survival in patients bearing the G allele, and to FCGR3A F158V polymorphism with a shorter survival in VV patients (in the entire population and in KRas wt patients. FCGR3A F158V and CCND1 A870G polymorphisms were significant independent predictors of overall survival. Conclusions Present original data obtained in wt KRas

  10. Pharmacogenetic profiling and cetuximab outcome in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the influence of 8 germinal polymorphisms of candidate genes potentially related to EGFR signalling (EGFR, EGF, CCND1) or antibody-directed cell cytotoxicity (FCGR2A and FCGR3A) on outcome of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients receiving cetuximab-based therapy. Fifty-eight advanced CRC patients treated with cetuximab-irinotecan salvage therapy between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed (mean age 60; 50 PS 0-1). The following polymorphisms were analyzed on blood DNA: EGFR (CA repeats in intron 1, -216 G > T, -191C > A, R497K), EGF (A61G), CCND1 (A870G), FCGR2A (R131H), FCGR3A (F158V). Statistical analyses were conducted on the total population and on patients with wt KRas tumors. All SNPs were considered as ternary variables (wt/wt vs wt/mut vs mut/mut), with the exception of -191C > A EGFR polymorphism (AA patient merged with CA patients). Analysis of skin toxicity as a function of EGFR intron 1 polymorphism showed a tendency for higher toxicity in patients with a low number of CA-repeats (p = 0.058). CCND1 A870G polymorphism was significantly related to clinical response, both in the entire population and in KRas wt patients, with the G allele being associated with a lack of response. In wt KRas patients, time to progression (TTP) was significantly related to EGFR -191C > A polymorphism with a longer TTP in CC patients as compared to others, and to CCND1 A870G polymorphism with the G allele being associated with a shorter TTP; a multivariate analysis including these two polymorphisms only retained CCND1 polymorphism. Overall survival was significantly related to CCND1 polymorphism with a shorter survival in patients bearing the G allele, and to FCGR3A F158V polymorphism with a shorter survival in VV patients (in the entire population and in KRas wt patients). FCGR3A F158V and CCND1 A870G polymorphisms were significant independent predictors of overall survival. Present original data obtained in wt KRas patients corresponding to the current cetuximab

  11. Biochemical Bone Markers in Prostate Cancer Patients with Local and Advanced Bone Metastates

    OpenAIRE

    AKSOY, Hülya

    2001-01-01

    In the present study involving patients with bone metastases arising from prostate cancer, we measured urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD) as a marker of collagen breakdown activity, serum total and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase activities and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA). This study included 20 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and 23 patients with carcinoma, 11 of had with bone metastases. DPD excretion in urine was significantly greater in prostate cancer patients w...

  12. Antiandrogen monotherapy in patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; McLeod, David G; See, William A; Morris, Thomas; Armstrong, Jon; Wirth, Manfred P

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once-daily as immediate hormonal therapy in patients with prostate cancer or as adjuvant to radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy.......To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once-daily as immediate hormonal therapy in patients with prostate cancer or as adjuvant to radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy....

  13. How can we help family carers manage pain medicines for patients with advanced cancer? A systematic review of intervention studies

    OpenAIRE

    Latter, Susan; Hopkinson, Jane; Richardson, Alison; Hughes, James; Lowson, Elizabeth; Edwards, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Family carers play a significant role in managing pain and associated medicines for people with advanced cancer. Research indicates that carers often feel inadequately prepared for the tasks involved, which may impact on carer and patient emotional state as well as the achievement of optimal pain control. However, little is known about effective methods of supporting family carers with cancer pain medicines. Aims: To systematically identify and review studies of interventions...

  14. Psychological Distress during Ovarian Cancer Treatment: Improving Quality by Examining Patient Problems and Advanced Practice Nursing Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Cynthia Kline O'Sullivan; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Sangchoon Jeon; Elizabeth Ercolano; Ruth McCorkle

    2011-01-01

    Background/Significance. Ovarian cancer patients are prone to psychological distress. The clinical significance and best practices for distress among this population are poorly understood. Method. Secondary analysis of research records from a six month randomized control trial included 32 women with primary ovarian cancer. All received 18 advanced practice nurse (APN) visits over six months. Three sub-samples were determined by distress level (high/low) and mental health service consent for h...

  15. Experience in treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer. Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of local control and breast conservation, intraarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy has been indicated in patients with locally advanced breast cancer both in primary and recurrent cases. The present series, evaluated during the past 4 years, consisted of 15 patients 35-83 years of age, with invasive ductal carcinoma, including 10 with primary breast cancer (stage IIIb: 1, IV: 9) and 5 with postoperative recurrence (stage IIIb: 2, IV: 3). Intraarterial chemotherapy is started, basically infusing ADM 50 mg, MMC 10 mg and CDDP 50 mg into the internal thoracic and/or subclavian artery 1-3 times, followed by reduction surgery (quadrantectomy: 4, wide resection: 2) and radiotherapy to the breast, supraclavicular, parasternal and cervical regions according to tumor extent. Local response after arterial infusion was CR: 2, PR: 10, NC: 3 (response rate: 73% ). The response rate of distant metastases after arterial infusion was 73%. Of 10 patients with primary breast cancer, recurrence was noted in 1. Breast conservation was successful in 8 of 10 patients. One of them, in stage IIIb, has survived for 4.5 years with no evidence of disease and with breast conservation. Five patients with postoperative recurrence showed CR with no recurrence after intraarterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Acute skin reaction occurred in 6 patients, and was especially frequent in patients with postoperative recurrence (4 of 5). According to these results, combined therapy affords breast conservation even in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, and improves patient's QOL in stage IV. (author)

  16. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer: A pilot-observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik G Dodiya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC remains major clinical issue with regard to selection and duration of therapy since many years. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT is multimodality program, established to treat LABC. Many research tasks are ongoing to develop specific neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen with specific duration to improve long-term control of LABC. Patients and Methods: Forty-seven patients diagnosed with LABC were Included and analyzed to compare the outcomes [pathological complete response (pCR, clinical response, overall response rate (ORR, disease control rate, overall survival and progression-free survival]. These patients treated with either combination of anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy or anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Results: There was no any statistical significance with respect to demographic data treated of patients between two arms (P > 0.05. Patients underwent TAC chemotherapy had pCR 20.8% whereas FAC/FEC chemotherapy patients had pCR 13% (P = 0.48. Higher ORR was noted in TAC chemotherapy arm (75% when compared with FAC/FEC chemotherapy arm (60.9% (P = 0.29. The study also shows better disease control rate in TAC chemotherapy arm (95.8% as compared to FAC/FEC chemotherapy arm (82.6%. There was no statistical significance in overall survival (P = 0.31 and progression-free survival (P = 0.51 between two arms. Conclusion: Despite of the superiority of combination of anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy over the anthracycline-based chemotherapy in the present study, further pivotal studies should be conducted to confirm the combination of anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy as a better neoadjuvant regimen for treatment of LABC tumors.

  17. Is the addition of cisplatin to S-1 better than S-1 alone for patients with advanced gastroesophageal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajani, Jaffer A

    2008-09-01

    The investigators of the recent phase III SPIRITS trial found that the addition of cisplatin to S-1 (a fourth generation oral fluoropyrimidine) provided a significant overall survival advantage (P = 0.04) over treatment with S-1 alone among previously untreated patients with advanced gastric cancer. In addition, the combination had an acceptable safety profile. This trial establishes a new first-line standard treatment for patients with advanced gastric cancer in Japan. Level 1 evidence for prolonged survival of patients with advanced gastroesophageal cancer has been established for docetaxel (V-325 trial) and cisplatin (SPIRITS trial) but not for S-1. Fluoropyrimidines (S-1 included) have been considered part of standard front-line therapy without the establishment of level 1 evidence for prolonging survival. The future lies in the rapid incorporation of biologic agents in combination with cytotoxics, with a continued focus on safety and convenience, and efforts to individualize therapy for each patient. Individualized therapy may be defined as the selection of optimum treatment for a specific patient on the basis of knowledge of the cancer's genetic and epigenetic alterations and the patient's genotype. PMID:18628737

  18. A patient with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer achieving long-term survival with Gemcitabine chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiki Okamoto; Takashi Maeba; Keitarou Kakinoki; Keiichi Okano; Kunihiko Izuishi; Hisao Wakabayashi; Hisashi Usuki; Yasuvuki Suzuki

    2008-01-01

    A 68-year-old female visited a local clinic with epigastralgia. A routine laboratory test revealed jaundice and liver dysfunction. She was referred to this hospital. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) revealed that the density of the entire pancreas had decreased, and showed dilatation of the common bile duct (CBD) and the main pancreatic duct (MPD). Pancreatic cancer was diagnosed by cytological examination analyzing the pancreatic juice obtained by ERCP. When jaundice had decreased the tumor was observed via laparotomy. No ascites, liver metastasis, or peritoneal dissemination was observed. The entire pancreas was a hard mass, and a needle biopsy was obtained from the head, body and tail of the pancreas. These biopsies diagnosed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Hepaticojejunostomy was thus performed, and postoperative progress was good. Chemotherapy with 1000 mg/body per week of gemcitabine was administered beginning 15 d postoperatively. However, the patient suffered relatively severe side effects, and it was necessary to change the dosing schedule of gemcitabine. Abdominal CT revealed a complete response (CR) after 3 treatments. Therefore, weekly chemotherapy was stopped and was changed to monthly administration. To date, for 4 years after chemotherapy, the tumor has not reappeared.Key werds: Gemcitabine; Long-term survival; Unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer

  19. FBXW7 mutations in patients with advanced cancers: clinical and molecular characteristics and outcomes with mTOR inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis L Jardim

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: FBXW7 is a tumor suppressor gene responsible for the degradation of several proto-oncogenes. Preclinical data suggest that FBXW7 mutations sensitize cells to mTOR inhibitors. Clinicopathologic characteristics of cancer patients with FBXW7 mutations and their responses to mTOR inhibitors remain unknown. METHODS: Using multiplex gene panels we evaluated how the FBXW7 mutation affected the cancer phenotype of patients referred to a phase I clinic starting January 2012. Whenever possible patients positive for FBXW7 mutation were treated with regimens containing an mTOR inhibitors and their outcomes were reviewed. RESULTS: FBXW7 mutations were detected in 17 of 418 patients (4.0%. Among tumor types with more than 10 patients tested, FBXW7 mutations occurred in colorectal cancer (7/49; 14.3%, squamous cell cancer of head and neck (2/18; 11.1%, liver (1/13; 7.7%, and ovarian cancers (1/40; 2.5%. No one clinical, pathological or demographic feature was characteristic of the FBXW7-mutated patient population. The mutation occurred in isolation in only 2/17 (12% patients, and KRAS was frequently found as a concomitant mutation, especially in patients with colorectal cancer (6/7; 86%. Ten patients were treated on a protocol containing an mTOR inhibitor, with a median time to treatment failure of 2.8 months (range, 1.3-6.8. One patient with liver cancer (fibrolamellar subtype continues to have a prolonged stable disease for 6.8+ months. CONCLUSION: In patients with advanced cancers, somatic mutations in FBXW7 usually occur with other simultaneous molecular aberrations, which can contribute to limited therapeutic efficacy of mTOR inhibitors.

  20. Efficacy and safety of palliative chemotherapy for patients with advanced breast cancer pretreated with anthracyclines and taxanes: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, L.J.M.; Stalmeier, P.F.M.; Donders, A.R.T.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Ottevanger, P.B.

    2011-01-01

    No standard monotherapy or combination palliative chemotherapy currently exists for patients with advanced breast cancer pretreated with anthracyclines and taxanes. In this systematic review we assess the current knowledge on the efficacy and safety of palliative single-agent chemotherapy drugs--cap

  1. Open comparative trial of formestane versus megestrol acetate in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer previously treated with tamoxifen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freue, M; Kjaer, M; Boni, C; Joliver, J; Janicke, F; Willemse, PHB; Coombes, RC; Van Belle, S; Perez-Carrion, R; Zieschang, J; de Palacios, PI; Rose, C

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the trial was to compare efficacy and safety of the aromatase inhibitor formestane (250 mg i.m. given every 2 weeks) with the progestin megestrol acetate (160 mg administered orally once daily), as second-line therapy in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer previously treat

  2. A phase II study using vinorelbine and continuous 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Susanne; Serup-Hansen, Eva; Andersen, Lisbeth J;

    2007-01-01

    Seventy patients with advanced head and neck cancer were treated with vinorelbine and continuous 5-FU administered in a central venous catheter. Over all response was 36% with 9% complete responses. The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities were stomatitis (13), infection (5), pain related to vino...

  3. Influences of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for serum tumor markers, invasion and metastasis related indexes of patients with advanced breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Xi Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore and analyze the influences on neoadjuvant chemotherapy for serum tumor markers, invasion and metastasis related indexes of patients with advanced breast cancer.Methods:Patients with advanced breast cancer who had been treated in our hospital from February 2010 to February 2014 were randomly selected as research objects. They were randomly divided into control group (conventional surgical treatment group) and observation group (neoadjuant chemotherapy group). There were 32 cases of each group. Then, the changes of the different periods of serum tumor markers, invasion and metastasis related indexes in pretherapy and post-treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer in the two groups were observed.Results:The postoperative serum tumor markers, invasion and metastasis related indexes in different periods of the observation group were all lower than those of the control group, and the postoperative evaluation indexes of the two groups had significant difference. Conclusions:Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has great influences on serum tumor markers, invasion and metastasis related indexes of patients with advanced breast cancer and possesses high clinical application values.

  4. Emmprin and survivin predict response and survival following cisplatin-containing chemotherapy in patients with advanced bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Anne B; Dyrskjøt, Lars; von der Maase, Hans;

    2007-01-01

    and survival. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Affymetrix GeneChip expression profiling was carried out using tumor material from 30 patients. A set of genes with an expression highly correlated to survival time after chemotherapy was identified. Two genes were selected for validation by immunohistochemistry in...... strong independent prognostic factors for response and survival after cisplatin-containing chemotherapy in patients with advanced bladder cancer.......PURPOSE: Cisplatin-containing chemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with locally advanced and metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium. The response rate is approximately 50% and tumor-derived molecular prognostic markers are desirable for improved estimation of response...

  5. A decentralized model of palliative care for patients with advanced incurable cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Mineko Koseki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Most cancer patients in Brazil are diagnosed in the disease advanced stages; therefore, survival rates are low, meaning that there is a large patient population in need of palliative care. Palliative care models in practice are based on those provided by cancer hospitals. The main limitation to this is their local range, whereas the demand is predominantly regional. The target of this study was to test a decentralized palliative care model based on local public health services and healthcare professionals for the assistance of gynecologic and/or breast cancer patients with incurable disease in partnership with the Center for the Integral Care of Women’s Health (Centro de Atenção Integral à Saúde da Mulher of the State University of Campinas (Universidade Estadual de Campinas. This was a qualitative descriptive study which followed the directives of a research in development. It was expected that the cities adopted the resolution corresponding to the primary treatment level, having Center for the Integral Care of Women’s Health as a reference center for the conditions demanding a higher complexity level of care. The cities which demonstrated interest and accepted the proposal were: Amparo, Atibaia, Indaiatuba, Mogi-Mirim, São João da Boa Vista and São João do Rio Pardo. Strategy for implementation included prior professionals qualification and accomplishment of specifc meetings in each city to seek political and strategic support for the implementation of these activities. Since data were collected through interviews, analysis included: the raw material preparation and description; reduction in data; decodification; vertical and cross analysis. The model was operational in the cities of: Amparo, Atibaia, Indaiatuba and São José do Rio Pardo. There was an increase in resolution and a positive perception of the biopsychosocial effects regarding patients and family members from the viewpoint of health care professionals and family

  6. Comparison of postoperative complications in advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery versus surgery alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Poonam; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar; Noronha, Vanita; Chaturvedi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Head and neck cancer is the third most common cancer in India with 60% presenting in advanced stages. There is the emerging role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in the management of these advanced cancers. There is a general perception that complication rates are higher with the use of NACT. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospectively collected data of head and neck cancer patients operated at our hospital from March 2013 to September 2014. A total of 205 patients were included in the study. These patients were studied in two groups. Group 1 included 153 patients who underwent surgery alone, and Group 2 included 52 patients who received 2-3 cycles of NACT followed by surgery. Results: The mean age of the population was 51 years in the Group 1 and 45 years in Group 2. The hospital stay and readmissions in postoperative period were similar in the two groups. In this study, the complication rate was 37.9% in the surgery patients and 30.8% in the NACT patients (P = 0.424). Conclusion: The postoperative complication rates in patients who received NACT followed by surgery were not significantly different from those who underwent surgery. PMID:26811595

  7. Comparison of postoperative complications in advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery versus surgery alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Head and neck cancer is the third most common cancer in India with 60% presenting in advanced stages. There is the emerging role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT in the management of these advanced cancers. There is a general perception that complication rates are higher with the use of NACT. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospectively collected data of head and neck cancer patients operated at our hospital from March 2013 to September 2014. A total of 205 patients were included in the study. These patients were studied in two groups. Group 1 included 153 patients who underwent surgery alone, and Group 2 included 52 patients who received 2-3 cycles of NACT followed by surgery. Results: The mean age of the population was 51 years in the Group 1 and 45 years in Group 2. The hospital stay and readmissions in postoperative period were similar in the two groups. In this study, the complication rate was 37.9% in the surgery patients and 30.8% in the NACT patients (P = 0.424. Conclusion: The postoperative complication rates in patients who received NACT followed by surgery were not significantly different from those who underwent surgery.

  8. Targeting Bone Metabolism in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer: Current Options and Controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Tilman Todenhöfer; Arnulf Stenzl; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.; Rachner, Tilman D.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining bone health remains a clinical challenge in patients with prostate cancer (PC) who are at risk of developing metastatic bone disease and increased bone loss due to hormone ablation therapy. In patients with cancer-treatment induced bone loss (CTIBL), antiresorptive agents have been shown to improve bone mineral density (BMD) and to reduce the risk of fractures. For patients with bone metastases, both zoledronic acid and denosumab delay skeletal related events (SREs) in the castrat...

  9. Clinical management of regorafenib in the treatment of patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sastre, J.; Argilés, G.; M. Benavides; Feliú, J.; García-Alfonso, P.; García-Carbonero, R.; Grávalos, C.; Guillén-Ponce, C; Martínez-Villacampa, M.; Pericay, C

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide and at least 50 % of patients with this disease develop metastases. In this setting, additional treatment options are needed for patients presenting disease progression after exhausting all standard therapies. Regorafenib is an orally administered multikinase inhibitor which has been shown to provide survival benefits to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Although most adverse events (AEs) associated with regorafenib...

  10. Acute mucosal reactions in patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted a clinical study to analyze the acute reactions in the oral cavity and the oropharyngeal (OCOPH) mucosa in patients with advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing a definitive treatment consisted of 3-D conformal radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy. Twenty nine patients with HNC who were treated between February 2008 and October 2009 were included in the study. The median age was 55 years (range 29-70). The site distribution was as follows: oropharynx, 20.7%; hypopharynx, 41.4%; larynx, 37.9%. The radiation technique used for 3-D conformal radiotherapy was named 'oblique photon fields' technique. The OCOPH mucosa as a critical normal tissue was delineated in every patient. Extraction of planning target volume (PTV50) from the volume of OCOPH mucosa led to formation of an OCOPH mucosa with extracted PTV50 (OCOPHEx mucosa). Acute mucosal reactions were recorded using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system. The duration of a maximum grade of reaction was also recorded. A time intensity parameter, so-called Severity-Time Units (STU), quantifying the area under the acute reaction curve, was used to express the intensity of mucositis over time in every patient. Grade 3 acute mucosal reaction was manifested in 19 patients (65.5%). The median duration of confluent mucositis was 21 days (range 14-35). The STU less than 1000 mm2 and the STU more than 1500 mm2 was calculated in equal number of patients (9 patients, or 31.0%). Statistically significant difference in the distribution of the grade 3 reaction was found among patients with different site of the primary tumor (p = 0.003). Statistically significant difference was found between the grade of the acute mucositis and the volume of OCOPHEx mucosa, the dose in 50% of the volume of OCOPHEx (D50%, OCOPHEx) mucosa, and the mean dose to OCOPHEx mucosa (p = 0.02, p = 0.0002, p = 0.00001, respectively). The tested relation between STU and delineated volumes (PTV50 and OCOPHEx

  11. Coping with an Advanced Stage Lung Cancer Diagnosis: Patient, Caregiver, and Provider Perspectives on the Role of the Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, K M; Opoku, Samuel T; Apenteng, Bettye A; Fetrick, Ann; Ryan, June; Copur, M; Tolentino, Addison; Vaziri, Irfan; Ganti, Apar K

    2016-09-01

    Although lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the USA, there have been few studies on patient-centered advanced lung cancer treatment practices. As part of a larger research study on how to use a patient-inclusive approach in late-stage lung cancer treatment, this present study describes patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on the role of the health care system in helping patients cope with an advanced stage lung cancer diagnosis. Four focus group sessions were conducted with six to eleven participants per group for a total of 36 participants. Two focus groups were held with patients and family members/caregivers and two with physicians and nurses. A major theme that emerged concerned coping with an advanced lung cancer diagnosis, which is the subject of this paper. The patients, caregivers, and providers spoke passionately about interactions with the health care system and volunteered examples of supportive and non-supportive relationships between patients and clinicians. They advocated for better patient-provider communication practices as well as the expanded use of patient navigation and new patient orientation programs. This study contributes additional knowledge by including the perspectives of caregivers and providers who live and work closely with patients with advanced lung cancer. The findings can inform the development of comprehensive patient-centered care plans for patients living with an advanced lung cancer diagnosis. PMID:25900672

  12. 198Au grain implantation for early tongue cancer in patients of advanced age or poor performance status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy using 198Au grains is minimally invasive and the only curative treatment for early tongue cancer in patients of advanced age or poor performance status available in our institution. From March 1993 to February 2008, 198Au grains were used to treat a group of 96 Stage I–II tongue cancer patients who could not undergo surgery or brachytherapy using 192Ir pins because of an advanced age (≥75 years) or poor performance status (≥2). The patients were followed for 3.9 ± 3.3 years, and the cause-specific survival and local control rates were determined. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. The results were compared with those for a group of 193 early tongue-cancer patients who underwent treatment using iridium pins. The 5-year cause-specific survival and local control rates of the 198Au grains group were 71% and 68%, respectively, both of which were 16% lower than the corresponding rates for the 192Ir pins group. Our study demonstrated that as the last curative treatment available, 198Au grain implantation could be used to achieve moderate treatment results for early tongue cancer in patients of advanced age or poor performance status

  13. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m2/day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m2/day, 3 at 70 mg/m2/day, and 10 at 80 mg/m2/day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m2/day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m2/day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated

  14. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Elderly Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zaniboni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women and approximately 219,440 new cases of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC were estimated to occur in the USA in 2009, which caused 159,390 NSCLC-related deaths. More than 50% of cases of advanced NSCLC are diagnosed in patients older than age 65, and recent Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEERs data suggest that the median age at diagnosis is 70 years. Until recently, the disease has been undertreated in this patient population, with a perception among many clinicians that elderly patients do not tolerate chemotherapy or radiotherapy. So, single agent chemotherapy is the recommended approach by the ASCO and International Expert Panels in unselected patients. The introduction of novel targeted therapies, such as Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs which improved survival versus placebo in patients who had previously failed on chemotherapy, gives clinicians new, effective, and better tolerated options to consider when treating NSCLC in elderly patients. This paper describes the advances of EGFR TKIs for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC.

  15. Lenalidomide and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck

  16. [A Case of Complete Pathological Response in a Patient with Locally Advanced Sigmoid Colon Cancer after FOLFOX IRI Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masakazu; Okitsu, Hiroshi; Yuasa, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Yuta; Edagawa, Hiroshi; Tani, Ryotaro; Mori, Osamu; Kuramoto, Shunsuke; Tomibayashi, Atsushi; Yamashita, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    A 61-year-old man with advanced sigmoid colon cancer was admitted to our hospital. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer, with suspected invasion of the bladder and small intestine. The clinical stage of the disease was T4b, N1, M0, and Stage III a, with wild-type KRAS expression. A transverse colostomy was performed because of the presence of a bowel obstruction. The patient received 4 courses of Leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan (FOLFOXIRI). The size of the tumor and lymph nodes decreased noticeably after chemotherapy and laparoscopic high anterior resection with lymph node dissection. During this phase, the pathological stage of the disease was ypT0, N0, and Stage 0(no viable carcinoma cells, Grade 3). This result suggested that preoperative FOLFOXIRI chemotherapy is a useful regimen for the treatment of locally advanced colon cancer. PMID:26602406

  17. Prognostic factors for long term survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumtzi, Despoina; Lampaki, Sofia; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Lagoudi, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Pataka, Athanasia; Tsiouda, Theodora; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Lazaridis, George; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Timotheadou, Helen; Barbetakis, Nikolaos; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Kontakiotis, Theodoros; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents 85% of all lung cancers. It is estimated that 60% of patients with NSCLC at time of diagnosis have advanced disease. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical and demographic prognostic factors of long term survival in patients with unresectable NSCLC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed data of 1,156 patients with NSCLC stage IIIB or IV who survived more than 60 days from the time of diagnosis and treated from August 1987 until March 2013 in the Oncology Department of Pulmonary Clinic of the General Hospital Papanikolaou. Initially univariate analysis using the log-rank test was conducted and then multivariate analysis using the proportional hazards model of Cox. Also Kaplan Meier curves were used to describe the distribution of survival times of patients. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results The mean age at diagnosis was 62 years. About 11.9% of patients were women and 88.1% were male. The majority of cases were adenocarcinomas (42.2%), followed squamous (33%) and finally the large cell (6%). Unlike men, most common histological type among women was adenocarcinoma rather than squamous (63% vs. 10.9%). In univariate analysis statistically significant factors in the progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were: weight loss ≥5%, histological type, line 1 drugs, line 1 combination, line 1 cycles and radio lung. Specifically radio lung gives clear survival benefit in the PFS and OS in stage IIIB (P=0.002) and IV (Pcell carcinoma recorded the shortest OS and PFS compared with adenocarcinoma (P=0.043 and P=0.016 respectively) and squamous cell carcinoma (P=0.021 and P=0.004 respectively). In multivariate analysis the same predictors were statistically significant except for line 1 drugs. Conclusions This study confirms the increased incidence of adenocarcinoma in women than in men and the aggressiveness of large cell carcinoma. It also underlines the vitality of factors

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Elderly Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    A. Zaniboni; Meriggi, F.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women and approximately 219,440 new cases of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were estimated to occur in the USA in 2009, which caused 159,390 NSCLC-related deaths. More than 50% of cases of advanced NSCLC are diagnosed in patients older than age 65, and recent Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEERs) data suggest that the median age at diagnosis is 70 years. Until recently, the disease has been undertr...

  19. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  20. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a predictor of tumor downstaging in locally advanced rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively whether levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression can predict tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 183 patients with rectal cancer (cT3-T4 or N+) were enrolled in this study. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy consisted of 50.4 Gy of pelvic radiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin bolus intravenous chemotherapy in 94 patients or oral capecitabine and leucovorin in 89 patients. EGFR expression in pretreatment paraffin-embedded tumor biopsy specimens was assessed by immunohistochemistry. EGFR expression was determined from the intensity and extent of staining. Tumor downstaging was defined as a reduction of at least one T-stage level. Results: Tumor downstaging occurred in 97 patients (53%), and the tumors showed a pathologic complete response in 27 patients (15%). Positive EGFR expression was observed in 140 (76%) of 183 patients. EGFR expression levels were low in 113 patients (62%) and high in 70 patients (38%). On logistic regression analysis, the significant predictive factor for increased tumor downstaging was a low level of EGFR expression and preoperative chemotherapy using oral capecitabine (odds ratio, 0.437; p 0.012 vs. odds ratio, 3.235; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: A high level of EGFR expression may be a significant predictive molecular marker for decreased tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

  1. MicroRNA expression profile associated with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectal cancer accounts for approximately one third of all colorectal cancers (CRC), which belong among leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/4 and/or cN+) includes neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil) followed by radical surgical resection. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of tumors do not respond enough to the neoadjuvant treatment and these patients are at risk of relapse. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs playing significant roles in the pathogenesis of many cancers including rectal cancer. MiRNAs could present the new predictive biomarkers for rectal cancer patients. We selected 20 patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer and whose tumors were classified as most sensitive or resistant to the treatment. These two groups were compared using large-scale miRNA expression profiling. Expression levels of 8 miRNAs significantly differed between two groups. MiR-215, miR-190b and miR-29b-2* have been overexpressed in non-responders, and let-7e, miR-196b, miR-450a, miR-450b-5p and miR-99a* have shown higher expression levels in responders. Using these miRNAs 9 of 10 responders and 9 of 10 non-responders (p < 0.05) have been correctly classified. Our pilot study suggests that miRNAs are part of the mechanisms that are involved in response of rectal cancer to the chemoradiotherapy and that miRNAs may be promising predictive biomarkers for such patients. In most miRNAs we identified (miR-215, miR-99a*, miR-196b, miR-450b-5p and let-7e), the connection between their expression and radioresistance or chemoresistance to inhibitors of thymidylate synthetase was already established

  2. Preliminary Report: Vitamin D Deficiency in Advanced Cancer Patients with Symptoms of Fatigue or Anorexia

    OpenAIRE

    Dev, Rony; Del Fabbro, Egidio; Gary G. Schwartz; Hui, David; Palla, Shana L.; Gutierrez, Noah; Bruera, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of low serum vitamin D levels in cancer patients with fatigue or poor appetite and their association with symptom burden and other correctable endocrine abnormalities were investigated.

  3. Adjuvant hormone therapy in patients undergoing high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    A. I. Neimark; M. A. Tachalov; B. A. Neimark

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of using the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone leuprorelin with the Atrigel delivery system in doses of 7.5, 22.5, and 45 mg as an adjuvant regimen in high- and moderate-risk cancer patients who have received high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy.Subjects and methods. Moderate- and high-risk locally advanced prostate cancer (PC) patients treated with HIFU (n = 28) and HIFU in combination with hormone therapy during 6 months (n = ...

  4. Panitumumab and irinotecan versus irinotecan alone for patients with KRAS wild-type, fluorouracil-resistant advanced colorectal cancer (PICCOLO): a prospectively stratified randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Seymour, Matthew T; Brown, Sarah R; Middleton, Gary; Maughan, Timothy; Richman, Susan; Gwyther, Stephen; Lowe, Catherine; Seligmann, Jennifer F; Wadsley, Jonathan; Maisey, Nick; Chau, Ian; Hill, Mark; Dawson, Lesley; Falk, Stephen; O'Callaghan, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Therapeutic antibodies targeting EGFR have activity in advanced colorectal cancer, but results from clinical trials are inconsistent and the population in which most benefit is derived is uncertain. Our aim was to assess the addition of panitumumab to irinotecan in pretreated advanced colorectal cancer. Methods In this open-label, randomised trial, we enrolled patients who had advanced colorectal cancer progressing after fluoropyrimidine treatment with or without oxaliplati...

  5. PAM50 breast cancer intrinsic subtypes and effect of gemcitabine in advanced breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte Levin Tykjær; Nielsen, Torsten O; Bjerre, Karsten D;

    2014-01-01

    NanoString nCounter. Statistical analyses were prespecified as a formal prospective-retrospective clinical trial correlative study. Using time to progression (TTP) as primary endpoint, overall survival (OS) and response rate as secondary endpoints, relationships between subtypes and outcome after...... patients (31%) were classified as luminal A, 97 (36%) luminal B, 43 (16%) basal-like, and 46 (17%) as HER2-enriched. PAM50 intrinsic subtype was a significant independent prognostic factor for both TTP (p=0.014) and OS (p=0.0003). Response rate was not different by subtype, and PAM50 was not a predictor of...... TTP by treatment arm. PAM50 was however a highly significant predictor of OS following GD compared to D (pinteraction=0.0016). Patients with a basal-like subtype had a significant reduction in OS events [hazard ratio (HR)=0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.15-0.57; pinteraction=0.0006]. CONCLUSION...

  6. Neoadjuvant intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and surgery in patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal treatment of advanced maxillary sinus cancer has been challenging for several decades. Intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) for head and neck cancer has been controversial. We have analyzed the long-term outcome of neoadjuvant IAC followed by radiation therapy (RT) and surgery. Twenty-seven patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer were treated between 1989 and 2002. Five-fluorouracil (5-FU, 500 mg/m2) was infused intra-arterially, and followed by RT (total 50.4 Gy/28 fractions). A planned surgery was performed 3 to 4 weeks after completion of IAC and RT. At a median follow-up of 77 months (range, 12 to 169 months), the 5-year rates of overall survival in all patients were 63%. The 5-year rates of overall survival of stage T3/T4 patients were 70.0% and 58.8%, respectively. Seven of fourteen patients with disease recurrence had a local recurrence alone. The 5-year actuarial local control rates in patients with stage T3/T4, and in all patients were 20.0%, 32.3%, and 27.4%, respectively. Overall response rate after the completion of IAC and RT was 70.3%. During the follow-up, seven patients (25.9%) showed mild to moderate late complications. The tumor extent (i.e., the involvement of either orbit and/or base of skull) appeared to be related with local recurrence. Neoadjuvant IAC with 5-FU followed by RT and surgery may be effective to improve local tumor control in the patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer. However, local failure was still the major cause of death. Further investigations are required to determine the optimal treatment schedule, radiotherapy techniques and chemotherapy regimens.

  7. Neoadjuvant intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and surgery in patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong Kan; Lee, Ju Hye; Kim, Dong Hyun; Park, Dahl; Cho, Kyu Sup; Kim, Dong Won [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ji Ho; Roh, Hwan Jung [Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The optimal treatment of advanced maxillary sinus cancer has been challenging for several decades. Intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) for head and neck cancer has been controversial. We have analyzed the long-term outcome of neoadjuvant IAC followed by radiation therapy (RT) and surgery. Twenty-seven patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer were treated between 1989 and 2002. Five-fluorouracil (5-FU, 500 mg/m2) was infused intra-arterially, and followed by RT (total 50.4 Gy/28 fractions). A planned surgery was performed 3 to 4 weeks after completion of IAC and RT. At a median follow-up of 77 months (range, 12 to 169 months), the 5-year rates of overall survival in all patients were 63%. The 5-year rates of overall survival of stage T3/T4 patients were 70.0% and 58.8%, respectively. Seven of fourteen patients with disease recurrence had a local recurrence alone. The 5-year actuarial local control rates in patients with stage T3/T4, and in all patients were 20.0%, 32.3%, and 27.4%, respectively. Overall response rate after the completion of IAC and RT was 70.3%. During the follow-up, seven patients (25.9%) showed mild to moderate late complications. The tumor extent (i.e., the involvement of either orbit and/or base of skull) appeared to be related with local recurrence. Neoadjuvant IAC with 5-FU followed by RT and surgery may be effective to improve local tumor control in the patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer. However, local failure was still the major cause of death. Further investigations are required to determine the optimal treatment schedule, radiotherapy techniques and chemotherapy regimens.

  8. Investigation of the oral infections and manifestations seen in patients with advanced cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Lihua; Zhang, Hualin; Liu, Jinsong; CHEN, XIAOWEI

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A prospective, observational study was undertaken to investigate the epidemiology of oral infection among the patients with advanced malignancies, and to investigate the effects of therapy strategies and risk factors on the incidence of oral infection. Methods: The patients with advanced malignancies were enrolled into the study. The incidence of oral infection with different malignant tumor groups or different treatment methods and the diagnoses of oral infection were confirmed. D...

  9. Symptoms and problems in a nationally representative sample of advanced cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, A T; Groenvold, M; Pedersen, Lise;

    2009-01-01

    predictors. In total, 977 (60%) patients participated. The most frequent symptoms/problems were fatigue (57%; severe 22%) followed by reduced role function, insomnia and pain. Age, cancer stage, primary tumour, type of department, marital status and whether the patient had recently been hospitalized or not...

  10. Interval colon cancer in a Lynch syndrome patient under annual colonoscopic surveillance: a case for advanced imaging techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxentenko Amy S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome confers increased risk for various malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Colonoscopic surveillance programs have led to reduced incidence of colorectal cancer and reduced mortality from colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy every 1–2 years beginning at age 20–25, or 10 years earlier than the first diagnosis of colorectal cancer in a family, with annual colonoscopy after age 40, is the recommended management for mutation carriers. Screening programs have reduced colon cancer mortality, but interval cancers may occur. Case presentation We describe a 48-year-old woman with Lynch syndrome who was found to have an adenoma with invasive colorectal cancer within one year after a normal colonoscopy. Conclusion Our patient illustrates two current concepts about Lynch syndrome: 1 adenomas are the cancer precursor and 2 such adenomas may be “aggressive,” in the sense that the adenoma progresses more readily and more rapidly to carcinoma in this setting compared to usual colorectal adenomas. Our patient’s resected tumor invaded only into submucosa and all lymph nodes were negative; in that sense, she represents a success for annual colonoscopic surveillance. Still, this case does raise the question of whether advanced imaging techniques are advisable for surveillance colonoscopy in these high-risk patients.

  11. First-line single agent treatment with gefitinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yong-Qian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is a malignant carcinoma which has the highest morbidity and mortality in Chinese population. Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, displays anti-tumor activity. The present data regarding first-line treatment with single agent gefitinib against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in Chinese population are not sufficient. Purpose To assess the efficacy and toxicity of gefitinib in Chinese patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, a study of single agent treatment with gefitinib in Chinese patients was conducted. Methods 45 patients with advanced NSCLC were treated with gefitinib (250 mg daily until the disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Results Among the 45 patients, 15 patients achieved partial response (PR, 17 patients experienced stable disease (SD, and 13 patients developed progression disease (PD. None of the patients achieved complete response (CR. The tumor response rate and disease control rate was 33% and 71.1%, respectively. Symptom remission rate was 72.5%, and median remission time was 8 days. Median overall survival and median progression-free survival was 15.3 months and 6.0 months, respectively. The main induced toxicities by gefitinib were skin rash and diarrhea (53.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The minor induced toxicities included dehydration and pruritus of skin (26.7% and 22.2%, respectively. In addition, hepatic toxicity and oral ulceration occurred in few patients (6.7% and 4.4%2, respectively. Conclusions Single agent treatment with gefitinib is effective and well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC.

  12. Advances in lung cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Hennon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The last few years have witnessed an explosion of the use of minimally invasive techniques for the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of all stages of lung cancer. The use of these techniques has improved the risk-benefit ratio of surgery and has made it more acceptable to patients considering lung surgery. They have also facilitated the delivery of multi-modality therapy to patients with advanced lung cancer. This review article summarizes current surgical techniques that represent the "cutting edge" of thoracic surgery for lung cancer.

  13. The conjoint use of music therapy and reflexology with hospitalized advanced stage cancer patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Lucanne; Berenson, Susan

    2008-09-01

    Advanced stage cancer patients experience debilitating physical symptoms as well as profound emotional and spiritual struggles. Advanced disease is accompanied by multiple changes and losses for the patient and the family. Palliative care focuses on the relief of overall suffering of patients and families, including symptom control, psychosocial support, and the meeting of spiritual needs. Music therapy and reflexology are complementary therapies that can soothe and provide comfort. When used conjointly, they provide a multifaceted experience that can aid in the reduction of anxiety, pain, and isolation; facilitate communication between patients, family members, and staff; and provide the potential for a more peaceful dying experience for all involved. This article addresses the benefits of the combined use of music therapy and reflexology. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the application and benefits of this dual approach for patients and their families regarding adjustment to the end of life in the presence of anxiety and cognitive impairment. PMID:18662423

  14. Influence of interventional chemotherapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine on the immune function of elderly patients with advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the influence of interventional chemotherapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine on the immune function in elderly patients with advanced lung cancer and to establish a comprehensive therapeutic pattern which is effective and economical with lower side-effects. Methods: A total of 60 aged patients with lung cancer were randomly and equally divided into two groups with 30 patients in each group. Patients in group A were purely treated with traditional Chinese medicine and patients in group B were treated with a combination of interventional chemotherapy and traditional Chinese medicine. And two therapeutic courses (6-8 weeks) were conducted in both groups. The serum T-lymphocyte subsets levels of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, NK cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cell levels were estimated with flow cytometry. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: No significant difference in serum levels of T cell subsets and CD4+CD25+ Treg cell levels existed between the two groups, both before and after the treatment (P > 0.05). However, after the treatment the CD4+CD25+ Treg cell level in group B was significantly lower than that in group A (P < 0.05). The short-term effective rate and the total clinical benefit rate in group B were 40% and 73.3% respectively, which were much better than those in group A (20% and 63.3% respectively). Conclusion: Interventional chemotherapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine will not damage the immune function of elderly patients with advanced lung cancer, on the contrary, the combination therapy, through effectively reducing the suppressor T cell level,shows excellent short-term effect. It indicates that interventional chemotherapy combined with Chinese medicine is an effective comprehensive therapeutic mode for elderly patients with advanced lung cancer. (authors)

  15. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  16. Management of Advanced Laryngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Sheahan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx continues to be the commonest head and neck cancer in many Western countries. The larynx plays a key role for many essential functions, including breathing, voice production, airway protection, and swallowing. The goals of laryngeal cancer treatment are thus to provide best possible oncologic control, while optimizing functional outcomes. In recent decades, the treatment paradigm for advanced laryngeal cancer has shifted from one of primary surgery (total laryngectomy as gold standard, toward non-surgical organ-preserving treatment using radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. However, concerns have emerged regarding functional outcomes after chemoradiotherapy, as well as possible decreased overall survival in patients with laryngeal cancer. The purpose of the present review is to review surgical and non-surgical options for treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer, as well as the evidence supporting each of these.

  17. Acute esophagitis for patients with local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Yi; Brink, Carsten; Knap, Marianne;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Esophagitis is common in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy for local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship using clinical and dosimetric parameters in patients receiving intensity modulated...... radiotherapy (IMRT) and concomitant chemotherapy (CCT). METHODS: Between 2009 and 2013, 117 patients with stages IIB-IIIB NSCLC were treated in a multicenter randomized phase II trial with 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT and CCT. The esophagitis was prospectively scored using the Common...

  18. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m2/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  19. Molecular guided therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer patients with PI3K activated mutation: vision or illusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazzah A

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Anas Gazzah,1 Daniel Barrios Gonzales,1 Antonin Levy,1 Rastislav Bahleda,1 Michel Ducreux,2 Ludovic Lacroix,3 Jean Charles Soria11SITEP (Service des Innovations Therapeutiques Précoces, Department of Medicine, Institut Gustave Roussy, Paris XI University, Villejuif, France; 2Department of Medicine, Institut Gustave Roussy, Paris XI University, Villejuif, France; 3Department of Biology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Paris XI University, Villejuif, FranceAbstract: Despite a modern validated regimen of chemotherapy, advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway (PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a major signaling pathway that may be activated in advanced pancreatic cancer. To highlight the potential interest of this targetable pathway in selected advanced pancreatic cancer patients, we report herein a patient with an activated PI3K mutation who was treated in a phase I trial evaluating a treatment combination including an mTOR inhibitor.Keywords: pancreatic cancer, PI3K, targeted therapy, molecular profiling

  20. The relationship between glasgow prognostic score and serum tumor markers in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) has been reported as a powerful prognostic tool for patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between GPS and prognosis related tumor markers in patients with advanced NSCLC. We included 138 advanced NSCLC patients and twenty healthy controls in the study. GPS was calculated by combined serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin. Three serum tumor markers, which included cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 (CYFRA21–1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS), were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). GPS and tumor markers were all assessed before chemotherapy. All patients received at least 2 courses of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. After that, 2 to 5 years follow-up was conducted. Median levels of CYFRA21–1 were 1.5 ng/ml (0.1–3.1 ng/ml) in healthy controls, and 4.6 ng/ml (0.7–35.2 ng/ml) in GPS 0 advanced NSCLC, 11.2 ng/ml (0.4–89.2) ng/ml in GPS 1 advanced NSCLC, and 15.7 ng/ml (2.9–134.6 ng/ml) in GPS 2 advanced NSCLC, respectively. Median levels of CYFRA21-1 were higher in NSCLC patients than in healthy controls, and CYFRA21-1 increased gradually according to GPS category in NSCLC patients (P < 0.05). Similar results were found for median levels of CEA and TPS in healthy controls and NSCLC patients (P < 0.05). In NSCLC patients, positive correlations were found between CYFRA21-1 and GPS, CEA and GPS, TPS and GPS. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient were 0.67 (P < 0.05), 0.61 (P < 0.05) and 0.55 (P < 0.05), respectively. Survival analyses showed GPS was an independent prognostic factor for advanced NSCLC. CYFRA21-1(>3.3 ng/ml) and TPS (>80 U/l) were related with the prognosis of advanced NSCLC by univariate analyses, but multivariate analyses showed CYFRA21-1, TPS and CEA were not the independent prognostic factors for advanced NSCLC. Our results showed GPS were positive correlated

  1. Prediction of sensitivity to anticancer agents for patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer by Tc-99m sestamibi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tc-99m Sestamibi (99mTc-MIBI) is known to be a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) that effluxes the drugs out of cancer cells. The overexpression of P-gp involved in multidrug resistance phenomenon in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancers was shown in the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells. In this study, we examined the usefulness of 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy for the prediction of sensitivity to anticancer agents in 8 cases with advanced or recurrent breast cancer. The retrospective analysis showed that the sensitivity to the chemotherapy could be evaluated in 3 cases by 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy, but in the other 5 cases 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy was not eligible for the prediction of sensitivity. Two out of 3 cases showed over 50% in reduction rate of target tumors (PR) with higher accumulation of 99mTc-MIBI, while another case with PD showed lower. These results suggest that the accumulation of 99mTc-MIBI could be associated with the sensitivity to P-gp-related anticancer agents, and that the functional analysis of P-gp by 99mTc-MIBI might be useful for the prediction of responsiveness of chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. (author)

  2. A qualitative investigation of the roles and perspectives of older patients with advanced cancer and their family caregivers in managing pain in the home

    OpenAIRE

    McPherson, Christine J; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Devereaux, Alana; Lobchuk, Michelle M

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain in advanced cancer is complex and multifaceted. In older patients comorbidities and age-related functional decline add to the difficulties in managing cancer pain. The current emphasis on care in the community, and preference by patients with life-limiting disease to receive care in the home, has meant that patients and their family caregivers have become increasingly responsible for the day-to-day management of cancer pain. An appreciation of patients’ and caregivers’ roles a...

  3. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppert W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU, and at a day care center (DCC. Patients and methods: QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS, and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS scale. Results: A total of 129 patients completed the study, with 51 patients treated at home, 51 patients treated at the PCU, and 27 patients at DCC. In the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL, improvement in functional and symptom scales was observed except in physical functioning and fatigue levels; patients at DCC had a better physical functioning, global QoL, appetite, and fatigue levels. In the ESAS, improvement in all items was found except for drowsiness levels, which was stable in patients treated at DCC and deteriorated in home and PCU patients. Higher activity, better appetite and well-being, and less drowsiness were observed in patients treated at DCC. KPS was better in DCC patients compared to those treated at home and at the PCU; the latter group deteriorated. Conclusions: QoL improved in all patient groups, with better results in DCC patients and similar scores in those staying at home and at the PCU. Along with clinical assessment, baseline age, KPS, physical and emotional functioning may be considered when assigning patients to care at a DCC, PCU, or at home. Keywords: oncology, patient care

  4. Quality of life among advanced breast cancer patients with and without distant metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Wyatt, G.; Sikorskii, A.; TAMKUS, D.; You, M

    2012-01-01

    This study presents the results of a secondary analysis of data collected during a trial of reflexology that aimed to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among women with advanced breast cancer in treatment. A comparison of HRQOL (functioning, symptoms, spirituality) of those with (n = 298) and without (n = 87) distant metastasis is presented. Following the intake interview, 385 women were randomised to reflexology, lay foot manipulation or conventional care control, and were inter...

  5. Temporal tuning of daily rhythms helps advanced cancer patients and cancer survivors feel better, live better, and live longer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrushesky W

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available William Hrushesky,1–5 James F Grutsch,6 Dinah Faith Q Huff,1 Linda Tavolacci,7 Thomas Kazlausky7 1Oncology Analytics, Inc., Plantation, FL, USA; 2South Carolina College of Pharmacy, 3Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; 4Hollings Cancer Center, 5Department of Public Health Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; 6Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois School of Public Health, Chicago, IL, USA; 7Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY, USA Abstract: There is now little doubt that disrupted day/night (circadian time structures are involved in the initiation and promotion of neoplastic disease. It has been established that the incidence of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and prostate cancer is increased as a result of nocturnal exposure to light and circadian function disruption and that cancer patient survival is diminished. So the question is: what public health measures can be implemented to minimize these health hazards? In addition, untreated cancer patients experience the symptom cluster of brief, interrupted, and poor nighttime sleep; depressed mood/anxiety; daytime fatigue/lethargy; and anorexia/early satiety/diminished taste sensation – each of which is virtually pathognomonic of a disrupted circadian temporal organization. Direct measurements of patients' activities and their timing and intensity using actigraphy reveal that untreated cancer patients experience severe deterioration in the robustness (amplitude and day-to-day phase stability of their daily rest/activity rhythms – and one of the most personal and socially destructive results of such circadian disorientation is unplanned, unwanted, and avoidable temporal isolation from family, friends, and society. Thus, therapeutic manipulation of the circadian clock is a powerful tool for improving cancer patients' quality of life (QOL, making life more worth living and perhaps

  6. Clinical Effects for Patients with Recurrent Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Icotinib Hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingying NONG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Icotinib hydrochloride is the third single target EGFR-TKI used in clinical treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Clinical research reports on its efficacy and survival in patients with Recurrent Advanced NSCLC are still little.The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and survival of Icotinib hydrochloride for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who failed to previous chemotherapy and explore the association of clinical features with the efficacy and survival. Methods The clinical data of 60 NSCLC patients referred to the Beijing Chest Hospital, Capital Medical University from March 2009 to July 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Results The overall response rate (ORR was 45.0% and the disease control rate (DCR was 80.0%. The median progression-free survival (PFS time was 6.7 months. RR and PFS in female were superior to male (P=0.014, 0.013, respectively. RR, DCR in 2nd-line subgroup were superior to ≥3rd-line subgroup (P=0.020, 0.024, respectively. RR, DCR and PFS in EGFR mutation carriers were significantly superior to wild-type patients (P=0.006, <0.001, 0.002, respectively . There was no statistical difference in RR and PFS between those age <65 and ≥65 or PS<2 and PS≥2. There was no statistical difference in RR and DCR between exon 19 deletion and exon 21 mutations, while the former had much longer PFS (P=0.020. EGFR mutation and exon 19 deletion are the independent prognostic factors to significantly improve the PFS (P=0.009, 0.012, respectively. The side effects were generally mild and consisted of rash and diarrhea. Conclusion Icotinib hydrochloride is effective especially in EGFR mutation carriers and well tolerated in patients with recurrent advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

  7. Prognostic and Predictive Value of CpG Island Methylator Phenotype in Patients with Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In the present study, the prognostic significance of CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP in stage II/III sporadic colorectal cancer was evaluated using a five-gene panel. Methods. Fifty stage II/III colorectal cancer patients who received radical resection were included in this study. Promoter methylation of p14ARF, hMLH1, p16INK4a, MGMT, and MINT1 was determined by methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP. CIMP positive was defined as hypermethylation of three or more of the five genes. Impact factors on disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method (log-rank test and adjusted Cox proportional hazards model. Results. Twenty-four percent (12/50 of patients were characterized as CIMP positive. Univariate analysis showed stage III (P=0.049 and CIMP positive (P=0.014 patients who had significantly inferior DFS. In Cox regression analysis, CIMP positive epigenotype was independently related with poor DFS with HR = 2.935 and 95% CI: 1.193–7.220 (P=0.019. In patients with CIMP positive tumor, those receiving adjuvant chemotherapy had a poor DFS than those without adjuvant chemotherapy (P=0.023. Conclusions. CIMP positive was significantly correlated with decreased DFS in stage II/III colorectal cancer. Patients with CIMP positive locally advanced sporadic colorectal cancers may not benefit from 5-fluorouracil based adjuvant chemotherapy.

  8. Bicalutamide 150 mg in addition to standard care in patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer: results from the second analysis of the early prostate cancer program at median followup of 5.4 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirth, Manfred P; See, William A; McLeod, David G; Iversen, Peter; Morris, Tom; Carroll, Kevin

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of 150 mg bicalutamide daily given in addition to standard care, in patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer.......We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of 150 mg bicalutamide daily given in addition to standard care, in patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer....

  9. Bicalutamide as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to standard care of patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer: first analysis of the early prostate cancer program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, William A; Wirth, Manfred P; McLeod, David G; Iversen, Peter; Klimberg, Ira; Gleason, Donald; Chodak, Gerald; Montie, James; Tyrrell, Chris; Wallace, D M A; Delaere, Karl P J; Vaage, Sigmund; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Lukkarinen, Olavi; Persson, Bo-Eric; Carroll, Kevin; Kolvenbag, Geert J C M

    2002-01-01

    We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer.......We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer....

  10. Risk of Pathologic Upgrading or Locally Advanced Disease in Early Prostate Cancer Patients Based on Biopsy Gleason Score and PSA: A Population-Based Study of Modern Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caster, Joseph M.; Falchook, Aaron D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Hendrix, Laura H. [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Ronald C., E-mail: Ronald_chen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncologists rely on available clinical information (biopsy Gleason score and prostate-specific antigen [PSA]) to determine the optimal treatment regimen for each prostate cancer patient. Existing published nomograms correlating clinical to pathologic extent of disease were based on patients treated in the 1980s and 1990s at select academic institutions. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to examine pathologic outcomes (Gleason score and cancer stage) in early prostate cancer patients based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA concentration. Methods and Materials: This analysis included 25,858 patients whose cancer was diagnosed between 2010 and 2011, with biopsy Gleason scores of 6 to 7 and clinical stage T1 to T2 disease, who underwent radical prostatectomy. In subgroups based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA level, we report the proportion of patients with pathologically advanced disease (positive surgical margin or pT3-T4 disease) or whose Gleason score was upgraded. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with pathologic outcomes. Results: For patients with biopsy Gleason score 6 cancers, 84% of those with PSA <10 ng/mL had surgical T2 disease with negative margins; this decreased to 61% in patients with PSA of 20 to 29.9 ng/mL. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 43% (PSA: <10 ng/mL) to 61% (PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) of biopsy Gleason 6 patients. Patients with biopsy Gleason 7 cancers had a one-third (Gleason 3 + 4; PSA: <10 ng/mL) to two-thirds (Gleason 4 + 3; PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) probability of having pathologically advanced disease. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 11% to 19% of patients with biopsy Gleason 4 + 3 cancers. Multivariable analysis showed that higher PSA and older age were associated with Gleason score upgrading and pathologically advanced disease. Conclusions: This is the first population-based study to examine pathologic extent of disease and pathologic Gleason score

  11. Risk of Pathologic Upgrading or Locally Advanced Disease in Early Prostate Cancer Patients Based on Biopsy Gleason Score and PSA: A Population-Based Study of Modern Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation oncologists rely on available clinical information (biopsy Gleason score and prostate-specific antigen [PSA]) to determine the optimal treatment regimen for each prostate cancer patient. Existing published nomograms correlating clinical to pathologic extent of disease were based on patients treated in the 1980s and 1990s at select academic institutions. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to examine pathologic outcomes (Gleason score and cancer stage) in early prostate cancer patients based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA concentration. Methods and Materials: This analysis included 25,858 patients whose cancer was diagnosed between 2010 and 2011, with biopsy Gleason scores of 6 to 7 and clinical stage T1 to T2 disease, who underwent radical prostatectomy. In subgroups based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA level, we report the proportion of patients with pathologically advanced disease (positive surgical margin or pT3-T4 disease) or whose Gleason score was upgraded. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with pathologic outcomes. Results: For patients with biopsy Gleason score 6 cancers, 84% of those with PSA <10 ng/mL had surgical T2 disease with negative margins; this decreased to 61% in patients with PSA of 20 to 29.9 ng/mL. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 43% (PSA: <10 ng/mL) to 61% (PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) of biopsy Gleason 6 patients. Patients with biopsy Gleason 7 cancers had a one-third (Gleason 3 + 4; PSA: <10 ng/mL) to two-thirds (Gleason 4 + 3; PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) probability of having pathologically advanced disease. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 11% to 19% of patients with biopsy Gleason 4 + 3 cancers. Multivariable analysis showed that higher PSA and older age were associated with Gleason score upgrading and pathologically advanced disease. Conclusions: This is the first population-based study to examine pathologic extent of disease and pathologic Gleason score

  12. Phase II trial of erlotinib and bevacizumab in patients with advanced upper gastrointestinal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrberg, Kristoffer S; Olesen, René K; Pfeiffer, Per;

    2012-01-01

    Patients with upper gastrointestinal cancers have a poor prognosis and only few treatment options. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are valid targets in many solid tumours, and they have synergistic effects in preclinical studies....

  13. Advanced lung cancer patients' experience with continuity of care and supportive care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Amna; Barbera, Lisa; Howell, Doris; Moineddin, Rahim; Bezjak, Andrea; Sussman, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    As cancer care becomes increasingly complex, the ability to coordinate this care is more difficult for health care providers, patients and their caregivers alike. Despite the widely recognized need for improving continuity and coordination of care, the relationship of continuity of care with patient outcomes has yet to be elucidated. Our study's main finding is that the Continuity and Coordination subscale of the widely used Picker System of Ambulatory Cancer Care Survey is able to distinguish between lung cancer patients with unmet supportive care needs and those without. Specifically, this study shows a new association between this widely implemented continuity and coordination survey and the 'psychological needs' domain, as well as the 'health system and information' domains of supportive care needs. The finding provides support for the idea that interventions to improve continuity may impact tangible indicators of patient care such as supportive care needs being met. The study focuses attention on continuity of care as an important aspect of optimizing outcomes in cancer care. PMID:23274923

  14. A Dose Escalation and Pharmacodynamic Study of Triapine and Radiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreas Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ludmila Katherine [Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Grecula, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Jia, Guang [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Wei Lai [Center for Biostatistics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Yang Xiangyu [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Otterson, Gregory A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Wu Xin; Harper, Erica; Kefauver, Cheryl [Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Zhou Bingsen; Yen Yun [City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California (United States); Bloomston, Mark [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Knopp, Michael [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Ivy, S. Percy [Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Grever, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Bekaii-Saab, Tanios, E-mail: Tanios.Saab@osumc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Triapine, a novel inhibitor of the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RR), is a potent radiosensitizer. This phase 1 study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, assessed the safety and tolerability of triapine in combination with radiation (RT) in patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer (LAPCA). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 3 dosage levels of triapine (24 mg/m{sup 2}, 48 mg/m{sup 2}, 72 mg/m{sup 2}) administered with 50.4 Gy of RT in 28 fractions. Patients with LAPCA received triapine thrice weekly, every other week during the course of RT. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was assessed during RT and for 4 weeks after its completion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and serum RR levels were evaluated as potential predictors for early response. Results: Twelve patients were treated. Four patients (1 nonevaluable) were enrolled at dosage level 1 (DL1), 3 patients at DL2, and 5 patients (2 nonevaluable) at DL3. No DLTs were observed, and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Two patients (17%) achieved partial response, and 6 patients (50%) had stable disease. One patient underwent R0 resection after therapy. Ninety-two percent of patients (100% at DL3) experienced freedom from local tumor progression. In 75% of patients who eventually experienced progression, metastases developed without local progression. RR levels did not seem to predict outcome. In 4 patients with available data, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may predict early response or resistance to therapy. Conclusion: The combination of triapine at 72 mg/m{sup 2} 3 times weekly every other week and standard RT is tolerable with interesting activity in patients with LAPCA.

  15. Role of Barium Esophagography in Patients with Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Evaluation of Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective study examined the usefulness of barium esophagography, focusing on the luminal stenosis, in the response evaluation of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) in patients with esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods. Thirty-four patients with primary advanced esophageal cancer (≥T2) who were treated with NACRT before surgical resection were analyzed. All patients underwent barium esophagography before and after NACRT. The tumor length, volume, and percent esophageal stenosis (PES) before and after NACRT were measured. These values and their changes were compared between histopathologic responders (Ρ=22) and nonresponders ( Ρ=12). Results. Posttreatment tumor length and PES in responders (4.5 cm ± 1.1 and 33.0% ± 18.5) were significantly smaller than those in nonresponders (5.8 cm±1.9 and 48.0% ±12.9) ( Ρ=0.018). Regarding post therapeutic changes, the decrease in Pes in responders (31.5% ± 13.9) was significantly greater than that in nonresponders (14.4% ± 10.7) ( Ρ < 0 . 0 0 1 ). The best decrease in PES cutoff with which to differentiate between responders and nonresponders was 18.8%, which yielded a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 75%. Conclusions. Decrease in PES is a good parameter to differentiate responders from nonresponders for NACRT. Barium esophagography is useful in response evaluation to NACRT in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer.

  16. Phase I study of intermittent and chronomodulated oral therapy with capecitabine in patients with advanced and/or metastatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of capecitabine and gemcitabine at Fixed Dose Rate (FDR) has been demonstrated to be well tolerated, with apparent efficacy in patients with advanced cancers. FDR gemcitabine infusion leads to enhanced intracellular accumulation of drug and possible augmented clinical effect. The goals of this phase I study were to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of chronomodulated capecitabine in patients with advanced cancer and to describe the dose-limiting toxicities (DLT), the safety profile of this way of administration. Patients with advanced solid tumours who had failed to response to standard therapy or for whom no standard therapy was available were elegible for this study. Capecitabine was administered orally according to following schedule: 1/4 of dose at 8:00 a.m.; 1/4 of dose at 6:00 p.m. and 1/2 of dose at 11:00 p.m. each day for 14 consecutive days, followed by a 7-day rest period. All 27 patients enrolled onto the study were assessable for toxicity. The most common toxicities during the first two cycles of chemotherapy were fatigue, diarrhoea and hand foot syndrome (HFS). Only one out of the nine patients treated at capecitabine dose of 2,750 mg/m2 met protocol-specified DLT criteria (fatigue grade 4). However, at these doses the majority of cycles of therapy were delivered without dose reduction or delay. No other episodes of DLT were observed at the same dose steps and at the lower dose steps of capecitabine (1,500/1,750/2,000/2,250/2,500 mg/m2). The dose of 2,750 mg/m2 is recommended for further study. Tumor responses were observed in patients with metastatic breast and colorectal cancer. High doses of chronomodulated capecitabine can be administered with acceptable toxicity. The evidence of antitumor activity deserves further investigation in phase II combination chemotherapy studies

  17. A phase-I study of intravenous bryostatin-1 in patients with advanced cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Prendiville, J.; Crowther, D; Thatcher, N.; Woll, P. J.; Fox, B. W.; McGown, A.; Testa, N.; Stern, P.; McDermott, R.; Potter, M; Pettit, G R

    1993-01-01

    Bryostatin 1 is a novel antitumour agent derived from Bugula neritina of the marine phylum Ectoprocta. Nineteen patients with advanced solid tumours were entered into a phase I study to evaluate the toxicity and biological effects of bryostatin 1. Bryostatin 1 was given as a one hour intravenous infusion at the beginning of each 2 week treatment cycle. A maximum of three treatment cycles were given. Doses were escalated in steps from 5 to 65 jig m-2 in successive patient groups. T...

  18. End-of-life costs of medical care for advanced stage cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cancer, one of the leading causes of mortality in the world, imposes a substantial economic burden on each society, including Serbia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the major cancer cost drivers in Serbia. Methods. A retrospective, indepth, bottom-up analysis of two combined databases was performed in order to quantify relevant costs. End-of-life data were obtained from patients with cancer, who deceased within the first year of the established diagnose, including basic demographics, diagnosis, tumour histology, medical resource use and related costs, time and cause of death. All costs were allocated to one of the three categories of cancer health care services: primary care (included home care, hospital outpatient and hospital inpatient care. Results. Exactly 114 patients were analyzed, out of whom a high percent (48.25% had distant metastases at the moment of establishing the diagnosis. Malignant neoplasms of respiratory and intrathoracic organs were leading causes of morbidity. The average costs per patient were significantly different according to the diagnosis, with the highest (13,114.10 EUR and the lowest (4.00 EUR ones observed in the breast cancer and melanoma, respectively. The greatest impact on total costs was observed concerning pharmaceuticals, with 42% of share (monoclonal antibodies amounted to 34% of all medicines and 14% of total costs, followed by oncology medical care (21%, radiation therapy and interventional radiology (11%, surgery (9%, imaging diagnostics (9% and laboratory costs (8%. Conclusion. Cancer treatment incurs high costs, especially for end-of-life pharmaceutical expenses, ensued from medical personnel tendency to improve such patients’ quality of life in spite of nearing the end of life. Reimbursement policy on monoclonal antibodies, in particular at end-stage disease, should rely on cost-effectiveness evidence as well as documented clinical efficiency. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke

  19. Randomized study of gefitinib versus pemetrexed as maintenance treatment in patients with advanced glandular non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yan-Hua; Mei, Jing-Song; Zhou, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Gefitinib was compared with pemetrexed as maintenance therapy in Patients with Advanced Glandular Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, mainly regarding clinical effect and side effect. A randomized trial of pemetrexed as study group (500 mg/m2, dl) versus gefitinib as the control group [250 mg on night 1, 250 mg on morning 2 (every day)] was conducted in 188 patients, 94 cases in each group with a therapy cycle of 21 days. In addition, the study group was also treated with folic acid, vitB12 and dexam...

  20. Platelet number and interleukin-6 correlate with VEGF but not with bFGF serum levels of advanced cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado, R.; Vermeulen, P B; Benoy, I; Weytjens, R; Huget, P; Van Marck, E; Dirix, L Y

    1999-01-01

    We have compared the platelet number and the serum concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in 80 blood samples of 50 patients with advanced cancer. We have also measured the mitogenic effect of patient sera on endothelial cells in vitro in order to estimate the biological activity of serum VEGF. Serum VEGF concentration correlated with platelet number (r = 0.61; P < 10−4). Serum IL-6 levels correlated with plat...

  1. Radiotherapy and hyperthermia for treatment of primary locally advanced cervix cancer: results in 378 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franckena, M.; Lutgens, L.C.; Koper, P.C.; Kleynen, C.E.; Steen-Banasik, E.M. van der; Jobsen, J.J.; Leer, J.W.H.; Creutzberg, C.L.; Dielwart, M.F.; Norden, Y. Van; Canters, R.A.; Rhoon, G.C. van; Zee, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report response rate, pelvic tumor control, survival, and late toxicity after treatment with combined radiotherapy and hyperthermia (RHT) for patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (LACC) and compare the results with other published series. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1996 to

  2. Tolerability, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of bicalutamide 300 mg, 450 mg or 600 mg as monotherapy for patients with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer, compared with castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, Chris J; Iversen, Peter; Tammela, Teuvo; Anderson, John; Björk, Thomas; Kaisary, Amir V; Morris, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetics, tolerability and effect on endocrinology of bicalutamide given as once-daily monotherapy at doses of >150 mg to patients with locally advanced (M0) or metastatic (M1) prostate cancer, with efficacy as a secondary endpoint.......To evaluate the pharmacokinetics, tolerability and effect on endocrinology of bicalutamide given as once-daily monotherapy at doses of >150 mg to patients with locally advanced (M0) or metastatic (M1) prostate cancer, with efficacy as a secondary endpoint....

  3. Prevention of doxorubicin-induced alopecia by scalp cooling in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, J E; Hunt, J. M.; Smith, I E

    1981-01-01

    Scalp cooling with gel packs was used to try to prevent alopecia in 31 patients being treated with doxorubicin (Adriamycin), 29 for advanced breast carcinoma and two for carcinoid tumour. Twenty-eight of the 31 patients tolerated the procedure well, and 22 of these had either no hair loss or only slight loss which remained acceptable and did not require a wig. The main factor limiting success was biochemical impairment of liver function, which occurred in nine patients; of these, six had seve...

  4. Integrated peripheral boost in preoperative radiotherapy for the locally most advanced non-resectable rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: Few studies have explored the potential clinical advantages of dose escalation and integrated boosts for patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer. The possibility of escalating dose to non-resectable regions in these patients was the aim of this study. Patients and methods: Seven patients with locally very advanced rectal tumours (sacrum overgrowth or growth into pelvic side walls) were evaluated. Intensity modulated photon and pencil beam scanning proton plans with simultaneously integrated boosts (45 Gy to elective lymph nodes, 50 Gy to tumour and 62.5 Gy to boost area in 25 fractions) were compared. Results: Target coverage was achieved with both photon and proton plans. Estimated risks of acute side effects put the two patients with the largest tumours at unacceptable risk for intestinal toxicity, regardless of modality. The remaining five patients had beneficial sparing of dose to the small intestine with protons. Conclusions: Adding boost to areas where rectal tumours infiltrate adjacent non-resectable organs is an attractive option which appears possible using both photon and proton irradiation. Proton plans reduced dose to organs at risk. Integrated peripheral boosts should be considered more frequently in these very advanced tumours

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a prognostic factor in locally advanced rectal-cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We investigated the prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in pretreatment biopsy specimens from patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment biopsy specimens from 92 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were examined for EGFR expression by immunohistochemistry. EGFR expression was assessed by immunoreactive score (IRS). The prognostic value of EGFR expression was evaluated according to the level of EGFR expression. Results: Epidermal growth factor receptor expression was positive in 65 patients (71%). EGFR expression levels were low (IRS 0 to 5) in 83 patients (90%) and high (IRS 6 to 7) in 9 patients (10%). A high level of EGFR expression was statistically significant for shorter overall survival (p = 0.013), disease-free survival (p = 0.002), and distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.003), as compared with a low level of expression in univariate analysis. Grouping based on positive or negative EGFR expression did not represent prognostic significance for survival. In multivariate analysis, high EGFR expression was an independent prognostic factor for decreased disease-free survival (relative risk 2.4, p = 0.041) and distant metastasis-free survival (relative risk 2.6, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results suggest that high level of EGFR expression in a pretreatment biopsy specimen may be a significant adverse prognostic factor for disease-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival

  6. Lessons learned from the application of whole-genome analysis to the treatment of patients with advanced cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Janessa; Jones, Steven; Aparicio, Samuel; Chia, Stephen; Ch'ng, Carolyn; Deyell, Rebecca; Eirew, Peter; Fok, Alexandra; Gelmon, Karen; Ho, Cheryl; Huntsman, David; Jones, Martin; Kasaian, Katayoon; Karsan, Aly; Leelakumari, Sreeja; Li, Yvonne; Lim, Howard; Ma, Yussanne; Mar, Colin; Martin, Monty; Moore, Richard; Mungall, Andrew; Mungall, Karen; Pleasance, Erin; Rassekh, S. Rod; Renouf, Daniel; Shen, Yaoqing; Schein, Jacqueline; Schrader, Kasmintan; Sun, Sophie; Tinker, Anna; Zhao, Eric; Yip, Stephen; Marra, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the success of targeted agents in specific populations it is expected that some degree of molecular biomarker testing will become standard of care for many, if not all, cancers. To facilitate this, cancer centers worldwide are experimenting with targeted “panel” sequencing of selected mutations. Recent advances in genomic technology enable the generation of genome-scale data sets for individual patients. Recognizing the risk, inherent in panel sequencing, of failing to detect meaningful somatic alterations, we sought to establish processes to integrate data from whole-genome analysis (WGA) into routine cancer care. Between June 2012 and August 2014, 100 adult patients with incurable cancers consented to participate in the Personalized OncoGenomics (POG) study. Fresh tumor and blood samples were obtained and used for whole-genome and RNA sequencing. Computational approaches were used to identify candidate driver mutations, genes, and pathways. Diagnostic and drug information were then sought based on these candidate “drivers.” Reports were generated and discussed weekly in a multidisciplinary team setting. Other multidisciplinary working groups were assembled to establish guidelines on the interpretation, communication, and integration of individual genomic findings into patient care. Of 78 patients for whom WGA was possible, results were considered actionable in 55 cases. In 23 of these 55 cases, the patients received treatments motivated by WGA. Our experience indicates that a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and scientists can implement a paradigm in which WGA is integrated into the care of late stage cancer patients to inform systemic therapy decisions. PMID:27148575

  7. Sunitinib Malate and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Kidney Cancer or Advanced Solid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Influence of Physician and Patient Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the impact of patient age, comorbidity, and physician factors on treatment recommendations for locally advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We surveyed radiation oncologists regarding their recommendations for treatment (chemoradiation, radiation alone, chemotherapy alone, or no therapy) for hypothetical patients with Stage IIIB NSCLC who varied by age (55 vs. 80 years) and comorbid illness (none, moderate, or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the impact of physician and practice characteristics on radiation oncologists' treatment recommendations for three scenarios with the least agreement. Results: Of 214 radiation oncologists, nearly all (99%) recommended chemoradiation for a healthy 55 year old. However, there was substantial variability in recommendations for a 55 year old with severe COPD, an 80-year-old with moderate COPD, and an 80-year-old with severe COPD. Physicians seeing a lower volume of lung cancer patients were statistically less likely to recommend radiotherapy for younger or older patients with severe COPD (both p < 0.05), but the impact was modest. Conclusions: Nearly all radiation oncologists report following the evidence-based recommendation of chemoradiation for young, otherwise healthy patients with locally advanced, unresectable NSCLC, but there is substantial variability in treatment recommendations for older or sicker patients, probably related to the lack of clinical trial data for such patients. The physician and practice characteristics we examined only weakly affected treatment recommendations. Additional clinical trial data are necessary to guide recommendations for treatment of elderly patients and patients with poor pulmonary function to optimize their management.

  9. Serum levels of HMGB1, survivin, and VEGF in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer during chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesława Nilklińska

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several reports have suggested that HMGB1 (the high-mobility group box-1 plays a key role in tumor angiogenesis through multiple mechanisms, including up-regulation of proangiogenic factors. This study was conducted to investigate the prognostic role and the effects of chemotherapy on serum (ELISA angiogenic factors: HMGB1, survivin and VEGF (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The study entered 40 patients (31 man and 15 healthy volunteers (control group. Peripheral blood samples were taken before and after four cycles of chemotherapy. The mean serum HMGB1 and VEGF levels were significantly higher in patients with advanced NSCLC than in controls (p=0.024, p=0.028, respectively. The levels of survivin in NSCLC patients were comparable to controls. No correlation was found between HMGB1, survivin and VEGF concentrations and the histological type and staging of lung cancer. Similarly, no correlation was revealed between the concentrations of HMGB1, survivin and VEGF and the effect of chemotherapy. However, in patients with NSCLC, HMGB1 positevely correlated with survivin (R=0.814, p=0.007 before chemotherapy, and negatively with VEGF (R=-0.841, p=0.035 after chemotherapy. When the cut-off values of serum HMGB1, survivin and VEGF (2.38 ng/ml, 81.92 pg/ml, 443.26 pg/ml, respectively were used, the prognoses of high and low groups were not different. Concluding, patients with NSCLC have a higher serum concentration of HMGB1 and VEGF, while survivin levels are comparable to healthy individuals. In our opinion, determination of HMGB1, survivin and VEGF concentrations has no clinical significance in the prognosis of the survival time in lung cancer.

  10. Validity, reliability and responsiveness to change of the Italian palliative care outcome scale:A multicenter study of advanced cancer patients Cancer palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    COSTANTINI, MASSIMO; Rabitti, Elisa; Beccaro, Monica; Fusco, Flavio; Peruselli, Carlo; La Ciura, Pietro; Valle, Alessandro; Suriani, Cinzia; Berardi, Maria Alejandra; Valenti, Danila; Mosso, Felicita; Morino, Piero; Zaninetta, Giovanni; Tubere, Giorgio; Piazza, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an increasing requirement to assess outcomes, but few measures have been tested for advanced medical illness. We aimed to test the validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Palliative care Outcome Scale (POS), and to analyse predictors of change after the transition to palliative care. Methods Phase 1: multicentre, mixed method study comprising cognitive and qualitative interviews with patients and staff, cultural refinement and adaption. Phase 2: consecutive cancer ...

  11. The effect of external beam radiotherapy volume on locoregional control in patients with locoregionally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated outcomes of patients treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for locoregionally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer and analyzed the effect of EBRT volume on locoregional control. This study included 23 patients with locoregionally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer who were treated with EBRT. Two different EBRT target volumes were executed as follows: 1) limited field (LF, n = 11) included the primary (involved lobe) or recurrent tumor bed and the positive nodal area; 2) elective field (EF, n = 12) included the primary (involved lobe) or recurrent tumor bed and the regional nodal areas in the cervical neck and upper mediastinum. Clinical parameters, such as gender, age, histologic type, recurrence, stage, thyroglobulin level, postoperative residuum, radioiodine treatment, and EBRT volume were analyzed to identify prognostic factors associated with locoregional control. There were no significant differences in the clinical parameter distributions between the LF and EF groups. In the LF group, six (55%) patients developed locoregional recurrence and three (27%) developed distant metastasis. In the EF group, one (8%) patient developed locoregional recurrence and one (8%) developed a distant metastasis. There was a significant difference in locoregional control rate at 5 years in the LF and EF groups (40% vs. 89%, p = 0.041). There were no significant differences in incidences of acute and late toxicities between two groups (p >0.05). EBRT with EF provided significantly better locoregional control than that of LF; however, further larger scaled studies are warranted

  12. Quality of life of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer: anterior rectal resection with colorectal anastomosis versus abdominoperineal excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Gabriela Aniţei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite advances in neoadjuvant treatment, rectal resection remains the gold-standard treatment for rectal cancer. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of anal sphincter preservation and to compare the quality of life in terms of functional outcome in long term survivors who underwent low (or ultra low anterior resection with total mesorectal excision to patients with abdominoperineal excision for locally advanced rectal cancer with neoadjuvant therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 319 patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer from 2006 to 2011. Quality of life in 69 eligible patients with preoperative treatment and rectal resection with total mesorectal excision was assessed using the EORTC QLQ C 30 and EORTC QLQ CR29 questionnaires. We evaluated the overall status of quality of life and functional status of these patients symptoms scale. High score for functional scores shows better function whereas high symptom score shows more problems. Results were compared for patients with anal sphincter preservation (SP, 20 patients versus abdominoperineal excision (APE, 49 patients using t-Student test for independent samples. RESULTS: The median follow up in 69 patients was 32 months (range 11-74 months, 32±2,3SD. Quality of life for our group is significantly higher than the reference EORTC population (P < 0.001. Physical functioning (P = 0.050, cognitive functioning (P = 0.039, emotional functioning (P = 0.006, physical and social functioning (P = 0.005, constipation (P = 0.018, body image (P = 0.003, abdominal pain (P = 0.004, embarrassment (P = 0.003 were significantly better for patients with SP. There was no significant differences in the general symptoms of the radiochemotherapy treatment (mouth dryness, hair loss, flavor. Most of the symptom scales like sexual interest, impotence, dyspareunia, diarrhoea did not differ. APE patients suffered more from anxiety (P = 0

  13. Metallic stents provide better QOL than plastic stents in patients with stricture of unresectable advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the utility and safety of treatment with esophageal stents (plastic and metallic stents) for unresectable advanced esophageal cancer. Between 1992 and 2002, 14 cases of unresectable advanced esophageal cancer were treated with esophageal stents (the plastic stent group, 7 cases; and the metallic stent group, 7 cases). Of these, 10 cases had a history of chemotherapy and or radiotherapy. An improvement in oral intake and performance status (PS), survival time, periods at home, and adverse events were compared between the two groups. After stenting, oral intake and PS were significantly improved in the metallic stent group. Follow-up at home was possible in 71.4%. There was no significant difference in survival or duration of time at home between the two groups. All adverse events were controllable and there was no difference between the two groups. Stenting not only improved oral intake and PS but also allowed a stay at home, resulting in a marked improvement in patients' quality of life (QOL). Stenting was performed safely even in cases with a history of radiotherapy. There was no difference in survival, ratios of staying at home, and safety between the two groups, but QOL was significantly improved in the metallic stent group. These outcomes indicate that placement of metallic stents should be actively considered to treat stricture due to advanced esophageal cancer. (author)

  14. Chemotherapy combined with target drugs in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis based on Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q H Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal carcinoma is one of most diagnosed solid malignant carcinoma. The chemotherapy combined with target drugs in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer in not conclusive. Methods: The clinical studies reporting the activity and adverse events between chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy combined with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor drugs were screened in the databases of Medline, the Cochrane Library, Wanfang and CNKI and included in this meta-analysis. The risk ratio (RR and its 95% confidence interval (CI for treatment response and adverse events were pooled by random or fixed effect model. Results: A total of 10 clinical studies reporting chemotherapy combined with the target in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer were included in this study. The pooled RR was 3.26 (95% CI: 1.74-6.11, P 0.05, liver function damage (RR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.74-1.42, myelosuppression (RR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.83-1.31 and neurotoxicity (RR = 1.12, 95% CI: 0.93-1.35 were not different between the two groups. Conclusion: For Chinese patients with advanced colorectal cancer, chemotherapy combined with target drug can improve the response rate, but also increase the risk of nausea and vomiting.

  15. A phase II randomized trial comparing radiotherapy with concurrent weekly cisplatin or weekly paclitaxel in patients with advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a prospective comparison of weekly cisplatin to weekly paclitaxel as concurrent chemotherapy with standard radiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Between May 2000 and May 2004, 31 women with FIGO stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer or with postsurgical pelvic recurrence were enrolled into this phase II study and randomized to receive on a weekly basis either 40 mg/m2 Cisplatin (group I; 16 patients) or 50 mg/m2 paclitaxel (group II; 15 patients) concurrently with radiotherapy. Median total dose to point A was 74 Gy (range: 66-92 Gy) for group I and 66 Gy (range: 40-98 Gy) for group II. Median follow-up time was 46 months. Patient and tumor characteristics were similar in both groups. The mean number of chemotherapy cycles was also comparable with 87% and 80% of patients receiving at least 4 doses in groups I and II, respectively. Seven patients (44%) of group I and 8 patients (53%) of group II developed tumor recurrence. The Median Survival time was not reached for Group I and 53 months for group II. The proportion of patients surviving at 2 and 5 years was 78% and 54% for group I and 73% and 43% for group II respectively. This small prospective study shows that weekly paclitaxel does not provide any clinical advantage over weekly cisplatin for concurrent chemoradiation for advanced carcinoma of the cervix

  16. Pilot study of a novel combination of two therapeutic vaccines in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Zaima Mazorra; Ramos, Tania Crombet

    2014-07-01

    Cancer vaccines contain tumor antigens in a pro-inflammatory context with the purpose to generate potent antitumor immune responses. However, tumor cells develop different immunosuppressive mechanisms that limit the effectiveness of an anticancer immune response. Therefore, therapeutic vaccine treatment alone is usually not sufficient to generate tumor regression or survival improvement, especially in the advanced disease scenario in which most clinical studies have been conducted. Combining cancer vaccines with different anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and other immunotherapeutic agents has had different levels of success. However, the combination of cancer vaccines with different mechanisms of action has not been explored in clinical trials. To address this issue, the current review summarizes the main clinical and immunological results obtained with two different therapeutic vaccines used in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients, inducing an immune response against epidermal growth factor (CIMAvax-EGF) and NGcGM3 ganglioside (racotumomab). We also discuss preliminary findings obtained in a trial of combination of these two vaccines and future challenges with these therapies. PMID:24777612

  17. A phase I study of intravenous bryostatin 1 in patients with advanced cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Prendiville, J.; Crowther, D; Thatcher, N.; Woll, P. J.; Fox, B. W.; McGown, A.; Testa, N.; Stern, P.; McDermott, R.; Potter, M

    1993-01-01

    Bryostatin 1 is a novel antitumour agent derived from Bugula neritina of the marine phylum Ectoprocta. Nineteen patients with advanced solid tumours were entered into a phase I study to evaluate the toxicity and biological effects of bryostatin 1. Bryostatin 1 was given as a one hour intravenous infusion at the beginning of each 2 week treatment cycle. A maximum of three treatment cycles were given. Doses were escalated in steps from 5 to 65 micrograms m-2 in successive patient groups. The ma...

  18. Efficacy of prophylactic anti-diarrhoeal treatment in patients receiving Campto for advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffour, J; Gourgou, S; Seitz, J F; Senesse, P; Boutet, O; Castera, D; Kramar, A; Ychou, M

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of combined prophylactic and curative anti-diarrhoeal medication in advanced colorectal patients treated by irinotecan. Thirty-four pre-treated eligible patients were evaluated. There were 44% women, the median age was 65 and 38% of the patients had a 0 performance status. The patients received sucralfate(4g/d) and nifuroxazide(600 mg/d) prophylactic treatment on days 0-7. In the case of severe diarrhoea, preventive treatment was replaced by loperamide(12 mg/d) and diosmectite (9 g/d). Grade 3 delayed diarrhoea occurred in 18% of patients (90% CI: [9.5-28.9]) and 4.6% of cycles. No grade 4 delayed diarrhoea was observed. Twenty-nine patients (85%) received the preventive treatment at cycle 1, while 14% (90% CI: [6.2-25.7]) experienced grade 3 delayed diarrhoea in 3.7% of cycles for a median 4.5 days. The objective response rate was 8% (90% CI [1.4-23.1]) among the 25 assessable patients. Preventive combined treatment is effective in reducing the incidence of severe delayed diarrhoea, and it should be proposed to patients treated with mono-therapy Campto(r) and evaluated in poly-chemotherapy protocols. PMID:12552984

  19. Systemic capillary leak syndrome in a patient receiving adjuvant oxaliplatin for locally advanced colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brandon J; Peterson, Lindsay L

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in the USA each year. Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapy agent, is part of the standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen FOLFOX (oxaliplatin with 5-fluorouracil [5-FU] and leucovorin [LV]) for the treatment of stage III and some high-risk stage II colorectal cancers. Although oxaliplatin is generally well tolerated, certain side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and peripheral neuropathy are common. We report a case of oxaliplatin-induced capillary-leak syndrome in a 63-year-old man undergoing his 12th and final cycle of FOLFOX for stage III colorectal cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first case of systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) reported in association with oxaliplatin. Currently, there is no prevention for SCLS. Documenting future cases of SCLS attributed to oxaliplatin is vital, as SCLS is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and no standard treatments beyond supportive care measures exist. Early recognition and diagnosis are therefore essential to improving patient outcomes. PMID:26071595

  20. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models. PMID:27011048

  1. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results: Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n=28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01-3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%-30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%-5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0-65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03-3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions: Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  2. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuaron, John J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chon, Brian; Tsai, Henry; Goenka, Anuj; DeBlois, David [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hug, Eugen [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Cahlon, Oren, E-mail: cahlono@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results: Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n=28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01-3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%-30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%-5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0-65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03-3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions: Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  3. The use of complementary and alternative medicines among patients with locally advanced breast cancer – a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakovitch Eileen

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is common among cancer patients. This paper reviews the use of CAM in a series of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC. Methods Women with LABC attending a specialist clinic at a single Canadian cancer centre were identified and approached. Participants completed a self-administered survey regarding CAM usage, beliefs associated with CAM usage, views of their risks of developing recurrent cancer and of dying of breast cancer. Responses were scored and compared between CAM users and non-users. Results Thirty-six patients were approached, 32 completed the questionnaire (response rate 89%. Forty-seven percent of LABC patients were identified as CAM users. CAM users were more likely to be younger, married, in a higher socioeconomic class and of Asian ethnicity than non-users. CAM users were likely to use multiple modalities simultaneously (median 4 with vitamins being the most popular (60%. Motivation for CAM therapy was described as, "assisting their body to heal" (75%, to 'boost the immune system' (56% and to "give a feeling of control with respect to their treatment" (56%. CAM therapy was used concurrently with conventional treatment in 88% of cases, however, 12% of patients felt that CAM could replace their conventional therapy. Psychological evaluation suggests CAM users perceived their risk of dying of breast cancer was similar to that of the non-Cam group (33% vs. 35%, however the CAM group had less severe anxiety and depression. Conclusion The motivation, objectives and benefits of CAM therapy in a selected population of women with LABC are similar to those reported for women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. CAM users display less anxiety and depression and are less likely to believe they will die of their breast cancer. However the actual benefit to overall and disease free survival has yet to be demonstrated, as well as the possible interactions with

  4. Benefits of intra-operative systemic chemotherapy during curative surgery in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-bin; YU Jian-chun; MA Zhi-qiang; KANG Wei-ming; ZHOU Li; YE Xin

    2013-01-01

    Background There is little information on the impact of intra-operative systemic chemotherapy on gastric cancer.The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer and undergoing curative resection,with a focus on evaluating survival benefits and tolerance of intra-operative systemic chemotherapy.Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinicopathological data for 264 consecutive patients who underwent curative resection for gastric cancer at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 2002 to January 2007.Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank tests.Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with the Cox proportional hazard model.Results Patients who received intra-operative systemic chemotherapy had higher 5-year overall survival and 5-year disease-free survival rates (P=0.019 and 0.010,respectively) than patients who did not receive intra-operative systemic chemotherapy.In the subgroup analysis,systemic intra-operative chemotherapy benefited the 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates for patients with cancer of stage pTNM ⅠB-ⅢB,but not stage pTNM ⅢC.Patients who received intra-operative systemic chemotherapy in combination with post-operative chemotherapy had higher 5-year overall survival and 5-year disease-free survival rates (P=0.046 and 0.021,respectively) than patients who only received postoperative chemotherapy.However,the difference in these rates between patients who received only intra-operative systemic chemotherapy and patients who only received curative surgery was not statistically significant (P=0.150 and 0.170,respectively).Multivariate analyses showed that intra-operative systemic chemotherapy was a favorable prognostic factor for the overall survival and disease-free survival rates (P =0.048 and 0.023,respectively).No grade 4 toxicities related to intra-operative systemic chemotherapy were recorded within the

  5. Preferred treatment frequency in patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Nielsen, Torben K; Al-Hamadani, Muhammad;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess patient preference regarding the length of treatment intervals of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists for prostate cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted as a questionnaire-based, cross......-sectional study at a large university hospital. A specific questionnaire was developed based on current literature, clinical experience and a pilot phase of the study. The primary endpoint was preferred treatment frequency. Secondary outcome measures included reasons for preferred treatment frequency, treatment...... satisfaction and side-effects. Overall, 238 men receiving ADT for prostate cancer were presented with the questionnaire between September 2011 and May 2012. Descriptive statistics, the chi-squared test and multiple regression were used for analyses. RESULTS: In total, 176 questionnaires (74%) were available...

  6. Cross-sectional study on comorbidities and adverse events in patients with advanced and recurrent ovarian cancer in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Saux O

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Olivia Le Saux,1 Aliki Taylor,2 Victoria Chia,3 Demetris Pillas,2 Moninder Kaur,2 Gilles Freyer11Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Pierre-Bénite Cédex, France; 2Center for Observational Research, Amgen Ltd, Uxbridge, UK; 3Center for Observational Research, Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of comorbidities and adverse events (AEs, and determine the treatment patterns according to platinum-sensitivity status in patients with advanced (stage IIIB–IV or recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in France with patients over 18 years, diagnosed with advanced (stage IIIB–IV or recurrent EOC between 2009 and 2012. A total of 23 physicians (oncologists and gynecologists participated, contributing 127 patients. Data were abstracted by participating physicians into a case report form. Results: Of the 127 patients included, 92 (72.4% had advanced EOC and 35 (27.6% had recurrent EOC. A total of 73 comorbidities were reported in 44 patients (34.6%. Vascular (10.2%, metabolic (7.1%, respiratory (5.5%, and psychiatric disorders (5.5% were the most common types of comorbidities reported. Prevalence of AEs was 74.8%, of which 12.6% were classified as serious. The most common AEs were anemia (16.5%, hematologic events (12.6%, taste change (11.8%, and headache (7.1%. Throughout the follow-up period, twelve patient deaths were reported (six due to disease progression. Of 35 patients with recurrent disease, 16 were highly platinum sensitive (recurrence >12 months after stopping platinum-based therapy, eleven were partially platinum sensitive (recurrence 6–12 months after stopping platinum-based therapy, seven were platinum resistant (recurrence within 6 months of stopping platinum-based therapy or progression while receiving second- or later-line platinum-based therapy, and one was platinum refractory (recurrence

  7. Immune-modulating effects of the newest cetuximab-based chemoimmunotherapy regimen in advanced colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Cirino; Bestoso, Elena; Apollinari, Serena; Cusi, Maria Grazia; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Abbruzzese, Alberto; Sperlongano, Pasquale; Misso, Gabriella; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2012-06-01

    Cetuximab is a human-murine chimeric monoclonal antibody to the epidermal growth factor receptor, active for advanced colorectal cancer treatment in combination with chemotherapy. Cetuximab mainly acts by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated pathways in cancer cells; however, in the human host, its IgG1 backbone may offer additional antitumor activity that includes FcγRs-mediated antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity, phagocytosis, cross priming, and tumor-specific T-cell-mediated immune response. These mechanisms are still under active investigation. At this purpose, we have performed an immunologic investigation in advanced colon cancer patients enrolled in an ongoing phase II trial aimed to test the toxicity and the biological and antitumor activity of a novel biochemotherapy regimen combining polychemotherapy with gemcitabine, irinotecan, levofolinic acid, and fluorouracil with cetuximab and with subcutaneous low-dose metronomic aldesleukin (GILFICet regimen). The peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the first 20 patients enrolled in the GILFICet trial were collected at baseline and after 6 treatment cycles and examined for immune-phenotype change by flow cytometry. Colon cancer-specific T-cell lines were also generated ex vivo from these samples and subsequently characterized for immune phenotype, functional activity, and antigen specificity. We found a treatment-related increase of circulating dendritic cells, natural killer cells, central memory T cells, and activated T cells with a T-helper 1 (Th1)-cytotoxic phenotype. In addition, the ex-vivo characterization of antigen-specific T cells derived from the treated patients revealed a significant increase in proliferating cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors specific for carcinoembryonic antigen and thymidylate synthase derivative epitope peptides. On these basis, we concluded that the GILFICet regimen exerts substantial immune-modulating activity that significantly affects tumor antigen

  8. Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers. These patients often have multiple symptoms, and integrated supportive care is critical in helping them remain well for as long as possible. Fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is known to improve overall survival (OS) by approximately 3 months, compared to the best supportive care alone. A 1997 study comparing gemcitabine and fluorouracil treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer patients showed an improvement in OS of 1 month in patients r...

  9. Next-generation sequencing in patients with advanced cancer: are we ready for widespread clinical use? A single institute's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenader, Tal; Tauber, Rachel; Shavit, Linda

    2016-10-01

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay targeting cancer-relevant genes has been adopted widely for use in patients with advanced cancer. The primary aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of commercially available NGS. We retrospectively collected demographic and clinicopathologic data, recommended therapy, and clinical outcomes of 30 patients with a variety of advanced solid tumors referred to Foundation Medicine NGS. The initial pathologic examination was performed at the pathology department of the referring hospital. The comprehensive clinical NSG assay was performed on paraffin-embedded tumor samples using the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified FoundationOne platform. The median number of genomic alterations was 3 (0-19). The median number of therapies with potential benefit was 2 (0-8). In 12 cases, a comprehensive clinical NGS assay did not indicate any therapy with potential benefit according to the genomic profile. Ten of the 30 patients received treatments recommended by genomic profile results. In six of the 10 cases, disease progressed within 2 months and four patients died within 3 months of treatment initiation. Three of the 30 patients benefited from a comprehensive clinical NGS assay and the subsequent recommended therapy. The median PFS was 12 weeks (95% confidence interval 10-57) in patients treated with molecularly targeted agents chosen on the basis of tumor genomic profiling versus 48 weeks (95% confidence interval 8-38) in the control group treated with physician choice therapy (P=0.12). Our study suggests that NGS can detect additional treatment targets in individual patients, but prospective medical research and appropriate clinical guidelines for proper clinical use are vital. PMID:27384593

  10. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-08

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  11. Consenting of the vulnerable: the informed consent procedure in advanced cancer patients in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verástegui Emma L

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A topic of great concern in bioethics is the medical research conducted in poor countries sponsored by wealthy nations. Western drug companies increasingly view Latin America as a proper place for clinical research trials. The region combines a large population, modern medical facilities, and low per capita incomes. Participants from developing countries may have little or non alternative means of treatment other than that offered through clinical trials. Therefore, the provision of a valid informed consent is important. Methods To gain insight about some aspects of the informed consent procedure in a major cancer centre in Mexico, we conducted a three-step evaluation process: 1 a ten point multiple choice survey questionnaires, was used to explore some aspects of the patients' experiences during the informed consent process, 2 researchers' knowledge about specific aspects of the informed consent was evaluated in this study using survey questionnaires; and 3 the comprehensibility, readability and number of pages of the consent forms were analysed. The socioeconomic and educational level of the patients, were also considered. Results were reported using a numerical scale. Results Thirty five patients, 20 doctors, and 10 individuals working at the hospital agreed to participate in the study. Eighty three percent of the patients in the study were classified as living in poverty; education level was poor or non existent, and 31% of the patients were illiterate. The consent forms were difficult to understand according to 49% of the patients, most doctors agreed that the forms were not comprehensible to the patients. The average length of the IC documents analysed was 14 pages, and the readability average score was equivalent to 8TH Grade. Conclusion The results presented in this work describe some relevant characteristics of the population seen at public health care institutions in Mexico. Poverty, limited or no education, and the

  12. Palliative chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer patients 80 years of age and older

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, P.; Sud, S.; Zhang, T.; Asmis, T.; Wheatley-Price, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (crc) has a median diagnostic age of 68 years. Despite significant progress in chemotherapy (ctx) options, few data on outcomes or toxicity from ctx in patients 80 years of age and older are available. We investigated ctx in such patients with metastatic crc (mcrc), hypothesizing high rates of hospitalization and toxicity. Methods A retrospective chart review identified patients 80 years of age and older with mcrc who initiated ctx between 2005–2010 at our institution. Patient demographics and ctx data were collected. Endpoints included rates of hospitalization, ctx discontinuation because of toxicity, and overall survival. Results In 60 patients, ctx was initiated on 88 occasions. Median age in the cohort was 83 years; 52% were men; 72% lived with family; 53% had a modified Charlson comorbidity index of 2 or greater; and 31% were taking 6 or more prescription medications at baseline. At baseline, 33% of the patients were anemic (hemoglobin 11×109/L), and 48% had renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). In 53%, ctx was given as first-line treatment. The initial ctx dose was adjusted in 67%, and capecitabine was the most common chemotherapeutic agent (45%). In 19 instances (22%), the patient was hospitalized during or within 30 days of ctx; in 26 instances (30%), the ctx was discontinued because of toxicity, and in 48 instances (55%), the patient required at least 1 dose reduction, omission, or delay. Median overall survival was 17.8 months (95% confidence interval: 14.3 to 20.8 months). Conclusions In the population 80 years of age and older, ctx for mcrc is feasible; however, most recipients will require dose adjustments, and a significant proportion will be hospitalized or stop ctx because of toxicity. Prospective research incorporating geriatric assessment tools is required to better select these older patients for ctx. PMID:27330342

  13. Advanced prostate cancerpatient survival and potential impact of enzalutamide and other emerging therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel NK

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nihar K Patel, Antoine Finianos, Kristen D Whitaker, Jeanny B Aragon-Ching Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: The advent of exponential growth of novel agents tested and approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC has brought about a need for understanding of the mechanism of action, side-effects, and clinical efficacy of these drugs as they relate to these patients. This review will provide a synopsis of the treatment landscape in mCRPC as varying agents such as abiraterone acetate, cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T, radium, and selected emerging agents are presented. A distinct focus on the utilization of enzalutamide, its mechanism of action, key pivotal trials that brought about its US Food and Drug Administration approval, as well as patient-focused perspectives and clinical implications are discussed herein. Keywords: metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, enzalutamide, systemic therapies

  14. [A patient with unresectable progressive advanced rectal cancer maintained in a state of remission by using combination therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yohei; Baba, Hironobu; Mitsuoka, Akito; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Sanada, Takahiro; Baba, Hiroyuki; Goseki, Narihide; Hodotsuka, Masanori; Sano, Tomohiko

    2012-11-01

    We report the case of a patient with unresectable progressive advanced rectal cancer, who has been able to maintain a good quality of life because of combination therapy, including chemoradiotherapy. A 52-year-old woman was diagnosed with progressive locally advanced rectal cancer and invasion of the adnexa of the uterus and the left ureter. No distant metastasis was detected. Colostomy was performed, followed by chemoradiotherapy combined with S-1; then, mFOLFOX6 +bevacizumab (BV) therapy was administered. Aggravation of bilateral hydronephrosis was detected upon completion of 2 courses of treatment, and therefore, percutaneous nephrostomy of the right kidney was performed. After the patient underwent 20 courses of treatment, imaging showed a reduction in the size of the lesion, and the CEA level returned to normal. Later, remission was sustained by sLV5FU2+BV therapy and oral administration of S-1. As a result, we were able to remove the nephrostomy tube from the right kidney in February 2011. Four years after initiation of the treatment, the patient has shown no indication of recurrence. PMID:23267933

  15. Phase I trial of thymidylate synthase poly-epitope peptide (TSPP) vaccine in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusi, Maria Grazia; Botta, Cirino; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Rossetti, Maria Grazia; Dreassi, Elena; Guidelli, Giacomo Maria; Fioravanti, Antonella; Martino, Elodia Claudia; Gandolfo, Claudia; Pagliuchi, Marco; Basile, Assunta; Carbone, Salvatore Francesco; Ricci, Veronica; Micheli, Lucia; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Pirtoli, Luigi; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2015-09-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) poly-epitope peptide (TSPP) is a 27-mer peptide vaccine containing the amino acidic sequences of three epitopes with HLA-A2.1-binding motifs of TS, an enzyme overexpressed in cancer cells, which plays a crucial role in DNA repair and replication. Based on the results of preclinical studies, we designed a phase Ib trial (TSPP/VAC1) to investigate, in a dose escalation setting, the safety and the biological activity of TSPP vaccination alone (arm A) or in combination with GM-CSF and IL-2 (arm B) in cancer patients. Twenty-one pretreated metastatic cancer patients, with a good performance status (ECOG ≤ 1) and no severe organ failure or immunological disease, were enrolled in the study (12 in arm A, nine in arm B) between April 2011 and January 2012, with a median follow-up of 28 months. TSPP resulted safe, and its maximal tolerated dose was not achieved. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. The most common adverse events were grade 2 dermatological reactions to the vaccine injection, cough, rhinitis, fever, poly-arthralgia, gastro-enteric symptoms and, to a lesser extent, moderate hypertension and hypothyroidism. We detected a significant rise in auto-antibodies and TS-epitope-specific CTL precursors. Furthermore, TSPP showed antitumor activity in this group of pretreated patients; indeed, we recorded one partial response and seven disease stabilizations (SD) in arm A, and three SD in arm B. Taken together, our findings provide the framework for the evaluation of the TSPP anti-tumor activity in further disease-oriented clinical trials. PMID:26031574

  16. PHARMACOTHERAPY IN ADVANCED THYROID CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voichiţa Mogoş

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancers are the most common carcinomas of the endocrine system. Their behavior depends of histology, extension of the disease and patients-related factors. Differentiated thyroid cancers arising from follicular epithelium may be cured with combined surgery and radioiodine therapy. In 10-15 % of cases patients may develop metastases which are cause of death. In advanced differentiated thyroid cancers of follicular origin combined therapy with radioiodine and TSH suppression may result in a long survival if metastases are still iodine avid are made iodine avid by redifferentiation therapy. Classical chemotherapy has no significant effect in differentiated advanced thyroid cancers. The knowledge regarding genes and gene products involved in cancer development, dedifferentiation, angiogenesis, tumor progression, and apoptosis allowed the development of a new arsenal of therapeutic agents designed to target these elements. Antibodies, small molecules, antisense nucleotides, and other agents directed against RET- RAF-MAPK, the main pathway of tumor initiation and growth or against other growth factors and their receptors. Most of these therapeutic agents proven to be efficient in preclinical trials and some enter into clinical trials.

  17. Pretreatment serum lactate dehydrogenase is an independent prognostic factor for patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wu, Miao-Fang; Lu, Huai-Wu; Chen, Qing; Lin, Zhong-Qiu; Wang, Li-Juan

    2016-08-01

    For locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC), hypoxia is a characteristic property. This study aimed to investigate whether baseline lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level, which is a marker of hypoxia, had clinical value in determining neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) response and prognosis for LACC patients. The study cohort included 418 patients with a median follow-up of 37.5 months. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the prognostic value of baseline LDH levels. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of complete response after NACT. Backward stepwise selection with the Akaike information criterion was used to identify factors that could be entered into the multivariate regression model. Compared with patients with LDH levels NACT (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.29; 95% CI, 0.15-0.58; P NACT. PMID:27350066

  18. Primary debulking surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by interval debulking surgery for patients with advanced ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zheng; Yu-Nong Gao

    2012-01-01

    Objectives:To compare the survival and perioperative morbidity between primary debulking surgery (PDS) and neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by interval debulking surgery (NAC/IDS) in treating patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC).Methods:We retrospectively reviewed 67 patients with stage ⅢC or Ⅳ EOC treated at Peking University Cancer Hospital from January 2006 to June 2009.Wherein,37 and 30 patients underwent PDS and NAC/IDS,respectively.Results:No difference in overall survival (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS) was observed between NAC/IDS group and PDS group (OS:41.2 vs.39.1 months,P=0.23; PFS:27.1 vs.24.3 months,P=0.37).The optimal debulking rate was 60% in the NAC/IDS group,which was significantly higher than that in the PDS group (32.4%) (P=0.024).The NAC/IDS group had significantly less intraoperative estimated blood loss and transfusion,lower nasogastric intubation rate,and earlier ambulation and recovery of intestinal function than the PDS group (P<0.05).Conclusions:NAC/IDS is less invasive than PDS,and offers the advantages regarding optimal cytoreduction rate,intraoperative blood loss,and postoperative recovery,without significantly impairing the survival compared with PDS in treating patients with stage ⅢC or Ⅳ EOC.Therefore,NAC/IDS may be a valuable treatment alternative for EOC patients.

  19. GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor decreases α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase levels in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Branca, Jacopo Jv; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Noakes, David; Eslinger, Robert; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-08-01

    α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (nagalase) accumulates in the serum of cancer patients and its activity correlates with tumor burden, aggressiveness and clinical disease progression. The administration of GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) to cancer patients with elevated levels of nagalase has been associated with a decrease of serum nagalase activity and with significant clinical benefits. Here, we report the results of the administration of GcMAF to a heterogeneous cohort of patients with histologically diverse, advanced neoplasms, generally considered as "incurable" diseases. In most cases, GcMAF therapy was initiated at late stages of tumor progression. As this is an open-label, non-controlled, retrospective analysis, caution must be employed when establishing cause-effect relationships between the administration GcMAF and disease outcome. However, the response to GcMAF was generally robust and some trends emerged. All patients (n = 20) presented with elevated serum nagalase activity, well above normal values. All patients but one showed a significant decrease of serum nagalase activity upon weekly GcMAF injections. Decreased nagalase activity was associated with improved clinical conditions and no adverse side effects were reported. The observations reported here confirm and extend previous results and pave the way to further studies aimed at assessing the precise role and indications for GcMAF-based anticancer immunotherapy. PMID:24179708

  20. Actionable mutations in plasma cell-free DNA in patients with advanced cancers referred for experimental targeted therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janku, Filip; Angenendt, Philipp; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Fu, Siqing; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald S.; Hong, David S.; Holley, Veronica R.; Cabrilo, Goran; Wheler, Jennifer J.; Piha-Paul, Sarina A.; Zinner, Ralph G.; Bedikian, Agop Y.; Overman, Michael J.; Kee, Bryan K.; Kim, Kevin B.; Kopetz, E. Scott; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Diehl, Frank; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free (cf) DNA in the plasma of cancer patients offers an easily obtainable source of biologic material for mutation analysis. Plasma samples from 157 patients with advanced cancers who progressed on systemic therapy were tested for 21 mutations in BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, and PIK3CA using the BEAMing method and results were compared to mutation analysis of archival tumor tissue from a CLIA-certified laboratory obtained as standard of care from diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Results were concordant for archival tissue and plasma cfDNA in 91% cases for BRAF mutations (kappa = 0.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63 – 0.88), in 99% cases for EGFR mutations (kappa = 0.90, 95% CI 0.71– 1.00), in 83% cases for KRAS mutations (kappa = 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 – 0.80) and in 91% cases for PIK3CA mutations (kappa = 0.65, 95% CI 0.46 – 0.85). Patients (n = 41) with > 1% of KRAS mutant cfDNA had a shorter median survival compared to 20 patients with 1% of mutant cfDNA (BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, or PIK3CA) had a shorter median survival compared to 33 patients with

  1. Clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy for super-elderly patients with localized and locally advanced prostate cancer. Comparison with patients under 80 years of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy in 23 patients aged ≥80 years with localized and locally advanced prostate cancer and compared the results with data from 171 patients under 80 years. All patients received helical tomotherapy in our hospital between September 2009 and October 2012. The median follow-up periods were 35 months in the aged group and 34 months in the younger group. The median prescribed dose in helical tomotherapy was 78 Gy in 39 fractions (range, 72–78 Gy). The 3-year overall survival and biochemical relapse-free rates were 92% and 96% in the aged group and 99.4% and 97.3% in the younger group, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the biochemical relapse-free rates. The 3-year cumulative incidences of late Grade 2 or higher rectal toxicity and urinary toxicity were 13% and 4.8% in the aged group and 7.0% and 1.2% in the younger group, respectively. There was no significant difference between the aged group and the younger group in the cumulative incidence rates of rectal toxicity or urinary toxicity. No patients exhibited Grade 4 or higher toxicity, and all patients improved with conservative therapy. Helical tomotherapy in super-elderly patients with localized and locally advanced prostate cancer had good biochemical control rates without severe late toxicity. Definitive helical tomotherapy may be the treatment of choice for patients with localized and locally advanced prostate cancer, even in those older than 80 years of age. (author)

  2. Treatment outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the response, toxicity, patterns of failure and survival rate of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel. Twenty-three patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received radical chemoradiotherapy from October 1999 to September 2004 were included in this retrospective study. Patients received total 55.4 ∼ 64.8 (median 64.8) Gy (daily 1.8 Gy per fraction, 5 days per weeks) over 7 ∼ 8 weeks. 50 or 60 mg/m2 of paclitaxel was administered on day 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 and 36 of radiotherapy. Four weeks after the concurrent chemoradiotherapy, three cycles of consolidation chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 was administered every 3 weeks. Of the 23 patients, 3 patients refused to receive the treatment during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. One patient died of bacterial pneumonia during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Grade 2 radiation esophagitis was observed in 4 patients (17%). Sixteen patients received consolidation chemotherapy. During the consolidation chemotherapy, 8 patients (50%) experienced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and one of those patients died of neutropenic sepsis. Overall response rate for 20 evaluable patients was 90% including 4 complete responses (20%) and 14 partial responses (70%). Among 18 responders, 9 had local failure, 3 had local and distant failure and 2 had distant failure only. Median progression-free survival time was 9.5 months and 2-year progression-free survival rate was 19%. Eleven patients received second-line or third-line chemotherapy after the treatment failure. The median overall survival time was 21 months. 2-year and 5-year survival rate were 43% and 33%, respectively. Age, performance status, tumor size were significant prognostic factors for progression-free survival. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel revealed high response rate and low toxicity

  3. Treatment outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Zy; Kim, Sung Whan; Shim, Byoung Yong [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    To analyze the response, toxicity, patterns of failure and survival rate of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel. Twenty-three patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients who received radical chemoradiotherapy from October 1999 to September 2004 were included in this retrospective study. Patients received total 55.4 {approx} 64.8 (median 64.8) Gy (daily 1.8 Gy per fraction, 5 days per weeks) over 7 {approx} 8 weeks. 50 or 60 mg/m{sup 2} of paclitaxel was administered on day 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 and 36 of radiotherapy. Four weeks after the concurrent chemoradiotherapy, three cycles of consolidation chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2} and cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} was administered every 3 weeks. Of the 23 patients, 3 patients refused to receive the treatment during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. One patient died of bacterial pneumonia during the concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Grade 2 radiation esophagitis was observed in 4 patients (17%). Sixteen patients received consolidation chemotherapy. During the consolidation chemotherapy, 8 patients (50%) experienced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and one of those patients died of neutropenic sepsis. Overall response rate for 20 evaluable patients was 90% including 4 complete responses (20%) and 14 partial responses (70%). Among 18 responders, 9 had local failure, 3 had local and distant failure and 2 had distant failure only. Median progression-free survival time was 9.5 months and 2-year progression-free survival rate was 19%. Eleven patients received second-line or third-line chemotherapy after the treatment failure. The median overall survival time was 21 months. 2-year and 5-year survival rate were 43% and 33%, respectively. Age, performance status, tumor size were significant prognostic factors for progression-free survival. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel revealed high

  4. Weekly chemotherapy as Induction chemotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer for patients ineligible for 3 weekly maximum tolerable dose chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Maruti Patil; Vanita Noronha; Amit Joshi; Vamshi Krishna Muddu; Sachin Dhumal; Supreeta Arya; Shashikant Juvekar; P Pai; Pankaj Chatturvedi; Arvind Chaukar Devendra; Sarbani Ghosh; Anil D′cruz; Prabhash Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the safety and efficacy of weekly chemotherapy as part of induction chemotherapy, in locally advanced head and neck cancer for patients, who are unfit for upfront radical treatment. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective analysis of on-use weekly chemotherapy as Induction chemotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer, who are technically unresectable are unfit for upfront radical treatment. Induction chemotherapy given was a 2 drug combination of paclitaxel (...

  5. Long-term outcome and patterns of failure in patients with advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To access the long-time outcome and patterns of failure in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Between 1992 and 2005 127 patients (median age 55 years, UICC stage III n = 6, stage IV n = 121) with primarily inoperable, advanced HNSCC were treated with definite platinum-based radiochemotherapy (median dose 66.4 Gy). Analysed end-points were overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), loco-regional progression-free survival (LPFS), development of distant metastases (DM), prognostic factors and causes of death. The mean follow-up time was 34 months (range, 3-156 months), the 3-, 5- and 10-year OS rates were 39%, 28% and 14%, respectively. The median OS was 23 months. Forty-seven patients achieved a complete remission and 78 patients a partial remission. The median LPFS was 17 months, the 3-, 5- and 10-year LPFS rates were 41%, 33% and 30%, respectively. The LPFS was dependent on the nodal stage (p = 0.029). The median DFS was 11 months (range, 2-156 months), the 3-, 5- and 10-year DFS rates were 30%, 24% and 22%, respectively. Prognostic factors in univariate analyses were alcohol abuse (n = 102, p = 0.015), complete remission (n = 47, p < 0.001), local recurrence (n = 71, p < 0.001), development of DM (n = 45, p < 0.001; median OS 16 months) and borderline significance in nodal stage N2 versus N3 (p = 0.06). Median OS was 26 months with lung metastases (n = 17). Nodal stage was a predictive factor for the development of DM (p = 0.025). Cause of death was most commonly tumor progression. In stage IV HNSCC long-term survival is rare and DM is a significant predictor for mortality. If patients developed DM, lung metastases had the most favourable prognosis, so intensified palliative treatment might be justified in DM limited to the lungs

  6. PD-L1 Expression and Survival among Patients with Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Filskov Sorensen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent clinical trial results have suggested that programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1 expression measured by immunohistochemistry may predict response to anti–programmed cell death 1 (PD-1 therapy. Results on the association between PD-L1 expression and survival among patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with chemotherapy are inconsistent. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We evaluated the relationship between PD-L1 expression and overall survival (OS among 204 patients with advanced NSCLC treated at Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, from 2007 to 2012. PD-L1 expression was measured using a prototype immunohistochemistry assay with the anti–PD-L1 22C3 antibody (Merck. PD-L1 strong positivity and weak positivity were defined to be traceable to the clinical trial version of the assay. RESULTS: Twenty-five percent of patients had PD-L1 strong-positive tumors, and 50% had PD-L1 weak-positive tumors. No statistically significant association was found between PD-L1 expression and survival; adjusted hazard ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 0.88-2.03; median OS, 9.0 months for the PD-L1 strong-positive group and 1.07 (0.74-1.55; median OS, 9.8 months for the PD-L1 weak-positive group compared with the PD-L1–negative group (median OS, 7.5 months. No association was seen between PD-L1 expression and OS when PD-L1 expression levels were stratified by median or tertiles. CONCLUSIONS: In concordance with previous studies, we found PD-L1 measured by immunohistochemistry to be frequently expressed in patients with advanced NSCLC. However, PD-L1 expression is not a strong prognostic marker in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with chemotherapy.

  7. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number in 101 advanced colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy plus cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeuli Massimo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Responsiveness to Cetuximab alone can be mediated by an increase of Epidermal Growth factor Receptor (EGFR Gene Copy Number (GCN. Aim of this study was to assess the role of EGFR-GCN in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab. Methods One hundred and one advanced CRC patients (43 untreated- and 58 pre-treated were retrospectively studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to assess EGFR-GCN and by immunohistochemistry (IHC to determine EGFR expression. Sixty-one out of 101 patients were evaluated also for k-ras status by direct sequencing. Clinical end-points were response rate (RR, progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS. Results Increased EGFR-GCN was found in 60/101 (59% tumor samples. There was no correlation between intensity of EGFR-IHC and EGFR-GCN (p = 0.43. Patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab as first line treatment had a RR of 70% (30/43 while it was 18% (10/56 in the group with previous lines of therapy (p Conclusion In metastatic CRC patients treated with chemotherapy plus Cetuximab number of chemotherapy lines and increased EGFR-GCN were significantly associated with a better clinical outcome, independent of k-ras status.

  8. Advancing the Future of Patient Safety in Oncology: Implications of Patient Safety Education on Cancer Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ted A; Goedde, Michael; Bertsch, Tania; Beatty, Dennis

    2016-09-01

    Emerging challenges in health care delivery demand systems of clinical practice capable of ensuring safe and reliable patient care. Oncology in particular is recognized for its high degree of complexity and potential for adverse events. New models of student education hold promise for producing a health care workforce armed with skills in patient safety. This training may have a particular impact on risk reduction in cancer care and ultimately improve clinical performance in oncology. A 1-day student program focused on the principles of patient safety was developed for the third-year medical school class. The core curriculum consisted of an online patient safety module, root cause analyses of actual patient safety events, and simulation scenarios designed to invoke patient safety skills. The program was successfully implemented and received an average of 4.2/5 on evaluations pertaining to its importance and effectiveness. Student surveys demonstrated that 59 % of students were not previously aware of system-based approaches to improving safety, 51 % of students had witnessed or experienced a patient safety issue, while only 10 % reported these events. Students reported feeling more empowered to act on patient safety issues as a result of the program. Educational programs can provide medical students with a foundation for skill development in medical error reduction and help enhance an organization's culture of safety. This has the potential to reduce adverse events in complex patient care settings such as clinical oncology. PMID:25893923

  9. Elderly with Advanced Colon Cancer Often Get Costly, Dubious Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157714.html Elderly With Advanced Colon Cancer Often Get Costly, Dubious Treatments: Study Drugs come ... far more often to elderly patients with advanced colon cancer, but they offer almost no benefit, a new ...

  10. Extended resection for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-ping; SONG Xin-ming

    2006-01-01

    @@ Colorectal cancer is a common cause of cancer-related mortality.1 In China, it is one of eight cancers in the cancer control blueprint, which are suggested to have comprehensive treatment.Some patients with colorectal cancer presented no symptoms when they were diagnosed, yet the tumor had already penetrated the intestinal wall and involved adjacent organs. If the tumor is localized at time of diagnosis without distant metastases, it is termed locally advanced colorectal cancer (LACC)regardless of whether there is lymph node metastasis. LACC commonly encountered in clinical practice accounts for 5%-10% of all colorectal cancers.2

  11. Safety of an oral anticancer agent (trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet) in patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, M; Go, M; Iwai, M; Ito, D; Asano, H; Usami, E; Teramachi, H; Yoshimura, T

    2016-04-01

    We retrospectively studied the safety of trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet (TAS-102) monotherapy in patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer. Adverse events to TAS-102 monotherapy were observed in 22 out of 23 cases (95.7%). The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia (69.6%), nausea (53.2%), and malaise (30.4%). Treatment was postponed in 54 (59.3%) out of 91 courses, and in 34 (66.7%) of these 54 courses, the delay in treatment was due to bone marrow suppression. Seven patients with peritoneal metastases suffered from nausea, whilst none of the patients without peritoneal metastases had nausea (p = 0.0139). Nausea and vomiting during a previous chemotherapy cycle was significantly associated with nausea after TAS-102 treatment (p = 0.0007), and the treatment cycles were significantly longer in patients with grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (p = 0.0061). Our results suggest that the incidence of nausea was higher in patients treated with TAS-102. Therefore, it is important to inform patients of the risk of these toxicities and to provide enhanced supportive care. Moreover, we recommend that, for patients with repeated treatment postponement due to neutropenia, the dosage should be fixed based on therapeutic efficacy and prognosis. PMID:27209703

  12. Chemoradiotherapy as preoperative treatment in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer patients: results of a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The combination of radiotherapy and fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma has led to a significant increase in survival in comparison with radiotherapy alone. Doxifluridine (5-DFUR) is an orally active fluoropyrimidine, and its cytotoxic metabolite (5-FU) may concentrate in areas of high tumor vascularisation. This trial was carried out with the aims of improving locoregional control and making lesions resectable in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods: 5-DFUR was given at a dose of 500 mg/m2 b.i.d. by way of mouth for 4 days every other week for a total of four courses, with leucovorin 25 mg b.i.d. orally being given 2 hours before each 5-DFUR administration. External beam RT was administered at a dose of 1000 cGy per week for 3 weeks, followed by a 2-week break and then by 1000 cGy per week for a further 2 weeks (a total dose of 5000 cGy). The patients were restaged 4 weeks after the end of treatment and explored for resection in cases of partial response (PR). Results: A total of 32 patients were treated between 1992 and 1997. Ab initio un resectability was shown by laparotomy (16 cases) or computed tomography (16 cases), and was due to vascular invasion in 27 patients, massive regional nodal metastases in nine, and both in four. The median age was 63 years (range 36-71); performance status (PS) (ECOG): 0-1 28 and PS 2 = 4. All the patients had measurable disease and were evaluable for response. There were seven PR (22%), 10 SD (31%), and 15 PD (47%). All of the responders underwent surgical exploration, and radical resection was possible in 5. Three of these patients are still disease-free with a follow-up of 18, 27, and 65 months; the other two cases relapsed 11 and 14 months after surgery. The median survival time was 9 months for the entire group, and 1-year survival rate was 31%. The treatment was never stopped because of toxicity. There were no CTC-NCI grade 3 or 4 toxic events; grade 1

  13. [Innovation in Surgery for Advanced Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Yasunori, Sohara; Endo, Shunsuke

    2016-07-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery can be one of less invasive surgical interventions for early stage lung cancer. Locally advanced lung cancer, however, cannot avoid aggressive procedures including pneumonectomy and/or extended combined resection of chest wall, aorta, esophagus, etc. for complete resection. Surgical approach even for advanced lung cancer can be less invasive by benefit from new anti-cancer treatment, innovated manipulations of bronchoplasty and angioplasty, and bench surgery( lung autotransplantation technique). We herein reviewed the strategy to minimize invasive interventions for locally advanced lung cancer, introducing 2 successful cases with advanced lung cancer. The 1st patient is a 62-year old man with centrally advanced lung cancer invading to mediastinum. Right upper sleeve lobectomy with one-stoma carinoplasty following induction chemoradiation therapy was successful. The operation time was 241 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 60 months after surgery. The 2nd is a 79-year old man with advanced lung cancer invading to the distal aortic arch. Left upper segmentectomy following thoracic endovascular aortic repair with stentgraft was successful with no extracorporeal circulation. The operation time was 170 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 30 months after surgery. The invasiveness of surgical interventions for local advanced lung cancer can be minimized by innovated device and new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27440037

  14. Everolimus: the first approved product for patients with advanced renal cell cancer after sunitinib and/or sorafenib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Coppin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chris CoppinMedical Oncology, BC Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, CanadaAbstract: Everolimus (RAD001, Afinitor® Novartis is the first oral inhibitor of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin to reach the oncology clinic. Everolimus 10 mg daily achieves complete inhibition of its target at below the maximum tolerable dose for most patients. A phase III randomized placebo-controlled trial has examined the impact of everolimus in patients with clear cell renal cancers and progressive disease on or within 6 months of the VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors sunitinib and/or sorafenib. The primary endpoint of progression-free survival was increased from median 1.9 to 4.9 months (hazard ratio 0.33, P < 0.001 and 25% were still progression-free after 10 months of everolimus therapy. There was a delay in time to decline of performance status and trends to improvement in quality of life, disease-related symptoms, and overall survival despite crossover of the majority of patients assigned to placebo. In 2009, everolimus was approved in the US and Europe as the only validated option for this indication. Toxicities are usually mild to moderate and can be managed with dose reduction or interruption if necessary. Opportunistic infections and non-infectious pneumonitis are seen as a class effect. Management of common practical management issues are discussed. Clinical trials are in progress to examine additional roles for everolimus in renal cancer, alone and in combination with other agents.Keywords: everolimus, drug therapy, advanced renal cancer

  15. Engaging patients and caregivers in patient-centered outcomes research on advanced stage lung cancer: insights from patients, caregivers, and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, K M; Opoku, Samuel T; Apenteng, Bettye A; Fetrick, Ann; Ryan, June; Copur, M; Tolentino, Addison; Vaziri, Irfan; Ganti, Apar K

    2014-12-01

    Participatory and patient-centered approaches to cancer research have been highlighted as the most appropriate means of engaging patients in the conduct of clinical research. However, there is a paucity of patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) on lung cancer. Previous studies seeking to define lung cancer treatment success have generally not included patients' and caregivers' perceptions and views in treatment decision-making. Additionally, little is known about effective strategies for the engagement of lung cancer patients in PCOR. We sought to gain insights into the perceptions of patients, caregivers, and providers on lung cancer treatment success, as well as on strategies for patient engagement in lung cancer PCOR. Four focus groups were conducted with provider, patient, and caregiver participants from four cancer centers in Nebraska and South Dakota. A total of 36 providers, patients, and caregivers participated in this study. Patients and caregivers confirmed that survival alone should not be the measure of lung cancer treatment success and that definitions of treatment success should emphasize factors such as effective clinical guidance throughout treatment, symptom management, functionality, and quality of life. Clinician participants noted that the definition of treatment success evolved over time and appeared to be linked to patients' experiences with chemotherapy. Participants identified barriers to and facilitators of research participation and suggested strategies for the recruitment and retention of research participants. Our study indicates that patients can successfully play active and engaged roles in clinical research, ranging from participant to partner. Judging from the enthusiasm of our focus group attendees, patients and caregivers want to participate and be engaged in clinical research. PMID:24744120

  16. The relationship of Vascular endothelial growth factor gene polymorphisms and clinical outcome in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with FOLFOX: VEGF polymorphism in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the associations between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and clinical outcome in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin (FOLFOX). Genomic DNA was isolated from whole blood, and six VEGF (−2578C/A, -2489C/T, -1498 T/C, -634 G/C, +936C/T, and +1612 G/A) gene polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR. Levels of serum VEGF were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Patients with G/G genotype for VEGF -634 G/C gene polymorphism showed a lower response rate (22.2%) than those with G/C or C/C genotype (32.3%, 51.1%; P = 0.034). Patients with the VEGF -634 G/C polymorphism G/C + C/C genotype had a longer progression free survival (PFS) of 4.9 months, compared with the PFS of 3.5 months for those with the G/G (P = 0.043, log-rank test). By multivariate analysis, this G/G genotype of VEGF -634 G/C polymorphism was identified as an independent prognostic factor (Hazard ratio 1.497, P = 0.017). Our data suggest that G/G genotype of VEGF -634 G/C polymorphism is related to the higher serum levels of VEGF, and poor clinical outcome in advanced gastric cancer patients

  17. Constitutive gene expression profile segregates toxicity in locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with high-dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer patients show a wide variation in normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. The individual sensitivity to x-rays limits the efficiency of the therapy. Prediction of individual sensitivity to radiotherapy could help to select the radiation protocol and to improve treatment results. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between gene expression profiles of ex vivo un-irradiated and irradiated lymphocytes and the development of toxicity due to high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Raw data from microarray experiments were uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus Database http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GEO accession GSE15341). We obtained a small group of 81 genes significantly regulated by radiotherapy, lumped in 50 relevant pathways. Using ANOVA and t-test statistical tools we found 20 and 26 constitutive genes (0 Gy) that segregate patients with and without acute and late toxicity, respectively. Non-supervised hierarchical clustering was used for the visualization of results. Six and 9 pathways were significantly regulated respectively. Concerning to irradiated lymphocytes (2 Gy), we founded 29 genes that separate patients with acute toxicity and without it. Those genes were gathered in 4 significant pathways. We could not identify a set of genes that segregates patients with and without late toxicity. In conclusion, we have found an association between the constitutive gene expression profile of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the development of acute and late toxicity in consecutive, unselected patients. These observations suggest the possibility of predicting normal tissue response to irradiation in high-dose non-conventional radiation therapy regimens. Prospective studies with higher number of patients are needed to validate these preliminary results

  18. Electroglottographic Comparison of Voice Outcomes in Patients With Advanced Laryngopharyngeal Cancer Treated by Chemoradiotherapy or Total Laryngectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To conduct prospective electroglottographic analyses of voice outcomes after radical chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced laryngopharyngeal cancers and to compare them with patients who have undergone total laryngectomy (TL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-one patients (19 male, 2 female, median age [range] 65 [50-85] years) with Stage III/IV laryngopharyngeal cancer received induction chemotherapy followed by radical chemoradiotherapy. Electroglottography, using the sustained vowel /i/ and connected speech, was performed before treatment and 1, 6, and 12 months after treatment. In addition, single voice recordings were taken from 21 patients (16 male, 5 female, aged 65 [50-84] years) who had undergone TL and surgical voice restoration and from 21 normal controls (18 male, 3 female, aged 65 [33-80] years). Results: Before treatment the vocal measures for the chemoradiotherapy patients were significantly different from normal controls in jitter (p = 0.02), maximum phonation time (MPT) (p = 0.001), and words per minute (WPM) (p = 0.01). At 12 months after treatment MPT and WPM had normalized, but jitter and normalized noise energy were significantly worse than in normal controls. Comparison of voice outcomes at 12 months for chemoradiotherapy patients revealed superiority over the TL group in all parameters except MPT (18.2 s vs. 10.4 s, p = 0.06). Analysis of the recovery of voice up to 12 months after treatment revealed progressive improvement in most electroglottographic measures. Conclusions: This prospective study demonstrates significantly better outcome for patients treated with chemoradiotherapy as compared with TL. Progressive normalization of many voice parameters occurs over the 12 months following chemoradiotherapy

  19. Bicalutamide as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to standard care of patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer: first analysis of the early prostate cancer program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, William A; Wirth, Manfred P; McLeod, David G;

    2002-01-01

    We determine the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide as immediate therapy, either alone or as adjuvant to treatment of curative intent, in patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer....

  20. Two-year results of a prospective preventive swallowing rehabilitation trial in patients treated with chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van der Molen; M. van Rossum; C.R.N. Rasch; L.E. Smeele; F.J.M. Hilgers

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was the assessment of the results of a prospective clinical trial with two preventive swallowing rehabilitation programs on the long-term side effects of chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in advanced head and neck cancer patients. The study cohort consisted of 29 patients, randomiz

  1. Phase I trial of intramuscularly administered tumor necrosis factor in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, A A; Casper, E S; Gabrilove, J L; Templeton, M A; Sherwin, S A; Oettgen, H F

    1989-03-01

    A phase I trial of intramuscularly administered recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) was conducted in 19 adult patients with advanced solid tumors. The agent was administered daily for up to five consecutive days every other week for two to four courses. Doses of rTNF ranged from 5 to 200 micrograms/m2/d. Dose-limiting toxicities were encountered at doses greater than 100 micrograms/m2/d. Toxicities included tenderness, erythema and induration at the site of injection, fatigue, fever, chills, headache, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Moderate to marked reductions in WBC and platelet counts were observed regularly at the highest dose levels, but none were clinically significant. Hepatic enzyme elevation was seen frequently, and two patients developed hyperbilirubinemia. Only one of seven patients treated with doses greater than 100 micrograms/m2/d completed the planned course of therapy. Even at the highest dose levels, serum concentrations of rTNF could only rarely be detected in the serum. No therapeutic responses were observed. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of rTNF in this trial was 150 micrograms/m2/d, administered for two courses. PMID:2918329

  2. Oxidative stress, redox signaling pathways, and autophagy in cachectic muscles of male patients with advanced COPD and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Vilanova, Ester; Rodriguez, Diego A; Lloreta, Josep; Ausin, Pilar; Pascual-Guardia, Sergio; Broquetas, Joan; Roca, Josep; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-02-01

    Muscle dysfunction and wasting are predictors of mortality in advanced COPD and malignancies. Redox imbalance and enhanced protein catabolism are underlying mechanisms in COPD. We hypothesized that the expression profile of several biological markers share similarities in patients with cachexia associated with either COPD or lung cancer (LC). In vastus lateralis of cachectic patients with either LC (n=10) or advanced COPD (n=16) and healthy controls (n=10), markers of redox balance, inflammation, proteolysis, autophagy, signaling pathways, mitochondrial function, muscle structure, and sarcomere damage were measured using laboratory and light and electron microscopy techniques. Systemic redox balance and inflammation were also determined. All subjects were clinically evaluated. Compared to controls, in both cachectic groups of patients, a similar expression profile of different biological markers was observed in their muscles: increased levels of muscle protein oxidation and ubiquitination (p<0.05, both), which positively correlated (r=0.888), redox-sensitive signaling pathways (NF-κB and FoxO) were activated (p<0.05, all), fast-twitch fiber sizes were atrophied, muscle structural abnormalities and sarcomere disruptions were significantly greater (p<0.05, both). Structural and functional protein levels were lower in muscles of both cachectic patient groups than in controls (p<0.05, all). However, levels of autophagy markers including ultrastructural autophagosome counts were increased only in muscles of cachectic COPD patients (p<0.05). Systemic oxidative stress and inflammation levels were also increased in both patient groups compared to controls (p<0.005, both). Oxidative stress and redox-sensitive signaling pathways are likely to contribute to the etiology of muscle wasting and sarcomere disruption in patients with respiratory cachexia: LC and COPD. PMID:25464271

  3. A retrospective quality of life analysis using the lung cancer symptom scale in patients treated with palliative radiotherapy for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To measure symptom palliation in patients treated with radiation therapy for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Five hundred thirty patients with NSCLC were treated at the Medical College of Virginia between 1988 and 1993. Sixty-three patients with the least favorable prognostic features received palliative radiation to 30 Gy in 10 or 12 fractions for symptoms related to the presence of intrathoracic tumor. The observer portion of the Lung Cancer Symptom Scale (LCSS) was employed in a retrospective chart review, scoring measures of appetite, fatigue, cough, dyspnea, hemoptysis, and pain. Results: In 54 evaluable patients, median survival was 4 months and was independent of age, stage, performance status, or histology. Ninety-six percent of the patients had at least one LCSS symptom at presentation. Fatigue was unaffected by therapy. Improvements in appetite (p = 0.68) and pain (p = 0.61) were not statistically significant. There was, however, a statistically significant reduction in cough (p = 0.01), hemoptysis (p = 0.001), and dyspnea (p 0.0003). Self-limiting acute side effects included transient esophagitis in 37% of patients, though no severe toxicities were noted. Conclusions: These results suggest symptomatic benefit from radiotherapy even in those NSCLC patients with advanced disease and a limited life expectancy. Treatment should be given to patients whose symptoms are most amenable to palliation. A site-specific quality of life instrument such as the LCSS should be included within any future clinical trial of NSCLC management so that symptom control may be scored as a treatment outcome in addition to disease-free survival

  4. Prognostic significance of radiation therapy delay in advanced head and neck cancer patients who completed induction chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the prognostic significance of radiation therapy (RT) delay in patients with advanced head and neck cancer who completed induction chemotherapy (IC). The authors retrospectively reviewed 67 patients who received radical RT after IC between 1978 and 1987. The time interval between the completion of IC and the initiation of RT was documented, and the reasons for delay were recorded. Approximately equal numbers of patients initiated RT within and beyond 30 days. In 24 patients who survived 9-79 months (median, 34 months) after IC and RT, 15/24 (62%) began RT within 30 days of IC, while only 9/24 (37%) survived if RT began beyond 30 days. Among these 24 patients, seven underwent salvage surgery. Five of seven began RT beyond 30 days. Without the surgically salvaged patients, the difference was more striking; 13/17 (76%) survived if RT was initiated within 30 days versus 4/17 (23%) if RT was initiated beyond 30 days

  5. Understanding the Racial and Ethnic Differences in Cost and Mortality Among Advanced Stage Prostate Cancer Patients (STROBE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatre, Sumedha; Bruce Malkowicz, Stanley; Sanford Schwartz, J; Jayadevappa, Ravishankar

    2015-08-01

    The aims of the study were to understand the racial/ethnic differences in cost of care and mortality in Medicare elderly with advanced stage prostate cancer.This retrospective, observational study used SEER-Medicare data. Cohort consisted of 10,509 men aged 66 or older and diagnosed with advanced-stage prostate cancer between 2001and 2004. The cohort was followed retrospectively up to 2009. Racial/ethnic variation in cost was analyzed using 2 part-models and quantile regression. Step-wise GLM log-link and Cox regression was used to study the association between race/ethnicity and cost and mortality. Propensity score approach was used to minimize selection bias.Pattern of cost and mortality varies between racial/ethnic groups. Compared with other racial/ethnic groups, non-Hispanic white patients had higher unadjusted costs in treatment and follow-up phases. Quintile regression results indicated that in treatment phase, Hispanics had higher costs in the 95th quantile and non-Hispanic blacks had lower cost in the 95th quantile, compared with non-Hispanic white men. In terminal phase non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics had higher cost. After controlling for treatment, all-cause and prostate cancer-specific mortality was not significant for non-Hispanic black men, compared with non-Hispanic white men. However, for Asians, mortality remained significantly lower compared with non-Hispanic white men.In conclusion, relationship between race/ethnicity, cost of care, and mortality is intricate. For non-Hispanic black men, disparity in mortality can be attributed to treatment differences. To reduce racial/ethnic disparities in prostate cancer care and outcomes, tailored policies to address underuse, overuse, and misuse of treatment and health services are necessary. PMID:26266389

  6. Personalized peptide vaccination for advanced biliary tract cancer: IL-6, nutritional status and pre-existing antigen-specific immunity as possible biomarkers for patient prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshitomi, Munehiro; Yutani, Shigeru; Matsueda, Satoko; IOJI, TETSUYA; Komatsu, Nobukazu; SHICHIJO, SHIGEKI; Yamada, Akira; ITOH, KYOGO; SASADA, TETSURO; Kinoshita, Hisafumi

    2011-01-01

    Considering that the prognosis of patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) remains very poor, with a median survival of less than 1 year, new therapeutic approaches need to be developed. In the present study, a phase II clinical trial of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) was conducted in advanced BTC patients to evaluate the feasibility of this treatment and to identify potential biomarkers. A maximum of 4 human leukocyte antigen-matched peptides, which were selected based on th...

  7. Effect of integrated Chinese medical treatment on the survival time of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a clinical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘苓霜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe clinical effect of integrated Chinese medical(CM)treatment(as maintenance therapy)on the progression-free survival(PFS)and overall survival(OS)in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC)after first-line chemotherapy.Methods The study was a prospective,randomized,controlled clinical trial.Totally 69 non-progressive advanced NSCLC patients treated with first-line chemotherapy were

  8. Adjuvant hormone therapy in patients undergoing high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Neimark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of using the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone leuprorelin with the Atrigel delivery system in doses of 7.5, 22.5, and 45 mg as an adjuvant regimen in high- and moderate-risk cancer patients who have received high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. Moderate- and high-risk locally advanced prostate cancer (PC patients treated with HIFU (n = 28 and HIFU in combination with hormone therapy during 6 months (n = 31 were examined.Results. The investigation has shown that leuprorelin acetate monotherapy used within 6 months after HIFU therapy can achieve the highest reduction in prostate-specific antigen levels and positively affect the symptoms of the disease. HIFU in combination with androgen deprivation substantially diminishes the clinical manifestations of the disease and improves quality of life in HIFU-treated patients with PC, by reducing the degree of infravesical obstruction (according to uroflowmetric findings and IPSS scores, and causes a decrease in prostate volume as compared to those who have undergone HIFU only. Treatment with leuprorelin having the Atrigel delivery system has demonstrated the low incidence of adverse reactions and good tolerability.

  9. Adjuvant hormone therapy in patients undergoing high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Neimark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of using the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone leuprorelin with the Atrigel delivery system in doses of 7.5, 22.5, and 45 mg as an adjuvant regimen in high- and moderate-risk cancer patients who have received high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. Moderate- and high-risk locally advanced prostate cancer (PC patients treated with HIFU (n = 28 and HIFU in combination with hormone therapy during 6 months (n = 31 were examined.Results. The investigation has shown that leuprorelin acetate monotherapy used within 6 months after HIFU therapy can achieve the highest reduction in prostate-specific antigen levels and positively affect the symptoms of the disease. HIFU in combination with androgen deprivation substantially diminishes the clinical manifestations of the disease and improves quality of life in HIFU-treated patients with PC, by reducing the degree of infravesical obstruction (according to uroflowmetric findings and IPSS scores, and causes a decrease in prostate volume as compared to those who have undergone HIFU only. Treatment with leuprorelin having the Atrigel delivery system has demonstrated the low incidence of adverse reactions and good tolerability.

  10. 晚期肿瘤患者疼痛护理措施%Pain-nursing for patients with advanced cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何守叶

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过对晚期肿瘤患者疼痛护理,解除或减轻患者的痛苦,以提高患者的生活质量.方法 护士正确掌握三阶梯给药原则及药物不良反应与处理,对患者的疼痛进行正确评估,予以心理支持及疼痛护理.结果 按三阶梯给药原则,结合有效的心理护理,50例患者疼痛有效控制率达到96%.结论 护理人员通过细致入微的临床护理,给予必要的药物治疗和心理支持,减轻了晚期肿瘤患者的痛苦,改善了患者的生活质量.%Objective To improve the quality of life by means of pain - nursing for patients with advanced cancer. Methods The principle of three- step analgesic ladder and adverse drug reactions and treatment were accurately mastered. 50 patients' pain should be properly assessed and the psychological support and pain management were given. Results According to the principle of three - step analgesic ladder and combination with effective psychological care, the efficiency of pain - relief was up to 96%. Conclusion The meticulous clinical care and necessary medical treatment and psychological support are effective for patients with advanced cancer toalleviate the pain and improve the quality of life.

  11. Chemotherapy with or without irinotecan in patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Chao; Zhou Hang; Wei Yang; Wang Liyang; Xie Hua; Yao Wenxiu

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that irinotecan can improve survival in patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer,but the overall benefit of irinotecan in the treatment of advanced or recurrent gastric cancer remains controversial.The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits and risks of irinotecan for survival in patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer.Method We searched PubMed,EmBase,the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials,reference lists of articles,and proceedings of major conferences for relevant clinical trials.We included randomized controlled trials that reported on the efficacy and safety of irinotecan in patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer.Outcomes were analyzed by survival rate,objective response rate (ORR),and toxicity.Furthermore,the analysis was further stratified by factors that could affect the treatment effects.Results Eight trials recruiting 1 546 patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer were included in the analysis.Overall,irinotecan therapy was associated with a 6% improvement in survival rate,but this difference was not statistically significant (odds ratio (OR) 0.94; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.70-1.27; P=-0.69).However,irinotecan therapy had more frequent ORR than irinotecan-free arm (OR 1.70; 95% CI 1.34-2.17; P <0.001).Furthermore,irinotecan therapy was associated with a clinically and statistically significant increase in the risk for declined hemoglobin,hyponatremia,and diarrhea,but it also protected against thrombocytopenia risk when compared with irinotecan-free therapy.Conclusions There is no evidence to support the use of irinotecan therapy in patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer; however,given the significant advantage in ORR irinotecan therapy using combination regimens may be considered for further evaluation in subsets of patients who may benefit from this treatment.

  12. THROMBOCYTOSIS AS PROGNOSTIC FACTOR FOR SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED NON SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER TREATED WITH FIRST- LINE CHEMOTHERAPY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyan Davidov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate elevated platelet count as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with advanced (stage IIIB/ IV non- small cell lung cancer (NSCLC receiving first- line chemotherapy. Methods: From 2005 to 2009 three hundreds forty seven consecutive patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC, treated in Department of Medical Oncology, UMHAT "Dr Georgi Stranski" entered the study. The therapeutic regimens included intravenous administration of platinum- based doublets. Survival analysis was evaluated by Kaplan- Meier test. The influence of pretreatment thrombocytosis as prognostic factor for survival was analyzed using multivariate stepwise Cox regression analyses. Results: Elevated platelet counts were found in 78 patients. The overall survival for patients without elevated platelet counts was 9,6 months versus 6,9 months for these with thrombocytosis. In multivariate analysis as independent poor prognostic factors were identified: stage, performance status and elevated platelet counts. Conclusions: These results indicated that platelet counts as well as some clinical pathologic characteristics could be useful prognostic factors in patients with unresectable NSCLC.

  13. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival. PMID:25867139

  14. Serum cytokine levels in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: correlation with clinical outcome of erlotinib treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-sheng; MIAO Li-yun; LIU Lu; CAI Hou-rong; DING Jing-jing; REN Sheng-xiang; ZHOU Cai-cun

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum expression of cytokines may provide information about the clinical outcome of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum cytokine levels and the clinical outcome of erlotinib treatment in a second or third line setting in patients with advanced NSCLC.Methods A total of 162 patients with advanced NSCLC who received erlotinib as either second or third line therapy were enrolled in this study.Blood samples were collected before the initiation of erlotinib treatment,and the levels of IL-1,IL-2R,IL-6,and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Cutoff points were defined as the median levels of IL-1 (low (≤26.5 pg/ml) and high (>26.5 pg/ml)),IL-2R (low (≤115 pmol/L) and high (>15 pmol/L)),IL-6 (low (≤49.5 pg/ml) and high (>49.5 pg/ml)),and TNF-α (low (≤48.5 pg/ml) and high (>48.5 pg/ ml)).Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the survival time,and Cox regression analyses were used to correlate cytokines and baseline clinical characteristics with clinical outcomes,including time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS).Results Between January 2007 and May 2011,162 patients were enrolled.Their median age was 58 years.In this group,109 were males and 53 were females,74 were former or current smokers and 88 were non-smokers.A total of 122 patients had adenocarcinoma,27 had squamous cell carcinoma,and 13 had tumors with other types of histology.And 139 patients had an Eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1,while 23 scored at 2-3.Expression of IL-1,IL-2R,and IL-6 was not significantly associated with age,gender,ECOG performance status,smoking status,or histology and stage of tumor.Only TNF-α was associated with smoking status (P=0.045).Survival analysis showed that patients with low levels of either IL-6 or TNF-α had a statistically longer TTp and OS than patients with high

  15. Advanced cancer patients' self-assessed physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from hospital general ward - a questionnaire study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølver, Lisbeth; Østergaard, Birte; Rydahl Hansen, Susan;

    2012-01-01

    -prolonging or palliative treatment are offered non-specialist palliative services. There is a lack of knowledge about their problem profile. The aim of this article is to describe the incidence of patient-reported physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from general hospital wards and health......SOELVER L., OESTERGAARD B., RYDAHL-HANSEN S. & WAGNER L. (2012) European Journal of Cancer Care21, 667-676 Advanced cancer patients' self-assessed physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from hospital general wards - a questionnaire study Most cancer patients receiving life...... between patient-reported problems and reported intervention for physical function, pain, constipation and loss of appetite. Palliative cancer patients' self-reported problem profile on admission and discharge from hospital has not previously been described and the results indicate a need to focus on...

  16. Phase I study of epigenetic modulation with 5-azacytidine and valproic acid in patients with advanced cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braiteh, Fadi; Soriano, Andres O; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Hong, David; Johnson, Marcella M; De Padua Silva, Leandro; Yang, Hui; Alexander, Stefanie; Wolff, Johannes; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) is a DNA hypomethylating agent. Valproic acid is a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Combining hypomethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors produces synergistic anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. On the basis of this evidence, we conducted a phase I study of the combination of 5-AZA and valproic acid in patients with advanced cancers. Experimental Design 5-AZA was administered subcutaneously daily for 10 days. Valproic acid was given orally daily with a goal to titrate to plasma levels of 75-100 mcg/mL (therapeutic for seizures). Cycles were 28 days long. 5-AZA was started at 20 mg/m2 and escalated using an adaptive algorithm based on the toxicity profile in the prior cohort (6+6 design). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell global DNA methylation and histone H3 acetylation were estimated with the LINE pyrosequencing assay and Western blots respectively, on days 1 and 10 of each cycle when patients agreed to provide them. Results Fifty-five patients were enrolled. Median age was 60 years (range, 12-77 years). The maximum tolerated dose was 75 mg/m2 of 5-AZA in combination with valproic acid. Dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenic fever and thrombocytopenia, which occurred at a dose of 94 mg/m2 of 5-AZA. Stable disease lasting 4-12 months (median = 6 months) was observed in 14 patients (25%). A significant decrease in global DNA methylation and induction of histone acetylation were observed. Conclusion The combination of 5-AZA and valproic acid is safe at doses up to 75 mg/m2 for 5-AZA in patients with advanced malignancies. PMID:18829512

  17. A phase II trial of Reiki for the management of pain in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Karin; Hanson, John; Michaud, Mary

    2003-11-01

    This trial compared pain, quality of life, and analgesic use in a sample of patients with cancer pain (n=24) who received either standard opioid management plus rest (Arm A) or standard opioid management plus Reiki (Arm B). Participants either rested for 1.5 hr on Days 1 and 4 or received two Reiki treatments (Days 1 and 4) one hour after their first afternoon analgesic dose. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain ratings, blood pressure, heart rate, and respirations were obtained before and after each treatment/rest period. Analgesic use and VAS pain scores were reported for 7 days. Quality of life was assessed on Days 1 and 7. Participants in Arm B experienced improved pain control on Days 1 and 4 following treatment, compared to Arm A, and improved quality of life, but no overall reduction in opioid use. Future research will determine the extent to which the benefits attributed to Reiki in this study may have been due to touch. PMID:14585550

  18. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients With Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results in 178 patients treated from 2001 to 2010 and have developed a prognostic model for both survival and the possibility of a subsequent resection in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2001 until 2010, 178 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated and included in the present study, with CRT consisting of 50 Gy in 27 fractions combined with tegafur-uracil(UFT)/folinic acid(FA). Results: The median survival from diagnosis was 11.5 months. Adverse events of Grade 3 or above were seen in 36% of the patients. Ninety-three percent of the patients completed all fractions. A Cox regression model for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1–0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4–0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0–1.3) was associated with shorter survival. A logistic regression model showed Stage III disease (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0–1.1) and abnormal hemoglobin (OR 0.26; 95% CI, 0.0–1.2) as being associated with lower odds of resection. Conclusion: This study confirms the favorable prognosis for patients receiving gemcitabine therapy before CRT and the poor prognosis associated with increasing tumor volume. In addition, CRT in patients with abnormal hemoglobin and Stage III disease rarely induced tumor shrinkage allowing subsequent resection.

  19. Concordance of Hypermethylated DNA and the Tumor Markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA in Serum during Monitoring of Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Høgh Hansen, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    The serological protein tumor markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA are frequently used to monitor tumor burden among metastatic breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is associated with global DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation of some promoter regions. No monitoring study has yet investigated the...... interrelationship between protein tumor markers, the global DNA hypomethylation, and hypermethylated genes in serum from patients with advanced disease. Twenty-nine patients with histologically proven advanced breast cancer received first-line chemotherapy with epirubicin. Samples were collected prior to each...... treatment and prospectively analyzed for CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA. The same samples were retrospectively analyzed for the concentration of hypermethylated RASSF1A and for global DNA hypomethylation using LINE-1. Among patients with elevated concentrations of the protein markers, concordance could be observed...

  20. Selective lateral pelvic lymph node dissection in patients with advanced low rectal cancer treated with pre-operative chemoradiotherapy based on pretreatment imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance of lateral pelvic lymph node (LPLN) metastasis in advanced low rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) remains unclear. We reviewed 127 consecutive patients with clinical stage II∼III low rectal cancer below the peritoneal reflection who underwent preoperative CRT and curative resection. LPLN dissection (LPLD) was performed in patients with suspected LPLN metastasis based on MDCT or MRI before CRT (LPLD group, N=38), and only total mesorectal excision (TME) was performed in patients without suspected LPLN metastasis (TME group, N=89). The incidence of LPLN metastasis is high even after preoperative CRT, and LPLD might improve local control and survival of patients with LPLN metastasis in advanced low rectal cancer treated with preoperative CRT. (author)

  1. Phase I study evaluating the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer with carbon ion radiotherapy: the PHOENIX-01 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment options for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer include surgery, chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy. In many cases, surgical resection is not possible, and therefore treatment alternatives have to be performed. Chemoradiation has been established as a convincing treatment alternative for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 1.16 and 2.46 depending on the pancreatic cancer cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy showed promising results for patients with pancreatic cancer. The present PHOENIX-01 trial evaluates carbon ion radiotherapy using the active rasterscanning technique in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with weekly gemcitabine and adjuvant gemcitabine. Primary endpoint is toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall survival, progression-free survival and response. The physical and biological properties of the carbon ion beam promise to improve the therapeutic ratio in patients with pancreatic cancer: Due to the inverted dose profile dose deposition in the entry channel of the beam leads to sparing of normal tissue; the Bragg peak can be directed into the defined target volume, and the sharp dose fall-off thereafter again spares normal tissue behind the target volume. The higher RBE of carbon ions, which has been shown also for pancreatic cancer cell lines in the preclinical setting, is likely to contribute to an increase in local control, and perhaps in OS. Early data from Japanese centers have shown promising results. In conclusion, this is the first trial to evaluate actively delivered carbon

  2. Radiation induced apoptosis and initial DNA damage are inversely related in locally advanced breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Gallego Carlos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA-damage assays, quantifying the initial number of DNA double-strand breaks induced by radiation, have been proposed as a predictive test for radiation-induced toxicity. Determination of radiation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes by flow cytometry analysis has also been proposed as an approach for predicting normal tissue responses following radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to explore the association between initial DNA damage, estimated by the number of double-strand breaks induced by a given radiation dose, and the radio-induced apoptosis rates observed. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were taken from 26 consecutive patients with locally advanced breast carcinoma. Radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was quantified as the initial number of DNA double-strand breaks induced per Gy and per DNA unit (200 Mbp. Radio-induced apoptosis at 1, 2 and 8 Gy was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide. Results Radiation-induced apoptosis increased in order to radiation dose and data fitted to a semi logarithmic mathematical model. A positive correlation was found among radio-induced apoptosis values at different radiation doses: 1, 2 and 8 Gy (p Conclusions An inverse association was observed for the first time between these variables, both considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity.

  3. Using economic analysis to evaluate the potential of multimodality therapy for elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Development of new and expensive drugs with activity against pancreatic cancer has made economic considerations more relevant to treatment decision-making for advanced disease. Economic modeling can be used to explore the potential of such novel therapies and to inform clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of radiation plus fluorouracil (RT-FU) relative to no treatment in elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to determine the economic potential of radiation plus gemcitabine (RT-GEM), a novel regimen for this disease. We used the SEER-Medicare database to estimate effectiveness and costs supplemented by data from the literature where necessary. Results: Relative to no treatment, RT-FU was associated with a cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $68,724/QALY in the base case analysis. Compared with RT-FU, the ICER for RT-GEM was below $100,000/QALY when the risk of dying with the new regimen was 1,000 subjects would be necessary to demonstrate this level of efficacy in a randomized trial. The ICER of RT-GEM was most sensitive to utility values, and, at lower efficacy levels, to costs of gemcitabine and treatment-related toxicity. Conclusions: In elderly patients with LAPC, RT-FU is a cost-effective alternative to no treatment. The novel regimen of RT-GEM is likely to be cost-effective at any clinically meaningful benefit, but quality-of-life issues, drug acquisition, and toxicity-related costs may be relevant, especially at lower efficacy levels

  4. Epidural analgesia during open radical prostatectomy does not improve long-term cancer-related outcome: a retrospective study in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Y Wuethrich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A beneficial effect of regional anesthesia on cancer related outcome in various solid tumors has been proposed. The data on prostate cancer is conflicting and reports on long-term cancer specific survival are lacking. METHODS: In a retrospective, single-center study, outcomes of 148 consecutive patients with locally advanced prostate cancer pT3/4 who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP with general anesthesia combined with intra- and postoperative epidural analgesia (n=67 or with postoperative ketorolac-morphine analgesia (n=81 were reviewed. The median observation time was 14.00 years (range 10.87-17.75 yrs. Biochemical recurrence (BCR-free, local and distant recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier technique. Multivariate Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to analyze clinicopathologic variables associated with disease progression and death. RESULTS: The survival estimates for BCR-free, local and distant recurrence-free, cancer-specific survival and overall survival did not differ between the two groups (P=0.64, P=0.75, P=0.18, P=0.32 and P=0.07. For both groups, higher preoperative PSA (hazard ratio (HR 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.01-1.02, P<0.0001, increased specimen Gleason score (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.46, P=0.007 and positive nodal status (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.03-2.67, P=0.04 were associated with higher risk of BCR. Increased specimen Gleason score predicted death from prostate cancer (HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.65-3.68, P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: General anaesthesia combined with epidural analgesia did not reduce the risk of cancer progression or improve survival after RRP for prostate cancer in this group of patients at high risk for disease progression with a median observation time of 14.00 yrs.

  5. Vascular intervention treatment role and signiifcance in patients with advanced ovarian cancer and cervical cancer%血管介入治疗对晚期卵巢癌与宫颈癌的治疗作用及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕峰泉; 李焕祥; 刘武军; 马彦寿

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo analysis of vascular interventional therapy in the treatment of patients with advanced ovarian cancer and cervical cancer role and signiifcance.Methods30 cases of advanced ovarian cancer and 30 cases of cervical cancer patients with vascular interventional therapy, and 30 cases of advanced ovarian cancer and 30 cases of cervical cancer patients with traditional surgery.ResultsThe vascular interventional treatment of patients with advanced ovarian cancer and cervical cancer patients with efficient and survival rate were obviously higher than that of traditional surgical treatment of patients, with signiifcant difference (P<0.05). ConclusionVascular interventional treatment of advanced ovarian cancer, and cervical cancer patients had a higher therapeutic effect and signiifcance.%目的分析血管介入治疗对晚期卵巢癌与宫颈癌的治疗作用及意义。方法30例晚期卵巢癌及30例宫颈癌患者采用血管介入治疗,另外30例晚期卵巢癌及30例宫颈癌患者采用传统手术治疗。结果晚期卵巢癌与宫颈癌患者血管介入治疗的有效率、存活率都明显高于传统手术治疗的患者,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论血管介入治疗晚期卵巢癌与宫颈癌患者有较高的治疗作用及意义。

  6. Repeat CT-scan assessment of lymph node motion in locally advanced cervical cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, Luiza; Velema, Laura; Mens, Jan Willem; Heijmen, Ben; Hoogeman, Mischa [Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, 3008 AE, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Zwijnenburg, Ellen [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    In cervical cancer patients the nodal clinical target volume (CTV, defined using the major pelvic blood vessels and enlarged lymph nodes) is assumed to move synchronously with the bony anatomy. The aim of this study was to verify this assumption by investigating the motion of the major pelvic blood vessels and enlarged lymph nodes visible in CT scans. For 13 patients treated in prone position, four variable bladder-filling CT scans per patient, acquired at planning and after 40 Gy, were selected from an available dataset of 9-10 CT scans. The bladder, rectum, and the nodal-vessels structure containing the iliac vessels and all visible enlarged nodes were delineated in each selected CT scan. Two online patient setup correction protocols were simulated. The first corrected bony anatomy translations and the second corrected translations and rotations. The efficacy of each correction was calculated as the overlap between the nodal-vessels structure in the reference and repeat CT scans. The motion magnitude between delineated structures was quantified using nonrigid registration. Translational corrections resulted in an average overlap of 58 ± 13% and in a range of motion between 9.9 and 27.3 mm. Translational and rotational corrections significantly improved the overlap (64 ± 13%, p value = 0.007) and moderately reduced the range of motion to 7.6-23.8 mm (p value = 0.03). Bladder filling changes significantly correlated with the nodal-vessels motion (p < 0.001). The motion of the nodal-vessels was large, nonrigid, patient-specific, and only moderately synchronous with the bony anatomy. This study highlights the need for caution when reducing the CTV-to-PTV (PTV planning target volume) margin of the nodal CTV for highly conformal radiation techniques. (orig.) [German] Bei Zervixkarzinompatientinnen wird davon ausgegangen, dass das nodale klinische Zielvolumen (CTV, definiert anhand der grossen Blutgefaesse des Beckens und vergroesserter Lymphknoten) sich synchron mit

  7. Nutrition in Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dintinjana, Renata Dobrila; Redžović, Arnela; Čubranić, Aleksandar; Dintinjana, Marin; Vanis, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Cachexia is defi ned as an unintended loss of stable weight exceeding 10%. Patients with advanced cachexia express anorexia, early satiety, severe weight loss, weakness, anemia, and edema. Anorexia represents the result of a failure of the usual appetite signals whereas cachexia is the debilitating state of involuntary weight loss. This syndrome, referred to as the »cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome« (CACS) and usually consists of a combination of anorexia, tissue wasting, malnutr...

  8. A Phase 1 First-in-Human Study of TRC105 (Anti-Endoglin Antibody) in Patients with Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Lee S.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Wong, Michael K.; Goldman, Jonathan; Mendelson, David S.; Figg, William D.; Spencer, Shawn; Adams, Bonne J.; Alvarez, Delia; Seon, Ben K.; Theuer, Charles P.; Leigh, Bryan R.; Gordon, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose TRC105 is a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds CD105 (endoglin). This first-in-human, phase 1, open label study assessed safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of TRC105 in patients with advanced refractory solid tumors. Patients and Methods Patients received escalating doses of intravenous TRC105 until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity using a standard 3 + 3 phase 1 design. Results Fifty patients were treated with escalating doses of TRC105. The maximum tolerated dose was exceeded at 15 mg/kg every week due to dose-limiting hypoproliferative anemia. TRC105 exposure increased with increasing dose, and continuous serum concentrations that saturate CD105 receptors were maintained at 10 mg/kg weekly (the maximum tolerated dose) and 15 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Common adverse events including anemia, telangiectasias and infusion reactions reflected the mechanism of action of the drug. Antibodies to TRC105 were not detected in patients treated with TRC105 from Chinese hamster ovary cells being used in ongoing phase 1b and phase 2 studies. Stable disease or better was achieved in 21 of 45 evaluable patients (47%) including two ongoing responses at 48 and 18 months. Conclusion TRC105 was tolerated at 10 mg/kg every week and 15 mg/kg every 2 weeks with a safety profile that was distinct from that of VEGF inhibitors. Evidence of clinical activity was seen in a refractory patient population. Ongoing clinical trials are testing TRC105 in combination with chemotherapy and VEGF inhibitors and as a single agent in prostate, ovarian, bladder, and hepatocellular cancer. PMID:22767667

  9. Gene-guided Gefitinib switch maintenance therapy for patients with advanced EGFR mutation-positive Non-small cell lung cancer: an economic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu Jun; Li Te; Wang Xiaohui; Ye Ming; Cai Jian; Xu Yuejuan; Wu Bin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Maintenance therapy with gefitinib notably improves survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and EGFR mutation-positive tumors, but the economic impact of this practice is unclear. Methods A decision-analytic model was developed to simulate 21-day patient transitions in a 10-year time horizon. The clinical data were primarily obtained from the results of a pivotal phase III trial that assessed gefitinib maintenance treatment in patients with ad...

  10. Tolerance of weekly metronomic paclitaxel and carboplatin as neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer patients who are unlikely to tolerate 3 weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin

    OpenAIRE

    Dessai, S. B.; Chakraborty, S; Babu, T. V. S.; Nayanar, S.; A Bhattacharjee; Jones, J.; S Balasubramanian; Patil, Vijay M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are little data regarding safety and effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in patients who are considered unfit for receiving 3 weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin. The aim of this study was to examine the toxicity and response rates of weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin as NACT in such cohort of patients. Methods: Study population included advanced ovarian cancer patients who were unlikely to tolerate 3 weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin and hence received weekly pacl...

  11. To Explore the Chinese Medicine Syndrome Types and Integrative Therapy from Clinical Relative Factors of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伊光

    2009-01-01

    Current Situation and Problems of the Treatment in Advanced Prostate Cancer In recent years,the incidence of prostate cancer shows a rising trend in China with an increase of 70%and has been the first place in the growth rate of malignant tumor in the male reproductive system. Prostate cancer has become a serious threat to male senior's health.Because of the application of

  12. Plasma levels of trefoil factors are increased in patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, E.M.; Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Poulsen, Steen Seier;

    2006-01-01

    Through cDNA array analyses and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays, trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) was recently shown to be overexpressed in prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of using the levels of trefoil factors as a plasma marker for prostate cancer....

  13. Disseminated Mycobacterium chelonae Infection in a Patient Receiving an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bark, Charles M.; Traboulsi, Rana S.; Honda, Kord; Starnes, Autumn M.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Rodriguez, Benigno

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of disseminated cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonae infection in a patient with head and neck cancer on salvage chemotherapy, including the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor cetuximab. Mycobacterium chelonae should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous infections in cancer patients receiving epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors.

  14. A phase II trial of Xeloda and oxaliplatin (XELOX) neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery for advanced gastric cancer patients with para-aortic lymph node metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yan; Yu, Yi-yi; Li, Wei; Feng, Yi; Hou, Jun; Ji, Yuan; Sun, Yi-Hong; Shen, Kun-Tang; Shen, Zhen-Bin; Qin, Xin-Yu; Liu, Tian-shu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer with para-aortic lymph node (PAN) involvement is regarded as advanced disease, and only chemotherapy is recommended from the guidelines. In unresectable cases, neoadjuvant chemotherapy could prolong survival if conversion to resectability could be achieved. Methods The study was a single-arm phase II trial. Patients who were diagnosed with gastric cancer and PAN involvement (Stations No. 16a2/16b1) were treated with capecitabine and oxaliplatin combination chemotherapy ...

  15. Randomised, phase II trial comparing oral capecitabine (Xeloda®) with paclitaxel in patients with metastatic/advanced breast cancer pretreated with anthracyclines

    OpenAIRE

    Talbot, D C; Moiseyenko, V; Van Belle, S; O'Reilly, S. M.; Alba Conejo, E; Ackland, S; Eisenberg, P; Melnychuk, D.; Pienkowski, T; Burger, H-U; Laws, S.; Osterwalder, B

    2002-01-01

    Capecitabine, an oral fluoropyrimidine carbamate, was designed to generate 5-fluorouracil preferentially at the tumour site. This randomised, phase II trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of capecitabine or paclitaxel in patients with anthracycline-pretreated metastatic breast cancer. Outpatients with locally advanced and/or metastatic breast cancer whose disease was unresponsive or resistant to anthracycline therapy were randomised to 3-week cycles of intermittent oral capecitabine (1255 ...

  16. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy with Biweekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Patients with Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cases of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is the leading therapeutic modality. However, much controversy exists about the chemotherapeutic regimens and radiation methods. Materials and Methods: During concurrent chemoradiotherapy, three or four cycles of gemcitabine (500 mg/m2) and cisplatin (30 mg/m2) were administered every two weeks while 50.4 Gy of irradiation was administered in 28 fractions (once/day, 5 treatment days/week) to the tumor site, mediastinum, and the involved lymph node region. In addition, a booster irradiation dose of 18 Gy in 10 fractions was administered to the primary tumor site unless the disease progressed. Two or three cycles of consolidation chemotherapy were performed with gemcitabine (1,200 mg/m2, 1st and 8th day) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2) every three weeks. Results: A total of 29 patients were evaluable for modality response. Response and treatment toxicities were assessed after concurrent chemoradiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy, respectively. One patient (4%) achieved a complete response; whereas 20 patients (69%) achieved a partial response after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Following the consolidation chemotherapy, three patients (10.3%) achieved complete responses and 21 patients (72.4%) achieved partial responses. The median follow-up period was 20 months (range 3-39 months) and the median survival time was 16 months (95% CI; 2.4-39.2 months). The survival rates in one, two, and three years after the completion of treatment were 62.7%, 43.9%, and 20%, respectively. Complications associated to this treatment modality included grade 3 or 4 esophagitis, which occurred in 15 patients (51.7%). In addition, an incidence of 24% for grade 3 and 14% for grade 4 neutropenia. Lastly, grade 2 radiation pneumonitis occurred in 6 patients (22%). Conclusion: The response rate and survival time of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with biweekly gemcitabine (500 mg/m2) and cisplatin

  17. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy with Biweekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Patients with Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, Chul Ho; Kim, Ja Kyung; Jang, Lee La; Moon, Dae Sung; Jang, Tae Won; Jung, Maan Hong; Cho, Sung Whan; Jeung, Tae Sig [Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    In cases of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is the leading therapeutic modality. However, much controversy exists about the chemotherapeutic regimens and radiation methods. Materials and Methods: During concurrent chemoradiotherapy, three or four cycles of gemcitabine (500 mg/m2) and cisplatin (30 mg/m2) were administered every two weeks while 50.4 Gy of irradiation was administered in 28 fractions (once/day, 5 treatment days/week) to the tumor site, mediastinum, and the involved lymph node region. In addition, a booster irradiation dose of 18 Gy in 10 fractions was administered to the primary tumor site unless the disease progressed. Two or three cycles of consolidation chemotherapy were performed with gemcitabine (1,200 mg/m2, 1st and 8th day) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2) every three weeks. Results: A total of 29 patients were evaluable for modality response. Response and treatment toxicities were assessed after concurrent chemoradiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy, respectively. One patient (4%) achieved a complete response; whereas 20 patients (69%) achieved a partial response after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Following the consolidation chemotherapy, three patients (10.3%) achieved complete responses and 21 patients (72.4%) achieved partial responses. The median follow-up period was 20 months (range 3-39 months) and the median survival time was 16 months (95% CI; 2.4-39.2 months). The survival rates in one, two, and three years after the completion of treatment were 62.7%, 43.9%, and 20%, respectively. Complications associated to this treatment modality included grade 3 or 4 esophagitis, which occurred in 15 patients (51.7%). In addition, an incidence of 24% for grade 3 and 14% for grade 4 neutropenia. Lastly, grade 2 radiation pneumonitis occurred in 6 patients (22%). Conclusion: The response rate and survival time of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with biweekly gemcitabine (500 mg/m2) and cisplatin

  18. Radiation induced apoptosis and initial DNA damage are inversely related in locally advanced breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA-damage assays, quantifying the initial number of DNA double-strand breaks induced by radiation, have been proposed as a predictive test for radiation-induced toxicity. Determination of radiation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes by flow cytometry analysis has also been proposed as an approach for predicting normal tissue responses following radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to explore the association between initial DNA damage, estimated by the number of double-strand breaks induced by a given radiation dose, and the radio-induced apoptosis rates observed. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were taken from 26 consecutive patients with locally advanced breast carcinoma. Radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was quantified as the initial number of DNA double-strand breaks induced per Gy and per DNA unit (200 Mbp). Radio-induced apoptosis at 1, 2 and 8 Gy was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide. Radiation-induced apoptosis increased in order to radiation dose and data fitted to a semi logarithmic mathematical model. A positive correlation was found among radio-induced apoptosis values at different radiation doses: 1, 2 and 8 Gy (p < 0.0001 in all cases). Mean DSB/Gy/DNA unit obtained was 1.70 ± 0.83 (range 0.63-4.08; median, 1.46). A statistically significant inverse correlation was found between initial damage to DNA and radio-induced apoptosis at 1 Gy (p = 0.034). A trend toward 2 Gy (p = 0.057) and 8 Gy (p = 0.067) was observed after 24 hours of incubation. An inverse association was observed for the first time between these variables, both considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity

  19. Daily etoposide and cisplatin during thoracic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A phase I/II trial was performed to investigate the toxicity and potential efficacy of delivering two radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agents (cisplatin and etoposide) on a daily basis during twice daily thoracic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Patients were eligible for this trial if they had unresectable or incompletely resected biopsy-proven stage IIIA or IIIB non-small cell lung carcinoma. However, patients with contralateral hilar or supraclavicular disease were excluded. Patients were required to have an ECOG performance status of 0-2 and ≤10% weight loss during the preceding three months. Thoracic radiation treatment (TRT) was delivered as accelerated hyperfractionated TRT with 150 cGy given twice daily beginning on a Monday. Patients received a two-week break between two courses of 3000 cGy (total dose:6000cGy). Patients received etoposide (25 mg/m2 po) on days 1-12 and cisplatin (3 mg/m2 IV) on days 1-5 and 8-12 of each course of TRT. Two weeks following the completion of TRT patients began two cycles (q 28d) of etoposide (25 mg/m2, po, d1-21) and cisplatin (50 mg/m2 IV, d1). Patients were seen in followup at 2 months following the completion of therapy and subsequently at 3 month intervals for the first year. Results: Seventeen patients were entered on the trial and the median followup was 11 months. Of the 17 patients, 13 had evaluable disease and 4 had measurable disease; 16 were deemed unresectable and one had an incomplete resection; 6 had squamous cell carcinomas and 11 had non-squamous cell carcinomas; 5 had primary tumors greater than 6 cm, 9 were 3-6 cm and 3 were <3 cm; 14 had less than 5% weight loss and 3 had 5-10% weight loss; 9 had stage IIIA disease and 8 had IIIB disease. The most common hematologic toxicity was leukopenias: 4 patients had grade 3 and 1 had grade 4 toxicity. No grade 3 or greater thrombocytopenia was observed. There were 6 grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities

  20. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  1. Latest advances in confocal microscopy of skin cancers toward guiding patient care: a Mohs surgeon's review and perspective (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Latest advances in confocal microscopy of skin cancers toward guiding patient care: a Mohs surgeon's review and perspective About 350 publications worldwide have reported the ability of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging to detect melanocytic skin lesions in vivo with specificity of 84-88% and sensitivity of 71-92%, and non-melanocytic skin lesions with specificity of 85-97% and sensitivity 100-92%. Lentigo maligna melanoma can be detected with sensitivity of 93% and specificity 82%. While the sensitivity is comparable to that of dermoscopy, the specificity is 2X superior, especially for lightly- and non-pigmented lesions. Dermoscopy combined with RCM imaging is proving to be both highly sensitive and highly specific. Recent studies have reported that the ratio of equivocal (i.e., would have been biopsied) lesions to detected melanomas dropped by ~2X when guided by dermoscopy and RCM imaging, compared to that with dermoscopy alone. Dermoscopy combined with RCM imaging is now being implemented to guide noninvasive diagnosis (to rule out malignancy and biopsy) and to also guide treatment, with promising initial impact: thus far, about 3,000 patients have been saved from biopsies of benign lesions. These are currently under follow-up monitoring. With fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) mosaicing, residual basal cell carcinomas can be detected in Mohs surgically excised fresh tissue ex vivo, with sensitivity of 94-97% and specificity 89-94%. FCM mosaicing is now being implemented for guiding Mohs surgery. To date, about 600 Mohs procedures have been performed, guided with mosaicing, and with pathology being performed in parallel to confirm the final outcome. These latest advances demonstrate the promising ability of RCM and FCM to guide patient care.

  2. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer: A survival study

    OpenAIRE

    Upasana Baruah; Debabrata Barmon; Amal Chandra Kataki; Pankaj Deka; Munlima Hazarika; Bhargab J Saikia

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patients with advanced ovarian cancer have a poor prognosis in spite of the best possible care. Primary debulking surgery has been the standard of care in advanced ovarian cancer; however, it is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates as shown in various studies. Several studies have discussed the benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Aims: This study aims to evaluate the survival statistics of the patients who have been managed with...

  3. Multivariable normal-tissue complication modeling of acute esophageal toxicity in advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated (chemo-)radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, R.; Dankers, F.; Troost, E.G.; Hoffman, A.L.; Heijden, E. van der; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Bussink, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The majority of normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for acute esophageal toxicity (AET) in advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (AS-NSCLC) patients treated with (chemo-)radiotherapy are based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Due to d

  4. Randomized phase III study comparing paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine and gemcitabine/cisplatin in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer without prior systemic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M;

    2012-01-01

    The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival....

  5. Favorable outcomes in locally advanced and node positive prostate cancer patients treated with combined pelvic IMRT and androgen deprivation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most appropriate treatment for men with prostate cancer and positive pelvic nodes, N+, is an area of active controversy. We report our 5-years outcomes in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (T1-T4N0-N1M0) treated with definitive radiotherapy encompassing the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes (intensity modulated radiotherapy, IMRT) and long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Of the 138 consecutive eligible men all living patients have been followed up to almost 5 years. Survival endpoints for 5-year biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression proportional hazards models were constructed for all survival endpoints. The RTOG morbidity grading system for physician rated toxicity was applied. Patients with locally advanced T3-T4 tumors (35 %) and N1 (51 %) have favorable outcome when long-term ADT is combined with definitive radiotherapy encompassing pelvic lymph nodes. The 5-year BFFS, RFS, PCSS and OS were 71.4, 76.2, 94.5 and 89.0 %, respectively. High Gleason sum (9–10) had a strong independent prognostic impact on BFFS, RFS and OS (p = 0.001, <0.001, and 0.005 respectively). The duration of ADT (= > 28 months) showed a significant independent association with improved PCSS (p = 0.02) and OS (p = 0.001). Lymph node involvement was not associated with survival endpoints in the multivariate analysis. The radiotherapy induced toxicity seen in our study population was moderate with rare Grade 3 GI side effects and up to 11 % for Grade 3 GU consisting mainly of urgency and frequency. Pelvic IMRT in combination with long-term ADT can achieve long-lasting disease control in men with N+ disease and unfavorable prognostic factors. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0540-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  6. Prognostic significance of total lesion glycolysis in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaizen, Yoshiaki [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Azuma, Koichi, E-mail: azuma@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kurata, Seiji [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Sadashima, Eiji; Hattori, Satoshi [Biostatistics Center, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Sasada, Tetsuro [Department of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Imamura, Yohei [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kaida, Hayato [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kawahara, Akihiko [Department of Pathology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kinoshita, Takashi [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Ishibashi, Masatoshi [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Hoshino, Tomoaki [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Background: [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging has been employed as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for malignant tumors. Total lesion glycolysis (TLG) on FDG-PET is calculated by multiplying the mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) by the tumor volume. Unlike the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), which represents the point of greatest metabolic activity within tumors, TLG has been suggested to reflect global metabolic activity in whole tumors. Methods: We retrospectively examined whether or not FDG-PET measurements, including SUVmean, SUVmax, and TLG, could predict progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving chemotherapy. Results: This study involved 81 consecutive patients with NSCLC who received chemotherapy. All of the patients underwent FDG-PET examination before treatment. SUVmean, SUVmax, and TLG on FDG-PET were significantly associated with gender, smoking status, and tumor histology. With adjustment for several other variables, Cox regression analysis showed that TLG was significantly prognostic for both PFS [hazard ratio = 2.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.18–4.64; P = 0.015] and OS (hazard ratio = 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.12–6.96; P = 0.003), whereas SUVmean and SUVmax had no significant association with PFS (P = 0.693 and P = 0.322, respectively) or OS (P = 0.587 and P = 0.214, respectively). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that TLG may be more useful than SUVmean and SUVmax for predicting PFS and OS in NSCLC patients receiving chemotherapy. The TLG measurement on FDG-PET imaging could be routinely recommended to advanced NSCLC patients.

  7. Predictive patient-specific dosimetry and individualized dosing of pretargeted radioimmunotherapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoffelen, Rafke; Woliner-van der Weg, Wietske; Visser, Eric P.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, PO Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Goldenberg, David M. [Garden State Cancer Center, Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States); IBC Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Sharkey, Robert M.; McBride, William J.; Chang, Chien-Hsing [Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Rossi, Edmund A. [IBC Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Graaf, Winette T.A. van der [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Medical Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) with bispecific antibodies (bsMAb) and a radiolabeled peptide reduces the radiation dose to normal tissues. Here we report the accuracy of an {sup 111}In-labeled pretherapy test dose for personalized dosing of {sup 177}Lu-labeled IMP288 following pretargeting with the anti-CEA x anti-hapten bsMAb, TF2, in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In 20 patients bone marrow absorbed doses (BMD) and doses to the kidneys were predicted based on blood samples and scintigrams acquired after {sup 111}In-IMP288 injection for individualized dosing of PRIT with {sup 177}Lu-IMP288. Different dose schedules were studied, varying the interval between the bsMAb and peptide administration (5 days vs. 1 day), increasing the bsMAb dose (75 mg vs. 150 mg), and lowering the peptide dose (100 μg vs. 25 μg). TF2 and {sup 111}In/{sup 177}Lu-IMP288 clearance was highly variable. A strong correlation was observed between peptide residence times and individual TF2 blood concentrations at the time of peptide injection (Spearman's ρ = 0.94, P < 0.0001). PRIT with 7.4 GBq {sup 177}Lu-IMP288 resulted in low radiation doses to normal tissues (BMD <0.5 Gy, kidney dose <3 Gy). Predicted {sup 177}Lu-IMP288 BMD were in good agreement with the actual measured doses (mean ± SD difference -0.0026 ± 0.028 mGy/MBq). Hematological toxicity was mild in most patients, with only two (10 %) having grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia. A correlation was found between platelet toxicity and BMD (Spearman's ρ = 0.58, P = 0.008). No nonhematological toxicity was observed. These results show that individual high activity doses in PRIT in patients with CEA-expressing CRC could be safely administered by predicting the radiation dose to red marrow and kidneys, based on dosimetric analysis of a test dose of TF2 and {sup 111}In-IMP288. (orig.)

  8. Radiation therapy of patients with locally advanced forms of upper airway cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These research devoted to the planning and radiation therapy problems and intended for patients with malignant neoplasms of upper airways. Devices ''Rocus AM'', ''Teratron-95'', linear accelerators ''Mevatron-KD-2'' and ''Clinac2100'' was applied toward the patients.

  9. First-line treatment with FOLFOXIRI for advanced pancreatic cancer in clinical practice: Patients' outcome and analysis of prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivaldi, Caterina; Caparello, Chiara; Musettini, Gianna; Pasquini, Giulia; Catanese, Silvia; Fornaro, Lorenzo; Lencioni, Monica; Falcone, Alfredo; Vasile, Enrico

    2016-08-15

    FOLFIRINOX is a standard first-line treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (aPC). The Gruppo Oncologico Nord Ovest (GONO) FOLFOXIRI regimen demonstrated efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer. We aimed to evaluate activity and tolerability of FOLFOXIRI regimen in patients with aPC and to explore putative prognostic factors. One hundred thirty-seven consecutive aPC patients were treated with FOLFOXIRI in our institution between 2008 and 2014. Clinical, laboratory and pathological data were collected and their association with activity, progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was investigated. After a median follow up of 30 months, median PFS and OS were 8.0 months (95% CI 6.19-9.81) and 12 months (95% CI 9.75-14.25), respectively. Response rate was 38.6%, while disease-control rate 72.2%. At multivariate analysis liver metastases (p = 0.019; Hazard Ratio, HR, 0.59, 95% Confidence Interval, CI, 0.380.96), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) 1 (p = 0.001; HR 2.26, 95%CI 1.42-3.59) and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR)> 4 (p= 0.002; HR: 2.42; 95% CI 1.38-4.25) were associated with poorer OS. We categorized 119 pts with complete available data as good-risk (0 factors, 38 pts), intermediate-risk (1 factor, 49 pts) and poor-risk (≥2 factors, 32 pts). Median OS for these three groups were 17.6, 11.1 and 7.4 months, respectively (p factors: our analysis revealed ECOG PS, liver metastases and NLR as the most important predictors of survival. These factors could be helpful for treatment decision and clinical trial design. PMID:27038273

  10. Prediction of response to chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer patients using Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locally advanced breast cancer is a common presentation in our part of the world. Down staging of the disease followed by surgery and further therapy has shown to prolong survival in such patients. Early prediction of response to therapy and chemo-resistance is of vital importance to ensure better outcome. The study was done to evaluate the possible role of Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography (MSM) in reliable and early prediction of response to therapy through tracer dynamics of the tumor. Response assessment through clinical criteria and other available modalities was also compared. 16 female patients were evaluated through dynamic and static prone MSM performed before and after two cycles of chemotherapy. Decay corrected washout curves were generated by drawing regions of interest (ROIs) all around the tumor. The tracer washout kinetics of the tumor were studied through half life estimation and tracer retention at 60 minute with reference to peak activity on pre and post therapy studies. Results were subjected to statistical analysis. There was a good correlation between the clinical assessment and dynamic MSM findings in good responders while the dynamic MSM was able to provide better information in poor responders. The results conclude that using tracer kinetics of MSM, early and reliable prediction of response to therapy and chemo-resistance may be possible

  11. Circulating tumor DNA identified by targeted sequencing in advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Lou, Feng; Wu, Yi; Sun, Da-Qiang; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Chen, Wei; Ye, Hua; Liu, Jing-Hao; Wei, Sen; Zhao, Ming-Yu; Wu, Wen-Jun; Su, Xue-Xia; Shi, Rong; Jones, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-28

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) have unique mutation patterns, and some of these mutations may be used to predict prognosis or guide patient treatment. Mutation profiling before and during treatment often requires repeated tumor biopsies, which is not always possible. Recently, cell-free, circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) isolated from blood plasma has been shown to contain genetic mutations representative of those found in the primary tumor tissue DNA (tDNA), and these samples can readily be obtained using non-invasive techniques. However, there are still no standardized methods to identify mutations in ctDNA. In the current study, we used a targeted sequencing approach with a semi-conductor based next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to identify gene mutations in matched tDNA and ctDNA samples from 42 advanced-stage NSCLC patients from China. We identified driver mutations in matched tDNA and ctDNA in EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and TP53, with an overall concordance of 76%. In conclusion, targeted sequencing of plasma ctDNA may be a feasible option for clinical monitoring of NSCLC in the near future. PMID:26582655

  12. Ondansetron in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer and Chronic Nausea and Vomiting Not Caused by Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Nausea and Vomiting; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. Feasibility of Electromagnetic Transponder Use to Monitor Inter- and Intrafractional Motion in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Eric T., E-mail: eric.t.shinohara@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Vanderbilt Clinic, Nashville, TN (United States); Kassaee, Alireza [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Vapiwala, Neha; Plastaras, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Drebin, Jeff [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wan, Fei [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of electromagnetic transponder implantation in patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Secondarily, the use of transponders to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, and the efficacy of breath holding for limiting target motion, were examined. Methods and Materials: During routine screening laparoscopy, 5 patients without metastatic disease were implanted with transponders peri-tumorally. The Calypso System's localization and tracking modes were used to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, respectively. Intrafractional motion, with and without breath holding, was also examined using Calypso tracking mode. Results: Transponder implantation was well tolerated in all patients, with minimal migration, aside from 1 patient who expulsed a single transponder. Interfractional motion based on mean shifts from setup using tattoos/orthogonal imaging to transponder based localization from 164 treatments was significant in all dimensions. Mean shift (in millimeters), followed by the standard deviation and p value, were as follows: X-axis: 4.5 mm (1.0, p = 0.01); Y axis: 6.4 mm (1.9, p = 0.03); and Z-axis 3.9 mm (0.6, p = 0.002). Mean intrafractional motion was also found to be significant in all directions: superior, 7.2 mm (0.9, p = 0.01); inferior, 11.9 mm (0.9, p < 0.01); anterior: 4.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.01); posterior, 2.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.02); left, 2.2 mm (0.4, p = 0.02); and right, 3.1 mm (0.6, p = 0.04). Breath holding during treatment significantly decreased tumor motion in all directions. Conclusions: Electromagnetic transponder implantation appears to be safe and effective for monitoring inter- and intrafractional motion. Based on these results a larger clinical trial is underway.

  14. Feasibility of Electromagnetic Transponder Use to Monitor Inter- and Intrafractional Motion in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of electromagnetic transponder implantation in patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Secondarily, the use of transponders to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, and the efficacy of breath holding for limiting target motion, were examined. Methods and Materials: During routine screening laparoscopy, 5 patients without metastatic disease were implanted with transponders peri-tumorally. The Calypso System’s localization and tracking modes were used to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, respectively. Intrafractional motion, with and without breath holding, was also examined using Calypso tracking mode. Results: Transponder implantation was well tolerated in all patients, with minimal migration, aside from 1 patient who expulsed a single transponder. Interfractional motion based on mean shifts from setup using tattoos/orthogonal imaging to transponder based localization from 164 treatments was significant in all dimensions. Mean shift (in millimeters), followed by the standard deviation and p value, were as follows: X-axis: 4.5 mm (1.0, p = 0.01); Y axis: 6.4 mm (1.9, p = 0.03); and Z-axis 3.9 mm (0.6, p = 0.002). Mean intrafractional motion was also found to be significant in all directions: superior, 7.2 mm (0.9, p = 0.01); inferior, 11.9 mm (0.9, p < 0.01); anterior: 4.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.01); posterior, 2.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.02); left, 2.2 mm (0.4, p = 0.02); and right, 3.1 mm (0.6, p = 0.04). Breath holding during treatment significantly decreased tumor motion in all directions. Conclusions: Electromagnetic transponder implantation appears to be safe and effective for monitoring inter- and intrafractional motion. Based on these results a larger clinical trial is underway.

  15. The use of tumour markers CEA, CA-195 and CA-242 in evaluating the response to chemotherapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, U.; Primrose, J N; Finan, P. J.; Perren, T. J.; Selby, P.; Purves, D. A.; Cooper, E H

    1993-01-01

    Tumour markers CEA, CA-195 and CA-242 were measured in 33 patients undergoing chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer. The aim was to determine whether they could be used to accurately monitor the course of the disease, and reduce the need for imaging. Treatment with a 5-fluorouracil based regimen resulted in a partial response in nine patients (27%), whereas the remainder either had disease stabilisation or suffered from progression. Before treatment the CEA was elevated in 85% of patien...

  16. Characteristics and outcomes of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer who declined to participate in randomised clinical chemotherapy trials

    OpenAIRE

    Tanai, C; Nokihara, H; Yamamoto, S.; Kunitoh, H; Yamamoto, N.; Sekine, I.; Ohe, Y; Tamura, T.

    2009-01-01

    There are inadequate data on the outcomes of patients who declined to participate in randomised clinical trials as compared with those of participants. We retrospectively reviewed the patient characteristics and treatment outcomes of both participants and non-participants in the two randomised trials for chemotherapy-naive advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Trial 1 compared four platinum-based combination regimens. Trial 2 compared two sequences of carboplatin plus paclitaxel and gefitinib ...

  17. High-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) with oral UFT/folinic acid and escalating doses of oxaliplatin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber Vestermark, Lene; Jensen, Helle A; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consensus is that patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) should receive long-term chemoradiotherapy (CRT) before surgery. With the intent to offer the patients intensified concomitant chemotherapy (CT) to improve outcome and to assess tolerability and toxicity of oxaliplatin (Ox) a...... phase I trial of high dose pelvic radiotherapy (RT), fixed dose of oral UFT/l-leucovorin and increasing doses of weekly Ox were performed....

  18. Role of Tc99m-Sestamibi scintimammography in assessing response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Singh, Rajesh K; Kumari, Saumya; Manohar, Kuruva; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Gurpreet

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is an essential part of multi-disciplinary management of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). In this study, we aimed at evaluating the role of Tc99m-Sestamibi scinti-mammography in assessing response to NACT in patients with LABC. Materials and Methods: A total of 42 patients of histologically proven LABC were enrolled in this prospective study. Imaging was performed according to pre-defined protocol at 10 min and 4 h after injection of tracer ...

  19. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, and Hydroxyurea Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous

  20. Phase I study of 4-demethoxydaunorubicin by oral route in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Andersen, E; Elbaek, K; Rasmussen, S N; Dalmark, M

    1988-01-01

    In a phase I trial 4-demethoxydaunorubicin (4-dm DNR) was administered as oral capsules once a week to 51 adults with advanced mainly gastrointestinal solid tumors. No fatal toxicity was observed at doses up to 25.0 mg/m2. Dose-limiting granulocytopenia and non-hematologic toxicity developed at...

  1. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  2. Chemotherapy with or without gefitinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of 6844 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hang; ZENG Chao; WANG Li-yang; XIE Hua; ZHOU Jin; DIAO Peng; YAO Wen-xiu

    2013-01-01

    Background Gefitinib is widely used in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC),in whom chemotherapy had failed.Previous trials reported inconsistent findings regarding the efficacy of gefitinib on overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS).This study was to evaluate the effects of chemotherapy plus gefitinib versus chemotherapy alone on survival of patients with NSCLC.Methods We systematically searched Medline,EmBase,the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials,reference lists of articles,and proceedings of major meetings for relevant literature.Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing chemotherapy with and without gefitinib in the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC were included in our analysis.The primary endpoints were OS and PFS.Results Of 182 relevant studies,12 were included in the final analysis,which consisted of 6844 patients with NSCLC.Overall,we noted that gefitinib therapy had an 8% improvement in the OS as compared to the gefltinib-free therapy,but this difference was not statistically significant (HR,0.92; 95% C/:0.85-1.00; P=0.051).Furthermore,gefltinib therapy had significantly longer PFS compared to gefitinib-free therapy (HR,0.72; 95% C/ 0.60-0.87,P=0.001).Patients receiving gefitinib therapy also had a more frequent objective response rate (ORR) than the control arm (OR,2.51; 95% C/,1.67-3.78,P <0.001).Rashes,diarrhea,dry skin,pruritus,paronychia,and abnormal hepatic function were more frequent in the gefitinib therapy group.Conclusions Treatment with gefitinib had a clear effect on PFS and ORR,and it might contribute considerably to the OS.Furthermore,there was some evidence of benefit for gefitinib therapy among patients with adenocarcinoma.

  3. Blood biomarkers are helpful in the prediction of response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer: A prospective, hypothesis driven study on patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/objective: Chemoradiation (CRT) has been shown to lead to downsizing of an important portion of rectal cancers. In order to tailor treatment at an earlier stage during treatment, predictive models are being developed. Adding blood biomarkers may be attractive for prediction, as they can be collected very easily and determined with excellent reproducibility in clinical practice. The hypothesis of this study was that blood biomarkers related to tumor load, hypoxia and inflammation can help to predict response to CRT in rectal cancer. Material/methods: 295 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were planned to undergo CRT were prospectively entered into a biobank protocol ( (NCT01067872)). Blood samples were drawn before start of CRT. Nine biomarkers were selected, based on a previously defined hypothesis, and measured in a standardized way by a certified lab: CEA, CA19-9, LDH, CRP, IL-6, IL-8, CA IX, osteopontin and 25-OH-vitamin D. Outcome was analyzed in two ways: pCR vs. non-pCR and responders (defined as ypT0-2N0) vs. non-responders (all other ypTN stages). Results: 276 patients could be analyzed. 20.7% developed a pCR and 47.1% were classified as responders. In univariate analysis CEA (p = 0.001) and osteopontin (p = 0.012) were significant predictors for pCR. Taking response as outcome CEA (p < 0.001), IL-8 (p < 0.001) and osteopontin (p = 0.004) were significant predictors. In multivariate analysis CEA was the strongest predictor for pCR (OR 0.92, p = 0.019) and CEA and IL-8 predicted for response (OR 0.97, p = 0.029 and OR 0.94, p = 0.036). The model based on biomarkers only had an AUC of 0.65 for pCR and 0.68 for response; the strongest model included clinical data, PET-data and biomarkers and had an AUC of 0.81 for pCR and 0.78 for response. Conclusion: CEA and IL-8 were identified as predictive biomarkers for tumor response and PCR after CRT in rectal cancer. Incorporation of these blood biomarkers leads to an additional accuracy of

  4. GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor decreases α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase levels in advanced cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Branca, Jacopo JV; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Noakes, David; Eslinger, Robert; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (nagalase) accumulates in the serum of cancer patients and its activity correlates with tumor burden, aggressiveness and clinical disease progression. The administration of GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) to cancer patients with elevated levels of nagalase has been associated with a decrease of serum nagalase activity and with significant clinical benefits. Here, we report the results of the administration of GcMAF to a heterogeneous cohort ...

  5. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor decreases alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase levels in advanced cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    L. Thyer; Ward, E.; Smith, R; J.J.V. Branca; G.Morucci; Gulisano, M; Noakes, D.; R. Eslinger; S. Pacini

    2013-01-01

    Abstract α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (nagalase) accumulates in the serum of cancer patients and its activity correlates with tumor burden, aggressiveness and clinical disease progression. The administration of GC protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) to cancer patients with elevated levels of nagalase has been associated with a decrease of serum nagalase activity and with significant clinical benefits. Here, we report the results of the administration of GcMAF to a heterogen...

  6. Supporting self-management of pain by patients with advanced cancer::Views of palliative care professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Nicholas D.; Closs, S. José; Flemming, Katherine Ann; Bennett, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the views of specialist palliative care professionals on patient self-management of cancer pain in order to inform the development of a new educational intervention to support self-management. Methods: Qualitative research using focus group interviews. Results: Participants viewed self-management of cancer pain as desirable and achievable but also as something that could be problematic. Challenges to self-management were perceived in: patient attitudes and behaviours, pr...

  7. Potential drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions among ambulatory cancer patients: a prevalence study using an advanced screening method

    OpenAIRE

    Schuitenmaker Martin S; Boom Frits A; Swart Eleonora L; van Leeuwen Roelof WF; Hugtenburg Jacqueline G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The pharmacotherapeutic treatment of patients with cancer is generally associated with multiple side-effects. Drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions between anti-cancer drugs or interactions with medication to treat comorbidity can reinforce or intensify side-effects. The aim of the present study is to gain more insight into the prevalence of drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions among patients being treated in the outpatient day care departments for oncolog...

  8. Ethical Dilemmas in Hospice and Palliative Care Units for Advanced Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Bag

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethical dilemmas that face heathcare team members referring patients to hospice programs include the ability of clinicians to predict accurately a patient bad prognosis. They affect day-to-day patient management in palliative care programs including healthcare team members concern over the use of morphine because possible respiratory depression in the patient, the question of providing enteral or parenteral nutritional support to patients who refuse to eat and the question of providing parenteral fluids to patients who are unable to take fluids during the terminal phrases of illness. A final ethical dilemma concerns the methodology for quality of life research in palliative care. Understanding and resolving these ethical dilemmas is an important factor determining the quality of the caring for the patient. The ethical dilemmas that are discussed in the article likely to occur in this period can be prevented through his/her participation in the decisions concerning his or her treatment. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 65-79

  9. The expression of E-cadherin-catenin complex in patients with advanced gastric cancer: role in formation of metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Ustymowicz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The E-cadherin-catenin complex plays an important role in the process of cell adhesion. Its dysfunction is associated with a decrease in cell differentiation and with increased invasiveness and metastasis. Our aim was to evaluate the expression of E-cadherin and B-catenin in advanced gastric cancer in relation to selected clinico-pathomorphological parameters. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens were immunohistochemically stained with monoclonal antibodies E-cadherin (NCL-E-Cad, Novocastra Laboratiries Ltd; dilution 1:50, beta-catenin (NCL-B-CAT, Novocastra Laboratories Ltd; dilution 1:100, alpha-catenin (alpha-E-caten, Santa Cruz Biotechnology; dilution 1:300 and gamma-catenin (gamma-catenin, Santa Cruz Biotechnology; dilution 1:100. The expressions of E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-, gamma-catenins in the main mass of tumor and lymph node metastasis were investigated in 91 patients with gastric cancer. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the expressions of E-cadherin, alpha-, beta-catenins and histological differentiation and between the expressions of E-cadherin, alpha-, gamma-catenins and location or depth of invasion. Moreover, the expression of alpha-, gamma-catenins in the main mass of tumor was not associated with lymph node metastasis. However, we found a relationship between the expression of beta-catenin in the main mass of tumor and lymph node metastasis and tumor location. The depth of invasion was correlated with positive expression of beta-catenin in the main mass of gastric cancer. A statistically significant association was observed between the expressions of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in the main mass of tumor and lymph node involvement. The expression of alpha-catenin in the main mass of tumor was also associated with histological differentiation and Lauren's classification. Statistical analysis showed an association between the expression of E-cadherin and postoperative survival time. No

  10. Gefitinib Plus Interleukin-2 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersanelli, Melissa, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it; Buti, Sebastiano; Camisa, Roberta [Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Brighenti, Matteo; Lazzarelli, Silvia [Oncology Unit, Azienda Istituti Ospitalieri di Cremona, Largo Priori, 1, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Mazza, Giancarlo [Radiology Division, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili,1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Passalacqua, Rodolfo, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it [1Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    The activation of lymphocytes by gefitinib treatment has been described. In this phase II pilot trial, we explored the possible synergism between IL-2 and gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. From September, 2003, to November, 2006, 70 consecutive patients with advanced, progressive NSCLC, previously treated with chemotherapy, received oral gefitinib 250 mg daily. The first 39 patients received gefitinib alone (G group). The other 31 also received subcutaneous IL-2 (GIL-2 group): 1 MIU/m{sup 2} (Million International Unit/m{sup 2})twice a day on Days 1 and 2, once a day on Days 3, 4, 5 every week for four consecutive weeks with a four-week rest period. Median follow-up was 25.2 months. Grade 3–4 toxicity of gefitinib was represented by skin rash (7%), asthenia/anorexia (6%) and diarrhea (7%); patients treated with IL-2 showed grade 2–3 fever (46%), fatigue (21%) and arthralgia (13%). In the GIL-2 group and G-group, we respectively observed: an overall response rate of 16.1% (6.4% complete response) and 5.1% (only partial response); a disease control rate of 41.9% and 41%; a median time to progression of 3.5 (CI 95% = 3.2–3.8) and 4.1 (CI 95% = 2.6–5.7) months; a median overall survival of 20.1 (CI 95% = 5.1–35.1) and 6.9 (CI 95% = 4.9–8.9) months (p = 0.002); and an actuarial one-year survival rate of 54% and 30%. Skin toxicity (p < 0.001; HR = 0.29; CI 95% = 0.16–0.54) and use of IL-2 (p < 0.001; HR = 0.33; CI 95% = 0.18–0.60) were independently associated with improvement of survival. In this consecutive, non-randomized, series of advanced NSCLC patients, the use of IL-2 increased the efficacy of gefitinib.

  11. Gefitinib Plus Interleukin-2 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bersanelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The activation of lymphocytes by gefitinib treatment has been described. In this phase II pilot trial, we explored the possible synergism between IL-2 and gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment. From September, 2003, to November, 2006, 70 consecutive patients with advanced, progressive NSCLC, previously treated with chemotherapy, received oral gefitinib 250 mg daily. The first 39 patients received gefitinib alone (G group. The other 31 also received subcutaneous IL-2 (GIL-2 group: 1 MIU/m2 (Million International Unit/m2twice a day on Days 1 and 2, once a day on Days 3, 4, 5 every week for four consecutive weeks with a four-week rest period. Median follow-up was 25.2 months. Grade 3–4 toxicity of gefitinib was represented by skin rash (7%, asthenia/anorexia (6% and diarrhea (7%; patients treated with IL-2 showed grade 2–3 fever (46%, fatigue (21% and arthralgia (13%. In the GIL-2 group and G-group, we respectively observed: an overall response rate of 16.1% (6.4% complete response and 5.1% (only partial response; a disease control rate of 41.9% and 41%; a median time to progression of 3.5 (CI 95% = 3.2–3.8 and 4.1 (CI 95% = 2.6–5.7 months; a median overall survival of 20.1 (CI 95% = 5.1–35.1 and 6.9 (CI 95% = 4.9–8.9 months (p = 0.002; and an actuarial one-year survival rate of 54% and 30%. Skin toxicity (p < 0.001; HR = 0.29; CI 95% = 0.16–0.54 and use of IL-2 (p < 0.001; HR = 0.33; CI 95% = 0.18–0.60 were independently associated with improvement of survival. In this consecutive, non-randomized, series of advanced NSCLC patients, the use of IL-2 increased the efficacy of gefitinib.

  12. Expression of TRF2 and its prognostic relevance in advanced stage cervical cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ozden, Sevgi; Tiber, Pinar Mega; Ozgen, Zerrin; Ozyurt, Hazan; Serakinci, Nedime; Orun, Oya

    2014-01-01

    Background Telomeres are protective caps consisted of specific tandem repeats (5′-TTAGGG-3′). Shortening of telomeres at each cell division is known as “mitotic clock” of the cells, which renders telomeres as important regulators of lifespan. TRF2 is one of the critical members of shelterin complex, which is a protein complex responsible from the preservation of cap structure, and loss or mutation of TRF2 results in DNA damage, senescence or apoptosis. Since cancer is frequently associated wi...

  13. Phase I clinical trial of fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ishikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that less-differentiated T cells are ideal for adoptive T cell transfer therapy (ACT and that fibronectin CH296 (FN-CH296 together with anti-CD3 resulted in cultured cells that contain higher amounts of less-differentiated T cells. In this phase I clinical trial, we build on these prior results by assessing the safety and efficacy of FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: Patients underwent fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy up to six times every two weeks and the safety and antitumor activity of the ACT were assessed. In order to determine immune function, whole blood cytokine levels and the number of peripheral regulatory T cells were analyzed prior to ACT and during the follow up. RESULTS: Transferred cells contained numerous less-differentiated T cells greatly represented by CD27+CD45RA+ or CD28+CD45RA+ cell, which accounted for approximately 65% and 70% of the total, respectively. No ACT related severe or unexpected toxicities were observed. The response rate among patients was 22.2% and the disease control rate was 66.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained in this phase I trial, indicate that FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy was very well tolerated with a level of efficacy that is quite promising. We also surmise that expanding T cell using CH296 is a method that can be applied to other T- cell-based therapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN UMIN000001835.

  14. The Impact of a Multidimensional Exercise Intervention on Physical and Functional Capacity, Anxiety, and Depression in Patients With Advanced-Stage Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist, Morten; Adamsen, Lis; Rørth, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with advanced-stage lung cancer face poor survival and experience co-occurring chronic physical and psychosocial symptoms. Despite several years of research in exercise oncology, few exercise studies have targeted advanced lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The aim...... of the present study was to investigate the benefits of a 6-week supervised group exercise intervention and to outline the effect on aerobic capacity, strength, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety, and depression. METHODS: VO2peak was assessed using an incremental exercise test. Muscle...... recruited. Forty-three patients dropped out. No serious adverse events were reported. Exercise adherence in the group training was 68%. Improvements in VO2peak (P < .001) and 6-minute walk distance (P < .001) and muscle strength measurements (P < .05) were seen. There was a reduction in anxiety level (P...

  15. The association of quality of life with potentially remediable disruptions of circadian sleep/activity rhythms in patients with advanced lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Donald P

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer patients routinely develop symptoms consistent with profound circadian disruption, which causes circadian disruption diminished quality of life. This study was initiated to determine the relationship between the severity of potentially remediable cancer-associated circadian disruption and quality of life among patients with advanced lung cancer. Methods We concurrently investigated the relationship between the circadian rhythms of 84 advanced lung cancer patients and their quality of life outcomes as measured by the EORTC QLQ C30 and Ferrans and Powers QLI. The robustness and stability of activity/sleep circadian daily rhythms were measured by actigraphy. Fifty three of the patients in the study were starting their definitive therapy following diagnosis and thirty one patients were beginning second-line therapy. Among the patients who failed prior therapy, the median time between completing definitive therapy and baseline actigraphy was 4.3 months, (interquartile range 2.1 to 9.8 months. Results We found that circadian disruption is universal and severe among these patients compared to non-cancer-bearing individuals. We found that each of these patient's EORTC QLQ C30 domain scores revealed a compromised capacity to perform the routine activities of daily life. The severity of several, but not all, EORTC QLQ C30 symptom items correlate strongly with the degree of individual circadian disruption. In addition, the scores of all four Ferrans/Powers QLI domains correlate strongly with the degree of circadian disruption. Although Ferrans/Powers QLI domain scores show that cancer and its treatment spared these patients' emotional and psychological health, the QLI Health/Function domain score revealed high levels of patients' dissatisfaction with their health which is much worse when circadian disruption is severe. Circadian disruption selectively affects specific Quality of Life domains, such as the Ferrans/Powers Health

  16. Optimal Second Line Treatment Options for Gemcitabine Refractory Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients. Can We Establish Standard of Care with Available Data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonmo Peter Kang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the birth of fluorouracil (5-FU 50 years ago, we have made only incremental changes in clinical outcomes in pancreatic cancer. Gemcitabine remains to be the only standard of care in advanced pancreatic cancer since mid-1990s [1]. Numerous trials which enrolled thousands of patients failed to improve the outcome significantly beyond gemcitabine. At present time, data set in 2nd line setting is grossly limited. One reason is that most advanced pancreatic cancer patients who progress on their 1st line treatment are often poor candidates for clinical trials due to their worsening performance status. Lack of active agents seen in number of trials in 1st line is another limitation in advancing agents in 2nd line setting. The change of this rather dark landscape in 1st line setting is suggested by two recent large randomized phase III trials in advanced pancreatic cancer showing that addition of capecitabine or erlotinib to gemcitabine render superiority to single-agent gemcitabine [2, 3].

  17. A prospective evaluation of Dignity Therapy in advanced cancer patients admitted to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmann, Lise Jul; Chochinov, Harvey M; Kristjanson, Linda J;

    2014-01-01

    questionnaires were completed when patients received the generativity document (T1) and 2 weeks later (T2). Changes from baseline (T0) were measured in sense of dignity, Structured Interview for Symptoms and Concerns items, Patient Dignity Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and European...... purpose, dignity and will to live. Quality of life decreased (mean = -9 (95% confidence interval: -14.54; -2.49)) and depression increased (mean = 0.31 (0.06; 0.57)) on one of several depression measures. At T2 (n = 31), sense of dignity (mean = -0.52 (-1.01; -0.02)) and sense of being a burden to others...... (mean = -0.26 (-0.49; -0.02)) improved. Patients with children and lower performance status, emotional functioning and quality of life were more likely to report benefit.Conclusions:This study adds to the growing body of evidence supporting Dignity Therapy as a valuable intervention in palliative care...

  18. Coping with Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Portfolio Snapshots Milestones in Cancer Research & Discovery Stories of ... Editorial Board Integrative Therapies Editorial Board Levels of Evidence Levels of Evidence: Treatment Levels of Evidence: Supportive & ...

  19. Evaluation of CYP3A-mediated drug-drug interactions with romidepsin in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laille, Eric; Patel, Manish; Jones, Suzanne F; Burris, Howard A; Infante, Jeffrey; Lemech, Charlotte; Liu, Liangang; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Two multicenter, single-arm, single-infusion, open-label studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of ketoconazole (a strong CYP3A inhibitor) or rifampin (a strong CYP3A inducer) daily for 5 days on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of romidepsin (8 mg/m(2) intravenous 4-hour infusion for the ketoconazole study or a 14 mg/m(2) intravenous 4-hour infusion for the rifampin study) in patients with advanced cancer. Romidepsin coadministered with ketoconazole (400 mg) or rifampin (600 mg) was not bioequivalent to romidepsin alone. With ketoconazole, the mean romidepsin AUC and Cmax were increased by approximately 25% and 10%, respectively. With rifampin, the mean romidepsin AUC and Cmax were unexpectedly increased by approximately 80% and 60%, respectively; this is likely because of inhibition of active liver uptake. For both studies, romidepsin clearance and volume of distribution were decreased, terminal half-life was comparable, and median Tmax was similar. Overall, the safety profile of romidepsin was not altered by coadministration with ketoconazole or rifampin, except that a higher incidence and greater severity of thrombocytopenia was observed when romidepsin was given with rifampin. The use of romidepsin with rifampin and strong CYP3A inducers should be avoided. Toxicity related to romidepsin exposure should be monitored when romidepsin is given with strong CYP3A inhibitors. PMID:26053962

  20. Advanced breast cancer. 2005-2007 period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exploratory study was conducted, observational (cohort study), application, in order to evaluate the performance of advanced breast cancer in Clinical and Surgical Teaching Hospital 'Jose Ramon Lopez Tabrane' during the period from January 2005 to December 2007. Our main objective was to understand the behavior of advanced cancer breast cancer in our midst in the aforementioned period. Our sample consisted of 44 patients, which was applied to the study Statistical analysis for the different variables used, expressing results in tables. The 4th and 5th decade of life, and the white skin color were variable representative in our sample. The right breast and upper quadrant outside were the most frequent sites of breast cancer. More than half of the patients had a tumor larger than 5 cm and metastatic nodes. Madden mastectomy was the most frequently used providing the greatest number of complications. We recommend the importance of breast self-examination and diagnosis preclinical use of mammography. (Author)

  1. Continuation maintenance therapy with S-1 in chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Seiichiro; Karayama, Masato; Inui, Naoki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Kuroishi, Shigeki; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Yokomura, Koshi; Koshimizu, Naoki; Toyoshima, Mikio; Imokawa, Shiro; Asada, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Masafumi; Yamada, Takashi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Maintenance therapy is a standard therapeutic strategy in non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer. However, there is no consensus regarding the benefit of maintenance therapy for patients with squamous cell lung cancer. We assessed maintenance therapy with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine agent, following induction therapy with carboplatin and S-1 in patients with squamous cell lung cancer. Methods In this phase II trial, chemotherapy-naïve patients with squamous cell lung cancer were enrolled to induction therapy with four cycles of carboplatin (at an area under the curve of 5 on day 1) and S-1 (80 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-14) in a 28-day cycle. Patients who achieved disease control after induction therapy received maintenance therapy with S-1 in a 21-day cycle until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival after administration of maintenance therapy. Results Fifty-one patients were enrolled in the study. The median progression-free survival from the start of maintenance therapy was 3.0 months (95 % confidence interval, 2.5-3.5). The most common toxicities associated with maintenance therapy were anemia, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue, but they were not severe. Conclusion S-1 maintenance therapy might be a feasible treatment option in patients with squamous cell lung cancer. PMID:27279143

  2. Reconstruction of Segmental Hemi-Mandibular Defects Using Soft Tissue Flaps in Patients with Severe Co morbidity and Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: The standard of care to reconstruct segmental oro-mandibular defects following head and neck oncological resection is to use osseocutaneous free-tissue transfer. Some patients however are not suitable for this type of complex reconstruction. The purpose of this paper is to study our results of soft-tissue flap reconstruction for segmental hemi-mandibular defects. Patients and Methods: Ten patients were included in the study, all had advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx or oral cavity and all had hemi- mandibulectomies. Results: In eight cases a vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) free flap was used and in two cases a pectoralis major myocutaneous pedicled flap was used. Normal oral feeding was achieved in six patients with a mean time for discontinuation of tube feeding of 18 days. Conclusion: In selected patients with severe co- morbidity and advanced oro-mandibular cancer, soft tissue flaps may be used for segmental hemi-mandibular defects

  3. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  4. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  5. Prognostic value of circulating VEGFR2+ bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Christophe; Borget, Isabelle; Le Deley, Marie Cécile; Taylor, Melissa; Gomez-Roca, Carlos; Soria, Jean Charles; Farace, Françoise

    2012-06-01

    We hypothesised that host-related markers, possibly reflecting tumour aggressiveness, such as circulating endothelial cells (CEC) and circulating VEGFR2(+) bone marrow-derived (BMD) progenitor cells, could have prognostic value in patients with advanced cancer enrolled in early anticancer drug development trials. Baseline CECs (CD45(-)CD31(+)CD146(+)7AAD(-) cells) and circulating VEGFR2(+)-BMD progenitor cells (defined as CD45(dim)CD34(+)VEGFR2(+)7AAD(-) cells) were measured by flow-cytometry in 71 and 58 patients included in phase 1 trials testing novel anti-vascular or anti-angiogenic agents. Correlations between levels of CECs, circulating VEGFR2(+)-BMD progenitor cells, clinical and biological prognostic factors (i.e. the Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) score), and overall survival (OS) were studied. The median value of CECs was 12 CEC/ml (range 0-154/ml). The median level of VEGFR2(+)-BMD progenitor cells was 1.3% (range 0-32.5%) of circulating BMD-CD34(+) progenitors. While OS was not correlated with CEC levels, it was significantly worse in patients with high VEGFR2(+)-BMD progenitor levels (>1%) (median OS 9.0 versus 17.0 months), and with a RMH prognostic score >0 (median OS 9.0 versus 24.2 months). The prognostic value of VEGFR2(+)-BMD progenitor levels remained significant (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-4.6, p = 0.02) after multivariate analysis. A composite VEGFR2(+)-BMD progenitor level/RHM score ≥ 2 was significantly associated with an increased risk of death compared to scores of 0 or 1 (median OS 9.0 versus 18.4 months, HR = 2.6 (95%CI, 1.2-5.8, p = 0.02)). High circulating VEGFR2(+)-BMD progenitor levels are associated with poor prognostics and when combined to classical clinical and biological parameters could provide a new tool for patient selection in early anticancer drug trials. PMID:22370181

  6. Locally advanced thyroid cancer: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Azizyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the results of treatment in a female patient with locally advanced thyroid cancer with a tumor thrombus in the internal jugular vein with laryngeal or tracheal involvement, and a giant metastasis into the bone of the vault of the skull.

  7. Weekly administration of docetaxel in combination with estramustine and celecoxib in patients with advanced hormone-refractory prostate cancer: final results from a phase II study

    OpenAIRE

    Carles, J; Font, A; Mellado, B.; Domenech, M.; Gallardo, E; González-Larriba, J L; Catalan, G.; Alfaro, J; Gonzalez del Alba, A; Nogué, M; LIANES, P; Tello, J M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of weekly docetaxel, estramustine and celecoxib in patients with advanced hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Forty-eight patients received 35 mg m−2 of weekly docetaxel for 3 out of every 4 weeks, 280 mg of estramustine twice daily on days 1–3, 8–10, 15–17 and 400 mg of celecoxib twice daily until progression or toxicity. Cycles were repeated every 28 days for at least six cycles. Patients were evaluated for response...

  8. Sequential measurements of serum matrix metalloproteinase 9 to monitor chemotherapy responses in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xiaojuan; Zhai, Xiaoran; Wang, Jinghui; Zhao, Xiaoting; Yang, Xinjie; Lv, Jialin; Ma, Li; Zhang, Lina; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Shucai; Yue, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, including lung cancer. However, whether variations in serum MMP-9 levels can serve as a biomarker for monitoring chemotherapy curative effect remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the association between variations in serum MMP-9 levels and chemotherapy curative effect in patients with lung cancer. Patients and methods A total of 82 patients with advanced lung cancer were included. All newly diagnosed patients were treated with platinum-based doublet chemotherapy. Serial measurements of serum MMP-9 levels were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In this manner, we chose four time points to examine the association, including before chemotherapy, and 3 weeks after the beginning of the first, second, and fourth cycles of chemotherapy. Results Compared with the serum level of MMP-9 before progressive disease, patients with progressive disease had elevated serum levels of MMP-9. Compared with the previous time point of collecting specimens, the serum levels of MMP-9 in the patients with a complete response/partial response/stable disease decreased or were maintained stable. The differences of variation in serum MMP-9 levels in patients with different chemotherapy curative effects were all statistically significant after one cycle, two cycles, and four cycles (after one cycle: P<0.001; after two cycles: P<0.001; after four cycles: P=0.01). However, patients with small-cell lung cancer did not exhibit similar test results. Conclusion The variation in serum MMP-9 levels in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer during chemotherapy was closely related to chemotherapy curative effect and could be useful to monitor chemotherapy curative effect for a small portion of patients. PMID:27330309

  9. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Advanced Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the experience at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) on the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy as primary treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer among patients in stages IIIC and IV. Methods: We conducted a descriptive retrospective study (case series type) of patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer in stages IIIC and IV, treated at the NCI from January 1, 2003 to December 31,2006, who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy as primary treatment. Demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes are described. Results: Seventeen patients who fulfilled the above mentioned criteria were selected. Once neoadjuvant chemotherapy ended, 5 patients (29.4%) achieved complete or partial clinical response; 4 (23.8%) remained in stable condition, and 8 (47.6%) showed signs of progressive illness. Interval debulking surgery was performed on objective response patients. Maximum cytoreduction was achieved in 5 patients (100%); first relapse was reported at month 18 of follow-up; 2 disease-free survivors were identified in December, 2007; 8 (49%) reported some degree of non-severe chemotherapy-related toxicity. No mortality was related to chemotherapy, no post surgical complications were observed and no patient required advanced support management. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by optimal interval debulking surgery among selected patients, can be an alternative treatment for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer among women with irresecability or the critically ill. Further studies with improved design are required to confirm these findings.

  10. Advanced techniques in dynamic infrared imaging research and application for cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared Imaging for biomedical applications is a non-invasive technique employed to visualize the distribution of infrared radiance coming from the subject under study, either in a static or a dynamic mode. The main difference is that while with the static method basal situations are studied, in the dynamic approach a sequence of thermograms, using thermal stimuli applied onto the patient are acquired, following the temperature evolution throughout the time. Since tumors possess abnormal metabolic activity, a structure and a vascular distribution essentially different from healthy tissue, and a lack of response to homeostatic signals, thermal stresses enhance even more their presence. For this reason, a completely non-invasive system, referred to as Enhancement and Stimulation System (ESS) was constructed, capable of imparting a cool or hot convective air flow onto the surface to examine and permitting to include in the study the time-course of the thermal stress application. In this work, the design of the Dynamic Infrared Imaging-ESS prototype, its characterization and optimization will be presented. In addition, examples of biomedical interest employing small animals will be shown as well. (author)

  11. Differences in Regional Diagnostic Strategies and in Intended Versus Actual First-Line Treatment of Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten Lindberg; Ottesen, Bent; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Triage of patients with ovarian cancer to primary debulking surgery (PDS) or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is challenging. In Denmark, the use of NACT has increased, but substantial differences in the use of NACT or PDS exist among centers. We aimed to characterize the differences...... and 4% never had debulking surgery. Of the 288 patients (53%) referred to NACT, 44% were never debulked. Fourteen patients (3%) were referred to palliative treatment. The use of different imaging modalities, diagnostic laparoscopy, and laparotomy varied significantly among the centers. Diagnostic......-line treatments as well as in the diagnostic process and use of NACT, calling for further discussion on diagnostic strategy and therapeutically approach for patients with advanced ovarian cancer....

  12. Retroperitoneoscopic Cutaneous Ureterostomy in the Supine Position to Relieve Painful Urinary-related Symptoms in an Advanced Anal Canal Cancer Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Akihiro Ito; Yasuhiro Kaiho; Yoichi Arai

    2014-01-01

    A case of advanced anal canal cancer with skin metastases that extended to the scrotum, penis, and lower abdomen is presented. The patient had severe pain on contact with voided urine because of skin tumors. The curved penis did not allow insertion of catheter to treat painful urination, and suprapubic cystostomy insertion was also impossible because of skin tumors. A right cutaneous ureterostomy was performed using the retroperitoneoscopic approach in supine position, and the left renal arte...

  13. PD-L1 Expression and Survival among Patients with Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy 1

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen Filskov Sorensen; Wei Zhou; Marisa Dolled-Filhart; Jeanette Baehr Georgsen; Zhen Wang; Kenneth Emancipator; Dianna Wu; Michael Busch-Sørensen; Peter Meldgaard; Henrik Hager

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent clinical trial results have suggested that programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression measured by immunohistochemistry may predict response to anti–programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) therapy. Results on the association between PD-L1 expression and survival among patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with chemotherapy are inconsistent. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We evaluated the relationship between PD-L1 expression and overall survival (OS) among 2...

  14. Cytokeratin 19-fragments (CYFRA 21-1) as a novel serum biomarker for response and survival in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Boeck, S.; Wittwer, C; Heinemann, V; Haas, M.; Kern, C; Stieber, P; Nagel, D; Holdenrieder, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: CYFRA 21-1 serves as biomarker in several epithelial malignancies. However, its role in pancreatic cancer (PC) has not yet been investigated. Methods: Within a prospective single-centre study serial blood samples were collected from patients with confirmed advanced PC. Pre-treatment values and weekly measurements of CYFRA 21-1, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) and carcinoembryonic antigen (assessed by Elecsys 2010, Roche Diagnostics) during palliative first-line chemotherapy we...

  15. The ethical decisions UK doctors make regarding advanced cancer patients at the end of life - the perceived (in appropriateness of anticoagulation for venous thromboembolism: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheard Laura

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer patients are at risk of developing blood clots in their veins - venous thromboembolism (VTE - which often takes the form of a pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis. The risk increases with advanced disease. Evidence based treatment is low molecular weight heparin (LMWH by daily subcutaneous injection. The aim of this research is to explore the barriers for doctors in the UK when diagnosing and treating advanced cancer patients with VTE. Method Qualitative, in-depth interview study with 45 doctors (30 across Yorkshire, England and 15 across South Wales. Doctors were from three specialties: oncology, palliative medicine and general practice, with a mixture of senior and junior staff. Framework analysis was used. Results Doctors opinions as to whether LMWH treatment was ethically appropriate for patients who were symptomatic from VTE but at end of life existed on a shifting continuum, largely influenced by patient prognosis. A lack of immediate benefit coupled with the discomfort of a daily injection had influenced some doctors not to prescribe LMWH. The point at which LMWH injections should be stopped in patients at the end of life was ambiguous. Some perceived ‘overcaution’ in their own and other clinicians’ treatment of patients. Viewpoints were divergent on whether dying of a PE was considered a “good way to go”. The interventionalism and ethos of palliative medicine was discussed. Conclusions Decisions are difficult for doctors to make regarding LMWH treatment for advanced cancer patients with VTE. Treatment for this patient group is bounded to the doctors own moral and ethical frameworks.

  16. A Phase II study of acute toxicity for CelebrexTM (celecoxib) and chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer: Primary endpoint analysis of RTOG 0128

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine treatment-related acute toxicity rates in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by oral celecoxib, i.v. cisplatin and 5-FU, and concurrent pelvic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients on this RTOG Phase I-II study for advanced cervix cancer included FIGO Stage IIB-IVA or patients with FIGO Stage IB through IIA with biopsy proven pelvic node metastases or tumor size ≥5 cm. Patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Celecoxib was prescribed at 400 mg twice daily beginning on day 1 for 1 year. Cisplatin (75 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1g/m2 for 4 days) were administered every 3 weeks times 3. The primary end point of the study was treatment related toxicity. Results: Between August 2001 and March 2004, 84 patients were accrued to the study and 77 patients were evaluable for toxicity. Regarding the primary end point, toxicities were observed in the following areas: blood/bone marrow (16), gastrointestinal (14), pain (7), renal/genitourinary (6), cardiovascular (3), hemorrhage (1), and neurologic (1). For the first 75 evaluable patients, a toxicity failure was identified in 36 patients for a rate of 48%. Conclusions: Celecoxib at 400 mg twice daily together with concurrent cisplatin and 5-FU and pelvic radiotherapy has a high incidence of acute toxicities. The most frequent toxicities were hematologic. Albeit, the toxicity was deemed excessive in this trial, the rate of toxicities was not too different compared to other recent experiences with concurrent chemoradiation for advanced cervix cancer

  17. Baseline neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (≥2.8) as a prognostic factor for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been proposed as an indicator of systemic inflammatory response and may predict the clinical outcome in some cancers, such as head and neck cancer and gastric cancer. However, the value of this ratio is variable in different cancers. Studies of the relationship between NLR and both survival and response to chemoradiation have been limited with respect to locally advanced rectal cancer. From 2006 to 2011, 199 consecutive locally advanced rectal cancer patients who were treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation in the Shanghai Cancer Center were enrolled and analysed retrospectively. Tumor response was evaluated by pathological findings. The baseline total white blood cell count (WBC) and the neutrophil, lymphocyte, platelet counts were recorded. The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and the relationship with clinical outcomes such as overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was analyzed. With ROC analysis, the baseline NLR value was found to significantly predict prognosis in terms of OS well in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. A multivariate analysis identified that a cut-off value of NLR ≥ 2.8 could be used as an independent factor to indicate decreased OS (HR, 2.123; 95% CI, 1.140-3.954; P = 0.018). NLR ≥ 2.8 was also associated with worse DFS in univariate analysis (HR, 1.662; 95% CI, 1.037-2.664; P = 0.035), though it was not significant in the multivariate analysis (HR, 1.363; 95% CI, 0.840-2.214; P = 0.210). There was no observed significant correlation of mean value of NLR to the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The mean NLR in the ypT0-2 N0 group was 2.68 ± 1.38, and it was 2.77 ± 1.38 in the ypT3-4/N+ group, with no statistical significance (P = 0.703). The mean NLR in the TRG 0–1 group was 2.68 ± 1.42, and it was 2.82 ± 1.33 in the TRG 2–3 group with no statistical significance (P = 0.873). An elevated baseline NLR is a valuable and easily available prognostic factor for OS in

  18. Dyspnea during Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. Laser therapy for tumors inside large airways: Use of a ... cases, treatment will begin before a diagnosis of cancer is made. The following ... therapy is usually used to treat a tumor that is blocking the vein. After ...

  19. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol 'SCHARC' and the overall survival of our patients. From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III) were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %), one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 %) and one fifth (19 %) suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1–5: 20 mg/m2/d DDP + 750–1000 mg/m2/d 5FU (cont. infusion). This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69–70.5 Gy). All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Forty patients (63 %) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d) and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d), respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 %) had acute grade 2–3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 %) suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient < 1.0 g/nl) and the mean hemoglobin value decreased from 13.2 to 10.5 g/dl. Univariate analysis of survival showed a better outcome for patients with a hemoglobin nadir >10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer. It led to

  20. A Study Of Oral PF-02341066, A c-Met/Hepatocyte Growth Factor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, In Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-03

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ALK-positive); Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (c-Met Dependent); Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (ROS Marker Positive); Systemic Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma; Advanced Malignancies (Except Leukemia)

  1. Prospective assessment of the prognostic value of circulating tumor cells and their clusters in patients with advanced-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Zhaomei; Wang, Chun; Ye, Zhong; Austin, Laura; Civan, Jesse; Hyslop, Terry; Palazzo, Juan P; Jaslow, Rebecca; Li, Bingshan; Myers, Ronald E; Jiang, Juntao; Xing, Jinliang; Yang, Hushan; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    The enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provides important prognostic values in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Recent studies indicate that individual CTCs form clusters and these CTC-clusters play an important role in tumor metastasis. We aimed to assess whether quantification of CTC-clusters provides additional prognostic value over quantification of individual CTCs alone. In 115 prospectively enrolled advanced-stage (III and IV) breast cancer patients, CTCs and CTC-clusters were counted in 7.5 ml whole blood using the CellSearch system at baseline before first-line therapy. The individual and joint effects of CTC and CTC cluster counts on patients' progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards modeling. Of the 115 patients, 36 (31.3 %) had elevated baseline CTCs (≥5 CTCs/7.5 ml) and 20 (17.4 %) had CTC-clusters (≥2 CTCs/7.5 ml). Patients with elevated CTCs and CTC-clusters both had worse PFS with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.76 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.57-4.86, P log-rank = 0.0005] and 2.83 (1.48-5.39, P log-rank = 0.001), respectively. In joint analysis, compared with patients with IBC), the most aggressive form of breast cancer with the poorest survival. Baseline counts of both individual CTCs and CTC-clusters were associated with PFS in advanced-stage breast cancer patients. CTC-clusters might provide additional prognostic value compared with CTC enumeration alone, in patients with elevated CTCs. PMID:26573830

  2. Phase III study comparing cisplatin plus gemcitabine with cisplatin plus pemetrexed in chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scagliotti, G.V.; Parikh, P.; Pawel, J. von;

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Cisplatin plus gemcitabine is a standard regimen for first-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Phase II studies of pemetrexed plus platinum compounds have also shown activity in this setting. Patients and Methods This noninferiority, phase III, randomized study...... neutropenia (P = .002); and alopecia (P common. Conclusion In advanced NSCLC, cisplatin/pemetrexed provides similar efficacy with better tolerability and more convenient administration than cisplatin....../gemcitabine. This is the first prospective phase III study in NSCLC to show survival differences based on histologic type Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7/20...

  3. EFFICACY OF ZOLEDRONIC ACID IN THE PREVENTION OF BONE METASTASES IN PATIENTS WITH LOCALLY ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Musaev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the performed study has established that zoledronic acid is an effective agent in multimodality therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC and allows long-term stabilization of bone tissue. In addition, there is evidence for the efficacy of zoledronic acid in preventing bone metastases (BM and increasing the time to the first BM. The currently accumulated experience with zoledronic acid used in PC permits one to consider its use as standard concomitant therapy.

  4. Radiotherapy in combination with simultaneous intra-arterial chemotherapy (RADPLAT) in patients with advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A particular challenge for both laryngologists and oncologists is presented by the fact that treatment of patients in advanced stages of cancer disease, in whom either combined therapy (surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy) or radiotherapy alone have been applied, is associated with highly dissatisfying results. Clinical trials exploring the application of chemotherapy combined with simultaneous radiotherapy are arousing greater interest. This is because the results of recently published randomised prospective studies and meta analyses show improved loco-regional results of this treatment strategy, which in turn improves overall survival. Cytostatic drugs used in conjunction with radiotherapy have many functions but, above all, their purpose is to intensify the effects of irradiation which, in such treatment schemes, is the leading method. One of the basic factors limiting the application of such strategies is the problem of how to limit the toxicity from one side, while administering a sufficiently high dose of cytostatics, and to continue without any gaps the course of radiation from the other. A problem associated with combined therapy is how to ensure the highest concentration of cytostatics is in the malignant tumour. The need to break through both of these limiting factors has become the subject of intensive research. One of the possible solutions to these problems is the simultaneous application of irradiation in combination with selective intra-arterial chemotherapy. To date, final results are still unavailable from phase III clinical trials which are investigating this treatment method. Presented in this paper are the advantages and disadvantages in the treatment strategy called the RADPLAT programme. The RADPLAT programme is characterised by great local effects, somewhat lesser regional effects and still lesser effects in the treatment of micro-metastases. Research is continuing, in order to find methods for the improvement of treatment results, with a view

  5. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Wojciech Leppert,1 Mikolaj Majkowicz,2 Maria Forycka,1 Eleonora Mess,3 Agata Zdun-Ryzewska2 1Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Quality of Life Research, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland; 3Palliative Care Nursing Department, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Aim of the study: To assess quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU), and at a day care...

  6. Effects of a ketogenic diet on the quality of life in 16 patients with advanced cancer: a pilot train

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Melanie; Pfetzer, Nadja; Schwab, Micheal; Strauss, Ingrid; Kaemmerer, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tumor patients exhibit an increased peripheral demand of fatty acids and protein. Contrarily, tumors utilize glucose as their main source of energy supply. Thus, a diet supplying the cancer patient with sufficient fat and protein for his demands while restricting the carbohydrates (CHO) tumors thrive on, could be a helpful strategy in improving the patients’ situation. A ketogenic diet (KD) fulfills these requirements. Therefore, we performed a pilot study to investigate the feasi...

  7. Nutritional variations during chemotherapy for patients suffering from a locally advanced oesophagus cancer; Variations nutritionnelles en cours de chimioradiotherapie chez des patients atteints d'un cancer de l'oesophage localement evolue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duclos, A.; Blondin, V.; Quiesse, M.; Iwanicki-Caron, I.; Lecleire, S.; Michel, P.; Di Fiore, F. [CHU Charles-Nicolle, 76 - Rouen (France); Dubray, B.; Di Fiore, F. [CRLCC Henri-Becquerel, 76 - Rouen (France)

    2010-10-15

    As de-nutrition is frequently noticed for patients suffering from a locally advanced oesophagus cancer, the authors report a study of the variations of nutritional parameters during chemotherapy and of their impacts of the treatment process and efficiency. Thus, different parameters have been studied at the beginning, during and at the end of the treatment: weight, albumin range, body weight index, calorie survey, and the nutritional support type. The authors observe very important variations with a significant impact on treatment tolerance and efficiency. Short communication

  8. Bone health in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coleman, R; Body, J J; Aapro, M;

    2014-01-01

    There are three distinct areas of cancer management that make bone health in cancer patients of increasing clinical importance. First, bone metastases are common in many solid tumours, notably those arising from the breast, prostate and lung, as well as multiple myeloma, and may cause major...... morbidity including fractures, severe pain, nerve compression and hypercalcaemia. Through optimum multidisciplinary management of patients with bone metastases, including the use of bone-targeted treatments such as potent bisphosphonates or denosumab, it has been possible to transform the course of advanced...... cancer for many patients resulting in a major reduction in skeletal complications, reduced bone pain and improved quality of life. Secondly, many of the treatments we use to treat cancer patients have effects on reproductive hormones, which are critical for the maintenance of normal bone remodelling...

  9. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of concurrent chemoradiotherapy in treatment of head and neck cancer was evaluated. Authers reviewed the patients with cancer in tongue, mesopharynx and hypopharynx, treated in Kyushu Cancer Center. Of twelve T3-4 mesopharyngeal cancers, complete responses were achieved in four cases (33%). Two of eight cases of T3 hypopharyngeal cancer could obtain complete response with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. However, chemoradiotherapy is not effective for advanced oral cancer patients. On the other hand, there is some patients which could not complete a treatment for complications. Patients should be under careful and strict management through concurrent chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  10. Phase i and pharmacological trial of lapatinib in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Noll, R.; Smit, W. M.; Wymenga, A. N M; Boss, D. S.; Grob, M.; Huitema, A. D R; Rosing, H.; Tibben, M. M.; Keessen, M.; Rehorst, H.; Beijnen, J. H.; Schellens, J. H M

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Background Lapatinib has proven efficacy as monotherapy and in combination with capecitabine in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) overexpressing HER2 and/or EGFR. Gemcitabine also has anti-tumor activity in MBC and a favourable toxicity profile. In this phase I study lapatinib an

  11. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  12. Phase II study of safety and efficacy of motesanib in patients with progressive or symptomatic, advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlumberger, Martin J; Elisei, Rossella; Bastholt, Lars;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: This phase II study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of motesanib, an investigational, highly selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3; platelet-derived growth factor receptor; and Kit in advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). PATIENTS AND...... METHODS: Patients with locally advanced or metastatic, progressive or symptomatic MTC received motesanib 125 mg/d orally for up to 48 weeks or until unacceptable toxicity or disease progression. The primary end point was objective response by independent review. Other end points included duration of...... response, progression-free survival, safety, pharmacokinetics, and changes in tumor markers. RESULTS: Of 91 enrolled patients who received motesanib, two (2%) achieved objective response (95% CI, 0.3% to 7.7%); their duration of response was 32 weeks (censored) and 21 weeks (disease progressed). Eighty...

  13. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Activity Measured by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in Patients with Advanced Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Choi, Jiyoun; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Jo, Kwan Hyeong; Lee, Jaehoon; Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We evaluated the potential prognostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with stage IIIC/IV endometrial cancer. Patients with stage IIIC/IV endometrial cancer who had undergone FDG PET/CT workup for staging were enrolled. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) measured from regions of interest (ROIs) of the primary tumor (SUVt) and lymph nodes (SUVn) were correlated with overall survival (OS). The SUVn was defined as the highest SUV{sub max} of the metastatic lymph nodes. Survival probability was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 42 patients with a median age of 55.5 years (range 32-76 years) were included. Twenty-nine percent (n =12) of patients were premenopausal and 71 % (n =30) were postmenopausal. The average SUVt was 12.9 (range 1.8-36.5), and the average SUVn was 7.3 (range 2.0-22.5). Median follow-up time was 25.9 months (range 1.84 months). Using a SUVt of 9.5 as a cutoff value, two groups with different rates were determined (P=0.026). In addition, patients with a low SUVn had significantly better OS than those with a high SUVn (P=0.003). Patients in the International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO) stage IV group with SUVt≥9.5 or SUVn≥7.3 showed a significantly longer OS than the other groups. FDG uptake of primary endometrial cancer and lymph nodes might be a prognostic factor in advanced endometrial cancer. More aggressive therapy could be considered in patients with stage IV endometrial cancer and high SUVt and/or high SUVn.

  14. Retroperitoneoscopic Cutaneous Ureterostomy in the Supine Position to Relieve Painful Urinary-related Symptoms in an Advanced Anal Canal Cancer Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Ito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of advanced anal canal cancer with skin metastases that extended to the scrotum, penis, and lower abdomen is presented. The patient had severe pain on contact with voided urine because of skin tumors. The curved penis did not allow insertion of catheter to treat painful urination, and suprapubic cystostomy insertion was also impossible because of skin tumors. A right cutaneous ureterostomy was performed using the retroperitoneoscopic approach in supine position, and the left renal artery was embolized using ethanol to eliminate left kidney function. The patient became completely free from all urinary-related pains until he died of progressive disease.

  15. Advances in Lung Cancer Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Rahimi

    2010-01-01

    Imaging has a critical role in diagnosis, staging and monitoring of patients with lung cancer."nThe role of imaging in screening for malignancy has not been established."nWe discuss new concepts in staging also the early diagnosis and screening for lung cancer.

  16. Whole-liver radiotherapy for end-stage colorectal cancer patients with massive liver metastases and advanced hepatic dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether whole-liver radiotherapy (RT) is beneficial in end-stage colorectal cancer with massive liver metastases and severe hepatic dysfunction. Between June 2004 and July 2008, 10 colorectal cancer patients, who exhibited a replacement of over three quarters of their normal liver by metastatic tumors and were of Child-Pugh class B or C in liver function with progressive disease after undergoing chemotherapy, underwent whole-liver RT. RT was administered using computed tomography-based three-dimensional planning and the median dose was 21 Gy (range, 21-30) in seven fractions. Improvement in liver function tests, defined as a decrease in the levels within 1 month after RT, symptom palliation, toxicity, and overall survival were analyzed retrospectively. Levels of alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase improved in 8, 6, 9, and all 10 patients, respectively, and the median reduction rates were 42%, 68%, 50%, and 57%, respectively. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen level decreased after RT in three of four assessable patients. For all patients, pain levels decreased and acute toxicity consisted of nausea/vomiting of grade ≤ 2. Further chemotherapy became possible in four of 10 patients. Mean survival after RT was 80 ± 80 days (range, 20-289); mean survival for four patients who received post-RT chemotherapy was 143 ± 100 days (range, 65-289), versus 38 ± 16 days (range, 20-64) for the six patients who did not receive post-RT chemotherapy (p = 0.127). Although limited by small case number, this study demonstrated a possible role of whole-liver RT in improving hepatic dysfunction and delaying mortality from hepatic failure for end-stage colorectal cancer patients with massive liver metastases. Further studies should be followed to confirm these findings

  17. Whole-liver radiotherapy for end-stage colorectal cancer patients with massive liver metastases and advanced hepatic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sun Young

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate whether whole-liver radiotherapy (RT is beneficial in end-stage colorectal cancer with massive liver metastases and severe hepatic dysfunction. Methods Between June 2004 and July 2008, 10 colorectal cancer patients, who exhibited a replacement of over three quarters of their normal liver by metastatic tumors and were of Child-Pugh class B or C in liver function with progressive disease after undergoing chemotherapy, underwent whole-liver RT. RT was administered using computed tomography-based three-dimensional planning and the median dose was 21 Gy (range, 21-30 in seven fractions. Improvement in liver function tests, defined as a decrease in the levels within 1 month after RT, symptom palliation, toxicity, and overall survival were analyzed retrospectively. Results Levels of alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase improved in 8, 6, 9, and all 10 patients, respectively, and the median reduction rates were 42%, 68%, 50%, and 57%, respectively. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen level decreased after RT in three of four assessable patients. For all patients, pain levels decreased and acute toxicity consisted of nausea/vomiting of grade ≤ 2. Further chemotherapy became possible in four of 10 patients. Mean survival after RT was 80 ± 80 days (range, 20-289; mean survival for four patients who received post-RT chemotherapy was 143 ± 100 days (range, 65-289, versus 38 ± 16 days (range, 20-64 for the six patients who did not receive post-RT chemotherapy (p = 0.127. Conclusions Although limited by small case number, this study demonstrated a possible role of whole-liver RT in improving hepatic dysfunction and delaying mortality from hepatic failure for end-stage colorectal cancer patients with massive liver metastases. Further studies should be followed to confirm these findings.

  18. Original P53 status predicts for pathological response in locally advanced breast cancer patients treated preoperatively with continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: 1) To test feasibility of preoperative continuous infusion (c.i.) 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiation (RT) in locally advanced breast cancer. 2) To study clinical and pathological response rates of 5-FU and radiation. 3) To attempt preliminary correlations between biological probes and pathological response. Methods and Materials: Previously untreated, locally advanced breast cancer patients were eligible: only patients who presented with T3/T4 tumors that could not be resected with primary wound closure were eligible, while inflammatory breast cancer patients were excluded. The protocol consisted of preoperative c.i. infusion 5-FU, 200 mg/m2/day with radiotherapy, 50 Gy at 2 Gy fractions to the breast and regional nodes. At mastectomy, pathological findings were classified based on persistence of invasive cancer: pathological complete response (pCR) = no residual invasive cells in the breast and axillary contents; pathological partial response (pPR) = presence of microscopic foci of invasive cells in either the breast or nodal specimens; no pathological response (pNR) = pathological persistence of tumor. For each patient pretreatment breast cancer biopsies were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for nuclear grade, ER/PR hormonal receptors, her2/neu and p53 overexpression. Results: Thirty-five women have completed the protocol and are available for analysis. 5-FU was interrupted during radiation in 10 of 35 patients because of oral mucositis in 8 patients, cellulitis in 1, and patient choice in another. Objective clinical response rate before mastectomy was 71% (25 of 35 patients): 4 CR, 21 PR. However, in all 35 patients tumor response was sufficient to make them resectable with primary wound closure. Accordingly, all patients underwent modified radical mastectomy: primary wound closure was achieved in all patients. At mastectomy there were 7 pCR (20%), 5 pPR (14%) and the remaining 23 patients (66%) had pathological persistence of cancer (p

  19. Muscle dysfunction in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Andersen, J L;

    2014-01-01

    dysfunction is evident across all stages of the cancer trajectory. The causes of cancer-related muscle dysfunction are complex, but may involve a wide range of tumor-, therapy- and/or lifestyle-related factors, depending on the clinical setting of the individual patient. The main importance of muscle...... dysfunction in cancer patients lies in the correlation to vital clinical end points such as cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, therapy complications and quality of life (QoL). Such associations strongly emphasize the need for effective therapeutic countermeasures to be developed and implemented in...... powered to evaluate clinical outcomes associated with improvements in muscle function, or be promoted in advanced stage settings, aiming to reverse cancer-related muscle dysfunction, and thus potentially improve time-to-progression, treatment toxicity and survival....

  20. Risk of Subclinical Micrometastatic Disease in the Supraclavicular Nodal Bed According to the Anatomic Distribution in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the anatomic distribution of gross supraclavicular nodes within the supraclavicular fossa using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans, and to evaluate likely coverage of specific regions of the supraclavicular fossa using standard radiation fields. Methods and Materials: We identified 33 patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer who had a PET/CT scan demonstrating hypermetabolic supraclavicular lymph nodes in 2005. The locations of the involved lymph nodes were mapped onto a single CT set of images of the supraclavicular fossa. These lymph nodes were also mapped onto the treatment-planning CT dataset of 4 patients treated in our institution (2 patients with biopsy-proven supraclavicular nodes and 2 patients with clinically negative supraclavicular nodes). Results: We were able to determine the distribution of 52 supraclavicular lymph nodes in 32 patients. Of 32 patients, 28 (87%) had a history of metastatic disease, and 2 patients had isolated nodal recurrences. Five patients had supraclavicular nodes posterior to the vertebral body transverse process, and several lymph nodes were in close proximity to the medial field border, raising the possibility of geographic miss in these areas. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, increased coverage of the supraclavicular fossa medially and posteriorly may be warranted

  1. The treatment of locally advanced colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The results of therapy for 103 patients with locally advanced colon cancer who received radiotherapy were analyzed to determine the outcome and tolerance of therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 1994, 103 patients received radiotherapy and maximal resection of locally advanced colon cancers. Following resection, 50 patients had no residual disease, 18 patients had microscopic residual disease, and 35 patients had gross residual disease. External beam radiotherapy was initiated 1 to 4 months following resection except in two patients who received preoperative radiotherapy. Treatment was delivered to the tumor bed and adjacent lymph nodes using 4 to 18 MV X-rays with doses ranging from 16.2 to 60 Gy. Intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) was also administered to 11 of the patients with doses ranging from 10 to 20 Gy. Chemotherapy was administered to 77 patients. Follow-up in survivors ranged from 0.5 to 17 years (median: 5.8 years). Results: The 5-year actuarial local failure rate was 10% for patients with no residual disease, 54% for patients with microscopic residual disease, and 79% for patients with gross residual disease (p < 0.0001). For patients with residual disease, local failure occurred in 11% of patients receiving IOERT compared with 82% of patients receiving only external beam therapy (p 0.02). The 5-year actuarial survival rate was 66% for patients with no residual disease, 47% for patients with microscopic residual disease, and 23% for patients with gross residual disease (p = 0.0009). The 5-year survival rate in patients with residual disease was 76% for patients receiving IOERT and 26% for patients receiving external beam therapy alone (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Patients with locally advanced colon cancer who have had a complete resection have a high probability of local control after external beam irradiation ± 5 fluorouracil (5FU)-based systemic therapy. The toxicity of therapy can be minimized with attention to treatment

  2. Management of locally advanced prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heather Payne

    2009-01-01

    The management of all stages of prostate cancer is an increasingly complex process and involves a variety of available treatments and many disciplines.Despite prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing,the presentation of prostate cancer at a locally advanced stage is common in the UK,accounting for one-third of all new cases.There is no universally accepted definition of locally advanced prostate cancer;the term is loosely used to encompass a spectrum of disease profiles that show high-risk features.Men with high-risk prostate cancer generally have a significant risk of disease progression and cancer-related death if left untreated.High-risk patients,including those with locally advanced disease,present two specific challenges.There is a need for local control as well as a need to treat any microscopic metastases likely to be present but undetectable until disease progression.The optimal treatment approach will therefore often necessitate multiple modalities.The exact combinations,timing and intensity of treatment continue to be strongly debated.Management decisions should be made after all treatments have been discussed by a multidisciplinary team (including urologists,oncologists,radiologists,pathologists and nurse specialists) and after the balance of benefits and side effects of each therapy modality has been considered by the patient with regard to his own individual circumstances.This article reviews the current therapy options.

  3. SU-E-J-87: Ventilation Weighting Effect On Mean Doses of Both Side Lungs for Patients with Advanced Stage Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study ventilation weighting effect on radiation doses to both side lungs for patients with advanced stage lung cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients with advanced stage lung cancer were included in this retrospective study. Proprietary software was developed to calculate the lung ventilation map based on 4DCT images acquired for radiation therapy. Two phases of inhale (0%) and exhale (50%) were used for the lung ventilation calculations. For each patient, the CT images were resampled to the same dose calculation resolution of 3mmx3mmx3mm. The ventilation distribution was then normalized by the mean value of the ventilation. The ventilation weighted dose was calculated by applying linearly weighted ventilation to the dose of each pixel. The lung contours were automatically delineated from patient CT image with lung window, excluding the tumor and high density tissues. For contralateral and ipsilateral lungs, the mean lung doses from the original plan and ventilation weighted mean lung doses were compared using two tail t-Test. Results: The average of mean dose was 6.1 ±3.8Gy for the contralateral lungs, and 26.2 ± 14.0Gy for the ipsilateral lungs. The average of ventilation weighted dose was 6.3± 3.8Gy for the contralateral lungs and 24.6 ± 13.1Gy for the ipsilateral lungs. The statistics analysis shows the significance of the mean dose increase (p<0.015) for the contralateral lungs and decrease (p<0.005) for the ipsilateral lungs. Conclusion: Ventilation weighted doses were greater than the un-weighted doses for contralateral lungs and smaller for ipsilateral lungs. This Result may be helpful to understand the radiation dosimetric effect on the lung function and provide planning guidance for patients with advance stage lung cancer

  4. Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers. These patients often have multiple symptoms, and integrated supportive care is critical in helping them remain well for as long as possible. Fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is known to improve overall survival (OS) by approximately 3 months, compared to the best supportive care alone. A 1997 study comparing gemcitabine and fluorouracil treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer patients showed an improvement in OS of 1 month in patients receiving gemcitabine. Over the next 10 years, multiple randomized studies compared single-agent gemcitabine with combination chemotherapy and showed no effective survival improvement. However, the addition of erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, was associated with a significant improvement in OS of approximately 2 weeks. However, adoption of this regimen has not been widespread because of its limited effect and added toxicity. Two clinical trials have recently prolonged OS in advanced pancreatic cancer patients by almost 1 year. The first compared FOLFIRINOX with gemcitabine alone, and was associated with a significant improvement in median survival. The second compared gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine alone, and was associated with improvements in OS. At present, these regimens are considered standard treatment for patients with good performance statuses. PMID:27114434

  5. Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-05-23

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers. These patients often have multiple symptoms, and integrated supportive care is critical in helping them remain well for as long as possible. Fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is known to improve overall survival (OS) by approximately 3 months, compared to the best supportive care alone. A 1997 study comparing gemcitabine and fluorouracil treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer patients showed an improvement in OS of 1 month in patients receiving gemcitabine. Over the next 10 years, multiple randomized studies compared singleagent gemcitabine with combination chemotherapy and showed no effective survival improvement. However, the addition of erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, was associated with a significant improvement in OS of approximately 2 weeks. However, adoption of this regimen has not been widespread because of its limited effect and added toxicity. Two clinical trials have recently prolonged OS in advanced pancreatic cancer patients by almost 1 year. The first compared FOLFIRINOX with gemcitabine alone, and was associated with a significant improvement in median survival. The second compared gemcitabine and nabpaclitaxel with gemcitabine alone, and was associated with improvements in OS. At present, these regimens are considered standard treatment for patients with good performance statuses. PMID:27114434

  6. Lack of relationship between TIMP-1 tumour cell immunoreactivity, treatment efficacy and prognosis in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) is a natural inhibitor of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which are proteolytic enzymes involved in degradation of extracellular matrix thereby favoring tumour cell invasion and metastasis. TIMP-1 activity in tumour tissue may therefore play an essential role in the progression of a malignant tumour. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate TIMP-1 protein immunoreactivity in tissue from primary ovarian cancer patients and associate these findings with the course of the disease including response to treatment in the individual patient. TIMP-1 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (in tissue micro arrays) in a total of 163 ovarian cancer specimens obtained from primary debulking surgery during 1991-1994 as part of a randomized clinical protocol. Positive TIMP-1 immunoreactivity was found in 12.3% of the tumours. The median survival time for the 143 patients with TIMP-1 negative tumours was 23.7 months [19.0-29.4] 95% CI, while the median survival time for the 20 patients with TIMP-1 positive tumours was 15.9 months [12.3-27.4] 95% CI. Although a difference of 7.8 months in median overall survival in favor of the TIMP-1 tumour negative patients was found, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.28, Kaplan-Meier, log-rank test). Moreover, TIMP-1 immunoreactivity was not associated with CA125 response (p = 0.53) or response at second look surgery (p = 0.72). TIMP-1 immunoreactivity in tumour tissue from patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer did not correlate with patient survival or response to combination platinum/cyclophosphamide therapy

  7. Subgroup Analyses from a Phase 3, Open-Label, Randomized Study of Eribulin Mesylate Versus Capecitabine in Pretreated Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twelves, Chris; Awada, Ahmad; Cortes, Javier; Yelle, Louise; Velikova, Galina; Olivo, Martin S.; Song, James; Dutcus, Corina E.; Kaufman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE AND METHODS Our secondary analyses compared survival with eribulin versus capecitabine in various patient subgroups from a phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Eligible women aged ≥18 years with advanced/metastatic breast cancer and ≤3 prior chemotherapies (≤2 for advanced/metastatic disease), including an anthracycline and taxane, were randomized 1:1 to intravenous eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 or twice-daily oral capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 on days 1–14 (21-day cycles). RESULTS In the intent-to-treat population (eribulin 554 and capecitabine 548), overall survival appeared longer with eribulin than capecitabine in various subgroups, including patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (15.9 versus 13.5 months, respectively), estrogen receptor-negative (14.4 versus 10.5 months, respectively), and triple-negative (14.4 versus 9.4 months, respectively) disease. Progression-free survival was similar between the treatment arms. CONCLUSIONS Patients with advanced/metastatic breast cancer and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-, estrogen receptor-, or triple-negative disease may gain particular benefit from eribulin as first-, second-, and third-line chemotherapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION (PRIMARY STUDY) This study reports the subgroup analyses of eribulin versus capecitabine from a phase 3, open-label, randomized study (www.clinicaltrials.gov; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00337103). PMID:27398025

  8. Advances in Cancer Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Snook, Adam E.; Waldman, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Our immune system is characterized by remarkable specificity, potency and memory – the ability of a single vaccine treatment to provide life-long protection. No pharmacologic treatment for any indication can provide the same level of safety, efficacy and long-lasting effect that a vaccine can. Thus, researchers and clinicians alike have sought to apply these characteristics to the treatment of cancer. Yet, for the last 125 years, the field has failed to realize this potential. Here, we will r...

  9. Advancements in radiotherapy for lung cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lujun Zhao; Luhua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in China. In recent years, great progress has been made in radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in China. The main advance-ments include the fol owing aspects:(1) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC), (2) post-operative radiotherapy for NSCLC, (3) combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for local y advanced NSCLC, (4) improved radiotherapy for advanced NSCLC, and 5) prediction of radiation-induced lung toxicity.

  10. Treatment Choice for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Had Gradual Progression After EGFR-TKIs: 32 Cases Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin LIN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have been widely used in the treatment of the advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, especially in the adenocarcinoma patients with activating EGFR mutations. But there is no published overview of the following treatment. This report through observing the efficacy, toxicity and overall survival of different treatments to the advanced NSCLC patients who had gradual progression after EGFR-TKIs, evaluates the influence of the continued treatment and switching chemotherapy. Methods Retrospective review is conducted on 32 cases of advanced NSCLC patients who experienced treatment failure of EGFR-TKIs. One group accepted the continued treatment and the other group accepted the switching chemotherapy. Results The median overall survival of the continued treatment group is 36.0 months. The respose rate of the switching chemotherapy group is 43.75%, and clinical benefit rate (complete and partial response and stable disease is 87.5%. The median overall survival is 15.5 months. The main toxicities are nausea, vomiting and hematological toxicities. Conclusion For the advanced NSCLC patients who had gradual progression after EGFR-TKIs, the continued treatment is one of the acceptable choices.

  11. How to be a patient in a palliative life experience? A qualitative study to enhance knowledge about coping abilities in advanced cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thora Grothe; Hansen, Susan Maybritt Rydahl; Wagner, Lis

    2011-01-01

    's own life" was identified as a central tendency in coping with advanced cancer. It involved a pattern of four life conditions: alleviation from a life-threatening illness, carry on a normal life, live with powerlessness, and find courage and strength, which were characterized by a series of limitations...

  12. Effects of melatonin on physical fatigue and other symptoms in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Rasmussen, Charlotte; Klee Olsen, Marc; Thit Johnsen, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    histologically confirmed stage IV cancer (TNM Classification), and who reported feeling significantly tired were recruited from the palliative care unit at the study institution. The study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial. Patients received 1 week of melatonin at a dose of 20 mg...... or a placebo orally each night, before crossing over and receiving the opposite treatment for 1 week. Between the 2 periods, a washout period of 2 days was implemented. Outcomes were measured using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) and The European Organization for Research and...... Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire. Physical fatigue from the MFI-20 was the primary outcome. The primary analysis was a complete complier analysis (ie, it included only those patients who had consumed at least 5 capsules per week and who had answered the MFI-20 on days 1, 7, 10, and 17...

  13. Requirement for a standardised definition of advanced gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    DE SOL, ANGELO; Trastulli, Stefano; GRASSI, VERONICA; Corsi, Alessia; Barillaro, Ivan; Boccolini, Andrea; Di Patrizi, Micol Sole; Di Rocco, Giorgio; Santoro, Alberto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Boselli, Carlo; Redler, Adriano; Noya, Giuseppe; Kong, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Each year, ~988,000 new cases of stomach cancer are reported worldwide. Uniformity for the definition of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is required to ensure the improved management of patients. Various classifications do actually exist for gastric cancer, but the classification determined by lesion depth is extremely important, as it has been shown to correlate with patient prognosis; for example, early gastric cancer (EGC) has a favourable prognosis when compared with AGC. In the literature,...

  14. Analgesia for patients with advanced disease: I

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, E.; Sykes, N

    2004-01-01

    This series of two articles explores the challenge of managing pain in patients with advanced malignant and non-malignant disease. Pain is a common symptom in advanced disease. Despite guidance from organisations such as the World Health Organisation, cancer pain is often inadequately managed. Managing pain in non-malignant conditions, such as end stage cardiac failure, presents an even greater challenge to healthcare professionals. This first article discusses epidemiology, definitions, path...

  15. Modulation of circulating protein biomarkers following TRC105 (anti-endoglin antibody) treatment in patients with advanced cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yingmiao; Starr, Mark D.; Brady, John C; Dellinger, Andrew; Pang, Herbert; Adams, Bonne; Theuer, Charles P.; Lee, Nam Y.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Nixon, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    TRC105 is an endoglin-targeting drug that possesses anti-angiogenic and antitumor potential. Analysis of the initial phase I trial of TRC105 demonstrated good tolerability and efficacy in cancer patients. In this report, we analyzed multiple circulating biomarkers at baseline, cycle 2 day 1 (C2D1), and end of study (EOS) for each patient. The baseline level and the fold change from baseline to both C2D1 and EOS for each marker were statistically analyzed. At C2D1, seven markers were significa...

  16. Circulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF Levels in Advanced Stage Cancer Patients Compared to Normal Controls and Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Critical Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoka H. Kusumanto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-angiogenic therapy is emerging as a valuable tool in the treatment of patients with cancer. As VEGF is a central target in anti-angiogenic therapy, its levels in the circulation might be relevant in selecting tumor types or patients likely to respond to this treatment. Additional VEGF has been recognized as a key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Recently anti-angiogenic therapy has been advocated in this situation. We measured VEGF levels in whole blood in 42 patients with high grade (n = 26 and low grade (n = 16 end stage cancer, and in 28 healthy controls and 37 patients with diabetes related vascular disease. Only 2/26 patients in the group of high grade cancer had signifi cantly elevated VEGF levels, 1/16 in the low grade group and 1/28 in the healthy control group. In contrast, in 10/37 diabetic patients the mean VEGF levels were significantly elevated compared to the other groups. The mean level in these diabetic patients was significantly elevated compared to the other groups. These data indicate the limitation of the use of circulating VEGF levels as a potential selection criterion for anti-angiogenic therapy in cancer patients and suggest further studies into its application in the management of diabetic complications.

  17. The Significance of Tumoral ERCC1 Status in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy: A Multicenter Clinicopathologic Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) expression has been shown to be a molecular marker of cisplatin resistance in many tumor sites, but has not been well studied in cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to measure tumoral ERCC1 in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in a large multicenter cohort, and to correlate expression with clinical outcome parameters. Methods and Materials: A total of 264 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated with curative-intent radical CRT from 3 major Canadian cancer centers were evaluated. Pretreatment formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens were retrieved, and tissue microarrays were constructed. Tumoral ERCC1 (FL297 antibody) was measured using AQUA (R) technology. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance of clinical factors and ERCC1 status with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. Results: The majority of patients had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage II disease (n=119, 45%); median tumor size was 5 cm. OS was associated with tumor size (HR 1.16, P=.018), pretreatment hemoglobin status (HR 2.33, P=.00027), and FIGO stage. In addition, tumoral ERCC1 status (nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio) was associated with PFS (HR 2.33 [1.05-5.18], P=.038) and OS (HR 3.13 [1.27-7.71], P=.013). ERCC1 status was not significant on multivariate analysis when the model was adjusted for the clinical factors: for PFS (HR 1.49 [0.61-3.6], P=.38); for OS (HR 2.42 [0.94-6.24] P=.067). Conclusions: In this large multicenter cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with radical CRT, stage, tumor size, and pretreatment hemoglobin status were significantly associated with PFS and OS. ERCC1 status appears to have prognostic impact on univariate analysis in these patients, but was not independently associated with outcome on

  18. Recent advances in technologies for the detection of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately half of breast cancer patients with stage I–III disease will suffer metastatic disease despite resection with tumour-free margins. In 30–40% of these patients, individual carcinoma cells can already be detected at the time of primary therapy in cytological bone marrow preparations using immunocytochemistry. Numerous prospective clinical studies have shown that the presence of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow is prognostically relevant to patient survival. Only a few studies failed to do so, thus stimulating a critical discussion on the methodology and clinical value of bone marrow analysis. The potential for obtaining improved prognostic information on patient outcome, for monitoring tumour cell eradication during adjuvant and palliative systemic therapy, and for specifically targeting tumour biological therapies are intriguing clinical opportunities that may be afforded by bone marrow analysis. Standardized and robust methodology is a prerequisite for clinical application of these techniques, however

  19. Accelerated radiotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single institution's outcome for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer treated with accelerated radiotherapy (RT). Fifty-eight patients with advanced laryngeal cancer were treated with curative intent with accelerated RT during the period 1990-1998. Patients received radiotherapy alone or with induction chemotherapy. The 5-year local control (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC) probabilities were both 49% for T3 and 75% for T4 tumors. The 5-year disease-free survival probability was 46% and 68% and overall survival probability was 30% and 39% for T3 and T4 tumors respectively. No significant statistical difference in outcome was found, either between T3 and T4 tumors, or between patients who received induction chemotherapy and those who did not. The treatment results for advanced laryngeal cancer at this institution were comparable to those reported in the literature. The results for T3 and T4 were similar. T4 classification alone should not be an exclusion criterion for larynx preservation. Overall survival was poor, partly because of a high incidence of deaths from intercurrent diseases

  20. Accelerated radiotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugen, Hedda; Mercke, Claes [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Johansson, Karl-Axel [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Radiophysics; Ejnell, Hasse; Edstroem, Staffan [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single institution's outcome for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer treated with accelerated radiotherapy (RT). Fifty-eight patients with advanced laryngeal cancer were treated with curative intent with accelerated RT during the period 1990-1998. Patients received radiotherapy alone or with induction chemotherapy. The 5-year local control (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC) probabilities were both 49% for T3 and 75% for T4 tumors. The 5-year disease-free survival probability was 46% and 68% and overall survival probability was 30% and 39% for T3 and T4 tumors respectively. No significant statistical difference in outcome was found, either between T3 and T4 tumors, or between patients who received induction chemotherapy and those who did not. The treatment results for advanced laryngeal cancer at this institution were comparable to those reported in the literature. The results for T3 and T4 were similar. T4 classification alone should not be an exclusion criterion for larynx preservation. Overall survival was poor, partly because of a high incidence of deaths from intercurrent diseases.

  1. Use of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in epidermal growth factor receptor mutation analysis in patients with advanced lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yi-Ping; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Yong (Dept. of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Inst. and Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)), email: yipingzhuang2010@sina.com; Shi, Mei-Qi (Dept. of Chemotherapy, Jiangsu Cancer Inst. and Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China))

    2011-12-15

    Background. The safety of using a cutting needle when performing a core-needle biopsy is of major concern, in particular for small lung tumors or tumors near the hilum. Purpose. To investigate the usefulness of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of the lung in obtaining tumor tissue for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation analysis in advanced lung cancer patients. Material and Methods. Forty-three patients with stage IIIB-IV lung cancer were enrolled. In all patients, CT-guided FNAB was performed using an 18-gauge or 20-gauge Chiba aspiration needle for histology diagnosis and EGFR mutation analysis. Complications associated with CT-guided FNAB were observed, and the specimen mutational assessments were recorded. Results. The obtained tumor samples ranged from 0.5-1.5 cm in length and were adequate for histological and DNA analyses in all patients. No patient had a pneumothorax or hemoptysis. Minor needle tract bleeding appeared in eight patients. Mutation analysis was satisfactorily demonstrated in 23 mutations and 20 non-mutations. Ten and 13 mutations were identified by 18-gauge and 20-gauge needle biopsies, respectively. EFGR mutations, including 12 cases of EGFR exon 19 deletion and 11 cases of exon 21 point mutation, were present in 21 patients with adenocarcinomas, one with squamous cell carcinoma, and one with undifferentiated carcinoma. Conclusion. CT-guided FNAB is a feasible and safe technique for obtaining lung tumor tissues for EGFR gene mutation analysis

  2. Use of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in epidermal growth factor receptor mutation analysis in patients with advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The safety of using a cutting needle when performing a core-needle biopsy is of major concern, in particular for small lung tumors or tumors near the hilum. Purpose. To investigate the usefulness of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of the lung in obtaining tumor tissue for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation analysis in advanced lung cancer patients. Material and Methods. Forty-three patients with stage IIIB-IV lung cancer were enrolled. In all patients, CT-guided FNAB was performed using an 18-gauge or 20-gauge Chiba aspiration needle for histology diagnosis and EGFR mutation analysis. Complications associated with CT-guided FNAB were observed, and the specimen mutational assessments were recorded. Results. The obtained tumor samples ranged from 0.5-1.5 cm in length and were adequate for histological and DNA analyses in all patients. No patient had a pneumothorax or hemoptysis. Minor needle tract bleeding appeared in eight patients. Mutation analysis was satisfactorily demonstrated in 23 mutations and 20 non-mutations. Ten and 13 mutations were identified by 18-gauge and 20-gauge needle biopsies, respectively. EFGR mutations, including 12 cases of EGFR exon 19 deletion and 11 cases of exon 21 point mutation, were present in 21 patients with adenocarcinomas, one with squamous cell carcinoma, and one with undifferentiated carcinoma. Conclusion. CT-guided FNAB is a feasible and safe technique for obtaining lung tumor tissues for EGFR gene mutation analysis

  3. A Case Series of Survival Outcomes in Patients with Advanced-stage IIIb/IV Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Treated with HangAm-Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Sun-Hwi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents approximately 80% of all lung cancers. Unfortunately, at their time of diagnosis, most patients have advanced to unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. The oriental herbal medicine HangAm-Plus (HAP has been developed for antitumor purposes, and several previous studies have reported its therapeutic effects. In this study, the efficacy of HAP was evaluated as a third-line treatment for advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC. Methods: The study involved six patients treated at the East- West Cancer Center (EWCC from April 2010 to October 2011. Inoperable advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients received 3,000 or 6,000 mg of HAP on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Computed tomography (CT scans were obtained from the patients at the time of the initial administration and after 12 weeks of treatment. We observed and analyzed the patients overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Results: Of the six patients, three expired during the study, and the three remaining patients were alive as of October 31, 2011. The OS ranged from 234 to 512 days, with a median survival of 397 days and a one-year survival rate of 66.7%. In the 12-week-interval chest CT assessment, three patients showed stable disease (SD, and the other three showed progressive disease (PD. The PFS of patients ranged from 88 to 512 days, the median PFS being 96 days. Longer OS and PFS were correlated with SD. Although not directly comparable, the OS and the PFS of this study were greater than those of the docetaxel or the best supportive care group in other studies. Conclusion: HAP may prolong the OS and the PFS of inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients without significant adverse effects. In the future, more controlled clinical trials with larger samples from multi-centers should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of HAP.

  4. Weekly chemotherapy as Induction chemotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer for patients ineligible for 3 weekly maximum tolerable dose chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Maruti Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the safety and efficacy of weekly chemotherapy as part of induction chemotherapy, in locally advanced head and neck cancer for patients, who are unfit for upfront radical treatment. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective analysis of on-use weekly chemotherapy as Induction chemotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer, who are technically unresectable are unfit for upfront radical treatment. Induction chemotherapy given was a 2 drug combination of paclitaxel (80 mg/m 2 and carboplatin AUC 2. The decision to give weekly induction chemotherapy was given on the basis of presence of 2 more following features: Poor performance status (ECOG PS 2-3, presence of uncontrolled co morbidities, BMI below 18.5 kg/m 2 and age more than 60 years. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (SPSS version 16.0 was used for analysis. The response rates, toxicity (accordance with CTCAE vs. 4.02, completion rate (Cp of radical intent treatment post neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT, progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS are reported. Results: Fifteen patients were considered for such therapy. Fourteen out of fifteen patients completed NACT. The median numbers of planned weekly cycles were 6 (3-8. Response (CR + PR was seen in 10 patients. Overall grade 3-4 toxicity was seen in 6 patients. No toxicity related mortality was noted. The calculated completion rate (Cp of radical intent treatment post NACT was 46.7%. The median PFS and OS were 10.36 months (95% CI 6.73-14.00 months and 16.53 months (95% CI 4.22-28.84. Conclusion: Use of induction chemotherapy with weekly regimen is safe and effective selected cohort of patients with locally advanced disease who are unfit for upfront radical treatment.

  5. Phase I clinical study of anti-apoptosis protein, survivin-derived peptide vaccine therapy for patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minamida Hidetoshi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family containing a single baculovirus IAP repeat domain. It is expressed during fetal development but becomes undetectable in terminally differentiated normal adult tissues. We previously reported that survivin and its splicing variant survivin-2B was expressed abundantly in various types of tumor tissues as well as tumor cell lines and was suitable as a target antigen for active-specific anti-cancer immunization. Subsequently, we identified an HLA-A24-restricted antigenic peptide, survivin-2B80-88 (AYACNTSTL recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs. We, therefore, started a phase I clinical study assessing the efficacy of survivin-2B peptide vaccination in patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer expressing survivin. Vaccinations with survivin-2B peptide were given subcutaneously six times at 14-day intervals. Of 15 patients who finished receiving the vaccination schedule, three suffered slight toxicities, including anemia (grade 2, general malaise (grade 1, and fever (grade 1. No severe adverse events were observed in any patient. In 6 patients, tumor marker levels (CEA and CA19-9 decreased transiently during the period of vaccination. Slight reduction of the tumor volume was observed in one patient, which was considered a minor responder. No changes were noted in three patients while the remaining eleven patients experienced tumor progression. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes of one patient using HLA-A24/peptide tetramers revealed an increase in peptide-specific CTL frequency from 0.09% to 0.35% of CD8+ T cells after 4 vaccinations. This phase I clinical study indicates that survivin-2B peptide-based vaccination is safe and should be further considered for potential immune and clinical efficacy in HLA-A24-expression patients with colorectal cancer.

  6. Comparison of vinorelbine plus cisplatin with vinorelbine plus capecitabine in patients with anthracyclines-and taxanes-refractory advanced breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhendong Zheng; Shuxian Qu; Xiaoxia Chen; Yongye Liu; Ying Piao; Yaling Han; Xiaodong Xie

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The aim of our study was to compare the ef icacy and toxicities of vinorelbine plus cisplatin (NP) regimen with that of vinorelbine plus capecitabine (NX) regimen in the treatment of anthracycline- and taxane-refractory advanced breast cancer. Methods:Forty-six patients with anthracycline-and taxane-refractory advanced breast cancer were equal y randomized into a NP group (n=23) and a NX group (n=23). Response rates and toxicities were evaluated after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Results:The overal response rate were 48.0%in both groups. There were no significant dif erences in disease control rates (78.0%vs. 83%) or 1-year survival rates (54.6%vs. 55.9%). The main adverse events were bone marrow depression and gastrointestinal reaction, and no significant dif erence was found in toxicities between the groups. Conclusion:For anthracycline-and taxane-refractory advanced breast cancer, NP and NX regimens exerted similar curative ef ects with acceptable toxicity.

  7. New advances in genitourinary cancer: evidence gathered in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, C; Puente, J; Gallardo, E; Méndez-Vidal, M J; Climent, M A; León, L; Olmos, D; García del Muro, X; González-Billalabeitia, E; Grande, E; Bellmunt, J; Mellado, B; Maroto, P; González del Alba, A

    2015-09-01

    This review provides updated information published in 2014 regarding advances and major achievements in genitourinary cancer. Sections include the best in prostate cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, and germ cell tumors. In the field of prostate cancer, data related to treatment approach of hormone-sensitive disease, castrate-resistant prostate cancer, mechanisms of resistance, new drugs, and molecular research are presented. In relation to renal cancer, relevant aspects in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma, immunotherapy, and molecular research, including angiogenesis and von Hippel-Lindau gene, molecular biology of non-clear cell histologies, and epigenetics of clear renal cell cancer are described. New strategies in the management of muscle-invasive localized bladder cancer and metastatic disease are reported as well as salient findings of biomolecular research in urothelial cancer. Some approaches intended to improve outcomes in poor prognosis patients with metastatic germ cell cancer are also reported. Results of clinical trials in these areas are discussed. PMID:26227584

  8. Non-Cross Resistant Sequential Single Agent Chemotherapy in First-Line Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Results of a Phase II Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Surmont

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. sequential chemotherapy can maintain dose intensity and preclude cumulative toxicity by increasing drug diversity. Purpose. to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of the sequential regimen of gemcitabine followed by paclitaxel in first line advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with good performance status (PS. Patients and methods. gemcitabine 1250 mg/m2 was administered on day 1 and 8 of course 1 and 2; Paclitaxel 150 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 of course 3 and 4. Primary endpoint was response rate (RR, secondary endpoints toxicity and time to progression (TTP. Results. Of the 21 patients (median age 56, range 38–80 years; 62% males, 38% females 10% (2/21 had stage IIIB, 90% (19/21 stage IV, 15% PS 0, 85% PS 1. 20% of patients had a partial response, 30% stable disease, 50% progressive disease. Median TTP was 12 weeks (range 6–52 weeks, median overall survival (OS 8 months (range 1–27 months, 1-year survival was 33%. One patient had grade 3 hematological toxicity, 2 patients a grade 3 peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions. sequential administration of gemcitabine followed by paclitaxel in first line treatment of advanced NSCLC had a favourable toxicity profile, a median TTP and OS comparable with other sequential trials and might , therefore, be a treatment option for NSCLC patients with high ERCC1 expression.

  9. Evaluation of the efficacy of palliative irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned intervals of patients with advanced cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    200 patients, previously not treated, with advanced highly differentiated cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx have been palliatively irradiated in the Oncology Center in Cracow in the years 1976-1985. Megavoltage irradiation with fractionated doses 4-5 Gy up to the dose of 20 Gy to the tumor with 4-5 fractions during 4-7 days has been applied. 64 patients received 20 Gy as simple dose, in 65 cases such dose has been repeated after month. 71 patients have been irradiated for the third time with similar dose after another 1 month interval. Partial regression of 25-50% of the tumor volume has been obtained after the first series of irradiation in 19% of patients and more than 50% in 28% of patients, complete regression in 4% of patients. 15,5% of the total number of patients survived 1 year since the initiation of the irradiation, 5% without symptoms of the neoplasm. Worse prognosis is connected with major advancement of the tumor (T4, N2), poor general condition, cachexia and alcohol addition. Absence of improvement after the first series of irradiations indicates the non-effectiveness of the treatment. Palliative treatment by irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned interval is a safe and efficacious method. 1 fig., 6 tabs., 14 refs. (author)

  10. {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Osborne, Joseph R. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); O' Donoghue, Joseph A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Beylergil, Volkan; Ruan, Shutian; Cheal, Sarah M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Lyashchenko, Serge [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiochemistry and Molecular Imaging Probes Core, New York, NY (United States); Gonen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Lewis, Jason S. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiochemistry and Molecular Imaging Probes Core, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Holland, Jason P. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Reuter, Victor E. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Loda, Massimo F. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science of Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Weber, Wolfgang A.; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Program in Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Bander, Neil H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Urology, New York, NY (United States); Scher, Howard I.; Morris, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Given the bone tropism of prostate cancer, conventional imaging modalities poorly identify or quantify metastatic disease. {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed in patients with metastatic prostate cancer to analyze and validate this as an imaging biomarker for metastatic disease. The purpose of this initial study was to assess safety, biodistribution, normal organ dosimetry, and optimal imaging time post-injection for lesion detection. Ten patients with metastatic prostate cancer received 5 mCi of {sup 89}Zr-huJ591. Four whole-body scans with multiple whole-body count rate measurements and serum activity concentration measurements were obtained in all patients. Biodistribution, clearance, and lesion uptake by {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging was analyzed and dosimetry was estimated using MIRD techniques. Initial assessment of lesion targeting of {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 was done. Optimal time for imaging post-injection was determined. The dose was well tolerated with mild chills and rigors seen in two patients. The clearance of {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 from serum was bi-exponential with biological half-lives of 7 ± 4.5 h (range 1.1-14 h) and 62 ± 13 h (range 51-89 h) for initial rapid and later slow phase. Whole-body biological clearance was 219 ± 48 h (range 153-317 h). The mean whole-body and liver residence time was 78.7 and 25.6 h, respectively. Dosimetric estimates to critical organs included liver 7.7 ± 1.5 cGy/mCi, renal cortex 3.5 ± 0.4 cGy/mCi, and bone marrow 1.2 ± 0.2 cGy/mCi. Optimal time for patient imaging after injection was 7 ± 1 days. Lesion targeting of bone or soft tissue was seen in all patients. Biopsies were performed in 8 patients for a total 12 lesions, all of which were histologically confirmed as metastatic prostate cancer. One biopsy-proven lesion was not positive on {sup 89}Zr-huJ591, while the remaining 11 lesions were {sup 89}Zr-huJ591 positive. Two biopsy-positive nodal lesions were noted only on

  11. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepek Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT for gastric cancer. Methods Patients with gastroesophageal (GE junction (Siewert type II and III or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS, local control (LC and disease-free survival (DFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73% had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75% underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated.

  12. Clinical benefit of gemcitabine plus cisplatin 3-week regimen for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer:a prospective observational study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉; 廖美琳; 李龙芸; 万欢英; 徐农; 刘基巍; 梁厚杰

    2004-01-01

    Background Platinum-based chemotherapy has been proved effective in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluated the effectiveness and safety of first-line chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GEM-Cis) 3-week regimen in routine care of Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC.Methods Two hundred and twenty-one patients with NSCLC stage IIIb or IV were enrolled and 209 were eligible foreffectiveness and safety analysis. The median age was 58 (range 29 to 79) years. The percents of cases in stage Ⅳ and stage Ⅲb were 52.2% and 47.8%; of Karnofsky performance score (KPS) less than 80 and 80-100 were 37.3% and 62.7% and of adeno-cancer and non-adeno-cancer were 59.8% and 40.2%. The average number of completed chemotherapy cycles was three. Measures of effectiveness included clinical benefit, significant clinical response (SCR) and adverse effects of GEM-Cis in the treatment of NSCLC at stages Ⅲb/Ⅳ.Results KPS increased from 79±9 at baseline to 86±10 after chemotherapy (P<0.01). Lung cancer symptom scale (LCSS) score of pain, dyspnea and cough increased from 77±24, 74±22 and 63±19 to 92±15, 90±14 and 86±15, respectively (P<0.01). The clinical benefit rate was 85.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 80.3%-90.0%]. The SCR was 89.5% (95% CI 85.3%-93.7%). Median survival time was 7.8 months (95% CI 7.1 months-9.1 months). Sixty-four patients (30.6%) experienced an adverse effect that was deemed clinically significant. Only one patient (0.5%) was hospitalized due to chemotherapy related adverse effects. Life-threatening toxicity was observed in two patients (1.0%).Conclusion First-line chemotherapy with GEM-Cis in the routine care of Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC is effective and safe.

  13. Laparoscopy to predict the result of primary cytoreductive surgery in advanced ovarian cancer patients (LapOvCa-trial: a multicentre randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutten Marianne J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standard treatment of advanced ovarian cancer is surgery and chemotherapy. The goal of surgery is to remove all macroscopic tumour, as the amount of residual tumour is the most important prognostic factor for survival. When removal off all tumour is considered not feasible, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT in combination with interval debulking surgery (IDS is performed. Current methods of staging are not always accurate in predicting surgical outcome, since approximately 40% of patients will have more than 1 cm residual tumour after primary debulking surgery (PDS. In this study we aim to assess whether adding laparoscopy to the diagnostic work-up of patients suspected of advanced ovarian carcinoma may prevent unsuccessful primary debulking surgery for ovarian cancer. Methods Multicentre randomized controlled trial, including all gynaecologic oncologic centres in the Netherlands and their affiliated hospitals. Patients are eligible when they are planned for PDS after conventional staging. Participants are randomized between direct PDS or additional diagnostic laparoscopy. Depending on the result of laparoscopy patients are treated by PDS within three weeks, followed by six courses of platinum based chemotherapy or with NACT and IDS 3-4 weeks after three courses of chemotherapy, followed by another three courses of chemotherapy. Primary outcome measure is the proportion of PDS's leaving more than one centimetre tumour residual in each arm. In total 200 patients will be randomized. Data will be analysed according to intention to treat. Discussion Patients who have disease considered to be resectable to less than one centimetre should undergo PDS to improve prognosis. However, there is a need for better diagnostic procedures because the current number of debulking surgeries leaving more than one centimetre residual tumour is still high. Laparoscopy before starting treatment for ovarian cancer can be an additional diagnostic tool

  14. Clinical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluations of metronomic UFT and cyclophosphamide plus celecoxib in patients with advanced refractory gastrointestinal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Allegrini, Giacomo; Di Desidero, Teresa; Barletta, Maria Teresa; Fioravanti, Anna; Orlandi, Paola; Canu, Bastianina; Chericoni, Silvio; Loupakis, Fotios; Di Paolo, Antonello; Masi, Gianluca; Fontana, Andrea; Lucchesi, Sara; Arrighi, Giada; GIUSIANI, MARIO; Ciarlo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Aims To evaluate UFT and cyclophosphamide (CTX) based metronomic chemotherapy plus celecoxib (CXB) for the treatment of patients with heavily pre-treated advanced gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods Thirty-eight patients received 500 mg/mq2 CTX i.v bolus on day 1 and, from day 2, 50 mg/day CTX p.o. plus 100 mg/twice a day UFT p.o. and 200 mg/twice a day CXB p.o. Tegafur, 5-FU, 5-FUH2, GHB and uracil pharmacokinetics were assessed. Plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), soluble V...

  15. Interstitial lung abnormalities in treatment-naïve advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients are associated with shorter survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, Mizuki, E-mail: Mizuki_Nishino@DFCI.HARVARD.EDU [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Cardarella, Stephanie [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215, (United States); Dahlberg, Suzanne E. [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Araki, Tetsuro [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lydon, Christine; Jackman, David M.; Rabin, Michael S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215, (United States); Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Johnson, Bruce E. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215, (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Interstitial lung abnormalities were present in 14% of stage IV NSCLC patients. • ILA was more common in older patients with heavier smoking history. • ILA was associated with shorter survival after adjusting for smoking and therapy. • ILA could be an additional independent marker for survival in advanced NSCLC. - Abstract: Objective: Interstitial lung diseases are associated with increased risk of lung cancer. The prevalence of ILA at diagnosis of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its impact on overall survival (OS) remain to be investigated. Materials and method: The study included 120 treatment-naïve stage IV NSCLC patients (53 males, 67 females). ILA was scored on CT prior to any systemic therapy using a 4-point scale [0 = no evidence of ILA, 1 = equivocal for ILA, 2 = suspicious for ILA, 3 = ILA] by a sequential reading method previously reported. ILA scores of 2 or 3 indicated the presence of ILA. Results: ILA was present in 17 patients (14%) with advanced NSCLC prior to any treatment (score3: n = 2, score2: n = 15). These 17 patients were significantly older (median age: 69 vs. 63, p = 0.04) and had a heavier smoking history (median: 40 vs. 15.5 pack-year, p = 0.003) than those with ILA score 0 or 1. Higher ILA scores were associated with shorter OS (p = 0.001). Median OS of the 17 patients with ILA was 7.2 months [95%CI: 2.9–9.4] compared to 14.8 months [95%CI: 11.1–18.4] in patients with ILA score 0 or 1 (p = 0.002). In a multivariate model, the presence of ILA remained significant for increased risk for death (HR = 2.09, p = 0.028) after adjusting for first-line systemic therapy (chemotherapy, p < 0.001; TKI, p < 0.001; each compared to no therapy) and pack years of smoking (p = 0.40). Conclusion: Radiographic ILA was present in 14% of treatment-naïve advanced NSCLC patients. Higher ILA scores were associated with shorter OS, indicating that ILA could be a marker of shorter survival in advanced NSCLC.

  16. Interstitial lung abnormalities in treatment-naïve advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients are associated with shorter survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Interstitial lung abnormalities were present in 14% of stage IV NSCLC patients. • ILA was more common in older patients with heavier smoking history. • ILA was associated with shorter survival after adjusting for smoking and therapy. • ILA could be an additional independent marker for survival in advanced NSCLC. - Abstract: Objective: Interstitial lung diseases are associated with increased risk of lung cancer. The prevalence of ILA at diagnosis of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its impact on overall survival (OS) remain to be investigated. Materials and method: The study included 120 treatment-naïve stage IV NSCLC patients (53 males, 67 females). ILA was scored on CT prior to any systemic therapy using a 4-point scale [0 = no evidence of ILA, 1 = equivocal for ILA, 2 = suspicious for ILA, 3 = ILA] by a sequential reading method previously reported. ILA scores of 2 or 3 indicated the presence of ILA. Results: ILA was present in 17 patients (14%) with advanced NSCLC prior to any treatment (score3: n = 2, score2: n = 15). These 17 patients were significantly older (median age: 69 vs. 63, p = 0.04) and had a heavier smoking history (median: 40 vs. 15.5 pack-year, p = 0.003) than those with ILA score 0 or 1. Higher ILA scores were associated with shorter OS (p = 0.001). Median OS of the 17 patients with ILA was 7.2 months [95%CI: 2.9–9.4] compared to 14.8 months [95%CI: 11.1–18.4] in patients with ILA score 0 or 1 (p = 0.002). In a multivariate model, the presence of ILA remained significant for increased risk for death (HR = 2.09, p = 0.028) after adjusting for first-line systemic therapy (chemotherapy, p < 0.001; TKI, p < 0.001; each compared to no therapy) and pack years of smoking (p = 0.40). Conclusion: Radiographic ILA was present in 14% of treatment-naïve advanced NSCLC patients. Higher ILA scores were associated with shorter OS, indicating that ILA could be a marker of shorter survival in advanced NSCLC

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor genotype in plasma DNA and outcome of chemotherapy in the Chinese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Ming-lei; DUAN Jian-chun; WANG Yu-yan; GUO Qing-zhi; LIU Xu-yi; LIU Ning-hong; WANG Jie; WU Mei-na; ZHAO Jun; Sonya Wei Song; BAI Hua; WANG Shu-hang; YANG Lu; AN Tong-tong; WANG Xin

    2011-01-01

    Background The genotype of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor and effectiveness of therapy,but its role in cytotoxic chemotherapy is still unknown.Previous studies indicated that certain EGFR mutations were associated with response and progression free survival following platinum based chemotherapy.Our recent studies have identified that EGFR genotypes in the tumour tissues were not associated with response to the first-line chemotherapy in Chinese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).In this study,we investigated associations of EGFR genotypes from plasma of patients with advanced NSCLC and response to first-line chemotherapy and prognosis.Methods We enrolled 145 advanced NSCLC patients who had received first-line chemotherapy in our department.We examined plasma EGFR genotypes for these patients and associations of EGFR mutations with response to chemotherapy and clinical outcomes.Results There were 54 patients with known EGFR mutations and 91 cases of wild types.No significant difference was detected in the response rate to first-line chemotherapy between mutation carriers and wild-type patients (37.0% vs.31.9%).The median survival time and 1-,2-year survival rates were higher in mutation carriers than wild-types (24months vs.18 months,85.7% vs.65.7% and 43.7% vs.25.9%,P=0.047).Clinical stage (IV vs.Ⅲb),response to the first-line chemotherapy (partial vs.no) and EGFR genotype were independent prognostic factors.Conclusion Plasma EGFR mutations in the Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC is not a predictor for the response to first-line chemotherapy,but an independent prognostic factor indicating longer survival.

  18. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved

  19. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esnaola, Nestor F. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O' Brien, Paul [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Camp, E. Ramsay [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Thomas, Melanie B. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Cole, David J. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Montero, Alberto J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Orwat, Kelly P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  20. Taxane-containing induction chemotherapy followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy. Outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broemme, J.O.; Schmuecking, M.; Leiser, D.; Geretschlaeger, A.; Ghadjar, P.; Aebersold, D.M. [Bern Univ. Hospital and Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Arnold, A.; Giger, R. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Head and Neck Surgery; Rauch, D. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Medical Oncology; Plasswilm, L. [Kantonsspital, St. Gallen (Switzerland). Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Background: Induction chemotherapy followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy is an intensified treatment approach for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) that might be associated with high rates of toxicity. Materials and methods: The data of 40 consecutive patients who underwent induction chemotherapy with docetaxel-containing regimens followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concomitant systemic therapy for unresectable locally advanced HNSCC were retrospectively analyzed. Primary objectives were RT-related acute and late toxicity. Secondary objectives were response to induction chemotherapy, locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), overall survival (OS), and influencing factors for LRRFS and OS. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 21 months (range, 2-53 months). Patients received a median of three cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT to 72 Gy. Three patients died during induction chemotherapy and one during chemoradiotherapy. Acute RT-related toxicity was of grade 3 and 4 in 72 and 3 % of patients, respectively, mainly dysphagia and dermatitis. Late RT-related toxicity was mainly xerostomia and bone/cartilage necrosis and was of grade 3 and 4 in 15 % of patients. One- and 2-year LRRFS and OS were 72 and 49 % and 77 and 71 %, respectively. Conclusion: Induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy using IMRT was associated with a high rate of severe acute and late RT-related toxicities in this selected patient cohort. Four patients were lost because of fatal complications. Induction chemotherapy did not compromise the delivery of full-dose RT; however, the use of three cycles of concomitant cisplatin was impaired. (orig.)

  1. Benefit and risk of primary thromboprophylaxis in ambulatory patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving chemotherapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun, Nay Min; Guevara, Elizabeth; Oo, Thein Hlaing

    2016-04-01

    As vascular thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of death in cancer patients, it has been postulated that primary thromboprophylaxis (PTP) in cancer patients might improve survival by reducing VTE occurrence. We performed a systemic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to investigate the benefit and risk of PTP with low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) in ambulatory advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) patients receiving chemotherapy. We undertook a literature search using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases through May 2015. RCTs with reduction in symptomatic VTE as a primary or secondary endpoints were included. Mantel-Haenszel method was used to estimate the pooled event-based risk ratio as well as the pooled absolute risk difference with 95% confidence interval (CI). Seven hundred and thirty-eight APC patients were eligible for analysis. PTP lasted 3-6 months. The crude VTE incidence was 2.1 and 11.2% in LMWH and in control groups, respectively (risk ratio, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.083-0.39; P questions. PMID:26963028

  2. Treatment Advances in Locally Advanced and Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Surmont, Veerle

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and Europe. Approximately 85% of the patients with lung cancer have non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which can be classified into squamous, adeno, large cell and not otherwise specified (NOS) histologies. The most common histologies are: adenocarcinoma ( 50%), squamous cell ( 20%), and large cell ( 10%). More than two third of the patients have locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnos...

  3. Important drugs for cough in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, J; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A

    2001-11-01

    Cough is a defense mechanism that prevents the entry of noxious materials into the respiratory system and clears foreign materials and excess secretions from the lungs and respiratory tract. In advanced cancer, it is a common symptom that interferes with the patient's daily activity and quality of life. Empiric treatment with antitussive agents is often needed. Two classes of antitussive drugs are available: (1) centrally acting: (a) opioids and (b) non-opioids; (2) peripherally acting: (a) directly and (b) indirectly. Antitussive availability varies widely around the world. Many antitussives, such as benzonatate, codeine, hydrocodone, and dextromethorphan, were extensively studied in the acute and chronic cough settings and showed relatively high efficacy and safety profiles. Benzonatate, clobutinol, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and levodropropizine were the only antitussives specifically studied in cancer and advanced cancer cough. They all have shown to be effective and safe in recommended daily dose for cough. In advanced cancer the patient's current medications, previous antitussive use, the availability of routes of administration, any history of drug abuse, the presence of other symptoms and other factors, all have a role in the selection of antitussives for prescription. A good knowledge of the pharmacokinetics, dosage, efficacy, and side effects of the available antitussives provides for better management. PMID:11762966

  4. Advances in cancer pain from bone metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu XC; JL Zhang; Ge CT; Yu YY; Wang P; Yuan TF; Fu CY

    2015-01-01

    Xiao-Cui Zhu,1 Jia-Li Zhang,1 Chen-Tao Ge,1 Yuan-Yang Yu,1 Pan Wang,1 Ti-Fei Yuan,2 Cai-Yun Fu1,31College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou, 2School of Psychology, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, 3Institute for Cell-Based Drug Development of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: With the technological advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment, the survival rates for patients with cancer are prolonged. The issue of figuring out h...

  5. 32-Phosphorus for bone pain palliation due to bone metastases, its safety and efficacy in patients with advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone pain due to bony metastases can seriously affect a patient's quality of life. External irradiation, narcotic drugs and polyphosphates may cause important side effects or are expensive, therefore in many patients radionuclide treatment using a single dose of beta emitting bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals has become widely accepted. Except 32-Phosphorus (32-P) all of them are expensive and difficult to obtain in certain countries. The aim of the study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of 32-P for palliation of bone pain due to bony metastases by comparing it to 89-Strontium (89-Sr), the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for bone pain palliation in the framework of a prospective IAEA co-ordinated multicenter study. A very strict protocol for unified patient inclusion and follow up was used. 93 cancer patients with osteoblastic bony metastases were included into the study, 48 were treated by 89-Sr (150 MBq) and 45 by 32-P (450 MBq). Pain score, analgesic consumption, quality of life, and indices of bone marrow depression were monitored 2 weeks pre- and up to 4 months post treatment. Favourable response to treatment was recorded in 75% of the patients treated with 89-Sr and in 60% of those treated with 32-P (p=0,122). There was no significant difference between the duration of favourable effect for both radiopharmaceuticals. Moderate decrease of white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts, and haemoglobin (Hb) levels was detected more often in the 32-P treated group. Although 32-P appears to be more toxic, no toxic effects requiring specific treatment were seen in either group. Due to its comparable efficacy and safety, general availability and low cost its more widespread use should be encouraged to increase quality of life and reduce cost of medical care of patients with intractable bone pain due to cancer metastases. (author)

  6. [Advancement in the treatment against prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Nobuo; Abe, Takashige; Maruyama, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    With the advancement of basic science and medical technology, the treatment against prostate cancer (PC) has dramatically changed. Although the introduction of robotic radical prostatectomy and particle therapies in patients with early stage PC is of much note, the issues on the over-treatment and treatment cost should be heeded. From these points, active surveillance has been an important strategy in these patients. In patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive PC, especially high volume metastases, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with docetaxel has been reported to prolong overall survival compared with ADT alone. Lastly, several novel therapeutic agents have been investigated and shown to be favorable outcomes in patients with castration resistant PC. This review focuses on the recent advancement in the treatment against PCs. PMID:26793875

  7. Sequential measurements of serum matrix metalloproteinase 9 to monitor chemotherapy responses in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao XJ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Xiaojuan Qiao,1–3,* Xiaoran Zhai,1,2,* Jinghui Wang,4 Xiaoting Zhao,1,2 Xinjie Yang,4 Jialin Lv,4 Li Ma,1,2 Lina Zhang,1,2 Yue Wang,1,2 Shucai Zhang,4 Wentao Yue1,21Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Beijing Chest Hospital, Capital Medical University, 2Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Beijing Tuberculosis and Thoracic Tumor Research Institute, Beijing, 3Health Care Ward, The First Hospital Affiliated to Inner Mongolia Medical University, Hohhot, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Beijing Chest Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, including lung cancer. However, whether variations in serum MMP-9 levels can serve as a biomarker for monitoring chemotherapy curative effect remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the association between variations in serum MMP-9 levels and chemotherapy curative effect in patients with lung cancer.Patients and methods: A total of 82 patients with advanced lung cancer were included. All newly diagnosed patients were treated with platinum-based doublet chemotherapy. Serial measurements of serum MMP-9 levels were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In this manner, we chose four time points to examine the association, including before chemotherapy, and 3 weeks after the beginning of the first, second, and fourth cycles of chemotherapy.Results: Compared with the serum level of MMP-9 before progressive disease, patients with progressive disease had elevated serum levels of MMP-9. Compared with the previous time point of collecting specimens, the serum levels of MMP-9 in the patients with a complete response/partial response/stable disease decreased or were maintained stable. The differences of variation in serum MMP-9 levels in patients with different chemotherapy curative

  8. Prognostic value of the 99mTc-Isonitrile washout rate in neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is the pre-surgical treatment of choice in patients with locally advanced breast tumor for better disease control and breast conservation. Resistance to chemotherapy may be seen in about 18%-51% of the cancers. The term multi drug resistance (MDR) is commonly used to indicate the expression of the transmembrane glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein). This protein removes some very important chemotherapeutic drugs from inside the cell and is responsible for the clinical manifestation of the MDR. The knowledge of MDR before the initiation of chemotherapy can help choosing the best treatment. 99mTc-Isonitrile is a radiotracer largely used in nuclear medicine. It enters cells, is identified by the P-glycoprotein as a substrate and is, therefore, expelled from the neoplastic cell. Various studies have demonstrated direct correlation between the 99mTc-Isonitrile efflux, P-glycoprotein expression and MDR. On the other hand, 99mTc-Isonitrile retention in the tumor suggests chemosensitivity. The objective of this study was to monitor the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer by the use of 99mTc-Sestamibi scintimammography and its washout rate in a pilot study. Five patients with locally advanced breast cancer were subjected to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Inclusion criteria were locally advanced tumor, biopsy results, no distant metastasis, and completion of the whole chemotherapy protocol. Exclusion criteria were any previous cancer treatment or other primary tumor. All the patients underwent 99mTc-Sestamibi scintimammography before and after completion of the chemotherapy protocol. For scintimammography, 740MBq of radiotracer was injected in the arm contra lateral to the side of lesion. Planar images were acquired at 10 and 240 minutes, in anterior supine position as well as in both lateral projections in prone position. Regions of interest of same size were drawn over the tumor and in the contra lateral breast to correct for

  9. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy with Concurrent Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil for Locoregional Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Analysis of 105 Consecutive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zaboli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We reviewed a cohort of patients with previously untreated locoregional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC who received a uniform chemoradiotherapy regimen. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 105 patients with stage III or IV HNSCC treated at Greater Baltimore Medical Center from 2000 to 2007. Radiation included 125 cGy twice daily for a total 70 Gy to the primary site. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (12 mg/m2/h daily for five days and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/20 h daily for five days, given with weeks one and six of radiation. All but seven patients with N2 or greater disease received planned neck dissection after chemoradiotherapy. Primary outcomes were overall survival (OS, locoregional control (LRC, and disease-free survival (DFS. Results. Median followup of surviving patients was 57.6 months. Five-year OS was 60%, LRC was 68%, and DFS was 56%. Predictors of increased mortality included age ≥55, female gender, hypopharyngeal primary, and T3/T4 stage. Twelve patients developed locoregional recurrences, and 16 patients developed distant metastases. Eighteen second primary malignancies were diagnosed in 17 patients. Conclusions. The CRT regimen resulted in favorable outcomes. However, locoregional and distant recurrences cause significant mortality and highlight the need for more effective therapies to prevent and manage these events.

  10. Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety of Bevacizumab Combined with Chemotherapy 
for Chinese Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao ZHAO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The current study reported the result of bevacizumab treatment administered to 25 Chinese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC who were treated at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital as a part of the SAiL (MO19390 trial. This trial is an open, international multicenter, single-arm clinical study that assesses the safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based therapy in advanced NSCLC. Methods Twenty-five Chinese patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC received bevacizumab (15 mg/kg combined with chemotherapy (carboplatin plus paclitaxel treatment from August 2007 to February 2008. Adverse effects (AEs, objective response rate (ORR, median time to progression (TTP, and overall survival (OS were measured. Results AEs were generally mild and reversible. The most frequent AEs were alopecia, peripheral neuropathy, rash, proteinuria, nausea/vomitting, fatigue, myalgia, bleeding, and hypertension. The partial remission and stable disease rates were 68% and 28%, respectively. The median TTP and OS of all patients were 11.2 and 19.3 months, respectively. Conclusion Bevacizumab combined with carboplatin-based chemotherapy may be well tolerated and beneficial for Chinese patients with non-squamous NSCLC.

  11. Glutathione S-transferase pi polymorphism contributes to the treatment outcomes of advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J B; Wang, F; Wu, J J; Cai, M

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the association between polymorphisms in three glutathione S-transferase genes (GSTP1, GSTM1, and GSTT1) and the treatment outcome for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We recruited 284 NSCLC patients at advanced stage from Department of Radiotherapy in Peace Hospital Attached to Changzhi Medical College between May 2009 and May 2011, who had received cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The GSTP1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 genotyping for was determined using DNA pyrosequencing on an ABI Prism 3100 DNA analyzer. In the Cox proportional hazards model, the IIe/Val and Val/Val genotypes of GSTP1 were associated with lower risk of disease progression compared with the IIe/IIe genotype, and the HRs (95%CIs) were 0.37 (0.18-0.74) and 0.15 (0.06-0.35), respectively. The IIe/Val and Val/Val genotypes significantly decreased risk of death from all causes in patients with NSCLC, and the HRs (95%CIs) were 0.52 (0.29-0.92) and 0.37 (0.17- 0.79), respectively No significant association was observed between GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms and progression-free survival and overall survival in the NSCLC patients. In summary, we suggest that GSTP1 polymorphisms might influence the treatment outcome of advanced NSCLC patients, and our results could help improve individualized therapy. PMID:27525853

  12. Phase I study of capecitabine combined with radioembolization using yttrium-90 resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres) in patients with advanced cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, S J; Konski, A A; Putnam, S; Ball, D S; Meyer, J E; J. Q. Yu; Astsaturov, I; Marlow, C; Dickens, A; Cade, D N; Meropol, N J

    2014-01-01

    Background: This was a prospective single-centre, phase I study to document the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and the recommended phase II dose for future study of capecitabine in combination with radioembolization. Methods: Patients with advanced unresectable liver-dominant cancer were enrolled in a 3+3 design with escalating doses of capecitabine (375–1000 mg/m2 b.i.d.) for 14 days every 21 days. Radioembolization with 90Y-resin microspheres was administered us...

  13. Circulating Cell-Free DNA in Plasma of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Undergoing Preoperative Chemoradiation: A Potential Diagnostic Tool for Therapy Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Zitt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating cell-free DNA opens up an interesting field for therapy monitoring, in particular during multimodal therapy protocols. The objective of this proof of principle study was to evaluate whether the amount of circulating plasma DNA has the potential to serve as a marker for therapy monitoring during the treatment course of locally advanced rectal cancer patients. We especially focused on kinetics of circulating DNA to assess whether variances in kinetics have the potential to discriminate between therapy responders and nonresponders.

  14. Imaging of hypoxia with 18F-FAZA PET in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many cancers, tumour hypoxia is an adverse prognostic factor, and increases chemoradiation resistance; its importance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unproven. This study evaluated tumoural hypoxia using fluoroazomycin arabinoside (18F-FAZA) positron emission tomography (PET) scans among patients with locoregionally advanced NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation. Patients with stage IIIA-IIIB NSCLC underwent 18F-FAZA PET scans and 18F-2-deoxyglucose (FDG)-PET scans within 4 weeks of commencing and 8 weeks following conventionally-fractionated concurrent platinum-based chemoradiation (60Gy). Intra-lesional hypoxic volumes of the primary and nodal masses were compared with FDG-PET metabolic volumes. Baseline tumoural hypoxia was correlated with disease free survival (DFS). Seventeen patients underwent pre-treatment 18F-FAZA PET and FDG-PET scans. Intra-lesional hypoxia was identified on 11 scans (65%). Baseline lesional hypoxic volumes were consistently smaller than FDG-PET volumes (P=0.012). There was no statistical difference between the mean FDG-PET volumes in patients with or without baseline hypoxia (P=0.38). Eight patients with baseline hypoxia had post treatment 18F-FAZA scans and 6 of these (75%) had resolution of imageable hypoxia following chemoradiation. The DFS was not significantly different between the hypoxic or non-hypoxic groups (median 0.8 years and 1.3 years respectively, P=0.42). Intra-lesional hypoxia, as detected by 18F-FAZA PET, was present in 65% of patients with locally-advanced NSCLC and resolved in the majority of patients following chemoradiation. Larger studies are required to evaluate the prognostic significance of the presence and resolution of hypoxia assessed by PET in NSCLC.

  15. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  16. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Efficacy of tamoxifen in combination with docetaxel in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer pretreated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Shimin; Fu, Xi; Li, Guangming; He, Lang; Zhao, Caixia; Hu, Xin; Pan, Rongqiang; Guo, Cuihua; Zhang, Xinping; Hu, Xingsheng

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the combination of docetaxel (TXT) plus tamoxifen (TAM) in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who had received platinum-based first-line chemotherapy. A total of 120 advanced NSCLC patients pretreated with platinum-based chemotherapy were randomized into two treatment groups (the TXT and TXT+TAM groups) in a 1 : 1 ratio. Reversal of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression, tumor response, progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety were evaluated on an intention-to-treat basis. The median number of cycles of allocated chemotherapy was four in each treatment group (range: 2-6 cycles). The overall response rate and disease control rate in the TXT+TAM group were significantly higher than those in the TXT group (36.7 vs. 15.0% for overall response rate, P=0.007; 85.0 vs. 68.3% for disease control rate, P=0.031). The combination of TXT and TAM could effectively reverse P-gp expression in tumor tissues and provide a significant survival benefit for advanced NSCLC patients compared with TXT alone (11.6 vs. 9.1 months, P=0.030). In addition, in the TXT+TAM group, patients achieving P-gp reversal had a significantly greater median progression-free survival and overall survival than nonreversal patients. Furthermore, the combined therapy showed a safety profile comparable to that of TXT. The combination of TXT and TAM may be an effective and safe treatment option for advanced NSCLC patients who have already developed P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance. PMID:26882453

  18. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: outcome of recursive partitioning analysis group 1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onal Cem

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI has been demonstrated to reduce or delay the incidence of brain metastases (BM in locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (LA-NSCLC patients with various prognostic groups. With this current cohort we planned to evaluate the potential usefulness of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI specifically in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA Group 1, which is the most favorable group of LA-NSCLC patients. Methods Between March 2007 and February 2008, 62 patients in RPA group 1 were treated with sequential chemoradiotherapy and PCI for stage IIIB NSCLC. The induction chemotherapy consisted of 3 courses of cisplatin (80 mg/m2 and docetaxel (80 mg/m2; each course was given every 21 days. Thoracic radiotherapy (TRT was given at a dose of 60 Gy using 3-D conformal planning. All patients received a total dose of 30 Gy PCI (2 Gy/fr, 5 days a week, beginning on the first day of the TRT. Then, all patients received 3 further courses of the same chemotherapy protocol. Results Six (9.7% patients developed brain metastases during their clinical course. Only one (2% patient developed brain metastasis as the site of first treatment failure. Median brain metastasis-free survival, overall survival, and progression free survival were 16.6, 16.7, and 13.0 months, respectively. By univariate analysis, rates of BM were significantly higher in patients younger than 60 years of age (p = 0.03. Multivariate analysis showed no significant difference in BM-free survival according to gender, age, histology, and initial T- and N-stage. Conclusion The current finding of almost equal bone metastasis free survival and overall survival in patients with LA-NSCLC in RPA group 1 suggests a longer survival for patients who receive PCI, and thereby have a reduced risk of BM.

  19. Translational Research on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Mutations in Targeted Therapy for Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-yan; ZHOU Er-xi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations in targeted therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods:One hundred and seventeen patients with advanced NSCLC admitted in Maternal and Child Health Care Center of Zibo City from Jan., 2011 to Jan., 2014 were performed with EGFR gene detection and then divided into 3 groups according to the detecting results. Patients in group A and group B were given oral geiftinib, 250 mg/d while patients in Group C with docetaxel, 75 mg/m2. Chemotherapy for 3 groups was discontinued until severe adverse reactions or disease progression occurred, or continuous treatment was considered to be unfavorable by the doctors, or patients asked for withdrawal from the study. The relationship between clinicopathological features and EGFR mutations were analyzed. The short-term and long-term efifcacy and adverse reactions of 3 groups were observed. Results:Of the 31 cases with EGFR mutations, there were 16 cases (51.6%) of mutations in exon 19, 14 (45.2%) in exon 21 and 2 (6.45%) in exon 18. No EGFR mutation was found in exon 20. EGFR mutations were associated with histological types of tumors and whether patients were smoking. The median follow-up time was 26 months and 62 patients were dead. None of CR was in 3 groups. The disease control rate (DCR) in group A was obviously higher than that in group B (χ2=9.382,P=0.002), which was also higher in group C than that in group B (χ2=4.674,P=0.031). The 1-year survival rate in group A was obviously higher than that in group B and group C (P Conclusion:EGFR mutations are the main indicators for guiding the targeted therapy for patients with advanced NSCLC.

  20. Emmprin and Survivin predict response and survival following cisplatin-containing chemotherapy in patients with advanced bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Anne Birgitte; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Maase, Hans von der;

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cisplatin-containing chemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with locally advanced and metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium. The response rate is approximately 50% and tumor-derived molecular prognostic markers are desirable for improved estimation of response...... and survival. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Affymetrix GeneChip expression profiling was carried out using tumor material from 30 patients. A set of genes with an expression highly correlated to survival time after chemotherapy was identified. Two genes were selected for validation by immunohistochemistry...... in an independent material of 124 patients receiving cisplatin-containing therapy. RESULTS: Fifty-five differentially expressed genes correlated significantly to survival time. Two of the protein products (emmprin and survivin) were validated using immunohistochemistry. Multivariate analysis identified emmprin...

  1. A prospective evaluation of the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography staging on survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and prognosis of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and October 2004, all patients with LAEC evaluated in the Department of Radiation Oncology were considered for enrollment into a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiation. Entry required a staging whole-body FDG-PET scan. Results: One hundred ten consecutive patients were evaluated; 38 were ineligible for reasons including treatment elsewhere, prior malignancy, or refusal of treatment. After conventional staging (clinical examination, endoscopic ultrasound, and chest/abdominal computerized tomography), 33 patients were ineligible because of metastatic disease or poor performance status. Of the remaining 39 patients, 23 were confirmed to have LAEC after FDG-PET staging and were treated in the Phase II trial (Cohort I). Sixteen patients, however, had FDG-PET findings consistent with occult metastatic disease and were deemed ineligible for the trial but were treated with curative intent (Cohort II). The 2-year survival rate for the 23 patients in Cohort I was 64%, compared with 17% (p = 0.003) for patients in Cohort II (FDG-PET positive). Conclusions: More than one-third of patients determined to have LAEC with conventional staging were upstaged with the use of FDG-PET. Despite comparable therapy, upstaging with FDG-PET predicts poor 2-year survival

  2. Progress in diagnosis of breast cancer: Advances in radiology technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mari Beth Linder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer in females between the ages of 15 and 54, and the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Diagnosis begins with detection by breast examination (clinical breast exam or breast self-exam or by radiologic studies, like mammography. Many advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer have taken place in recent years. This article will review the history of radiologic advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Use of technological advancements in digital breast tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound in breast cancer diagnosis will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic interventions when compared to older, traditional X-ray films will be discussed. It is important for all nurses, including radiology and oncology nurses, to be well informed about these varied diagnostic modalities, and appreciate the fact that advances in radiologic imaging technologies can yield improved outcomes for breast cancer patients.

  3. Cancer Patients, Doctors Often Disagree about Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159903.html Cancer Patients, Doctors Often Disagree About Prognosis Those with advanced disease are likely to be more optimistic than their doctor, study shows To use the sharing features on ...

  4. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m2 b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m2 on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96–100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  5. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbea, Leire, E-mail: larbea@unav.es [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Hernandez, Jose Luis [Department of General Surgery, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Sola, Jesus Javier [Department of Pathology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Ramos, Luis Isaac [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Subtil, Jose Carlos [Department of Gastroenterology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Nunez, Jorge [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain); Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier [Department of Oncology, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Navarra (Spain)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  6. Depression in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Bag

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not enough to consider treatment and care depression in the oncology that is the most common psychiatric illness in cancer patient affects of cancer treatment and the patient`s quality of life negatively, which is determined through researches in the field. With development of psycho-oncology it has been demonstrated to establish an important link between the cancer patient`s treatment as well as psycho-social support for the patient and psychiatric treatment and care for the if it is needed. With this connection between them it has been proposed to use of bio-psycho-social-model in cancer patient to improve their care. To achieve this goal, it is expected from medical personnel to realize patients psychosocial need und if he/she has a psychiatric disorders or syndromes. For the medical personnel that work in oncology services, it is inevitable to organize in order to raise the awareness of depression in the cancer patients. In the present study, it is focused on raising the awareness of depression in cancer patient for the medical personnel. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 186-198

  7. Renal Salt Wasting in Patients Treated with High-Dose Cisplatin, Etoposide, and Mitomycin in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yong Koo; Shin, Dong Moon

    1992-01-01

    Cisplatin has many toxic effects; emesis, impairment of renal function, myelosuppression, peripheral neuropathy, ototoxicity and renal tubular wasting. We used MVP regimen (Mitomycin C, Vp-16, and Cisplatin) in advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Using hydration and prophylactic supplementation of sodium and potassium before and during chemotherapy, we have observed the development of hyponatremia in 48 courses (43%), hypokalemia in 23 courses and hypomagnesemia in 11 courses. Some p...

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression correlated with tumor response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze whether the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors are associated with tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients who had undergone preoperative chemoradiotherapy were evaluated retrospectively. Treatment consisted of pelvic radiotherapy and two cycles of 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks later. MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry of the preradiation biopsy and surgical specimens. The intensity and extent of staining were evaluated separately, and a final score was calculated by multiplying the two scores. The primary endpoint was the correlation of expression with tumor response, with the secondary endpoint the effect of chemoradiotherapy on the expression. Results: Preoperative treatment resulted in downstaging in 20 patients (45%) and no clinical response in 24 (55%). The pathologic tumor response was complete in 11 patients (25%), partial in 23 (52%), and none in 10 (23%). Positive MMP-9 staining was observed in 20 tumors (45%) and was associated with the clinical nodal stage (p = 0.035) and the pathologic and clinical response (p < 0.0001). The staining status of the other markers was associated with neither stage nor response. The overall pathologic response rate was 25% in MMP-9-positive patients vs. 52% in MMP-9-negative patients (p = 0.001). None of the 11 patients with pathologic complete remission was MMP-9 positive. Conclusions: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression correlated with a poor tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal carcinoma patients

  9. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  10. Crizotinib for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international phase III clinical trial that compared crizotinib versus chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer whose tumors have an EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  11. Optimizing Treatment Risk and Benefit for Elderly Patients With Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Right Treatment for the Right Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Carolyn J; Gross, Cary P; Lilenbaum, Rogerio C

    2016-05-01

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in theJournal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better und