WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced cancer excluding

  1. Preoperative axillary lymph node evaluation in breast cancer patients by breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Can breast MRI exclude advanced nodal disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Su Jeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation of axillary lymph node metastasis (ALNM) in breast cancer patients and to assess whether breast MRI can be used to exclude advanced nodal disease. A total of 425 patients were included in this study and breast MRI findings were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic performance of breast MRI for diagnosis of ALNM was evaluated in all patients, patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and those without NAC (no-NAC). We evaluated whether negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude advanced nodal disease (pN2-pN3) using the negative predictive value (NPV) in each group. The sensitivity and NPV of breast MRI in evaluation of ALNM was 51.3 % (60/117) and 83.3 % (284/341), respectively. For cN0 cases on MRI, pN2-pN3 manifested in 1.8 % (6/341) of the overall patients, 0.4 % (1/257) of the no-NAC group, and 6 % (5/84) of the NAC group. The NPV of negative MRI findings for exclusion of pN2-pN3 was higher for the no-NAC group than for the NAC group (99.6 % vs. 94.0 %, p = 0.039). Negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude the presence of advanced nodal disease with an NPV of 99.6 % in the no-NAC group. (orig.)

  2. Preoperative axillary lymph node evaluation in breast cancer patients by breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Can breast MRI exclude advanced nodal disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Su Jeong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Breast Cancer Clinic, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Breast Cancer Clinic, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation of axillary lymph node metastasis (ALNM) in breast cancer patients and to assess whether breast MRI can be used to exclude advanced nodal disease. A total of 425 patients were included in this study and breast MRI findings were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic performance of breast MRI for diagnosis of ALNM was evaluated in all patients, patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and those without NAC (no-NAC). We evaluated whether negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude advanced nodal disease (pN2-pN3) using the negative predictive value (NPV) in each group. The sensitivity and NPV of breast MRI in evaluation of ALNM was 51.3 % (60/117) and 83.3 % (284/341), respectively. For cN0 cases on MRI, pN2-pN3 manifested in 1.8 % (6/341) of the overall patients, 0.4 % (1/257) of the no-NAC group, and 6 % (5/84) of the NAC group. The NPV of negative MRI findings for exclusion of pN2-pN3 was higher for the no-NAC group than for the NAC group (99.6 % vs. 94.0 %, p = 0.039). Negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude the presence of advanced nodal disease with an NPV of 99.6 % in the no-NAC group. (orig.)

  3. Planning for Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find out what issues need to be addressed when dealing with an advanced or metastatic cancer diagnosis. Completing advance directives, looking at health insurance, organizing records and documents, and looking at the meanings in your life are some of the things to think about.

  4. Should breast cancer survivors be excluded from, or invited to, organised mammography screening programmes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bucchi Lauro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of breast cancer in developed countries has steadily risen over recent decades. Immediate and long-term health needs of patients, including preventive care and screening services, are receiving increasing attention. A question still unresolved is whether breast cancer survivors should receive mammographic surveillance in the clinical or screening setting and, thus, whether they should be excluded from, or invited to, organised mammography screening programmes. The objective of this article is to discuss the many contradictory aspects of this matter. Discussion Problems with mammographic surveillance of breast cancer survivors include: weak evidence of a reduction in mortality; lack of evidence in favour of one setting or the other; lack of evidence-based guidelines for the frequency and duration of surveillance; disproportionate emphasis placed on the first few years post-treatment, probably dictated by surgical and oncological priorities; a variety of screening policies, as these women are permanently or temporarily or partially excluded from many - but not all - organised screening programmes worldwide; an even greater disparity in follow-up protocols used in the clinical setting; a paucity of data on compliance to mammographic surveillance in both settings; and a difficulty in coordinating the roles of health care providers. In the future, the use of mammography in breast cancer survivors will be influenced by the inclusion of women aged > 69 years in organised screening programmes and the implementation of multidisciplinary breast units, and will probably be investigated by research activities on individual risk assessment and risk-tailored screening. In the interim, current problems can be partially alleviated with some technical solutions in screening data recording, patient flows, and care coordination. Summary Mammographic surveillance of breast cancer survivors is situated at the crossroads of numerous

  5. Patients with computed tomography-proven acute diverticulitis require follow-up to exclude colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafquat Zaman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Traditionally, patients with acute diverticulitis undergo follow-up endoscopy to exclude colorectal cancer (CRC. However, its usefulness has been debated in this era of high-resolution computed tomography (CT diagnosis. We assessed the frequency and outcome of endoscopic follow-up for patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis, according to the confidence in the CT diagnosis.Methods: Records of patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis between October 2007 and March 2014 at Sandwell & West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust were retrieved. The National Cancer Registry confirmed the cases of CRC. Endoscopy quality indicators were compared between these patients and other patients undergoing the same endoscopic examination over the same period.Results: We identified 235 patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis, of which, 187 were managed conservatively. The CT report was confident of the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis in 75% cases. Five of the 235 patients were subsequently diagnosed with CRC (2.1%. Three cases of CRC were detected in the 187 patients managed conservatively (1.6%. Forty-eight percent of the conservatively managed patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; one case of CRC was identified. Endoscopies were often incomplete and caused more discomfort for patients with diverticulitis compared with controls.Conclusions: CRC was diagnosed in patients with CT-proven diverticulitis at a higher rate than in screened asymptomatic populations, necessitating follow-up. CT reports contained statements regarding diagnostic uncertainty in 25% cases, associated with an increased risk of CRC. Follow-up endoscopy in patients with CT-proven diverticulitis is associated with increased discomfort and high rates of incompletion. The use of other follow-up modalities should be considered.

  6. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruckdeschel, John

    1999-01-01

    ... through screening, and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. In addition, the Center created and supports education programs to provide increased cancer awareness and established working collaborations with the James...

  7. Can 16-detector multislice CT exclude skeletal lesions during tumour staging? Implications for the cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, Ashley M.; Beadsmoore, Clare J.; Courtney, Helen M.; Harish, Srinivasan; Bearcroft, Philip W.P.; Dixon, Adrian K.; Cheow, Heok K.; Balan, Kottekkattu K.; Kaptoge, Stephen; Win, Thida

    2006-01-01

    Current imaging guidelines recommend that many cancer patients undergo soft-tissue staging by computed tomography (CT) whilst the bones are imaged by skeletal scintigraphy (bone scan). New CT technology has now made it feasible, for the first time, to perform a detailed whole-body skeletal CT. This advancement could save patients from having to undergo duplicate investigations. Forty-three patients with known malignancy were investigated for bone metastasis using skeletal scintigraphy and 16-detector multislice CT. Both studies were performed within six weeks of each other. Whole-body images were taken 4 h after injection of 500 Mbq 99m Tc-MDP using a gamma camera. CT was performed on a 16-detector multislice CT machine from the vertex to the knee. The examinations were reported independently and discordant results were compared at follow-up. Statistical equivalence between the two techniques was tested using the Newcombe-Wilson method within the pre-specified equivalence limits of ±20%. Scintigraphy detected bone metastases in 14/43 and CT in 13/43 patients. There were seven discordances; four cases were positive on scintigraphy, but negative on CT; three cases were positive on CT and negative on scintigraphy. There was equivalence between scintigraphy and CT in detecting bone metastases within ±19% equivalence limits. Patients who have undergone full whole-body staging on 16-detector CT may not need additional skeletal scintigraphy. This should shorten the cancer patient's diagnostic pathway. (orig.)

  8. Management of Advanced Laryngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Sheahan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx continues to be the commonest head and neck cancer in many Western countries. The larynx plays a key role for many essential functions, including breathing, voice production, airway protection, and swallowing. The goals of laryngeal cancer treatment are thus to provide best possible oncologic control, while optimizing functional outcomes. In recent decades, the treatment paradigm for advanced laryngeal cancer has shifted from one of primary surgery (total laryngectomy as gold standard, toward non-surgical organ-preserving treatment using radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. However, concerns have emerged regarding functional outcomes after chemoradiotherapy, as well as possible decreased overall survival in patients with laryngeal cancer. The purpose of the present review is to review surgical and non-surgical options for treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer, as well as the evidence supporting each of these.

  9. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krischer, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    ... and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. The projects included in this report are: ̂ Markers of Transformation in Airways Epithelial Cells from a Cohort of Obstructed Smokers and Former Smokers (PT: Tockman...

  10. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krischer, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    ... and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. The projects included in this report are: (1) Markers of Transformation in Airways Bpithelial Cells from a Cohort of Obstructed Smokers and Former Smokers (PT: Tockman); (2...

  11. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krischer, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    ... and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. The projects included in this report are: 1) Markers of Transformation in Airways Epithelial Cells from a Cohort of Obstructed Smokers and Former Smokers (PI: Tockman); 2...

  12. NIKEI: a new inexpensive and non-invasive scoring system to exclude advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münevver Demir

    Full Text Available AIMS: To develop, validate and compare a non-invasive fibrosis scoring system for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD derived from routinely obtained clinical and biochemical parameters. METHODS: 267 consecutive patients with biopsy proven fatty liver or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis were randomly assigned to the estimation (2/3 or validation (1/3 group to develop a model for the prediction of advanced fibrosis. Univariate statistics were performed to compare patients with and without advanced fibrosis, and following a multivariate logistic regression analysis a new scoring system was constructed. This non-invasive Koeln-Essen-index (NIKEI was validated and compared to the FIB-4 index by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. We evaluated a stepwise combination of both scoring systems for the precise prediction of advanced fibrosis. To set in contrast, we additionally tested the diagnostic accuracy of the AST/ALT ratio, BARD score and the NAFLD fibrosis score in our cohort. RESULTS: Age, AST, AST/ALT ratio, and total bilirubin were identified as significant predictors of advanced fibrosis and used to construct the NIKEI with an AUC of 0.968 [0.937; 0.998] compared to 0.929 [0.869; 0.989] for the FIB-4 index. The absence of advanced fibrosis could be confirmed with excellent accuracy (99-100%. The positive predictive value of the FIB-4 index was higher (100% vs. 60%, however, the false negative rate was also high (33%. With a stepwise combination of both indices 82%-84% of biopsies would have been avoidable without a single misclassification. The AUROC for AST/ALT ratio, the NAFLD fibrosis score, and the BARD score were 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72-0.90, 0.96 (95% CI 0.92-0.99, and 0.67 (95% CI 0.55-0.78, respectively. CONCLUSION: The NIKEI can reliably exclude advanced fibrosis in subjects with NAFLD. In combination with the FIB-4 index misclassification with inadequate clinical management can be avoided while

  13. TSH alone is not sufficient to exclude all patients with a functioning thyroid nodule from undergoing testing to exclude thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado-Lopez, Luis-Mauricio; Monroy-Lozano, Blanca-Estela [General Hospital of Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Martinez-Duncker, Carlos [Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez, Medicina Nuclear Molecular, Mexico City, DF (Mexico)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to analyze whether the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) alone avoids tests to exclude malignancy in all patients with functional thyroid nodules (FTN). Sixty-nine patients with FTN on {sup 99m}Tc scintigraphy, radioiodine uptake test (RIU), {sup 99m}Tc thyroid uptake, TSH assay, T3, and T4 obtained within 48 h were retrospectively identified out of 2,356 thyroid scans performed from January 2000 to April 2007. FTNs were classified as causing total, partial, or no inhibition of the thyroid as group 1, 2, or 3, respectively. TSH was subnormal in 21 of 69 (30.43%) patients. In group 1 (N = 23, 33.3%), TSH was subnormal, normal, and high in eight, nine, and six patients; in group 2 (N = 17, 24.6%), TSH was subnormal, normal, and high in four, six, and seven patients, and in group 3 (N = 29, 42%), TSH was subnormal, normal, and high in 9, 13, and 7 patients, respectively. TSH was significantly lower in group 1. In T3, T4, {sup 99m}Tc thyroid uptake, and RIU, there were no differences between the three groups. Only 30.43% of patients had subnormal TSH. TSH alone cannot avoid tests to exclude malignancy in all patients with FTN. FTN existence can only be accurately assessed by thyroid scintigraphy. The current incidence of FTN may be unknown because scintigraphy is not routinely performed in all patients with thyroid nodules. Thyroid scintigraphy of patients with high TSH can detect diseases such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and identify patients with FTN in whom no further diagnostic procedures would be needed in patients with normal TSH levels with nondiagnostic fine-needle aspiration results. (orig.)

  14. Advancing Public Health in Cancer - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer is the leading cause of death from disease among Americans under 85. Learn how NCI advances public health by conducting research to improve the delivery of quality cancer prevention, screening, and treatment to all Americans.

  15. Immunotherapy Combination Approved for Advanced Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    FDA has approved the combination of the immunotherapy drugs nivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy) as an initial treatment for some patients with advanced kidney cancer. The approval is expected to immediately affect patient care, as this Cancer Currents post explains.

  16. Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer them to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will be multiplied and infused into the patient to fight the cancer

  17. Contemporary management of advanced laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Christopher J; Gourin, Christine G

    2017-10-01

    The treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer has undergone a paradigm shift in recent years, with an increase in chemoradiation for organ preservation and a decrease in primary surgery. This review will summarize the contemporary management of advanced laryngeal cancer and discuss treatment-related toxicity and strategies to improve outcomes. NA.

  18. Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Syn, Nicholas Lx; Moehler, Markus; Grothe, Wilfried; Yong, Wei Peng; Tai, Bee-Choo; Ho, Jingshan; Unverzagt, Susanne

    2017-08-29

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In "Western" countries, most people are either diagnosed at an advanced stage, or develop a relapse after surgery with curative intent. In people with advanced disease, significant benefits from targeted therapies are currently limited to HER-2 positive disease treated with trastuzumab, in combination with chemotherapy, in first-line. In second-line, ramucirumab, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, demonstrated significant survival benefits. Thus, systemic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Uncertainty remains regarding the choice of the regimen. To assess the efficacy of chemotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC), combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy combinations in advanced gastric cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and Embase up to June 2016, reference lists of studies, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We considered only RCTs on systemic, intravenous or oral chemotherapy versus BSC, combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy regimens in advanced gastric cancer. Two review authors independently identified studies and extracted data. A third investigator was consulted in case of disagreements. We contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We included 64 RCTs, of which 60 RCTs (11,698 participants) provided data for the meta-analysis of overall survival. We found chemotherapy extends overall survival (OS) by approximately 6.7 months more than BSC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.3, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.24 to 0.55, 184 participants, three studies, moderate-quality evidence). Combination chemotherapy extends OS slightly (by an additional month) versus single-agent chemotherapy (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.89, 4447 participants, 23 studies, moderate-quality evidence), which is

  19. Management of cancer-associated thrombosis in people with advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Simon; Johnson, Miriam J

    2012-06-01

    The management of venous thromboembolism in the cancer population is clearly established. Low molecular weight heparin has a greater efficacy than warfarin in the treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis and is recommended as the preferred therapy. However, the evidence informing these recommendations excluded patients with poor prognosis or performance status, thrombocytopenia, bleeding or brain metastases. Furthermore, there is limited data on the management of venous thromboembolism resistant to anticoagulation, a phenomenon frequently encountered in the advanced cancer population. This paper will review the management of cancer-associated thrombosis with a particular focus on challenging clinical situations faced by palliative care teams looking after patients with advanced disease.

  20. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion...

  1. Radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. Immediate results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, M.V.; Silveira Filho, L.; Martorelli Filho, B.

    1976-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with advanced breast cancer were submited to local radiotherapy of the affected regions. The response of 155 metastatic lesions are recorded. Early results are good, with objective and functional clinical improvement [pt

  2. Treatment of advanced breast cancer. An experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnoni, G; Corcione, S; Api, P

    1984-01-01

    The Authors report their experience about the efficacy of the association surgery-radiotherapy-polichemotherapy, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of this association in the survival rate.

  3. Radiotherapy for advanced breast cancer. Immediate results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederman, M V; Silveira Filho, L; Martorelli Filho, B [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    1976-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with advanced breast cancer were submited to local radiotherapy of the affected regions. The response of 155 metastatic lesions are recorded. Early results are good, with objective and functional clinical improvement.

  4. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullane, Stephanie A; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-05-01

    Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients.

  5. Advance directives: cancer patients' preferences and family-based decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan-Fang; Lin, Jin-Xiang; Li, Xing; Lin, Qu; Ma, Xiao-Kun; Chen, Jie; Wu, Dong-Hao; Wei, Li; Yin, Liang-Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yuan

    2017-07-11

    Advance directives are a sensitive issue among traditional Chinese people, who usually refrain from mentioning this topic until it is imperative. Medical decisions for cancer patients are made by their families, and these decisions might violate patients' personal will. This study aimed to examine the acceptance of advance directives among Chinese cancer patients and their families and patient participation in this procedure and, finally, to analyze the moral risk involved. While 246 patients and their family members refused official discussion of an advance directive, the remaining 166 patients and their families accepted the concept of an advance directive and signed a document agreeing to give up invasive treatment when the anti-cancer treatment was terminated. Of these, only 24 patients participated in the decision making. For 101 patients, anti-cancer therapy was ended prematurely with as many as 37 patients not told about their potential loss of health interests. Participants were 412 adult cancer patients from 9 leading hospitals across China. An advance directive was introduced to the main decision makers for each patient; if they wished to sign it, the advance directive would be systematically discussed. A questionnaire was given to the oncologists in charge of each patient to evaluate the interaction between families and patients, patients' awareness of their disease, and participation in an advance directive. Advance directives were not widely accepted among Chinese cancer patients unless anti-cancer therapy was terminated. Most cancer patients were excluded from the discussion of an advance directive.

  6. Advances in immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jiyu; Chen Lijun

    2009-01-01

    The conventional treatments for bladder cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, are highly invasive and bring about lots of side effects. Immunotherapy has become a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant tumors. This review presents the research advances in immunotherapy of bladder cancer. (authors)

  7. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  8. Local advanced transitional cell cancer and squamous cell cancer of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case report: A 51-year-old man presented with a locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the periurethral tissues as well as an underlying isolated transitional cell cancer of the urethra. Chemotherapy with Gemcitabin and Cisplatinum together with local radiation to the pelvis and the perineum was given. There was ...

  9. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy - Recent Advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when 'photoradiation therapy' was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  10. Specialized palliative care in advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmenlund, Kristina; Sjogren, Per; Nordly, Mie

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Due to the multiple physical, psychological, existential, and social symptoms involved, patients with advanced cancer often have a reduced quality of life (QoL), which requires specialized palliative care (SPC) interventions. The primary objective of the present systematic review...... was to review the existing literature about SPC and its effect on QoL, on physical and psychological symptoms, and on survival in adult patients with advanced cancer. Method: We utilized a search strategy based on the PICO (problem/population, intervention, comparison, and outcome) framework and employed....... The evidence in this field of study in general is still nascent, but there is growing support for the utilization of SPC to improve the quality of life of adult patients with advanced cancer. The evidence that SPC reduces physical and psychological symptoms is moderate, while the evidence that it prolongs...

  11. Technological advances in radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Lorraine; Morgia, Marita; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    2011-09-01

    To discuss the important technological advances that have taken place in the planning and delivery of both external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, and the implications for improved clinical outcomes. Technological advances in external beam radiation treatment and brachytherapy for patients with cervical cancer allow more precise targeting of tumour and relative sparing of surrounding normal organs and tissues. Early evidence is emerging to indicate that these advances will translate into improvements in tumour control and reduced side effects. However, there are patient, tumour and treatment-related factors that can detract from these benefits. Foremost among these is complex, unpredictable and sometimes dramatic internal tumour and normal organ motion during treatment. The focus of current research and clinical development is on tracking internal anatomic change in individual patients and adapting treatment plans as required to assure that optimal tumour coverage and normal tissue sparing is maintained at all times. The success of this approach will depend on clear definitions of target volumes, high resolution daily soft tissue imaging, and new software tools for rapid contouring, treatment planning and quality assurance. Radiation treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer is evolving rapidly, driven by advances in technology, towards more individualized patient care that has the potential to substantially improve clinical outcomes.

  12. Advances and Challenges in Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. Joshua; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer have occurred over the past 30 years. Advances in surgical pathology, refinements in surgical techniques and instrumentation, new imaging modalities, and the widespread use of neoadjuvant therapy have all contributed to these improvements. Several questions emerge as we learn of the benefits or lack thereof for components of the current multimodality treatment in subgroups of patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). What is the optimal surgical technique for distal rectal cancers? Do all patients need postoperative chemotherapy? Do all patients need radiation? Do all patients need surgery, or is a nonoperative, organ-preserving approach warranted in selected patients? Answering these questions will lead to more precise treatment regimens, based on patient and tumor characteristics, that will improve outcomes while preserving quality of life. However, the idea of shifting the treatment paradigm (chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant therapy) currently applied to all patients with LARC to a more individually tailored approach is controversial. The paradigm shift toward organ preservation in highly selected patients whose tumors demonstrate clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment is also controversial. Herein, we highlight many of the advances and resultant controversies that are likely to dominate the research agenda for LARC in the modern era. PMID:25918296

  13. Advances in combination therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lan; Leng, Donglei; Cun, Dongmei

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease caused by a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. The progression of lung cancer involves dynamic changes in the genome and a complex network of interactions between cancer cells with multiple, distinct cell types that form tumors. Combination therapy......, including small molecule drugs and biopharmaceuticals, which make the optimization of dosing and administration schedule challenging. This article reviews the recent advances in the design and development of combinations of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of lung cancer. Focus is primarily on rationales...... for the selection of specific combination therapies for lung cancer treatment, and state of the art of delivery technologies and dosage regimens for the combinations, tested in preclinical and clinical trials....

  14. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-01-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression

  15. Hemostatic radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, P.E.R.S.; Possik, R.A.; Peres, O.; Abrao, A.

    1987-01-01

    Nine patients with advanced bleeding gastric cancer are treated with 4MVC linear accelerator or cobaltotherapy inparallel opposed fields to epigastric region. The radiation therapy is employed as an hemostatic procedure and the results of treatment are analysed. The doses ranged of 1000 rad to 4000 rad, 150 to 300 rad/day, five days a week. (M.A.C.) [pt

  16. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced hypopharyngeal or cervical esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Sohei; Hamada, Norihisa; Shigihara, Shuntaro

    2001-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been shown to be most effective when delivered concurrently with radiation for patients with untreated advanced-stage tumors. We conducted a concurrent chemoradiation protocol using systemic infusion of Cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-Fluorouracil (FU), followed by radical surgery. Thirty-six patients with advanced hypopharyngeal (n=28) or cervical esophageal cancer (n=8) received intravenous administration of CDDP (100 mg/m 2 ), followed by a 120-hour continuous infusion of 5-FU (1000 mg/m 2 /day), and concomitant radiotherapy (200 cGy/day x 20-35 fractions). One patient died of aspiration pneumonia. The rate of grade 3-4 hematological chemotoxicity was 27.8% (10/36). Pharyngo-laryngo-cervical esophagectomies were performed in 23 patients, one received partial resection of the hypopharynx, and one received radical neck dissection. Ten remaining patients refused radical surgery. In the resected specimens, 11 out of 24 (46%) were confirmed as complete response (CR). The median length of follow-up was 74.5 weeks. The projected 5-year survival was 39.7%. When the patients who had refused radical surgery for residual tumor were excluded, the 5-year survival rate rose up to 70.0% in the patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy can be safely and effectively applied. Preliminary pathological results indicate the possibility in improving the rate of organ preservation. (author)

  17. Excluding Lynch syndrome in a female patient with metachronous DNA mismatch repair deficient colon- and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Crobach (Stijn); Jansen, A.M.L. (Anne M. L.); Ligtenberg, M.J.L. (Marjolein J. L.); Koopmans, M. (Marije); M. Nielsen (Maartje); F.J. Hes (Frederik); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand); T. van Wezel (Tom); H. Morreau (Hans)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPatients synchronously or metachronously presenting with ovarian and colon cancer can pose diagnostic challenges. A primary colon carcinoma can metastasize to one or both ovaries, two independent primary tumors can arise or an ovarian carcinoma can metastasize to the colon. Clinical and

  18. Management of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, Silke; Attard, Gerhardt; Beer, Tomasz M

    2018-01-01

    some of these topics. OBJECTIVE: To present the report of APCCC 2017. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Ten important areas of controversy in APC management were identified: high-risk localised and locally advanced prostate cancer; "oligometastatic" prostate cancer; castration-naïve and castration...... literature review or meta-analysis. The outcomes of the voting had varying degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of this article, as well as in the detailed voting results recorded in Supplementary data. CONCLUSIONS: The presented expert voting results can be used for support in areas of management...

  19. Advanced strategies in liposomal cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Thomas Lars; Jensen, Simon Skøde; Jørgensen, Kent

    2005-01-01

    is therefore of great importance. In the first part of this review, we present current strategies in the drug delivery field, focusing on site-specific triggered drug release from liposomes in cancerous tissue. Currently marketed drug delivery systems lack the ability to actively release the carried drug......, none of them have yet led to marketed drugs and are still far from achieving this goal. The most advanced and prospective technologies are probably the prodrug strategies where nontoxic drugs are carried and activated specifically in the malignant tissue by overexpressed enzymes. In the second part......Tumor specific drug delivery has become increasingly interesting in cancer therapy, as the use of chemotherapeutics is often limited due to severe side effects. Conventional drug delivery systems have shown low efficiency and a continuous search for more advanced drug delivery principles...

  20. Hypo fractionated radiotherapy in advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa de; Saito, Newton Heitetsu; Gomes, Herbeni Cardoso; Aguilar, Patricia Bailao; Nadalin, Wladimir

    1996-01-01

    Patients with advanced lung cancers have bad prognosis and, many times, are submitted to prolonged and not always efficient treatments. We present a study where 51 patients were treated with hypo fractionated radiotherapy, based on two distinct schemes, according to the performance status and social conditions of each patient: continuous treatment: 30 Gy, 10 fractions of 3 Gy, 5 days/week (37 cases); weekly treatment: 30 Gy, 6 fractions of 5 Gy, once a week (14 cases). Symptoms relief and impact in survival were evaluated. In both groups, we observed improvement of symptoms in about 70% of the occurrences with a medium survival of three months. We conclude that hypo fractionation is an effective palliative treatment for lung cancers, in patients with short life-expectancy and must be considered as a option in advanced cases, in patients with short life-expectancy that deserve some kind of treatment. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs

  1. EXPRESSING DISTRESS IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Gabriela FELEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative emotions (distress are recognized as part of the psychological profile of patients diagnosed with advanced stage cancer. However, most patients are not accustomed to verbalize feelings towards their physician, and generally towards family and medical care personnel. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the expression of emotions by patients in advanced stages of cancer, respectively the means by which they get to express emotions. To this respect, we identified the most common types of emotions expressed, or metaphors used by patients to describe their emotions and topics that trigger emotions. Words and phrases most commonly used are in relation to: fear, anxiety, depression, guilt, negligence, concern. They are uttered in order to depict the network created between disclosed emotions and topics on health status, symptoms, adverse effects and therapeutic choice, patient privacy, and social and family issues.

  2. Advances in nanotheranostics II cancer theranostic nanomedicine

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book surveys recent advances in theranostics based on magnetic nanoparticles, ultrasound contrast agents, silica nanoparticles and polymeric micelles. It presents magnetic nanoparticles, which offer a robust tool for contrast enhanced MRI imaging, magnetic targeting, controlled drug delivery, molecular imaging guided gene therapy, magnetic hyperthermia, and controlling cell fate. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents have great potential in ultrasound molecular imaging, multimodal imaging, drug/gene delivery, and integrated diagnostics and therapeutics. Due to their diversity and multifunctionality, polymeric micelles and silica-based nanocomposites are highly capable of enhancing the efficacy of multimodal imaging and synergistic cancer therapy. This comprehensive book summarizes the main advances in multifunctional nanoprobes for targeted imaging and therapy of gastric cancer, and explores the clinical translational prospects and challenges. Although more research is needed to overcome the substan...

  3. Excluding Lynch syndrome in a female patient with metachronous DNA mismatch repair deficient colon- and ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Crobach, Stijn; Jansen, A.M.L. (Anne M. L.); Ligtenberg, M.J.L. (Marjolein J. L.); Koopmans, M. (Marije); Nielsen, Maartje; Hes, Frederik; Wijnen, Juul; Dinjens, Winand; Wezel, Tom; Morreau, Hans

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPatients synchronously or metachronously presenting with ovarian and colon cancer can pose diagnostic challenges. A primary colon carcinoma can metastasize to one or both ovaries, two independent primary tumors can arise or an ovarian carcinoma can metastasize to the colon. Clinical and immunohistochemical characterization can aid the diagnosis. Recently, we reported that in difficult cases finding pathogenic APC variants supports a colonic origin. In this case report we describe ...

  4. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Advanced Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avendano Juan; Buitrago, Giancarlo; Ramos, Pedro; Suescun Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the experience at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) on the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy as primary treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer among patients in stages IIIC and IV. Methods: We conducted a descriptive retrospective study (case series type) of patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer in stages IIIC and IV, treated at the NCI from January 1, 2003 to December 31,2006, who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy as primary treatment. Demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes are described. Results: Seventeen patients who fulfilled the above mentioned criteria were selected. Once neoadjuvant chemotherapy ended, 5 patients (29.4%) achieved complete or partial clinical response; 4 (23.8%) remained in stable condition, and 8 (47.6%) showed signs of progressive illness. Interval debulking surgery was performed on objective response patients. Maximum cytoreduction was achieved in 5 patients (100%); first relapse was reported at month 18 of follow-up; 2 disease-free survivors were identified in December, 2007; 8 (49%) reported some degree of non-severe chemotherapy-related toxicity. No mortality was related to chemotherapy, no post surgical complications were observed and no patient required advanced support management. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by optimal interval debulking surgery among selected patients, can be an alternative treatment for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer among women with irresecability or the critically ill. Further studies with improved design are required to confirm these findings.

  5. Immunotherapy (excluding checkpoint inhibitors) for stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer treated with surgery or radiotherapy with curative intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianwei; Li, Rui; Tiselius, Eva; Roudi, Raheleh; Teghararian, Olivia; Suo, Chen; Song, Huan

    2017-12-16

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common lung cancer, accounting for approximately 80% to 85% of all cases. For patients with localised NSCLC (stages I to III), it has been speculated that immunotherapy may be helpful for reducing postoperative recurrence rates, or improving the clinical outcomes of current treatment for unresectable tumours. While several new agents have now entered phase III clinical trials, we felt a systematic review was needed to address the question of the effectiveness and safety of immunotherapy in patients with stages I to III NSCLC. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of immunotherapy (excluding checkpoint inhibitors) in patients with localised NSCLC (stages I to III) who received surgery or radiotherapy with curative intent. We searched the following databases (from inception to 20 January 2017): CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL, and five trial registers. We also manually checked abstracts or reports from relevant conference proceedings and the reference lists of included trials. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in adults (≥ 18 years) with histologically-confirmed early-stage (stages I to III) NSCLC after surgical resection, and those with unresectable locally advanced stage III NSCLC who had received radiotherapy with curative intent. For patients who had received primary surgical treatment, postoperative radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy was allowed if it was used for both experimental and control groups. Two review authors independently selected eligible trials, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. We used survival analysis to pool time-to-event data, expressing the intervention effect as a hazard ratio (HR). We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data, and mean differences for continuous data, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Due to clinical heterogeneity (immunotherapeutic agents with different underlying mechanisms), we used random-effects models for our meta-analyses. We

  6. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokelaar RF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RF Kokelaar, MD Evans, M Davies, DA Harris, J Beynon Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK Abstract: Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer. Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0 resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. Keywords: rectal cancer, exenteration, pelvic sidewall, sacrectomy

  7. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsugoe, Shoji; Matsumoto, Masataka; Okumura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The limitations of surgical treatment for advanced esophageal cancer have been clarified, although esophagectomy with extended lymph node dissection has been widespread in Japan. Preoperative adjuvant therapy has been investigated in Western countries, and recently preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has been introduced for the treatment of resectable esophageal cancer. There are several reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing CRT followed by surgery and surgery alone. According to the results of a meta-analysis, preoperative CRT is considered to be the standard therapy in Western countries. However, problems in the clinical heterogeneity of meta-analyses include: small number of patients in each RCT; differences in stage grouping; presence of both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma; various surgical techniques used; and differences in the amount of radiation administered. Preoperative CRT appears to be a promising method for the treatment of potentially resectable advanced esophageal cancer patients with nodal metastasis. Currently, phase I and II trials of new anticancer agents or molecular targeting agents are ongoing. However, since the surgical procedure in the Western method is still being debated, well-designed RCTs are necessary, especially in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The effectiveness of CRT followed by surgery should be clarified based on excellent Japanese surgical techniques. (author)

  8. Systematic literature review: xerostomia in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchanale, Sarika; Adkinson, Lucy; Daniel, Sunitha; Fleming, Michelle; Oxberry, Stephen G

    2015-03-01

    Dry mouth (xerostomia) is one of the commonest symptoms in cancer patients and can adversely affect quality of life. The aim of this review was to determine the effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions in treating xerostomia in adult advanced cancer patients. The literature search was performed in February 2014 using databases including EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, BNI and Cochrane library. The search was carried out using standard MeSH terms and was limited to adult population and English language. Studies investigating xerostomia secondary to head and neck cancer treatment and autoimmune disease were excluded. Titles and abstracts were screened and reviewed for eligibility. Only studies involving primary research were included in the analysis. Six studies met the eligibility criteria for review: three randomized controlled trials and three prospective studies. The quality assessment and reporting was performed using PRISMA, Jadad and STROBE. These studies compared acupuncture, pilocarpine, Saliva Orthana and chewing gum with each other or with placebo. All interventions were considered effective in treating xerostomia. However, effectiveness versus placebo could not be demonstrated for Saliva Orthana. Meta-analysis could not be performed due to heterogeneity of the study type and intervention. Limited published data exists reporting the effectiveness of measures in the treatment of xerostomia in cancer patients. Based on primary research of low quality, firm conclusions cannot be drawn. However, pilocarpine, artificial saliva, chewing gum and acupuncture can be tried based on the available data. This highlights the explicit need to improve our evidence base. Properly constructed randomized controlled trials demonstrating effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for dry mouth are required.

  9. Advanced Merkel cell cancer and the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bird, B R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Merkel cell cancer (MCC) is an uncommon neuroendocrine skin cancer occurring predominantly in elderly Caucasians. It tends to metastasize to regional lymph nodes and viscera and is sensitive to chemotherapy but recurs rapidly. AIM: To report one such case, its response to chemotherapy and briefly review the literature. METHODS: A 73-year-old male with a fungating primary lesion on his left knee and ulcerated inguinal lymph nodes was diagnosed with MCC and treated with chemotherapy. The two largest case series and reviews of case reports were summarised. RESULTS: His ulcer healed after two cycles of carboplatin and etoposide with improvement in quality of life. Overall response rates of nearly 60% to chemotherapy are reported but median survival is only nine months with metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Chemotherapy should be considered for fit elderly patients with MCC who have recurrent or advanced disease.

  10. Parental hope for children with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamihara, Junne; Nyborn, Justin A; Olcese, Maura E; Nickerson, Taylor; Mack, Jennifer W

    2015-05-01

    Previous work suggests that parents of children with cancer can remain hopeful despite receiving prognostic information, but we know little about what hope means to such parents, or the extent to which parents can feel hopeful even while facing the child's impending death. We audiotaped conversations between clinicians and parents of 32 children with relapsed or refractory cancer, and then interviewed parents about their hopes and expectations for their child. Parent statements about prognosis in interviews mirrored those made by clinicians during discussions about the child's diagnosis with refractory or relapsed cancer. Clinicians used language referring to hope during these conversations but did not ask parents directly about their hopes. Parents expressed a range of hopes for their children, from hopes related to cure or treatment response, to quality of life, normalcy, and love and relationships for the child. For most parents, expectations about prognosis were not aligned with their hopes for the child; for example, many parents hoped for a cure and also reported that they did not believe cure was possible. Many parents were able to acknowledge this incongruence. Parents accurately conveyed the reality of their child's serious condition in the setting of advanced cancer, and yet maintained hope. Hopes were not limited to hope for cure/treatment response. Clinicians should be encouraged to engage in direct conversations about hope with parents as a means to elicit realistic hopes that can help to focus the most meaningful plans for the child and family. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Concurrent radiochemotherapy in advanced hypopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukarski Dusko

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent platinum-based radiochemotherapy has been recommended as a standard of care in patients with locally advanced squamous cell head and neck carcinomas. Unfortunately, there is a lack of level one evidence on best treatment approach for advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. This report aims to summarize the results of our study on concurrent radiochemotherapy in patients with advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. Methods A retrospective analysis of 41 patients with stage III-IV hypopharyngeal cancer was performed. All patients were treated with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and received 70 Gy in 35 fractions (2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week. In dependence of the period when radiotherapy was realized, two different treatment techniques were used. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 30 mg/m2 given on a weekly basis. Results The median age was 52 years (range 29-70. Stage IV disease was recognized in 73.2% of the patients. Complete response rates at the primary site and at the metastatic neck lymph nodes were 68.3% and 36.6%, respectively. A complete composite response was present in 27 patients (65.9%. Median follow-up was 13 months (range 7-36. Distant metastases as initial failure occurred in 7 patients (46.7%. The 2-year local relapse-free survival and regional relapse-free survival rates were 55.2% and 75.8%, respectively. The 2-year locoregional relapse-free survival rate was 51.3%. The 2-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 29.3% and 32.8%, respectively. Confluent mucositis was developed in 46.3% of patients. Leucopenia grade 1 was the most frequent hematological toxicity. The median weight loss at the end of treatment was 12% (range 5-21. The worst grade of late toxicity was most commonly pronounced in the skin and in the subcutaneous tissue. Conclusions Based on unsatisfactory results in our study we suggest that the use of sequential radiochemotherapy or chemotherapy

  12. Multidimensional fatigue and its correlates in hospitalised advanced cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Echteld, M.A.; Passchier, J.; Teunissen, S.; Claessen, S.; Wit, R. de; Rijt, C.C.D. van der

    2007-01-01

    Although fatigue is a multidimensional concept, multidimensional fatigue is rarely investigated in hospitalised cancer patients. We determined the levels and correlates of multidimensional fatigue in 100 advanced cancer patients admitted for symptom control. Fatigue dimensions were general fatigue

  13. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy for advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujinaka, Toshimasa; Murotani, Masahiro; Iihara, Keisuke

    1997-01-01

    Preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin was applied for advanced rectal cancer. Eligible criteria were as follows: no previous treatment, more than hemicircular occupation, T 3 or more, invasion to adjacent organs or lymph node metastasis on CT scan, tumor fixation by digital examination. Eleven patients were enrolled with this regimen consisting of 5-FU; 500 mg/day x 5/w x 4, CDDP; 10 mg/day x 5/w x 4 and radiation; 2 Gy x 5/w x 4. As a toxicity, grade 2 leukopenia in 2 cases, grade 2 GI symptoms in one case and radiation dermatitis was observed in 8 cases. As a local response, there were PR in 10 cases and NC in 1 case. Surgical resection was performed on 8 patients. Histological responses in the resected specimens were grade 2, 5 cases; grade 1b, 1 case; and grade 1a, 2 cases. Operative radicalities were grade A, 3 cases; grade B, 3 cases; and grade C, 2 cases. Preoperative chemoradiation is one of the effective options in multimodal treatment for advanced rectal cancer. (author)

  14. Recent advances in managing differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamartina, Livia; Grani, Giorgio; Durante, Cosimo; Filetti, Sebastiano

    2018-01-01

    The main clinical challenge in the management of thyroid cancer is to avoid over-treatment and over-diagnosis in patients with lower-risk disease while promptly identifying those patients with more advanced or high-risk disease requiring aggressive treatment. In recent years, novel clinical and molecular data have emerged, allowing the development of new staging systems, predictive and prognostic tools, and treatment approaches. There has been a notable shift toward more conservative management of low- and intermediate-risk patients, characterized by less extensive surgery, more selective use of radioisotopes (for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes), and less intensive follow-up. Furthermore, the histologic classification; tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) staging; and American Thyroid Association risk stratification systems have been refined, and this has increased the number of patients in the low- and intermediate-risk categories. There is now a need for new, prospective data to clarify how these changing practices will impact long-term outcomes of patients with thyroid cancer, and new follow-up strategies and biomarkers are still under investigation. On the other hand, patients with more advanced or high-risk disease have a broader portfolio of options in terms of treatments and therapeutic agents, including multitarget tyrosine kinase inhibitors, more selective BRAF or MEK inhibitors, combination therapies, and immunotherapy.

  15. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepek, Joseph M; Chino, Junzo P; Willett, Christopher G; Palta, Manisha; Blazer III, Dan G; Tyler, Douglas S; Uronis, Hope E; Czito, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for gastric cancer. Patients with gastroesophageal (GE) junction (Siewert type II and III) or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS), local control (LC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73%) had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus) tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75%) underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated

  16. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepek Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT for gastric cancer. Methods Patients with gastroesophageal (GE junction (Siewert type II and III or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS, local control (LC and disease-free survival (DFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73% had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75% underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated.

  17. Progress in diagnosis of breast cancer: Advances in radiology technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mari Beth Linder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer in females between the ages of 15 and 54, and the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Diagnosis begins with detection by breast examination (clinical breast exam or breast self-exam or by radiologic studies, like mammography. Many advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer have taken place in recent years. This article will review the history of radiologic advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Use of technological advancements in digital breast tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound in breast cancer diagnosis will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic interventions when compared to older, traditional X-ray films will be discussed. It is important for all nurses, including radiology and oncology nurses, to be well informed about these varied diagnostic modalities, and appreciate the fact that advances in radiologic imaging technologies can yield improved outcomes for breast cancer patients.

  18. POLE somatic mutations in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Joana; Pinto, Carla; Pinto, Diana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Silva, Romina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Veiga, Isabel; Santos, Catarina; Santos, Rui; Cabreira, Verónica; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-12-01

    Despite all the knowledge already gathered, the picture of somatic genetic changes in colorectal tumorigenesis is far from complete. Recently, germline and somatic mutations in the exonuclease domain of polymerase epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) gene have been reported in a small subset of microsatellite-stable and hypermutated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), affecting the proofreading activity of the enzyme and leading to misincorporation of bases during DNA replication. To evaluate the role of POLE mutations in colorectal carcinogenesis, namely in advanced CRC, we searched for somatic mutations by Sanger sequencing in tumor DNA samples from 307 cases. Microsatellite instability and mutation analyses of a panel of oncogenes were performed in the tumors harboring POLE mutations. Three heterozygous mutations were found in two tumors, the c.857C>G, p.Pro286Arg, the c.901G>A, p.Asp301Asn, and the c.1376C>T, p.Ser459Phe. Of the POLE-mutated CRCs, one tumor was microsatellite-stable and the other had low microsatellite instability, whereas KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were found in one tumor each. We conclude that POLE somatic mutations exist but are rare in advanced CRC, with further larger studies being necessary to evaluate its biological and clinical implications. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Advances in Cancer Immunotherapy in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitha Menon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is heralded as one of the most important advances in oncology. Until recently, only limited immunotherapeutic options were available in selected immunogenic cancers like melanoma and renal cell carcinomas. Nowadays, there is an improved understanding that anti-tumor immunity is controlled by a delicate balance in the tumor microenvironment between immune stimulatory and immune inhibitory pathways. Either by blocking the inhibitory pathways or stimulating the activating pathways that regulate cytotoxic lymphocytes, anti-tumor immunity can be enhanced leading to durable anti-tumor responses. Drugs which block the immune regulatory checkpoints namely the PD-1/PDL1 and CTLA 4 pathway have shown tremendous promise in a wide spectrum of solid and hematological malignancies, significantly improving overall survival in newly diagnosed and heavily pretreated patients alike. Hence there is renewed enthusiasm in the field of immune oncology with current research focused on augmenting responses to checkpoint inhibitors by combination therapy as well as studies looking at other immune modulators and adoptive T cell therapy. In this article, we highlight the key clinical advances and concepts in immunotherapy with particular emphasis on checkpoint inhibition as well as the future direction in this field.

  20. Recent Advances in Endometrial Cancer [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur-Quan Tran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States, with yearly rates continuing to increase. Most women present with early stage disease; however, advanced disease carries a grave prognosis. As a result, novel therapies are currently under investigation for the treatment of endometrial cancer. These advances include a better understanding of the genetic basis surrounding the development of endometrial cancer, novel surgical therapies, and new molecular targets for the treatment of this disease. This review explores the literature regarding these advancements in endometrial cancer.

  1. An approach to the management of locally advanced breast cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases. It incorporates a subset of stage IIB (T3N0) disease, stage III disease and inflammatory breast cancer. In the developed world, 7% of breast cancer patients have stage III disease at diagnosis. In developing countries, LABC constitutes ...

  2. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: recommendations of the St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillessen, S.; Omlin, A.; Attard, G.; Bono, J.S. de; Efstathiou, E.; Fizazi, K.; Halabi, S.; Nelson, P.S.; Sartor, O.; Smith, M.R.; Soule, H.R.; Akaza, H.; Beer, T.M.; Beltran, H.; Chinnaiyan, A.M.; Daugaard, G.; Davis, I.D.; Santis, M. de; Drake, C.G.; Eeles, R.A.; Fanti, S.; Gleave, M.E.; Heidenreich, A.; Hussain, M.; James, N.D.; Lecouvet, F.E.; Logothetis, C.J.; Mastris, K.; Nilsson, S.; Oh, W.K.; Olmos, D.; Padhani, A.R.; Parker, C.; Rubin, M.A.; Schalken, J.A.; Scher, H.I.; Sella, A.; Shore, N.D.; Small, E.J.; Sternberg, C.N.; Suzuki, H; Sweeney, C.J.; Tannock, I.F.; Tombal, B.

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant

  3. Radiation therapy of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer and hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Hida, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    Ten patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy and hormone therapy to improve tumor control and survival. Eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy to improve their quality of life. Local control of the tumor was achieved in 9 of 10 patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer. Five of eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer obtained improved quality of life. Combined radiotherapy and hormone therapy were effective in the treatment of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer, and radiotherapy was useful for improving the quality of life of patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer. (author)

  4. Multiple Cutaneous Metastases as Initial Presentation in Advanced Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer Nambiar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin metastases from advanced colorectal cancer are relatively rare and occur most often when the cancer is advanced, following the spread to other organs. Cutaneous metastases occur in about 3% of advanced colorectal cancers. We present an extremely rare case of a 68-year-old woman with advanced ascending colon adenocarcinoma that presented with multiple rapidly progressing painless cutaneous metastatic lesions with no other distant metastases. Of all the tumors, breast cancer most commonly spreads as cutaneous metastasis is followed by lung, colorectal, renal, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cutaneous metastases can present in a variety of clinical manifestations, such as a rapidly growing painless dermal or subcutaneous nodule with intact overlying epidermis or as ulcers. In cases where the cutaneous deposit is isolated, as in visceral metastasis, there is a role for radical management such as wide local excision and reconstruction. In our patient, since she had multiple cutaneous metastases she began treatment with palliative systemic combination chemotherapy.

  5. Molecular targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Gwang

    2013-03-01

    Although medical treatment has been shown to improve quality of life and prolong survival, no significant progress has been made in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) within the last two decades. Thus, the optimum standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for AGC remains debatable, and most responses to chemotherapy are partial and of short duration; the median survival is approximately 7 to 11 months, and survival at 2 years is exceptionally > 10%. Recently, remarkable progress in tumor biology has led to the development of new agents that target critical aspects of oncogenic pathways. For AGC, many molecular targeting agents have been evaluated in international randomized studies, and trastuzumab, an anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibody, has shown antitumor activity against HER-2-positive AGC. However, this benefit is limited to only ~20% of patients with AGC (patients with HER-2-positive AGC). Therefore, there remains a critical need for both the development of more effective agents and the identification of molecular predictive and prognostic markers to select those patients who will benefit most from specific chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies.

  6. A Grounded Theory Approach to Physical Activity and Advanced Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya S. Lowe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical activity has demonstrated benefits in cancer-related fatigue and physical functioning in early-stage cancer patients, however the role of physical activity at the end stage of cancer has not been established. To challenge positivist–empiricist assumptions, I am seeking to develop a new theoretical framework that is grounded in the advanced cancer patient’s experience of activity. Aim: To gain an in-depth understanding of the experience of activity and quality of life in advanced cancer patients. Objectives: (1 To explore the meaning of activity for advanced cancer patients in the context of their day-to-day life, (2 to elicit advanced cancer patients’ perceptions of activity with respect to their quality of life, and (3 to elicit advanced cancer patients’ views of barriers and facilitators to activity in the context of their day-to-day life. Study Design: A two-phase, cross-sectional, qualitative study will be conducted through the postpositivist lens of subtle realism and informed by the principles of grounded theory methods. Study Methods: Advanced cancer patients will be recruited through the outpatient department of a tertiary cancer center. For Phase one, participants will wear an activPAL™ activity monitor and fill out a daily record sheet for seven days duration. For Phase two, the activity monitor output and daily record sheets will be used as qualitative probes for face-to-face, semistructured interviews. Concurrent coding, constant comparative analysis, and theoretical sampling will continue with the aim of achieving as close as possible to theoretical saturation. Ethics and Discussion: Ethical and scientific approval will be obtained by all local institutional review boards prior to study commencement. The findings will generate new mid-level theory about the experience of activity and quality of life in advanced cancer patients and aid in the development of a new theoretical framework for designing

  7. Cardiac autonomic modulation impairments in advanced breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Claudia; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; da Silva Paiva, Laércio; Fulghum, Kyle Levi; Fristachi, Carlos Elias; Nazario, Afonso Celso Pinto; Elias, Simone; Gebrim, Luiz Henrique; Ferreira Filho, Celso; Gidron, Yori; Ferreira, Celso

    2018-05-02

    To compare cardiac autonomic modulation in early- versus advanced-stage breast cancer patients before any type of cancer treatment and investigate associated factors. This cross-sectional study included women (30-69 years old) with primary diagnosis of breast cancer and women with benign breast tumors. We evaluated cardiac modulation by heart rate variability and assessed factors of anxiety, depression, physical activity, and other relevant medical variables. Patients were divided into three groups based on TNM staging of cancer severity: early-stage cancer (n = 42), advanced-stage cancer (n = 37), or benign breast tumors to serve as a control (n = 37). We analyzed heart rate variability in time and frequency domains. The advanced-stage cancer group had lower vagal modulation than early-stage and benign groups; also, the advance-stage group had lower overall heart rate variability when compared to benign conditions. Heart rate variability was influenced by age, menopausal status, and BMI. Heart rate variability seems to be a promising, non-invasive tool for early diagnosis of autonomic dysfunction in breast cancer and detection of cardiovascular impairments at cancer diagnosis. Cardiac autonomic modulation is inversely associated with breast cancer staging.

  8. TIMP-1 and responsiveness to gemcitabine in advanced breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte Levin Tykjær; Bjerre, Christina Annette; Ejlertsen, Bent Laursen

    2014-01-01

    receiving GD. CONCLUSIONS: TIMP-1 status was an independent prognostic factor for OS but not TTP in patients with advanced breast cancer receiving either D or GD. There was no statistically significant interaction between TIMP-1 status and treatment, but a trend towards an incremental OS from the addition...... and predictive marker in advanced breast cancer patients receiving docetaxel (D) or gemcitabine plus docetaxel (GD). METHODS: Patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who were assigned to D or GD by participation in a randomized phase III trial were included in the study. Assessment of TIMP-1...

  9. Advanced Breast Cancer as Indicator of Quality Mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the Mexican Republic. Mammography is the more important screening tool for detecting early breast cancer. Screening mammography involves taking x-rays from two views from each breast, typically from above (cranial-caudal view, CC) and from an oblique or angled view (mediolateral-oblique, MLO). The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of the issue of patients with advanced breast cancer who have had a screening mammography. A general result of the survey is that 22.5% of all patients (102) with advanced breast cancer that participated in the study had previous screening mammography. But we should consider that 10% of breast cancers are not detected by mammography. Only 70% of the family doctors prescribed a diagnostic mammography when the first symptoms were diagnosed

  10. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBERS: W81XWH-14-1-0554 TITLE: Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Dr. Nora M. Navone CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030-4009...COVERED 09/22/2016-09/21/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced

  11. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable

  12. Prognostic significance of symptoms of hospitalised advanced cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Saskia C.; de Graeff, Alexander; de Haes, Hanneke C.; Voest, Emile E.

    2006-01-01

    To assess the prognostic value of symptoms in hospitalised advanced cancer patients. A prospective analysis was performed of 181 hospitalised patients referred to a Palliative Care Team. Comprehensive symptom questionnaire, functional status, estimated life expectancy and survival were assessed.

  13. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  14. Experience about the treatment of advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Api, P; Corcione, S; Magnoni, G

    1985-01-01

    The authors report their experience about the efficacy of the association surgery-radiotherapy-polichemotheraphy, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of this association in the survival rate.

  15. Crizotinib for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international phase III clinical trial that compared crizotinib versus chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer whose tumors have an EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  16. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  17. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  18. Advance Care Planning: Experience of Women With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    recorded along with other characteristics. Inclusion criteria for the primary studies required that women with breast cancer be at least 21 years of age; cog ...W81XWH-04-1-0469 TITLE: Advance Care Planning: Experience of Women with Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ardith Z. Doorenbos...with Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0469 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Ardith Z. Doorenbos, Ph.D

  19. Advanced prostate cancer risk in relation to toenail selenium levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geybels, M.S.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Schooten, F.J. van; Goldbohm, A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selenium may prevent advanced prostate cancer (PCa), but most studies on this topic were conducted in populations with moderate to high selenium status. We investigated the association of toenail selenium, reflecting long-term selenium exposure, and advanced PCa risk in a population from

  20. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  1. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  2. Intraoperative Radiotherapy (IORT) for Locally Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Se; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Jae Hwang; Kwan, Koing Bo; Kim, Heung Dae

    1991-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most frequent malignant tumor in the United States and fourth most frequent tumor in Korea. Surgery has been used as a primary treatment modality but reported overall survivals after curative resection were from 20% to 50%. Local recurrence is the most common failure in the treatment of locally advanced colorectal cancer. Once recurrence has developed, surgery has rarely the role and the five year survival of locally advanced rectal cancer is less than 5%, this indicated that significant improvement of local control could be achieved. We performed 6 cases of IORT for locally advanced colorectal cancer which is he first experience in Korea. Patient's eligibility, treatment applicator, electron energy, dose distribution on the surface and depth within the treatment field and detailed skills are discussed. We hope that our IORT protocol can reduce local failure and increase the long term survival significantly

  3. Relatives' level of satisfaction with advanced cancer care in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustussen, Mikaela; Hounsgaard, Lise; Pedersen, Michael Lynge

    2017-01-01

    from health professionals. They experienced a lack of security, worries about the future and a lack of support at home. The study showed a substantial level of dissatisfaction among relatives of patients with advanced cancer. We strongly recommend a focus on psychosocial care, more access......Palliative cancer care in Greenland is provided by health professionals at local level, the national Queen Ingrid's Hospital and at Rigshospitalet in Denmark. To improve and develop care for relatives of patients with advanced cancer, we conducted a mixed method study examining relatives' level...... was supplemented by open-ended questions about relative's current main concerns and analyzed with a phenomenological hermeneutical approach. Greenlandic patients with advanced cancer who were previously participating in a prospective study were asked if their closest adult relative would participate in the study...

  4. Current advances in T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjun; Yin, Bingnan; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide; due to the lack of ideal cancer biomarkers for early detection or diagnosis, most patients present with late-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, thus limiting the potential for successful treatment. Traditional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have demonstrated very limited efficacy for patients with late-stage disease. Therefore, innovative and effective cancer treatments are urgently needed for cancer patients with late-stage and refractory disease. Cancer immunotherapy, particularly adoptive cell transfer, has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with late-stage disease, including those who are refractory to standard therapies. In this review, we will highlight recent advances and discuss future directions in adoptive cell transfer based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25524383

  5. Advances in MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longmin; Liu Ailian

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in the world, and the incidence of prostate cancer in China shows an upward trend. MRI has high soft tissue resolution and multi-dimensional imaging advantages, and it can better show the anatomy of the prostate and adjacent tissue structures. With the development of MR technique, it plays a more and more important role in prostate cancer diagnosis. This review starts from the imaging performance of routine MRI sequence of prostate cancer, and a variety of functional MRI applications in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of prostate cancer are described in detail, such as MR perfusion-weighted imaging, MR spectroscopy, MR diffusion-weighted imaging, MR diffusion tensor imaging, intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging, MR susceptibility-weighted imaging. Meanwhile this review introduces that functional MRI has more advantages and can provide more image information than routine MRI sequence. According to a series of semi-quantitative and quantitative data, functional MRI can further provide the blood perfusion of prostate cancer, water molecule diffusion and microcirculation state, metabolism and biochemical composition change information. (authors)

  6. Physical activity in advanced cancer patients: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Sonya S; Tan, Maria; Faily, Joan; Watanabe, Sharon M; Courneya, Kerry S

    2016-03-11

    Progressive, incurable cancer is associated with increased fatigue, increased muscle weakness, and reduced physical functioning, all of which negatively impact quality of life. Physical activity has demonstrated benefits on cancer-related fatigue and physical functioning in early-stage cancer patients; however, its impact on these outcomes in end-stage cancer has not been established. The aim of this systematic review is to determine the potential benefits, harms, and effects of physical activity interventions on quality of life outcomes in advanced cancer patients. A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature on physical activity in advanced cancer patients will be undertaken. Empirical quantitative studies will be considered for inclusion if they present interventional or observational data on physical activity in advanced cancer patients. Searches will be conducted in the following electronic databases: CINAHL; CIRRIE Database of International Rehabilitation Research; Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); EMBASE; MEDLINE; PEDro: the Physiotherapy Evidence Database; PQDT; PsycInfo; PubMed; REHABDATA; Scopus; SPORTDiscus; and Web of Science, to identify relevant studies of interest. Additional strategies to identify relevant studies will include citation searches and evaluation of reference lists of included articles. Titles, abstracts, and keywords of identified studies from the search strategies will be screened for inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers will conduct quality appraisal using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies (EPHPP) and the Cochrane risk of bias tool. A descriptive summary of included studies will describe the study designs, participant and activity characteristics, and objective and patient-reported outcomes. This systematic review will summarize the current

  7. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Andersen, Fahimeh; Fischer, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has proven valuable in several tumors, but it has not been elucidated in colon cancer. The present phase II trial addressed the issue in high-risk patients selected by computed tomography (CT) scan. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with resectable colon cancer...... 32% (p = 0.005) translating into a three-year DFS of 94% versus 63% (p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer is feasible and the results suggest that a major part of the patients can be spared adjuvant chemotherapy. Validation in a randomized trial is warranted....

  8. Conceptualizing prognostic awareness in advanced cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Allison J; Kolva, Elissa A; Kulikowski, Julia R; Jacobs, Jordana D; DeRosa, Antonio; Lichtenthal, Wendy G; Olden, Megan E; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2014-09-01

    This systematic review synthesizes the complex literature on prognostic awareness in cancer. A total of 37 studies examining cancer patients' understanding of their prognosis were included. Prognostic awareness definitions and assessment methods were inconsistent across studies. A surprisingly high percentage of patients (up to 75%) were unaware of their poor prognosis, and in several studies, even their cancer diagnosis (up to 96%), particularly in studies conducted outside of North America. This review highlights surprisingly low rates of prognostic awareness in patients with advanced cancer as well as discrepancies in prognostic awareness assessment, suggesting the need for empirically validated measures of prognostic awareness. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric...

  10. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nio, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yasushi; Teramoto, Mutsumi; Nagami, Haruhiko; Yano, Seiji; Sumi, Shoichiro; Tamura, Katsuhiro; Kushima, Takeyuki [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer has rarely been reported. In the present study, we investigated the objective response and histopathological effects of neoadjuvant radiotherapy in patients with primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer. Between 1992 and 1997, a total of 11 patients with primary or recurrent breast cancer (5 primary advanced and 6 locally recurrent breast cancers) were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy before surgery. Six patients received radiotherapy alone and 5 received radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy, and the objective response was assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Society of Cancer Therapy. After neoadjuvant radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy, all patients underwent surgery or biopsy, and histopathological effects were assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer Study. The overall objective response was 27% (3PR/11; 2PR in 5 primary cancers and 1PR in 6 recurrent cancers), and histopathological effects included 5 grade-3 or -2 responses (45%; 2 grade-3 and 1 grade-2 in primary cancers and 2 grade-2 in recurrent cancers). There were no correlations between total radiation dose and objective response or histopathological effects. The objective response rates were 40% (2/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 17% (1/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, histopathological effects higher than grade-2 were seen in 60% (3/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 33% (2/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, and a grade-3 response was seen only in the radiochemotherapy group. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer resulted in a high response rate and was more effective against primary cancer than recurrent cancer. Furthermore, chemotherapy may be beneficial in improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nio, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yasushi; Teramoto, Mutsumi; Nagami, Haruhiko; Yano, Seiji; Sumi, Shoichiro; Tamura, Katsuhiro; Kushima, Takeyuki

    1998-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer has rarely been reported. In the present study, we investigated the objective response and histopathological effects of neoadjuvant radiotherapy in patients with primary advanced or locally recurrent breast cancer. Between 1992 and 1997, a total of 11 patients with primary or recurrent breast cancer (5 primary advanced and 6 locally recurrent breast cancers) were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy before surgery. Six patients received radiotherapy alone and 5 received radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy, and the objective response was assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Society of Cancer Therapy. After neoadjuvant radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy, all patients underwent surgery or biopsy, and histopathological effects were assessed according to the criteria of the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer Study. The overall objective response was 27% (3PR/11; 2PR in 5 primary cancers and 1PR in 6 recurrent cancers), and histopathological effects included 5 grade-3 or -2 responses (45%; 2 grade-3 and 1 grade-2 in primary cancers and 2 grade-2 in recurrent cancers). There were no correlations between total radiation dose and objective response or histopathological effects. The objective response rates were 40% (2/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 17% (1/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, histopathological effects higher than grade-2 were seen in 60% (3/5) in the radiochemotherapy group and 33% (2/6) in the radiotherapy alone group, and a grade-3 response was seen only in the radiochemotherapy group. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer resulted in a high response rate and was more effective against primary cancer than recurrent cancer. Furthermore, chemotherapy may be beneficial in improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Clinical utility of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan MMK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Matthew MK Chan,1,2 Katrin M Sjoquist,1,3 John R Zalcberg4 1NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford Hospital, Gosford, NSW, Australia; 3Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Gastric cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Prognosis remains poor with most patients presenting with advanced or metastatic disease. A better understanding of angiogenesis has led to the investigation of drugs that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway including anti-VEGF antibody therapy (eg, bevacizumab, inhibitors of angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (eg, sunitinib, sorafenib, apatinib, regorafenib, and inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs (eg, ramucirumab. Ramucirumab, a VEGFR-2 inhibitor, is the first anti-angiogenic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of advanced gastric cancers. This review will focus on the clinical utility and potential use of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer. Keywords: ramucirumab, IMC-1121B, gastric cancer, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, angiogenesis, targeted therapy

  13. Radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia in advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuma, Akiko; Terashima, Hiromi; Torii, Yoshikuni; Nakata, Hajime; Inatomi, Hisato

    1986-01-01

    Radiation therapy combined with radiofrequency (RF) hyperthermia was performed on 5 advanced cancer patients. Included were one each with urinary bladder cancer, hepatoma with left axillary node metastasis, breast cancer, tongue cancer with left cervical metastasis, and mandibular cancer. All had large tumors, which were judged to be uncontrollable by radiotherapy alone. They were treated with irradiation (Linac: 10 MV X-ray 1.8 - 2.0 Gy/day, 5 days/week), followed within an hour by RF hyperthermia once or twice a week. Partial response was obtained in the urinary bladder cancer patient. Surface overheating around the margin of electrodes occurred in all but no severe complications were observed. (author)

  14. Economical impact of orchiectomy for advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Adriano A. P. de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To demonstrate the economical impact of surgical castration in comparison to the medical castration for patients with advanced prostate cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between January 2001 and December 2001, 32 patients with advanced prostate cancer underwent bilateral sub-capsular orchiectomy at our Hospital. The costs of this procedure were compared to the costs of medical castration with LH-RH analogues. RESULTS: The costs of the surgical procedure were extremely reduced when compared to published data on the medical treatment. Surgical castration did not have any stronger negative impact on the evolution of these patients when compared to medical castration. CONCLUSION: Surgical castration is an efficient and low cost treatment for advanced prostate cancer.

  15. Pathological study on preoperative concurrent chemoradiation for advanced hypopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toshiya; Nagata, Motoki; Yukawa, Hisaya

    2008-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is frequently applied as the first-line therapy for advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. However, organ-preserving therapy does not allow true pathological assessment of the effectiveness of the therapy. We therefore determined the following treatment modality for advanced hypopharyngeal cancer based on local findings upon the completion of radiotherapy at 40 Gy. Pathological assessments of 33 cases of advanced hypopharyngeal cancer who had undergone extended operation after chemoradiotherapy were performed. The pathological effects were 12 cases of Grade 1, 13 cases of Grade 2 and 8 cases of Grade 3. However, the rate of tumor-free cases was only 60% of the extended operation. In those cases, the local controlled lesions were well, however, distant metastases influenced the outcome; to control distant metastasis is a future issue. Additional studies to select a surgical approach will be needed. (author)

  16. Superselective intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy for advanced oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Wataru; Sakaki, Hirotaka; Kakehata, Shinya; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Hiroto; Teh, Beng Gwan

    2012-01-01

    Functional preservation is important in the treatment of advanced oral cancer in terms of patient's quality of life (QOL), therefore surgery is not ideal for advanced oral cancer. In order to ensure both curability and functional preservation, superselective intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy (SSIACRT), which is considered to be superior to conventional surgical treatment, has been conducted. Thirty-four patients with advanced oral cancer have been treated with SSIACRT with a combination of nedaplatin (CDGP) and docetaxel (DOC) since 2003. Complete response was achieved in 30 (89%) out of the 34 patients. Amongst the 25 patients with positive neck diseases, 23 (92%) were assessed as disease-free. The 5-year overall survival rate was 71.4%. Wide resection of both primary and neck lesions was avoidable and oral cavity function (swallowing, speech, mastication) after SSIACRT was satisfactory. A problem for SSIACRT is the development of late adverse events of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis. (author)

  17. Radiotherapy Boost Following Conservative Surgery for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cendales, Ricardo; Ospino, Rosalba; Torres, Felipe; Cotes, Martha

    2009-01-01

    Nearly half of breast cancer patients in developing countries present with a locally advanced cancer. Treatment is centered on a multimodal approach based on chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy. The growing use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy has led to a more conservative surgical approach; nonetheless, it is not yet considered as a standard. There are no clear recommendations on the use of a radiotherapy boost in such situation. A Medline search was developed. Most articles are retrospective series. Survival free of locoregional relapse in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy is good. All articles described a boost administered to nearly all patients without regard to their prognostic factors, given that a locally advanced tumor is already considered as a poor prognostic factor. Even tough the poor level of evidence, a recommendation can be made: radiotherapy boost should be administered to all patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast conserving surgery.

  18. Interventional therapy of advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiliang; Fan Ye; Cao Jun; Yan Liping; Yang Ya

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of intraarterial infusion chemotherapy in patients with advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer. Methods: From February 2000 to March 2003, 18 patients with advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer were treated with interaarterial chemotherapy (IAC). The Seldinger's technique was used in all patients. IAC was administered for 2-3 courses every 3-4 weeks for each patient. Results: The procedure was successfully performed in all 18 patients including one with a complete response, 12 of a partial response, none in 3, and with progression in 2. The overall response rate was 72.2%. The frequent adverse effects were fever, leukopenia, nausea, and vomiting but no severe complication occurred. Conclusion: Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy is a safe, simple, complication-free and effective in the patients with advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer. (authors)

  19. Relatives' level of satisfaction with advanced cancer care in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustussen, Mikaela; Hounsgaard, Lise; Pedersen, Michael Lynge

    2017-01-01

    Palliative cancer care in Greenland is provided by health professionals at local level, the national Queen Ingrid's Hospital and at Rigshospitalet in Denmark. To improve and develop care for relatives of patients with advanced cancer, we conducted a mixed method study examining relatives' level...... of satisfaction with care and treatment and their current main concerns. The aim was to investigate relatives' level of satisfaction with advanced cancer care and bring to light their current main concerns. The FAMCARE-20 questionnaire was translated to Greenlandic and pilot tested. The questionnaire...... (66%) and relatives were the most dissatisfied with the lack of inclusion in decision making related to treatment and care (71%) and the length of time required to diagnose cancer (70%). Responses to the open-ended questions revealed that relatives faced challenges in gaining access to information...

  20. Treatment of advanced rectal cancer after renal transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yi Liu; Xiao-Bo Liang; Yao-Ping Li; Yi Feng; Dong-Bo Liu; Wen-Da Wang

    2011-01-01

    Renal transplantation is a standard procedure for end-stage renal disease today. Due to immunosuppressive drugs and increasing survival time after renal trans-plantation, patients with transplanted kidneys carry an increased risk of developing malignant tumors. In this case report, 3 patients with advanced rectal can-cer after renal transplantation for renal failure were treated with anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection plus total mesorectal excision, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. One patient eventually died of metastasized cancer 31 mo after therapy, although his organ grafts functioned well until his death. The other 2 patients were well during the 8 and 21 mo follow-up periods after rectal resection. We therefore strongly argue that patients with advanced rectal cancer should receive standard oncology treatment, including opera-tion and adjuvant treatment after renal transplantation. Colorectal cancer screening in such patients appears justified.

  1. New Perspectives in the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahlberg, Rolf; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Thuss-Patience, Peter

    2017-01-01

    available in non-Asia countries until recently. In Japan, S-1 in combination with cisplatin is the recommended first-line treatment in patients with gastric cancer. In Europe, the first trials with S-1 were disappointing due to high unacceptable incidences of adverse events. Pharmacokinetic studies showed...... differences in Asian and Caucasian patients; therefore, a new non-Asian study program was initiated, which led to the pivotal phase 3 trial First-Line Advanced Gastric Cancer Study (FLAGS). In FLAGS, 1,053 patients with advanced gastric cancer from 24 non-Asian countries were enrolled. S-1 plus cisplatin...... safety profile. This led to the approval of S-1 in combination with cisplatin in gastric cancer in Europe in 2011. This article reviews the mode of action of S-1, pivotal study results from an EU point of view, and future perspectives....

  2. Efficacy of c-Met inhibitor for advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, William H; Zhu, Chunfang; Clark, Curtis; Christensen, James G; Sun, Zijie

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant expression of HGF/SF and its receptor, c-Met, often correlates with advanced prostate cancer. Our previous study showed that expression of c-Met in prostate cancer cells was increased after attenuation of androgen receptor (AR) signalling. This suggested that current androgen ablation therapy for prostate cancer activates c-Met expression and may contribute to development of more aggressive, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Therefore, we directly assessed the efficacy of c-Met inhibition during androgen ablation on the growth and progression of prostate cancer. We tested two c-Met small molecule inhibitors, PHA-665752 and PF-2341066, for anti-proliferative activity by MTS assay and cell proliferation assay on human prostate cancer cell lines with different levels of androgen sensitivity. We also used renal subcapsular and castrated orthotopic xenograft mouse models to assess the effect of the inhibitors on prostate tumor formation and progression. We demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of PHA-665752 and PF-2341066 on the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells and the phosphorylation of c-Met. The effect on cell proliferation was stronger in androgen insensitive cells. The c-Met inhibitor, PF-2341066, significantly reduced growth of prostate tumor cells in the renal subcapsular mouse model and the castrated orthotopic mouse model. The effect on cell proliferation was greater following castration. The c-Met inhibitors demonstrated anti-proliferative efficacy when combined with androgen ablation therapy for advanced prostate cancer

  3. Splenectomy combined with gastrectomy and immunotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, H; Orita, K

    1983-06-01

    We studied the effects of a splenectomy in combination with immunotherapy on the survival of patients who had undergone a total gastrectomy. It was found that a splenectomy was not effective against advanced gastric cancer at stage III, and that the spleen should be retained for immunotherapy. Splenectomy for gastric cancer at terminal stage IV, particularly in combination with immunotherapy, produced not only augmentation of cellular immunity, but also increased survival.

  4. Recent advances in cancer metabolism: a technological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun Pyo; Ward, Nathan P; DeNicola, Gina M

    2018-04-16

    Cancer cells are highly dependent on metabolic pathways to sustain both their proliferation and adaption to harsh microenvironments. Thus, understanding the metabolic reprogramming that occurs in tumors can provide critical insights for the development of therapies targeting metabolism. In this review, we will discuss recent advancements in metabolomics and other multidisciplinary techniques that have led to the discovery of novel metabolic pathways and mechanisms in diverse cancer types.

  5. Systemic treatment of advanced, persistent or recurrent cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reckova, M.

    2015-01-01

    The cervical cancer is the third most common malignancy in women in the world. Despite advances in screening and treatment there are a relatively large number of patients who are diagnosed with advanced stage of disease, or who have inoperable recurrence. In this group of patients, the main aim of a treatment is palliative intent. The main cytotoxic agent is cisplatin, but the responses are also observed with other chemotherapy agents. Improved therapeutic results are observed with combined platinum-based chemotherapy regimens as compared to cisplatin monotherapy. Overall, however, the treatment results in advanced, persistent and recurrent cervical cancer are unfavorable and disease is considered to be relatively chemo resistant. The new treatment approaches are searched and a significant therapeutic benefit, as far as progression-free and overall survival, has been recently demonstrated when adding bevacizumab to systemic chemotherapy. The current article is a review of systemic treatment in advanced, persistent and recurrent metastatic carcinoma of the cervix. (author)

  6. Clinical experience with intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Takahashi, Masaharu; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was performed on 20 patients with colorectal cancer. IORT with a single dose of 20 to 40 Gy was delivered to the residual tumor, tumor bed, and/or lymphnode regions. Although most of the patients had advanced lesions, local control was achieved in 67 % of the patients when IORT was combined with tumor resection, and 4 patients survived more than 5 years. There were no serious complications, except for contracture or atrophy of the psoas muscle seen in 2 patients. IORT combined with external beam radiotherapy should be a useful adjuvant therapy to surgery for locally advanced colorectal cancer. (author)

  7. Intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced refractory cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Mitsuyuki; Takahashi, Masaji; Ono, Koji; Dodo, Yoshihiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1983-05-01

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IOR) in carcinoma of the stomach and prostate, and malignant soft tissue tumors are reported. The 5-year survival rate was found to be increased by IOR in stages II-IV gastric cancer. From the analysis of the clinical results of prostatic cancer, a single dose of 3,500 rad was considered to be a potential curative dose for the tumor less than 3 cm in diameter. The local recurrence rate of patients with malignant soft tissue tumors who received a single dose ranging from 3,000 to 4,500 rad was 5.9 and the 5-year survival rate was 64.6 %.

  8. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Wakako; Ogino, Takashi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    To investigate factors influencing response and survival for patients with squamous cell cancer of the esophagus. Forty-nine patients with squamous cell cancer of the esophagus, classified by guidelines for the clinical and pathologic studies on carcinoma of the esophagus published by the Japanese Society for Esophageal Disease, were treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy using chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil with definitive irradiation of 60 Gy concurrently. Endoscopic findings and biopsy were used for evaluating the response. Nurse charts recording patient's feeding status were adopted to estimate severity of dysphagia. Complete response (CR) rate was 69.4%, median survival time (MST) was 12.3 months, and median local failure-free survival time 7.3 months. Patients in early stage (= 32.4 months, 20.4 months, 20.4 months, 15.7 months, respectively). Patients in A3 stage were often suffered from severe dysphagia both before and after treatment (81.5%, 70.4%), respectively. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy was effective treatment for esophageal cancer. Degree of dysphagia was considered to be a good prognosticator of patients' survival. (author)

  9. Intraoperative irradiation in advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, G.; Goldson, A.L.; Ashayeri, E.; Petrilli, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional treatment of cervical cancer, such as radical hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy or pelvic exenteration, is limited to the pelvis. Standard radio-therapeutic treatment is a combination of external-beam radiotherapy to the pelvis and intracavitary applications. However, there is a group of patients for whom external radiotherapy alone has limitations. This group consists primarily of patients with large pelvic lymph nodes containing metastatic cancer, metastatically involved paraaortic lymph nodes outside the usual pelvic radiation field, or large central tumors with parametrial involvement. In patients with cancer of the cervix, the incidence of metastasis to paraaortic lymph nodes is high. Attempts to treat paraaortic nodes with external radiotherapy have resulted in high complication rates because the treatment field includes the highly sensitive gastrointestinal tract. External radiation therapy after retroperitoneal exploration of lymph nodes does not seem to improve survival. In an attempt to circumvent the morbidity and mortality associated with conventional external-beam irradiation, the authors initiated a pilot study of intraoperative electron-beam irradiation of the paraaortic nodes and of the large metastatic lymph nodes in the pelvis. The intraoperative boost was followed by conventional fractionated external-beam irradiation. The theoretical advantages of this procedure include a higher radiation tumor dose without a concomitant increase in treatment morbidity and mortality

  10. Advances and challenges in hereditary cancer pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascorbi, Ingolf; Werk, Anneke Nina

    2017-01-01

    Cancer pharmacogenetics usually considers tumor-specific targets. However, hereditary genetic variants may interfere with the pharmacokinetics of antimetabolites and other anti-cancer drugs, which may lead to severe adverse events. Areas covered: Here, the impact of hereditary genes considered in drug labels such as thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UTG1A1) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) are discussed with respect to guidelines of the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC). Moreover, the association between genetic variants of drug transporters with the clinical outcome is comprehensively discussed. Expert opinion: Precision therapy in the field of oncology is developing tremendously. There are a number of somatic tumor genetic markers that are indicative for treatment with anti-cancer drugs. By contrast, for some hereditary variants, recommendations have been developed. Although we have vast knowledge on the association between drug transporter variants and clinical outcome, the overall data is inconsistent and the predictability of the related phenotype is low. Further developments in research may lead to the discovery of rare, but functionally relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms and a better understanding of multiple genomic, epigenomic as well as phenotypic factors, contributing to drug response in malignancies.

  11. Hypofractionated radiotherapy as local hemostatic agent in advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Tariq Rasool

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Tumor bleeding continues to remain a challenge in an oncological setting, and radiotherapy has been studied as a local hemostatic agent. We studied the role of local radiotherapy in controlling bleeding at our center. Materials and Methods : We reviewed 25 treated cases (cancer urinary bladder: 12, lung cancer: 5, cervical cancer: 4, uterine cancer: 1, rectal cancer: 2, schwanoma: 1 at our center from March 2008 to December 2010. All patients had either an advanced or recurrent disease. Radiotherapy schedule was either 20 Gray in 5 fractions or 15 Gray in 5 fractions and was delivered with Cobalt 60. Results and Conclusion : Of 25 patients, 22 (88% responded, and there was complete cessation of bleeding. Both 15 Gray and 20 Gray dose schedule had equal efficacy. Treatment was well tolerated without any intermission. Radiotherapy is a safe and effective option in controlling tumor bleeding.

  12. Advances in radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Zhengping; Zhang Yangde; Huang Fang; Liang Zhaoyu; Yang Shuren

    2007-01-01

    Modern advances in computers have fueled advances in imaging technologies. The improvements in imaging have in turn allowed a higher level of complexity to be incorporated into radiotherapy treatment planning systems. As a result of these changes, the delivery of radiotherapy evolved from therapy designed based primarily on plain (two dimensional) X-ray images and hand calculations to three-dimensional X-ray based images incorporating increasingly complex computer algorithms. More recently, biologic variables based on differences between tumor metabolism, tumor antigens, and normal tissues have been incorporated into the treatment process. In addition, greater awareness of the challenges to the accuracy of the treatment planning process, such as problems with set-error and organ movement, have begun to be systematically addressed, ushering in an era of socalled four-dimensional radiotherapy. (authors)

  13. Locally advanced breast cancer (stage III and stage IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baracat, F.F.; Grabert, H.; Lima, G.R. de; Pontes, M.; Ferraro, O.; Santana, A.; Brook, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    The results concerning to the treatment of 193 patients with locally advanced breast cancer-stage III and stage IV are analysed. All the patients were treated with radical radiotherapy plus total mastectomy about 6 weeks later; 53 pacients received also chemotherapy (CMF - 12 courses) and 52 were oophorectomized. (M.A.C) [pt

  14. Advanced breast cancer and its prevention by screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, H. J.; van Ineveld, B. M.; de Haes, J. C.; van Oortmarssen, G. J.; Klijn, J. G.; van der Maas, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    In discussions on breast cancer screening, much attention has been focussed on the possible morbidity generated by screening. Favourable effects like the prevention of advanced disease seem underestimated, probably because quantification is that difficult. To analyse the amount of care and treatment

  15. Quality of pathology reports for advanced ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verleye, Leen; Ottevanger, Petronella B; Kristensen, Gunnar B

    2011-01-01

    To assess the quality of surgical pathology reports of advanced stage ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancer. This quality assurance project was performed within the EORTC-GCG 55971/NCIC-CTG OV13 study comparing primary debulking surgery followed by chemotherapy with neoadjuvant...

  16. Chemoradiotherapy using platinum analogs/5-FU for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Shigeru; Kawasaki, Hitoshi; Nakai, Makoto; Morohashi, Hajime; Matsuya, Hideki; Yamada, Kyougo; Morita, Takayuki; Sasaki, Mutsuo

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using cisplatin/nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for advanced esophageal cancer. Thirteen patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (T4 cases) and 3 with recurrence of esophageal cancer were treated with radiotherapy (40-70 Gy) and 5-FU combined and cisplatin/nedaplatin concurrently. T4 patients who obtained down-staging by CRT also underwent esophagectomy. A complete response was obtained in one case, partial response in 8 cases, and no change in 7 cases. The overall response rate was 56.3%. A pathological complete response was obtained in one case in which curative resection was performed after CRT. Bone marrow suppression was observed in 68.8% and grade 3 and 4 bone marrow suppression was observed in 43.8%. Concurrent CRT using cisplatin/nedaplatin and 5-FU for advanced esophageal cancer has a high response rate and patients obtaining down-staging by CRT as a neoadjuvant therapy have a chance for long survival after curative resection in locally advanced cases. (author)

  17. Advanced Cancer Of The Cervix Coexisting With Multiple Fibroids In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of a 47 year old nulliparous woman with advanced cervical cancer coexisting with uterine fibroid is presented. The nulliparity and the presence of Fibroids presented diagnostic challenges especially because epidemiologically the factors present are not commonly associated. Diagnosis was assisted by a thorough ...

  18. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Trong Khoa

    2015-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of cancer are currently on the top of disease pattern and the number is increasing and increasing worldwide. The impact of screening program for early diagnosis has been proved their important roles in the war against cancer because it helps increase the cure rates, decrease the mortality and morbidity rates, and therefore reduces the economic-social burden. Advances in diagnostic imaging techniques, especially the hybrid imaging (X-ray and Nuclear Medicine) such as PET/CT, SPECT/CT, PET/MRI, is important in accurate staging and these help choose the optimized treatment options to prolong survival while improve the quality of life. The treatment outcomes of cancer has certain remarkable advances based on variety of research to modify, promote and strengthen the traditional treatments (surgery-chemotherapy-radiation) such as laparoscopic surgery, combined chemo-regimens, intensity modulated radiation therapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, stereotactic radiation therapy, radio surgery, PET/CT simulation, radioactive seeds implant, selective internal radiation therapy, intra-operative radiation therapy, etc. as well as the emerge of new methods such as targeted therapy, immune therapy, radio immunotherapy, proton therapy and heavy ion. Treatment of cancer is now the “individualized treatment” with the advances of biochemistry and histopathology. To achieve the most optimal outcomes, cancer should be approached by a multi professional team including biochemistry, immunology, histopathology, surgical oncology, medical oncology and radiation oncology. (author)

  19. Radiation therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Noriko; Inoue, Masayoshi; Uehara, Tomoko; Miyasaka, T.; Miyasaka, M.; Tabata, Yoji; Sakamoto, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen cases of inoperable advanced breast cancer were treated with radiotherapy between 2002 to 2012 at Nara Prefectural Hospital. All cases were treated by radiotherapy and chemo-endocrine therapy. Patients received 60-81 Gy (median 60 Gy) to the primary breast tumor. Response of the breast tumors were complete response in 3 cases (23%), partial response in 8 cases (62%) and stable disease in 2 cases (15%) (response rate: 85%). All breast tumors had been controlled and skin troubles were reduced. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is useful for primary tumor control and improved quality of life (QOL). Radiotherapy should be considered to be useful modality in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. (author)

  20. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Junichi; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Seki, Noriko; Hongo, Atsushi; Mizutani, Yasushi; Miyagi, Yasunari; Yoshinouchi, Mitsuo; Kudo, Takafumi

    2001-01-01

    Recently, attempts have made to use radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy in various solid tumors including cervical cancer. Twenty-four patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were treated with concurrent Carboplatin (16-24 mg/m 2 /day) or Nedaplatin (20 mg/m 2 /week) and conventional radiotherapy. Of 13 evaluable patients, there were nine complete responders and four partial responders. There was no renal damage or grade 4 hematological toxicity. Gastrointestinal adverse reactions were mild. One patient had grade 3 dermatologic toxicity after delayed radiation therapy. This pilot study suggests that daily Carboplatin or weekly Nedaplatin administered with standard radiation therapy is safe, well-tolerated, and thus may be useful as a radiation sensitizer in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. (author)

  1. Current status and prospect of therapy with advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, Tsutomu

    1979-01-01

    Symtomatic or palliative therapy of the patients with advanced cancer must be directed to the relief of specific distressing symptoms caused by or associated with neoplasm. The radiotherapy must have a clear concepts of the potential accomplishments of other treatment modalities, such as neurosurgery, anesthesiology, chemotherapy, pharmacology and psychotherapy, so that he may use his own method in proper perspective. I discussed following is an list of contents in this papers. Relief of pain, Psychotherapy, SVC obstruction, Obstructive jaundice, Brain and lung metastasis, prevention of fracture, Skin metastasis, Liver metastasis and treatment of advanced pediaric tumor etc. For the future: 1) Establishment of Stage and Grade of advanced cancer. 2) Development of new chemotherapeutic drug and immunotherapy. 3) Combination of multidisciplinary team and multidisciplinary treatment. (author)

  2. Clinical evaluation of chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Okawa, Tomohiko [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan); Okawa-Kita, Midori

    1997-11-01

    Locally advanced cervical cancer has a poor prognosis, poor survival rate, and high local failure rate. A number of questions regarding the optimal agents and schedule of concurrent chemoradiation remain unanswered. To improve the cure rate for advanced or recurrent cervix cancer, we studied intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) with or without radiotherapy. We analyzed 52 cases of advanced or recurrent cervical cancer treated by IAIC with or without radiotherapy. IAIC regimen was separated into two groups: group I consisted of 5-FU+MMC{+-}ADM (30 cases) and group II of CDDP+MMC{+-}5-FU (22 cases). The tip of the catheter was placed in the bifurcation of abdominal aorta or the bilateral internal iliac arteries (7 cases). The overall response rate (CR+PR) was 71%, 87% in patients receiving radiotherapy, 50% in those without radiotherapy, and 100% in primary cases. The five-year survival rate was 20% in primary cases, 14% in recurrent cases, 3% in group I and 38% in group II by chemotherapy regimen. Severe (more than grade III) hematological acute side effects were found in 48% of all cases, but recovered by interruption of drugs. In 7 cases in which the tip of the catheter was placed in internal iliac arteries, there were severe skin ulcers in 2 cases and severe pain of leg or gluteal region which need narcotics in 2 cases. These data suggest that IAIC mainly with cisplatin with or without radiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. But we should check blood flow distribution periodically, and control the concentration of drugs. To improve the survival rate for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, we should discuss neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and maintenance systemic chemotherapy. (author)

  3. Effect of hydronephrosis on survival in advanced stage cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goklu, Mehmet Rıfat; Seckin, Kerem Doga; Togrul, Cihan; Goklu, Yasemin; Tahaoglu, Ali Emre; Oz, Murat; Ertas, Ibrahim Egemen

    2015-01-01

    Hydronephrosis is frequently encountered in advanced stage cervical cancers, and may be associated with mortality. In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate the effect of hydronephrosis on survival in patients with inoperable advanced stage cervical cancer. The study data were acquired by retrospective analysis of the patient records belonging to 165 women with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage-IIIB or more advanced cervical cancer, which were not surgical candidates. Parameters including patient age, pathological diagnosis, disease stage, pelvic sidewall extension, presence of hydronephrosis and administration of chemoradiation were analyzed. Further, the effects of these variables on survival were assessed. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. The distribution of the study patients according to disease stage was as follows: 131 (79.4%) had stage-IIIB, 18 (10.9%) had stage-IVB and 16 (% 9.7) patients had stage-IVA disease. Hydronephrosis was not evident in 91 (55.2%) of these patients, whereas 41 (24.8%) had unilateral and 33 (20%) patients had bilateral hydronephrosis. When compared to mean survival in patients who did not have hydronephrosis, survival was significantly shortened in patients who had bilateral and unilateral hydronephrosis (phydronephrosis (p>0.05). Although patient age, pathological type, pelvic involvement, and chemotherapy treatment rates were similar (p>0.05), radiotherapy requirement rate and disease stage were significantly different among the study groups (pHydronephrosis was found to be a significant predictor of poor survival in patients with advanced stage cervical cancer, irrespective of unilateral or bilateral involvement.While waiting for future studies with larger sample sizes, we believe that the FIGO stages in advanced cervical cancer could further be stratified into subgroups according to presence or absence of hydronephrosis.

  4. Clinical evaluation of chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Okawa, Tomohiko; Okawa-Kita, Midori.

    1997-01-01

    Locally advanced cervical cancer has a poor prognosis, poor survival rate, and high local failure rate. A number of questions regarding the optimal agents and schedule of concurrent chemoradiation remain unanswered. To improve the cure rate for advanced or recurrent cervix cancer, we studied intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) with or without radiotherapy. We analyzed 52 cases of advanced or recurrent cervical cancer treated by IAIC with or without radiotherapy. IAIC regimen was separated into two groups: group I consisted of 5-FU+MMC±ADM (30 cases) and group II of CDDP+MMC±5-FU (22 cases). The tip of the catheter was placed in the bifurcation of abdominal aorta or the bilateral internal iliac arteries (7 cases). The overall response rate (CR+PR) was 71%, 87% in patients receiving radiotherapy, 50% in those without radiotherapy, and 100% in primary cases. The five-year survival rate was 20% in primary cases, 14% in recurrent cases, 3% in group I and 38% in group II by chemotherapy regimen. Severe (more than grade III) hematological acute side effects were found in 48% of all cases, but recovered by interruption of drugs. In 7 cases in which the tip of the catheter was placed in internal iliac arteries, there were severe skin ulcers in 2 cases and severe pain of leg or gluteal region which need narcotics in 2 cases. These data suggest that IAIC mainly with cisplatin with or without radiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. But we should check blood flow distribution periodically, and control the concentration of drugs. To improve the survival rate for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, we should discuss neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and maintenance systemic chemotherapy. (author)

  5. Beyond radioiodine: novel therapies in advanced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugen, Bryan R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Thyroid cancer is a relatively common endocrine malignancy. Fortunately, many patients do well with standard therapy including surgery and radioiodine. A minority of patients have poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma that is unresponsive to radioiodine therapy. Redifferentiation agents that 'reprogram ' these tumors to concentrate radioiodine would be of great value in treating patients with advanced thyroid cancer. The retinoid isotretinoin is the most extensively studied of these agents. It appears that 20-40% of patients respond to isotretinoin treatment by concentration of radioiodine in metastatic tumors, but the clinical utility of this redifferentiation is still unclear. In vitro studies suggest that the retinoid receptors RARβ and RXRγ are required for this effect. Abnormal DNA methylation may be an early event in thyroid tumorigenesis and methylation of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) may play a role in loss of iodine concentration in these tumors. Inhibitors of methylation (5-azacytidine, phenylacetate and sodium butyrate) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in cell culture models, but published trials in humans are not yet available. Histone acetylation is required for efficient transcription of genes necessary for differentiated function. Proteins that cause histone deacetylation inhibit gene transcription and differentiated function. Inhibitors of histone deacetylation (depsipeptide, trichostatin A) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated cell lines. Finally, commonly used agents such as thiazolidine diones (diabetes) and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (hypercholesterolemia) have shown promise in preliminary in vitro studies in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Our own work has focused on receptor-selective retinoids and thiazolidine diones as potential therapy in patients with advanced thyroid cancer based on nuclear hormone receptor

  6. Recent Advances in Prostate Cancer Treatment and Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Nevedomskaya

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Novel drugs, drug sequences and combinations have improved the outcome of prostate cancer in recent years. The latest approvals include abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide and apalutamide which target androgen receptor (AR signaling, radium-223 dichloride for reduction of bone metastases, sipuleucel-T immunotherapy and taxane-based chemotherapy. Adding abiraterone acetate to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT in order to achieve complete androgen blockade has proven highly beneficial for treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer and metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC. Also, ADT together with docetaxel treatment showed significant benefit in mHSPC. Ongoing clinical trials for different subgroups of prostate cancer patients include the evaluation of the second-generation AR antagonists enzalutamide, apalutamide and darolutamide, of inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K pathway, of inhibitors of DNA damage response, of targeted alpha therapy and of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA targeting approaches. Advanced clinical studies with immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown limited benefits in prostate cancer and more trials are needed to demonstrate efficacy. The identification of improved, personalized treatments will be much supported by the major progress recently made in the molecular characterization of early- and late-stage prostate cancer using “omics” technologies. This has already led to novel classifications of prostate tumors based on gene expression profiles and mutation status, and should greatly help in the choice of novel targeted therapies best tailored to the needs of patients.

  7. Postoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. Z.; Chun, H. C.; Kim, I. S.; Chung, T. J. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-06-01

    Radical gastrectomy is main treatment of gastric cancer. We analyzed patients with stage III and IV stomach cancer who had radical operation and received postoperative radiation therapy combined with or without chemotherapy retrospectively. From March 1985 to June 1993, 68 patients treated with curative resection and received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy with 36Gy or more were evaluated. Median age was 60years(range 28-66 yrs). Thirty seven patients had non signet ring adenocarcinoma, 29 signet ring cell, 2 other cell. Patients with stage IIIA, IIIB, IV disease were 19, 25 and 24 respectively. Chemotherapy was given to all patients except two. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate were 36.6% and 33.6T, respectively. Recurrence was documented in 34 patients. High recurrence was seen in omentum and peritoneum with 23.5%, and remnant stomach, anastomosis site, A-loop and E-loop had also high recurrence with 13.2%. In field locoregional recurrence was 20.7% and total distant metastases were 39.7%. Total intraabdominal failure was 47.1% and extraabdominal failure was 13.2%. Treatment toxicity was considered to be acceptable. 22.1% of patients had grade 3 and only 1 patient had grade 4 leukopenia. Six patients(8.8%) had weigh loss more than 10%. Treatment toxicity was acceptable with combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Locoregional recurrence was relatively low compared to distant failure with addition of irradiation. Peritoneal and omental seeding was high. Five-year survival was increased with combined modality. Radiation may eradicate minimal residual disease and improve survival. Furthermore to reduce intraabdominal failure, role of intraabdominal chemotherapy in addition to combined chemotherapy plus radiation has to be explored. (author).

  8. Determining patient preferences for improved chemotoxicity during treatment for advanced bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aristides, M.; Maase, Hans von der; Roberts, T.

    2005-01-01

    Determining patient preferences for improved chemotoxicity during treatment for advanced bladder cancer Conventional treatment for advanced bladder cancer is methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin plus cisplatin (MVAC), with a median survival of 1 year but significant toxicity. The newer combinat...

  9. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  10. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Stage, M; Laursen, J

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home......-based exercise program. An explorative study using individual semi-structured interviews (n=15) and one focus group interview (n=8) was conducted among the participants. Throughout the intervention the patients experienced increased muscle strength, improvement in wellbeing, breathlessness and energy. The group...

  11. Targeting HIF-2α as therapy for advanced cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Thanabal; Rajajeyabalachandran, Gurukumari; Kumar, Swetha; Nagaraju, Shruthi; Kumar, Sooriya

    2018-05-14

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α, -2α -3α, and -β) are key factors that control hypoxia-induced carcinogenic pathways. HIF-1α is predominantly involved in the early stages of cancer, whereas HIF-2α is actively involved in the later stages; in addition, chronic (prolonged) rather than acute (short) hypoxia is a feature of metastasis and chemoresistance that occur during the later stages of cancer. Oncometabolites, onco-miRNAs, glucose deprivation, pseudohypoxia, cytokine/chemokine secretion, and some unique upstream proteins are involved in the signaling switch from HIF-1α to HIF-2α; thus, understanding this signaling switch is critical for the treatment of advanced cancer. In this review, we highlight data relating to HIF-2α rather than HIF-1α signaling in cancer pathways and discuss prospective drugs that target this important factor. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy: Recent advances, challenges, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-12-01

    Compared to conventional treatments, gene therapy offers a variety of advantages for cancer treatment including high potency and specificity, low off-target toxicity, and delivery of multiple genes that concurrently target cancer tumorigenesis, recurrence, and drug resistance. In the past decades, gene therapy has undergone remarkable progress, and is now poised to become a first line therapy for cancer. Among various gene delivery systems, nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their desirable characteristics including low toxicity profiles, well-controlled and high gene delivery efficiency, and multi-functionalities. This review provides an overview on gene therapeutics and gene delivery technologies, and highlight recent advances, challenges and insights into the design and the utility of nanoparticles in gene therapy for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Chemotherapy resistance mechanisms in advanced skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvanesh Sukhlal Kalal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a most dangerous and deadly type of skin cancer, and considered intrinsically resistant to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. It has become a major public health concern as the incidence of melanoma has been rising steadily over recent decades with a 5-year survival remaining less than 5%. Detection of the disease in early stage may be curable, but late stage metastatic disease that has spread to other organs has an extremely poor prognosis with a median survival of less than 10 months. Since metastatic melanoma is unresponsive to therapy that is currently available, research is now focused on different treatment strategies such as combinations of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The molecular basis of resistance to chemotherapy seen in melanoma is multifactorial; defective drug transport system, altered apoptotic pathway, deregulation of apoptosis and/or changes in enzymatic systems that mediate cellular metabolic machinery. Understanding of alterations in molecular processes involved in drug resistance may help in developing new therapeutic approaches to treatment of malignant melanoma.

  14. Women with inoperable or locally advanced breast cancer -- what characterizes them?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Charnoubi, Waseem Asim Ghulam; Svendsen, Jesper Brink; Tange, Ulla Brix

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Danish women. Locally advanced breast cancer occurs in a relatively large proportion of all new primary breast cancer diagnoses and for unexplained reasons 20-30% of women with breast cancer wait more than eight weeks from the initial breast cancer...

  15. Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion for advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yu CAO

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the clinical effects of chemotherapy via arterial infusion in treatment of advanced gastric cancer.Methods Forty-seven patients with advanced gastric cancer were given chemotherapy via arterial infusion.Chemotherapy plan was as follows: 5-Fluorouracil(Fu 500mg/m2,cyclophosphamide(MMX 10mg/m2,Hydroxycamptothecin(HPT 20mg/m2,once per week,2 weeks as a course,a total of 2-3 courses.Results After chemotherapy via arterial infusion,complete remission(CR was achieved in 1 case,partial remission(PR in 28 cases,stabilization of disease(SD in 16 cases,progression of disease(PD was found in 2 cases,and rate with response(CR+PR was 61.7%.Four of 28 PR patients underwent tumorectomy,the pathology revealed the presence of cancer cells around the vascular vessels,manifesting karyopyknosis,karyorrhexis,coagulation and necrosis of cytoplasm,intercellular edema,hyperplasia of fibroblasts,inflammatory cell infiltration,thickening of endothelium,and thrombosis.One,two and three-year survival rates were 70.2%,14.9% and 2.1%,respectively.The average survival period was 17.2 months.Conclusion Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion,as a part of the combined treatment,is beneficial to the patients with unresectable advanced gastric cancer.

  16. Management of Locally Advanced Cancer Cervix an Indian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J K; Chauhan, Richa

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer has a major impact on the lives of Indian women with an estimated 122, 844 new cases of cervical cancer in the year 2012. About 80% of these cases present in a locally advanced stage leading to high morbidity and mortality. Because of lack of public awareness and infrastructure for screening and early detection in developing countries, this late presentation is likely to continue in the coming years. Radiation therapy has been the treatment of choice for patients with locally advanced cancer cervix. Many clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown a significant improvement in overall and progression-free survival with decreased local and distant recurrences with the use of concurrent chemotherapy with radiation. Most of these trials have been done in women from developed countries where the patient and disease profile are entirely different from ours. Recently, few trials from India have also shown promising results in locally advanced cancer cervix with concurrent chemoradiotherapy but toxicities remain a major concern. Further exploration is required for the use of concurrent chemo radiation prior to incorporating it into routine clinical practice.

  17. Clinical impact of radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaki, Akira; Hoki, Noriyuki; Ito, Satoko

    2009-01-01

    Although a randomized controlled trial for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) has demonstrated a survival advantage for treatment with gemcitabine alone, chemoradiotherapy remains the treatment of choice for locally advanced disease in Japan. The aim of this study was to compare the survival benefits associated with gemcitabine and concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced unresectable PC. Seventy-seven patients with locally advanced unresectable PC were retrospectively enrolled from April 2001 to December 2006. All cases were histologically proven, and patients received gemcitabine chemotherapy (n=30) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (based on 5-fluorouracil, n=28, or gemcitabine, n=19, as a radiosensitizer) at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital. Patients who received chemoradiotherapy had significantly better performance status than those who had chemotherapy. Tumor response was 0% for chemotherapy and 13% chemoradiotherapy, but survival benefit was similar among patients in the chemotherapy group (overall response (OS) 12 months; progression-free survival (PFS), 3 months) and those in the chemoradiotherapy group (OS, 13 months; PFS, 5 months). Two-year survival was 21% for chemotherapy patients and 19% for chemoradiotherapy patients. Severe toxicities (Grade 3-4 National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0) were significantly more frequent for chemoradiotherapy than for chemotherapy. Gemcitabine chemotherapy showed similar survival benefit compared to 5-fluorouracil- and gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  18. Self-Advocacy Serious Game in Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-05

    Ovarian Cancer Stage III; Ovarian Cancer Stage IV; Breast Cancer Stage IV; Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB; Cervical Cancer Stage IVA; Cervical Cancer Stage IVB; Endometrial Cancer Stage III; Endometrial Cancer Stage IV; Vulvar Cancer, Stage III; Vulvar Cancer, Stage IV; Vaginal Cancer Stage III; Vaginal Cancer Stage IVA; Vaginal Cancer Stage IVB

  19. SDHB downregulation facilitates the proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer through AMPK functions excluding those involved in the modulation of aerobic glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiming; Liu, Shaojun; Ai, Feiyan; Chen, Xiong; Li, Xiayu; Liu, Rui; Ren, Weiguo; Zhang, Xuemei; Shu, Peng; Zhang, Decai

    2018-01-01

    Loss-of-function of succinate dehydrogenase-B (SDHB) is a predisposing factor of aerobic glycolysis and cancer progression. Adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) is involved in the regulation of aerobic glycolysis and the diverse hallmarks of cancer. The present study investigated whether AMPK mediated the regulatory effects of SDHB in aerobic glycolysis and cancer growth. The expression of SDHB and AMPK in colorectal cancer (CRC) and normal tissues was assessed by western blotting. HT-29 CRC cells were used to establish in vitro models of ectopic overexpression and knockdown of SDHB. SDHB was downregulated, while AMPK and phosphorylated-AMPK (Thr172) were upregulated in CRC tissues. Experiments involving the loss- or gain-of-function of SDHB, revealed that this protein negatively regulated AMPK by influencing its expression and activity. However, SDHB and AMPK were identified to suppress lactic acid production in CRC cells, indicating that each had an inhibitory effect on aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, the regulation of aerobic glycolysis by SDHB is unlikely to be mediated via AMPK. SDHB knockdown promoted the viability, migration and invasion of HT-29 cells, whereas inhibition of AMPK demonstrated the opposite effect. SDHB overexpression impaired cell migration and invasion, and this effect was reversed following AMPK activation. These results indicate that AMPK may mediate the effects of SDHB in CRC cell proliferation and migration. In conclusion, SDHB downregulation in CRC cells may increase AMPK activity, which may subsequently facilitate the proliferation and invasion of these cancer cells. However, the regulation of aerobic glycolysis by SDHB may be independent of AMPK. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the mechanism by which SDHB regulates aerobic glycolysis.

  20. Activation of the hedgehog pathway in advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCormick Frank

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hedgehog pathway plays a critical role in the development of prostate. However, the role of the hedgehog pathway in prostate cancer is not clear. Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent cause of cancer death in American men. Therefore, identification of novel therapeutic targets for prostate cancer has significant clinical implications. Results Here we report that activation of the hedgehog pathway occurs frequently in advanced human prostate cancer. We find that high levels of hedgehog target genes, PTCH1 and hedgehog-interacting protein (HIP, are detected in over 70% of prostate tumors with Gleason scores 8–10, but in only 22% of tumors with Gleason scores 3–6. Furthermore, four available metastatic tumors all have high expression of PTCH1 and HIP. To identify the mechanism of the hedgehog signaling activation, we examine expression of Su(Fu protein, a negative regulator of the hedgehog pathway. We find that Su(Fu protein is undetectable in 11 of 27 PTCH1 positive tumors, two of them contain somatic loss-of-function mutations of Su(Fu. Furthermore, expression of sonic hedgehog protein is detected in majority of PTCH1 positive tumors (24 out of 27. High levels of hedgehog target genes are also detected in four prostate cancer cell lines (TSU, DU145, LN-Cap and PC3. We demonstrate that inhibition of hedgehog signaling by smoothened antagonist, cyclopamine, suppresses hedgehog signaling, down-regulates cell invasiveness and induces apoptosis. In addition, cancer cells expressing Gli1 under the CMV promoter are resistant to cyclopamine-mediated apoptosis. All these data suggest a significant role of the hedgehog pathway for cellular functions of prostate cancer cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that activation of the hedgehog pathway, through loss of Su(Fu or overexpression of sonic hedgehog, may involve tumor progression and metastases of prostate cancer. Thus, targeted inhibition of hedgehog signaling may have

  1. Targeted treatment of advanced and metastatic breast cancer with lapatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Corkery

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Brendan Corkery1,2, Norma O’Donovan2, John Crown1,21St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 2National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin, IrelandAbstract: Improved molecular understanding of breast cancer in recent years has led to the discovery of important drug targets such as HER-2 and EGFR. Lapatinib is a potent dual inhibitor of HER-2 and EGFR. Preclinical and phase I studies have shown activity with lapatinib in a number of cancers, including breast cancer, and the drug is well tolerated. The main known drug interactions are with paclitaxel and irinotecan. The most significant side-effects of lapatinib are diarrhea and adverse skin events. Rates of cardiotoxicity compare favorably with trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against HER-2. This paper focuses on lapatinib in advanced and metastatic breast cancer, which remains an important therapeutic challenge. Phase II and III studies show activity as monotherapy, and in combination with chemotherapy or hormonal agents. Results from these studies suggest that the main benefit from lapatinib is in the HER-2 positive breast cancer population. Combinations of lapatinib and trastuzumab are also being studied and show encouraging results, particularly in trastuzumab-refractory metastatic breast cancer. Lapatinib may have a specific role in treating HER-2 positive CNS metastases. The role of lapatinib as neoadjuvant therapy and in early breast cancer is also being evaluated.Keywords: HER-2, EGFR, erbB, lapatinib, Tykerb®, tyrosine kinase

  2. Prognostic significance of obstructive uropathy in advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oefelein, Michael G

    2004-06-01

    To report the incidence and prognostic implications of obstructive uropathy (OU) in patients with advanced prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy and to define the impact initial local therapy has on the development of OU in patients with prostate cancer who develop recurrence and begin androgen deprivation therapy. From a population of 260 patients with advanced prostate cancer diagnosed between 1986 and 2003, OU was identified in 51 patients. The OU treatment options included ureteral stent, percutaneous nephrostomy, transurethral resection of the prostate, Foley catheter placement, and urinary diversion. Overall survival and the factors that influenced survival were calculated using standard statistical methods. OU was diagnosed in 15 (16%) of 80 patients who received local therapy with curative intent and in whom local therapy subsequently failed and in 36 (19%) of 180 patients who had never received local therapy (P = 0.7, chi-square test). Of these 51 patients, 39 had bladder neck obstruction and 16 had ureteral obstruction. Overall survival was significantly worse for the men with OU compared with those without OU (41 versus 54 months). OU was associated with tumor stage and androgen-insensitive prostate cancer. OU results in significantly reduced survival in men with prostate cancer. In a select group of patients with prostate cancer with progression after local therapy (primarily radiotherapy), no statistically significant reduction in the development of OU was observed relative to patients matched for stage, grade, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level treated with androgen deprivation therapy alone. Aggressive advanced stage and hormone-insensitive disease are variables associated with OU.

  3. Nursing care dependence in the experiences of advanced cancer inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piredda, Michela; Bartiromo, Chiara; Capuzzo, Maria Teresa; Matarese, Maria; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Increasing burden of cancer in Europe and socio-demographic trends imply that more cancer patients will face high levels of dependency. Care dependency is often perceived as a distressing experience by cancer patients who are concerned about becoming a burden to others. The experience of care dependence has been scarcely investigated in advanced cancer patients, especially in the hospital setting. This study aimed at describing advanced cancer patients' experiences of care dependence in hospital and of the factors perceived by them as contributing to decrease or increase this dependence. The study used a descriptive phenomenological approach based on Husserl's (1913) life world perspective. Data collection and analysis followed Giorgi's (1997) five basic methodological steps. Data were gathered by semi-structured interviews with thirteen advanced cancer adult inpatients of a teaching hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded and the recordings transcribed word for word. Three themes emerged: 'dependency discovers new meanings of life', 'active coping with dependency' and 'the care cures the dependent person'. The essential meaning of care dependency was the possibility to become aware of being a person as both an object and subject of care. Dependence appears as an experience with strong relational connotations, which enable patients to see differently their life, themselves, the world and others. Dependency is revealed as a natural experience, only partly in accordance with previous studies. Deeper insight into the meaning patients attach to care dependency can enable nurses to better meet the patient's needs, e.g. by improving caring relationships with patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD; Joyce Niland, PhD; Anna ter Veer, MS; Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD; Lily Lai, MD; Joshua E. Meyer, MD; Steven J. Nurkin, MD, MS; Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH; John M. Skibber, MD, FACS; Al B. Benson, MD; Martin R. Weiser, MD; Christopher H. Crane, MD; Karyn A. Goodman, MD, MS

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been rapidly incorporated into clinical practice because of its technological advantages over 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We characterized trends in IMRT utilization in trimodality treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network cancer centers between 2005 and 2011. Methods and materials: Using the prospective National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colorectal Cancer Database, ...

  5. Primary Surgery or Interval Debulking for Advanced Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markauskas, Algirdas; Mogensen, Ole; dePont Christensen, René

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the surgical complexity, the postoperative morbidity, and the survival of the women after primary debulking surgery (PDS) and neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by interval debulking surgery (NACT-IDS) for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: We consecutively included all patients who underwent debulking surgery at our institution between January 2007 and December 2012 for stages IIIc and IV of epithelial ovarian cancer. RESULTS: Of the 332 patients included, 165 (49.7%) underwent PDS, and 167 (50.3%) had NACT...

  6. Cost-effectiveness of modern radiotherapy techniques in locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James D; Chang, Daniel T; Abelson, Jon; Daly, Megan E; Yeung, Heidi N; Nelson, Lorene M; Koong, Albert C

    2012-02-15

    Radiotherapy may improve the outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer but at an increased cost. In this study, the authors evaluated the cost-effectiveness of modern radiotherapy techniques in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. A Markov decision-analytic model was constructed to compare the cost-effectiveness of 4 treatment regimens: gemcitabine alone, gemcitabine plus conventional radiotherapy, gemcitabine plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT); and gemcitabine with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Patients transitioned between the following 5 health states: stable disease, local progression, distant failure, local and distant failure, and death. Health utility tolls were assessed for radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatments and for radiation toxicity. SBRT increased life expectancy by 0.20 quality-adjusted life years (QALY) at an increased cost of $13,700 compared with gemcitabine alone (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio [ICER] = $69,500 per QALY). SBRT was more effective and less costly than conventional radiotherapy and IMRT. An analysis that excluded SBRT demonstrated that conventional radiotherapy had an ICER of $126,800 per QALY compared with gemcitabine alone, and IMRT had an ICER of $1,584,100 per QALY compared with conventional radiotherapy. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness to pay of $50,000 per QALY was 78% for gemcitabine alone, 21% for SBRT, 1.4% for conventional radiotherapy, and 0.01% for IMRT. At a willingness to pay of $200,000 per QALY, the probability of cost-effectiveness was 73% for SBRT, 20% for conventional radiotherapy, 7% for gemcitabine alone, and 0.7% for IMRT. The current results indicated that IMRT in locally advanced pancreatic cancer exceeds what society considers cost-effective. In contrast, combining gemcitabine with SBRT increased clinical effectiveness beyond that of gemcitabine alone at a cost potentially acceptable by

  7. Laparoscopic splenic hilar lymphadenectomy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogi, Hisahiro; Okabe, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Hisashi; Tsunoda, Shigeru; Hisamori, Shigeo; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy has recently become accepted as a surgical option for early gastric cancer in the distal stomach, but laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) has not become widespread because of technical difficulties of esophagojejunal anastomosis and splenic hilar lymphadenectomy. Splenic hilar lymphadenectomy should be employed in the treatment of advanced proximal gastric cancer to complete D2 dissection, but laparoscopically it is technically difficult even for skilled surgeons. Based on the evidence that prophylactic combined resection of spleen in total gastrectomy increased the risk of postoperative morbidity with no survival impact, surgeons have preferred laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy (LSPL) for advanced tumors without metastasis to splenic hilar nodes or invasion to the greater curvature of the stomach, and reports with LSPL have been increasing rather than LTG with splenectomy. In this paper, recent reports with laparoscopic splenic hilar lymphadenectomy were reviewed.

  8. Aesthetic engagements: "being" in everyday life with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Cour, Karen; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2012-03-01

    Living with advanced cancer can present an overwhelming challenge. It may impact the everyday life of the individual with respect to an array of psychological, physical, social, and existential issues. We focus on ways in which people with advanced cancer experience and use their engagement in daily activities when confronting nearing death. Through a phenomenological analysis based on Heidegger's thinking, we illuminate the complexities of "being toward death" and the human striving for authentic being through engagement in daily living. The main findings demonstrate how sensory experiences support being through an appreciation of everyday aesthetics. Furthermore, the making of material things was identified as a means to express the value of self and others in relation to the involved individual's past, present, and future.

  9. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Yoo Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dong Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae Ho; Jang, Hong Seok

    2014-01-01

    Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival.

  10. Termination of Pregnancy in a Patient with Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Suna Özdemir; Çetin Çelik; Kazım Gezginç; Hasan Esen

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer during pregnancy is a rare entity and the management of the disease can be challenging for the patient and the clinician. In this case, we report a case of advanced ovarian carcinoma diagnosed during pregnancy, which was managed with termination of pregnancy and chemotheraphy. The patient was underwent exploratory laparatomy including the right ovarian cystectomy, omentectomy, appendectomy, pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy after frozen section of borderline serous cystade...

  11. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Yoo Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dong Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae Ho; Jang, Hong Seok [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival.

  12. Advancing cancer control research in an emerging news media environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine C; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Blake, Kelly D; Cappella, Joseph N

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is both highly feared and highly newsworthy, and there is a robust body of research documenting the content and effects of cancer news coverage on health behaviors and policy. Recent years have witnessed ongoing, transformative shifts in American journalism alongside rapid advances in communication technology and the public information environment. These changes create a pressing need to consider a new set of research questions, sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and theories of media effects to ensure continued relevance and adaptation of communication research to address critical cancer control concerns. This paper begins by briefly reviewing what we know about the role of cancer news in shaping cancer-related beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, and policies. We then outline challenges and opportunities, both theoretical and methodological, posed by the rapidly changing news media environment and the nature of audience engagement. We organize our discussion around three major shifts associated with the emerging news media environment as it relates to health communication: 1) speed and dynamism of news diffusion, 2) increased narrowcasting of media content for specialized audiences, and 3) broadened participation in shaping media content. In so doing, we articulate a set of questions for future theory and research, in an effort to catalyze innovative communication scholarship to improve cancer prevention and control.

  13. [Modern aspects of surgical treatment of locally advanced pelvic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyov, I A; Vasilchenko, M V; Lychev, A B; Ambartsumyan, S V; Alekseev, V V

    2015-09-01

    The aim of investigation is to improve surgical treatment of patients with locally advanced pelvic cancer. The basis of investigation is 186 patients with locally advanced pelvic cancer. The average age of patients is 65.2 ± 5.2 years (from 43.7 to 88.4 years). Among them are 112 women and 74 men. In the period from 2007 to 2015 they were carried out combined (101 patients) and expanded (85 patients) surgical intervention in the department of naval surgery of the Military medical academy after S.M.Kirov. Pelvic evisceration was performed in 63 cases. Both patients were performed isolated vascular hyperthermic chemical pelvic perfusion. Indications for plastic surgery of peritoneum pelvic were: total infralitoral pelvic evisceration (9 patients), dorsal infralitoral pelvic evisceration (11 cases) and expanded abdominoperineal rectum extirpation (34 patients). Plastic surgery with autogenouse tissues was performed to 43 patients, with reticulate explants--to 11 patients. The rate of postoperative complications was 40.2%. The rate of postoperative lethality was 8%. Expanded and combined operations of pelvic at patients with locally advanced cancer without absolute contra-indications can be performed irrespective of age. Plastic surgery of peritoneum pelvic after total and dorsal infralitoral pelvic evisceration and expanded abdominoperineal rectum extirpation indicated in all cases. The easiest method is plastic surgery with greater omentum or peritoneum pelvic. Plastic surgery with reticulate explants is performed when autoplastic is impossible.

  14. Fast neutron irradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.P.; Schein, P.S.; MacDonald, J.S.; Woolley, P.V.; Ornitz, R.; Rogers, C.

    1981-01-01

    Nineteen patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and one patient with islet cell cancer were treated with 1700-1500 neutron rad alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil to exploit the theoretic advantages of higher linear energy of transfer, and lower oxygen enhancement ratio of neutrons. Only 5 of 14 (36%) obtained partial tumor regression. The median survival for all patients with pancreatic cancer was 6 months, which is less than that reported with 5-fluorouracil and conventional photon irradiation. Gastrointestinal toxicity was considerable; hemorhagic gastritis in five patients, colitis in two and esophagitis in one. One patient developed radiation myelitis. We therefore, caution any enthusiasm for this modality of therapy until clear evidence of a therapeutic advantage over photon therapy is demonstrated in controlled clinical trials

  15. Fast neutron irradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F.P. (Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC); Schein, P.S.; MacDonald, J.S.; Woolley, P.V.; Ornitz, R.; Rogers, C.

    1981-11-01

    Nineteen patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and one patient with islet cell cancer were treated with 1700-1500 neutron rad alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil to exploit the theoretic advantages of higher linear energy of transfer, and lower oxygen enhancement ratio of neutrons. Only 5 of 14 (36%) obtained partial tumor regression. The median survival for all patients with pancreatic cancer was 6 months, which is less than that reported with 5-fluorouracil and conventional photon irradiation. Gastrointestinal toxicity was considerable; hemorhagic gastritis in five patients, colitis in two and esophagitis in one. One patient developed radiation myelitis. We therefore, caution any enthusiasm for this modality of therapy until clear evidence of a therapeutic advantage over photon therapy is demonstrated in controlled clinical trials.

  16. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered.

  17. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy in high risk locally advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sang Hyuk; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyu Bo; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Yang, Han Kwang; Han, Sae Won; Oh, Do Youn; Im, Seok Ah; Bang, Yung Jue; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate treatment outcome of patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer after postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Between May 2003 and May 2012, thirteen patients who underwent postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer with resection margin involvement or adjacent structure invasion were retrospectively analyzed. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered in 10 patients. Median dose of radiation was 50.4 Gy (range, 45 to 55.8 Gy). The median follow-up duration for surviving patients was 48 months (range, 5 to 108 months). The 5-year overall survival rate was 42% and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 28%. Major pattern of failure was peritoneal seeding with 46%. Loco-regional recurrence was reported in only one patient. Grade 2 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 54% of the patients. However, there was only one patient with higher than grade 3 toxicity. Despite reported suggested role of adjuvant radiotherapy with combination chemotherapy in gastric cancer, only very small portion of the patients underwent the treatment. Results from this study show that postoperative chemoradiotherapy provided excellent locoregional control with acceptable and manageable treatment related toxicity in patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer. Thus, postoperative chemoradiotherapy may improve treatment result in terms of locoregional control in these high risk patients. However, as these findings are based on small series, validation with larger cohort is suggested.

  18. Locally advanced colon cancer with cutaneous invasion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenreiro, Nádia; Ferreira, Cátia; Silva, Silvia; Marques, Rita; Ribeiro, Artur; Sousa, Paulo Jorge; Luís, Fernando Próspero

    2017-03-01

    Locally advanced colon cancer with direct abdominal wall and skin invasion is an extremely rare finding with most data being derived from case reports, historical autopsy-based or single-center retrospective studies. We present a unique case of a colon cancer with direct cutaneous invasion and colocutaneous fistulization. Eighty-six year old Caucasian female with multiple comorbidities, referred to Surgical Consultation due to ulcerated skin lesion in the abdomen. She had a long-standing large umbilical hernia but with no previous episodes of incarceration or occlusive symptoms. She denied any digestive or constitutional symptoms. Physical examination showed a large non-reducible umbilical hernia, with an associated painless firm mass within the hernia sac and cutaneous ulcerated growth. Colonoscopy revealed transverse colon cancer (endoscopic biopsy of the tumor and skin punch biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma of the colon). Computed tomography showed a tumoral mass within the umbilical hernia, with cutaneous infiltration and enlarged regional lymph nodes. Rapid local progression led to colocutaneous fistula with total fecal diversion. We performed an extended right hemicolectomy with en bloc excision of the hernia sac and infiltrating cutaneous mass. In the current era of widespread use of screening colonoscopies, initial diagnosis of locally advanced colon cancer is decreasing. However, this unique case presented an opportunity to recall the advantages of multivisceral resections.

  19. Rhus verniciflua Stokes against Advanced Cancer: A Perspective from the Korean Integrative Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woncheol Choi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Active anticancer molecules have been searched from natural products; many drugs were developed from either natural products or their derivatives following the conventional pharmaceutical paradigm of drug discovery. However, the advances in the knowledge of cancer biology have led to personalized medicine using molecular-targeted agents which create new paradigm. Clinical benefit is dependent on individual biomarker and overall survival is prolonged through cytostatic rather than cytotoxic effects to cancer cell. Therefore, a different approach is needed from the single lead compound screening model based on cytotoxicity. In our experience, the Rhus verniciflua stoke (RVS extract traditionally used for cancer treatment is beneficial to some advanced cancer patients though it is herbal extract not single compound, and low cytotoxic in vitro. The standardized RVS extract's action mechanisms as well as clinical outcomes are reviewed here. We hope that these preliminary results would stimulate different investigation in natural products from conventional chemicals.

  20. Optimal primary surgical treatment for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elattar, Ahmed; Bryant, Andrew; Winter-Roach, Brett A; Hatem, Mohamed; Naik, Raj

    2011-08-10

    Ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer among women. In addition to diagnosis and staging, primary surgery is performed to achieve optimal cytoreduction (surgical efforts aimed at removing the bulk of the tumour) as the amount of residual tumour is one of the most important prognostic factors for survival of women with epithelial ovarian cancer. An optimal outcome of cytoreductive surgery remains a subject of controversy to many practising gynae-oncologists. The Gynaecologic Oncology group (GOG) currently defines 'optimal' as having residual tumour nodules each measuring 1 cm or less in maximum diameter, with complete cytoreduction (microscopic disease) being the ideal surgical outcome. Although the size of residual tumour masses after surgery has been shown to be an important prognostic factor for advanced ovarian cancer, it is unclear whether it is the surgical procedure that is directly responsible for the superior outcome that is associated with less residual disease. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of optimal primary cytoreductive surgery for women with surgically staged advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (stages III and IV).To assess the impact of various residual tumour sizes, over a range between zero and 2 cm, on overall survival. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3) and the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Review Group Trials Register, MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to August 2010). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Retrospective data on residual disease from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or prospective and retrospective observational studies which included a multivariate analysis of 100 or more adult women with surgically staged advanced epithelial ovarian cancer and who underwent primary cytoreductive surgery followed by adjuvant platinum

  1. Advanced Prostate Cancer Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, consumption thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. HUS generally has a dismal prognosis, except when associated with gastroenteritis caused by verotoxin-producing bacteria. Cancer associated HUS is uncommon, and there are only scarce reports on prostate cancer presenting with HUS. Case Presentation. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department with oliguria, hematuria, and hematemesis. Clinical evaluation revealed acute renal failure, hemolysis, normal blood-clotting studies, and prostate-specific antigen value of 1000 ng/mL. The patient was started on hemodialysis, ultrafiltration with plasma exchange, and androgen blockade with bicalutamide and completely recovered from HUS. The authors review the 14 published cases on this association. Conclusion. The association of HUS and prostate cancer occurs more frequently in patients with high-grade, clinically advanced prostate cancer. When readily recognized and appropriately treated, HUS does not seem to worsen prognosis in prostate cancer patients.

  2. Preoperative chemoradiation using oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jae-Sung; Cho, Moon-June; Song, Kyu-Sang; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Capecitabine (Xeloda) is a new orally administered fluoropyrimidine carbamate that was rationally designed to exert its effect by tumor-selective activation. We attempted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of preoperative chemoradiation using capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between July 1999 and March 2001, 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/T4 or N+) were treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Radiation of 45 Gy/25 fractions was delivered to the pelvis, followed by a 5.4 Gy/3 fractions boost to the primary tumor. Chemotherapy was administered concurrent with radiotherapy and consisted of 2 cycles of 14-day oral capecitabine (1650 mg/m 2 /day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m 2 /day), each of which was followed by a 7-day rest period. Surgery was performed 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: Thirty-eight patients received definitive surgery. Primary tumor and node downstaging occurred in 63% and 90% of patients, respectively. The overall downstaging rate, including both primary tumor and nodes, was 84%. A pathologic complete response was achieved in 31% of patients. Twenty-one patients had tumors located initially 5 cm or less from the anal verge; among the 18 treated with surgery, 72% received sphincter-preserving surgery. No Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities developed. Other Grade 3 toxicities were as follows: hand-foot syndrome (7%), fatigue (4%), diarrhea (4%), and radiation dermatitis (2%). Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective neoadjuvant treatment modality for locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition, this preoperative treatment has a considerable downstaging effect on the tumor and can increase the possibility of sphincter preservation in distal rectal cancer

  3. Cervical cancer stem cells and correlation with radiation response in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, Supriya; Goda, Jayant Sastri; Deodhar, Kedar

    2016-01-01

    While tumour-initiating cells (TIC) have been reported across solid tumours, there is dearth of data regarding TICs and radiation response in cervical cancer. From October, 2013- July, 2015 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were included. Pretreatment biopsy was obtained. IHC was performed for SOX-2,OCT-4, Nanog (ESC), CD44 and Podoplanin (TIC). Semiquantitative scoring was used for IHC. All patients received uniform concurrent chemoradiation and brachytherapy. On follow up, local control and distant relapse was recorded

  4. Perspectives of newly diagnosed advanced cancer patients receiving dignity therapy during cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose, Ann Marie; Rhudy, Lori M

    2018-01-01

    Dignity therapy is a psychosocial intervention that has been used primarily at the end of life to improve quality of life and other patient outcomes, but many individuals are unable to complete it due to health decline and death. The purpose of this study was to identify what individuals with advanced pancreatic or lung cancer with limited life expectancy, undergoing active cancer treatment describe during the dignity therapy intervention as important to them when not immediately facing end of life. Twenty patients undergoing chemotherapy for advanced cancer participated in a dignity therapy intervention study. Initial interviews were analyzed using descriptive content analysis. Family provided the overall context and background for emerging themes of defining events, accomplishments, and God's plan, which led to lessons learned, and resulted in messages of hope. Interviews were often autobiographical in nature and contained much reminiscence, consistent with dignity therapy's intent. Few participants spoke about their cancer diagnoses during the interview. This study adds unique insight into the use of dignity therapy for those still receiving active cancer treatment, different from work by others in which it was offered only at end of life. As part of supportive care, clinicians need to validate the importance of family to those with advanced cancer and to provide opportunities for patients to share what they have learned throughout life and to impart messages of hope to those closest to them.

  5. Investigation of treatment strategy for advanced cancer according to treatment of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Kecheng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of pancreatic cancer diagnoses are made at the advanced stage and when metastasis has already occurred, and the 1- and 5-year survival rates are extremely low. Cemcitabine remains the most frequently applied treatment option, yet the most effective chemotherapeutic agents and combinations with multiple agents and/or radiotherapy only marginally improve patient survival and may even establish an environment conducive to cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics. An alternative treatment modality, cryoablation, is available and has been applied at our institute to patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer since 2001. In this article, we present our collective experience with patient outcome using cryoablation, alone or combined with other treatment modalities such as brachytherapy (125iodine seed implantation. The overall outcomes have been encouraging, suggesting that comprehensive therapy including cryoablation may prolong the survival of patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, and we are achieving particular success with a novel combination of percutaneous cryoablation, cancer microvascular intervention with 125iodine seed implantation, and combined immunotherapy (3C applied using an individualized patient strategy (P. The 1- through 10-year survival rates of 145 patients treated with the so-called “3C+P model” are presented in support of this new strategy as a promising new treatment for advanced and metastatic cancer

  6. Combined androgen blockade in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer--an overview. The Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1997-01-01

    The value of combined androgen blockade in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer is still controversial. In this review by the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group, the literature addressing the concept and its clinical use is critically reviewed....

  7. Multidisciplinary treatment including chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Kenji; Fukuda, Kazuhiro; Kikkawa, Nobuteru; Kobayashi, Tetsurou; Yagyu, Toshio; Hasuike, Yasunori; Mishima, Hideyuki; Shin, Eisei [Osaka National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Over 3 years, concurrent chemoradiotherapy was performed in 16 patients with advanced esophageal cancer (clinical Stage IV) and suspected noncurative resection. The subjects were {>=}A3 or N3, or were stage IV with distant metastasis on preoperative diagnosis. Two courses of 5FU and CDDP were given with concurrent radiotherapy. The predominant side effects were nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Mild or moderate leukopenia also occurred. The response was complete remission (CR) in two patients, partial remission (PR) in eight, minor response (MR) in two, no change (NC) in two and progressive disease (PD) in two. The overall response rate was 62.5%. Esophagectomy was performed in four patients (histological stage II in one, stage III in one, and stage IV in two). Two of 4 resected patients are alive (33.8 months), while the other died of unrelated causes. One of the 6 non-resected PR patients has survived for 18 months, but all other patients died of cancer within nine months of starting treatment. The survival rate of 16 patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy was 16.7% at one and two years. Thus, chemoradiotherapy may improve the prognosis of advanced esophageal cancer with suspected noncurative resection by increasing the response rate and the curative resection rate. (author)

  8. Recent Advances in the Treatment of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy W. S. Tong

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most common malignancy in women. It is classified into a few major molecular subtypes according to hormone and growth factor receptor expression. Over the past few years, substantial advances have been made in the discovery of new drugs for treating BC. Improved understanding of the biologic heterogeneity of BC has allowed the development of more effective and individualized approach to treatment. In this review, we provide an update about the current treatment strategy and discuss the various emerging novel therapies for the major molecular subtypes of BC. A brief account of the clinical development of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase, cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, histone deacetylation, multi-targeting tyrosine kinases, and immune checkpoints for personalized treatment of BC is included. However, no targeted drug has been approved for the most aggressive subtype—triple negative breast cancer (TNBC. Thus, we discuss the heterogeneity of TNBC and how molecular subtyping of TNBC may help drug discovery for this deadly disease. The emergence of drug resistance also poses threat to the successful development of targeted therapy in various molecular subtypes of BC. New clinical trials should incorporate advanced methods to identify changes induced by drug treatment, which may be associated with the upregulation of compensatory signaling pathways in drug resistant cancer cells.

  9. Predictors of advanced colorectal neoplasia for colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Lam, Thomas Y T; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Chan, Victor C W; Hirai, Hoyee W; Ching, Jessica Y L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2014-05-01

    The Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening (APCS) score based on age, gender, family history, and smoking is useful to predict advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in asymptomatic Asian subjects. To evaluate the factors in addition to those of APCS associated with ACN colonoscopic findings. Data from 5,220 asymptomatic subjects aged between 50 and 70 years who underwent screening colonoscopy in a community center between 2008 and 2012 were analyzed. One binary logistic regression analysis was conducted in 2013 with the presence of ACN or cancer as the outcome, controlling for APCS score, alcohol consumption, BMI, hypertension, and other chronic diseases as independent variables. The average participant age was 57.7 years (SD=4.9) and 47.5% were men. Advanced neoplasms or cancers were identified at colonoscopy in 5.6% of all screening participants. From multivariate regression analysis, APCS score≥4 (adjusted OR [AOR]=1.74, 95% CI=1.34, 2.25, pstatistic of APCS score alone was 0.560 (95% CI=0.524, 0.595, p=0.001) and that of APCS score plus BMI, hypertension, and alcohol consumption was 0.613 (95% CI=0.578, 0.648, p<0.001). Alcohol consumption, hypertension, and BMI are independent predictors of ACN, which could be incorporated into the APCS for prioritizing Asian asymptomatic subjects for colorectal cancer screening. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the management of locally advanced cervix cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Osman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced cervix cancer has comparable benefits to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT, but with fewer side effects. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the benefits of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for the management of locally advanced cervix cancer from stage IB2 (tumor >4.0 cm to IIIB (tumor extending to the pelvic wall and/or hydronephrosis. Our primary objective was to assess benefits in terms of survival. The data source included the USA national library of medicine, Medline search, and the National Cancer Institute PDQ Clinical Protocols. Inclusion criteria for consideration in the current systematic review included studies published between January 1997 and December 2012. In terms of histology, they had to be focused on squamous cell carcinoma, adenosquamous carcinoma, and/or adenocarcinoma. Patients should be either chemotherapy naïve or cervix cancer chemotherapy naïve, and have a performance status ≤2. The search in the above-mentioned scientific websites led to identify 49 publications, 19 of which were excluded, as they did not meet the inclusion criteria of this systematic review. Therefore only 30 studies were deemed eligible. Data was collected from 1760 patients enrolled in the current systematic review study. The mean age was 45.2 years. The mean tumor size was 4.7 cm. The most commonly used chemotherapies were cisplatin doublets. Paclitaxel was the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent in the doublets. The mean chemotherapy cycles were 2.7. After chemotherapy, patients underwent surgery after a mean time of 2.5 weeks. The standard operation was radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Chemotherapy achieved an objective response rate of 84%. The 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 61.9% and 72.8% respectively. The treatment protocol was associated

  11. Advance Care Planning Does Not Adversely Affect Hope or Anxiety Among Patients With Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael J; Schubart, Jane R; Whitehead, Megan M; Farace, Elana; Lehman, Erik; Levi, Benjamin H

    2015-06-01

    Many physicians avoid advance care planning (ACP) discussions because they worry such conversations will lead to psychological distress. To investigate whether engaging in ACP using online planning tools adversely affects hope, hopelessness, or anxiety among patients with advanced cancer. Patients with advanced cancer and an estimated survival of two years or less (Intervention group) and a Control group were recruited at a tertiary care academic medical center (2007-2012) to engage in ACP using an online decision aid ("Making Your Wishes Known"). Pre/post and between-group comparisons were made, including hope (Herth Hope Index), hopelessness (Beck Hopelessness Scale), and anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory). Secondary outcomes included ACP knowledge, self-determination, and satisfaction. A total of 200 individuals completed the study. After engaging in ACP, there was no decline in hope or increase in hopelessness in either the Control or Intervention group. Anxiety was likewise unchanged in the Control group but decreased slightly in the Intervention group. Knowledge of ACP (% correct answers) increased in both the groups, but more so in the Intervention group (13% increase vs. 4%; P<0.01). Self-determination increased slightly in both groups, and satisfaction with the ACP process was greater (P<0.01) in the Intervention than Control group. Engaging in ACP with online planning tools increases knowledge without diminishing hope, increasing hopelessness, or inducing anxiety in patients with advanced cancer. Physicians need not avoid ACP out of concern for adversely affecting patients' psychological well-being. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of advanced pancreatic cancer in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Piacentini, Paolo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this outcome study was to evaluate the management of advanced pancreatic cancer in a real-world clinical practice; few such experiences have been reported in the literature. A retrospective analysis was performed of all consecutive patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma followed at our medical oncology unit between January 2003 and December 2013. We evaluated 78 patients, mostly with metastatic disease (64.1%). Median follow-up was 10.77 months, by which time 74 patients (94.9%) had died. Median overall survival was 8.29 months. Median age was 67 years. In univariate analysis, pain at onset (p = 0.020), ECOG performance status (p<0.001), stage (p = 0.047), first-line chemotherapy (p<0.001), second-line chemotherapy (p<0.001) and weight loss at diagnosis (p = 0.029) were factors that had an impact on overall survival. In multivariate analysis, the presence of pain at onset (p = 0.043), stage (p = 0.003) and second-line chemotherapy (p = 0.004) were confirmed as independent prognostic factors. Our data, derived from daily clinical practice, confirmed advanced pancreatic cancer as an aggressive malignant disease with a very short expected survival. Second-line treatment seems to provide an advantage in terms of overall survival in patients who showed a partial response as their best response to first-line treatment.

  13. Cancer Pain Control for Advanced Cancer Patients by Using Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwi-joong Kang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a case series of advanced cancer patients whose cancer pain was relieved by using autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP treatment. ANP is a subcutaneous injection therapy of mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP along the acupoints on the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue; 0.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of vertebrae to enhance the immune system and to balance autonomic nerve function. Methods: Patients with three different types of cancer (gastric cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer with distant metastases with cancer pain were treated with ANP. 1 mL of MGP was injected into the bilateral Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue on the T1-L5 sites (total 12 ─ 20 mL injection of each patient’s dorsum by using the principle of symptom differentiation. During ANP treatment, the visual analogue scale (VAS for pain was used to assess their levels of cancer pain; also, the dosage and the frequency of analgesic use were measured. Results: The cancer pain levels of all three patients improved with treatment using ANP. The VAS scores of the three patients decreased as the treatment progressed. The dosage and the frequency of analgesics also gradually decreased during the treatment period. Significantly, no related adverse events were found. Conclusion: ANP has shown benefit in controlling cancer pain for the three different types of cancer investigated in this study and in reducing the dosage and the frequency of analgesics. ANP is expected to be beneficial for reducing cancer pain and, thus, to be a promising new treatment for cancer pain.

  14. Uterus necrosis after radiochemotherapy in two patients with advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnitz, S.; Hinkelbein, W.; Koehler, C.; Schneider, A.; Fueller, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Simultaneous platinum-based radiochemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced or node-positive cancer of the uterine cervix. A large body of literature concerning therapy-related acute and late morbidity is available. Chemoradiation-associated necrosis of the uterus has not been described so far. Case Report: Two patients are reported who were treated by combine chemoradiation between 2004 and 2005 for histologically confirmed cervical cancer following laparoscopic staging. Both patients were diagnosed with squamous cell cancer of the cervix FIGO stage IIB (T2b pN1 pM1 LYM G2) and FIGO IIIA (T3a pN1 MO G2), respectively. External-beam radiotherapy was applied in a 3-D-planned four-field technique, covering pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumor. Simultaneously, cisplatin was given to both patients. Following chemoradiation, both patientsdeveloped pelvic pain and an elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the presence of a normal leukocyte count. Both patients underwent relaparoscopy, and necrosis of the uterus combined with partial necrosis of the bladder was diagnosed in patient 1. Patient 1 underwent total supralevatoric exenteration and patient 2 laparoscopically assisted hysterectomy withbilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Conclusion: In patients with persisting or incident pelvic pain, questionable findings in imaging techniques and/or elevated inflammation parameters following completion of chemoradiation for cervical cancer, differential diagnosis should include radiogenic necrosis of the uterus and other pelvic organs. Laparoscopy is an ideal technique to exclude or confirm this diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Systemic treatment in advanced biliary cancers: A multicenter Australian analysis and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungs, Daniel; Aghmesheh, Morteza; Sjoquist, Katrin; Goldstein, David

    2017-10-01

    While first-line palliative chemotherapy (CT1) improves survival and quality of life in advanced biliary cancer (ABC), there is no randomized evidence to support second-line chemotherapy (CT2) in ABC. We aim to explore to role of CT2 in ABC. We performed a retrospective review of all patients who received one or more lines of chemotherapy for ABC at four Australian cancer centers between 2008 and 2011. A Cox proportional hazard model was developed to determine the impact of clinicopathologic variables on overall survival (OS) from time of progression on CT1. We identified 73 patients who received palliative chemotherapy for ABC. Twenty-five patients (34%) received two or more lines of chemotherapy. Patients with a preserved performance status on progression on first-line chemotherapy (CT1) were more likely to receive second-line chemotherapy (CT2) (P Cooperative Oncology Group performance status at progression on CT1 (P accounting for confounding variables, CT2 appears to increase OS in ABC, although we are unable to exclude other unmeasured factors such as tumor biology. These findings warrant further evaluation with prospective trials. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjamaegi, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective analyses was performed in a series of patients with advanced cervix cancer. The aim of this analyses was to evaluate the efficiency of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for advanced cervix cancer. For the patients with advanced stages, active multidisciplinary treatment is necessary for local control and suppression of distant metastases

  17. Recent advances in surgical management of early lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Mao Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The broad application of low-dose computed tomography screening has resulted in the detection of many more cases of early lung cancer than ever before in modern history. Recent advances in the management of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer have focused on making therapy less traumatic, enhancing recovery, and preserving lung function. In this review, we discuss several new modalities associated with minimally invasive surgery for lung cancer. Firstly, less lung parenchyma resection via sublobar resection has become an acceptable alternative to lobectomy in patients with tumors less than 2 cm in size or with poor cardiopulmonary reserve. Secondly, thoracoscopic surgery using a single-portal or needlescopic approach to decrease chest wall trauma is becoming common practice. Thirdly, less invasive anesthesia, using nonintubated techniques, is feasible and safe and is associated with fewer intubation- and ventilator-associated complications. Fourthly, preoperative or intraoperative image-guided localization is an effective modality for identifying small and deep nodules during thoracoscopic surgery. Keywords: Anesthesia, Lung cancer, Nonintubated, Surgery, Thoracoscopy, Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS

  18. Oncotargeting by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV: Advances in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Bishnoi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern oncotherapy approaches are based on inducing controlled apoptosis in tumor cells. Although a number of apoptosis-induction approaches are available, site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents still remain the biggest hurdle in achieving the desired cancer treatment benefit. Additionally, systemic treatment-induced toxicity remains a major limiting factor in chemotherapy. To specifically address drug-accessibility and chemotherapy side effects, oncolytic virotherapy (OV has emerged as a novel cancer treatment alternative. In OV, recombinant viruses with higher replication capacity and stronger lytic properties are being considered for tumor cell-targeting and subsequent cell lysing. Successful application of OVs lies in achieving strict tumor-specific tropism called oncotropism, which is contingent upon the biophysical interactions of tumor cell surface receptors with viral receptors and subsequent replication of oncolytic viruses in cancer cells. In this direction, few viral vector platforms have been developed and some of these have entered pre-clinical/clinical trials. Among these, the Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based platform shows high promise, as it is not pathogenic to humans. Further, modern molecular biology techniques such as reverse genetics tools have favorably advanced this field by creating efficient recombinant VSVs for OV; some have entered into clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the current status of VSV based oncotherapy, challenges, and future perspectives regarding its therapeutic applications in the cancer treatment.

  19. Oncotargeting by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV): Advances in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Suman; Tiwari, Ritudhwaj; Gupta, Sharad; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Nayak, Debasis

    2018-02-23

    Modern oncotherapy approaches are based on inducing controlled apoptosis in tumor cells. Although a number of apoptosis-induction approaches are available, site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents still remain the biggest hurdle in achieving the desired cancer treatment benefit. Additionally, systemic treatment-induced toxicity remains a major limiting factor in chemotherapy. To specifically address drug-accessibility and chemotherapy side effects, oncolytic virotherapy (OV) has emerged as a novel cancer treatment alternative. In OV, recombinant viruses with higher replication capacity and stronger lytic properties are being considered for tumor cell-targeting and subsequent cell lysing. Successful application of OVs lies in achieving strict tumor-specific tropism called oncotropism, which is contingent upon the biophysical interactions of tumor cell surface receptors with viral receptors and subsequent replication of oncolytic viruses in cancer cells. In this direction, few viral vector platforms have been developed and some of these have entered pre-clinical/clinical trials. Among these, the Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based platform shows high promise, as it is not pathogenic to humans. Further, modern molecular biology techniques such as reverse genetics tools have favorably advanced this field by creating efficient recombinant VSVs for OV; some have entered into clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the current status of VSV based oncotherapy, challenges, and future perspectives regarding its therapeutic applications in the cancer treatment.

  20. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu; Yea, Ji Woon

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  1. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National Yonsei University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yea, Ji Woon [Dongguk University Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  2. A multidisciplinary treatment strategy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, F.; Yanagi, Hidenori; Atono, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the therapeutic effects and adverse events of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer in different radiation doses and fractions. A total of 142 consecutive patients with locally advanced (cT3-4 and/or cN1-2) adenocarcinoma of the rectum were treated with preoperative CRT and were operated radically. 121 patients with resectable cT3 or N1-2 rectal adenocarcinoma were assigned to receive pelvic radiation with single fractions of 2.5 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 25 Gy (Short CRT). Surgery was undergone within two weeks. 21 patients with clinical unresectable or marginally resectable cT4 rectal cancer were assigned to receive preoperative pelvic radiation therapy 45 to 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of neoadjuvant therapy (Long CRT). We examined retrospectively the preoperative therapeutic effect and adverse event of Short CRT and Long CRT. Short CRT; Overall R0 resection rate was 98%. Anus preserving rate was 95%. pCR rate was 5%. Median follow-up was 62 months. The actuarial 5-year-local-control rate was 94%. Overall survival for 5 years was 92%. Long neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT); Overall R0 resection rate was 90%. Anus preserving rate was 86%. pCR rate was 24%. Median follow-up was 60 months. The actuarial 5-year-local-control rate was 88%. Overall survival rate for 5 years was 88%. Radiation related adverse event such as pelvic infection and skin trouble was significantly higher in the long CRT group. Local control in primarily resectable rectal cancer after short chemoradiation was excellent. Long chemoradiation for unresectable or marginal cT4 rectum cancer was higher response ratio, but induced more radiation related adverse event than short course CRT. (author)

  3. Interval debulking surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorelli, Sergio; Odicino, Franco; Favalli, Giuseppe

    2002-08-01

    Cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy are the mainstay for the treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. In order to minimize the tumour burden before chemotherapy, cytoreductive surgery is usually performed first. The importance of the amount of residual disease as the main prognostic factor for patients suffering from advanced disease has been almost universally accepted even in the absence of prospective randomized trials addressing the benefit of cytoreductive surgery. In the last decade, the value of debulking surgery after induction chemotherapy - interval debulking surgery, IDS - has been widely debated, especially after the completion of a prospective randomized study from the EORTC addressing the introduction of a surgical procedure with debulking intent preceded and followed by cytoreductive chemotherapy. The rationale of such a strategy in the context of the primary treatment of advanced ovarian cancer lies in a higher cytoreductibility to the 'optimal' status forwarded, and possibly facilitated, by chemotherapy. The results demonstrated a prolongation of both progression-free survival and median survival in favour of patients randomized to IDS (5 and 6 months, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed IDS to be an independent prognostic factor which reduced the risk of death by 33% at 3 years and by 48% in subsequent re-evaluation after more than 6 years of observation. Despite the above, results have been questioned by many, leading the GOG to perform a similar study which has been concluded very recently. Nevertheless, the main concern regarding the application of IDS in all instances relates to the morbidity of two major surgical procedures integrated within a short period during which cytotoxic chemotherapy is also administered. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been recently proposed to avoid a non-useful surgical procedure in patients considered 'optimally unresectable' after diagnosis of advanced ovarian cancer. Whether or not this newer

  4. Radio(chemotherapy in locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Glatzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Definitive radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for many patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Treatment outcomes have improved over the last decades. Several treatment regimens have been shown effective and safe. This review summarises the results of significant studies between 1996 and 2015 on concomitant and sequential radiochemotherapy regimens and radiation dose per fraction. Beside therapy regimens, optimised radiotherapy planning is indispensable to improve outcome and minimise radiation-induced toxicity. An insight into the rationale of radiotherapy planning for stage III NSCLC is also provided.

  5. Advanced smart-photosensitizers for more effective cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wooram; Cho, Soojeong; Han, Jieun; Shin, Heejun; Na, Kun; Lee, Byeongdu; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2017-12-19

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) based upon the use of light and photosensitizers (PSs) has been used as a novel treatment approach for a variety of tumors. It, however, has several major limitations in the clinic: poor water solubility, long-term phototoxicity, low tumor targeting efficacy, and limited light penetration. With advances in nanotechnology, materials science, and clinical interventional imaging procedures, various smart-PSs have been developed for improving their cancer-therapeutic efficacy while reducing the adverse effects. Here, we briefly review state-of-the-art smart-PSs and discuss the future directions of PDT technology.

  6. Chyle fistula in advanced and metastatic thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Carlos S; Sánchez, Juan Guillermo; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2017-10-01

    Chyle fistula (CF) is a rare but challenging condition for the surgeon and the patient's health. A retrospective review of single surgeon's case load in a 12-year period is presented, reviewing the case of those patients presenting with a CF. Three patients were found during this study period from more than 1,050 surgeries performed due to thyroid cancer. Patients underwent extensive lymph node dissection for advanced, metastatic and infiltrative disease. In all patients, a long hospital stay and surgical re-interventions were required. A description of the management of CF is presented along with a review of current Literature.

  7. Locally advanced transverse colon cancer with Trousseau’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aliyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Migratory venous thrombosis is a manifestation of the rare paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with malignant neoplasms. The paper describes successful surgical treatment in a young patient with a colon tumor associated with Trousseau’s syndrome. The latter manifesting itself as ischemia forced urgent surgeons to amputate the lower third of the left leg. Locally advanced transverse colon cancer spreading to the great vessels was subsequently diagnosed. All paraneoplastic manifestations disappeared after tumor removal. The patient was professionally given surgical, anesthesiological, and resuscitative aids that not only improved his quality of life, but also gave the chance to prolong it.

  8. Hyperfractionation radiation therapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Ye, Ji Won

    2003-01-01

    The effects of hyperfractionation radiation therapy, such as the failure pattern and survival, on the treatment results in advanced stage head and neck cancer were studied. Between September 1990 and October 1998, 24 patients with advanced stage (III, IV) head and neck cancers, were treated using hyperfractionation radiation therapy in the Department at Radiation Oncology at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The male to female ratio was 7 ; 1, and the age range from 38 to 71 years with the median of 56 years. With regard to the TNM stage, 11 patients were stage III and 13 were stage IV. The sites of primary cancer were the nasopharynx in six, the hypopharynx in 6, the larynx in five, the oropharynx in three, the maxillary sinus in three, and the oral cavity in one patient. The radiotherapy was delivered by 6 MV X-ray, with a fraction size of 1.2 Gy at two fractions a day, with at least 6 hours inter-fractional interval. The mean total radiation doses was 72 Gy, (ranging from 64.4 to 76.8 Gy). Fallow-up periods ranged between 3 and 136 months, with the median of 52 months. The overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years in all patients were 66.7% and 52.4%. The disease-free survival rates at 3 and 5 years (3YDFS, 5YDFS) in all patients Were 66.7% and 47.6%. The 3YDFS and 5YDFS in stage III patients were 81.8% and 63.6%, and those in stage IV patients were 53.8% and 32.3%. Ten patients were alive with no local nor distant failures at the time of analyses. Six patients (25%) died due to distant metastasis and 12.5% died due to local failure. Distant metastasis was the major cause of failure, but 2 patients died due to unknown failures and 3 of other diseases. The distant metastasis sites were the lung (3 patients), the bone (1 patient), and the liver (2 patients). One patient died of second esophageal cancer. There were no severe late complications, with the exception of 1 osteoradionecrosis of the mandible 58 months after treatment. Although this study was

  9. Predictors of cervical cancer being at an advanced stage at diagnosis in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Rasch, Vibeke; Pukkala, Eero

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Sudan, with more than two-thirds of all women with invasive cervical cancer being diagnosed at an advanced stage (stages III and IV). The lack of a screening program for cervical cancer in Sudan may contribute to the late presentation...... of this cancer, but other factors potentially associated with advanced stages of cervical cancer at diagnosis are unknown. The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between age, marital status, ethnicity, health insurance coverage, residence in an urban vs a rural setting, and stage (at...... diagnosis) of cervical cancer in Sudan....

  10. Postoperative radiation for advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K. Kian; Garden, Adam S.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss both general and specific indications for radiation following surgery for patients with cancers of the head and neck. Patients with advanced cancers of the head and neck are often not suitable candidates for treatment with definitive radiation, and are treated with surgery. Frequently these patients fail by recurring in either the primary sites or in the necks. Adjuvant radiation is therefore often a critical component in the management of these patients. While radiation can be done either prior to or after surgery, most centers prefer the postoperative setting. This refresher course will review general concepts of postoperative irradiation for the patient with head and neck cancer and apply these concepts to specific situations. The course will begin with a broad review of the indications for postoperative irradiation as not all patients undergoing surgery for cancers of the head and neck require additional treatment. We will also review the concept of using postoperative radiation to allow for more conservative surgery with preservation of function. The second portion of the course will focus on general techniques of postoperative irradiation. We will review concepts of patient setup and treatment portal design and describe how specific techniques are practiced at MDACC. Controversial topics, including field matching, total dose and fractionation, and the timing of postoperative radiation will be discussed. The final section of the course will review the results of postoperative irradiation as applied to the head and neck in general as well as to specific subsites. In addition to results for the common scenarios of squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx, we will review results of postoperative irradiation for skin cancers of the head and neck, paranasal sinuses, and salivary glands

  11. Risk factors determining chemotherapeutic toxicity in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansman, FGA; Sleijfer, DT; Coenen, JLLM; De Graaf, JC; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2000-01-01

    Antitumour therapy in advanced colorectal cancer has limited efficacy. For decades, fluorouracil has been the main anticancer drug for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Recently, however, new agents have been introduced: raltitrexed, irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Currently, the dosage for an

  12. Recent Advances in Understanding, Diagnosing, and Treating Ovarian Cancer [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Mills

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer, a term that encompasses ovarian, fallopian, and peritoneal cancers, is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer mortality. To improve patient outcomes, the field is currently focused on defining the mechanisms of cancer formation and spread, early diagnosis and prevention, and developing novel therapeutic options. This review summarizes recent advances in these areas.

  13. Factors influencing diagnosis delay of advanced breast cancer in Moroccan women

    OpenAIRE

    Maghous, A.; Rais, F.; Ahid, S.; Benhmidou, N.; Bellahamou, K.; Loughlimi, H.; Marnouche, E.; Elmajjaoui, S.; Elkacemi, H.; Kebdani, T.; Benjaafar, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Delay in the diagnosis of breast cancer in symptomatic women of 3?months or more is associated with advanced stage and low survival. We conducted this study to learn more about the extent and reasons behind diagnosis delay of advanced breast cancer in Moroccan women. Methods A group of patients with advanced breast cancer were interviewed at the National Institute of Oncology in Rabat during the period from February to December 2014. Diagnosis delay was devised into patient delay a...

  14. 'Boomerang' technique: an improved method for conformal treatment of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corry, June; D'Costa, Leta; Porceddu, Sandro; Peters, Lester J.; Hornby, Colin; Fisher, Richard; Rischin, Danny

    2004-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to assess radiation dosimetry and subsequent clinical outcomes in patient: with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer using a novel radiation technique termed the 'Boomerang'. Dosimetric comparisons were made with both conventional and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. Thi; is a study of 22 patients treated with this technique from June 1995 to October 1998. The technique used entailec delivery of 36 Gy in 18 fractions via parallel opposed fields, then 24 Gy in 12 fractions via asymmetric rotating arc field' for a total of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Patients also received induction and concurrent chemotherapy. The radiation dosimetry was excellent. Dose-volume histograms showed that with the arc fields, 90% of the planning target volume received 94% of the prescribed dose. Relative to other conventional radiation therapy off-cord techniques, the Boomerang technique results in a 27% greater proportion of the prescribed dose being received by 90% of the planning target volume. This translates into an overall 10% greater dose received for the same prescribed dose. At 3 years, the actuarial loco-regional control rate, the failure-free survival rate and the overall survival rate were 91, 75 and 91%, respectively. At 5 years, the actuarial loco-regional control rate, the failure-free survival rate and the overall survival rate were 74, 62 and 71%, respectively. The Boomerang technique provided excellent radiation dosimetry with correspondingly good loco-regional control rates (in conjunction with chemotherapy) and very acceptable acute and late toxicity profiles. Because treatment can be delivered with conventional standard treatment planning and delivery systems, it is a validated treatment option for centres that do not have the capability or capacity for IMRT. A derivative of the Boomerang technique, excluding the parallel opposed component, is now our standard for patients with locally advanced

  15. 'Boomerang' technique: an improved method for conformal treatment of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corry, June; Hornby, Colin; Fisher, Richard; D'Costa, Ieta; Porceddu, Sandro; Rischin, Danny; Peters, Lester J

    2004-06-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to assess radiation dosimetry and subsequent clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer using a novel radiation technique termed the 'Boomerang'. Dosimetric comparisons were made with both conventional and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. This is a study of 22 patients treated with this technique from June 1995 to October 1998. The technique used entailed delivery of 36 Gy in 18 fractions via parallel opposed fields, then 24 Gy in 12 fractions via asymmetric rotating arc fields for a total of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Patients also received induction and concurrent chemotherapy. The radiation dosimetry was excellent. Dose-volume histograms showed that with the arc fields, 90% of the planning target volume received 94% of the prescribed dose. Relative to other conventional radiation therapy off-cord techniques, the Boomerang technique results in a 27% greater proportion of the prescribed dose being received by 90% of the planning target volume. This translates into an overall 10% greater dose received for the same prescribed dose. At 3 years, the actuarial loco-regional control rate, the failure-free survival rate and the overall survival rate were 91, 75 and 91%, respectively. At 5 years, the actuarial loco-regional control rate, the failure-free survival rate and the overall survival rate were 74, 62 and 71%, respectively. The Boomerang technique provided excellent radiation dosimetry with correspondingly good loco-regional control rates (in conjunction with chemotherapy) and very acceptable acute and late toxicity profiles. Because treatment can be delivered with conventional standard treatment planning and delivery systems, it is a validated treatment option for centres that do not have the capability or capacity for IMRT. A derivative of the Boomerang technique, excluding the parallel opposed component, is now our standard for patients with locally advanced

  16. National Cancer Data Base Analysis of Radiation Therapy Consolidation Modality for Cervical Cancer: The Impact of New Technological Advancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Lin, Jeff F. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Krivak, Thomas C. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Sukumvanich, Paniti; Laskey, Robin A.; Ross, Malcolm S.; Lesnock, Jamie L. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To utilize the National Cancer Data Base to evaluate trends in brachytherapy and alternative radiation therapy utilization in the treatment of cervical cancer, to identify associations with outcomes between the various radiation therapy modalities. Methods and Materials: Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer in the National Cancer Data Base who received treatment from January 2004 to December 2011 were analyzed. Overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to identify factors associated with type of boost radiation modality used and its impact on survival. Results: A total of 7654 patients had information regarding boost modality. A predominant proportion of patients were Caucasian (76.2%), had stage IIIB (48.9%) disease with squamous (82.0%) histology, were treated at academic/research centers (47.7%) in the South (34.8%), and lived 0 to 5 miles (27.9%) from the treating facility. A majority received brachytherapy (90.3%). From 2004 to 2011, brachytherapy use decreased from 96.7% to 86.1%, whereas intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) use increased from 3.3% to 13.9% in the same period (P<.01). Factors associated with decreased brachytherapy utilization included older age, stage IVA disease, smaller tumor size, later year of diagnosis, lower-volume treatment centers, and facility type. After controlling for significant factors from survival analyses, IMRT or SBRT boost resulted in inferior overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.55; P<.01) as compared with brachytherapy. In fact, the survival detriment associated with IMRT or SBRT boost was stronger than that associated with excluding chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 1.61′ 95% confidence interval, 1.27-2.04′ P<.01). Conclusions: Consolidation brachytherapy is a critical treatment component for

  17. Pre-operative radiochemotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi-Chu Yang; Jian-Bin Hu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate results of pre-operative radiochemotherapy followed by surgery for 15 patients with locally advanced un-resectable rectal cancer.METHODS: 15 patients with advanced non-resectable rectal cancer were treated with pre-operative irriadiation of 40-46 Gy plus concomitant chemotherapy (5-FU+LV and 5′-DFuR) (RCS group). For comparison, 27 similar patients,treated by preoperative radiotherapy (40-50 Gy) plus surgery were served as control (RS group).RESULTS: No radiochemotherapy or radiotherapy was interrupted and then was delayed because of toxicities in both groups. The radical resectability rate was 73.3% in the RCS group and 37.0% (P=0.024) in RS group. Sphincter preservation rates were 26.6% and 3.7% respectively (P=0.028). Sphincter preservation rates of lower rectal cancer were 27.3 % and 0.0 % respectively (P=0.014). Response rates of RCS and RS groups were 46.7 % and 18.5 %(P=0.053). The tumor downstage rates were 8 (53.3%)and 9 (33.3%) in these groups (P=0.206). The 3-year overall survival rates were 66.7 % and 55.6% (P=0.485), and the disease free survival rates were 40.1% and 33.2%(P=0.663). The 3-year local recurrent rates were 26.7%and 48.1% (P=0.174). No obvious late effects were found in either groups.CONCLUSION: High resectability is possible following preoperative radiochemotherapy and can have more sphincters preserved. It is important to improve the quality of the patients′ life even without increasing the survival or local control rates. Preoperative radiotherapy with concomitant full course chemotherapy (5-Fu+LV and 5′-DFuR) is effective and safe.

  18. Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Uterine Cervix Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Young Seok; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Seong Yul

    2008-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of the use of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (AHRT) for locally advanced uterine cervix cancers. Between May 2000 and September 2002, 179 patients were identified with FIGO stage IIB, IIIB, and IVA cancers. Of the 179 patients, 45 patients were treated with AHRT (AHRT group) and 134 patients were treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT group), respectively. Patients undergoing the AHRT regimen received a dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions (1.5 Gyx2 fractions/day) to the whole pelvis. Subsequently, with a midline block, we administered a parametrial boost with a dose of 20 Gy using 2 Gy fractions. Patients also received two courses of low-dose-rate brachytherapy, up to a total dose of 85∼90 Gy to point A. In the CRT group of patients, the total dose to point A was 85∼90 Gy. The overall treatment duration was a median of 37 and 66 days for patients that received AHRT and CRT, respectively. Statistical analysis was calculated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank test, and Chi-squared test. For patients that received cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the local control rate at 5 years was 100% and 79.2% for the AHRT and CRT group of patients, respectively (p=0.028). The 5-year survival rate for patients with a stage IIB bulky tumor was 82.6% and 62.1% for the AHRT group and CRT group, respectively (p=0.040). There was no statistically significant difference for severe late toxicity between the two groups (p=0.561). In this study, we observed that treatment with AHRT with concurrent chemotherapy allows a significant advantage of local control and survival for locally advanced uterine cervix cancers

  19. Carcinoembryonic antigen: an invaluable marker for advanced breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak K

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial serum Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels were measured in 150 individuals (50 patients with breast cancer, 50 benign breast diseases and 50 other controls. These levels were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and follow-up information. Serum CEA levels were independent of the primary tumor status, their histology, lymphoreticular response and the patients′ characteristics as well as the age, sex and the menstrual status. However, the nodal status, number of involved nodes and the grade of the tumors had significant influence on the level of serum CEA. Breast cancer patients especially those with metastasis had significantly higher serum CEA levels as compared to the controls and those with localised disease, irrespective of the site of metastasis. These levels were lowered appreciably by the disease regression and were raised or stable during the disease progression. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve showed metastasis to be more frequent in patients with pretreatment serum CEA levels above 25 ng/ml and persistent post treatment CEA levels above 15 ng/ml. Serum CEA level was found to be a valuable prognostic indicator for advanced breast cancer and serial serum CEA levels provided an average lead time of about 3.9 months before the clinical appearance of metastasis.

  20. The management of localized and locally advanced prostate cancer - 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. - The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. - Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. - The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachy therapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. - Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. - Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. - The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  1. A pilot study of bendamustine in advanced bile duct cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoppmeyer, Konrad; Kreth, Florian; Wiedmann, Marcus; Mössner, Joachim; Preiss, Rainer; Caca, Karel

    2007-07-01

    We performed a pilot study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of bendamustine in patients with advanced hilar bile duct cancer and impaired liver function. Six patients with histologically proven, unresectable adenocarcinoma of the hilar bile duct were treated with bendamustine 140 mg/m intravenously on day 1 of the first cycle and with bendamustine 100 mg/m on days 1 and 2 of the second to fourth cycle. Treatment cycles were repeated every 21 days. Primary endpoint was the safety and tolerability of the treatment; secondary endpoints were response rate, time to progression and overall survival. Transient lymphopenia grade 3 occurred in all six patients. No other grade 3 or 4 toxicities were present. The most common nonhematologic toxicity was mouth dryness grade 2 in six patients. Three patients had stable disease. No partial or complete responses were observed. Median time to progression was 3.3 months; median overall survival was 6 months. Our study demonstrates that bendamustine can be safely administered in patients with hilar bile duct cancer and impaired liver function. A potential role of bendamustine in combination therapies for bile duct cancer will be a subject of further trials.

  2. Pretreatment tables predicting pathologic stage of locally advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joniau, Steven; Spahn, Martin; Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Tombal, Bertrand; Tosco, Lorenzo; Marchioro, Giansilvio; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Walz, Jochen; Kneitz, Burkhard; Bader, Pia; Frohneberg, Detlef; Tizzani, Alessandro; Graefen, Markus; van Cangh, Paul; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Montorsi, Francesco; van Poppel, Hein; Gontero, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Pretreatment tables for the prediction of pathologic stage have been published and validated for localized prostate cancer (PCa). No such tables are available for locally advanced (cT3a) PCa. To construct tables predicting pathologic outcome after radical prostatectomy (RP) for patients with cT3a PCa with the aim to help guide treatment decisions in clinical practice. This was a multicenter retrospective cohort study including 759 consecutive patients with cT3a PCa treated with RP between 1987 and 2010. Retropubic RP and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients were divided into pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and biopsy Gleason score (GS) subgroups. These parameters were used to construct tables predicting pathologic outcome and the presence of positive lymph nodes (LNs) after RP for cT3a PCa using ordinal logistic regression. In the model predicting pathologic outcome, the main effects of biopsy GS and pretreatment PSA were significant. A higher GS and/or higher PSA level was associated with a more unfavorable pathologic outcome. The validation procedure, using a repeated split-sample method, showed good predictive ability. Regression analysis also showed an increasing probability of positive LNs with increasing PSA levels and/or higher GS. Limitations of the study are the retrospective design and the long study period. These novel tables predict pathologic stage after RP for patients with cT3a PCa based on pretreatment PSA level and biopsy GS. They can be used to guide decision making in men with locally advanced PCa. Our study might provide physicians with a useful tool to predict pathologic stage in locally advanced prostate cancer that might help select patients who may need multimodal treatment. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Survey of advanced radiation technologies used at designated cancer care hospitals in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Naoto; Tsujino, Kayoko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Ishikura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Our survey assessed the use of advanced radiotherapy technologies at the designated cancer care hospitals in Japan, and we identified several issues to be addressed. We collected the data of 397 designated cancer care hospitals, including information on staffing in the department of radiation oncology (e.g. radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation therapists), the number of linear accelerators and the implementation of advanced radiotherapy technologies from the Center for Cancer Control and Information Services of the National Cancer Center, Japan. Only 53% prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 16% regional designated cancer care hospitals have implemented intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers, and 62% prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 23% regional designated cancer care hospitals use intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Seventy-four percent prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 40% regional designated cancer care hospitals employ stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer. Our multivariate analysis of prefectural designated cancer care hospitals which satisfy the institute's qualifications for advanced technologies revealed the number of radiation oncologists (P=0.01) and that of radiation therapists (P=0.003) were significantly correlated with the implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and the number of radiation oncologists (P=0.02) was correlated with the implementation of stereotactic body radiotherapy. There was a trend to correlate the number of medical physicists with the implementation of stereotactic body radiotherapy (P=0.07). Only 175 (51%) regional designated cancer care hospitals satisfy the institute's qualification of stereotactic body radiotherapy and 76 (22%) satisfy that of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Seventeen percent prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 13% regional designated cancer care hospitals

  4. Audit of advanced gastric cancer at Ibn Sina Hospital, Khartoum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences ... Background: Worldwide, gastric cancer is the second most common cancer (second to lung cancer). ... and age influences the clinico-pathological features of gastric cancer and to audit the outcome of ...

  5. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    of this study is to develop a strategy to identify molecular markers of response of advanced prostate cancer to specific therapies using clinically...combination treatment strategies are urgently needed. The purpose of this study is to develop a strategy for identifying molecular markers of response of...PENDING) Level of Funding: $125,978 annual direct Project Goals: To develop a strategy for identifying molecular therapeutic response markers of

  6. Personalized treatment for advanced colorectal cancer: KRAS and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Gargi Surendra; Karapetis, Christos S

    2013-01-01

    Targeted therapies have improved the survival of patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). However, further improvements in patient outcomes may be gained by the development of predictive biomarkers in order to select individuals who are most likely to benefit from treatment, thus personalizing treatment. Using the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, we discuss the existing and potential predictive biomarkers in clinical development for use with EGFR-targeted agents in metastatic CRC. The data and technological issues surrounding such biomarkers as expression of EGFR or its family members or ligands, KRAS-, NRAS-, and BRAF-mutation status, PI3K/PTEN expression, and imaging and clinical biomarkers, such as rash and hypomagnesemia, are summarized. Although the discovery of KRAS mutations has improved patient selection for EGFR-targeted treatments, further biomarkers are required, especially for those patients who exhibit KRAS mutations rather than the wild-type gene

  7. Oral yeast carriage in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A N; Brailsford, S; Broadley, K; Beighton, D

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate oral yeast carriage amongst patients with advanced cancer. Oral rinse samples were obtained from 120 subjects. Yeasts were isolated using Sabouraud's dextrose agar and CHROMagar Candida, and were identified using a combination of the API 20 C AUX yeast identification system, species-specific PCR and 26S rDNA gene sequencing. Oral yeast carriage was present in 66% of subjects. The frequency of isolation of individual species was: Candida albicans, 46%; Candida glabrata, 18%; Candida dubliniensis, 5%; others, yeast carriage was associated with denture wearing (P = 0.006), and low stimulated whole salivary flow rate (P = 0.009). Identification of these risk factors offers new strategies for the prevention of oral candidosis in this group of patients.

  8. Quality-of-life assessment in advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, S

    2000-07-01

    In the past 5 years, quality-of-life (QOL) assessment measures such as the McGill, McMaster, Global Visual Analogue Scale, Assessment of QOL at the End of Life, Life Evaluation Questionnaire, and Hospice QOL Index have been devised specifically for patients with advanced cancer. The developers of these instruments have tried to respond to the changing needs of this specific population, taking into account characteristics including poor performance status, difficulty with longitudinal study, rapidly deteriorating physical condition, and change in relevant issues. Emphasis has been placed on patient report, ease and speed of completion, and the existential domain or meaning of life. Novel techniques in QOL measurement have also been adapted for palliative care, such as judgment analysis in the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life. It is generally agreed that a single tool will not cover all QOL assessment needs.

  9. Termination of Pregnancy in a Patient with Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suna Özdemir

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer during pregnancy is a rare entity and the management of the disease can be challenging for the patient and the clinician. In this case, we report a case of advanced ovarian carcinoma diagnosed during pregnancy, which was managed with termination of pregnancy and chemotheraphy. The patient was underwent exploratory laparatomy including the right ovarian cystectomy, omentectomy, appendectomy, pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy after frozen section of borderline serous cystadenocarcinoma at the 14 week of gestation. After final histopathology, the patient was staged as having FIGO stage IIIC disease. The pregnancy was termineted with the decision of patient and her family. The patient was treated with chemotheraphy.

  10. PTEN status in advanced colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, F V; Bozzetti, C; Lagrasta, C A; Crafa, P; Bonasoni, M P; Camisa, R; Pedrazzi, G; Ardizzoni, A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10 (PTEN) function in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) may represent one of the resistance mechanisms to cetuximab by interfering with the epidermal growth factor receptor signal transduction pathway. Methods: PTEN expression tested by indirect immunofluorescence was evaluated both on primary (n=43) and on metastatic (n=24) sites in CRC patients treated with cetuximab. Results: The loss of PTEN expression tested on metastatic sites was negatively associated with response (100% progressive disease (PD) in PTEN-negative cases vs 30% PD in PTEN-positive cases; P<0.05), PFS (0.8 vs 8.2 months; P<0.001) and OS (2.9 vs 14.2 months; P<0.001). Conclusion: A potential role of PTEN in the anti-tumour activity of cetuximab could be hypothesised. PMID:19953097

  11. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: two randomised studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, L.; Grover, R.; Pokharel, Y.H.; Chander, S.; Kumar, S.; Singh, R.; Rath, G.K.; Kochupillai, V.

    1998-01-01

    The results of two studies looking at the place of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer being treated with radiotherapy are presented. Between August 1990 and January 1992, 184 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, FIGO stage II B IVA were randomised (study 1) to receive either two cycles of bleomycin, ifosfamide-mesna and cisplatin (BIP) chemotherapy (CT) followed by radiotherapy (RT). Three patients died of CT toxicity - two in study 1 and one in study 2. Cystitis, proctitis and local skin reaction after RT occurred equally in the two groups in both the studies. The neo-adjuvant chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy demonstrated a high response rate, but this did not translate into improved overall survival compared to those patients receiving radiotherapy alone

  12. Intra-arterial chemotherapy for locally advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aota, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuhiko

    1999-01-01

    A total of 83 patients with locally advanced bladder cancer (T1, n=5; T2, n=28; T3a, n=21; T3b, n=21; T4, n=8) were treated with intra-arterial (i.a.) cisplatin and adriamycin (or epirubicin) chemotherapy. In 51 of the 83 cases, we combined this treatment with radiotherapy. The pathological complete response (CR) rate was 68% for all patients, 84% for i.a. chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and only 41% for i.a. chemotherapy. The 5-year survival rate was 57% for all patients, 71% for i.a. chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and only 44% for i.a. chemotherapy. The 5-year survival as a function of the clinical stage was 82% for T1+T2, 66% for T3a, 28% for T3b, 25% for T4 (T1+T2 vs. T3b: p<0.001, T1+T2 vs. T4: p<0.0001, T3a vs. T3b: p<0.0263, T3a vs. T4: p<0.0214, T3b vs. T4: p<0.029). In 46% of all patients, we succeeded in preserving the bladder; especially noteworthy, is that in 65% of the patients undergoing i.a. chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy, we succeeded in preserving the bladder. These results demonstrate that i.a. chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy is a useful method for locally advanced bladder cancer which may make preservation of the bladder function feasible. (author)

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Coping with Your Feelings During Advanced Cancer Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer and Caregivers Questions ... Talking About Advanced Cancer Coping With Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer ...

  14. PAM50 breast cancer intrinsic subtypes and effect of gemcitabine in advanced breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte Levin Tykjær; Nielsen, Torsten O; Bjerre, Karsten D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vitro studies suggest basal breast cancers are more sensitive to gemcitabine relative to other intrinsic subtypes. The main objective of this study was to use specimens from a randomized clinical trial to evaluate whether the basal-like subtype identifies patients with advanced...... breast cancer who benefit from gemcitabine plus docetaxel (GD) compared to single agent docetaxel (D). MATERIAL AND METHODS: From patients randomly assigned to GD or D, RNA was isolated from archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary breast tumor tissue and used for PAM50 intrinsic subtyping...... chemotherapy were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox proportional hazards regression models. Data analysis was performed independently by the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) statistical core and all statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: RNA from 270 patients was evaluable; 84...

  15. A phase I study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holländer, Cecilie; Baeksgaard, Lene; Sorensen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab in patients with non-resectable locally advanced esophageal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Escalating doses of oxaliplatin every second week and daily tegafur....../uracil were given concurrently with radiotherapy, 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. Cetuximab was given on day 15 (400 mg/m(2)) and weekly (250 mg/m(2)) during radiotherapy. Fixed doses of oxaliplatin (130 mg/m(2)) and tegafur/uracil (300 mg/m(2)) were administered before, and after radiotherapy. RESULTS: Eleven...... patients were included in the study; two were excluded due to allergic reactions to cetuximab. In DL2 (tegafur/uracil 300 mg/m(2), oxaliplatin 30 mg/m(2)) two grade 3/4 fistula and one grade 3 neuropathy were observed. Six patients were enrolled in DL1 (tegafur/uracil 150 mg/m(2)/, oxaliplatin 30 mg/m(2...

  16. Spiritual pain among patients with advanced cancer in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mako, Caterina; Galek, Kathleen; Poppito, Shannon R

    2006-10-01

    The large body of empirical research suggesting that patients' spiritual and existential experiences influence the disease process has raised the need for health care professionals to understand the complexity of patients' spiritual pain and distress. The current study explores the multidimensional nature of spiritual pain, in patients with end-stage cancer, in relation to physical pain, symptom severity, and emotional distress. The study combines a quantitative evaluation of participants' intensity of spiritual pain, physical pain, depression, and intensity of illness, with a qualitative focus on the nature of patients' spiritual pain and the kinds of interventions patients believed would ameliorate their spiritual pain. Fifty-seven patients with advanced stage cancer in a palliative care hospital were interviewed by chaplains. Overall, 96% of the patients reported experiencing spiritual pain, but they expressed it in different ways: (1) as an intrapsychic conflict, (2) as interpersonal loss or conflict, or (3) in relation to the divine. Intensity of spiritual pain was correlated with depression (r = 0.43, p spiritual pain did not vary by age, gender, disease course or religious affiliation. Given both the universality of spiritual pain and the multifaceted nature of pain, we propose that when patients report the experience of pain, more consideration be given to the complexity of the phenomena and that spiritual pain be considered a contributing factor. The authors maintain that spiritual pain left unaddressed both impedes recovery and contributes to the overall suffering of the patient.

  17. Clinical review: surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Courtney, D

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent and locally advanced colorectal cancers frequently require en bloc resection of involved organs to achieve negative margins. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most current literature related to the surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  18. Early experience of proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Youjirou; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Makita, Chiyoko; Suzuki, Motohisa; Azami, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2013-01-01

    Between 2009 and 2012, 10 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer underwent proton therapy combined with chemotherapy. The initial results of this therapy were 8 complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR), local recurrence was detected 1 patient. Proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy is thought to be an effective treatment for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. (author)

  19. A review of potential factors relevant to coping in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thora G.; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan; Wagner, Lis

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to identify characteristics that are considered to describe coping in patients with advanced cancer, as seen from a patient perspective. Based on the identified characteristics, the second aim was to identify potential factors that are relevant to coping in patients with advanced cancer....

  20. Contents of life review and quality of life of advanced cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, Michiyo; Ishiwara, Tatsuhiko; Kimura, Hideyuki; Tsuchida, Yoko

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated the utility of life review for advanced cancer patients. In the investigation, we examined the contents of life review of advanced cancer patients, and the relation between specific contents and Quality of Life (QoL) issues.

  1. European Society of Gynaecologic Oncology Quality Indicators for Advanced Ovarian Cancer Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querleu, Denis; Planchamp, Francois; Chiva, Luis; Fotopoulou, Christina; Barton, Desmond; Cibula, David; Aletti, Giovanni; Carinelli, Silvestro; Creutzberg, Carien; Davidson, Ben; Harter, Philip; Lundvall, Lene; Marth, Christian; Morice, Philippe; Rafii, Arash; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Rockall, Andrea; Sessa, Cristiana; van der Zee, Ate; Vergote, Ignace; du Bois, Andreas

    Objectives The surgical management of advanced ovarian cancer involves complex surgery. Implementation of a quality management program has a major impact on survival. The goal of this work was to develop a list of quality indicators (QIs) for advanced ovarian cancer surgery that can be used to audit

  2. Clinical benefit of palliative radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Rana, Vishal; Janjan, Nora A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (US)) (and others)

    2008-03-15

    Background. Local progression of advanced gastric cancer often manifests as bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, or pain. We evaluated the magnitude and durability of palliation with radiotherapy (RT). Material and methods. From 1996 to 2004, 37 gastric cancer patients were treated with palliative RT (median dose 35Gy in 14 fractions). Nearly two-thirds of all patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Index pre-treatment symptoms were gastric bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain in 54%, 43%, and 19% of patients, respectively. Results. The rates of control for bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain were 70% (14/20), 81% (13/16), and 86% (6/7), respectively. These symptoms were controlled without additional interventions for a median of 70%, 81%, and 49% of the patient's remaining life, respectively. Patients receiving CRT had a trend towards better median overall survival than those receiving RT alone (6.7 vs. 2.4 months, p=0.08). Lower (<41 Gy) biologically effective dose (BED, assuming an alpha/beta ratio of 10 for early responding tissues) predicted for poorer local control (6-month local control 70% vs. 100%, p=0.05) while T4 tumors had a trend towards inferior local control (6-month LC 56% vs. 100%, p=0.06). Discussion. Palliative RT controls symptoms for most of the remaining life in the majority of gastric cancer patients. The role of a higher dose of RT (BED >= 41 Gy), especially in patients with T4 tumors, remains to be established. In order to accurately define the role for radiotherapy in palliation of these symptoms, prospective randomized studies need to be conducted.

  3. Clinical benefit of palliative radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Rana, Vishal; Janjan, Nora A.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Local progression of advanced gastric cancer often manifests as bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, or pain. We evaluated the magnitude and durability of palliation with radiotherapy (RT). Material and methods. From 1996 to 2004, 37 gastric cancer patients were treated with palliative RT (median dose 35Gy in 14 fractions). Nearly two-thirds of all patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Index pre-treatment symptoms were gastric bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain in 54%, 43%, and 19% of patients, respectively. Results. The rates of control for bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain were 70% (14/20), 81% (13/16), and 86% (6/7), respectively. These symptoms were controlled without additional interventions for a median of 70%, 81%, and 49% of the patient's remaining life, respectively. Patients receiving CRT had a trend towards better median overall survival than those receiving RT alone (6.7 vs. 2.4 months, p=0.08). Lower (<41 Gy) biologically effective dose (BED, assuming an alpha/beta ratio of 10 for early responding tissues) predicted for poorer local control (6-month local control 70% vs. 100%, p=0.05) while T4 tumors had a trend towards inferior local control (6-month LC 56% vs. 100%, p=0.06). Discussion. Palliative RT controls symptoms for most of the remaining life in the majority of gastric cancer patients. The role of a higher dose of RT (BED ≥ 41 Gy), especially in patients with T4 tumors, remains to be established. In order to accurately define the role for radiotherapy in palliation of these symptoms, prospective randomized studies need to be conducted

  4. Effectiveness of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Masaomi; Mizuta, Minoru; Kaji, Mitsumasa

    2006-01-01

    To determine the pathologic effectiveness of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with advanced rectal carcinoma, we reviewed clinical records of 76 patients who received preoperative pelvic radiation +/- chemotherapy. Since 2 patients refused operation and 2 died before surgery, 72 patients underwent operation with a mean delay of 19.9 days after completion of irradiation. Pathologic tumor regression grade (Grade 0-3) was determined by the amount of viable tumor versus necrosis and fibrosis. Grade 0, 1a, 1b, 2, and 3 (pCR) were observed in 0%, 25.0%, 38.9%, 27.8% and 2.8% of patients, respectively. The pathologic response (PR) rate was 75.0% when PR was defined as greater than grade 1b (tumor regression more than 1/3). Downstaging was observed in 35.8% of patients, in which 5-year overall survival was significantly better than in patients without downstaging (90.0% vs. 50.1%, p<0.05). No correlation could be observed between PR and downstaging. CRT is a useful tool with a high PR rate in patients with advanced rectal cancer. More accurate and careful clinical staging is important to select adequate candidates for CRT. Multi-institutional clinical trials as well as standardizing the surgical procedure including lymph node (LN) dissection are required to validate the advantages of CRT for Japanese patients. (author)

  5. Treatments Results and Prognostic Factors in Locally Advanced Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Mee-Sun; Chung, Woong-Ki; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Nam, Taek-Keun; Song, Ju-Young; Nah, Byung-Sik; Lim, Sang Cheol; Lee, Joon Kyoo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the treatment results and to identify possible prognostic indicators in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Between October 1985 to December 2000, 90 patients who had locally advanced stage IV hypopharyngeal carcinoma were studied retrospectively. Twelve patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 65 patients were treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and 13 patients were treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Total radiation dose ranged from 59.0 to 88.2 Gy (median 70 Gy) for radiotherapy alone. Most patients had ciplatin and 5-fluorouracil, and others had cisplatin and peplomycin or vincristin. Median follow-up period was 15 months. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival rate and Cox proportional hazard model for multivariate analysis of prognostic factors. Results: Overall 3- and 5-year survival rates were 27% and 17%, respectively. The 2-year locoregional control rates were 33% for radiotherapy alone, 32% for combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and 81% for combined surgery and radiotherapy (p=0.006). The prognostic factors affecting overall survival were T stage, concurrent chemo radiation and treatment response. Overall 3- and 5-year laryngeal preservation rates in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy were 26% and 22%, respectively. Of these, the 5-year laryngeal preservation rates were 52% for concurrent chemo radiation group (n=11), and 16% for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (n=54, p=0.012). Conclusion: Surgery and postoperative radiotherapy showed better results than radiotherapy alone or with chemotherapy. Radiotherapy combined with concurrent chemotherapy is an effective modality to achieve organ preservation in locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. Further prospective randomized studies will be required

  6. Results of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sang Gyu; Kim, Su Ssan; Bae, Hoon Sik [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    We performed a retrospective non-randomized clinical study of locally advanced rectal cancer, to evaluate the anal sphincter preservation rates, down staging rates and survival rates of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. From January 2002 to December 2005, patients with pathologically confirmed rectal cancer with clinical stage T2 or higher, or patients with lymph node metastasis were enrolled in this study. A preoperative staging work-up was conducted in 36 patients. All patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and curative resection was performed for 26 patients at Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital. Radiotherapy treatment planning was conducted with the use of planning CT for all patients. A total dose of 45.0 {approx} 52.2 Gy conventionally fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis. Chemotherapy was given at the first and fifth week of radiation therapy with continuous infusion i.v. 5-FU (Fluorouracil) and LV (Leucovorine). Surgical resection was performed 2 to 4 weeks after the completion of the chemoradiotherapy regimen. The complete resection rate with negative resection margin was 100% (26/26). However, a pathologically complete response was not seen after curative resection. Surgery was done by LAR (low anterior resection) in 23 patients and APR (abdomino-perineal resection) in 3 patients. The sphincter preservation rate was 88.5% (23/26), down staging of the tumor occurred in 12 patients (46.2%) and down-sizing of the tumor occurred in 19 patients (73%). Local recurrence after surgical resection developed in 1 patient, and distant metastasis developed in 3 patients. The local recurrence free survival rate, distant metastasis free survival rate, and progression free survival rate were 96.7%, 87% and 83.1%, respectively. Treatment related toxicity was minimal except for one grade 3, one grade 4 anemia, one grade 3 leukopenia, and one grade 3 ileus. Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally

  7. The dynamic relationship between daily activities, home environment, and identity when living with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mærsk, Jesper Larsen

    The importance of daily activities and home to identity when living with advanced cancer Introduction Research within occupational science and gerontology has documented that being engaged in daily activities and having relational bonds to home are important to identity formation. For people living...... with advanced cancer in Denmark it is of priority to be able to live at home for as long as possible. For approximately 80% their home is the preferred place to die. Studies indicate home is the place where people with advanced cancer spent most of their day and are engaged in most of their daily activities...... with advanced cancer in Denmark may experience challenges to how they can form and express their identity through what they do and where they live. Objectives The purpose of this study is to generate knowledge about how people with advanced cancer through their words and actions express: • The importance...

  8. Advanced Cancer Patients' Perceptions of Dignity: The Impact of Psychologically Distressing Symptoms and Preparatory Grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulou, Sotiria; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Katsaragakis, Stylianos; Papazoglou, Irene; Zygogianni, Anna; Galanos, Antonis; Mystakidou, Kyriaki

    2018-04-01

    The present study assesses the relationship between patient dignity in advanced cancer and the following variables: psychological distress, preparatory grief, and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. The sample consisted of 120 patients with advanced cancer. The self-administered questionnaires were as follows: the Preparatory Grief in Advanced Cancer Patients (PGAC), the Patient Dignity Inventory-Greek (PDI-Gr), the Greek Schedule for Attitudes toward Hastened Death (G-SAHD), and the Greek version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (G-HADS). Moderate to strong statistically significant correlations were found between the 4 subscales of PDI-Gr (psychological distress, body image and role identity, self-esteem, and social support) with G-HADS, G-SAHD, and PGAC ( P dignity among patients with advanced cancer. Clinicians should assess and attend to dignity-distressing factors in the care of patients with advanced cancer.

  9. Clinical experience of intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Takeshi; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kawakami, Yukikiyo; Sakiyama, Shoji; Kondo, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer is an intractable and serious pathosis, which directly aggravates patients' Quality of Life (QOL) and prognosis. We first select the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. From April 2009 to May 2012, we encountered 5 patients who developed secondary pneumothorax during treatment for advanced lung cancer. Their average age was 60.8 years old, and 4 of them had squamous cell carcinoma, 1 had adenocarcinoma, and all had unresectable advanced lung cancer. In 4 of them, the point of air leakage could be detected by pleurography, and leakage could be stopped by the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue. All of them could receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy after treatment for secondary pneumothorax. The intrapleural administration of fibrin glue may be an effective and valid treatment for intractable secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. (author)

  10. Supporting women with advanced breast cancer: the impact of altered functional status on their social roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bai Qi Peggy; Parmar, Monica P; Gartshore, Kimberley

    2014-01-01

    Despite early detection of breast cancer and the progress of treatment modalities, metastasis-specific symptoms continue to impact women's functional status and daily living. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of altered functional status and social roles of women with advanced breast cancer. Using qualitative descriptive methodology, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 women diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and altered functional status attending a tertiary care cancer centre. Results illustrated the adaptive experience of women living with their illness as they reshaped their social roles to fit with their altered functional status and advanced disease. These findings highlight the opportunity for supportive care nursing interventions to facilitate the behavioural and cognitive transitions that are experienced by women with advanced breast cancer and altered functional status. These results may have implications for women with other advanced chronic diseases, though more research is required.

  11. Factors Associated with Suicide Risk in Advanced Cancer Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sun A; Chung, Seung Hyun; Lee, Youngjin

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to find out to what degree suicidal thoughts and associated factors affect the suicide risk of advanced cancer patients. The frequency of suicidal thoughts among patients with cancer, especially in the advanced stages, is about 3 times greater than the adult average in South Korea. We recruited 457 participants with four types of cancers (colon, breast, cervical, and lung) using stratified sampling. Data collection was carried out through one-on-one interviews by trained nurse...

  12. The relationship between bioelectrical impedance phase angle and subjective global assessment in advanced colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Digant; Lis, Christopher G; Dahlk, Sadie L; King, Jessica; Vashi, Pankaj G; Grutsch, James F; Lammersfeld, Carolyn A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA) derived phase angle is increasingly being used as an objective indicator of nutritional status in advanced cancer. Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) is a subjective method of nutritional status. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between BIA derived phase angle and SGA in advanced colorectal cancer. Methods We evaluated a case series of 73 stages III and IV colorectal cancer patients. Patients were classified as ei...

  13. A prospective study of the incidence of falls in patients with advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stone, Carol

    2011-10-01

    The association between aging and falls risk, and the morbidity and mortality resulting from falls in older persons, is well documented. Results from a small number of studies of patients with cancer in inpatient settings suggest that patients with advanced cancer may be at high risk of falling. We present preliminary results pertaining to the incidence of falls in patients with advanced cancer from an ongoing study of risk factors for falls.

  14. Radiofrequency ablation for unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegrachi, Samira; Besselink, Marc G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Molenaar, Izaak Quintus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Median survival in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer lies in the range of 9–15 months. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) may prolong survival, but data on its safety and efficacy are scarce. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library with the syntax ‘(radiofrequency OR RFA) AND (pancreas OR pancreatic)’ for studies published until 1 January 2012. In addition, a search of the proceedings of conferences on pancreatic disease that took place during 2009–2011 was performed. Studies with fewer than five patients were excluded as they were considered to be case reports. The primary endpoint was survival. Secondary endpoints included morbidity and mortality. Results: Five studies involving a total of 158 patients with pancreatic cancer treated with RFA fulfilled the eligibility criteria. These studies reported median survival after RFA of 3–33 months, morbidity related to RFA of 4–37%, mortality of 0–19% and overall morbidity of 10–43%. Pooling of data was not appropriate as the study populations and reported outcomes were heterogeneous. Crucial safety aspects included ensuring a maximum RFA tip temperature of < 90 °C and ensuring minimum distances between the RFA probe and surrounding structures. Conclusions: Radiofrequency ablation seems to be feasible and safe when it is used with the correct temperature and at an appropriate distance from vital structures. It appears to have a positive impact on survival. Multicentre randomized trials are necessary to determine the true effect size of RFA and to minimize the impacts of selection and publication biases. PMID:23600801

  15. Complex MSH2 and MSH6 mutations in hypermutated microsatellite unstable advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Colin C; Morrissey, Colm; Kumar, Akash; Zhang, Xiaotun; Smith, Christina; Coleman, Ilsa; Salipante, Stephen J; Milbank, Jennifer; Yu, Ming; Grady, William M; Tait, Jonathan F; Corey, Eva; Vessella, Robert L; Walsh, Tom; Shendure, Jay; Nelson, Peter S

    2014-09-25

    A hypermutated subtype of advanced prostate cancer was recently described, but prevalence and mechanisms have not been well-characterized. Here we find that 12% (7 of 60) of advanced prostate cancers are hypermutated, and that all hypermutated cancers have mismatch repair gene mutations and microsatellite instability (MSI). Mutations are frequently complex MSH2 or MSH6 structural rearrangements rather than MLH1 epigenetic silencing. Our findings identify parallels and differences in the mechanisms of hypermutation in prostate cancer compared with other MSI-associated cancers.

  16. The economic burden of advanced gastric cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jihyung; Tsai, Yiling; Novick, Diego; Hsiao, Frank Chi-Huang; Cheng, Rebecca; Chen, Jen-Shi

    2017-09-16

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in both sexes worldwide, especially in Eastern Asia. This study aimed to estimate the economic burden of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) in Taiwan. The costs of AGC in 2013 were estimated using resource use data from a chart review study (n = 122 with AGC) and national statistics. Annual per-patient costs, where patients' follow-up periods were adjusted for, were estimated with 82 patients who had complete resource use data. The costs were composed of direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs (healthcare travel and caregiver costs), morbidity costs, and mortality costs. Relevant unit costs were retrieved mainly from literature and national statistics, and applied to the resource use data. A broad definition of morbidity and mortality costs was employed to value the productivity loss in patients with unpaid employment, economically inactive and unemployed as well as the life years after the age of retirement. Their narrow definitions were also used in sensitivity analyses, using age- and/or sex-specific employment rates. Forgone future earnings/productivity loss were discounted at 3%. Annual per-patient costs were projected to estimate the total costs of AGC at the national level with an estimated number of patients with AGC (N = 2611) in Taiwan in 2013. The mean age of the 82 patients was 59.3 (SD: 11.9) years, and 67.1% were male. Per-patient costs were US$26,431 for direct medical costs, US$4669 for direct non-medical costs, US$5758 for morbidity costs, and US$145,990 for mortality costs (per death). These per-patient costs were projected to incur total AGC costs of US$423 million at the national-level. Mortality costs accounted for 77.3% of the total costs, followed by direct medical costs (16.3%), morbidity costs (3.6%), and direct non-medical costs (2.9%). AGC was found to exert a significant economic burden in Taiwan, incurring US$423 million in 2013. This represents about 0.08% of

  17. Prospective study of falls and risk factors for falls in adults with advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stone, Carol A

    2012-06-10

    Retrospective studies of inpatients with cancer suggest that a cancer diagnosis confers a high risk of falls. In adults with advanced cancer, we aimed to prospectively document the incidence of falls, identify the risk factors, and determine if falls in this population occur predominantly in older patients.

  18. Palliative surgical approach in advanced nonresponsive mucinous ovarian cancer: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manika Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced mucinous ovarian cancer is a separate entity and has different biological behaviour. There is a wide range of therapeutic challenges and dilemmas in the management of these patients. The authors present a case of advanced ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma with pseudomyxoma peritonei who had poor response to standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This case is highlighted to emphasize the challenges in the decision making for the management of advanced mucinous ovarian cancer.

  19. Treatment of locally advanced/locally recurrent breast cancer and inflammatory breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masao

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, and locally recurrent breast cancer. A multidisciplinary approach considering subclinical distant metastases is needed to treat these types of breast cancer. Subclinical distant metastasis is observed in about 80% of case of locally advanced cancer, and treatment of subclinical distant metastases, e.g., by endocrinotherapy and chemotherapy, is therefore essential to improving the prognosis. The standard therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer consists of induction chemotherapy with anthracyclines and local treatment with mastectomy or irradiation. Previous reports have stated that induction chemotherapy was effective in 60-80% of the primary lesions or lymph node metastasis, and the CR rates were in the 10-20% range. Combination therapy with induction chemotherapy clearly improved the outcome over local treatment alone. The usual irradiation dose is 50 to 60 Gy/5 to 7 weeks to the whole breast or the thoracic wall. Boost irradiation at a dose of 10 to 25 Gy is performed in unresectable cases. The boost irradiation dose to the lymph node area is usually 45 to 50 Gy/5 to 6 weeks in cases without gross lesions and 10 to 15 Gy in cases with gross lesions. Combination therapy consisting of conservative pectoral mastectomy and postoperative adjuvant chemo- endocrino-therapy (i.e., adjuvant therapy) has become the standard regimen for treating resectable locally advanced breast cancer, because it significantly improves the recurrence rate and survival rate compared to local treatment alone. Some clinical have studies indicated that neoadjuvant therapy (i.e., induction chemotherapy + surgery/radiation therapy) is comparable or superior to adjuvant therapy in terms of improving the prognosis. However, the efficacy and most appropriate method of breast-conserving therapy after induction chemotherapy are still unclear. More clinical trials are needed. It has been

  20. Risk Factors for New Hypothyroidism During Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Advanced Nonthyroidal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Melissa G; Vyas, Chirag M; Hamnvik, Ole-Petter R; Alexander, Erik K; Larsen, P Reed; Choueiri, Toni K; Angell, Trevor E

    2018-04-01

    Thyroid dysfunction during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) cancer treatment is common, but predisposing risk factors have not been determined. Recommendations for monitoring patients treated with one or multiple TKI and in conjunction with other relevant cancer therapies could be improved. The study objective was to assess the risk factors for new thyroid dysfunction in TKI-treated previously euthyroid cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study of patients with advanced nonthyroidal cancer treated with TKI from 2000 to 2017, having available thyroid function tests showing initial euthyroid status, excluding patients with preexisting thyroid disease or lack of follow-up thyroid function tests. During TKI treatment, patients were classified as euthyroid (thyrotropin [TSH] normal), subclinical hypothyroidism (TSH 5-10 mIU/L, or higher TSH if free thyroxine normal), or overt hypothyroidism (TSH >10 mIU/L, low free thyroxine, or requiring thyroid hormone replacement). The timing of thyroid dysfunction and TKI used were assessed. Risk factors for incident hypothyroidism were evaluated using multivariate models. In 538 adult patients included, subclinical hypothyroidism occurred in 71 (13.2%) and overt hypothyroidism occurred in 144 (26.8%) patients with TKI therapy, following a median cumulative TKI exposure of 196 days (interquartile range [IQR] 63.5-518.5 days). The odds of hypothyroidism were greatest during the first six months on a TKI. Median exposure time on the TKI concurrent with thyroid dysfunction in patients treated with only one TKI was 85 days (IQR 38-293.5 days) and was similar to the 74 days (IQR 38-133.3 days) in patients treated previously with other TKI (p = 0.41). Patients who developed hypothyroidism compared to those who remained euthyroid had greater odds of being female (odds ratio = 1.99 [confidence interval 1.35-2.93], p < 0.01), but greater cumulative TKI exposure and greater number of TKI received were not associated with

  1. CPI-613 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-22

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  2. Radiation therapy and arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced gallbladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokodate, Hirofumi; Saito, Hiroya; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Horikawa, Masahiro; Takamura, Akio

    2009-01-01

    The standard therapy is not yet established for the unresectable advanced gallbladder cancer (AGC). Here described is the outcome of authors' therapeutic protocol for AGC during the time Jan., 1989-Dec., 2008. Subjects are 73 patients (M 32/F 41, average age 65 y) with AGC of Stage IV. One shot arterial infusion (AI) of EEP regimen (etoposide (VP16)/4'epiadriamycin (EPIR)/cisplatin (CDDP)) is conducted via hepatic artery proper or common at the first angiography and one week later, external radiation therapy (RT), with about 30-50 Gy/6 fractions (actually, 12-61.6 Gy). AI is weekly done with FP regimen (CDDP/5-fluorouracil (FU)) through the reservoir indwelled in the gastroduodenal artery for 6 months where a metal stent for the stegnosis of bile duct is used if necessary after RT, and in recent days, additionally with biweekly CDDP/gemcitabin (GEM) regimen depending on patient's state after FP. As a result, RT is conducted to 62 cases (RT alone 8 cases), AI, 64 (alone, 10), and RT+AI, 54. Response is found to be 49% (CR 7 cases and PR, 28). Survivals 1- and 3-year are 39 and 6%, respectively, and average survival time, 408 days. Survival rate in (RT+AI) is significantly superior to that in AI alone and in RT alone. Prognosis in patients with jaundice, hepatic or duodenal invasion is significantly inferior to those without the symptom, and in non-responded cases, to responded cases. Complications like hepatic abscess are seen in 4 cases at 6 months after treatment. Four actual case-reports are presented in details with their images. Combination of RT+AI is suggested to be of utility for AGC, of which multi-center trial is awaited with addition of newer anti-cancers developed recently. (K.T.)

  3. Concept and viability of androgen annihilation for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, James L

    2014-09-01

    There remains no standard of care for patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen level after radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy but who have no radiographic metastases, even though this is the second largest group of patients with prostate cancer (CaP) in the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) may cure some men with advanced CaP based on single-institution series and a randomized clinical trial of immediate versus delayed ADT for men found to have pelvic lymph node metastasis at the time of radical prostatectomy. ADT may be more effective when initiated for minimal disease burden, which can be detected using PSA after radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, and if more complete disruption of the androgen axis using newer agents decreases the chance that androgen-sensitive cells survive to adapt to a low-androgen environment. Androgens may be "annihilated" simultaneously using a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist or agonist to inhibit testicular production of testosterone, a P45017A1 (CYP17A1) inhibitor to diminish metabolism of testosterone via the adrenal pathway and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) via the backdoor pathway, a 5α-reductase (SRD5A) inhibitor to diminish testosterone reduction to DHT and backdoor metabolism of progesterone substrates to DHT, and a newer antiandrogen to compete better with DHT for the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain. Early initiation of androgen annihilation for induction as part of planned intermittent ADT should be safe, may reduce tumor burden below a threshold that allows eradication by the immune system, and may cure many men who have failed definitive local therapy. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  4. Advancement of mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies to explore triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Sayem; Banks, Charles A S; Adams, Mark K; Florens, Laurence; Lukong, Kiven E; Washburn, Michael P

    2016-12-20

    Understanding the complexity of cancer biology requires extensive information about the cancer proteome over the course of the disease. The recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies have led to the accumulation of an incredible amount of such proteomic information. This information allows us to identify protein signatures or protein biomarkers, which can be used to improve cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. For example, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has been used in breast cancer research for over two decades to elucidate protein function. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases with distinct molecular features that are reflected in tumour characteristics and clinical outcomes. Compared with all other subtypes of breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer is perhaps the most distinct in nature and heterogeneity. In this review, we provide an introductory overview of the application of advanced proteomic technologies to triple-negative breast cancer research.

  5. External beam radiotherapy alone in advanced esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Ja; Chung, Woong Ki; Nah, Byung Sik; Nam, Taek Keun [College of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    We performed the retrospective analysis to find the outcome of external beam radiotherapy alone in advanced esophageal cancer patients. One hundred and six patients treated with external beam radiotherapy alone between July 1990 and December 1996 were analyzed retrospectively. We limited the site of the lesions to the thoracic esophagus and cell type to the squamous cell carcinoma. Follow-up was completed in 100 patients (94%) and ranged from 1 month to 92 months (median; 6 months). The median age was 62 years old and male to female ratio was 104:2. Fifty-three percent was the middle thorax lesion and curative radiotherapy was performed in 83%. Mean tumor dose delivered with curative aim was 58.6 Gy (55-70.8 Gy) and median duration of the radiation therapy was days. The median survival of all patients was 6 months and 1-year and 2-year overall survival rate was 27% and 12%, respectively. Improvement of dysphagia was obtained in most patients except for 7 patients who underwent feeding gastrostomy. The complete response rate immediately after radiation therapy was 32% (34/106). The median survival and 2-year survival rate of the complete responder was 14 months and 30% respectively, while those of the nonresponder was 4 months and 0% respectively (p=0.000). The median survival and 2-year survival rate of the patients who could tolerate regular diet was 9 months and 16% while those of the patients who could not tolerate regular diet was 3 months and 0%, respectively (p=0.004). The survival difference between the patients with 5 cm or less tumor length and those with more than 5 cm tumor length was marginally statistically significant (p=0.06). However, the survival difference according to the periesophageal invasion or mediastinal lymphadenopathy in the chest CT imaging study was not statistically significant in this study. In a multivariate analysis, the statistically significant covariates to the survival were complete response to radiotherapy, tumor, length, and

  6. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Zy; Wu, Hong Gyun; Heo, Dae Seog; Park, Cham II

    2000-01-01

    To see the relationship between the response to chemotherapy and the final outcome of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. A retrospective analysis was done for thirty-two patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated in the Seoul National University Hospital with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy from August 1979 to July 1997. The patients were treated with Co-60 teletherapy unit or 4MV or 6MV photon beam produced by linear accelerator. Daily fractionation was 1.75 to 2 Gy, delivered five times a week. Total dose ranged from 60.8 Gy to 73.8 Gy. Twenty-nine patients received continuous infusion of cisplatin and 5-FU. Other patients were treated with cisplatin combined with bleomycin or vinblastin. Twenty-four (75%) patients received all three prescribed cycles of chemotherapy delivered three weeks apart. Six patients received two cycles, and two patients received only one cycle. The overall 2-year and 5-year survival rates are 65.6% and 43.0, respectively. 5-year local control rate is 34%. Organ preservation for more than five years is achieved in 12 patients (38%). After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 24 patients achieved more than partial remission (PR); the response rate was 75% (24/32). Five patients had complete remission (CR), 19 patients PR, and 8 patients no response (NR). Among the 19 patients who had PR to chemotherapy, 8 patients achieved CR after radiotherapy. Among the 8 non-responders to chemotherapy, 2 patients achieved CR, and 6 patients achieved PR after radiotherapy, There was no non-responder after radiotherapy. The overall survival rates were 60% for CR to chemotherapy group, 35.1 % for PR to chemotherapy group, and 50% for NR to chemotherapy group. respectively (p=0.93). There were significant difference in five-year overall survival rates between the patients with CR and PR after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (73.3% vs. 14.7%, p< 0.01). The prognostic

  7. Treatment results of incomplete chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ying Gao,1,* Fei Gao,2,* Zi Liu,1 Li-ping Song1 1Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China; 2Second Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Regimens that combine chemotherapy and radiotherapy increase toxicity and compromise a patient’s ability to adhere to the treatment plan. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of a partially completed chemoradiation regimen prescribed for locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix. Methods: Medical records of 156 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer stage IIB–IVA who received chemoradiation with cisplatin (40 mg/m2 and 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 from October 2006 to October 2008 were collected. The treatment protocol called for two cycles of chemotherapy. External beam radiation therapy was administered using a 10-MeV electron beam. Local control, disease free survival, overall survival, and toxicities were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, 89 patients (57% completed the planned protocol. Sixty seven patients (43% completed fewer than two cycles. The 3-year local control rate was significantly better in the patient group that completed the prescribed plan (92.1% compared to 80.6%; P = 0.033. No statistical significance was observed between the groups that completed or did not complete the two cycle protocol with regard to disease free survival (80.9% and 73.2%, respectively; P = 0.250, overall survival (84.3% and 79.1%; P = 0.405, and progression survival (3.4% and 3.0%; P = 0.892. Differences in acute hematologic toxicity and subcutaneous toxicity were observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Completion of two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin with radiotherapy was effective, safe, and responsible for better local control

  8. New developments in chemotherapy of advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, D E; Canetta, R

    1999-01-01

    Anthracyclines and taxanes are the two most active classes of chemotherapy for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. Recent studies have investigated combination therapy including doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel. The efficacy of this combination has been established in a phase III study conducted by ECOG, comparing Dox/paclitaxel versus Dox versus paclitaxel. The combination is superior to Dox or paclitaxel with respect to response rate and time to disease progression, indicating that the combination provides a new standard for the first line treatment of metastatic breast cancer [1]. Phase II studies using higher doses of Dox and using shorter infusions of paclitaxel have suggested the combination can be further optimized; Gianni reported a 94% objective response rate using Dox 60 mg/m2 followed by paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 given over three hours [2]. The more active regimens are associated with enhanced cardiotoxicity; this toxicity can be avoided, however, by limiting the exposure to doxorubicin. The newer regimens have now been moved into phase III studies. Future progress for this disease will depend on the introduction of new agents. Two novel drugs are currently being investigated in randomised phase III trials as potentiators of Dox and/or paclitaxel. One is a monoclonal antibody from Genentech (Herceptin, trastuzumab) directed at the HER-2/neu oncogene, which is overexpressed in > 25% of breast cancers [3]. Recent results indicate that Herceptin in combination with paclitaxel (or with a Dox plus cyclophosphamide regimen) induces a higher response rate (RR) and prolongs the time to disease progression when compared to chemotherapy alone. The second agent N,N-diethyl-2[4-(phenylmethyl)-phenoxy] ethanamine.HCl (DPPE, BMS-217380-01), when combined with Dox, was associated with a higher RR than previously observed with Dox alone [4]. A randomized trial of Dox versus Dox plus DPPE is ongoing. The possible mechanisms underlying chemo-potentiation by these agents

  9. Yoga as palliation in women with advanced cancer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Tracey; Quinlan, Elizabeth; Robertson, Susan; Duggleby, Wendy; Thomas, Roanne; Holtslander, Lorraine

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the palliative potential of home-based yoga sessions provided to women with advanced cancer. Personalised 45-minute yoga sessions were offered to three women with advanced cancer by an experienced yoga teacher. Each woman took part in a one-to-one interview after the completion of the yoga programme and was asked to describe her experiences of the programme's impact. The personalised nature of the yoga sessions resulted in similar positive physical and psychosocial effects comparable to those demonstrated in other studies with cancer patients. Participants described physical, mental, and emotional benefits as well as the alleviation of illness impacts. The enhancement of mind-body and body-spirit connections were also noted. Personalised home-based yoga programmes for people with advanced cancer may produce similar benefits, including palliation, as those institutionally-based programmes for people with non-advanced cancer.

  10. Pain experiences of patients with advanced cancer: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ozgul; Unsar, Serap; Yacan, Lale; Pelin, Meryem; Kurt, Seda; Erdogan, Bülent

    2018-04-01

    Uncontrolled pain, especially in patients with advanced cancer, affects quality of life negatively and causes negative physical and psychological conditions. The aim of this study was to explore the pain experiences of patients with advanced cancer and how they manage with pain, and to present a view of pain management approaches of nurses from the perspectives of the patients. This was a qualitative descriptive study of sixteen hospitalized patients with advanced cancer. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with patients. Data were analysed by Colaizzi's phenomenological method. This study found that patients with advanced cancer who had pain experienced anxiety, helplessness, hopelessness and many restrictions in daily life as well as inability to manage with pain. Most of the patients with advanced cancer were not satisfied with their nursing care with regard to pain management. The themes that emerged were pain perception and experiences, effects of pain on daily life, pain management and management strategies and the patients' perspectives about nursing approaches to pain. This study demonstrated the difficulties of patients with advanced cancer who experienced pain in their daily lives, yet lack pain management strategies. Furthermore, nurses' caring approaches to patients with advanced cancer who experienced pain was found inadequate. Oncology nurses should provide educational interventions in order to enhance knowledge and skills about pain assessment and non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies used in pain management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cancer of the Pancreas: Molecular Pathways and Current Advancement in Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polireddy, Kishore; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers among all malignances, with a median overall survival of cancers harbor a variety of genetic alternations that render it difficult to treat even with targeted therapy. Recent studies revealed that pancreatic cancers are highly enriched with a cancer stem cell (CSC) population, which is resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs, and therefore escapes chemotherapy and promotes tumor recurrence. Cancer cell epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is highly associated with metastasis, generation of CSCs, and treatment resistance in pancreatic cancer. Reviewed here are the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer, the major signaling pathways regulating pancreatic cancer EMT and CSCs, and the advancement in current clinical and experimental treatments for pancreatic cancer.

  12. Characterization of low active ghrelin ratio in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Tomofumi; Mitsunaga, Shuichi; Ikeda, Masafumi; Ohno, Izumi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Suzuki, Hidetaka; Irisawa, Ai; Kuwata, Takeshi; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2018-05-18

    Acyl ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide. Active ghrelin ratio, the ratio of acyl ghrelin to total ghrelin, has an important role in physiological functions and gastrointestinal symptoms. However, low active ghrelin ratio-related characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms, and chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have not been previously evaluated. The goal of this study was to identify low active ghrelin ratio-related factors in treatment-naïve advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Patients with treatment-naïve advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible for inclusion in this study. Active ghrelin ratio and clinical parameters of patients were prospectively recorded. Factors correlated with low active ghrelin ratio and survival were analyzed. In total, 92 patients were analyzed. Low active ghrelin ratio-related factors were advanced age (P advanced pancreatic cancer.

  13. Advances in mass spectrometry-based cancer research and analysis: from cancer proteomics to clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, John F; Hale, Oliver J; Cramer, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The last 20 years have seen significant improvements in the analytical capabilities of biological mass spectrometry (MS). Studies using advanced MS have resulted in new insights into cell biology and the etiology of diseases as well as its use in clinical applications. This review discusses recent developments in MS-based technologies and their cancer-related applications with a focus on proteomics. It also discusses the issues around translating the research findings to the clinic and provides an outline of where the field is moving. Expert commentary: Proteomics has been problematic to adapt for the clinical setting. However, MS-based techniques continue to demonstrate potential in novel clinical uses beyond classical cancer proteomics.

  14. Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Locher, Julie L.; Nabell, Lisle M.; Carroll, William R.; Magnuson, J. Scott; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia. Methods and Materials: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture. Results: A composite dysphagia outcome occurred in 38.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia. The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia. Early intervention using swallowing exercises, avoidance of nothing-by-mouth periods, and the use of intensity-modulated RT to reduce the dose to the uninvolved swallowing structures should be explored further in populations at greater risk of long-term dysphagia

  15. A Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Androgen Receptor Signaling Inhibitors Repress Prostate Cancer Growth by Downregulating Androgen Receptor Splice Variants, EZH2, and Src. Cancer ...research 2015;75(24):5309-17. 18. Wadosky KM, Koochekpour S. Androgen receptor splice variants and prostate cancer : From bench to bedside. Oncotarget...2017;8(11):18550-76. 19. Cao S, Zhan Y, Dong Y. Emerging data on androgen receptor splice variants in prostate cancer . Endocrine-related cancer

  16. The role of cisplatin in chemotherapy of advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurga, L; Misurova, E; Kovac, V [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Teaching Hospital, 04190 Kosice (Slovak Republic); Sevcikova, L [Department of Radiotherapy, Postgraduate School of Medicine, 81259 Bratislava (Slovak Republic)

    1994-12-31

    Cisplatin containing regimes as first-time, second-time or as third-line chemotherapy were administered in 26 and 36 patients, respectively. The overall response rate in patients on first-line chemotherapy was 53.9 %, in patients on on second or third-line chemotherapy 30.6 %. The differences both in overall and disease-free survival between patients on first-line and on second/third-line chemotherapy were statistically significant in favor of women treated with first-line chemotherapy (p = 0.05). Hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were mild to moderate and were more pronounced in patients on second and third-line chemotherapy. The overall response date, disease-free survival and overall survival were significantly better and longer in the group of patients treated with `bolus` cisplatin in comparison to the group of patients treated with continuous venous infusion cisplatin. Our results confirm the activity of cisplatin-containing regimes (mainly CAP schedules) in patients with advanced breast cancer not only as first-line therapy but also in heavily pretreated patients by chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy and endocrine manipulation. (author) 10 tabs., 21 refs.

  17. Accelerated fractionation radiotherapy for advanced haed and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, D.S.; Spry, N.A.; Gray, A.J.; Johnson, A.D.; Alexander, S.R.; Dally, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Between 1981 and 1986, 89 patients with advanced head and neck squamous cancer were treated with a continuous accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AFRT) regimen. Three fractions of 1.80 Gy, 4 h apart, were given on three treatment days per week, and the tumour dose was taken to 59.40 Gy in 33 fractions in 24-25 days. Acute mucosal reactions were generally quite severe, but a split was avoided by providing the patient with intensive support, often as an in-patient, until the reactions settled. Late radiation effects have been comparable to those obtained with conventional fractionation. The probability of local-regional control was 47% at 3 years for 69 previously untreated patients, whereas it was only 12% at one year for 20 patients treated for recurrence after radical surgery. Fifty-eight previously untreated patients with tumours arising in the upper aero-digestive tract were analysed in greated detail. The probability of local-regional control at 3 years was 78% for 17 Stage III patients and 15% for 31 Stage IV patients. This schedule of continuous AFRT is feasible and merits further investigation. (author). 31 refs.; 4 figs.; 6 tabs

  18. Results of irradiation therapy for advanced uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Haruo; Asakawa, Hiroshi; Otawa, Hirokazu; Nemoto, Kenji; Saito, Hiroyuki

    1983-01-01

    152 patients with advanced uterine cervical cancer (76 in stage III, 47 in stage IV and 29 in recurrence) were treated at Miyagi Seijinbyo Center in fifteen years (1967-1981). Our standard treatment was a combined therapy of 6 MVX ray whole pelvis irradiation and intracavitary radium irradiation (or simple total hysterectomy) The actuarial 5-year-survival rate was 46.0% in stage III, 9.4% in stage IV and 10.3% in recurrence. In stage III, the actuarial 5-year-survival rate in nine cases with external irradiation alone was (22.2%), in 44 cases with intracavitary irradiation and external irradiation 48.7%; in 14 cases with operation and external irradiation 57.1%. No five year survival was found in nine interrupted-irradation cases. Moderate complications in the rectum and/or the urinary bladder were found in eight of 67 (12%) irradiation-completed patients in stage III. Five 5-year-survival cases (two in stage IV and three in recurrence) were reported. (author)

  19. New players for advanced prostate cancer and the rationalisation of insulin-sensitising medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Jennifer H; Sarkar, Phoebe L; Lubik, Amy A; Nelson, Colleen C

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are recognised risk factors for the development of some cancers and, increasingly, predict more aggressive disease, treatment failure, and cancer-specific mortality. Many factors may contribute to this clinical observation. Hyperinsulinaemia, dyslipidaemia, hypoxia, ER stress, and inflammation associated with expanded adipose tissue are thought to be among the main culprits driving malignant growth and cancer advancement. This observation has led to the proposal of the potential utility of "old players" for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome as new cancer adjuvant therapeutics. Androgen-regulated pathways drive proliferation, differentiation, and survival of benign and malignant prostate tissue. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) exploits this dependence to systemically treat advanced prostate cancer resulting in anticancer response and improvement of cancer symptoms. However, the initial therapeutic response from ADT eventually progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which is currently incurable. ADT rapidly induces hyperinsulinaemia which is associated with more rapid treatment failure. We discuss current observations of cancer in the context of obesity, diabetes, and insulin-lowering medication. We provide an update on current treatments for advanced prostate cancer and discuss whether metabolic dysfunction, developed during ADT, provides a unique therapeutic window for rapid translation of insulin-sensitising medication as combination therapy with antiandrogen targeting agents for the management of advanced prostate cancer.

  20. Efficacies of 125I seed implantation in advanced stage central lung cancer via fibrobronchoscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianguo; An Liqing; Cheng Jinguang; Zhang Yufen; Guo Xiaokui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the temporal curative effect of 125 I seed implantation in advanced stage central type lung cancer. Methods: 125 I seed was implanted in 56 patients confirmed advanced stage central type lung cancer via fibrobronchoscope and all cases were fellow up in certain duration to explore their efficacies and the adverse reaction. Results: Total efficient rate was 76.78% in 56 patients. Lung reexpanded rate was 90.90%. Conclusion: The therapy of 125 I seed implantation in advanced stage central type lung cancer is safe and available. (authors)

  1. Randomized phase II study of paclitaxel/carboplatin intercalated with gefitinib compared to paclitaxel/carboplatin alone for chemotherapy-naïve non-small cell lung cancer in a clinically selected population excluding patients with non-smoking adenocarcinoma or mutated EGFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Ji; Lee, Dae Ho; Choi, Chang Min; Lee, Jung Shin; Lee, Seung Jin; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kim, Sang-We

    2015-01-01

    Considering cell cycle dependent cytotoxicity, intercalation of chemotherapy and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) may be a treatment option in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This randomized phase 2 study compared the efficacy of paclitaxel and carboplatin (PC) intercalated with gefitinib (G) versus PC alone in a selected, chemotherapy-naïve population of advanced NSCLC patients with a history of smoking or wild-type EGFR. Eligible patients were chemotherapy-naïve advanced NSCLC patients with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0—2. Non-smoking patients with adenocarcinoma or patients with activating EGFR mutation were excluded because they could benefit from gefitinib alone. Eligible patients were randomized to one of the following treatment arms: PCG, P 175 mg/m 2 , and C AUC 5 administered intravenously on day 1 intercalated with G 250 mg orally on days 2 through 15 every 3 weeks for four cycles followed by G 250 mg orally until progressive disease; or PC, same dosing schedule for four cycles only. The primary endpoint was the objective response rate (ORR), and the secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity profile. A total of 90 patients participated in the study. The ORRs were 41.9 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 27.0–57.9 %) for the PCG arm and 39.5 % (95 % CI 25.0–55.6 %) for the PC arm (P = 0.826). No differences in PFS (4.1 vs. 4.1 months, P = 0.781) or OS (9.3 vs. 10.5 months, P = 0.827) were observed between the PCG and PC arms. Safety analyses showed a similar incidence of drug-related grade 3/4 toxicity. Rash and pruritus were more frequent in the PCG than in the PC arm. PCG did not improve ORR, PFS, and OS compared to PC chemotherapy alone for NSCLC in a clinically selected population excluding non-smoking adenocarcinoma or mutated EGFR. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01196234). Registration date is 08/09/2010

  2. Natural Products as Adjunctive Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer: Recent Trends and Advancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxi Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a type of common malignant tumors with high occurrence in the world. Most patients presented in clinic had pancreatic cancer at advanced stages. Furthermore, chemotherapy or radiotherapy had very limited success in treating pancreatic cancer. Complementary and alternative medicines, such as natural products/herbal medicines, represent exciting adjunctive therapies. In this review, we summarize the recent advances of using natural products/herbal medicines, such as Chinese herbal medicine, in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents to treat pancreatic cancer in preclinical and clinical trials.

  3. Racial/Ethnic, socioeconomic, and geographic disparities of cervical cancer advanced-stage diagnosis in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, F Benjamin; Lin, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Advanced-stage diagnosis is among the primary causes of mortality among cervical cancer patients. With the wide use of Pap smear screening, cervical cancer advanced-stage diagnosis rates have decreased. However, disparities of advanced-stage diagnosis persist among different population groups. A challenging task in cervical cancer disparity reduction is to identify where underserved population groups are. Based on cervical cancer incidence data between 1995 and 2008, this study investigated advanced-stage cervical cancer disparities in Texas from three social domains: Race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), and geographic location. Effects of individual and contextual factors, including age, tumor grade, race/ethnicity, as well as contextual SES, spatial access to health care, sociocultural factors, percentage of African Americans, and insurance expenditures, on these disparities were examined using multilevel logistic regressions. Significant variations by race/ethnicity and SES were found in cervical cancer advanced-stage diagnosis. We also found a decline in racial/ethnic disparities of advanced cervical cancer diagnosis rate from 1995 to 2008. However, the progress was slower among African Americans than Hispanics. Geographic disparities could be explained by age, race/ethnicity, SES, and the percentage of African Americans in a census tract. Our findings have important implications for developing effective cervical cancer screening and control programs. We identified the location of underserved populations who need the most assistance with cervical cancer screening. Cervical cancer intervention programs should target Hispanics and African Americans, as well as individuals from communities with lower SES in geographic areas where higher advanced-stage diagnosis rates were identified in this study. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel Antiangiogenic/Cytotoxic Therapies for Advanced Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fett, James

    2000-01-01

    .... In order to evaluate whether these inhibitors may be useful for treating breast cancer, we have during the grant period developed mouse models for both primary and metastatic growth of human breast cancer cells...

  5. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  6. Organoid cultures derived from patients with advanced prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Dong; Vela, Ian; Sboner, Andrea; Iaquinta, Phillip J; Karthaus, Wouter R; Gopalan, Anuradha; Dowling, Catherine; Wanjala, Jackline N; Undvall, Eva A; Arora, Vivek K; Wongvipat, John; Kossai, Myriam; Ramazanoglu, Sinan; Barboza, Luendreo P; Di, Wei; Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Qi Fan; Sirota, Inna; Ran, Leili; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Beltran, Himisha; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Touijer, Karim A; Scardino, Peter T; Laudone, Vincent P; Curtis, Kristen R; Rathkopf, Dana E; Morris, Michael J; Danila, Daniel C; Slovin, Susan F; Solomon, Stephen B; Eastham, James A; Chi, Ping; Carver, Brett; Rubin, Mark A; Scher, Howard I; Clevers, Hans; Sawyers, Charles L; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The lack of in vitro prostate cancer models that recapitulate the diversity of human prostate cancer has hampered progress in understanding disease pathogenesis and therapy response. Using a 3D organoid system, we report success in long-term culture of prostate cancer from biopsy specimens and

  7. Advanced research on separating prostate cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Yumei; He Xin; Song Naling

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignant tumor in male urinary system,and may easily develop into the hormone refractory prostate cancer which can hardly be cured. Recent studies had found that the prostate cancer stem cells may be the source of the prostate cancer's occurrence,development, metastasis and recurrence. The therapy targeting the prostate cancer stem cells may be the effective way to cure prostate cancer. But these cells is too low to be detected. The difficulty lies in the low separation efficiency of prostate cancer stem cell, so the effectively separating prostate cancer stem cells occupied the main position for the more in-depth research of prostate cancer stem cells. This paper reviews the research progress and existing problems on the several main separating methods of prostate cancer stem cells, includes the fluorescence activated cells sorting and magnetic activated cells sorting based on prostate cancer stem cell surface markers, the side-population sorting and serum-free medium sphere forming sorting based on prostate cancer stem cell's biology. (authors)

  8. Continuous palliative sedation for patients with advanced cancer at a tertiary care cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Bernard Lobato; Gomes, Diogo Bugano Diniz; Usón Júnior, Pedro Luiz Serrano; Taranto, Patricia; França, Monique Sedlmaier; Eiger, Daniel; Mariano, Rodrigo Coutinho; Hui, David; Del Giglio, Auro

    2018-01-04

    Palliative sedation (PS) is an intervention to treat refractory symptoms and to relieve suffering at the end of life. Its prevalence and practice patterns vary widely worldwide. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency, clinical indications and outcomes of PS in advanced cancer patients admitted to our tertiary comprehensive cancer center. We retrospectively studied the use of PS in advanced cancer patients who died between March 1st, 2012 and December 31st, 2014. PS was defined as the use of continuous infusion of midazolam or neuroleptics for refractory symptoms in the end of life. This study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of our institution (project number 2481-15). During the study period, 552 cancer patients died at the institution and 374 met the inclusion criteria for this study. Main reason for exclusion was death in the Intensive Care Unit. Among all included patients, 54.2% (n = 203) received PS. Patients who received PS as compared to those not sedated were younger (67.8 vs. 76.4 years-old, p sedation were dyspnea (55%) and delirium (19.7%) and the most common drugs used were midazolam (52.7%) or midazolam and a neuroleptic (39.4%). Median initial midazolam infusion rate was 0.75 mg/h (interquartile range - IQR - 0.6-1.5) and final rate was 1.5 mg/h (IQR 0.9-3.0). Patient survival (length of hospital stay from admission to death) of those who had PS was more than the double of those who did not (33.6 days vs 16 days, p palliative care team was involved in the care of 12% (n = 25) of sedated patients. PS is a relatively common practice in the end-of-life of cancer patients at our hospital and it is not associated with shortening of hospital stay. Involvement of a dedicated palliative care team is strongly recommended if this procedure is being considered. Further research is needed to identify factors that may affect the frequency and outcomes associated with PS.

  9. A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2004-01-01

    The tasks that were originally planned for the first year of this 3 year project are to demonstrate that the fusogenic oncolytic herpes simplex viruses are potent anti-tumor agents for advanced ovarian cancer...

  10. Combination of retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and Seldinger method in locally advanced oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Uehara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonsurgical strategies for locally advanced oral cancer are desirable. Superselective intra-arterial infusion with radiotherapy was utilized for this purpose, and there are two types of superselective intra-arterial infusion methods: The Seldinger method and the retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy (HFT method. In one case, the HFT method was applied to locally advanced tongue cancer, and the Seldinger method was used for additional administration of cisplatin (CDDP to compensate for a lack of drug flow in the HFT method. In another case, the HFT method was applied to locally advanced lower gingival cancer. The Seldinger method was applied to metastatic lymph nodes. In both cases, additional administration of CDDP using the Seldinger method resulted in a complete response. The combination of the HFT and Seldinger methods was useful to eradicate locally advanced oral cancer because each method compensated for the defects of the other.

  11. Phase 1 Study of CK-301 as a Single Agent in Subjects With Advanced Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-02

    Lung Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; Carcinoma, Small Cell; Malignant Mesothelioma, Advanced; Head and Neck Cancer; Melanoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Urothelial Carcinoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

  12. Case Report: Locally advanced skin cancer in an albino, a treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Report: Locally advanced skin cancer in an albino ... headache, anorexia, weight loss, night sweats, dizziness, change in ... This was the case with our patient, whose five ... We need more interventional studies in treatment of locally.

  13. Advanced esophageal cancer and esophageal stenosis endoscopic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piazze, A. E mail: apiazze@hc.edu.uy

    2005-01-01

    Advanced esophageal cancer (AEC) is diagnosed during those stages in which surgery is possible, it is palliative for disphagia, with high morbimortality.In inoperable or irresectable cases, resorting to alternative treatment such as radiotherapy or endoscopy may palliate dsphagia.Endoscopically it is possible to place a transtumoral nasogastric catheter (NGC) for preoperative nutrition or branchial therapy (intratumoral iridium).It is possible to dilate the tumor and place and indwelling plastic or auto expandable prosthesis or to inject absolute intratumoral alcohol.There is and evaluation of results and morbimortality of personal case material through the retrospective study of 54 patients in whom 120 procedures such as those referred to above were carried out.The series includes 41 men and 13 women (3-1), 79.5% of which were of ages between 61 and 90.Optic fiber endoscopes or video endoscopes, coaxial dilators, hydro-pneumatic balloons, metallic guides and non industrial and autoexpandable plastic prosthesis were used; 34.1% of procedures were performed under used; 34.1% of procedures were performed under radioscopy.Eleven patient (8 for nutritional purposes and 3 for brachiotherapy)form part of Groups 1 and 2 of NGC.Group 3 consist of:dilations of radicular stenosis with or without neopasic recurrence, or neoplasic infiltration of esophagus, 6 patient; Group 4: 14 patients for the purpose of dilation of esophageal neoplasm; Group 5:prosthesis, 12 patients; Group 6: 11 patients with anastomotic stenosis.In patients in Group 1-2-3 solution was achieved.In Group 3 there was 1 perforation.In Group 4, out of 14 patient 13 were dilated.In Group 5 it proved impossible to place prosthesis in 2 patient, (3.7%).The conclusion arrived at is that various endoscopic techniques may palliate disphagia in patient with AEC, collaborate with preoperative nutrition through enteral path, with brachioterapy or by treating post surgical stenosis, with low mortality

  14. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icro Meattini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6% underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4% did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (range 2–16 for the whole cohort, median time to locoregional recurrence (LRR was 3.3 years (range 0.7–12.4. The 5-year and 10-year actuarial LRR rate were 14.5% and 15.9%, respectively. At the multivariate analysis the factors that significantly correlated with survival outcome were ≥4 positive nodes (HR 5.0, 1.51–16.52; P=0.035, extracapsular extension (HR 2.18, 1.37–3.46; P=0.009, and estrogen receptor positive disease (HR 0.57, 0.36–0.90; P=0.003. Concerning LRR according to use of radiation, PMRT reduced LRR for patient with clinical T3 staged disease (P=0.015. Our experience confirmed the impact of pathological nodal involvement on survival outcome. PMRT was found to improve local control in patients presenting with clinical T3 tumors, regardless of the response to chemotherapy.

  15. Symptoms and problems in a nationally representative sample of advanced cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Pedersen, Lise

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the need for palliative care among advanced cancer patients who are not in specialist palliative care. The purpose was to identify prevalence and predictors of symptoms and problems in a nationally representative sample of Danish advanced cancer patients. Patients with cancer...... or not were associated with several symptoms and problems. This is probably the first nationally representative study of its kind. It shows that advanced cancer patients in Denmark have symptoms and problems that deserve attention and that some patient groups are especially at risk....... predictors. In total, 977 (60%) patients participated. The most frequent symptoms/problems were fatigue (57%; severe 22%) followed by reduced role function, insomnia and pain. Age, cancer stage, primary tumour, type of department, marital status and whether the patient had recently been hospitalized...

  16. Clinical Cancer Advances 2018: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymach, John; Krilov, Lada; Alberg, Anthony; Baxter, Nancy; Chang, Susan Marina; Corcoran, Ryan; Dale, William; DeMichele, Angela; Magid Diefenbach, Catherine S; Dreicer, Robert; Epstein, Andrew S; Gillison, Maura L; Graham, David L; Jones, Joshua; Ko, Andrew H; Lopez, Ana Maria; Maki, Robert G; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Schilsky, Richard L; Sznol, Mario; Westin, Shannon Neville; Burstein, Harold

    2018-04-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I remember when ASCO first conceived of publishing an annual report on the most transformative research occurring in cancer care. Thirteen reports later, the progress we have chronicled is remarkable, and this year is no different. The research featured in ASCO's Clinical Cancer Advances 2018 report underscores the impressive gains in our understanding of cancer and in our ability to tailor treatments to tumors' genetic makeup. The ASCO 2018 Advance of the Year, adoptive cell immunotherapy, allows clinicians to genetically reprogram patients' own immune cells to find and attack cancer cells throughout the body. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy-a type of adoptive cell immunotherapy-has led to remarkable results in young patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in adults with lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Researchers are also exploring this approach in other types of cancer. This advance would not be possible without robust federal investment in cancer research. The first clinical trial of CAR T-cell therapy in children with ALL was funded, in part, by grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and researchers at the NCI Center for Cancer Research were the first to report on possible CAR T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma. These discoveries follow decades of prior research on immunology and cancer biology, much of which was supported by federal dollars. In fact, many advances that are highlighted in the 2018 Clinical Cancer Advances report were made possible thanks to our nation's support for biomedical research. Funding from the US National Institutes of Health and the NCI helps researchers pursue critical patient care questions and addresses vital, unmet needs that private industry has little incentive to take on. Federally supported cancer research generates the biomedical innovations that fuel the development and availability of new and improved treatments for patients. We need sustained federal

  17. 24 CFR 3280.7 - Excluded structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded structures. 3280.7 Section... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS General § 3280.7 Excluded structures. Certain structures may be excluded from these Standards as modular homes under 24 CFR 3282.12. [52 FR 4581, Feb. 12...

  18. 42 CFR 409.49 - Excluded services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital Insurance § 409.49 Excluded services. (a... individual's dialysis, are excluded from coverage under the Medicare home health benefit. (f) Prosthetic... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded services. 409.49 Section 409.49 Public...

  19. Adjuvant hysterectomy after radiochemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hass, Peter [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Magdeburg (Germany); Eggemann, Holm; Costa, Serban Dan; Ignatov, Atanas [Otto-von-Guericke University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with concomitant chemotherapy (cCT) (=RCT) plus intracavitary (±interstitial) brachytherapy (iBT) is standard of care for advanced cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate morbidity and survival outcome of simple adjuvant hysterectomy (AH) after EBRT/cCT and to compare it with the standard treatment. Patients with FIGO stage III cervical cancer were treated with EBRT/cCT and then divided in two groups: group 1 was further treated with standard intracavitary/interstitial BT, while group 2 underwent AH. From 881 women with cervical cancer, 248 were eligible for analysis: 161 received iBT and 87 underwent AH. The median follow-up of the study was 53 months. Clinical and pathological characteristics were well balanced in the two groups. After EBRT/cCT, complete clinical response was observed in 121 (48.8%) of 246 patients. Clinical complete response was observed in 81 (50.3%) of 161 patients in group 1. At 6 weeks after EBRT/cCT, 40 (46.0%) of 87 patients in the surgery group had pathological complete response. Intra- and postoperative complications were observed in 10 (11.5%) of 87 cases. The rates of locoregional recurrence and metastasis were similar in both groups. Progression-free (PFS) and disease-specific overall survival (DOS) for these patients were similar between the control and surgery group. Interestingly, PFS and DOS were significantly improved by AH for the patients with residual tumor. AH could improve survival in patients with residual disease after RCT and is characterized by a low complication rate. (orig.) [German] Die Teletherapie (EBRT) mit begleitender Chemotherapie (cCT), entsprechend einer Radiochemotherapie (RCT), plus intrakavitaere (± interstitielle) Brachytherapie (iBT) ist Standard in der Behandlung des fortgeschrittenen Zervixkarzinoms. Ziel dieser Studie war es, die Morbiditaet und das Ueberleben zwischen der einfachen adjuvanten Hysterektomie (AH) nach EBRT/cCT und dem

  20. Nutrition impact symptoms in advanced cancer patients: frequency and specific interventions, a case?control study

    OpenAIRE

    Omlin, Aurelius; Blum, David; Wierecky, Jan; Haile, Sarah R.; Ottery, Faith D.; Strasser, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Background Involuntary weight loss (IWL) is frequent in advanced cancer patients causing compromised anticancer treatment outcomes and function. Cancer cachexia is influenced by nutrition impact symptoms (NIS). The aim of this study was to explore the frequency of NIS in advanced patients and to assess specific interventions guided by a 12-item NIS checklist. Methods Consecutive patients from an outpatient nutrition-fatigue clinic completed the NIS checklist. The NIS checklist was developed b...

  1. Advances in targeting strategies for nanoparticles in cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yhee, Ji Young; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2014-11-21

    In the last decade, nanoparticles have offered great advances in diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery. In particular, nanoparticles have provided remarkable progress in cancer imaging and therapy based on materials science and biochemical engineering technology. Researchers constantly attempted to develop the nanoparticles which can deliver drugs more specifically to cancer cells, and these efforts brought the advances in the targeting strategy of nanoparticles. This minireview will discuss the progress in targeting strategies for nanoparticles focused on the recent innovative work for nanomedicine.

  2. Do advanced cancer patients in Denmark receive the help they need?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Pedersen, Lise

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the adequacy of help delivered by the healthcare system for 12 symptoms/problems in a national, randomly selected sample of advanced cancer patients in Denmark.......The aim of the study was to investigate the adequacy of help delivered by the healthcare system for 12 symptoms/problems in a national, randomly selected sample of advanced cancer patients in Denmark....

  3. Recent advances in high-throughput molecular marker identification for superficial and invasive bladder cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Zieger, Karsten; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2007-01-01

    individually contributed to the management of the disease. However, the development of high-throughput techniques for simultaneous assessment of a large number of markers has allowed classification of tumors into clinically relevant molecular subgroups beyond those possible by pathological classification. Here......Bladder cancer is the fifth most common neoplasm in industrialized countries. Due to frequent recurrences of the superficial form of this disease, bladder cancer ranks as one of the most common cancers. Despite the description of a large number of tumor markers for bladder cancers, none have......, we review the recent advances in high-throughput molecular marker identification for superficial and invasive bladder cancers....

  4. Prognosis in advanced lung cancer--A prospective study examining key clinicopathological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Claribel P; Koinis, Filippos; Fallon, Marie T; Fearon, Kenneth C; Bowden, Jo; Solheim, Tora S; Gronberg, Bjorn Henning; McMillan, Donald C; Gioulbasanis, Ioannis; Laird, Barry J

    2015-06-01

    In patients with advanced incurable lung cancer deciding as to the most appropriate treatment (e.g., chemotherapy or supportive care only) is challenging. In such patients the TNM classification system has reached its ceiling therefore other factors are used to assess prognosis and as such, guide treatment. Performance status (PS), weight loss and inflammatory biomarkers (Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS)) predict survival in advanced lung cancer however these have not been compared. This study compares key prognostic factors in advanced lung cancer. Patients with newly diagnosed advanced lung cancer were recruited and demographics, weight loss, other prognostic factors (mGPS, PS) were collected. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods were used to compare these prognostic factors. 390 patients with advanced incurable lung cancer were recruited; 341 were male, median age was 66 years (IQR 59-73) and patients had stage IV non-small cell (n=288) (73.8%) or extensive stage small cell lung cancer (n=102) (26.2%). The median survival was 7.8 months. On multivariate analysis only performance status (HR 1.74 CI 1.50-2.02) and mGPS (HR 1.67, CI 1.40-2.00) predicted survival (padvanced lung cancer. In combination, these improved survival prediction compared with either alone. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Palliative care in advanced cancer patients in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Bisht

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Advanced cancer, irrespective of the site of the cancer, is characterized by a number of associated symptoms that impair the quality of life of patients. The management of these symptoms guides palliative care. The present study aims to describe the symptoms and appropriate palliation provided in patients with advanced cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 100 patients with advanced cancer were included in the study. The data obtained from the patients included symptoms reported by the patients, currently prescribed treatments and the site of cancer. Results: The average number of symptoms reported per patient was 5.33 ± 0.67 (mean ± SE. The most common symptoms were pain, weakness/fatigue, anorexia, insomnia, nausea/vomiting, dyspnea, constipation and cough. Polypharmacy was frequent. Patients consumed approximately 8.7 ± 0.38 (mean ± SE drugs on average during the 2-month period of follow-up. Conclusion: The result gives insight into the varied symptomatology of patients with advanced cancer. Polypharmacy was quite common in patients with advanced cancer, predisposing them to complicated drug interactions and adverse drug reactions.

  6. Patient perceptions of helpful communication in the context of advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajduhar, Kelli I; Thorne, Sally E; McGuinness, Liza; Kim-Sing, Charmaine

    2010-07-01

    Based on a secondary analysis of data from a large qualitative study on cancer care communication, we address the question: what do patients with advanced cancer identify as helpful in their communication encounters with health care providers? Communication is of critical importance to the care of patients with advanced cancer. A better understanding of what such patients identify as helpful in their communication encounters with nurses and other health care providers seems critical to creating evidence-informed recommendations for best practices. Secondary analysis of qualitative interview data. Data from 18 participants interviewed individually and 16 focus group participants, with advanced cancer in the palliative phase of care. Interpretive description methodology informed data collection and analysis. Findings suggest four key elements are critically important to consider in communications with patients in an advanced or palliative phase - respecting the importance of time, demonstrating caring, acknowledging fear and balancing hope and honesty in the provision of information. Communication is an important element in the provision of advanced cancer care. Findings emphasise the complex meanings inherent in cancer care communication and identify central themes that are fundamental to effective cancer care communication. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Usefulness of CT-angiography for superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for advanced head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Junkichi [Iwaki Kyoritu General Hospital, Fukushima (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Eighteen N3 cases, fourteen skullbase invasion cases and twenty-six cases of paranasal sinus cancer with orbital invasion were treated by superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy using cisplatin (CDDP) and sodium thiosulfate to preserve the organs and to improve poor prognosis. In these patients, 100-150 mg/m{sup 2} of CDDP was administered weekly to each feeding artery of the tumor superselectively at 5 mg/m. CT-arteriography (CTA) was used to diagnosis all feeding arteries of advanced cancers before infusing CDDP. Twenty-three of 26 cases with orbital invasion were treated with preservation of the eyeball. In three cases with extirpation of the eyeball CTA was not used in the treatment, and CDDP was infused into only the maxillary artery excluding the transverse facial artery. In skullbase invasion cases, the number of complete responses (CR) was 8/14, and that of partial responses (PR) was 6/14. Feeding arteries originating from the external carotid artery were found in 10 of all 14 cases by CTA, and four cases in which blood supply was from both carotid arteries were all anterior skullbase invasion cases. Ten cases with superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy originating from only the external carotid artery were significantly better responders than four cases originating from both carotid arteries. In N3 cases, feeding arteries were found in more than three arteries by CTA and the overall survival rate was 55%, calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. CTA is a very efficient method for diagnosing all feeding arteries of advanced cancers in the superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. (author)

  8. Usefulness of CT-angiography for superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Junkichi

    2002-01-01

    Eighteen N3 cases, fourteen skullbase invasion cases and twenty-six cases of paranasal sinus cancer with orbital invasion were treated by superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy using cisplatin (CDDP) and sodium thiosulfate to preserve the organs and to improve poor prognosis. In these patients, 100-150 mg/m 2 of CDDP was administered weekly to each feeding artery of the tumor superselectively at 5 mg/m. CT-arteriography (CTA) was used to diagnosis all feeding arteries of advanced cancers before infusing CDDP. Twenty-three of 26 cases with orbital invasion were treated with preservation of the eyeball. In three cases with extirpation of the eyeball CTA was not used in the treatment, and CDDP was infused into only the maxillary artery excluding the transverse facial artery. In skullbase invasion cases, the number of complete responses (CR) was 8/14, and that of partial responses (PR) was 6/14. Feeding arteries originating from the external carotid artery were found in 10 of all 14 cases by CTA, and four cases in which blood supply was from both carotid arteries were all anterior skullbase invasion cases. Ten cases with superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy originating from only the external carotid artery were significantly better responders than four cases originating from both carotid arteries. In N3 cases, feeding arteries were found in more than three arteries by CTA and the overall survival rate was 55%, calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. CTA is a very efficient method for diagnosing all feeding arteries of advanced cancers in the superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. (author)

  9. The preclinical development of novel treatment options for advanced prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major societal problem with 11.000 new cases every year in the Netherlands. The advanced stage of the disease, castration-resistant prostate cancer, is especially deadly and is often accompanied with (bone) metastases. In this PhD-thesis, we have explored several strategies to

  10. Predictors of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients with Advanced Common Solid Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, I. E.; Andersen, M. S.; Gross, C. P.; Krumholz, H. M.; Gross, C. P.; Krumholz, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    There is uncertainty about risk heterogeneity for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in older patients with advanced cancer and whether patients can be stratified according to VTE risk. We performed a retrospective cohort study of the linked Medicare-Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry in older patients with advanced cancer of lung, breast, colon, prostate, or pancreas diagnosed between 1995-1999. We used survival analysis with demographics, co morbidities, and tumor characteristics/treatment as independent variables. Outcome was VTE diagnosed at least one month after cancer diagnosis. VTE rate was highest in the first year (3.4%). Compared to prostate cancer (1.4 VTEs/100 person-years), there was marked variability in VTE risk (hazard ratio (HR) for male-colon cancer 3.73 (95% CI 2.1-6.62), female-colon cancer HR 6.6 (3.83-11.38), up to female-pancreas cancer HR 21.57 (12.21-38.09). Stage IV cancer and chemotherapy resulted in higher risk (HRs 1.75 (1.44-2.12) and 1.31 (1.0-1.57), resp.). Stratifying the cohort by cancer type and stage using recursive partitioning analysis yielded five groups of VTE rates (non localized prostate cancer 1.4 VTEs/100 person-years, to non localized pancreatic cancer 17.4 VTEs/100 patient-years). In a high-risk population with advanced cancer, substantial variability in VTE risk exists, with notable differences according to cancer type and stage.

  11. Predictors of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients with Advanced Common Solid Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac E. Hall

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is uncertainty about risk heterogeneity for venous thromboembolism (VTE in older patients with advanced cancer and whether patients can be stratified according to VTE risk. We performed a retrospective cohort study of the linked Medicare-Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry in older patients with advanced cancer of lung, breast, colon, prostate, or pancreas diagnosed between 1995–1999. We used survival analysis with demographics, comorbidities, and tumor characteristics/treatment as independent variables. Outcome was VTE diagnosed at least one month after cancer diagnosis. VTE rate was highest in the first year (3.4%. Compared to prostate cancer (1.4 VTEs/100 person-years, there was marked variability in VTE risk (hazard ratio (HR for male-colon cancer 3.73 (95% CI 2.1–6.62, female-colon cancer HR 6.6 (3.83–11.38, up to female-pancreas cancer HR 21.57 (12.21–38.09. Stage IV cancer and chemotherapy resulted in higher risk (HRs 1.75 (1.44–2.12 and 1.31 (1.0–1.57, resp.. Stratifying the cohort by cancer type and stage using recursive partitioning analysis yielded five groups of VTE rates (nonlocalized prostate cancer 1.4 VTEs/100 person-years, to nonlocalized pancreatic cancer 17.4 VTEs/100 patient-years. In a high-risk population with advanced cancer, substantial variability in VTE risk exists, with notable differences according to cancer type and stage.

  12. Degarelix 240/80 mg: a new treatment option for patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccon-Gibod, Laurent; Iversen, Peter; Persson, Bo-Eric

    2009-01-01

    levels that can lead to clinical flare in patients with advanced disease. Degarelix (Firmagon is a new GnRH blocker that has recently been approved by the EMEA and US FDA for the treatment of men with hormone-sensitive advanced prostate cancer. In this article, we briefly review the Phase III trial data...

  13. Bicalutamide monotherapy compared with castration in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V

    2000-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiandrogen monotherapy may be a treatment option for some patients with advanced prostate cancer. We report a survival and safety update from an analysis of 2 studies in which patients with nonmetastatic (M0) locally advanced disease were treated with either 150 mg. bicalutamide mo...

  14. Distinguishing Symptoms of Grief and Depression in a Cohort of Advanced Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Juliet C.; Zhang, Baohui; Block, Susan D.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the symptoms of grief are different from symptoms of depression among bereaved family members. This study is an attempt to replicate this finding among advanced cancer patients and examine clinical correlates of patient grief and depression. Analyses were conducted on data from interviews with 123 advanced cancer…

  15. Coping Well with Advanced Cancer: A Serial Qualitative Interview Study with Patients and Family Carers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Diane; Appleton, Lynda; Calman, Lynn; Large, Paul; Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Grande, Gunn

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To understand successful strategies used by people to cope well when living with advanced cancer; to explore how professionals can support effective coping strategies; to understand how to support development of effective coping strategies for patients and family carers. Design Qualitative serial (4–12 week intervals) interview study with people with advanced cancer and their informal carers followed by focus groups. The iterative design had a novel focus on positive coping strategies. Interview analysis focused on patients and carers as individuals and pairs, exploring multiple dimensions of their coping experiences. Focus group analysis explored strategies for intervention development. Participants 26 people with advanced (stage 3–4) breast, prostate, lung or colorectal cancer, or in receipt of palliative care, and 24 paired nominated informal/family carers. Setting Participants recruited through outpatient clinics at two tertiary cancer centres in Merseyside and Manchester, UK, between June 2012 and July 2013. Results 45 patient and 41 carer interviews were conducted plus 4 focus groups (16 participants). People with advanced cancer and their informal/family carers develop coping strategies which enable effective management of psychological wellbeing. People draw from pre-diagnosis coping strategies, but these develop through responding to the experience of living with advanced cancer. Strategies include being realistic, indulgence, support, and learning from others, which enabled participants to regain a sense of wellbeing after emotional challenge. Learning from peers emerged as particularly important in promoting psychological wellbeing through the development of effective ‘everyday’, non-clinical coping strategies. Conclusions Our findings challenge current models of providing psychological support for those with advanced cancer which focus on professional intervention. It is important to recognise, enable and support peoples’ own

  16. Treatment for Chronic Pain in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-25

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Pain; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  17. Diffusion Weighted MRI as a predictive tool for effect of radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Søren; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars

    Diffusion weighted MRI has shown great potential in diagnostic cancer imaging and may also have value for monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy. Patients with advanced cervical cancer are treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy. This study evaluates the value of DW......-MRI for predicting outcome of patients with advanced cervical cancer at time of brachytherapy. Volume of hyper-intensity on highly diffusion sensitive images and resulting ADC value for treatment responders and non-responders is compared. The change of ADC and volume of hyper-intensity over time of BT is also...

  18. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  19. Cancer of the esophagus and gastric cardia: recent advances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N. J.; Bartelink, H.; Bernards, R.; Giaccone, G.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; Peters, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Esophageal cancer and cancer of the gastric cardia, in particular adenocarcinomas, have shown a rapid and largely unexplained increase in incidence in many developed countries around the world. These diseases have a poor prognosis and current therapies have a modest impact on survival. This review

  20. Functionally Assessing Candidate Drivers Advances Precision Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kenneth L; Powers, Scott

    2016-08-08

    The complexity of genomic alterations in cancer has made it difficult to identify oncogenic drivers for the development of targeted therapies. The study by Berger et al. in this issue of Cancer Cell demonstrates that high-throughput functional profiling can uncover impactful mutations and oncogenic driver alleles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances in MRI for colorectal cancer and bowel motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Paardt, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis certain aspects of MRI in the evaluation of colorectal cancer and its precursors, and restaging of rectal cancer were addressed. The current status of MR colonography regarding the different preparation techniques as well as the imaging sequences and colon distension

  2. Hypothyroidism During Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy Is Associated with Longer Survival in Patients with Advanced Nonthyroidal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Melissa G; Vyas, Chirag M; Hamnvik, Ole-Petter R; Alexander, Erik K; Larsen, P Reed; Choueiri, Toni K; Angell, Trevor E

    2018-04-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-induced thyroid dysfunction is recognized as a common adverse effect of treatment, but the importance of incident hypothyroidism during TKI therapy remains unclear. This study analyzed the prognostic significance of hypothyroidism during TKI therapy in cancer patients. This was a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with advanced nonthyroidal cancer treated with TKI and available thyroid function testing at three affiliated academic hospitals from 2000 to 2017. Patients with preexisting thyroid disease were excluded. Demographic, clinical, and cancer treatment data were collected. Thyroid status with TKI treatment was determined from thyroid function testing and initiation of thyroid medication, and classified as euthyroid (thyrotropin [TSH] normal), subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH; TSH 5-10 mIU/L, or higher TSH if free thyroxine normal), or overt hypothyroidism (OH; TSH >10 mIU/L, low free thyroxine, or requiring replacement). Multivariate models were used to evaluate the effect of TKI-related hypothyroidism on overall survival (OS). Of 1120 initial patients, 538 remained after exclusion criteria. SCH occurred in 72 (13%) and OH in 144 (27%) patients with TKI therapy. Patients with hypothyroidism had significantly longer OS, with median OS in euthyroid patients of 685 days [confidence interval (CI) 523-851] compared to 1005 days [CI 634-1528] in SCH and 1643 days [CI 1215-1991] in OH patients (p hypothyroid patients (SCH and OH) with TSH >5 and hypothyroidism in cancer patients treated with TKI is associated with significantly improved OS, should not necessitate TKI dose reduction or discontinuation, and may provide independent prognostic information.

  3. 'Good’ palliative primary care according to advanced cancer patients and their relatives: an interview study on needs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Rijken, P.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Custers, J.; Hofstede, J.; Francke, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cancer causes approximately one third of all deaths in industrialized countries. Hence advanced cancer patients and their relatives are a main target group of palliative care. Methods: In qualitative interviews with 13 Dutch patients and 14 relatives confronted with advanced cancer

  4. Anti-angiogenic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Gastric and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Tzong; Oh, Do-Youn; Ryu, Min-Hee; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Yeo, Winnie; Carlesi, Roberto; Cheng, Rebecca; Kim, Jongseok; Orlando, Mauro; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2017-10-01

    Despite advancements in therapy for advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancers, their prognosis remains dismal. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer growth and metastasis, and recent studies indicate that pharmacologic blockade of angiogenesis is a promising approach to therapy. In this systematic review, we summarize current literature on the clinical benefit of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric cancer. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed and conference proceedings including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress. Included studies aimed to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer. Each trial investigated at least one of the following endpoints: overall survival, progression-free survival/time to progression, and/or objective response rate. Our search yielded 139 publications. Forty-two met the predefined inclusion criteria. Included studies reported outcomes with apatinib, axitinib, bevacizumab, orantinib, pazopanib, ramucirumab, regorafenib, sorafenib, sunitinib, telatinib, and vandetanib. Second-line therapy with ramucirumab and third-line therapy with apatinib are the only anti-angiogenic agents so far shown to significantly improve survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Overall, agents that specifically target the vascular endothelial growth factor ligand or receptor have better safety profile compared to multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  5. Oncolytic Sendai virus-based virotherapy for cancer: recent advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saga K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Kotaro Saga, Yasufumi Kaneda Division of Gene Therapy Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Many drugs have been developed and optimized for the treatment of cancer; however, it is difficult to completely cure cancer with anticancer drugs alone. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic technologies, in addition to new anticancer drugs, is necessary for more effective oncotherapy. Oncolytic viruses are one potential new anticancer strategy. Various oncolytic viruses have been developed for safe and effective oncotherapy. Recently, Sendai virus-based oncotherapy has been reported by several groups, and attention has been drawn to its unique anticancer mechanisms, which are different from those of the conventional oncolytic viruses that kill cancer cells by cancer cell-selective replication. Here, we introduce Sendai virus-based virotherapy and its anticancer mechanisms. Keywords: HVJ-E, cancer therapy, apoptosis, necroptosis, anticancer immunity 

  6. A review of topotecan in combination chemotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Robati

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Minoo Robati, David Holtz, Charles J DuntonDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Main Line Gynecologic Oncology, Lankenau Hospital, Wynnewood, PA, USAAbstract: Treatment of advanced, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer includes radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiation has been the primary treatment modality for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Concomitant systemic cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation have shown high response rates with improvements in durable remissions and overall survival. Cisplatin has been the standard medication for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. Combinations with other chemotherapeutic agents have been the subject of clinical trials with varying results. The toxicity of combination chemotherapy and tolerability of patients are other factors that should be considered in the management of patients with advanced disease. Recently topotecan, in combination with cisplatin, achieved increased response and overall survival rates without further compromising the patients’ quality of life. This review focuses on the mechanism of action and toxicities of topotecan, as well as its role as a radio-sensitizer and chemotherapeutic agent in the management of advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer. Other combination modalities and dosages are also discussed.Keywords: topotecan, combination chemotherapy, advanced cervical cancer

  7. Home-based specialized palliative care in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordly, Mie; Vadstrup, Eva Soelberg; Sjøgren, Per

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Due to an urgent need for specialized palliative care (SPC) for patients with advanced cancer, an overview of available information on organization and outcomes of home-based SPC would be valuable. Our systematic review aims to give an overview of available information...... on the organization and outcomes of home-based SPC for patients with advanced cancer. Outcomes related to place of death, survival time, quality of life, performance status, and symptom management are included. METHOD: A PICO process search strategy consisting of terms related to cancer, palliation, and home care...... for patients with advanced cancer, resulting in poor information and a lack of evidence. Generally, home-based SPC seems to have some positive effect on pain and dyspnea, but more high-quality studies are required....

  8. Present trends in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, T.; Iskandrani, A.

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths all over the world. As most patients present with advanced disease, major efforts have been made in the treatment of such disease with systemic chemotherapy. Several new agents and new combinations of chemotherapy have been developed recently. This article reviews the randomized clinical trials investigating chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in relapse or progressive disease while being treated and in elderly patients. Therapies that incorporate new biological agents to target specific defects in lung cancer are also discussed. Several clinical trials have demonstrated improvement in overall survival as well as quality of life with presently available chemotherapy treatment of advanced NSCLC. Better options are available for the elderly as well as those having relapse after first line chemotherapy. Despite all this progress the 5-year survival rate still remains at a dismal 14%. New therapies with good results are still desired. (author)

  9. Conducting Biobehavioral Research in Patients With Advanced Cancer: Recruitment Challenges and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson-White, Stephanie; Bohr, Nicole; Wickersham, Karen E

    2017-10-01

    Despite significant advances in cancer treatment and symptom management interventions over the last decade, patients continue to struggle with cancer-related symptoms. Adequate baseline and longitudinal data are crucial for designing interventions to improve patient quality of life and reduce symptom burden; however, recruitment of patients with advanced cancer in longitudinal research is difficult. Our purpose is to describe challenges and solutions to recruitment of patients with advanced cancer in two biobehavioral research studies examining cancer-related symptoms. Study 1: Symptom data and peripheral blood for markers of inflammation were collected from newly diagnosed patients receiving chemotherapy on the first day of therapy and every 3-4 weeks for up to 6 months. Study 2: Symptom data, blood, and skin biopsies were collected from cancer patients taking epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors at specific time points over 4 months. Screening and recruitment results for both studies are summarized. Timing informed consent with baseline data collection prior to treatment initiation was a significant recruitment challenge for both the studies. Possible solutions include tailoring recruitment to fit clinic needs, increasing research staff availability during clinic hours, and adding recruitment sites. Identifying solutions to these challenges will permit the conduct of studies that may lead to identification of factors contributing to variability in symptoms and development of tailored patient interventions for patients with advanced cancer.

  10. Future of bisphosphonates and denosumab for men with advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iranikhah, Maryam; Stricker, Steve; Freeman, Maisha Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer occurring in American men of all races. It is also the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the USA. Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in men with advanced prostate cancer, with skeletal-related events being a common complication and having negative consequences, leading to severe pain, increased health care costs, increased risk of death, and decreased quality of life for patients. Bone loss can also result from antiandrogen therapy, which can further contribute to skeletal-related events. Treatment with antiresorptive agents bisphosphonates, and the newly approved denosumab, a receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANK-L) inhibitor, has been shown to reduce the risk of skeletal-related complications and prevent treatment-induced bone loss in patients with advanced prostate cancer. This review discusses the role of antiresorptive agents bisphosphonates and RANK-L inhibitor in the current treatment of advanced prostate cancer by examining the primary literature and also focuses on the likely role of the bisphosphonates in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer in the future

  11. Advances in surgical techniques in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Anthony W; Detterbeck, Frank C

    2013-12-01

    Thoracic surgery is a dynamic field, and many scientific, technological, technical, and organizational changes are occurring. A prominent example is the use of less invasive approaches to major resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), both thoracoscopic and robotic. Sophisticated technology corroborated by clinical data has led to these approaches becoming accepted additions to the armamentarium. Additionally, improvements in perioperative pain management have also contributed to dramatically changing the experience of patients who undergo modern thoracic surgery. Lung cancer is being detected more often at an early stage. At the same time, advances in techniques, patient care, clinical science, and multidisciplinary treatment support an increased role for aggressive resection in the face of larger locally advanced tumors or for those with limited metastatic disease. These advances, conducted in the setting of multidisciplinary decision making, have resulted in real and palpable advancements for patients with lung cancer. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Comparison of problems and unmet needs of patients with advanced cancer in a European country and an asian country

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effendy, C.; Vissers, K.; Osse, B.H.; Tejawinata, S.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Engels, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with advanced cancer experience problems and unmet needs. However, we assume that patients with advanced cancer will have more problems and unmet needs in a country with a lower economic status than in an economically stronger country. We studied whether patients with advanced

  13. Health-related Quality of Life after complex rectal surgery for primary advanced rectal cancer and locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Henriette Vind

    2013-01-01

    postoperative morbidity, Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) is an important issue. The overall aim of this thesis was therefore to evaluate HRQoL in patients with PARC and LRRC treated with COMP-RCS and curative intent. In study I a review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of HRQo......Advances in the treatment of rectal cancer, have made it possible to perform complex rectal cancer surgery (COMP-RCS) with curative intent in patients with primary advanced rectal caner (PARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Due to the complexity of the treatment and its high...... in the study was 164 (86%) patients treated with standard rectal cancer surgery (STAN-RCS). The Danish version showed satisfactory psychometric properties for the scales concerning body image, sexual functioning, male sexual problems and defecations problems. Reduced psychometric properties were found...

  14. Nanotechnology Strategies To Advance Outcomes in Clinical Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorn, Christopher M; Bradbury, Michelle S; Lanza, Gregory M; Nel, Andre E; Rao, Jianghong; Wang, Andrew Z; Wiesner, Ulrich B; Yang, Lily; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2018-01-23

    Ongoing research into the application of nanotechnology for cancer treatment and diagnosis has demonstrated its advantages within contemporary oncology as well as its intrinsic limitations. The National Cancer Institute publishes the Cancer Nanotechnology Plan every 5 years since 2005. The most recent iteration helped codify the ongoing basic and translational efforts of the field and displayed its breadth with several evolving areas. From merely a technological perspective, this field has seen tremendous growth and success. However, an incomplete understanding of human cancer biology persists relative to the application of nanoscale materials within contemporary oncology. As such, this review presents several evolving areas in cancer nanotechnology in order to identify key clinical and biological challenges that need to be addressed to improve patient outcomes. From this clinical perspective, a sampling of the nano-enabled solutions attempting to overcome barriers faced by traditional therapeutics and diagnostics in the clinical setting are discussed. Finally, a strategic outlook of the future is discussed to highlight the need for next-generation cancer nanotechnology tools designed to address critical gaps in clinical cancer care.

  15. Clinical advances of nanocarrier-based cancer therapy and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Michel, Edurne; Imbuluzqueta, Edurne; Sebastián, Víctor; Blanco-Prieto, María J

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and efficient new strategies are urgently needed to combat its high mortality and morbidity statistics. Fortunately, over the years, nanotechnology has evolved as a frontrunner in the areas of imaging, diagnostics and therapy, giving the possibility of monitoring, evaluating and individualizing cancer treatments in real-time. Areas covered: Polymer-based nanocarriers have been extensively studied to maximize cancer treatment efficacy and minimize the adverse effects of standard therapeutics. Regarding diagnosis, nanomaterials like quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles or gold nanoparticles have been developed to provide rapid, sensitive detection of cancer and, therefore, facilitate early treatment and monitoring of the disease. Therefore, multifunctional nanosystems with both imaging and therapy functionalities bring us a step closer to delivering precision/personalized medicine in the cancer setting. Expert opinion: There are multiple barriers for these new nanosystems to enter the clinic, but it is expected that in the near future, nanocarriers, together with new 'targeted drugs', could replace our current treatments and cancer could become a nonfatal disease with good recovery rates. Joint efforts between scientists, clinicians, the pharmaceutical industry and legislative bodies are needed to bring to fruition the application of nanosystems in the clinical management of cancer.

  16. A pilot study on understanding the journey of advanced prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagholikar, Amol; Fung, Maggie; Nelson, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    To understand the journey of advanced prostate cancer patients for supporting development of an innovative patient journey browser. Prostate cancer is one of the common cancers in Australia. Due to the chronic nature of the disease, it is important to have effective disease management strategy and care model. Multi-disciplinary care is a well-proven approach for chronic disease management. The Multi-disciplinary team (MDT) can function more effectively if all the required information is available for the clinical decision support. The development of innovative technology relies on an accurate understanding of the advanced prostate cancer patient's journey over a prolonged period. This need arises from the fact that advanced prostate cancer patients may follow various treatment paths and change their care providers. As a result of this, it is difficult to understand the actual sources of patient's clinical records and their treatment patterns. The aim of the research is to understand variable sources of clinical records, treatment patterns, alternative therapies, over the counter (OTC) medications of advanced prostate cancer patients. This study provides better and holistic understanding of advanced prostate cancer journey. The study was conducted through an on-line survey developed to seek and analyse the responses from the participants. The on-line questionnaire was carefully developed through consultations with the clinical researchers at the Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre-Queensland, prostate cancer support group representatives and health informaticians at the Australian E-Health Research Centre. The non-identifying questionnaire was distributed to the patients through prostate cancer support groups in Queensland, Australia. The pilot study was carried out between August 2010 and December 2010. The research made important observations about the advanced prostate cancer journey. It showed that General Practitioner (GP) was the common source of

  17. Oncofertility in the setting of advanced cervical cancer - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Gordon

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To consider fertility options in women with advanced cervical cancer. Design: Case report. Setting: Large tertiary care center. Patient: A 30-year-old nulligravida woman diagnosed with FIGO Stage IBI squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix that had metastasized to a pelvic lymph node. Interventions: Robotic radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy and cerclage placement, followed by ovarian stimulation with oocyte retrieval and in vitro fertilization. Subsequent therapy included adjuvant chemoradiation and embryo transfer to a surrogate mother. Main outcome measures: Cervical cancer remission, live birth from surrogate pregnancy. Results: 33-year-old woman in her third year of remission from advanced cervical cancer with healthy twin girls. Conclusions: Fertility options may exist for patients even in the setting of metastatic cervical cancer. Early involvement of a reproductive endocrinologist is imperative. This case emphasizes the importance of cross-specialty communication. Keywords: Cervical cancer, Oncofertility, Radical trachelectomy, In vitro fertilization

  18. Concomitant chemo-radiotherapy for the locally advanced rectum cancer; Chimioradiotherapie concomitante dans le cancer du rectum localement evolue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haoui, M.; Aksil, N.; Boualga, K.; Moussaoui, D.; Ladj, O. [Service de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre anti-cancer, Blida (Algeria)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective study which aimed at assessing the use of a concomitant chemo-radiotherapy, its tolerance and its feasibility in the case of a locally advanced rectum cancer. Based on data obtained among 62 patients presenting a rectum cancer, they analyse the results in terms of tolerance (cases of leukopenia, anemia, diarrhea, radiodermatitis), of relapses, and survival. Toxicity is acceptable and the concomitant treatment renders the tumour operable in many cases. Short communication

  19. Glutathione S-transferase M1 null genotype: lack of association with tumour characteristics and survival in advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizard-Nacol, Sarab; Coudert, Bruno; Colosetti, Pascal; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Fargeot, Pierre; Brunet-Lecomte, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    had no effect on disease-free or overall survival. The absence of hormone receptors (P = 0.002), the presence of a mutated p53 gene (P = 0.0098) and lack of response to primary chemotherapy (P = 0.0086) were the only factors associated with reduced disease-free or overall survival. GSTM1-null genotype alone had no effect on tumour characteristics and outcome of patients with advanced breast cancers. The lack of correlation of GSTM1 genotype with clinical tumour features, clinical response to chemotherapy and survival exclude a role for GSTM1 polymorphism as a prognostic factor in advanced breast cancer

  20. Extracellular vesicles for personalized therapy decision support in advanced metastatic cancers and its potential impact for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekmadji, Carolina; Corcoran, Niall M; Oleinikova, Irina; Jovanovic, Lidija; Ramm, Grant A; Nelson, Colleen C; Jenster, Guido; Russell, Pamela J

    2017-10-01

    The use of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes, as liquid biopsy-derived biomarkers for cancers have been investigated. CTC enumeration using the CellSearch based platform provides an accurate insight on overall survival where higher CTC counts indicate poor prognosis for patients with advanced metastatic cancer. EVs provide information based on their lipid, protein, and nucleic acid content and can be isolated from biofluids and analyzed from a relatively small volume, providing a routine and non-invasive modality to monitor disease progression. Our pilot experiment by assessing the level of two subpopulations of small EVs, the CD9 positive and CD63 positive EVs, showed that the CD9 positive EV level is higher in plasma from patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer with detectable CTCs. These data show the potential utility of a particular EV subpopulation to serve as biomarkers for advanced metastatic prostate cancer. EVs can potentially be utilized as biomarkers to provide accurate genotypic and phenotypic information for advanced prostate cancer, where new strategies to design a more personalized therapy is currently the focus of considerable investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Research advances in traditional Chinese medicine syndromes in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qing; Luo, Yun-quan; Wang, Wen-hai; Liu, Xuan; Li, Qi; Su, Shi-bing

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, also known as TCM ZHENG or TCM pattern, is an integral and essential part of TCM theory that helps to guide the design of individualized treatments. A TCM syndrome, in essence, is a characteristic profile of all clinical manifestations in one patient that can be readily identified by a TCM practitioner. In this article, the authors reviewed the presentations of TCM syndromes in seven common malignancies (liver, lung, gastric, breast, colorectal, pancreatic and esophageal cancers), the objectivity and the standardization of TCM syndrome differentiation, the evaluation of TCM syndrome modeling in cancer research, and syndrome differentiation-guided TCM treatment of cancers. A better understanding of TCM syndrome theory, as well as its potential biological basis, may contribute greatly to the clinical TCM diagnosis and the treatment of cancer.

  2. Advancements of antisense oligonucleotides in treatment of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGShuan-Ping; SONGSan-Tai; 等

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is one kind of multi-gene related malignancy.Overexpression of some oncogenes such as HER-2(c-erbB-2,Neu),bcl-2/bcl-xL,protein kinase A(PKA),and transferrin receptor gene(TfR gene),etc significantly affect the prognosis of breast cancer.It was shown that specific suppression of the overexpressed genes above resulted in the improvement of the therapy of breast cancer.Antisense interference.one of useful tools for inhibiting the overexpression of specific oncogenes,was involved in the therapy of breast cancer in recent years. Data indicated that antisense oligonucleotides(ON)could inhibit specially the expression of the target genes on mRNA or protein levels in most of cases;some ON candidates showed encouraging therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo on breast cancer cell lines or xenografts.Furthermore,the combination use of the antisense ON and normal chemotherapeutic agents indicated synergistic antitumor effects,which was probably the best utilization of antisense ON in the treatment of breast cancer.

  3. Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Hanne; Brandt, Åse; Wæhrens, Eva E; la Cour, Karen

    2017-01-01

    People with advanced cancer are able to live for extended periods of time. Advanced cancer can cause functional limitations influencing the ability to manage occupations. Although studies have shown that people with advanced cancer experience occupational difficulties, there is only limited research that specifically explores how these occupational difficulties are managed. To describe and explore how people with advanced cancer manage occupations when living at home. A sub-sample of 73 participants from a larger occupational therapy project took part in the study. The participants were consecutively recruited from a Danish university hospital. Qualitative interviews were performed at the homes of the participants. Content analysis was applied to the data. Managing occupations were manifested in two main categories; (1) Conditions influencing occupations in everyday life and (2) Self-developed strategies to manage occupations. The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer should be supported to a greater extent in finding ways to manage familiar as well as new and more personally meaningful occupations to enhance quality of life.

  4. [Prognostic factors of advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwas, H; Guermazi, E; Khattab, A; Hrizi, C; Zendah, I; Ghédira, H

    2017-09-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men in the world. Although the introduction of new drugs, new therapeutic strategies and despite therapeutic advances, the prognosis is relatively improved during the last years. To evaluate the prognosis of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to identify prognostic factors at these stages. A retrospective study, including 140 cases of locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC diagnosed in our department between 2003 and 2013. The average age was 61±10 years (35 to 90 years). Sex ratio was 18. The delays management were 80±25 days for presentation, 45±20 days for the diagnostic, while the treatment delay was 8±2.33 days. The cancer was at stage IIIA in 14%, IIIB in 27% and IV in 59%. Six months and one-year survival was between 50 and 74% and between 9 and 25%, respectively. Better survival was observed in patients with NSCLC on stage III, having better performance status, having comorbid conditions, with prolonged delays management, a short therapeutic delay and patients who received specific antitumor treatment. The prognostic factors in locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC in our patients were: stage of cancer, performance status, comorbid conditions, delay of management and specific antitumoral treatment. These factors should be considered in the management of patients with advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Respiratory Symptoms, Sleep, and Quality of Life in Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Vivian W Q; Chen, Elaine J; Jian, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Zhu, Jingfen; Li, Guohong; He, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Maintenance of quality of life and symptom management are important in lung cancer therapy. To the author's knowledge, the interplay of respiratory symptoms and sleep disturbance in affecting quality of life in advanced lung cancer remains unexamined. The study was designed to examine the relationships among respiratory symptoms, sleep disturbance, and quality of life in patients with advanced lung cancer. A total of 128 patients with advanced lung cancer (from chest oncology inpatient-units in Shanghai, China) participated in the study. They completed two questionnaires: the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Symptomatic breathing difficulty, coughing, shortness of breath, and tightness in the chest were reported in 78.1%, 70.3%, 60.9%, and 60.2% of the patients, respectively. Sleep disturbance affected 62.5% of the patients. The patients with severe respiratory symptoms were more likely to be poor sleepers and to have a lower quality of life. After the covariates were controlled for, regression analysis showed that respiratory symptoms and sleep disturbance were significant indicators of quality of life. In addition, some of the effect of the respiratory symptoms on quality of life was mediated by sleep disturbance. Respiratory symptoms and sleep disturbance were common in the advanced lung cancer patients and had a negative impact on their quality of life; sleep disturbance may mediate the relationship between respiratory symptoms and quality of life. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High rates of advanced gastric cancer in community of Flushing, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinani, Amreen; Desai, Amit; Kohn, Nina; Gutkin, Ellen; Nussbaum, Michel; Somnay, Kaumudi

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer remains a major public health issue and is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 600,000 deaths annually. Over the last decades, there has been a steady decline in the incidence rates of gastric cancer. Furthermore, the incidence rates of gastric cancer in different parts of the country vary due to epidemiological and migration trends. Despite these trends, several studies that have continued to observe high rates of gastric cancer in populations that come from high-risk regions. The aim of the study was to describe the gastric cancer patients presenting NYHQ with an emphasis on those presenting at a young age and advanced disease. A subanalysis of the Asian population was also done, which is considered a high-risk group. Consecutive chart review of patients admitted with gastric cancer from January 2000 to August 2008 was extracted from the Oncology registry at NYHQ. Parameters that were evaluated were age, sex, race, type of gastric cancer, and stage of gastric cancer at initial presentation. The SAS/PC software package (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) was employed for statistical analyses. Four hundred fifty-seven patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer. Approximately one third of the total patients were younger than 60 years of age. Of the Asian patients, almost half the patients (48.8%) had advanced disease of which two thirds were under the age of 60 years. The rates of advanced gastric cancer observed at NYHQ are significant and comparable to recent epidemiology literature on rates in Asian populations in Asia. Communities, like Flushing, NY, may benefit from early detection of gastric cancers, similar to those instituted in Japan and Taiwan.

  7. Vandetanib in locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboulleux, Sophie; Bastholt, Lars; Krause, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    No effective standard treatment exists for patients with radioiodine-refractory, advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma. We aimed to assess efficacy and safety of vandetanib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of RET, VEGFR and EGFR signalling, in this setting....

  8. Subgroup effects of occupational therapy-based intervention for people with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro Pilegaard, Marc; Oestergaard, Lisa Gregersen; la Cour, Karen; Thit Johnsen, Anna; Brandt, Åse

    2018-03-23

    Many people with advanced cancer have decreased ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL). We recently performed a randomized, controlled trial (RCT) assessing the efficacy of an occupational therapy-based program, the 'Cancer Home-Life Intervention' in people with advanced cancer (N = 242) and found no overall effects on ADL ability. However, heterogeneity of treatment effect may disguise subgroup differences. To investigate whether subgroups of people with advanced cancer gain positive effects from the 'Cancer Home-Life Intervention' on ADL ability. An exploratory subgroup analysis including 191 participants from a RCT. The outcome was ADL motor ability measured by the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS). Subgroups were defined by age, gender, years of education, type of primary tumor, functional level, and activity problems. The 'Cancer Home-Life Intervention' had no statistically significant effect in the six subgroups. Modifying effects of age (0.30 [95% CI: -0.05 to 0.64]) and gender (0.23 [95% CI: -0.11 to 0.57]) were not found. There were no subgroup effects of the 'Cancer Home-Life Intervention'on ADL motor ability. Some indications suggest greater effects for those aged below 69 years; however, this result should be interpreted with caution.

  9. 7 CFR 58.137 - Excluded milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excluded milk. 58.137 Section 58.137 Agriculture... Milk § 58.137 Excluded milk. A plant shall not accept milk from a producer if: (a) The milk has been in...) Three of the last five milk samples have exceeded the maximum bacterial estimate of 500,000 per ml...

  10. Advances in immunotherapy for treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante Alvarez, Jean G.; González-Cao, María; Karachaliou, Niki; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Viteri, Santiago; Teixidó, Cristina; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Different approaches for treating lung cancer have been developed over time, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies against activating mutations. Lately, better understanding of the role of the immunological system in tumor control has opened multiple doors to implement different strategies to enhance immune response against cancer cells. It is known that tumor cells elude immune response by several mechanisms. The development of monoclonal antibodies against the checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1), on T cells, has led to high activity in cancer patients with long lasting responses. Nivolumab, an anti PD-1 inhibitor, has been recently approved for the treatment of squamous cell lung cancer patients, given the survival advantage demonstrated in a phase III trial. Pembrolizumab, another anti PD-1 antibody, has received FDA breakthrough therapy designation for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), supported by data from a phase I trial. Clinical trials with anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in NSCLC have demonstrated very good tolerability and activity, with response rates around 20% and a median duration of response of 18 months

  11. Use of advanced treatment technologies among men at low risk of dying from prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Bruce L; Zhang, Yun; Schroeck, Florian R; Skolarus, Ted A; Wei, John T; Montie, James E; Gilbert, Scott M; Strope, Seth A; Dunn, Rodney L; Miller, David C; Hollenbeck, Brent K

    2013-06-26

    The use of advanced treatment technologies (ie, intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT] and robotic prostatectomy) for prostate cancer is increasing. The extent to which these advanced treatment technologies have disseminated among patients at low risk of dying from prostate cancer is uncertain. To assess the use of advanced treatment technologies, compared with prior standards (ie, traditional external beam radiation treatment [EBRT] and open radical prostatectomy) and observation, among men with a low risk of dying from prostate cancer. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data, we identified a retrospective cohort of men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 2004 and 2009 who underwent IMRT (n = 23,633), EBRT (n = 3926), robotic prostatectomy (n = 5881), open radical prostatectomy (n = 6123), or observation (n = 16,384). Follow-up data were available through December 31, 2010. The use of advanced treatment technologies among men unlikely to die from prostate cancer, as assessed by low-risk disease (clinical stage ≤T2a, biopsy Gleason score ≤6, and prostate-specific antigen level ≤10 ng/mL), high risk of noncancer mortality (based on the predicted probability of death within 10 years in the absence of a cancer diagnosis), or both. In our cohort, the use of advanced treatment technologies increased from 32% (95% CI, 30%-33%) to 44% (95% CI, 43%-46%) among men with low-risk disease (P risk of noncancer mortality (P use of these advanced treatment technologies among men with both low-risk disease and high risk of noncancer mortality increased from 25% (95% CI, 23%-28%) to 34% (95% CI, 31%-37%) (P use of advanced treatment technologies for men unlikely to die from prostate cancer increased from 13% (95% CI, 12%-14%), or 129.2 per 1000 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, to 24% (95% CI, 24%-25%), or 244.2 per 1000 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (P risk disease, high risk of noncancer mortality, or both, the use of

  12. Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulshine, James L; Avila, Rick; Yankelevitz, David; Baer, Thomas M; Estépar, Raul San Jose; Ambrose, Laurie Fenton; Aldigé, Carolyn R

    2015-05-01

    The Prevent Cancer Foundation Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management was held in New York, NY on May 16 and 17, 2014. The two goals of the Workshop were to define strategies to drive innovation in precompetitive quantitative research on the use of imaging to assess new therapies for management of early lung cancer and to discuss a process to implement a national program to provide high quality computed tomography imaging for lung cancer and other tobacco-induced disease. With the central importance of computed tomography imaging for both early detection and volumetric lung cancer assessment, strategic issues around the development of imaging and ensuring its quality are critical to ensure continued progress against this most lethal cancer.

  13. Status and Advances of RGD Molecular Imaging in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning YUE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  14. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  15. Feasibility of intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Nam P; Desai, Anand; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Jang, Siyoung; Vock, Jacqueline; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Pugh, Judith; Vo, Richard A; Ceizyk, Misty

    2014-01-01

    In this study the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for locally advanced esophageal cancer was assessed. A retrospective study of ten patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who underwent concurrent chemotherapy with IMRT (1) and IGRT (9) was conducted. The gross tumor volume was treated to a median dose of 70 Gy (62.4-75 Gy). At a median follow-up of 14 months (1-39 months), three patients developed local failures, six patients developed distant metastases, and complications occurred in two patients (1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 esophageal stricture requiring repeated dilatations). No patients developed grade 3-4 pneumonitis or cardiac complications. IMRT and IGRT may be effective for the treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer with acceptable complications

  16. Evaluation of multimodality treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer. Special reference to intraoperative vs. external radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasugi, Hideyuki; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Seo, Yousuke; Iguchi, Haruo; Wada, Susumu

    1999-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT)+postoperative external beam radiation therapy (ERT) with chemotherapy and ERT alone with chemotherapy have been performed in our hospital for unresectable, especially locally advanced, pancreatic cancer. We compared the former method with the latter. Chemotherapy was performed together with radiation, using 5-FU, CDDP, and MMC. IORT+ERT was successful in only half of the treated patients, while ERT alone was successful in almost all of the patients. As a result, the doses of radiation were often shorter in patients treated by the former method compared to the latter method. Both methods, when completed for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (stage IVa), produced good effects on tumor markers, tumor size and pain. Furthermore, the latter method was better than the former in improving the survival time and quality of life (QOL). Therefore, ERT is a practical and useful method for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. (author)

  17. Identity and home: Understanding the experience of people with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maersk, Jesper Larsen; Cutchin, Malcolm P; la Cour, Karen

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how the identity of people with advanced cancer is influenced by their experiences of living at home. A total of 28 in-depth interviews were conducted with 22 people with advanced cancer and four spouses. Grounded theory guided the collection and analysis of data. Home tours and associated field notes augmented the interview data. The analysis revealed that support of participants' identity was reflected in their abilities to live and occupy the home during daily activities, and in the ways the home and objects functioned as referents to themselves and their past. Threats to their identity ensued as the home environment became unmanageable during daily activities and as homecare professionals and assistive devices entered the home. By supporting people with advanced cancer in maintaining daily activities in the home and reducing changes in the home caused by homecare it is possible to reduce loss of identity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adjuvant neutron therapy in complex treatment of patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisin, V. A.; Velikaya, V. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Popova, N. O.; Goldberg, V. E.

    2017-09-01

    The study included 128 patients with stage T2-4N0-3M0 locally advanced breast cancer. All patients were divided into two groups. Group I (study group) consisted of 68 patients, who received neutron therapy, and group II (control group) comprised 60 patients, who received electron beam therapy. Neutron therapy was well tolerated by the patients and 1-2 grade radiation skin reactions were the most common. Neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of the patients with locally advanced breast cancer. The 8-year recurrence-free survival rate in the patients with locally advanced breast cancer was 94.5 ± 4.1% after neutron therapy and 81.4 ± 5.9% after electron beam therapy (p = 0.05).

  19. [Eight Cases of Esophagus and Tracheobronchial Stenting for Advanced Esophageal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Yujiro; Takachi, Ko; Tsujimura, Naoto; Wakasugi, Masaki; Hirota, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Oshima, Satoshi

    2017-11-01

    Malignant stricture and fistula of the esophagus and tracheobronchus adversely affect the quality of life(QOL)in patients with advanced esophageal cancer. Stenting is one ofthe therapies available for these patients. We investigated the outcomes ofesophagus and tracheobronchial stenting in our institution. Eight patients with advanced esophageal cancer underwent double stenting from 2010 to 2016. Among them, 4 patients underwent double stenting as planned. One patient underwent an emergency tracheal stenting because ofstenosis ofthe trachea caused by esophageal stenting. Three patients underwent tracheobronchial stenting later on because ofan increase in the tumor size after esophageal stenting. Dysphagia score was improved in 5(67.5%)out ofthe 8 patients. Respiratory symptoms were improved in all patients, and 4 patients(50.0%) were discharged. The median survival time after esophageal stenting was 70.5 days. Esophagus and tracheobronchial stenting for advanced esophageal cancer was useful for the improvement of the QOL.

  20. Therapeutic effect of transcatheter arterial infusion chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Junhua; Song Mingzhi; Zhang Yuanyuan; Xu Yiyu; Chen Jing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of transcatheter arterial infusion (TAI) or transcatheter arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: 36 cases of advanced pancreatic cancer were divided into two groups, 18 cases were treated with TAI or TACE (group A), other 18 cases were treated with systemic chemotherapy (group B). Results: The clinical benefit response rate of the group A was 55.6% (10/18) and that of the group B was 16.7%(3/18), respectively (P 0.05). Conclusions: In the transcatheter arterial infusion group, no survival advantage could be demonstrated when compared with the controls, but TAI could effectively increase clinical benefit response and improve the quality of life of advanced pancreatic cancer

  1. Belonging and quality of life as perceived by people with advanced cancer who live at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Nissen, Nina; Brandt, Åse

    Purpose: In previous research (Peoples, Nissen, Brandt, & la Cour, 2017), we explored how people with advanced cancer who live at home perceive quality of life. Findings from our previous study indicate that dimensions of belonging in various ways may be connected to quality of life when living...... with an impending death. These findings prompted our curiosity to further explore, how perceived quality of life may be linked to belonging when living with advanced cancer. By drawing on our findings and the theoretical concept of belonging within occupational science, the purpose of this study was to gain...... a deeper understanding of the ways in which quality of life may be related to belonging as perceived by people with advanced cancer. Method: The study employed a qualitative approach using a combination of qualitative interviews and photo-elicitation. A thematic approach was used to analyse the data. Ten...

  2. Contemporary management of locally advanced rectal cancer: Resolving issues, controversies and shifting paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacion, Aeris Jane D; Park, Youn Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2018-02-01

    Advancements in rectal cancer treatment have resulted in improvement only in locoregional control and have failed to address distant relapse, which is the predominant mode of treatment failure in rectal cancer. As the efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) reaches a plateau, the need for alternative strategies in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) has grown in relevance. Several novel strategies have been conceptualized to address this issue, including: 1) neoadjuvant induction and consolidation chemotherapy before CRT; 2) neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone to avoid the sequelae of radiation; and 3) nonoperative management for patients who achieved pathological or clinical complete response after CRT. This article explores the issues, recent advances and paradigm shifts in the management of LARC and emphasizes the need for a personalized treatment plan for each patient based on tumor stage, location, gene expression and quality of life.

  3. Research advances in sorafenib-induced apoptotic signaling pathways in liver cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Chaoya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, sorafenib is the multi-target inhibitor for the treatment of advanced primary liver cancer, and can effectively prolong the progression-free survival and overall survival in patients with advanced primary liver cancer. The application of sorafenib in the targeted therapy for liver cancer has become a hot topic. Major targets or signaling pathways include Raf/Mek/Erk, Jak/Stat, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, VEGFR and PDGFR, STAT, microRNA, Wnt/β-catenin, autolysosome, and tumor-related proteins, and sorafenib can regulate the proliferation, differentiation, metastasis, and apoptosis of liver cancer cells through these targets. This article reviews the current research on the action of sorafenib on these targets or signaling pathways to provide useful references for further clinical research on sorafenib.

  4. Classical prognostic factors in patients with non-advanced endometrial cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karolewski, K.; Kojs, Z.; Jakubowicz, J.; Urbanski, K.; Michalak, A.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Analysis of classical prognostic factors in patients with non-advanced endometrial cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Materials/Methods: In the years 1985 - 1999, 705 patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy due to endometrial cancer: 529 patients with FIGO stage I and 176 with FIGO stage II cancer. Mean age was 58 years. In 96% of patients endometrioid adenocarcinoma was found. In 49.9% the cancer had a high, in 27.9% a medium, and in 22.2% a low degree of differentiation. Results: 82% of patients had 5-year disease-free survival. In univariate analysis a significantly higher rate of disease-free survival was observed in: patients younger than 60, with moderately and well differentiated cancers, with stage I endometrioid adenocarcinoma with less than 50% myometrial invasion. In multivariate analysis degree of cancer differentiation was the only independent prognostic factor. Conclusions: In a group of patients with non-advanced endometrial cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy, degree of cancer differentiation is the primary prognostic factor. (authors)

  5. Advances in circulating microRNAs as diagnostic and prognostic markers for ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Hong; Liu, Jia-Yu; Song, Feng-Ju; Chen, Ke-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal malignant gynecological tumors. More than 70% of patients with ovarian cancer are diagnosed at advanced stage. The 5-year survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer is less than 30% because of the lack of effective biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment. MicroRNA (miR) is a class of small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression primarily through post-transcriptional repression. Many studies on tissue miR in ovarian cancer have been carried out and show great potential in clinical practice. However, tissue samples are not easily available because sampling causes injury. Researchers have started to focus on plasma/serum miR, assuming that blood samples may replace tissue samples in miR research in the future. Plasma/serum miR research is still in its early stages. Studies on its function in the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer have achieved some progress, but plasma/serum miR profiling for prognosis and personalized treatment of ovarian cancer remains unknown. A thorough understanding of the function of plasma/serum miR in ovarian cancer will facilitate early diagnosis and improve treatment for ovarian cancer

  6. Interaction patterns between parents with advanced cancer and their adolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Denice Kopchak; Draucker, Claire Burke

    2011-10-01

    Advanced cancer profoundly affects those with the illness and their families. The interaction patterns between parents with advanced cancer and their adolescent children are likely to influence how a family experiences a parent's dying process. There is little information on such interactions. This study aimed to develop an explanatory model that explains interaction patterns between parents with advanced cancer and their adolescent children and to identify strategies to prepare children for their lives after a parent dies. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 9 parents with advanced cancer, 7 of their spouses/partners, and 10 of their adolescent children. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a constructionist grounded theory approach. Twenty-six family participants were interviewed. Their main concern was not having enough time together. In response, they described a four-stage process for optimizing the time they had left together: coming to know our time together is limited, spending more time together, extending our time together, and giving up our time together to end the suffering. The adolescents and their ill parents did not change their interaction patterns until they realized their time together was limited by the advanced cancer. Then they spent more time together to make things easier for each other. Time was of great importance to the parents and adolescents; all the participants structured their stories in relation to the concept of time. The model reflects the dynamic process by which families continuously adapt their relationships in the face of advanced cancer. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Detectability of T Measurable diseases in advanced gastric cancer in FDG PET CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sun Young; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Young Chul; Jeong, Eugene; Kim, Seung Eun; Choe, Jae Gol

    2012-01-01

    Usefulness of FDG PET CT in monitoring response in locally advanced gastric cancer has been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the related factors to detect measurable diseases in advanced gastric cancer on FDG PET CT. We retrospectively reviewed 38 patients diagnosed as having advanced gastric cancer. We defined the measurable diseases when there was visualized tumor of which maximum standardized uptake value(SUVmax) was higher than 1.35*SUVmax of liver + 2*SD of liver SUV. We evaluated what kinds of factors from the clinicopathologic features were related to identifying measurable diseases. Of 38 patients with advanced gastric cancer, 18 (50%) had measurable tumors on FDG PET CT. Measurable tumors were significantly more frequent in well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (70.5% vs 35.3%, p<0.05), in the tumors located at antrum or angle (66.7% vs 29.4%, p<0.05) and in the elderly group (age of 55 years old or more, 72.0% vs 8.3%, p<0.001) than the others, respectively. By multivariate analysis, age at diagnosis was the only independent predictor for the measurable disease on FDG PET CT. We found that age at diagnosis, as well as histologic types and location of tumors, were the affecting factors to detect measurable disease on FDG PET CT in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Our study suggests that elderly patients of age of 55 years old or more can frequently have T measurable disease on FDG PET CT in advanced gastric cancer and FDG PET CT will be helpful to monitor measurable disease

  8. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments. PMID:26855534

  9. Advances in diagnosis and follow-up in kidney cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rioja, Jorge; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Laguna, M. Pilar

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the most recent data on preoperative diagnostic methods in kidney cancer and in follow-up and monitoring after ablation therapy. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the role of the percutaneous biopsy in the diagnostics of renal masses has been limited, new data suggest a high

  10. Effects of electronic massager on patients with advanced cancer of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The electronic massager has in recent times become so popularized that it is used in the treatment of almost every ailment. Its prescriptions range from treatment of obesity through acute painful conditions to the treatment of complications of cancer conditions. There are many claims and counter claims from the ...

  11. Mutations in the AXIN1 gene in advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yardy, George W; Bicknell, David C; Wilding, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt signalling pathway directs aspects of embryogenesis and is thought to contribute to maintenance of certain stem cell populations. Disruption of the pathway has been observed in many different tumour types. In bowel, stomach, and endometrial cancer, this is usually due to mutation of genes...

  12. A review of patients with advanced cervical cancer presenting to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outcomes of cervical cancer patients who entered care at Tiyanjane Clinic in Blantyre, Malawi ... a palliative approach from the time of presentation. Opportunities for ... to start on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), irrespective of ..... antenatal care, maternity care, under 5 clinics, family planning clinics, exposed ...

  13. An approach to the management of locally advanced breast cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    female, aspects surrounding family planning ... surgery and is the current standard of care ... In the developed world, 7% of breast cancer patients have stage III disease at diagnosis. In ... of chemotherapy compared with adjuvant therapy.[6]. Regimens. Historically, regimens based on ... immunohistochemical approach. The.

  14. Synthetic Lethality as a Targeted Approach to Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    protein kinase Cδ: The contrasting roles of PKCδ in cell survival and cell death. Sci. World J. 10 (2272−84), 2272−2284. (16) Lonne, G. K., Masoumi, K...dehydrogenase 1 is a marker for normal and malignant human colonic stem cells (SC) and tracks SC overpopulation during colon tumorigenesis. Cancer Res

  15. Advances in the care of patients with mucinous colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugen, N.; Brown, G.; Glynne-Jones, R.; Wilt, J.H.W. de; Nagtegaal, I.D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) are classified as adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified (AC). Mucinous carcinoma (MC) is a distinct form of CRC and is found in 10-15% of patients with CRC. MC differs from AC in terms of both clinical and histopathological characteristics, and has long

  16. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-02-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments.

  17. Concurrent Cisplatin and Radiation Versus Cetuximab and Radiation for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutcher, Lawrence, E-mail: Koutchel@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sherman, Eric; Fury, Matthew [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wolden, Suzanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Mo Qianxing [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Stewart, Laschelle; Schupak, Karen; Gelblum, Daphna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wong, Richard; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zelefsky, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Pfister, David [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare concurrent cisplatin (CDDP) and radiation (RT) with cetuximab (C225) and RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LAHNC). Methods and Materials: This study retrospectively compared 174 consecutive, newly diagnosed LAHNC patients definitively treated from March 1, 2006, to April 1, 2008, with single-agent CDDP/RT (n = 125) or C225/RT (n = 49). We excluded patients who received additional concurrent, induction, or adjuvant systemic therapy; weekly cisplatin; prior head-and-neck radiotherapy; or primary surgical resection. Outcomes were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox model, and competing-risks analysis tools. Results: The C225/RT patients were older and had decreased creatinine clearance. At a median follow-up of 22.5 months for living patients, the 2-year locoregional failure rate was 5.7% for CDDP/RT and 39.9% for C225/RT (p < 0.0001). The 2-year failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 87.4% vs. 44.5% (p < 0.0001) and 92.8% vs. 66.6% (p = 0.0003), respectively, in favor of CDDP/RT. When the Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis, treatment with CDDP/RT predicted for improved locoregional control (p < 0.0001), FFS (p < 0.0001), and OS (p = 0.01). Late Grade 3 or 4 toxicity or feeding tube dependence 9 months after completion of RT was observed in 21% of patients in the CDDP/RT cohort and 24% in the C225/RT cohort (p = 0.66). Conclusions: In this study of LAHNC patients, CDDP/RT achieved better locoregional control, FFS, and OS than C225/RT. Although the results were upheld on multivariate analysis, they must be interpreted cautiously because of the retrospective nature of the study and significant differences in patient selection. There was no statistically significant difference in late Grade 3 or 4 effects or feeding tube dependence.

  18. Pretreatment advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI) for predicting early progression in nivolumab-treated patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tamiya, Motohiro; Tamiya, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayako; Okamoto, Norio; Nakahama, Kenji; Taniguchi, Yoshihiko; Isa, Shun-Ichi; Inoue, Takako; Imamura, Fumio; Atagi, Shinji; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2018-01-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression status is inadequate for indicating nivolumab in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Because the baseline advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI) is reportedly associated with patient outcomes, we investigated whether the pretreatment ALI is prognostic in NSCLC patients treated with nivolumab. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients treated with nivolumab for advanced NSCLC between December 2015 and May 2016 at three Japanese institutes. Multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the impact of the pretreatment ALI (and other inflammation-related parameters) on progression-free survival (PFS) and early progression (i.e., within 8 weeks after starting nivolumab). A total of 201 patients were analyzed; their median age was 68 years (range, 27-87 years), 67% were men, and 24% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 2 or higher. An ECOG performance status ≥2, serum albumin ALI ALI ALI was found to be a significant independent predictor of early progression in patients with advanced NSCLC receiving nivolumab, and may help identify patients likely to benefit from continued nivolumab treatment in routine clinical practice. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Awareness of incurable cancer status and health-related quality of life among advanced cancer patients: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Kyung; Baek, Sun Kyung; Kim, Si-Young; Heo, Dae Seog; Yun, Young Ho; Park, Sook Ryun; Kim, Jun Suk

    2013-02-01

    Many patients near death report an interest in knowing their prognoses. Patients' awareness of disease status may lead to more appropriate care and maintained or improved quality of life. However, it is not known whether advanced cancer patients' awareness of disease status is associated with patients' quality of life. We aimed to examine the effect of patients' awareness of disease status on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among advanced cancer patients undergoing palliative chemotherapy. In this prospective cohort study, patients were followed-up at 4-6 weeks and 2-3 months after the initial palliative chemotherapy. Patients' awareness of disease status, and demographic and clinical characteristics were assessed at baseline, and depression and anxiety using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and HRQOL using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) were assessed three times. In total, 100 patients with advanced cancer starting palliative chemotherapy were recruited from two tertiary university hospitals and from the Korea National Cancer Center. Patients with advanced cancer undergoing palliative chemotherapy experienced deteriorated HRQOL. Of these, the patients who were aware of their disease status as incurable had significantly higher role (p=0.002), emotional (p=0.025), and social functioning (p=0.002), and lower fatigue (p=0.008), appetite loss (p=0.039), constipation (p=0.032), financial difficulties (p=0.019), and anxiety (p=0.041) compared with patients unaware of disease status. Our findings demonstrate the importance of patients' awareness of disease status to HRQOL.

  20. Chemotherapy and intensity modulated conformational radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreas cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, F.; Wu, A.; Zhang, Z.; Winston, C.; Reidy, D.; Ho, A.; Allen, P.; Karyn, G.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a retrospective study of the tolerance and survival of 48 patients who have been treated by a chemotherapy followed by a chemotherapy concomitant with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy for a locally advanced pancreas cancer. Results are discussed in terms of toxicity, cancer response, operability, survival rate. Tolerance is good. Local control rates, global survival rates and secondary resection rates are promising. Short communication

  1. Krukenberg tumors diagnosed during pregnancy simultaneously with advanced gastric cancer; A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Myung Won; Jung, Yoon Young; Shin, Jung Hwan; Hong, Young Ok

    2015-01-01

    Krukenberg tumors recognized during pregnancy are rarely reported. The preoperative diagnosis can be challenging because of the confusing morphological features and symptoms during pregnancy. Here, we report a case of a 29-year-old pregnant woman at 29 weeks gestation presenting with bilateral solid ovarian masses, which were later diagnosed as metastatic ovarian cancer originating from advanced gastric cancer. This case suggests that Krukenberg tumors should be considered when bilateral ovarian solid masses are encountered regardless of pregnancy

  2. Advanced glycation end-products: a biological consequence of lifestyle contributing to cancer disparity

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Low income, poor diet, obesity and a lack of exercise are inter-related lifestyle factors that can profoundly alter our biological make-up to increase cancer risk, growth and development. We recently reported a potential mechanistic link between carbohydrate derived metabolites and cancer which may provide a biological consequence of lifestyle that can directly impact tumor biology. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are reactive metabolites produced as a by-product of sugar metabolism. F...

  3. Krukenberg tumors diagnosed during pregnancy simultaneously with advanced gastric cancer; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Myung Won; Jung, Yoon Young; Shin, Jung Hwan; Hong, Young Ok [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Krukenberg tumors recognized during pregnancy are rarely reported. The preoperative diagnosis can be challenging because of the confusing morphological features and symptoms during pregnancy. Here, we report a case of a 29-year-old pregnant woman at 29 weeks gestation presenting with bilateral solid ovarian masses, which were later diagnosed as metastatic ovarian cancer originating from advanced gastric cancer. This case suggests that Krukenberg tumors should be considered when bilateral ovarian solid masses are encountered regardless of pregnancy.

  4. Characterizing the Hypermutated Subtype of Advanced Prostate Cancer as a Predictive Biomarker for Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    was a think tank of leading prostate cancer researchers focused on the question of oligo- metastatic disease. I was part of the program organizing...Wilke, J., Wilder-Romans, K., Dhanireddy, S., Engelke, C., et al. (2014). Therapeutic targeting of BET bromodomain proteins in castration-resistant...begun to make a positive difference in the lives of men with advanced prostate cancer. Attention to how we might similarly adjust the way we think

  5. Advance care planning within survivorship care plans for older cancer survivors: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Caoimh, Rónán; Cornally, Nicola; O'Sullivan, Ronan; Hally, Ruth; Weathers, Elizabeth; Lavan, Amanda H; Kearns, Tara; Coffey, Alice; McGlade, Ciara; Molloy, D William

    2017-11-01

    Advances in the medical treatment of cancer have increased the number of survivors, particularly among older adults, who now represent the majority of these. Survivorship care plans (SCPs) are documents that cancer patients receive summarising their care, usually at the end of treatment but preferably from initial diagnosis. These may increase patient satisfaction and represent an opportunity to initiate preventative strategies and address future care needs. Advance care planning (ACP), incorporating advance healthcare decision-making, including formal written directives, increases satisfaction and end-of-life care. This paper systematically reviews evaluations of ACP within SCPs among older (≥65 years) cancer survivors. No studies meeting the inclusion criteria were identified by search strategies conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases. One paper examined cancer survivors' mainly positive views of ACP. Another discussed the use of a SCP supported by a 'distress inventory' that included an advance care directive (living will) as an issue, though no formal evaluation was reported. Although ACP is important for older adults, no study was found that evaluated its role within survivorship care planning. Despite the risk of recurrence and the potential for morbidity and mortality, especially among older cancer survivors, ACP is not yet a feature of SCPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Palliative Care Specialist Consultation Is Associated With Supportive Care Quality in Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne M; Tisnado, Diana; Ettner, Susan L; Asch, Steven M; Dy, Sydney M; Pantoja, Philip; Lee, Martin; Ahluwalia, Sangeeta C; Schreibeis-Baum, Hannah; Malin, Jennifer L; Lorenz, Karl A

    2016-10-01

    Although recent randomized controlled trials support early palliative care for patients with advanced cancer, the specific processes of care associated with these findings and whether these improvements can be replicated in the broader health care system are uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of palliative care consultation and its association with specific processes of supportive care in a national cohort of Veterans using the Cancer Quality ASSIST (Assessing Symptoms Side Effects and Indicators of Supportive Treatment) measures. We abstracted data from 719 patients' medical records diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, or pancreatic cancer in 2008 over a period of three years or until death who received care in the Veterans Affairs Health System to evaluate the association of palliative care specialty consultation with the quality of supportive care overall and by domain using a multivariate regression model. All but 54 of 719 patients died within three years and 293 received at least one palliative care consult. Patients evaluated by a palliative care specialist at diagnosis scored seven percentage points higher overall (P specialist consultation is associated with better quality of supportive care in three advanced cancers, predominantly driven by improvements in information and care planning. This study supports the effectiveness of early palliative care consultation in three common advanced cancers within the Veterans Affairs Health System and provides a greater understanding of what care processes palliative care teams influence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Radiotherapy of locally advanced laryngeal cancer: the Gliwice Center of Oncology experience, 1990-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucha-Malecka, A.; Skladowski, K.; Wygoda, A.; Sasiadek, W.; Tarnawski, R.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of radiotherapy alone in patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer T3 - T4, and to establish the prognostic value of the size and the location of the extra laryngeal infiltrations and of emergency tracheostomy. 296 patients with advanced squamous cell cancer of the larynx were radically treated with radiotherapy alone in Center of Oncology in Gliwice between the years 1990 and 1996. There were 221 cases of supraglottic cancer (75%) and 75 of glottic cancer (25%). The stages were as follows: supraglottic cancer: T3 - 113 (51%), T4 - 108 (49%), glottic cancer: T3 - 69 (92%), T4 - 6 (8%). Positive neck nodes were found in 100 patients with supraglottic cancer (45%), and only in 11 patients with glottic cancer (15%). In cases of extra laryngeaI invasion (T4) the pyriform recess was involved in 33%, the base of tongue and valleculae glosso-epiglotticae in 30%, the hypopharyngeal wall in 9% of cases, while a massive involvement of the larynx, the pyriform recess and the base of the tongue was found in 6% of patients. Cartilage involvement was suspected in 22% of patients. Thirty six patients (12%) underwent emergency tracheostomy. Generally, the 3-year local control rate (LC) and disease free survival rate (DSF) were 46% and 41%, respectively. The probability of LC was similar in both supraglottic and glottic cancer: 44% and 47.5% respectively. The presence of involved neck nodes significantly decreased LC and DFS rates in both groups (about 20%). For stage T4 laryngeal cancer the LC rate was correlated with the location of the extra laryngeal infiltrations. Best prognosis was connected with the suspicion of cartilage infiltration - 56% of 3-year LC rate. The worst results were noted in cases of massive infiltrations spreading from larynx through the hypopharynx - 13.5% of 3-year LC rate. Emergency tracheostomy before radiotherapy was very significantly linked to poorer treatment results. The 3-year LC rate in

  8. Degarelix 240/80 mg: a new treatment option for patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccon-Gibod, L.; Iversen, P.; Persson, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor blockers (antagonists) are the latest addition to the hormonal therapy armamentarium for patients with prostate cancer. In contrast to the GnRH agonists, GnRH blockers have an immediate onset of action and do not cause an initial surge in testosterone...... levels that can lead to clinical flare in patients with advanced disease. Degarelix (Firmagon is a new GnRH blocker that has recently been approved by the EMEA and US FDA for the treatment of men with hormone-sensitive advanced prostate cancer. In this article, we briefly review the Phase III trial data...

  9. The Emerging Role of Extracellular Vesicle-Mediated Drug Resistance in Cancers: Implications in Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekmadji, Carolina; Nelson, Colleen C

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that the extracellular vesicles (EVs) regulate various biological processes and can control cell proliferation and survival, as well as being involved in normal cell development and diseases such as cancers. In cancer treatment, development of acquired drug resistance phenotype is a serious issue. Recently it has been shown that the presence of multidrug resistance proteins such as Pgp-1 and enrichment of the lipid ceramide in EVs could have a role in mediating drug resistance. EVs could also mediate multidrug resistance through uptake of drugs in vesicles and thus limit the bioavailability of drugs to treat cancer cells. In this review, we discussed the emerging evidence of the role EVs play in mediating drug resistance in cancers and in particular the role of EVs mediating drug resistance in advanced prostate cancer. The role of EV-associated multidrug resistance proteins, miRNA, mRNA, and lipid as well as the potential interaction(s) among these factors was probed. Lastly, we provide an overview of the current available treatments for advanced prostate cancer, considering where EVs may mediate the development of resistance against these drugs.

  10. First brazilian consensus of advanced prostate cancer: recommendations for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Deeke Sasse

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Prostate cancer still represents a major cause of morbidity, and still about 20% of men with the disease are diagnosed or will progress to the advanced stage without the possibility of curative treatment. Despite the recent advances in scientific and technological knowledge and the availability of new therapies, there is still considerable heterogeneity in the therapeutic approaches for metastatic prostate cancer. Objectives This article presents a summary of the I Brazilian Consensus on Advanced Prostate Cancer, conducted by the Brazilian Society of Urology and Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology. Materials and Methods Experts were selected by the medical societies involved. Forty issues regarding controversial issues in advanced disease were previously elaborated. The panel met for consensus, with a threshold established for 2/3 of the participants. Results and Conclusions The treatment of advanced prostate cancer is complex, due to the existence of a large number of therapies, with different response profiles and toxicities. The panel addressed recommendations on preferred choice of therapies, indicators that would justify their change, and indicated some strategies for better sequencing of treatment in order to maximize the potential for disease control with the available therapeutic arsenal. The lack of consensus on some topics clearly indicates the absence of strong evidence for some decisions.

  11. Clinical (non-histological) diagnosis of advanced prostate cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-03

    Aug 3, 2014 ... the cost of prostate biopsy itself is an important consideration, especially in ... ZAR1 068 200 (US$1 = ZAR8) was saved by treating men with advanced. ACP on the ... avoid the issue of possible non-compliance. The costs of ...

  12. Lapatinib for treatment of advanced or metastasized breast cancer: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Rachel; Soárez, Patrícia Coelho de; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Ferraz, Marcos Bosi

    2009-09-01

    Around 16% to 20% of women with breast cancer have advanced, metastasized breast cancer. At this stage, the disease is treatable, but not curable. The objective here was to assess the effectiveness of lapatinib for treating patients with advanced or metastasized breast cancer. Systematic review of the literature, developed at Centro Paulista de Economia da Saúde (CPES), Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp). Systematic review with searches in virtual databases (PubMed, Lilacs [Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde], Cochrane Library, Scirus and Web of Science) and manual search. Only one clinical trial that met the selection criteria was found. This study showed that lapatinib in association with capecitabine reduced the risk of cancer progression by 51% (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.34-0.71; P < 0.001), compared with capecitabine alone, without any increase in severe adverse effects. The combination of lapatinib plus capecitabine was more effective than capecitabine alone for reducing the risk of cancer progression. Further randomized clinical trials need to be carried out with the aim of assessing the effectiveness of lapatinib as monotherapy or in association for first-line or second-line treatment of advanced breast cancer.

  13. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-02-28

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient's functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer.

  14. Radiation therapy in the management of locally advanced and disseminated breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, F.C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation theraoy should be fully used in the management of advanced breast cancer. Locally advanced primary or recurrent carcinoma, with limited extent, should be treated aggressively, aimed at permanent control. Palliative treatment of incurable or metastatic lesions relieves symptoms and improves patient's quality of survival. Some metastatic lesions involving vital structures may create emergencies. Prompt institution of radiation therapy may reverse the serious complication and save the patient's life

  15. Extended Distal Pancreatectomy with En Bloc Resection of the Celiac Axis for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick H. Alizai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to a lack of early symptoms, pancreatic cancers of the body and tail are discovered mostly at advanced stages. These locally advanced cancers often involve the celiac axis or the common hepatic artery and are therefore declared unresectable. The extended distal pancreatectomy with en bloc resection of the celiac artery may offer a chance of complete resection. We present the case of a 48-year-old female with pancreatic body cancer invading the celiac axis. The patient underwent laparoscopy to exclude hepatic and peritoneal metastasis. Subsequently, a selective embolization of the common hepatic artery was performed to enlarge arterial flow to the hepatobiliary system and the stomach via the pancreatoduodenal arcades from the superior mesenteric artery. Fifteen days after embolization, the extended distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and en bloc resection of the celiac axis was carried out. The postoperative course was uneventful, and complete tumor resection was achieved. This case report and a review of the literature show the feasibility and safety of the extended distal pancreatectomy with en bloc resection of the celiac axis. A preoperative embolization of the celiac axis may avoid ischemia-related complications of the stomach or the liver.

  16. Advances of Immunotherapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing LIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is complex heterogeneous due to unclear biological characteristics in terms of cell origin, pathogenesis and driver genes etc. Diagnosis and treatment of SCLC has been slowly improved and few breakthroughs have been discovered up to now. Therefore new strategies are urgently needed to improve the efficacy of SCLC treatment. Tumor immunotherapy has potential to restore and trigger the immune system to recognize and eliminate tumor cells, notably it has only minimal adverse impact on normal tissue. Cancer vaccine, adoptive immunotherapy, cytokines and checkpoint inhibitors have now been launched for clinical treatment of SCLC. Ipilimumab is the most promising medicine of immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is expected to bring new vision to the treatment of SCLC. And further researches are needed on such problems affecting efficacy of immunotherapy as the heterogeneity of SCLC, the uncertainty of target for immunotherapy, the immune tolerance, etc.

  17. Advanced Lung Cancer Screening: An Individualized Molecular Nanotechnology Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    proportion of smokers , former 146 smokers and never smokers was not different between cases and controls. 147 Detection of DNA Methylation 148 We...highest risk smokers for an expensive screening modality such as CT scanning. Hypothesis: DNA methylation testing is more specific in selecting those...with non -cancerous nodules, and have completed the writing of a manuscript containing these results. The abstract of that manuscript is as follows

  18. Postoperative radio-chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, Marcelo; Bustos, Marisa; Orellana, Eric; Madrid, Jorge; Galindo, Hector; Sanchez, Cesar; Pimentel, Fernando; Guzman, Sergio; Butte, Jean Michel; Alvarez, Manuel; Besa, Pelayo

    2009-01-01

    Background: Overall 5 years survival for surgically excised gastric cancer is 30%. Adjuvant treatment may improve the surgical results. Aim: To assess treatment results and toxicity in patients with surgically excised gastric cancer, treated with adjuvant radiotherapy and concomitant continuous 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Material and Methods: Forty one patients aged 32 to 73 years (29 males) with stage II-IVA gastric cancer, subjected to a total or subtotal gastrectomy and D2 nodal dissection between 1997 to 2006, were studied. They received adjuvant radiotherapy to the gastric bed and draining lymphatic nodes in a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions and chemotherapy with continuous infusion 5-FU, 200 mg/m2/day. Results were compared to historical controls matched according to demographic parameters and tumor characteristics. Results: Eighteen patients were in stage II, 10 in stage IIIA, nine in stage IIIB and four in stage IVA. Twelve patients had an N0 nodal status, 15 were N1, nine were N2 and five were N3. After a mean follow up of 32 months, 26 patients (63%) were alive. Five year overall survival was 49.6% for surgery plus radiochemotherapy compared to 30.7% for the historical group subjected only to surgery (p =0.002). Radiotherapy was associated with grade 1-2 toxicity and treatment was completed without interruptions in all patients. Chemotherapy was delayed temporarily in 3 patients. Conclusions: Adjuvant radio-chemotherapy improved overall survival in gastric cancer, compared to historical controls subjected only to surgical treatment

  19. Nuclear medicine imaging of locally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, A.; Chernov, V.; Zeltchan, R.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chijevskaya, S.; Choynzonov, E.; Goldberg, A.

    2017-09-01

    The diagnostic capabilities of nuclear medicine imaging in the detection and assessment of the spread of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer were studied. A total of 40 patients with histologically verified laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal lesions were included into the study. Submucosal injections of 99mTc-MIBI and 99mTc-Alotech were made around the tumor. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed 20 minutes after the injection of 99mTc-MIBI. Sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) were detected in 26 patients. In 18 hours after the injection of 99mTc-Alotech, SPECT was performed. In 24 hours after the injection of 99mTc-Alotech, intraoperative SLN detection was performed using Gamma Finder II. SPECT with 99mTc-MIBI revealed laryngeal and hypopharyngeal tumors in 38 of the 40 patients. The 99mTc-MIBI uptake in metastatic lymph nodes was visualized in 2 (17%) of the 12 patients. Twenty eight SLNs were detected by SPECT and 31 SLNs were identified using the intraoperative gamma probe. The percentage of 99mTc-Alotech in the SLN was 5-10% of the radioactivity in the injection site by SPECT and 18-33% by intraoperative gamma probe detection. Thus, SPECT with 99mTc-MIBI is an effective tool for the diagnosis of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of this technique were 95%, 80% and 92%, respectively. The use of 99mTc-Alotech for the detection of SLNs in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer is characterized by 92.8% sensitivity.

  20. Immunotherapy Plus Cryotherapy: Potential Augmented Abscopal Effect for Advanced Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Abdo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1920s the gold standard for treating cancer has been surgery, which is typically preceded or followed with chemotherapy and/or radiation, a process that perhaps contributes to the destruction of a patient’s immune defense system. Cryosurgery ablation of a solid tumor is mechanistically similar to a vaccination where hundreds of unique antigens from a heterogeneous population of tumor cells derived from the invading cancer are released. However, releasing tumor-derived self-antigens into circulation may not be sufficient enough to overcome the checkpoint escape mechanisms some cancers have evolved to avoid immune responses. The potentiated immune response caused by blocking tumor checkpoints designed to prevent programmed cell death may be the optimal treatment method for the immune system to recognize these new circulating cryoablated self-antigens. Preclinical and clinical evidence exists for the complementary roles for Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA-4 and PD-1 antagonists in regulating adaptive immunity, demonstrating that combination immunotherapy followed by cryosurgery provides a more targeted immune response to distant lesions, a phenomenon known as the abscopal effect. We propose that when the host’s immune system has been “primed” with combined anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 adjuvants prior to cryosurgery, the preserved cryoablated tumor antigens will be presented and processed by the host’s immune system resulting in a robust cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell response. Based on recent investigations and well-described biochemical mechanisms presented herein, a polyvalent autoinoculation of many tumor-specific antigens, derived from a heterogeneous population of tumor cancer cells, would present to an unhindered yet pre-sensitized immune system yielding a superior advantage in locating, recognizing, and destroying tumor cells throughout the body.

  1. Toshiba's advanced technologies contributing to heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iikura, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Toshiba has been focusing effects on cancer treatment in the healthcare field, which is likely to continue to expand in the future. Our objective is to offer healthcare processes from early detection by means of regular cancer examinations, through to precise diagnosis, treatment ensuring the quality of life (QOL) appropriate to individual patients, and aftercare. In particular, we are promoting the development of heavy-ion radiotherapy systems incorporating our range of technologies for particle accelerators, irradiation devices, superconducting magnets, and information processing and networks. By offering heathcare processes with advanced heavy-ion radiotherapy systems as a core, our approach is expected to contribute to high-quality cancer treatment. (author)

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HIF-1α gene and chemoradiotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Ploen, John

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive impact of polymorphisms in the HIF-1α gene on the response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. This study included two cohorts of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving long-course CRT. The HIF-1α C1772T (rs11549465...... tumour response (P=0.03) in the validation cohort. In conclusion, these results suggest that HIF-1α polymorphisms have no value as predictors of response to neoadjuvant CRT in rectal cancer. The results of the HIF-1α c(*)191T>C in two cohorts differ and emphasise the importance of biomarker validation....

  3. The role of magnetotherapy in combined treatment of advanced cancer of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letyagin, V.P.; Dobrynin, Ya.V.; Rybakov, Yu.L.; Ermilova, V.D.; Protchenko, N.V.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of conventional treatment of advanced breast cancer (radiotherapy + chemotherapy) and its use in combination with magnetotherapy (regimen 1 and 2, respectively) have been compared. The effects on the primary breast tumors were almost similar (68 and 69 %, respectively). Positive changes in lymph nodes in response to regimens 1 and 2 occurred in 22 and 88 % of cases, respectively. Marked pathomorphosis in the tumor was observed in 48 and 56 % of patients on regimen 1 and 2, respectively. Pilot experience of magnetotherapy as an adjuvant in combined therapy of breast cancer suggests the validity of further studies of relevant effectiveness in different cancer stage and long-term administration

  4. Personalizing Therapy in Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C.; Burns, Timothy F.; Ramfidis, Vasilis S.; Socinski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition that non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is not a single disease entity, but rather a collection of distinct molecularly driven neoplasms, has permanently shifted the therapeutic landscape of NSCLC to a personalized approach. This personalization of NSCLC therapy is typified by the dramatic response rates seen in EGFR mutant NSCLC when treated with targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and in ALK translocation–driven NSCLC when treated with ALK inhibitors. Targeted therapeutic approaches in NSCLC necessitate consideration of more invasive biopsy techniques aimed at providing sufficient tissue for both histological determination and molecular profiling in all patients with stage IV disease both at the time of diagnosis and at the time of disease progression. Comprehensive genotyping efforts have identified oncogenic drivers in 62% lung adenocarcinomas and an increasing proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. The identification of these oncogenic drivers and the triage of patients to clinical trials evaluating novel targeted therapeutic approaches will increasingly mold a landscape of personalized lung cancer therapy where each genotype has an associated targeted therapy. This review outlines the state of personalized lung cancer therapy as it pertains to individual NSCLC genotypes. PMID:24258572

  5. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1 Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS damage. (2 Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3 Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4 Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8 and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective.

  6. Answer to preoperative chemie radiation in locally advanced rectum cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villegas Mendez, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    Study the pre-operative combined therapy effect in the treatment of the rectum cancer cases of the Servicio de Cirugia General 2 of the Hospital Mexico. The study covers since January of 2003 until December of 2005. It has like specific objectives to analyze the effect in the tumour stages, the sphincters preservation and the recurrence. In the conclusions, it notes that the pre-operative chemie-radiation in the rectum cancer is indicated in II and III stages, in which it has showed most advantages for the patient. It describes that the time between the end of pre-operative combined treatment and the surgery must has at least six weeks to guarantee the effect in the tumour and to reduce the treatment toxicity. It concludes besides, that the complication rate after the pre-operative combined therapy and the total meso rectum excision is approximately of 33%; however, the pelvic septic complications can reduce with an ostomy of protection. It focus that the technique of sphincters preservation has showed to be effective and secure if it does a previous selection to the patients in appropriate form. To get an suitable stages must count with trans rectum endoscopic ultrasound and a tomography of suitable quality. It concludes, also, in intervened tumours after of neo-adjuvancy they don't need free distal margins of illness higher to 2 cm. The total meso rectum excision is the updated surgical recommendation in the rectum cancer [es

  7. A Patient with Advanced Gastric Cancer Presenting with Extremely Large Uterine Fibroid Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Kuk Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Uterine fibroid tumors (uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign uterine tumors. The incidence of uterine fibroid tumors increases in older women and may occur in more than 30% of women aged 40 to 60. Many uterine fibroid tumors are asymptomatic and are diagnosed incidentally. Case Presentation. A 44-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with general weakness, dyspepsia, abdominal distension, and a palpable abdominal mass. An abdominal computed tomography scan showed a huge tumor mass in the abdomen which was compressing the intestine and urinary bladder. Gastroduodenal endoscopic and biopsy results showed a Borrmann type IV gastric adenocarcinoma. The patient was diagnosed with gastric cancer with disseminated peritoneal carcinomatosis. She underwent a hysterectomy with both salphingo-oophorectomy and bypass gastrojejunostomy. Simultaneous uterine fibroid tumor with other malignancies is generally observed without resection. But in this case, a surgical resection was required to resolve an intestinal obstruction and to exclude the possibility of a metastatic tumor. Conclusion. When a large pelvic or ovarian mass is detected in gastrointestinal malignancy patients, physicians try to exclude the presence of a Krukenberg tumor. If the tumors cause certain symptoms, surgical resection is recommended to resolve symptoms and to exclude a metastatic tumor.

  8. ESTIMATION OF SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED OVARIAN CANCER – ABSTRACT OF THE RESEARCH PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Smrkolj

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morbidity and mortality caused by cancer persist to be an important health problem world- wide and in the European Union member states as well. In Slovenia, most ovarian cancer cases are detected in advanced stages, hence a rather high mortality rate. Aims: The purpose of this research project is to analyze the primary cytoreduction in the patients with advanced ovarian cancer. The main objective of the project is to assess the use of lap- aroscopy in the prediction of optimal cytoreduction in these patients. Applicative research project ‘Estimation of survial in patients with advanced ovarian can- cer based on primary laparoscopical assessment of optimal cytoreduction’ (L3-2371 was approved and has been financed by the Slovene Research Agency and co-financed by the Ministry of Health of RS; Duration: May 1, 2009–April 30, 2012. Methods: The research project will consist of retrospective and prospective study. In all the patients with advanced ovarian cancer managed at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecol- ogy, University Medical Centre Ljubljana in the years 2003–2008, and in whom optimal primary cytoreduction was made using either laparoscopy or laparotomy, certain clinical and pathomorphological factors will be compared, and the effects of all analyzed factors on the outcome of treatment assessed. In the prospective study, we will aim at assessing the use of laparoscopy in the prediction of optimal cytoreduction in all newly detected cases using a laparoscopy-based score (Fagotti’s scoring system. Conclusions: The standard management of advanced ovarian cancer patients consists of primary surgical optimal and/or suboptimal cytoreduction followed by aggressive cytotoxic chemotherapy. In line with our experience and with that published most recently, laparoscopy seems to be a promising method with which we will attempt to most accurately assess the optimal cytoreduction in surgical treatment of ovarian cancer patients.

  9. Excluded Volume Effects in Gene Stretching

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Pui-Man

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the effects excluded volume on the stretching of a single DNA in solution. We find that for small force F, the extension h is not linear in F but proportion to F^{\\chi}, with \\chi=(1-\

  10. Hospitalization Rates and Predictors of Rehospitalization Among Individuals With Advanced Cancer in the Year After Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Robin L; Bell, Janice F; Tancredi, Daniel J; Romano, Patrick S; Bold, Richard J; Joseph, Jill G

    2017-11-01

    Purpose Among individuals with advanced cancer, frequent hospitalization increasingly is viewed as a hallmark of poor-quality care. We examined hospitalization rates and individual- and hospital-level predictors of rehospitalization among individuals with advanced cancer in the year after diagnosis. Methods Individuals diagnosed with advanced breast, colorectal, non-small-cell lung, or pancreatic cancer from 2009 to 2012 (N = 25,032) were identified with data from the California Cancer Registry (CCR). After linkage with inpatient discharge data, multistate and log-linear Poisson regression models were used to calculate hospitalization rates and to model rehospitalization in the year after diagnosis, accounting for survival. Results In the year after diagnosis, 71% of individuals with advanced cancer were hospitalized, 16% had three or more hospitalizations, and 64% of hospitalizations originated in the emergency department. Rehospitalization rates were significantly associated with black non-Hispanic (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.29; 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.42) and Hispanic (IRR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.20) race/ethnicity; public insurance (IRR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.47) and no insurance (IRR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.35); lower socioeconomic status quintiles (IRRs, 1.09 to 1.29); comorbidities (IRRs, 1.13 to 1.59); and pancreatic (IRR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.95 to 2.20) and non-small-cell lung (IRR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.54 to 1.86) cancers versus colorectal cancer. Rehospitalization rates were significantly lower after discharge from a hospital that had an outpatient palliative care program (IRR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.97) and were higher after discharge from a for-profit hospital (IRR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.56). Conclusion Individuals with advanced cancer experience a heavy burden of hospitalization in the year after diagnosis. Efforts to reduce hospitalization and provide care congruent with patient preferences might target individuals at higher risk. Future work might

  11. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... with this DC-based cancer vaccine was safe and non-toxic. Stable disease was found in 24% (4/17) of the patients. The quality of life remained for most categories high and stable throughout the study period.......Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based......-testis antigens. Vaccines were biweekly administered intradermally with a total of 10 vaccines per patient. CT scans were performed and responses were graded according to the RECIST criteria. Quality of life was monitored with the SF-36 questionnaire. Toxicity and adverse events were graded according...

  12. Subgroup effects of occupational therapy-based intervention for people with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Marc Sampedro; Østergaard, Lisa Gregersen; la Cour, Karen

    2018-01-01

    cancer (N = 242) and found no overall effects on ADL ability. However, heterogeneity of treatment effect may disguise subgroup differences. Objective: To investigate whether subgroups of people with advanced cancer gain positive effects from the ‘Cancer Home-Life Intervention’ on ADL ability. Material....... Results: The ‘Cancer Home-Life Intervention’ had no statistically significant effect in the six subgroups. Modifying effects of age (0.30 [95% CI: −0.05 to 0.64]) and gender (0.23 [95% CI: −0.11 to 0.57]) were not found. Conclusion: There were no subgroup effects of the ‘Cancer Home-Life Intervention......’on ADL motor ability. Some indications suggest greater effects for those aged below 69 years; however, this result should be interpreted with caution....

  13. E-cadherin and Vimentin as Predictors of Resistance to Preoperative Systemic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonar. S. Panigoro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of E-cadherin and increased vimentin expression are associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition andcancer stemness which are responsible for treatment resistance. The study aims to evaluate the role of E-cadherin andvimentin as predictors of resistance to preoperative systemic therapy in patients with advanced breast cancer. This wasa cross-sectional analytical study in patients with stage III-IV breast cancer in Dharmais Cancer Hospital and dr. CiptoMangunkusumo National Hospital from July 2015 to April 2016. Patients had biopsy specimens embedded in paraffinblocks. Expressions of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins were done immunohistochemically. Treatment response wasevaluated histopathologically using Miller-Payne criteria on mastectomy specimens. A total of 65 patients were enrolled.Five patients with invasive lobular carcinoma were excluded. Thirty one had chemotherapy and 29 had hormonaltherapy. After treatment, 46 patients were eligible for mastectomy. E-cadherin and vimentin were positive in 28 (60.9%and 11 (20.3% of specimens. Twenty-three (50% patients showed no response. Treatment resistance were associatedwith type of therapy (OR=4.4; 95% CI=1.27-15.41; p=0.017 and vimentin expression (OR=6.75; 95% CI=1.27-30.02;p=0.016. Hormonal therapy (ORadj=6.26; 95%CI=1.59-24.6; p=0.009 and positive vimentin (ORadj=8.75; 95%CI=1.43-57.4; p=0.019 were independent predictors of treatment resistance. In conclusion, E-cadherin and vimentin can beused as predictors of resistance to preoperative systemic therapy in patients with advanced breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, cancer stemness, E-cadherin, preoperative therapy, vimentin.   Peran E-cadherin dan Vimentin sebagai Prediktor Resistensi Terapi Sistemik Preoperatif pada Pasien Kanker Payudara Stadium Lanjut Abstrak Hilangnya ekspresi E-cadherin dan meningkatnya ekspresi vimentin dihubungkan dengan epithelial-mesenchymaltransition dan cancer stemness yang bertanggungjawab terhadap

  14. Potential of cancer cell-derived exosomes in clinical application: a review of recent research advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Liu, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Exosomes are 30- to 100-nm, membrane-bound vesicles that are released by most types of cells, including tumor cells. Exosomes contain a great variety of bioactive molecules, including signal peptides, microRNA, lipids, and DNA. In cancer, tumor cells aberrantly secrete large quantities of exosomes to transport paracrine signals or to contribute to tumor-environment interaction at a distance. The goal of this review was to discuss the recent advances on the mechanism of cancer-derived exosomes in tumor regulation. Pertinent articles and abstracts were identified through searches of PubMed for literature published from 1983 to December 2013. Search terms included exosome, tumor, cancer, diagnosis, and therapy. All of the exposed evidence points to communication between cancer cells and their surroundings, either mediated by cancer cell-derived exosomes or by stromal cell-derived exosomes. This communication probably supports tumor proliferation, motility, invasion, angiogenesis, and premetastatic niche preparation. In addition, recent research implies that cancer cell-derived exosomes play a suppressive role in cancer-directed immune response. The biomarkers detected in bodily fluid-derived exosomes imply a potential for exosomes in cancer diagnosis. Also, exosomes could be used as a vehicle to selectively deliver therapeutic nucleic-acid drugs or conventional drugs for tumor therapy. The tolerability and feasibility of cancer exosomes in diagnosis and therapy need to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. KRAS Testing for Anti-EGFR Therapy in Advanced Colorectal Cancer: An Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    affected by treatments, therefore, for patients for whom surgical tissue is available for KRAS testing, additional biopsies prior to treatment with these targeted agents is not necessary. For patients that have not undergone surgery or for whom surgical tissue is not available, a biopsy of either the primary or metastatic site is required to determine their KRAS status. This is possible as status at the metastatic and primary tumour sites is considered to be similar. To determine if there is predictive value of KRAS testing in guiding treatment decisions with anti-EGFR targeted therapies in advanced colorectal cancer patients refractory to chemotherapy. The Medical Advisory Secretariat followed its standard procedures and on May 18, 2010, searched the following electronic databases: Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and The International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment database. The subject headings and keywords searched included colorectal cancer, cetuximab, panitumumab, and KRAS testing. The search was further restricted to English-language articles published between January 1, 2009 and May 18, 2010 resulting in 1335 articles for review. Excluded were case reports, comments, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, and letters. Studies published from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2008 were identified in a health technology assessment conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), published in 2010. In total, 14 observational studies were identified for inclusion in this EBA: 4 for cetuximab monotherapy, 7 for the cetuximab-irinotecan combination therapy, and 3 to be included in the review for panitumumab monotherapy English-language articles, and English or French-language HTAs published from January 2005 to May 2010, inclusive.Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or observational studies, including single

  16. Challenges faced by palliative care physicians when caring for doctors with advanced cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noble, S. I. R.; Nelson, A.; Finlay, I. G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: It is possible that patients with advanced cancer, who are from the medical profession, have different or additional care needs than other patients. Previous training, professional experiences and access to information and services may influence their needs and subsequent illness

  17. Acute toxicity after a diverting stoma and spacer prior to chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Voort Van Zyp, Jochem R N; Ceha, Heleen M.; Niehe, Valerie; Marinelli, Andreas W K S; Putter, Hein; Marijnen, Corrie A M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by surgery is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). For grade ≥3 acute diarrhea there is a relationship between dose and irradiated small bowel volume. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether combined

  18. The relatives' perspective on advanced cancer care in Denmark. A cross-sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna T; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten A

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve advanced cancer care, evaluations are necessary. An important element of such evaluations is the perspective of the patient's relatives who have the role of being caregivers as well as co-users of the health care system. The aims were to investigate the scale structure of the ...

  19. Customising chemotherapy in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer: daily practice and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, A C; Sorensen, J B

    2011-01-01

    Treating patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a daunting task but during recent years new options have emerged. By tailoring treatment using either information on histological subtypes of NSCLC or biomarkers it is now possible to improve outcome and maintain stable quality...

  20. Managing One's Symptoms: A Qualitative Study of Low-Income African Americans With Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Katherine A; Sterk, Claire E; Quest, Tammie E; DiIorio, Colleen; Vena, Catherine; Bauer-Wu, Susan

    2016-01-01

    African Americans endure disproportionately high advanced cancer rates and also are disproportionately represented in the lower socioeconomic strata. These individuals work to manage symptoms in order to function and have a satisfactory quality of life. The purpose of this study was to discover what low-income African American adults with advanced cancer do on a day-to-day basis to relieve and manage symptoms. This study viewed the individuals as experts and asked them not what they are told to do, but rather what they actually do. A purposive sample of 27 individuals participated in semistructured interviews conducted by 2 research interviewers. This qualitative descriptive approach used content analysis to develop themes to describe symptom self-management. Participants described 2 approaches: making continual adjustments and finding stability through spirituality. In seeking comfort from the distress of their symptoms, they were constantly altering their activities and fine-tuning strategies. They adjusted medical regimens and changed the speed and selection of daily activities, including comfort measures and diet modifications. In contrast, their spirituality was a consistent presence in their lives that provided balance to their unstable symptom experience. This study illustrates that people with advanced cancer actively engage in multiple complex self-management strategies in response to symptoms. As providers assess how individuals manage their symptoms, they must find ways to support those efforts. Providers then will recognize the challenges faced by advanced cancer patients in obtaining the best quality of life while managing multiple symptoms, activities, and family responsibilities.

  1. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Lænsø Madsen, Mads; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary–interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented...

  2. An unusual presentation of advanced prostate cancer in a 56-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    P.O. Areo

    2016-12-26

    Dec 26, 2016 ... Introduction: Advanced prostate cancer usually presents with lower urinary tract symptoms associated with features of ... fever or drenching night sweat. There was no ... active. Digital rectal examination revealed a firm mass bulging into the rectum on .... cells with pleomorphic and hyperchromatic nuclei.

  3. Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Brandt, Åse; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    “Everyday life under change” and two sub-categories 1) Appling strategies to manage occupations in everyday life and 2) Preserving a meaningful everyday life. Significance: The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer, to a greater extent, should be supported in exploring familiar as well as new...

  4. Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer living at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Brandt, Åse; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2017-01-01

    occupations in everyday life and 2) Self-developed strategies to manage occupations. Significance: The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer should be supported to a greater extent in finding ways to manage familiar as well as new and more personally meaningful occupations to enhance quality...

  5. Expressed wishes and incidence of euthanasia in advanced lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pardon, K.; Deschepper, R.; van der Stichele, R.; Bernheim, J.L.; Mortier, F.; Schallier, D.; Germonpre, P.; Galdermans, D.; Van Kerckhoven, W.; Deliens, L.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores expressed wishes and requests for euthanasia (i.e. administration of lethal drugs at the explicit request of the patient), and incidence of end-of-life decisions with possible life-shortening effects (ELDs) in advanced lung cancer patients in Flanders, Belgium. We performed a

  6. Case Report: Down-staging locally advanced head and neck cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Report: Down-staging locally advanced head and neck cancer in an HIV infected patient in a limited resource setting. L Masamba, D Nkosi, D Kumiponjera. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  7. Two Cases of Pneumatosis Intestinalis during Cetuximab Therapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Miller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatosis intestinalis is a rare but known potential complication of treatment with cetuximab. Here we present two cases of pneumatosis intestinalis occurring in patients who were receiving cetuximab as treatment for advanced head and neck cancer. In both cases, cetuximab was discontinued after discovery of the pneumatosis intestinalis.

  8. Vandetanib in advanced medullary thyroid cancer: review of adverse event management strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grande, Enrique; Kreissl, Michael C; Filetti, Sebastiano

    2013-01-01

    Vandetanib has recently demonstrated clinically meaningful benefits in patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Given the potential for long-term vandetanib therapy in this setting, in addition to treatment for disease-related symptoms, effective...

  9. Systematic review of innovative ablative therapies for the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, S. J. E.; Vogel, J. A.; van Santvoort, H. C.; van Lienden, K. P.; van Hillegersberg, R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Besselink, M. G. H.; Molenaar, I. Q.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundLocally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is associated with a very poor prognosis. Current palliative (radio)chemotherapy provides only a marginal survival benefit of 2-3 months. Several innovative local ablative therapies have been explored as new treatment options. This systematic

  10. Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Ploen, John; Vuong, Té

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation...

  11. Computed tomography findings after radiofrequency ablation in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Steffi J. E.; Derksen, Tyche C.; Nio, Chung Y.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Walma, Marieke S.; Molenaar, Izaak Q.; van Leeuwen, Maarten S.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide a systematic evaluation of the computed tomography(CT) findings after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer(LAPC). Eighteen patients with intra-operative RFA-treated LAPC were included in a prospective case series. All CT-scans

  12. Recent Advances in Pancreatic Cancer Surgery of Relevance to the Practicing Pathologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssen, Lennart B.; Rombouts, Steffi J. E.; Walma, Marieke S.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tol, Johanna A.; Molenaar, Isaac Q.; van Eijck, Casper H. J.; Verheij, Joanne; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; Besselink, Marc G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in pancreatic surgery have the potential to improve outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer. We address 3 new, trending topics in pancreatic surgery that are of relevance to the pathologist. First, increasing awareness of the prognostic impact of intraoperatively detected

  13. Prognosis for advanced-stage primary peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma and serous ovarian cancer in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Chong Chao

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: PFS was similar for advanced-stage PSPC and PSOC patients. Since the PSPC patients tended to be older and have more high-grade tumors, OS was shorter for PSPC than for POSC patients. Thus, management of the two types of cancer should not differ.

  14. Fluorouracil continuous infusion plus alfa interferon plus oral folinic acid in advanced colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, C. J.; de Mulder, P. H.; Burghouts, J. T.; Wagener, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Several reports on fluorouracil (5-FU) and alfa interferon (IFN-alpha) combination therapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer have been published. In our study high-dose continuous infusion 5-FU (60 mg/kg per 48 hours), oral folinic acid (FA) (8 x 90 mg during 5-FU), and IFN-alpha three

  15. Clinical implementation of coverage probability planning for nodal boosting in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Assenholt, Marianne S; Jensen, Maria F

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To implement coverage probability (CovP) for dose planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) of pathologic lymph nodes in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: CovP constraints for SIB of the pathological nodal target (PTV-N) with a central dose peak...

  16. Liquid fiducial marker performance during radiotherapy of locally advanced non small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhög, Jonas Scherman; Mortensen, Steen Riisgaard; Larsen, Klaus Richter

    2016-01-01

    We analysed the positional and structural stability of a long-term biodegradable liquid fiducial marker (BioXmark) for radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced lung cancer. Markers were injected via endoscopic- or endobronchial ultrasound in lymph nodes and reachable primary tumours. Marker...

  17. Living with Symptoms: A Qualitative Study of Black Adults with Advanced Cancer Living in Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Katherine A; Quest, Tammie E; Vena, Catherine; Sterk, Claire E

    2018-02-01

    Cancer is associated with disease-related and treatment-related symptoms. Little is known about the symptom experience of black individuals with advanced cancer especially those with limited financial resources. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the symptom experience of black adults with advanced cancer living in poverty. This qualitative descriptive study focused on the perspectives of the participants experiencing at least two symptoms related to cancer. A purposive sample of 27 individuals receiving care at a public hospital in a southeastern city participated in the study. Semi-structured audiotaped interviews were conducted by two research interviewers. Content analysis was used to develop themes to describe the symptom experience. Two main themes emerged in terms of the participants' symptom experiences: (1) "living in pain," which included the overwhelming experience of pain, both physical and emotional, and (2) "symptoms associated with functioning in everyday life." Participants frequently used the context of activities in their daily lives to explain symptoms, including the effect of symptoms on the activities of eating, moving and doing, and communicating. People with advanced cancer work to negotiate a high frequency of multiple distressful symptoms of severe-to-moderate severity. Information gained from this study can help guide research in symptom science and provide direction for clinicians working with this minority group. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. All rights reserved.

  18. Predicting survival time in noncurative patients with advanced cancer: a prospective study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing; Zhou, Lingjun; Wee, B; Shen, Fengping; Ma, Xiuqiang; Zhao, Jijun

    2014-05-01

    Accurate prediction of prognosis for cancer patients is important for good clinical decision making in therapeutic and care strategies. The application of prognostic tools and indicators could improve prediction accuracy. This study aimed to develop a new prognostic scale to predict survival time of advanced cancer patients in China. We prospectively collected items that we anticipated might influence survival time of advanced cancer patients. Participants were recruited from 12 hospitals in Shanghai, China. We collected data including demographic information, clinical symptoms and signs, and biochemical test results. Log-rank tests, Cox regression, and linear regression were performed to develop a prognostic scale. Three hundred twenty patients with advanced cancer were recruited. Fourteen prognostic factors were included in the prognostic scale: Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score, pain, ascites, hydrothorax, edema, delirium, cachexia, white blood cell (WBC) count, hemoglobin, sodium, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) values. The score was calculated by summing the partial scores, ranging from 0 to 30. When using the cutoff points of 7-day, 30-day, 90-day, and 180-day survival time, the scores were calculated as 12, 10, 8, and 6, respectively. We propose a new prognostic scale including KPS, pain, ascites, hydrothorax, edema, delirium, cachexia, WBC count, hemoglobin, sodium, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, AST, and ALP values, which may help guide physicians in predicting the likely survival time of cancer patients more accurately. More studies are needed to validate this scale in the future.

  19. The End of Nihilism: Systemic Therapy of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernani, Vinicius; Steuer, Conor E; Jahanzeb, Mohammad

    2017-01-14

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and many other parts of the world. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) comprises 85-90% of lung cancers. Historically, the expected survival of patients with advanced disease has been estimated in months. In recent years, however, lung cancer has come to be seen as a treatable disease with multiple therapeutic options. Enormous advances in the understanding of its pathways and mechanisms have enabled personalized therapy in NSCLC. The evolving approach to therapy focuses on genomic profiling of the tumors to find molecular targets and develop specific agents for individualized therapy. In addition, maintenance therapy has emerged as a valid approach, and the choice of chemotherapy now varies by histology. Most recently, immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibitors has shown promising results, with impressive durations of response and a tolerable toxicity profile. Together, these discoveries have improved overall survival substantially in patient populations that have access to these advancements. We review the clinical data surrounding these impressive improvements.

  20. Clinical use of cabozantinib in the treatment of advanced kidney cancer: efficacy, safety, and patient selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu SS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Steven S Yu, David I Quinn, Tanya B Dorff Division of Oncology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Clear cell (cc renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common type of cancer found in the kidney accounting for ~90% of all kidney cancers. In 2012, there were ~337,000 new cases of RCC diagnosed worldwide with an estimated 143,000 deaths, with the highest incidence and mortality in Western countries. Despite improvements in cancer control achieved with VEGF- and mTOR-targeted therapy for RCC, progression remains virtually universal and additional therapies are needed. The pivotal results of the METEOR trial led to cabozantinib’s designation as a breakthrough drug by the US Food and Drug Administration and its approval for treatment of advanced RCC in 2016. Subsequent data from the CABOSUN trial, where caboxantinib is compared with sunitinib, will provide information on the relative activity of cabozantinib as first-line therapy for ccRCC. We review the development of cabozantinib in advanced RCC and its role in the treatment landscape for advanced RCC. Keywords: cabozantinib, renal cell carcinoma, kidney cancer, clear cell carcinoma, tyrosine kinase inhibitor

  1. Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancers-Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsa, N; Nagaraja, H; Shweta, S; Raghunath, S K

    2017-06-01

    Twenty-five to thirty percent of patients with prostate cancer present with locally advanced disease. While risk stratification remains the same with high incidence of upstaging of disease on imaging and histopathological evaluation; there have been progressive refinements in surgical therapy. With availability of reasonably robust data, radical prostatectomy in men with locally advanced prostate cancers seems to effect improvement in both cancer specific and overall survival rates in comparison to the current standard of care of radiation with androgen deprivation therapy. Studies using radical prostatectomy as a part of multimodality approach have also shown promising results. There is an imminent need for well-designed prospective studies of benefits of radical prostatectomy over radiation and androgen deprivation as well as benefits of multimodality therapy over monotherapy. Surgery for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer is technically challenging. Surgical outcomes are comparable to those of organ-confined disease when performed in high-volume centers. Neoadjuvant therapies prior to radical prostatectomy might improve surgical outcomes, but whether they will translate into a better cancer specific and overall survival are yet to be ascertained.

  2. Nutrition impact symptoms in advanced cancer patients: frequency and specific interventions, a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlin, Aurelius; Blum, David; Wierecky, Jan; Haile, Sarah R; Ottery, Faith D; Strasser, Florian

    2013-03-01

    Involuntary weight loss (IWL) is frequent in advanced cancer patients causing compromised anticancer treatment outcomes and function. Cancer cachexia is influenced by nutrition impact symptoms (NIS). The aim of this study was to explore the frequency of NIS in advanced patients and to assess specific interventions guided by a 12-item NIS checklist. Consecutive patients from an outpatient nutrition-fatigue clinic completed the NIS checklist. The NIS checklist was developed based on literature review and multiprofessional clinical expert consensus. Chart review was performed to detect defined NIS typical interventions. Oncology outpatients not seen in the nutrition-fatigue clinic were matched for age, sex, and tumor to serve as controls. In 52 nutrition-fatigue clinic patients, a mixed cancer population [IWL in 2 months 5.96 % (mean)], the five most frequent NIS were taste and smell alterations 27 %, constipation 19 %, abdominal pain 14 %, dysphagia 12 %, and epigastric pain 10 %. A statistically significant difference for NIS typical interventions in patients with taste and smell alterations (p = 0.04), constipation (p = 0.01), pain (p = 0.0001), and fatigue (p = 0.0004) were found compared to the control population [mixed cancer, 3.53 % IWL in 2 months (mean)]. NIS are common in advanced cancer patients. The NIS checklist can guide therapeutic nutrition-targeted interventions. The awareness for NIS will likely evoke more research in assessment, impact, and treatment.

  3. Contemporary management of voice and swallowing disorders in patients with advanced lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Grainne C; Carding, Paul N; Bhosle, Jaishree; Roe, Justin W G

    2015-06-01

    Advanced lung cancer can cause changes to swallowing and communication function. Direct tumour invasion, dyspnoea and deconditioning can all impact on swallowing function and communication. Cancer treatment, if administered, may cause or compound symptoms. In this study, the nature of swallowing and communication difficulties in patients with advanced lung cancer will be discussed, and management options including medical management, speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention, and surgical interventions will be considered. Advanced lung cancer can result in voice and swallowing difficulties, which can increase symptom burden and significantly impact on quality of life (QOL). There is a growing evidence base to support the use of injection laryngoplasty under local anaesthetic to offer immediate improvement in voice, swallowing and overall QOL. There is limited literature on the nature and extent of voice and swallowing impairment in patients with lung cancer. Well designed studies with robust and sensitive multidimensional dysphagia and dysphonia assessments are required. Outcome studies examining interventions with clearly defined treatment goals are required. These studies should include both functional and patient-reported outcome measures to develop the evidence base and to ensure that interventions are both timely and appropriate.

  4. [A Case of Effective Chemoradiotherapy Using mFOLFOX6 for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Yoshio; Kitamura, Shosuke; Mouri, Teruo; Miwata, Tomohiro; Hirata, Yuzoh; Ishizaki, Yasuyo; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi

    2017-05-01

    We report a case of locally advanced rectal cancer, treated effectively with chemotherapy consisting of mFOLFOX6 combined with radiotherapy. A 63-year-old man was admitted to our hospital in March 2012 for diarrhea and anal and perineal pain. Advanced rectal cancer with invasion ofthe right perineum was diagnosed based on computer tomography(CT) findings. Surgery was performed; however, the rectal cancer was unresectable. A sigmoid colostomy was performed, and a central venous port was implanted. In April 2012, the patient was treated with chemotherapy using 3 courses ofmFOLFOX6 and concurrent radiotherapy. Radiotherapy at 2 Gy/day was administered 25 times(total dose, 50 Gy). After chemoradiotherapy, the patient underwent 3 courses ofmFOLFOX6 as an additional therapy. By June 2012, CT showed resolution ofthe tumor in the right perineum and a marked decrease in the size ofthe primary rectal cancer. Because the patient refused surgery, we started treatment with combination chemotherapy using oral S-1 and intravenous CPT-11 in August 2012. After 18 courses, the treatment was changed to oral administration ofS -1 alone, which was continued for 1 year. The patient remained well without recurrence for 54 months since the original diagnosis. Therefore, chemoradiotherapy with mFOLFOX6 is a possible option for the management of advanced rectal cancer.

  5. Association between protein C levels and mortality in patients with advanced prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilts, I T; Hutten, B A; Meijers, J C M; Spek, C A; Büller, H R; Kamphuisen, P W

    2017-06-01

    Procoagulant factors promote cancer progression and metastasis. Protein C is involved in hemostasis, inflammation and signal transduction, and has a protective effect on the endothelial barrier. In mice, administration of activated protein C reduced experimental metastasis. We assessed the association between protein C and mortality in patients with three types of cancer. The study population consisted of patients with advanced prostate, non-small cell lung or pancreatic cancer, who participated in the INPACT trial (NCT00312013). The trial evaluated the addition of nadroparin to chemotherapy in patients with advanced malignancy. Patients were divided into tertiles based on protein C at baseline. The association between protein C levels and mortality was evaluated with Cox proportional hazard models. We analysed 477 patients (protein C tertiles: C level was 107% (IQR 92-129). In the lowest tertile, 75 patients per 100 patient-years died, as compared to 60 and 54 in the middle and high tertile, respectively. Lower levels of protein C were associated with increased mortality (in tertiles: HR for trend 1.18, 95%CI 1.02-1.36, adjusted for age, sex and nadroparin use; as a continuous variable: HR 1.004, 95%CI 1.00-1.008, p=0.07). Protein C seems inversely associated with mortality in patients with advanced prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer. Further research should validate protein C as a biomarker for mortality, and explore the effects of protein C on progression of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Recent technological advances in using mouse models to study ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Carrie Danielle; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina Messineo

    2014-01-01

    Serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer in the United States with disease recurrence being the major cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of SEOC, the survival rate for women with this disease has remained relatively unchanged in the last two decades. Preclinical mouse models of ovarian cancer, including xenograft, syngeneic, and genetically engineered mice, have been developed to provide a mechanism for studying the development and progression of SEOC. Such models strive to increase our understanding of the etiology and dissemination of ovarian cancer in order to overcome barriers to early detection and resistance to standard chemotherapy. Although there is not a single model that is most suitable for studying ovarian cancer, improvements have led to current models that more closely mimic human disease in their genotype and phenotype. Other advances in the field, such as live animal imaging techniques, allow effective monitoring of the microenvironment and therapeutic efficacy. New and improved preclinical mouse models, combined with technological advances to study such models, will undoubtedly render success of future human clinical trials for patients with SEOC.

  7. Trousseau's syndrome in a patient with advanced stage gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tai-Long; Rau, Kung-Ming; Chung, Wen-Jung; Tai, Wei-Chen; Wang, Shih-Ho; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chou, Yeh-Pin; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Yen-Hao; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2015-09-14

    Patients with cancer are at high risk for thrombotic events, which are known collectively as Trousseau's syndrome. Herein, we report a 66-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with terminal stage gastric cancer and liver metastasis and who had an initial clinical presentation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute ischemia of the left lower leg that resulted in gangrenous changes occurred during admission. Subsequent angiography of the left lower limb was then performed. This procedure revealed arterial thrombosis of the left common iliac artery with extension to the external iliac artery, the left common iliac artery, the posterior tibial artery, and the peroneal artery, which were occluded by thrombi. Aspiration of the thrombi demonstrated that these were not tumor thrombi. The interesting aspect of our case was that the disease it presented as arterial thrombotic events, which may correlate with gastric adenocarcinoma. In summary, we suggested that the unexplained thrombotic events might be one of the initial presentations of occult malignancy and that thromboprophylaxis should always be considered.

  8. Genetic and epigenetic markers in colorectal cancer screening: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manish Pratap; Rai, Sandhya; Suyal, Shradha; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Nand Kumar; Agarwal, Akash; Srivastava, Sameer

    2017-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogenous disease which develops from benign intraepithelial lesions known as adenomas to malignant carcinomas. Acquired alterations in Wnt signaling, TGFβ, MAPK pathway genes and clonal propagation of altered cells are responsible for this transformation. Detection of adenomas or early stage cancer in asymptomatic patients and better prognostic and predictive markers is important for improving the clinical management of CRC. Area covered: In this review, the authors have evaluated the potential of genetic and epigenetic alterations as markers for early detection, prognosis and therapeutic predictive potential in the context of CRC. We have discussed molecular heterogeneity present in CRC and its correlation to prognosis and response to therapy. Expert commentary: Molecular marker based CRC screening methods still fail to gain trust of clinicians. Invasive screening methods, molecular heterogeneity, chemoresistance and low quality test samples are some key challenges which need to be addressed in the present context. New sequencing technologies and integrated omics data analysis of individual or population cohort results in GWAS. MPE studies following a GWAS could be future line of research to establish accurate correlations between CRC and its risk factors. This strategy would identify most reliable biomarkers for CRC screening and management.

  9. Para-aortic lymph node radiation in advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, B.; Watring, W.G.; Tak, W.; Anderson, B.; Piro, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-six patients with advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix and with iliac or para-aortic nodes interpreted as un-equivocally positive on lymphangiography have received radiation therapy to the para-aortic area at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology at Tufts-New England Medical Center Hospital. Of 29 patients who received para-aortic area irradiation as part of their initial treatment, local control was achieved in 18 patients (62%). Overall, four patients developed major complications requiring surgical intervention. Detailed results and our current pre-treatment evaluation policy including lymphangiography, percutaneous needle biopsy and selective extra-peritoneal lymph node biopsy will be discussed

  10. Advances in molecular biomarkers for gastric cancer: miRNAs as emerging novel cancer markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hua-Hsi; Lin, Wen-chang; Tsai, Kuo-Wang

    2014-01-23

    Carcinoma of the stomach is one of the most prevalent cancer types in the world. Although the incidence of gastric cancer is declining, the outcomes of gastric cancer patients remain dismal because of the lack of effective biomarkers to detect early gastric cancer. Modern biomedical research has explored many potential gastric cancer biomarker genes by utilising serum protein antigens, oncogenic genes or gene families through improving molecular biological technologies, such as microarray, RNA-Seq and the like. Recently, the small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to be critical regulators in the oncogenesis pathways and to serve as useful clinical biomarkers. This new class of biomarkers is emerging as a novel molecule for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, including gastric cancer. By translational suppression of target genes, miRNAs play a significant role in the gastric cancer cell physiology and tumour progression. There are potential implications of previously discovered gastric cancer molecular biomarkers and their expression modulations by respective miRNAs. Therefore, many miRNAs are found to play oncogenic roles or tumour-suppressing functions in human cancers. With the surprising stability of miRNAs in tissues, serum or other body fluids, miRNAs have emerged as a new type of cancer biomarker with immeasurable clinical potential.

  11. Combined functional CT/FDG-PET: demonstrates reduced hepatic phosphorylation of glucose in advanced colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.A.; Keith, C.J.; Griffiths, M.R.; Fuentes, M.; Bunce, I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: This study describes a technique to quantify hepatic glucose phosphorylation using combined data from functional CT and FDG-PET and assesses the differences in phosphorylation between patients with either early or advanced colorectal cancer. Functional CT and FDG-PET were utilised to obtain measurements of perfusion and glucose uptake respectively within the livers of a series of 35 patients with colorectal cancer. Patients with PET evidence of extrahepatic tumour were considered to have advanced disease. The net influx constant (Ki) for FDG was determined from the liver SUV. CT measurements of hepatic perfusion were incorporated into FDG kinetic analysis to determine hepatic glucose phosphorylation fraction. SUV and Ki were significantly lower in the 12 patients with advanced disease (p=0.015 and p=0.013 respectively) whereas portal and total hepatic perfusion were increased (p=0.013 and p=0.008 respectively). Combining the PET and CT data yielded phosphorylation fractions of 1.14% and 0.74% for early and advanced disease respectively (p=0.002). Hepatic glucose phosphorylation can be determined by combining functional CT measurements of perfusion with PET measurements of FDG and is significantly reduced in patients with more advanced malignancy. Reduced hepatic glucose phosphorylation may be an important mechanism in the development of cancer cachexia. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  12. Combined functional CT/FDG-PET: demonstrates reduced hepatic phosphorylation of glucose in advanced colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, K A [Southernex Imaging Group, QLD (Australia); Queensland University of Technology, QLD (Australia); Keith, C J [Southernex Imaging Group, QLD (Australia); Wesley Research Institute, QLD (Australia); Griffiths, M R [Queensland University of Technology, QLD (Australia); Fuentes, M [Southernex Imaging Group, QLD (Australia); Bunce, I [Wesley Research Institute, QLD (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    Full text: This study describes a technique to quantify hepatic glucose phosphorylation using combined data from functional CT and FDG-PET and assesses the differences in phosphorylation between patients with either early or advanced colorectal cancer. Functional CT and FDG-PET were utilised to obtain measurements of perfusion and glucose uptake respectively within the livers of a series of 35 patients with colorectal cancer. Patients with PET evidence of extrahepatic tumour were considered to have advanced disease. The net influx constant (Ki) for FDG was determined from the liver SUV. CT measurements of hepatic perfusion were incorporated into FDG kinetic analysis to determine hepatic glucose phosphorylation fraction. SUV and Ki were significantly lower in the 12 patients with advanced disease (p=0.015 and p=0.013 respectively) whereas portal and total hepatic perfusion were increased (p=0.013 and p=0.008 respectively). Combining the PET and CT data yielded phosphorylation fractions of 1.14% and 0.74% for early and advanced disease respectively (p=0.002). Hepatic glucose phosphorylation can be determined by combining functional CT measurements of perfusion with PET measurements of FDG and is significantly reduced in patients with more advanced malignancy. Reduced hepatic glucose phosphorylation may be an important mechanism in the development of cancer cachexia. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc.

  13. [The necessary perseverance of surgery for the treatment of locally advanced colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jin

    2018-03-25

    Colorectal cancer, a malignant tumor arising from the colon or rectum, is a common cancer in China, with most patients diagnosed at the advanced stage or locally advanced stage. Large tumor size results in the invasion of adjacent organs and the multiple organ involvement, which poses certain challenges for clinical treatment. When facing advanced stage colorectal cancer, some surgeons do not consider surgery, a reasonable option. However, in fact, multi-disciplinary treatment can achieve relatively good treatment outcomes in patients with advanced stage or locally advanced stage colorectal cancer. Therefore, reasonable surgery should not be hastily abandoned. For patients with large tumors without distant metastases but with multiple organ involvement, directly surgical resection is difficult, therefore, preoperative adjuvant therapy can be considered. The basic principle of surgical treatment is to accomplish maximum protection of organ functions and to perform reasonable regional lymph node dissection on the basis of achieving R0 resection. Common surgical procedures for locally advanced colorectal cancer are as follows: (1)Right-sided colon cancer with duodenal invasion: first, the colon must be freed from three directions, namely the right posterior surface of the colon, the left side of the tumor, and the upper side of the tumor inferior to the pylorus, so as to expose and assess the spatial relationship between the tumor and the duodenum; the actual tumor invasion depth in the duodenum may be shallow. (2) Splenic flexure colon cancer with invasion of the cauda pancreatis and hilum lienis: multivisceral resection must be performed without separating the attachment between the tumor and spleen. The tumor border can be found more easily through manipulations starting from the descending colon. (3) Giant sigmoid colorectal cancer with bladder invasion: invasion usually occurs at the bladder fundus. Therefore, during surgery, the attachment between the rectum and

  14. Comprehensive clinical study of concurrent chemotherapy breathing IMRT middle part of locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jae Hong; Moon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Seung Chul

    2015-01-01

    The standard treatment of locally advanced type of mid-esophageal cancer is concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). We evaluated the feasibility of chemotherapy with adding docetaxel to the classical basic regimens of cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiotherapy up to 70.2 Gy using dose escalations for esophageal cancer. It was possible to escalate radiation treatment dose up to 70.2 Gy by the respiratory-gated intensity- modulated radiotherapy (gated-IMRT) based on the 4DCT-simulation, with improving target coverage and normal tissue (ex., lung, heart, and spinal cord) sparing. This study suggested that the definitive chemo-radiotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (i.e., DCF-R) and gating IMRT is tolerable and active in patients with locally advanced mid-esophageal cancer (AEC)

  15. Cf-252 neutron brachytherapy: an advance for bulky localized cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The physical and radiobiogical basis as well as the rationale for neutron brachytherapy, using Cf-252, in human cancer therapy is reviewed. Cf-252 brachytherapy represents an economical and effective form of neutron radiotherapy that is readily and safely applied clinically. It can be used anywhere in the world without unusual personnel, equipment or facilities, or prohibitive expenses or maintenance costs. Used on bulky head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, pelvic, brain and appendage cancers, it overcomes hypoxic radioresistance and produces remarkable rates of tumor clearance. It is easily combined with photon radiotherapy and in proper schedules and doses, it can control advanced but still localized regional cancers to produce tumor cure. It will clear the local manifestations of recurrent or metastatic tumors or advanced stages of primary tumors and therefore in conjunction with other adjuvant therapies offers much more effective tumor control and palliation than present conventional therapy. (Auth.)

  16. Family Relationships and Psychosocial Dysfunction among Family Caregivers of Patients with Advanced Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Kathrine Grovn; Trevino, Kelly; Lange, Theis

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Caring for a family member with advanced cancer strains family caregivers. Classification of family types has been shown to identify patients at risk of poor psychosocial function. However, little is known about how family relationships affect caregiver psychosocial function. OBJECTIVES......: To investigate family types identified by a cluster analysis and to examine the reproducibility of cluster analyses. We also sought to examine the relationship between family types and caregivers' psychosocial function. METHODS: Data from 622 caregivers of advanced cancer patients (part of the Coping with Cancer...... Study) were analyzed using Gaussian Mixture Modeling as the primary method to identify family types based on the Family Relationship Index questionnaire. We then examined the relationship between family type and caregiver quality of life (Medical Outcome Survey Short Form), social support (Interpersonal...

  17. Follow-up of patients with localized breast cancer and first indicators of advanced breast cancer recurrence: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viot, Julien; Bachour, Martin; Meurisse, Aurélia; Pivot, Xavier; Fiteni, Frédéric

    2017-08-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to assess the follow-up of patients with localized breast cancer and the first indicators of advanced breast cancer recurrence. All patients with advanced breast cancer recurrence treated between January 2010 and June 2016 in our institution were registered. Among these patients, 303 patients initially treated for early breast cancer with curative intent were identified. After initial curative treatment, follow-up involved the oncologist, the general practitioner and the gynecologist in 68.0%, 48.9% and 19.1% of cases, respectively. The median DFI was 4 years for luminal A, 3.8 years for luminal B, 3.7 years for HER2-positive and 1.5 years for TNBC (p = 0.07). Breast cancer tumor marker was prescribed for 164 patients (54.1%). No difference in terms of follow-up was observed according to the molecular subtype. Symptoms were the primary indicator of relapse for 143 patients (47.2%). Breast cancer recurrence was discovered by CA 15.3 elevation in 57 patients (18.8%) and by CAE elevation in 3 patients (1%). The rate of relapse diagnosed by elevation of CA 15.3 or CAE was not statistically associated with the molecular subtype (p = 0.65). Luminal A cases showed a significantly higher rate of bone metastases (p = 0.0003). TNBC cases showed a significantly higher rate of local recurrence (p = 0.002) and a borderline statistical significant higher rate of lung/pleural metastases (p = 0.07). Follow-up recommendations could be adapted in clinical practice according to the molecular subtype. General practitioners should be more involved by the specialists in breast cancer follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Safety and Activity of Anti–PD-L1 Antibody in Patients with Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmer, Julie R.; Tykodi, Scott S.; Chow, Laura Q.M.; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Hwu, Patrick; Drake, Charles G.; Camacho, Luis H.; Kauh, John; Odunsi, Kunle; Pitot, Henry C.; Hamid, Omid; Bhatia, Shailender; Martins, Renato; Eaton, Keith; Chen, Shuming; Salay, Theresa M.; Alaparthy, Suresh; Grosso, Joseph F.; Korman, Alan J.; Parker, Susan M.; Agrawal, Shruti; Goldberg, Stacie M.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Gupta, Ashok; Wigginton, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Programmed death 1 (PD-1) protein, a T-cell coinhibitory receptor, and one of its ligands, PD-L1, play a pivotal role in the ability of tumor cells to evade the host’s immune system. Blockade of interactions between PD-1 and PD-L1 enhances immune function in vitro and mediates antitumor activity in preclinical models. METHODS In this multicenter phase 1 trial, we administered intravenous anti–PD-L1 antibody (at escalating doses ranging from 0.3 to 10 mg per kilogram of body weight) to patients with selected advanced cancers. Anti–PD-L1 antibody was administered every 14 days in 6-week cycles for up to 16 cycles or until the patient had a complete response or confirmed disease progression. RESULTS As of February 24, 2012, a total of 207 patients — 75 with non–small-cell lung cancer, 55 with melanoma, 18 with colorectal cancer, 17 with renal-cell cancer, 17 with ovarian cancer, 14 with pancreatic cancer, 7 with gastric cancer, and 4 with breast cancer — had received anti–PD-L1 antibody. The median duration of therapy was 12 weeks (range, 2 to 111). Grade 3 or 4 toxic effects that investigators considered to be related to treatment occurred in 9% of patients. Among patients with a response that could be evaluated, an objective response (a complete or partial response) was observed in 9 of 52 patients with melanoma, 2 of 17 with renal-cell cancer, 5 of 49 with non–small-cell lung cancer, and 1 of 17 with ovarian cancer. Responses lasted for 1 year or more in 8 of 16 patients with at least 1 year of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Antibody-mediated blockade of PD-L1 induced durable tumor regression (objective response rate of 6 to 17%) and prolonged stabilization of disease (rates of 12 to 41% at 24 weeks) in patients with advanced cancers, including non–small-cell lung cancer, melanoma, and renal-cell cancer. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00729664.) PMID:22658128

  19. PET/CT and histopathologic response to preoperative chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, C.; Loft, A.; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared to histopathologic...

  20. PET/CT and Histopathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Charlotte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... of chemoradiation is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography....... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral(R) (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared...

  1. Outcome of advanced lung cancer with central airway obstruction versus without central airway obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akash; Goh, Soon Keng; Tai, Dessmon Y.H.; Kor, Ai Ching; Seow, Debra G.F.; Sein, Zin Nge Nge; Samol, Jens; Abisheganaden, John

    2018-01-01

    Patients with central airway obstruction (CAO) from advanced lung cancer present with significant morbidity and are assumed to have lower survival. Hence, they are offered only palliative support. We asked if patients who have advanced lung cancer with CAO (recanalised and treated) will behave similarly to those with advanced lung cancer without CAO. This study was a retrospective review of the medical records of the patients managed for advanced lung cancer during 2010 and 2015 at our institution. 85 patients were studied. Median survival and 1-, 2- and 5-year survival were 5.8 months, 30.3%, 11.7% and 2.3% versus 9.3 months, 35.7%, 9.6% and 4.7%, respectively, in the CAO and no CAO groups (p=0.30). More patients presented with respiratory failure (15 (35%) versus none; p=0.0001) and required assisted mechanical ventilation (10 (23.3%) versus none; p=0.001) in the CAO group compared with the no CAO group. Fewer patients received chemotherapy in the CAO group (11 (25.5%)) compared with the no CAO group (23 (54.7%); p=0.008). There was no difference in survival among patients with advanced lung cancer whether they presented with CAO or without CAO. Survival was similar to those without CAO in patients with recanalised CAO despite greater morbidity and lesser use of chemotherapy, strongly advocating bronchoscopic recanalisation of CAO. These findings dispel the nihilism associated with such cases. PMID:29637076

  2. Pilot study of psilocybin treatment for anxiety in patients with advanced-stage cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Charles S; Danforth, Alicia L; Chopra, Gurpreet S; Hagerty, Marycie; McKay, Charles R; Halberstadt, Adam L; Greer, George R

    2011-01-01

    Researchers conducted extensive investigations of hallucinogens in the 1950s and 1960s. By the early 1970s, however, political and cultural pressures forced the cessation of all projects. This investigation reexamines a potentially promising clinical application of hallucinogens in the treatment of anxiety reactive to advanced-stage cancer. To explore the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in patients with advanced-stage cancer and reactive anxiety. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of patients with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety, with subjects acting as their own control, using a moderate dose (0.2 mg/kg) of psilocybin. A clinical research unit within a large public sector academic medical center. Twelve adults with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety. In addition to monitoring safety and subjective experience before and during experimental treatment sessions, follow-up data including results from the Beck Depression Inventory, Profile of Mood States, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were collected unblinded for 6 months after treatment. Safe physiological and psychological responses were documented during treatment sessions. There were no clinically significant adverse events with psilocybin. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory trait anxiety subscale demonstrated a significant reduction in anxiety at 1 and 3 months after treatment. The Beck Depression Inventory revealed an improvement of mood that reached significance at 6 months; the Profile of Mood States identified mood improvement after treatment with psilocybin that approached but did not reach significance. This study established the feasibility and safety of administering moderate doses of psilocybin to patients with advanced-stage cancer and anxiety. Some of the data revealed a positive trend toward improved mood and anxiety. These results support the need for more research in this long-neglected field. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00302744.

  3. Effect of a life review program for Chinese patients with advanced cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Huimin; Kwong, Enid; Pang, Samantha; Mok, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Empirical data suggest that life review is an effective psychospiritual intervention. However, it has not been applied to Chinese patients with advanced cancer, and its effects on this population remain unknown. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of a life review program on quality of life among Chinese patients with advanced cancer. In this prospective randomized controlled trial, a total of 80 patients were randomly assigned to the life review program group and the control group. The 3-weekly life review program included reviewing a life and formulating a life review booklet. Outcome data were assessed by a collector who was blinded to group assignment before and immediately after the program and at a 3-week follow-up. Significantly better scores in overall quality of life, support, negative emotions, sense of alienation, existential distress, and value of life were found in the life review group immediately after the program and at the 3-week follow-up. This study provides additional data on the potential role of a life review in improving quality of life, particularly psychospiritual well being; it also indicates that the life review program could enable Chinese patients with advanced cancer to express their views on life and death. The life review program offers advanced cancer patients an opportunity to integrate their whole life experiences and discuss end-of-life issues, which lays the ground for further active intervention in their psychospiritual distress. The program could be integrated into daily home care to enhance the psychospiritual well-being of Chinese patients with advanced cancer.

  4. The usefulness of multiplanar reconstruction images in preoperative t-staging of advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Young Baek; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Soo Jin; Choo, Ki Seok; Lee, Tae Hong; Moon, Tae Yong; Lee, Suk Hong; Jeon, Tae Yong

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of multidetector-row CT (MDCT) in the preoperative T-staging of patients with advanced gastric cancer. A total of 65 patients with an established diagnosis of advanced gastric cancer (T2 or more) were evaluated with MDCT. The protocol of MDCT consisted of high-quality (HQ) mode helical scanning with a slice thickness of 2.5 mm. The axial CT images were reconstructed with a slice thickness of 5 mm. MPR images were reconstructed from the raw axial data with a slice thickness of 5 mm. A comparison between the standard axial and axial MPR images was performed by two radiologists with regard to the evaluation of the tumor location and T-stage. These findings were compared with the pathologic and surgical findings. T-staging of the advanced stomach cancer was correct in 89% (58/65) and 69% (45/65) of the MPR images and axial images, respectively. The MPR images improved the detection rate (5 lesions) of the tumors and increased the accuracy of the T-staging (13 lesions) in comparison with the axial images. The MPR images are of greater diagnostic value for the evaluation of omental seeding (5 lesions: axial images, 9 lesions: MPR images), tumor location and extension. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images provide increased confidence in the location and T-staging of certain cases of advanced gastric cancer, such as those in locations where CT images are susceptible to be affected by the difficulties associated with partial volume averaging. In this study, the MPR images provided more precise information about the tumor location and T-staging than the standard axial images in the preoperative evaluation of advanced gastric cancer

  5. Merging transcriptomics and metabolomics - advances in breast cancer profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathen Tone F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combining gene expression microarrays and high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR MAS MRS of the same tissue samples enables comparison of the transcriptional and metabolic profiles of breast cancer. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of combining these two different types of information. Methods Breast cancer tissue from 46 patients was analyzed by HR MAS MRS followed by gene expression microarrays. Two strategies were used to combine the gene expression and metabolic data; first using multivariate analyses to identify different groups based on gene expression and metabolic data; second correlating levels of specific metabolites to transcripts to suggest new hypotheses of connections between metabolite levels and the underlying biological processes. A parallel study was designed to address experimental issues of combining microarrays and HR MAS MRS. Results In the first strategy, using the microarray data and previously reported molecular classification methods, the majority of samples were classified as luminal A. Three subgroups of luminal A tumors were identified based on hierarchical clustering of the HR MAS MR spectra. The samples in one of the subgroups, designated A2, showed significantly lower glucose and higher alanine levels than the other luminal A samples, suggesting a higher glycolytic activity in these tumors. This group was also enriched for genes annotated with Gene Ontology (GO terms related to cell cycle and DNA repair. In the second strategy, the correlations between concentrations of myo-inositol, glycine, taurine, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, choline and creatine and all transcripts in the filtered microarray data were investigated. GO-terms related to the extracellular matrix were enriched among the genes that correlated the most to myo-inositol and taurine, while cell cycle related GO-terms were enriched for the genes that correlated the most

  6. Merging transcriptomics and metabolomics - advances in breast cancer profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgan, Eldrid; Sitter, Beathe; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Johnsen, Hilde; Lundgren, Steinar; Bathen, Tone F; Sørlie, Therese; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Gribbestad, Ingrid S

    2010-01-01

    Combining gene expression microarrays and high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR MAS MRS) of the same tissue samples enables comparison of the transcriptional and metabolic profiles of breast cancer. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of combining these two different types of information. Breast cancer tissue from 46 patients was analyzed by HR MAS MRS followed by gene expression microarrays. Two strategies were used to combine the gene expression and metabolic data; first using multivariate analyses to identify different groups based on gene expression and metabolic data; second correlating levels of specific metabolites to transcripts to suggest new hypotheses of connections between metabolite levels and the underlying biological processes. A parallel study was designed to address experimental issues of combining microarrays and HR MAS MRS. In the first strategy, using the microarray data and previously reported molecular classification methods, the majority of samples were classified as luminal A. Three subgroups of luminal A tumors were identified based on hierarchical clustering of the HR MAS MR spectra. The samples in one of the subgroups, designated A2, showed significantly lower glucose and higher alanine levels than the other luminal A samples, suggesting a higher glycolytic activity in these tumors. This group was also enriched for genes annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) terms related to cell cycle and DNA repair. In the second strategy, the correlations between concentrations of myo-inositol, glycine, taurine, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, choline and creatine and all transcripts in the filtered microarray data were investigated. GO-terms related to the extracellular matrix were enriched among the genes that correlated the most to myo-inositol and taurine, while cell cycle related GO-terms were enriched for the genes that correlated the most to choline. Additionally, a subset of transcripts was

  7. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2016: 10-year special edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Miseon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung Hun; Kim, Jae Weon

    2017-05-01

    In 2016, 13 topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, study results supporting previous ones regarding surgical preventive strategies were reported. There were several targeted agents that showed comparable responses in phase III trials, including niraparib, cediranib, and nintedanib. On the contrary to our expectations, dose-dense weekly chemotherapy regimen failed to prove superior survival outcomes compared with conventional triweekly regimen. Single-agent non-platinum treatment to prolong platinum-free-interval in patients with recurrent, partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer did not improve and even worsened overall survival (OS). For cervical cancer, we reviewed robust evidences of larger-scaled population-based study and cost-effectiveness of nonavalent vaccine for expanding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage. Standard of care treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) was briefly reviewed. For uterine corpus cancer, new findings about appropriate surgical wait time from diagnosis to surgery were reported. Advantages of minimally invasive surgery over conventional laparotomy were reconfirmed. There were 5 new gene regions that increase the risk of developing endometrial cancer. Regarding radiation therapy, Post-Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Cancer (PORTEC)-3 quality of life (QOL) data were released and higher local control rate of image-guided adaptive brachytherapy was reported in LACC. In addition, 4 general oncology topics followed: chemotherapy at the end-of-life, immunotherapy with reengineering T-cells, actualization of precision medicine, and artificial intelligence (AI) to make personalized cancer therapy real. For breast cancer, adaptively randomized trials, extending aromatase inhibitor therapy, and ribociclib and palbociclib were introduced. Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

  8. The first report from Sapporo Tsukisamu Hospital. Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamitsu, Susumu; Kimura, Hiromichi; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Inui, Noriaki; Hiyama, Shigemi; Hirata, Koichi; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Koito, Kazumitsu; Shirasaka, Tetsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    The remedy, especially chemotherapy, for advanced pancreatic cancer is hardly ever successful in terms of efficacy rate and survival period, because it is virtually unable to contribute to the improvement of median survival time (MST). Thus, we devised a new intermittent dosage regimen utilizing the cell cycle difference of normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract, bone marrow cell and pancreatic cancer cell, making use of 5-FU (→S-1), cisplatin (CDDP) and paclitaxel in March 2002. Ten patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (4 in Stage IVa and 6 in Stage IVb) were treated with this new regimen. As a result, an efficacy ratio of 50.0% and a 1-year survival ratio of 60.0% were achieved. However, 2-year survival ratio of 12.0% was low, and there was no 3-year survivor. The MST was 19 months as of December 31, 2006. All of the non-hematological toxicities were under grade 2. Eight patients had hematological toxicities over grade 3 and most of them were anemia and neutropenia. Only 2 cases had thrombocytopenia. Although adverse effects related to this regimen were clinically manageable, it was difficult to improve MST of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer with chemotherapy alone including this regimen. Hence, we devised another regimen with the joint use of radiotherapy along with the same chemotherapy regimen in January 2003. Twenty patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (Stage IV) were treated with this regimen. It is presently under way, and an efficacy ratio of 35.0%, 1-year survival ratio of 86.3% and 2-year survival ratio of 64.0% were obtained by May 2005, showing that this may contribute to the extension of survival time of Stage IV pancreatic cancer patients. (author)

  9. Family Relationships and Psychosocial Dysfunction Among Family Caregivers of Patients With Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Kathrine G; Trevino, Kelly; Lange, Theis; Prigerson, Holly G

    2016-12-01

    Caring for a family member with advanced cancer strains family caregivers. Classification of family types has been shown to identify patients at risk of poor psychosocial function. However, little is known about how family relationships affect caregiver psychosocial function. To investigate family types identified by a cluster analysis and to examine the reproducibility of cluster analyses. We also sought to examine the relationship between family types and caregivers' psychosocial function. Data from 622 caregivers of advanced cancer patients (part of the Coping with Cancer Study) were analyzed using Gaussian Mixture Modeling as the primary method to identify family types based on the Family Relationship Index questionnaire. We then examined the relationship between family type and caregiver quality of life (Medical Outcome Survey Short Form), social support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List), and perceived caregiver burden (Caregiving Burden Scale). Three family types emerged: low-expressive, detached, and supportive. Analyses of variance with post hoc comparisons showed that caregivers of detached and low-expressive family types experienced lower levels of quality of life and perceived social support in comparison to supportive family types. The study identified supportive, low-expressive, and detached family types among caregivers of advanced cancer patients. The supportive family type was associated with the best outcomes and detached with the worst. These findings indicate that family function is related to psychosocial function of caregivers of advanced cancer patients. Therefore, paying attention to family support and family members' ability to share feelings and manage conflicts may serve as an important tool to improve psychosocial function in families affected by cancer. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydration in advanced cancer: can bioelectrical impedance analysis improve the evidence base? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Amara Callistus; Mayland, Catriona R; Mason, Stephen R; Khodabukus, Andrew F; Varro, Andrea; Ellershaw, John E

    2013-09-01

    Decisions surrounding the administration of clinically assisted hydration to patients dying of cancer can be challenging because of the limited understanding of hydration in advanced cancer and a lack of evidence to guide health care professionals. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has been used to assess hydration in various patient groupings, but evidence for its use in advanced cancer is limited. To critically appraise existing methods of hydration status assessment in advanced cancer and review the potential for BIA to assess hydration in advanced cancer. Searches were carried out in four electronic databases. A hand search of selected peer-reviewed journals and conference abstracts also was conducted. Studies reporting (de)hydration assessment (physical examination, biochemical measures, symptom assessment, and BIA) in patients with advanced cancer were included. The results highlight how clinical examination and biochemical tests are standard methods of assessing hydration, but limitations exist with these methods in advanced cancer. Furthermore, there is disagreement over the evidence for some commonly associated symptoms with dehydration in cancer. Although there are limitations with using BIA alone to assess hydration in advanced cancer, analysis of BIA raw measurements through the method of bioelectrical impedance vector analysis may have a role in this population. The benefits and burdens of providing clinically assisted hydration to patients dying of cancer are unclear. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis shows promise as a hydration assessment tool but requires further study in advanced cancer. Innovative methodologies for research are required to add to the evidence base and ultimately improve the care for the dying. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. New thoughts on the treatment of common complications of advanced liver cancer by external therapy of traditional Chinese medicine

    OpenAIRE

    PAN Shasha

    2017-01-01

    Cancerous pain, hepatic ascites and intractable hiccups are common complications in patients with advanced liver cancer, but clinical symptomatic treatment cannot achieve satisfactory results. This article reviews the application of external therapy of traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of common complications in patients with advanced liver cancer and analyzes the clinical effect and feasibility of common therapeutic methods used in treatment, such as plaster sticking therapy, tum...

  12. Standardized uptake value on positron emission tomography/computed tomography predicts prognosis in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si-Liang; Cao, Shuo; Sun, Yu-Nan; Wu, Rong; Chi, Feng; Tang, Mei-Yue; Jin, Xue-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the use and value of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max) on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images as a prognostic marker for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). The medical records of all consecutive patients who underwent PET/CT examination in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were histologically or cytologically proven LAPC. Patients with distant metastasis were excluded. For statistical analysis, the SUV max of primary pancreatic cancer was measured. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariable analysis was performed to determine the association of SUV max with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) using a Cox proportional hazards model. Between July 2006 and June 2013, 69 patients were enrolled in the present study. OS and PFS were 14.9 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 13.1-16.7] and 8.3 months (95% CI 7.1-9.5), respectively. A high SUV max (>5.5) was observed in 35 patients, who had significantly worse OS and PFS than the remaining patients with a low SUV max (P = 0.025 and P = 0.003). Univariate analysis showed that SUV max and tumor size were prognostic factors for OS, with a hazard ratio of 1.90 and 1.81, respectively. A high SUV max was an independent prognostic factor, with a hazard ratio of 1.89 (95% CI 1.015-3.519, P = 0.045). The present study suggests that increased SUV max is a predictor of poor prognosis in patients with LAPC.

  13. Phase I trial of gefitinib with concurrent radiotherapy and fixed 2-h gemcitabine infusion, in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, Joan; Martin-Richard, Marta; Conill, Carlos; Sanchez, Marcelo; Petriz, Lourdes; Gines, Angels; Miquel, Rosa; Gallego, Rosa; Cajal, Rosana; Ayuso, Carmen; Navarro, Salvador; Marmol, Maribel; Nadal, Cristina; Auge, Josep Maria; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano; Gascon, Pere

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancers are resistant to radiotherapy (RT) and current chemotherapy agents. Epidermal growth factor receptor is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and in vitro studies have shown that epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors can overcome radio- and chemoresistance. The aim of the study was to determine whether the addition of gefitinib to RT and gemcitabine for patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) was feasible and safe. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with pathologically proven LAPC, based on major vascular invasion based on helical computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound, were entered into the study. The targeted irradiated volume included the tumor and 2-cm margin. Prophylactic irradiation of regional nodes was not allowed. Patients with >500 cm 3 of planning tumor volume were excluded. An initial cohort of 6 patients was treated with RT (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) plus concomitant gefitinib (250 mg/day). Successive cohorts of patients received 100, 150, and 200 mg/m 2 /day of gemcitabine in a 2-h infusion over Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 with gefitinib (250 mg/day) and RT. Gefitinib was continued after RT until progression. A pharmacodynamic study of angiogenic markers was also performed to evaluate a possible antiangiogenic effect. Results: There were no dose-limiting toxicities. Common toxicities were mild neutropenia, asthenia, diarrhea, cutaneous rash and nausea/vomiting. The median (95% confidence interval [CI]) progression-free survival was 3.7 (95% CI = 1.9-5.5) months, and the median overall survival was 7.5 (95% CI 5.2-9.9) months. No significant reduction of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-8 was observed after treatment. Conclusion: Our results support that the combination of gefitinib, RT, and gemcitabine has an acceptable toxicity but with modest activity in LAPC

  14. Prognostic outcomes in advanced breast cancer: the metastasis-free interval is important.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tiansheng; Gao, Cheng; Zhang, Kui; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2017-12-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a diverse clinical course. There have been limited studies regarding prognostic outcomes in patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer versus those with metastatic recurrence, with controversial observations. In this study, we sought to examine the difference in survival outcomes among patients with advanced breast cancer stratified based on metastasis-free interval (MFI) and to further explore the role of systemic therapy in these patient groups. Of 569 consecutive patients with stage IV breast cancer between 1998 and 2013, 201 had de novo metastatic disease (metastasis at diagnosis) and 368 developed metastatic recurrence, including 168 with an MFI≤24 months and 200 with an MFI>24 months. In the 492 patients who received systemic therapy, de novo metastasis was an independent favorable prognostic factor for overall survival after metastasis when compared with metastatic recurrence irrespective of MFI. Compared with the patients with metastatic recurrence with an MFI≤24 months, those with an MFI>24 months had a superior survival outcome, although it did not reach statistical significance by multivariate analysis. In contrast, de novo metastatic breast cancer was associated with a worse prognosis when compared with recurring metastasis in the patients who did not receive systemic treatment. These findings provide more insight into the natural history of advanced breast cancer, thus necessitating further investigation into the molecular mechanism of drug resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced biomaterials and microengineering technologies to recapitulate the stepwise process of cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peela, Nitish; Truong, Danh; Saini, Harpinder; Chu, Hunghao; Mashaghi, Samaneh; Ham, Stephanie L; Singh, Sunil; Tavana, Hossein; Mosadegh, Bobak; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2017-07-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death globally according to the World Health Organization. Although improved treatments and early diagnoses have reduced cancer related mortalities, metastatic disease remains a major clinical challenge. The local tumor microenvironment plays a significant role in cancer metastasis, where tumor cells respond and adapt to a plethora of biochemical and biophysical signals from stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Due to these complexities, there is a critical need to understand molecular mechanisms underlying cancer metastasis to facilitate the discovery of more effective therapies. In the past few years, the integration of advanced biomaterials and microengineering approaches has initiated the development of innovative platform technologies for cancer research. These technologies enable the creation of biomimetic in vitro models with physiologically relevant (i.e. in vivo-like) characteristics to conduct studies ranging from fundamental cancer biology to high-throughput drug screening. In this review article, we discuss the biological significance of each step of the metastatic cascade and provide a broad overview on recent progress to recapitulate these stages using advanced biomaterials and microengineered technologies. In each section, we will highlight the advantages and shortcomings of each approach and provide our perspectives on future directions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spiritual Well-Being and Correlated Factors in Subjects With Advanced COPD or Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takaaki; Kawai, Momoko; Kuzuya, Nanori; Futamura, Yohei; Horiba, Akane; Ishiguro, Takashi; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Sawa, Toshiyuki; Sugiyama, Yasuyuki

    2017-05-01

    Spiritual care for patients with COPD has rarely been discussed, and thus much remains unknown about their needs. The aims of this study were to identify the factors associated with spiritual well-being and to compare the levels of spiritual well-being between subjects with advanced COPD and those with inoperable lung cancer. A total of 96 subjects with COPD or lung cancer participated in this study, which was conducted between December 2014 and April 2016. Measures included the Japanese version of the 12-item Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp-12) scale, the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQOL), the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) dyspnea scale, and various other medico-social factors. No significant differences were found between subjects with COPD and those with lung cancer in median FACIT-Sp-12 scores (COPD, 27; lung cancer, 26; P = .81). However, significant differences were found in the 2 MQOL domains, suggesting that subjects with COPD had a better psychological state ( P = .01) and that subjects with lung cancer had a better support state ( P = .002). Multiple regression analysis revealed that mMRC was significantly associated with FACIT-Sp-12 scores in subjects with COPD. These results suggest that subjects with advanced COPD experience spiritual well-being similar to that of subjects with inoperable lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  17. Effectiveness and problems of radiotherapy for the advanced biliary tract cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Nobuhiko; Konishi, Ichiro; Izumi, Ryohei

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the effectiveness and problems of radiotherapy for the advanced biliary tract cancer, 19 cases with the biliary tract cancer adding radiotherapy (7 cases with bile duct cancer and 12 cases with gallbladder cancer) were stratified into two groups: 3 cases with microscopically non-curative resection adding radiotherapy (group I) and 16 cases with macroscopically non-curative resection or non-resection adding radiotherapy (group II). In the group I, one case of bile duct cancer has been alive for 8 years and 9 months, and the other case had survived for 1 year and 8 months, and one case of gallbladder cancer has been alive for 2 years and 2 months. Survival periods in 12 of 16 cases of group II were within 1 year. But recanalization of bile duct was recognized in 2 of 4 cases of bile duct cancer with external radiotherapy and 7 of 8 cases of gallbladder cancer with external and/or intraoperative radiotherapy. Moreover, in 5 of 6 cases with biliary stent, patency of billary stent had been kept until death. From the above results, radiotherapy is suggested to be effective on the prognosis in group I, and recanalization of bile duct and patency of biliary stent in group II. (author)

  18. Advanced glycation end-products: a biological consequence of lifestyle contributing to cancer disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, David P

    2015-05-15

    Low income, poor diet, obesity, and a lack of exercise are interrelated lifestyle factors that can profoundly alter our biologic make up to increase cancer risk, growth, and development. We recently reported a potential mechanistic link between carbohydrate-derived metabolites and cancer, which may provide a biologic consequence of lifestyle that can directly affect tumor biology. Advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are reactive metabolites produced as a by-product of sugar metabolism. Failure to remove these highly reactive metabolites can lead to protein damage, aberrant cell signaling, increased stress responses, and decreased genetic fidelity. Critically, AGE accumulation is also directly affected by our lifestyle choices and shows a race-specific, tumor-dependent pattern of accumulation in cancer patients. This review will discuss the contribution of AGEs to the cancer phenotype, with a particular emphasis on their biologic links with the socioeconomic and environmental risk factors that drive cancer disparity. Given the potential benefits of lifestyle changes and the potential biologic role of AGEs in promoting cancer, opportunities exist for collaborations affecting basic, translational, epidemiologic, and cancer prevention initiatives. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Trastuzumab for HER-2-Positive Advanced Salivary Gland Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Tsung Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Salivary gland adenocarcinoma is a rare type of head and neck cancer and often has aggressive behavior with propensity to recur and metastasize. Currently, there are no standard treatment guidelines. Surgery is however, the mainstay of treatment in resectable disease and radiation is also considered for most patients after surgery. Systemic chemotherapy is reserved for metastatic cases, but its results are often disappointing. Recent development of molecular biology has shown that salivary gland caner has several molecular changes which may guide potential therapeutic targets. Here, we report a 67 year-old man diagnosed to have metastasized minor salivary gland adenocarcinoma with diffuse human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2-positive, by the immunohistochemical (IHC stain. He was treated with a trastuzumab-containing chemotherapeutic regimen with encouraging results.

  20. Clinical advance in radionuclide imaging of pulmonary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Zhiyong; Yang Lichun

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclide imaging of pulmonary cancer develops very rapidly in recent years. Its important value on the diagnosis, staging, monitoring recur and metastasis after treatment, and judging the curative effect and prognosis has been demonstrated. Clinicians pay more attention to it than before. This present article introduces the imaging principle, clinical use, good and bad points, progress situation of 67 Ga, 201 Tl, 99 Tc m , 18 F and their labelled compounds, which are more commonly used in clinical. And introduces the clinical progress of radionuclide imaging of pulmonary neoplasm concerning 99 Tc m -sestamibi ( 99 Tc m -MIBI), 99 Tc m -HL91 and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) with emphasis. (authors)

  1. Combined cisplatin and radiation therapy for advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Masaharu; Sawamura, Yoshikatsu; Kase, Takahisa

    1991-01-01

    The combined effects of cisplatin and irradiation were investigated in 44 patients with bladder cancer accompanied by the infiltration of T 2 ∼T 4 cells, in a study commencing in September 1985. The antitumor effect and adverse reactions to the therapy were recorded. The majority of these patients had not undergone total bladder excision, for a variety of reasons. Thirty-two patients were male and 12 were female; the average age was 66.7 years, with ranging from 33∼83 years of age. Irradiation was performed using table cobalt 60 or a linear accelerator at a dose of 2 Gy per day, 5 days a week. The total radiation dose ranged from 40 to 70 Gy. Cisplatin was administered systemically at a dose of 20∼30 mg/day for 5 consecutive days during the first and fourth weeks of irradiation. At the time of final assessment of the antitumor effect, 24 out of 40 eligible patients (60%) had achieved complete remission (CR). The duration of CR averaged 18.8 months, with a range of 1∼50 months. The actual survival rates were as follows: 81% at 1 year, 69% at 2 years, and 52% at 3 and 4 years. Regarding adverse reactions, anorexia occurred in 28 patients (70%), nausea and vomiting in 21 (53%), diarrhea in 8 (20%), leukopenia in 16 (40%), mild thrombocytopenia in 5 (13%), and dermatitis in 8 (20%). All of these adverse reactions were mild and were alleviated after completion of the combined therapy. The present investigation demonstrated that combined therapy with cisplatin and irradiation is effective for the regional treatment of invasive bladder cancer. (author)

  2. Treatment patterns in patients with advanced gastric cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyun Carter, Gebra; Kaltenboeck, Anna; Ivanova, Jasmina; Liepa, Astra M; San Roman, Alexandra; Koh, Maria; Rajan, Narayan; Cheng, Rebecca; Birnbaum, Howard; Chen, Jen-Shi

    2017-06-01

    To describe treatment patterns, outcomes and healthcare resource use in patients with metastatic and/or locally recurrent, unresectable gastric cancer (MGC) in Taiwan. Patients who had received first-line therapy (platinum and/or fluoropyrimidine) followed by second-line therapy or best supportive care (BSC) only were eligible. Participating physicians provided de-identified information from patient charts. Data were summarized descriptively and Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to describe time to events. Overall, 37 physicians contributed 122 patient charts. Of the 122 patients (median age, 61 years; 62% male), 43 (35%) received BSC only following first-line therapy, whereas 79 (65%) received second-line therapy. There was heterogeneity in second-line treatment, although fluoropyrimidine with or without a platinum agent was most frequently used. Median survival was 12.5 (interquartile range [IQR], 8.2-20.8) months from MGC diagnosis for patients receiving second-line therapy and 8.0 (IQR, 5.6-not reached) months for patients receiving BSC only. The most common treatment-related symptoms were nausea/vomiting (58%); the most common cancer-related symptoms were pain (61%), ascites (35%) and nausea/vomiting (33%). Inpatient and outpatient hospitalizations were numerically more common for patients receiving second-line therapy than for those receiving BSC only; the prevalence of hospice and skilled nursing facility stays were numerically more common for patients receiving BSC only. In this Taiwanese MGC population, 65% received active second-line therapy with heterogeneity seen in the regimen used. Clinical outcomes suggest an unmet medical need in this population. This study may help inform clinical practice and future research to ultimately improve patient outcomes in Taiwan. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation in completely resected locally advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Saracino, Biancamaria; Arcangeli, Giancarlo; Angelini, Francesco; Marchetti, Paolo; Tirindelli Danesi, Donatella

    2002-01-01

    Background: The 5-year survival of patients with completely resected node-positive gastric cancer ranges from 15% to 25%. We explored the feasibility of a chemoradiation regime consisting of concomitant hyperfractionated radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil protracted venous infusion (5-FU PVI). Materials and Methods: Forty patients received a total or partial gastrectomy operation and D2 nodal resection for Stage III gastric cancer; they were then irradiated by linac with 6-15-MV photons. The target included the gastric bed, the anastomosis, stumps, and regional nodes. A total dose of 55 Gy was given in 50 fractions using 1.1 Gy b.i.d. All patients received a concomitant 200 mg/m2/day 5-FU PVI. Patients were examined during the follow-up period as programmed. Toxicity was recorded according to RTOG criteria. Results: After a median follow-up of 75.6 months (range: 22-136 months), 24 (60%) patients had died, and 16 (40%) were alive and free of disease. The 5-year actuarial incidence of relapse was 39%, 22%, and 2% for distant metastases, out-field peritoneal seeding, and in-field local regional recurrences, respectively. The 5-year actuarial cause-specific survival was 43%. Three patients survived more than 11 years. Acute ≥ Grade 3 toxicity consisted of hematologic (22.5%) and gastrointestinal toxicity (nausea and vomiting 22.5%, diarrhea 2.8%, and abdominal pain 2.6%). No late toxicity was observed. Conclusion: This regime of concomitant 5-FU PVI and hyperfractionated radiotherapy was well tolerated and resulted in successful locoregional control and satisfactory survival

  4. Symptoms in Advanced Cancer Patients in a Greek Hospital: a Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavdaniti, Maria; Fradelos, Evangelos C; Troxoutsou, Konstantina; Zioga, Efrosini; Mitsi, Dimitroula; Alikari, Victoria; Zyga, Sofia

    2018-04-27

    Background: Advanced cancer patients experience several physical or psychological symptoms which require palliative care for alleviation. Purpose: To assess the prevalence and intensity of symptoms among cancer patients receiving palliative care in a Greek hospital and to examine the association between reported symptoms and social clinical and demographic characteristics. Material-methods: This descriptive research was conducted during a sixmonth period using a convenient sample of 123 advanced cancer patients. All participants were assessed for their symptoms using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) with a questionnaire covering demographic and clinical characteristics. Results: The mean age was 63.8± 10.8 years, with lung and breast (58.5% and 11.4%, respectively) as the most common primary cancer types. The most severe symptoms were fatigue, sleep disturbance, dyspnea, depression and anxiety. Negative correlations were revealed between age and the following symptoms: pain (r = -0.354, p = 0.001), fatigue (r = -0.280, p = 0.002), nausea (r = -0.178, p = 0.049), anorexia (r = -0.188, p = 0.038), dyspnea (r = -0.251, p = 0.005), and depression (r = -0.223, p = 0.013). Advanced breast cancer patients scored higher in pain, fatigue and dyspnea compared to those with other cancers. Conclusions: Hospitalized cancer patients in Greece experience several symptoms during the last months of their life. These are influenced by demographic characteristics. Appropriate interventions are strongly advised with appropriate recognition and evaluation of symptoms by health professionals. Creative Commons Attribution License

  5. A randomised comparison of 'Casodex' (bicalutamide) 150 mg monotherapy versus castration in the treatment of metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer.......To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer....

  6. Prevalence of oral mucositis, dry mouth, and dysphagia in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Aielli, Federica; Adile, Claudio; Ferrera, Patrizia; Valle, Alessandro; Fusco, Flavio; Caruselli, Amanda; Cartoni, Claudio; Massimo, Pizzuto; Masedu, Francesco; Valenti, Marco; Porzio, Giampiero

    2015-11-01

    Oral symptoms can be a sign of an underlying systemic condition and have a significant impact on quality of life, nutrition, and cost of care, while these lesions are often studied in the context of cancer treatment. However, information regarding oral symptoms in advanced cancer patients is poor. The aim of this multicenter study was to determine the prevalence and the characteristics of oral symptoms in a large population of advanced cancer patients. A consecutive sample of patients with advanced cancer for a period of 6 months was prospectively assessed for an observational study. At time of admission, the epidemiological characteristics, surgery-radiotherapy of head and neck, and oncologic treatments in the last month were recorded. The presence of mucositis, dry mouth, and dysphagia was assessed by clinical examination and patients' report and their intensity recorded. Patients were also asked whether they had limitation on nutrition of hydration due to the local condition. Six hundred sixty-nine patients were surveyed in the period taken into consideration. The mean age was 72.1 years (SD 12.3), and 342 patients were males. The primary tumors are listed in Table 1. The prevalence of mucositis was 22.3 %. The symptom relevantly reduced the ingestion of food or fluids and was statistically associated with the Karnofsky level and head and neck cancer. The prevalence of dry mouth was 40.4 %, with a mean intensity of 5.4 (SD 2.1). Several drugs were concomitantly given, particularly opioids (78 %), corticosteroids (75.3 %), and diuretics (70.2 %). Various and nonhomogeneous treatments were given for dry mouth, that was statistically associated with current or recent chemotherapy, and hematological tumors. The prevalence of dysphagia was 15.4 % with a mean intensity of 5.34 (SD 3). Dysphagia for liquids was observed in 52.4 % of cases. A high level of limitation for oral nutrition due to dysphagia was found, and in 53.4 % of patients, alternative routes to the oral

  7. Factors influencing diagnosis delay of advanced breast cancer in Moroccan women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghous, A; Rais, F; Ahid, S; Benhmidou, N; Bellahamou, K; Loughlimi, H; Marnouche, E; Elmajjaoui, S; Elkacemi, H; Kebdani, T; Benjaafar, N

    2016-06-07

    Delay in the diagnosis of breast cancer in symptomatic women of 3 months or more is associated with advanced stage and low survival. We conducted this study to learn more about the extent and reasons behind diagnosis delay of advanced breast cancer in Moroccan women. A group of patients with advanced breast cancer were interviewed at the National Institute of Oncology in Rabat during the period from February to December 2014. Diagnosis delay was devised into patient delay and system delay. Patient delay was defined as time from first symptoms until first medical consultation. System delay was defined as time from first presentation to a health care provider until definite diagnosis or treatment. Prospective information and clinical data were collected on a form during an interview with each patient and from medical records. In all, 137 patients were interviewed. The mean age of women was 48.3 ± 10.4 years. The median of consultation time was 6[4,12] months and the median of diagnosis time was 1[1,3] months. Diagnosis delay was associated to a personal reason in 96 (70.1 %) patients and to a medical reason in 19 (13.9 %) patients. A number of factors predicted diagnosis delay: symptoms were not considered serious in 66 (55.9 %) patients; traditional therapy was applied in 15 (12.7 %) patients and fear of cancer diagnosis and/or treatment in 14 (11.9 %) patients. A use of traditional methods was significantly associated with rural residence and far away from basic health center (p = 0.000). Paradoxically, a family history of breast cancer was significantly higher in who report a fear of cancer diagnosis and/or treatment to diagnosis delay (p Diagnosis delay is very serious problem in Morocco. Diagnosis delay was associated with complex interactions between several factors and with advanced stages. There is a need for improving breast cancer information in our populations and training of general practitioners to reduce advanced breast cancer by

  8. Radiation with cisplatin or carboplatin for locally advanced cervix cancer: the experience of a tertiary cancer centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au-Yeung, George; Mileshkin, Linda; Rischin, Danny; Bernshaw, David M.; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Narayan, Kailash

    2013-01-01

    Definitive treatment with concurrent cisplatin and radiation is the standard of care for locally advanced cervix cancer. The optimal management of patients with a contraindication to cisplatin has not been established. We conducted a retrospective audit of concurrent chemotherapy in a cohort of patients with locally advanced cervix cancer. All patients with locally advanced cervix cancer treated with definitive radiation were entered into a prospective database. Information regarding their demographics, stage, histology, recurrence and survival were recorded. Pharmacy records were reviewed to determine concurrent chemotherapy use. A total of 442 patients were included in the audit. Two hundred sixty-nine patients received cisplatin, 59 received carboplatin and 114 received no concurrent chemotherapy. Overall survival was significantly improved with the use of concurrent cisplatin compared with radiation alone (adjusted hazard ratio 0.53, P=0.001), as was disease-free survival and rate of distant failure. The use of carboplatin was not associated with any significant benefit in terms of overall survival or disease-free survival. The results of this audit are consistent with the known significant survival benefit with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy. However, there did not appear to be any significant benefit with carboplatin although there were potential confounding factors. The available evidence in the literature would favour the use of non-platinum chemotherapy rather than carboplatin in patients with contraindications to cisplatin.

  9. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with AdvancedProstate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    propose to study the mechanism of pharmacologic inhibition of the MLL complex in prostate cancer cells 3) we will assess the in vivo efficacy of the...Project Goals: 1) Enroll patients with known or suspicious for prostate cancer in the NIH MRI /metabolic imaging program, 2) Whole exome and...Henderson 02/11/2014-01/31/2017 Project Goals: 1) Enroll patients with known or suspicious for prostate cancer in the NIH MRI /metabolic imaging program

  10. What is the Right to Exclude Immigrants?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    It is normally taken for granted that states have a right to control immigration into their territory. When immigration is raised as a normative issue two questions become salient, one about what the right to exclude is, and one about whether and how it might be justified. This paper considers...... the first question. The paper starts by noting that standard debates about immigration have not addressed what the right to exclude is. Standard debates about immigration furthermore tend to result either in fairly strong cases for open borders or in denials that considerations of justice apply...... to immigration at all, which results in state discretion positions. This state of debate is both theoretically unsatisfactory and normatively implausible. The paper therefore explores an alternative approach to the right to exclude immigrants from the perspective of recent debates about the territorial rights...

  11. Does implementation matter if comprehension is lacking? A qualitative investigation into perceptions of advance care planning in people with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Anna; O'Callaghan, Clare; Byard, Clem; Brean, Samantha; MacKay, Jenelle; Boltong, Anna; Davoren, Sondra; Lawson, Deborah; Parente, Phillip; Michael, Natasha; Livingston, Patricia

    2018-05-11

    While advance care planning holds promise, uptake is variable and it is unclear how well people engage with or comprehend advance care planning. The objective of this study was to explore how people with cancer comprehended advance care plans and examine how accurately advance care planning documentation represented patient wishes. This study used a qualitative descriptive design. Data collection comprised interviews and an examination of participants' existing advance care planning documentation. Participants included those who had any diagnosis of cancer with an advance care plan recorded: Refusal of Treatment Certificate, Statement of Choices, and/or Enduring Power of Attorney (Medical Treatment) at one cancer treatment centre. Fourteen participants were involved in the study. Twelve participants were female (86%). The mean age was 77 (range: 61-91), and participants had completed their advance care planning documentation between 8 and 72 weeks prior to the interview (mean 33 weeks). Three themes were evident from the data: incomplete advance care planning understanding and confidence, limited congruence for attitude and documentation, advance care planning can enable peace of mind. Complete advance care planning understanding was unusual; most participants demonstrated partial comprehension of their own advance care plan, and some indicated very limited understanding. Participants' attitudes and their written document congruence were limited, but advance care planning was seen as helpful. This study highlighted advance care planning was not a completely accurate representation of patient wishes. There is opportunity to improve how patients comprehend their own advance care planning documentation.

  12. Improving chemotherapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer is the third most common mortal disease in industrialised countries and the prognosis has been slow to improve. The largest subgroup has locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Unfortunately, these patients can usually not be cured and the main...... project. The description of the experiences can serve as an example for the improvement of microsystems in settings with similar problems. Finally, in the registry study of Norwegian patients with lung cancer, we found significant geographical and temporal variations of the utilisation of chemotherapy...... that were related to survival. Potential areas of improvement in the system of care for lung cancer are recruitment of patients in clinical studies, standardisation of the processes of care in outpatient clinics, definition of strategic aims of quality, development of balanced quality indicators, as well...

  13. [Current status and future prospect of internal medicine treatment for advanced esophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Fan, Q X

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is one of common malignant tumors, and the incidence and mortality of EC in China rank the first place in the world. Because of the occult onset, the early atypical symptoms, and the lack of effective early diagnostic methods, most of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease and lost the chance of surgery. Comprehensive treatment including palliative medical treatment, molecular targeted therapy, immunotherapy and so on is appropriate for these patients. How to choose the chemotherapy regimen and formulate reasonable treatment plan has become a hot spot in clinical research. Molecular targeted drugs have become a new developmental direction in cancer treatment because of their high specificity and antitumor activity, but the effects on esophageal cancer remain controversial. With the development of immune check point blockade treatment, breakthrough has been made in tumor immunotherapy, which has become an important means in cancer comprehensive treatment and shown a good prospect of treatment.

  14. Prognostic factors for progression-free and overall survival in advanced biliary tract cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bridgewater, J; Lopes, A; Wasan, H

    2016-01-01

    independently with outcome. This score was validated externally by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis using the independent international dataset. RESULTS: A total of 410 patients were included from the ABC-02 study and 753 from the international dataset. An overall survival (OS) and progression......BACKGROUND: Biliary tract cancer is an uncommon cancer with a poor outcome. We assembled data from the National Cancer Research Institute (UK) ABC-02 study and 10 international studies to determine prognostic outcome characteristics for patients with advanced disease. METHODS: Multivariable...... biliary tract cancer derived from the ABC-02 study that are validated in an international dataset. Although these findings establish the benchmark for the prognostic evaluation of patients with ABC and confirm the value of longheld clinical observations, the ability of the model to correctly predict...

  15. A multidisciplinary clinical treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer complicated with rectovesical fistula: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Tiancheng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula is a rare and difficult to treat entity. Here, we describe a case of rectal cancer with rectovesical fistula successfully managed by multimodality treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case report in the literature. Case presentation A 51-year-old Chinese man was diagnosed as having rectal cancer accompanied by rectovesical fistula. He underwent treatment with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy combined with total pelvic excision and adjuvant chemotherapy, as recommended by a multimodality treatment team. Post-operative pathology confirmed the achievement of pathological complete response. Conclusions This case suggests that a proactive multidisciplinary treatment is needed to achieve complete cure of locally advanced rectal cancer even in the presence of rectovesical fistula.

  16. Plasma and ovarian tissue sphingolipids profiling in patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Paweł; Bodnar, Lubomir; Błachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Świderska, Magdalena; Chabowski, Adrian

    2017-10-01

    The role of lipids in carcinogenesis through induction of abnormal cell lines in the human body is currently undisputable. Based on the literature, bioactive sphingolipids play an essential role in the development and progression of cancer and are involved in the metastatic process. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration of selected sphingolipids in patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC, FIGO III/IV, high grade ovarian cancer). Seventy-four patients with ovarian cancer were enrolled. Plasma concentrations of C16-Cer, C18:1-Cer and C18-Cer were assessed by LC/MS/MS. The content of tissue sphingolipids was measured using a UHPLC/MS/MS. Plasma concentration of 3 ceramides: C16-Cer, C18:1-Cer and C18-Cer was significantly elevated in women with advanced ovarian cancer compared to control group (P=0.031; 0.022; 0.020; respectively). There were increases in concentration of 5 ceramides: C16-Cer, C18:1-Cer, C18-Cer, C24:1-Cer, C24-Cer (P=0.025; 0.049; 0.032; 0.005; 0.013, respectively) and S1P (P=0.004) in ovarian tissue of women with advanced ovarian cancer compared to healthy individuals. Importantly, significantly higher risk of ovarian cancer when the plasma concentration of C16-Cer>311.88ng/100μl (AUC: 0.76, P=0.0261); C18:1-Cer>4.75ng/100μl (AUC: 0.77, P=0.0160) and C18-Cer>100.76ng/100μl (AUC:0.77, P=0.0136) was noticed. Bioactive sphingolipids play an essential role in the development and progression of cancer and they also take part in the process of metastasizing. This study suggests that some sphingolipids can be used as potential biomarkers of advanced ovarian cancer and that they can play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recent advances in head and neck cancer reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of cancer is race against time! Following radical excision, breathing, speech, mastication and swallowing are hampered. Face is invariably involved. Beside functional normalcy, excellent cosmetic restoration is necessary for patient′s life quality. Primary wound healing, quick resumption of adequate oral intake, prompt initiation of chemo-radiotherapy has direct bearing on cure. Primary reconstruction with pedicle or free flap is the choice of treatment in most protocols. Composite defects are requiring bone, muscle and skin restrict choice of donor site and may have shortfalls in aesthetic and functional requirements. To improve further newer, and newer modalities are being developed and used to give best aesthetic and functions. Navigation, use of three-dimensional imaging, stereo lithic model and custom made implant for reconstruction are recommended as they promise improvement in aesthetics. Robotic surgeries allow access for resection of tumours and reconstruction with free flap in deep oropharynx obviating need of doing mandibulotomy. Researchers in stem cell and tissue engineering are looking forward to regenerating tissues and avoid the need of autologous tissue flaps. Desired tissue combination across counter may be available in the future. Excellent immunosuppressant drugs have made it possible to reconstruct composite facial anatomical units with allotransplant in a single surgery, along sensory and motor recovery! Mythological heterogenic head transplant like clone Ganesha, will be a reality in the near future!!

  18. Advanced Drug-Delivery Systems of Curcumin for Cancer Chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Shyam S.; Goel, Mehak; Aqil, Farrukh; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2011-01-01

    From ancient times, chemopreventive agents have been used to treat/prevent several diseases, including cancer. They are found to elicit a spectrum of potent responses including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-angiogenic activity in various cell culture and some animal studies. Research over the past four decades has shown that chemopreventives affect a number of proteins involved in various molecular pathways that regulate inflammatory and carcinogenic responses in a cell. Various enzymes, transcription factors, receptors, and adhesion proteins are also affected by chemopreventives. Although, these natural compounds have shown significant efficacy in cell-culture studies, they elicited limited efficacy in various clinical studies. Their introduction into the clinical setting is hindered largely by their poor solubility, rapid metabolism, or a combination of both, ultimately resulting in poor bioavailability upon oral administration. Therefore, to circumvent these limitations and to ease their transition to clinics, alternate strategies should be explored. Drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microemulsions, and polymeric implantable devices are emerging as one of the viable alternatives that have been demonstrated to deliver therapeutic concentrations of various potent chemopreventives such as curcumin, ellagic acid, green tea polyphenols, and resveratrol into the systemic circulation. In this review article, we have attempted to provide a comprehensive outlook for these delivery approaches, using curcumin as a model agent, and discussed future strategies to enable the introduction of these highly potent chemopreventives into a physician’s armamentarium. PMID:21546540

  19. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-07-01

    This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. The dosimetric benefits of IMRT and VMAT are well established, but prospective clinical studies are limited, with phase I-II studies only. Recent years have seen the publication of a few larger prospective patient series as well as some retrospective cohorts, several of which include much needed late toxicity data. Overall results are encouraging, as toxicity levels - although varying across reports - appear lower than for 3D conformal radiotherapy. Innovative treatment techniques and strategies which may be facilitated by the use of IMRT/VMAT include simultaneously integrated tumour boost, adaptive treatment, selective sparing of specific organs to enable chemotherapy escalation, and nonsurgical management. Few prospective studies of IMRT and VMAT exist, which causes uncertainty not just in regards to the clinical benefit of these technologies but also in the optimal use. The priority for future research should be subgroups of patients who might receive relatively greater benefit from innovative treatment techniques, such as patients receiving chemoradiotherapy with definitive intent and patients treated with dose escalation.

  20. Adjuvanticity of vitamin A in advanced irradiated cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, H.; Micksche, M.; Vienna Univ.

    1982-01-01

    For treatment of patients with inoperable cervical cancer (FIGO III) a randomized trial has been initiated. Patients were randomized to receive either conventional irradiation therapy together with vitamin A palmitate (1.5 mill. I.U./day; total dose: 30 mill. I.U.), applied orally, or irradiation alone. When lymphocyte reactivity to PHA (maximum response during therapy) was compared within the groups, it was found, that 66% of the patients who received irradiation combined with vitamin A palmitate, showed an increase in their blastogenic response, while in irradiated patients without vitamin A palmitate a response was seen only in 33%. This difference being statistically significant in comparison to pretreatment values. From immunological data it can be concluded, that vitamin A has an effect on functional response on T-cells. Concerning the clinical outcome, after an observation period of 12 months relapse rates were lower in the vitamin A group, but not significantly reduced. Therefore further follow up is warranted. (orig.) [de

  1. Second-line treatments: moving towards an opportunity to improve survival in advanced gastric cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salati, Massimiliano; Di Emidio, Katia; Tarantino, Vittoria; Cascinu, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death globally with approximately 723 000 deaths every year. Most patients present with advanced unresectable or metastatic disease, only amenable to palliative systemic treatment and a median survival uncommonly exceeding 12 months. Over the last years, the efficacy of chemotherapy combination has plateaued and the introduction of the anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 trastuzumab has resulted in a limited survival gain in the upfront setting. After this positive experience, first-line treatment with new targeted therapies failed to improve the outcome of advanced gastric cancer. On the contrary, second-line options, including monochemotherapy with taxanes or irinotecan and the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 ramucirumab, either alone or combined with paclitaxel, opened new therapeutic rooms for an ever-increasing number of patients who maintain an acceptable performance status across multiple lines. This article provides an updated overview on the current management of advanced gastric cancer and discusses how the different treatment options available may be best combined to favourably impact the outcome of patients following the logic of a treatment strategy.

  2. Profiles of dyadic adjustment for advanced prostate cancer to inform couple-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kate-Ellen J; Scott, Jennifer L; Monsour, Michael; Nuwayhid, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to describe from a relational perspective, partners' psychological adjustment, coping and support needs for advanced prostate cancer. A mixed methods design was adopted, employing triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data, to produce dyadic profiles of adjustment for six couples recruited from the urology clinics of local hospitals in Tasmania, Australia. Dyads completed a video-taped communication task, semi-structured interview and standardised self-report questionnaires. Themes identified were associated with the dyadic challenges of the disease experience (e.g. relationship intimacy, disease progression and carer burden). Couples with poor psychological adjustment profiles had both clinical and global locus of distress, treatment side-effects, carer burden and poor general health. Resilient couples demonstrated relationship closeness and adaptive cognitive and behavioural coping strategies. The themes informed the adaption of an effective program for couples coping with women's cancers (CanCOPE, to create a program for couples facing advanced prostate cancer (ProCOPE-Adv). Mixed method results inform the development of psychological therapy components for couples coping with advanced prostate cancer. The concomitance of co-morbid health problems may have implications for access and engagement for older adult populations in face-to-face intervention.

  3. Value of the prognostic nutritional index in advanced gastric cancer treated with preoperative chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianyi; Wang, Donghai; Mei, Ying; Jin, Hailong; Zhu, Kankai; Liu, Xiaosun; Zhang, Qing; Yu, Jiren

    2017-03-01

    The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) is a useful parameter indicating the immune and nutritional status of cancer patients; this study investigated the prognostic value of the PNI in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy. We retrospectively reviewed 117 advanced gastric cancer patients who met the inclusion criteria for preoperative chemotherapy and underwent surgical resection from July 2004 to December 2011. The patients were divided into PNI-high (PNI ≥ 45) and PNI-low (PNI  0.05). Cox regression analysis indicated that yield pathologic T (ypT), yield pathologic N (ypN) stage, and prechemotherapy PNI were independent prognostic factors (ypT: HR = 2.914, 95% CI = 1.312-6.470, P = 0.009; ypN: HR = 4.909, 95% CI = 1.764-13.660, P = 0.003; prechemotherapy PNI: HR = 1.963, 95% CI = 1.101-3.499, P = 0.022). The prechemotherapy PNI is a useful predictor of the long-term outcome of patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with preoperative chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Soup Service for Advanced Digestive Cancer Patients with Severe Anorexia in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hideaki; Kakihara, Naoki; Nishitani, Yoko; Asano, Kota; Nose, Mariko; Takanashi, Asami; Kanda, Eiichiro; Nishimura, Masako; Tokunaga, Eiko; Matsurugi, Ayako; Fujimura, Keiko; Nishikawa, Masanori; Taga, Chiaki; Ikawa, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Makiko; Masuda, Katsuhiko

    2018-03-01

    The palliative care team (PCT), nutrition support team (NST), and department of nutrition in our hospital developed a special soup service for patients with terminal cancer. We evaluated the usefulness of this soup service for improving the mood in patients with advanced digestive cancer with severe anorexia. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of 18 patients with advanced cancer originating in digestive organs who received soup service at our institution between 2015 and 2016. Members of the PCT, NST, and a licensed cook visited the bedside of each patient and served them a cup of soup twice a week. Fifteen patients (83%) were able to taste the soup with no adverse events, and 11 (73%) of them enjoyed the taste of the soup. In the five patients who died in our hospital during the service, the time between their last soup intake and death ranged from two to seven days (median three days). Even terminally ill patients suffering from advanced digestive cancer with severe anorexia were able to enjoy the taste of the soup served to them. The establishment of special meal service, such as this soup service, may not only relieve their stress but also support the strength of living and help improve their spiritual quality of life.

  5. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trip, Anouk K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Poppema, Boelo J. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Siemerink, Ester [Department of Internal Medicine, Ziekenhuisgroep Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); Beukema, Jannet C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Plukker, John T.M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Richel, Dick J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sandick, Johanna W. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Edwin P.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hospers, Geke A.P., E-mail: g.a.p.hospers@umcg.nl [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates.

  6. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trip, Anouk K.; Poppema, Boelo J.; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van; Siemerink, Ester; Beukema, Jannet C.; Verheij, Marcel; Plukker, John T.M.; Richel, Dick J.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Sandick, Johanna W. van; Cats, Annemieke; Jansen, Edwin P.M.; Hospers, Geke A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates

  7. Factors influencing the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-A; Chung, Seung Hyun; Lee, Youngjin

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the predictors of quality of life (QOL) of patients with advanced cancer. A cross-sectional study involving 494 patients with advanced cancer was conducted using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale-Short Form, the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale, the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (Korean version), and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core 30. Regression analyses showed that physical and psychological symptoms significantly predicted the patients' QOL and explained 28.8% of the variance in QOL. Moreover, lack of energy was the patients' most prevalent symptom. The results of the present study will serve as fundamental data upon which the development of an intervention will be based so as to enhance the patients' QOL. Accordingly, an effective management of symptoms and performance maintenance should be considered in the future as key factors in providing support and establishing palliative care systems for patients with advanced cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Quo vadis radiotherapy? Technological advances and the rising problems in cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Barry J; Bezak, Eva; Marcu, Loredana G

    2013-01-01

    Despite the latest technological advances in radiotherapy, cancer control is still challenging for several tumour sites. The survival rates for the most deadly cancers, such as ovarian and pancreatic, have not changed over the last decades. The solution to the problem lies in the change of focus: from local treatment to systemic therapy. The aim of this paper is to present the current status as well as the gaps in radiotherapy and, at the same time, to look into potential solutions to improve cancer control and survival. The currently available advanced radiotherapy treatment techniques have been analysed and their cost-effectiveness discussed. The problem of systemic disease management was specifically targeted. Clinical studies show limited benefit in cancer control from hadron therapy. However, targeted therapies together with molecular imaging could improve treatment outcome for several tumour sites while controlling the systemic disease. The advances in photon therapy continue to be competitive with the much more expensive hadron therapy. To justify the cost effectiveness of proton/heavy ion therapy, there is a need for phase III randomised clinical trials. Furthermore, the success of systemic disease management lies in the fusion between radiation oncology technology and microbiology.

  9. Parent-Child Communication and Adjustment Among Children With Advanced and Non-Advanced Cancer in the First Year Following Diagnosis or Relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Madelaine C; Lehmann, Vicky; Shultz, Emily L; Winning, Adrien M; Rausch, Joseph R; Barrera, Maru; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Murphy, Lexa K; Vannatta, Kathryn A; Compas, Bruce E; Gerhardt, Cynthia A

    2017-09-01

    To examine parent-child communication (i.e., openness, problems) and child adjustment among youth with advanced or non-advanced cancer and comparison children. Families (n = 125) were recruited after a child's diagnosis/relapse and stratified by advanced (n = 55) or non-advanced (n = 70) disease. Comparison children (n = 60) were recruited from local schools. Children (ages 10-17) reported on communication (Parent-Adolescent Communication Scale) with both parents, while mothers reported on child adjustment (Child Behavior Checklist) at enrollment (T1) and one year (T2). Openness/problems in communication did not differ across groups at T1, but problems with fathers were higher among children with non-advanced cancer versus comparisons at T2. Openness declined for all fathers, while changes in problems varied by group for both parents. T1 communication predicted later adjustment only for children with advanced cancer. Communication plays an important role, particularly for children with advanced cancer. Additional research with families affected by life-limiting conditions is needed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Management of advanced pancreatic cancer with gemcitabine plus erlotinib: efficacy and safety results in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Beveridge, Robert; Alcolea, Vicent; Aparicio, Jorge; Segura, Ángel; García, Jose; Corbellas, Miguel; Fonfría, María; Giménez, Alejandra; Montalar, Joaquin

    2014-01-10

    The combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib is a standard first-line treatment for unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. We reviewed our single centre experience to assess its efficacy and toxicity in clinical practice. Clinical records of patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer who were treated with the combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib were reviewed. Univariate survival analysis and multivariate analysis were carried out to indentify independent predictors factors of overall survival. Our series included 55 patients. Overall disease control rate was 47%: 5% of patients presented complete response, 20% partial response and 22% stable disease. Median overall survival was 8.3 months). Cox regression analysis indicated that performance status and locally advanced versus metastatic disease were independent factors of overall survival. Patients who developed acne-like rash toxicity, related to erlotinib administration, presented a higher survival than those patients who did not develop this toxicity. Gemcitabine plus erlotinib doublet is active in our series of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. This study provides efficacy and safety results similar to those of the pivotal phase III clinical trial that tested the same combination.

  11. Dendritic Cell-Based Adjuvant Vaccination Targeting Wilms’ Tumor 1 in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigetaka Shimodaira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant recent advances in the development of immune checkpoint inhibitors, the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer involving metastasis to distant organs remains challenging. We conducted a phase I study to investigate the safety and immunogenicity of Wilms’ tumor (WT1 class I/II peptides-pulsed dendritic cell DC vaccination for patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Standard treatment comprising surgical resection and chemotherapy was followed by one course of seven biweekly administrations of 1–2 × 107 DCs with 1–2 KE of OK-432 (streptococcal preparation in three patients. Clinical efficacy was confirmed based on WT1 expression using immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissues and immune monitoring using tetramer analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT assays. WT1 expression with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-class I molecules was detected in surgical resected tissues. Adverse reactions to DC vaccinations were tolerable under an adjuvant setting. WT1-specific cytotoxic T cells were detected by both modified WT1-peptide/HLA-A*24:02 tetramer analysis and/or interferon-γ-producing cells through the use of ELISPOT assays after the first DC vaccination. Immunity acquired from DC vaccination persisted for two years with prolonged disease-free and overall survival. The present study indicated that DC vaccination targeting WT1 demonstrated the safety and immunogenicity as an adjuvant therapy in patients with resectable advanced colorectal cancer.

  12. Palliative prostate radiotherapy for symptomatic advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Din, Omar S.; Thanvi, Narottam; Ferguson, Catherine J.; Kirkbride, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report the results for the use of short-course palliative radiotherapy to the prostate for localised symptoms. Materials and methods: Fifty-eight patients were identified from radiotherapy records between 2003 and 2007. Data were collected retrospectively on patients' demographics, radiotherapy details and response. Symptoms and toxicity were scored, retrospectively, according to the following scale: 0 = no symptoms, 1 = mild symptoms, 2 = moderate symptoms, and 3 = severe symptoms. Results: All the 58 patients had advanced prostate carcinoma. The median age at radiotherapy was 76.6 years (range 54-91). Fifty-six patients (97%) had hormone refractory disease. Twenty-seven patients (47%) had evidence of metastatic disease. 20Gy in 5 fractions was the most commonly used fractionation. The most frequent baseline symptom was haematuria (54%). Eighty-nine percent (31/35) of the patients had a complete or partial resolution of symptoms at 4 months. Response rates for individual symptoms (including unknown responses) were: rectal symptoms (75%), pelvic pain (69%), urinary obstruction (54%) and haematuria (42%). A >50% reduction in PSA occurred in five patients. Toxicity was mild to moderate only and was self-limiting. Conclusion: Palliative radiotherapy to the prostate gland for local symptoms appears to be an effective means of palliation with minimal toxic side effects. Prospective studies are now required to assess its benefits in more detail.

  13. Physiotherapy programme reduces fatigue in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyszora, Anna; Budzyński, Jacek; Wójcik, Agnieszka; Prokop, Anna; Krajnik, Małgorzata

    2017-09-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common and relevant symptom in patients with advanced cancer that significantly decreases their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a physiotherapy programme on CRF and other symptoms in patients diagnosed with advanced cancer. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. Sixty patients diagnosed with advanced cancer receiving palliative care were randomized into two groups: the treatment group (n = 30) and the control group (n = 30). The therapy took place three times a week for 2 weeks. The 30-min physiotherapy session included active exercises, myofascial release and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques. The control group did not exercise. The outcomes included Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) and satisfaction scores. The exercise programme caused a significant reduction in fatigue scores (BFI) in terms of severity of fatigue and its impact on daily functioning. In the control group, no significant changes in the BFI were observed. Moreover, the physiotherapy programme improved patients' general well-being and reduced the intensity of coexisting symptoms such as pain, drowsiness, lack of appetite and depression. The analysis of satisfaction scores showed that it was also positively evaluated by patients. The physiotherapy programme, which included active exercises, myofascial release and PNF techniques, had beneficial effects on CRF and other symptoms in patients with advanced cancer who received palliative care. The results of the study suggest that physiotherapy is a safe and effective method of CRF management.

  14. The relationship between bioelectrical impedance phase angle and subjective global assessment in advanced colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grutsch James F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA derived phase angle is increasingly being used as an objective indicator of nutritional status in advanced cancer. Subjective Global Assessment (SGA is a subjective method of nutritional status. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between BIA derived phase angle and SGA in advanced colorectal cancer. Methods We evaluated a case series of 73 stages III and IV colorectal cancer patients. Patients were classified as either well-nourished or malnourished using the SGA. BIA was conducted on all patients and phase angle was calculated. The correlation between phase angle and SGA was studied using Spearman correlation coefficient. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were estimated using the non-parametric method to determine the optimal cut-off levels of phase angle. Results Well-nourished patients had a statistically significantly higher (p = 0.005 median phase angle score (6.12 as compared to those who were malnourished (5.18. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient between phase angle and SGA was found to be 0.33 (p = 0.004, suggesting better nutritional status with higher phase angle scores. A phase angle cut-off of 5.2 was 51.7% sensitive and 79.5% specific whereas a cut-off of 6.0 was 82.8% sensitive and 54.5% specific in detecting malnutrition. Interestingly, a phase angle cut-off of 5.9 demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy in males who had failed primary treatment for advanced colorectal cancer. Conclusion Our study suggests that bioimpedance phase angle is a potential nutritional indicator in advanced colorectal cancer. Further research is needed to elucidate the optimal cut-off levels of phase angle that can be incorporated into the oncology clinic for better nutritional evaluation and management.

  15. Cancer survivorship: Advancing the concept in the context of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Amanda; Payne, Sheila; Brady, Anne-Marie

    2017-08-01

    Previous conceptualizations of cancer survivorship have focused on heterogeneous cancer survivors, with little consideration of the validity of conclusions for homogeneous tumour groups. This paper aims to examine the concept of cancer survivorship in the context of colorectal cancer (CRC). Rodgers' (1989) Evolutionary Method of Concept Analysis guided this study. A systematic search of PUBMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO and The Cochrane Library was conducted in November 2016 to identify studies of CRC survivorship. The Braun and Clarke (2006) framework guided the analysis and interpretation of data extracted from eighty-five publications. Similar to general populations of cancer survivors, CRC survivors experience survivorship as an individual, life-changing process, punctuated by uncertainty and a duality of positive and negative outcomes affecting quality of life. However, CRC survivors experience specific concerns arising from the management of their disease. The concept of cancer survivorship has evolved over the past decade as the importance of navigating the healthcare system and its resources, and the constellation of met and unmet needs of cancer survivors are realised. The results highlight core similarities between survivorship in the context of CRC and other tumour groups, but underlines issues specific to CRC survivorship. Communication and support are key issues in survivorship care which may detrimentally affect CRC survivors' well-being if they are inadequately addressed. Healthcare professionals (HCP's) therefore have a duty to ensure cancer survivors' health, information and supportive care needs are met in the aftermath of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Religion and spirituality in coping with advanced breast cancer: perspectives from Malaysian Muslim women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Farizah; Muhammad, Mazanah binti; Abdullah, Amini Amir

    2011-03-01

    This article is part of a larger study on the role of spirituality in coping with breast cancer among Malaysian Muslim women. The study seeks to reveal the meaning of the experience through the stories of three Muslim women surviving advanced breast cancer, to better understand the deep meanings that inform their experiences with spirituality and transformation as they cope with the challenges of breast cancer. Data were gathered using in-depth interview. Qualitative methods were used in identifying two themes--illness as an awakening and hope and freedom comes from surrendering to God. The themes were discussed in the context of two broad areas: (1) what are the new meanings these women discovered in their experiences with cancer; and (2) how did the new meanings change their lives? The study suggests that cancer survivors' experiences with cancer and their learning processes must be understood within the appropriate cultural context. This is especially so for spirituality. The common emphasis of spirituality on relationship with God, self and others, may significantly influence how people learn to live with cancer.

  17. Nutritional status and related factors of patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyan; Lu, Yuhan; Fang, Yu

    2014-04-14

    The scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) is considered to be the most appropriate tool for detecting malnutrition in cancer patients. In particular, malignant tumours derived from the gastrointestinal tract may impair nutrient intake and absorption and cause malnutrition. We carried out a cross-sectional study to assess the nutritional status and related factors of patients with gastrointestinal cancer. Nutritional status was determined using the scored PG-SGA in patients (n 498) with advanced gastrointestinal cancer admitted to the Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology Unit at Beijing Cancer Hospital between 1 August 2012 and 28 February 2013. The possible related factors including age, sex, hospitalisation frequency and pathology were explored. We found that 98% of the patients required nutrition intervention and 54% of the patients required improved nutrition-related symptom management and/or urgent nutritional support (PG-SGA score ≥9). Factors related to malnutrition were age (r 0.103, Pcancer had a lower risk of malnutrition than patients with other types of gastrointestinal cancer (F=35.895, Pnutritional status of gastrointestinal patients, especially those at a higher risk of malnutrition, such as elderly patients, those hospitalised for the first time, male patients and those with other types of gastrointestinal cancer except rectal cancer. The nutritional status of these patients should be evaluated and they should be given proper nutrition education and nutritional support in a timely manner.

  18. A parallel-group randomized clinical trial of individually tailored, multidisciplinary, palliative rehabilitation for patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nottelmann, Lise; Groenvold, Mogens; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of early palliative care and rehabilitation on the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer has been only sparsely described and needs further investigation. In the present trial we combine elements of early, specialized palliative care with cancer rehabilitation...... in a 12-week individually tailored, palliative rehabilitation program initiated shortly after a diagnosis of advanced cancer. METHODS: This single center, randomized, controlled trial will include 300 patients with newly diagnosed advanced cancer recruited from the Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital...... initiated shortly after an advanced cancer diagnosis. The study will contribute with evidence on the effectiveness of implementing early palliative care in standard oncology treatment and hopefully offer new knowledge and future directions as to the content of palliative rehabilitation programs. TRIAL...

  19. Contemporary Management of Borderline Resectable and Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaib, Walid L; Ip, Andrew; Cardona, Kenneth; Alese, Olatunji B; Maithel, Shishir K; Kooby, David; Landry, Jerome; El-Rayes, Bassel F

    2016-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas remains a highly lethal disease, with less than 5% survival at 5 years. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) and locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) account for approximately 30% of newly diagnosed cases of PC. The objective of BRPC therapy is to downstage the tumor to allow resection; the objective of LAPC therapy is to control disease and improve survival. There is no consensus on the definitions of BRPC and LAPC, which leads to major limitations in designing clinical trials and evaluating their results. A multimodality approach is always needed to ensure proper utilization and timing of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery in the management of this disease. Combination chemotherapy regimens (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and gemcitabine [FOLFIRINOX] and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel) have improved overall survival in metastatic disease. The role of combination chemotherapy regimens in BRPC and LAPC is an area of active investigation. There is no consensus on the dose, modality, and role of radiation therapy in the treatment of BRPC and LAPC. This article reviews the literature and highlights the areas of controversy regarding management of BRPC and LAPC. Pancreatic cancer is one of the worst cancers with regard to survival, even at early stages of the disease. This review evaluates all the evidence for the stages in which the cancer is not primarily resectable with surgery, known as borderline resectable or locally advanced unresectable. Recently, advancements in radiation techniques and use of better combination chemotherapies have improved survival and tolerance. There is no consensus on description of stages or treatment sequences (chemotherapy, chemoradiation, radiation), nor on the best chemotherapy regimen. The evidence behind the treatment paradigm for these stages of pancreatic cancer is summarized. ©AlphaMed Press.

  20. The effect of radiotherapy on NKT cells in patients with advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kouichi; Tanaka, Yuriko; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Yamamoto, Shouji; Toshinori, Nakayama; Sugimoto, Akira; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2010-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapy with NKT cells is a potential new treatment strategy for advanced head and neck cancer. NKT cell therapy is promising due to its unique anti-tumor activity and higher degree of safety compared to current therapies. Radiotherapy is indispensable as a standard treatment for advanced head and neck cancer. To elucidate the possibility of using NKT cells as an adjuvant immunotherapy with radiotherapy, we examined the effect of radiotherapy on NKT cells in patients with head and neck cancer. The number, IFN-gamma production and proliferation capacity of NKT cells were analyzed before and after 50 Gy radiation therapy in 12 patients with stage IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The cytotoxic activity of NKT cells was examined in vitro. The number of NKT cells in the blood varied widely between patients. After radiation therapy, the population of CD3 T cells decreased significantly, while the NKT cell population remained stable. The number of NKT cells was the same after radiation therapy as before. IFN-gamma production from NKT cells collected just after radiotherapy was impaired after stimulation with exogenous ligand, but the proliferative responses of these NKT cells was enhanced in comparison to those collected before radiation therapy. Furthermore, the proliferated NKT cells displayed a significant level of anti-tumor activity. NKT cells are relatively resistant to radiation and might therefore be suitable for adjuvant immunotherapy to eradicate remnant cancer cells in patients who have undergone radiation therapy.