WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced biomaterials characterization tissue

  1. Advancing biomaterials of human origin for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterials have played an increasingly prominent role in the success of biomedical devices and in the development of tissue engineering, which seeks to unlock the regenerative potential innate to human tissues/organs in a state of deterioration and to restore or reestablish normal bodily function. Advances in our understanding of regenerative biomaterials and their roles in new tissue formation can potentially open a new frontier in the fast-growing field of regenerative medicine. Taking inspiration from the role and multi-component construction of native extracellular matrices (ECMs) for cell accommodation, the synthetic biomaterials produced today routinely incorporate biologically active components to define an artificial in vivo milieu with complex and dynamic interactions that foster and regulate stem cells, similar to the events occurring in a natural cellular microenvironment. The range and degree of biomaterial sophistication have also dramatically increased as more knowledge has accumulated through materials science, matrix biology and tissue engineering. However, achieving clinical translation and commercial success requires regenerative biomaterials to be not only efficacious and safe but also cost-effective and convenient for use and production. Utilizing biomaterials of human origin as building blocks for therapeutic purposes has provided a facilitated approach that closely mimics the critical aspects of natural tissue with regard to its physical and chemical properties for the orchestration of wound healing and tissue regeneration. In addition to directly using tissue transfers and transplants for repair, new applications of human-derived biomaterials are now focusing on the use of naturally occurring biomacromolecules, decellularized ECM scaffolds and autologous preparations rich in growth factors/non-expanded stem cells to either target acceleration/magnification of the body's own repair capacity or use nature's paradigms to create new tissues for

  2. Instrumental methods and techniques for structural and physicochemical characterization of biomaterials and bone tissue: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitić, Žarko; Stolić, Aleksandra; Stojanović, Sanja; Najman, Stevo; Ignjatović, Nenad; Nikolić, Goran; Trajanović, Miroslav

    2017-10-01

    A review of recent advances in instrumental methods and techniques for structural and physicochemical characterization of biomaterials and bone tissue is presented in this paper. In recent years, biomaterials attracted great attention primarily because of the wide range of biomedical applications. This paper focuses on the practical aspects of instrumental methods and techniques that were most often applied (X-ray methods, vibrational spectroscopy (IR and Raman), magnetic-resonance spectroscopy (NMR and ESR), mass spectrometry (MS), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) in the structural investigation and physicochemical characterization of biomaterials and bone tissue. The application of some other physicochemical methods was also discussed. Hands-on information is provided about these valuable research tools, emphasizing practical aspects such as typical measurement conditions, their limitations and advantages, interpretation of results and practical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Advanced biomaterials and biodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials are the fastest-growing emerging field of  biodevices. Design and development of biomaterials play a significant role in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. Recently, a variety of scaffolds/carriers have been evaluated for tissue regeneration, drug delivery, sensing and imaging.  Liposomes and microspheres have been developed for sustained delivery. Several anti-cancer drugs have been successfully formulated using biomaterial. The targeting of drugs to certain physiological sites has emerged as a promising tool in the treatment with improved drug bioavailability and reduction of dosing frequency. Biodevices-based targeting of drugs may improve the therapeutic success by limiting the adverse drug effects and resulting in more patient compliance and attaining a higher adherence level. Advanced biodevices hold merit as a drug carrier with high carrier capacity, feasibility of incorporation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances, high stability, as well as the feasibility...

  4. Recent Advances in Biomaterials for 3D Printing and Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Udayabhanu Jammalamadaka; Karthik Tappa

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing has significant potential as a fabrication method in creating scaffolds for tissue engineering. The applications of 3D printing in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering are limited by the variety of biomaterials that can be used in this technology. Many researchers have developed novel biomaterials and compositions to enable their use in 3D printing methods. The advantages of fabricating scaffolds using 3D printing are numerous, including the abi...

  5. Recent Advances in Biomaterials for 3D Printing and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udayabhanu Jammalamadaka

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional printing has significant potential as a fabrication method in creating scaffolds for tissue engineering. The applications of 3D printing in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering are limited by the variety of biomaterials that can be used in this technology. Many researchers have developed novel biomaterials and compositions to enable their use in 3D printing methods. The advantages of fabricating scaffolds using 3D printing are numerous, including the ability to create complex geometries, porosities, co-culture of multiple cells, and incorporate growth factors. In this review, recently-developed biomaterials for different tissues are discussed. Biomaterials used in 3D printing are categorized into ceramics, polymers, and composites. Due to the nature of 3D printing methods, most of the ceramics are combined with polymers to enhance their printability. Polymer-based biomaterials are 3D printed mostly using extrusion-based printing and have a broader range of applications in regenerative medicine. The goal of tissue engineering is to fabricate functional and viable organs and, to achieve this, multiple biomaterials and fabrication methods need to be researched.

  6. Recent Advances in Biomaterials for 3D Printing and Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammalamadaka, Udayabhanu; Tappa, Karthik

    2018-03-01

    Three-dimensional printing has significant potential as a fabrication method in creating scaffolds for tissue engineering. The applications of 3D printing in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering are limited by the variety of biomaterials that can be used in this technology. Many researchers have developed novel biomaterials and compositions to enable their use in 3D printing methods. The advantages of fabricating scaffolds using 3D printing are numerous, including the ability to create complex geometries, porosities, co-culture of multiple cells, and incorporate growth factors. In this review, recently-developed biomaterials for different tissues are discussed. Biomaterials used in 3D printing are categorized into ceramics, polymers, and composites. Due to the nature of 3D printing methods, most of the ceramics are combined with polymers to enhance their printability. Polymer-based biomaterials are 3D printed mostly using extrusion-based printing and have a broader range of applications in regenerative medicine. The goal of tissue engineering is to fabricate functional and viable organs and, to achieve this, multiple biomaterials and fabrication methods need to be researched.

  7. Keratoconus: Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Karamichos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is a bilateral, asymmetric, corneal disorder that is characterized by progressive thinning, steepening, and potential scarring. The prevalence of KC is stated to be 1 in 2000 persons worldwide; however, numbers vary depending on size of the study and regions. KC appears more often in South Asian, Eastern Mediterranean, and North African populations. The cause remains unknown, although a variety of factors have been considered. Genetics, cellular, and mechanical changes have all been reported; however, most of these studies have proven inconclusive. Clearly, the major problem here, like with any other ocular disease, is quality of life and the threat of vision loss. While most KC cases progress until the third or fourth decade, it varies between individuals. Patients may experience periods of several months with significant changes followed by months or years of no change, followed by another period of rapid changes. Despite the major advancements, it is still uncertain how to treat KC at early stages and prevent vision impairment. There are currently limited tissue engineering techniques and/or “smart” biomaterials that can help arrest the progression of KC. This review will focus on current treatments and how biomaterials may hold promise for the future.

  8. Biomaterials for tissue engineering: summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, L.; Mikos, A. G.; Gibbons, D. F.; Picciolo, G. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations and discussion at the workshop "Enabling Biomaterial Technology for Tissue Engineering," which was held during the Fifth World Biomaterials Congress in May 1996. Presentations covered the areas of material substrate architecture, barrier effects, and cellular response, including analysis of biomaterials challenges involved in producing specific tissue-engineered products.

  9. Formulation and characterization of a porous, elastomeric biomaterial for vocal fold tissue engineering research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Joel; Bartlett, Rebecca S; Klemuk, Sarah A; Thibeault, Susan L

    2014-12-01

    Biomaterials able to mimic the mechanical properties of vocal fold tissue may be particularly useful for furnishing a 3-dimensional microenvironment allowing for in vitro investigation of cell and molecular responses to vibration. Motivated by the dearth of biomaterials available for use in an in vitro model for vocal fold tissue, we investigated polyether polyurethane (PEU) matrices, which are porous, mechanically tunable biomaterials that are inexpensive and require only standard laboratory equipment for fabrication. Rheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy were performed on PEU matrices at 5%, 10%, and 20% w/v mass concentrations. For 5%, 10%, and 20% w/v concentrations, shear storage moduli were 2 kPa, 3.4 kPa, and 6 kPa, respectively, with shear loss moduli being 0.2 kPa, 0.38 kPa, and 0.62 kPa, respectively. Storage moduli responded to applied frequency as a linear function. Mercury intrusion porosimetry revealed that all 3 mass concentrations of PEU have a similar overall percentage porosity but differ in pore architecture. Twenty-µm diameter pores are ideal for cell seeding, and a range of mechanical properties indicates that the lower [corrected] mass concentration PEU formulations are best suited for mimicking the viscoelastic properties of vocal fold tissue for in vitro research. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Advancing the field of 3D biomaterial printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakus, Adam E; Rutz, Alexandra L; Shah, Ramille N

    2016-01-11

    3D biomaterial printing has emerged as a potentially revolutionary technology, promising to transform both research and medical therapeutics. Although there has been recent progress in the field, on-demand fabrication of functional and transplantable tissues and organs is still a distant reality. To advance to this point, there are two major technical challenges that must be overcome. The first is expanding upon the limited variety of available 3D printable biomaterials (biomaterial inks), which currently do not adequately represent the physical, chemical, and biological complexity and diversity of tissues and organs within the human body. Newly developed biomaterial inks and the resulting 3D printed constructs must meet numerous interdependent requirements, including those that lead to optimal printing, structural, and biological outcomes. The second challenge is developing and implementing comprehensive biomaterial ink and printed structure characterization combined with in vitro and in vivo tissue- and organ-specific evaluation. This perspective outlines considerations for addressing these technical hurdles that, once overcome, will facilitate rapid advancement of 3D biomaterial printing as an indispensable tool for both investigating complex tissue and organ morphogenesis and for developing functional devices for a variety of diagnostic and regenerative medicine applications.

  11. Biomaterials in myocardial tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Lewis A.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Feric, Nicole; Fu, Lara; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world, and as such there is a pressing need for treatment options. Cardiac tissue engineering emerged from the need to develop alternate sources and methods of replacing tissue damaged by cardiovascular diseases, as the ultimate treatment option for many who suffer from end-stage heart failure is a heart transplant. In this review we focus on biomaterial approaches to augment injured or impaired myocardium with specific emphasis on: the design criteria for these biomaterials; the types of scaffolds—composed of natural or synthetic biomaterials, or decellularized extracellular matrix—that have been used to develop cardiac patches and tissue models; methods to vascularize scaffolds and engineered tissue, and finally injectable biomaterials (hydrogels)designed for endogenous repair, exogenous repair or as bulking agents to maintain ventricular geometry post-infarct. The challenges facing the field and obstacles that must be overcome to develop truly clinically viable cardiac therapies are also discussed. PMID:25066525

  12. Designing Smart Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdous Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The engineering of human tissues to cure diseases is an interdisciplinary and a very attractive field of research both in academia and the biotechnology industrial sector. Three-dimensional (3D biomaterial scaffolds can play a critical role in the development of new tissue morphogenesis via interacting with human cells. Although simple polymeric biomaterials can provide mechanical and physical properties required for tissue development, insufficient biomimetic property and lack of interactions with human progenitor cells remain problematic for the promotion of functional tissue formation. Therefore, the developments of advanced functional biomaterials that respond to stimulus could be the next choice to generate smart 3D biomimetic scaffolds, actively interacting with human stem cells and progenitors along with structural integrity to form functional tissue within a short period. To date, smart biomaterials are designed to interact with biological systems for a wide range of biomedical applications, from the delivery of bioactive molecules and cell adhesion mediators to cellular functioning for the engineering of functional tissues to treat diseases.

  13. Heterogeneity of Scaffold Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Edgar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering (TE offers a potential solution for the shortage of transplantable organs and the need for novel methods of tissue repair. Methods of TE have advanced significantly in recent years, but there are challenges to using engineered tissues and organs including but not limited to: biocompatibility, immunogenicity, biodegradation, and toxicity. Analysis of biomaterials used as scaffolds may, however, elucidate how TE can be enhanced. Ideally, biomaterials should closely mimic the characteristics of desired organ, their function and their in vivo environments. A review of biomaterials used in TE highlighted natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and decellularized organs as sources of scaffolding. Studies of discarded organs supported that decellularization offers a remedy to reducing waste of donor organs, but does not yet provide an effective solution to organ demand because it has shown varied success in vivo depending on organ complexity and physiological requirements. Review of polymer-based scaffolds revealed that a composite scaffold formed by copolymerization is more effective than single polymer scaffolds because it allows copolymers to offset disadvantages a single polymer may possess. Selection of biomaterials for use in TE is essential for transplant success. There is not, however, a singular biomaterial that is universally optimal.

  14. Nanophase hydroxyapatite as a biomaterial in advanced hard tissue engineering: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakaria, S.M.; Zein, S.H. Sharif; Othman, M.R.; Yang, F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite is a biocompatible material that is extensively used in the replacement and regeneration of bone material. In nature, nanostructured hydroxyapatite is the main component present in hard body tissues. Hence, the state of the art in nanotechnology can be exploited to synthesize

  15. Polymeric Biomaterials: Diverse Functions Enabled by Advances in Macromolecular Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yingkai; Li, Linqing; Scott, Rebecca A; Kiick, Kristi L

    2017-01-24

    Biomaterials have been extensively used to leverage beneficial outcomes in various therapeutic applications, such as providing spatial and temporal control over the release of therapeutic agents in drug delivery as well as engineering functional tissues and promoting the healing process in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This perspective presents important milestones in the development of polymeric biomaterials with defined structures and properties. Contemporary studies of biomaterial design have been reviewed with focus on constructing materials with controlled structure, dynamic functionality, and biological complexity. Examples of these polymeric biomaterials enabled by advanced synthetic methodologies, dynamic chemistry/assembly strategies, and modulated cell-material interactions have been highlighted. As the field of polymeric biomaterials continues to evolve with increased sophistication, current challenges and future directions for the design and translation of these materials are also summarized.

  16. Computer-aided design and finite-element modelling of biomaterial scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Damien; Planell, Josep A; Prendergast, Patrick J

    2009-05-28

    Scaffold biomaterials for tissue engineering can be produced in many different ways depending on the applications and the materials used. Most research into new biomaterials is based on an experimental trial-and-error approach that limits the possibility of making many variations to a single material and studying its interaction with its surroundings. Instead, computer simulation applied to tissue engineering can offer a more exhaustive approach to test and screen out biomaterials. In this paper, a review of the current approach in biomaterials designed through computer-aided design (CAD) and through finite-element modelling is given. First we review the approach used in tissue engineering in the development of scaffolds and the interactions existing between biomaterials, cells and mechanical stimuli. Then, scaffold fabrication through CAD is presented and characterization of existing scaffolds through computed images is reviewed. Several case studies of finite-element studies in tissue engineering show the usefulness of computer simulations in determining the mechanical environment of cells when seeded into a scaffold and the proper design of the geometry and stiffness of the scaffold. This creates a need for more advanced studies that include aspects of mechanobiology in tissue engineering in order to be able to predict over time the growth and differentiation of tissues within scaffolds. Finally, current perspectives indicate that more efforts need to be put into the development of such advanced studies, with the removal of technical limitations such as computer power and the inclusion of more accurate biological and genetic processes into the developed algorithms.

  17. Leveraging advances in biology to design biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Max; Mooney, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Biomaterials have dramatically increased in functionality and complexity, allowing unprecedented control over the cells that interact with them. From these engineering advances arises the prospect of improved biomaterial-based therapies, yet practical constraints favour simplicity. Tools from the biology community are enabling high-resolution and high-throughput bioassays that, if incorporated into a biomaterial design framework, could help achieve unprecedented functionality while minimizing the complexity of designs by identifying the most important material parameters and biological outputs. However, to avoid data explosions and to effectively match the information content of an assay with the goal of the experiment, material screens and bioassays must be arranged in specific ways. By borrowing methods to design experiments and workflows from the bioprocess engineering community, we outline a framework for the incorporation of next-generation bioassays into biomaterials design to effectively optimize function while minimizing complexity. This framework can inspire biomaterials designs that maximize functionality and translatability.

  18. Biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Migonney , Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Discovered in the 20th century, biomaterials have contributed to many of the incredible scientific and technological advancements made in recent decades. This book introduces and details the tenets of biomaterials, their relevance in a various fields, practical applications of their products, and potential advancements of the years to come. A comprehensive resource, the text covers the reasons that certain properties of biomaterials contribute to specific applications, and students and researchers will appreciate this exhaustive textbook.

  19. Additive Manufacturing of Biomaterials, Tissues, and Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadpoor, Amir A; Malda, Jos

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of additive manufacturing (AM), often referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, has initiated what some believe to be a manufacturing revolution, and has expedited the development of the field of biofabrication. Moreover, recent advances in AM have facilitated further development of patient-specific healthcare solutions. Customization of many healthcare products and services, such as implants, drug delivery devices, medical instruments, prosthetics, and in vitro models, would have been extremely challenging-if not impossible-without AM technologies. The current special issue of the Annals of Biomedical Engineering presents the latest trends in application of AM techniques to healthcare-related areas of research. As a prelude to this special issue, we review here the most important areas of biomedical research and clinical practice that have benefited from recent developments in additive manufacturing techniques. This editorial, therefore, aims to sketch the research landscape within which the other contributions of the special issue can be better understood and positioned. In what follows, we briefly review the application of additive manufacturing techniques in studies addressing biomaterials, (re)generation of tissues and organs, disease models, drug delivery systems, implants, medical instruments, prosthetics, orthotics, and AM objects used for medical visualization and communication.

  20. Tissue engineering; strategies, tissues, and biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshandeh, Behnaz; Zarrintaj, Payam; Oftadeh, Mohammad Omid; Keramati, Farid; Fouladiha, Hamideh; Sohrabi-Jahromi, Salma; Ziraksaz, Zarrintaj

    2017-10-01

    Current tissue regenerative strategies rely mainly on tissue repair by transplantation of the synthetic/natural implants. However, limitations of the existing strategies have increased the demand for tissue engineering approaches. Appropriate cell source, effective cell modification, and proper supportive matrices are three bases of tissue engineering. Selection of appropriate methods for cell stimulation, scaffold synthesis, and tissue transplantation play a definitive role in successful tissue engineering. Although the variety of the players are available, but proper combination and functional synergism determine the practical efficacy. Hence, in this review, a comprehensive view of tissue engineering and its different aspects are investigated.

  1. Keratoconus: Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Karamichos, Dimitrios; Hjortdal, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a bilateral, asymmetric, corneal disorder that is characterized by progressive thinning, steepening, and potential scarring. The prevalence of KC is stated to be 1 in 2000 persons worldwide; however, numbers vary depending on size of the study and regions. KC appears more often in South Asian, Eastern Mediterranean, and North African populations. The cause remains unknown, although a variety of factors have been considered. Genetics, cellular, and mechanical changes have a...

  2. Manufacturing of hydrogel biomaterials with controlled mechanical properties for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedadghavami, Armin; Minooei, Farnaz; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Khetani, Sultan; Rezaei Kolahchi, Ahmad; Mashayekhan, Shohreh; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2017-10-15

    Hydrogels have been recognized as crucial biomaterials in the field of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications due to their specific characteristics. These biomaterials benefit from retaining a large amount of water, effective mass transfer, similarity to natural tissues and the ability to form different shapes. However, having relatively poor mechanical properties is a limiting factor associated with hydrogel biomaterials. Controlling the biomechanical properties of hydrogels is of paramount importance. In this work, firstly, mechanical characteristics of hydrogels and methods employed for characterizing these properties are explored. Subsequently, the most common approaches used for tuning mechanical properties of hydrogels including but are not limited to, interpenetrating polymer networks, nanocomposites, self-assembly techniques, and co-polymerization are discussed. The performance of different techniques used for tuning biomechanical properties of hydrogels is further compared. Such techniques involve lithography techniques for replication of tissues with complex mechanical profiles; microfluidic techniques applicable for generating gradients of mechanical properties in hydrogel biomaterials for engineering complex human tissues like intervertebral discs, osteochondral tissues, blood vessels and skin layers; and electrospinning techniques for synthesis of hybrid hydrogels and highly ordered fibers with tunable mechanical and biological properties. We finally discuss future perspectives and challenges for controlling biomimetic hydrogel materials possessing proper biomechanical properties. Hydrogels biomaterials are essential constituting components of engineered tissues with the applications in regenerative medicine and drug delivery. The mechanical properties of hydrogels play crucial roles in regulating the interactions between cells and extracellular matrix and directing the cells phenotype and genotype. Despite

  3. Nanoreinforced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering: Biomaterials that are Compatible with Load-Bearing and Electroactive Tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Thakur, Ashish; Pennisi, Christian Pablo

    2017-01-01

    , mechanical, and electrical properties. Here, recent advances in the fabrication and application of nanocomposite hydrogels in tissue engineering applications are described, with specific attention toward skeletal and electroactive tissues, such as cardiac, nerve, bone, cartilage, and skeletal muscle......Given their highly porous nature and excellent water retention, hydrogel-based biomaterials can mimic critical properties of the native cellular environment. However, their potential to emulate the electromechanical milieu of native tissues or conform well with the curved topology of human organs...

  4. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman Swaminathan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves.

  5. Injectable silk-based biomaterials for cervical tissue augmentation: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joseph E; Partlow, Benjamin P; Berman, Alison M; House, Michael D; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-01

    Cerclage therapy is an important treatment option for preterm birth prevention. Several patient populations benefit from cerclage therapy including patients with a classic history of cervical insufficiency; patients who present with advanced cervical dilation prior to viability; and patients with a history of preterm birth and cervical shortening. Although cerclage is an effective treatment option in some patients, it can be associated with limited efficacy and procedure complications. Development of an alternative to cerclage therapy would be an important clinical development. Here we report on an injectable, silk protein-based biomaterial for cervical tissue augmentation. The rationale for the development of an injectable biomaterial is to restore the native properties of cervical tissue. While cerclage provides support to the tissue, it does not address excessive tissue softening, which is a central feature of the pathogenesis of cervical insufficiency. Silk protein-based hydrogels, which are biocompatible and naturally degrade in vivo, are suggested as a platform for restoring the native properties of cervical tissue and improving cervical function. We sought to study the properties of an injectable, silk-based biomaterial for potential use as an alternative treatment for cervical insufficiency. These biomaterials were evaluated for mechanical tunability, biocompatibility, facile injection, and in vitro degradation. Silk protein solutions were cross-linked by an enzyme catalyzed reaction to form elastic biomaterials. Biomaterials were formulated to match the native physical properties of cervical tissue during pregnancy. The cell compatibility of the materials was assessed in vitro using cervical fibroblasts, and biodegradation was evaluated using concentrated protease solution. Tissue augmentation or bulking was demonstrated using human cervical tissue from nonpregnant hysterectomy specimens. Mechanical compression tests measured the tissue stiffness as a

  6. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Tissue Engineered Bone Tissue Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bressan Eriberto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering strategies are emerging as attractive alternatives to autografts and allografts in bone tissue reconstruction, in particular thanks to their association with nanotechnologies. Nanostructured biomaterials, indeed, mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM of the natural bone, creating an artificial microenvironment that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. At the same time, the possibility to easily isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from different adult tissues together with their multi-lineage differentiation potential makes them an interesting tool in the field of bone tissue engineering. This review gives an overview of the most promising nanostructured biomaterials, used alone or in combination with MSCs, which could in future be employed as bone substitutes. Recent works indicate that composite scaffolds made of ceramics/metals or ceramics/polymers are undoubtedly more effective than the single counterparts in terms of osteoconductivity, osteogenicity and osteoinductivity. A better understanding of the interactions between MSCs and nanostructured biomaterials will surely contribute to the progress of bone tissue engineering.

  7. Soy Protein Scaffold Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Karen B.

    Developing functional biomaterials using highly processable materials with tailorable physical and bioactive properties is an ongoing challenge in tissue engineering. Soy protein is an abundant, natural resource with potential use for regenerative medicine applications. Preliminary studies show that soy protein can be physically modified and fabricated into various biocompatible constructs. However, optimized soy protein structures for tissue regeneration (i.e. 3D porous scaffolds) have not yet been designed. Furthermore, little work has established the in vivo biocompatibility of implanted soy protein and the benefit of using soy over other proteins including FDA-approved bovine collagen. In this work, freeze-drying and 3D printing fabrication processes were developed using commercially available soy protein to create porous scaffolds that improve cell growth and infiltration compared to other soy biomaterials previously reported. Characterization of scaffold structure, porosity, and mechanical/degradation properties was performed. In addition, the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on various designed soy scaffolds was analyzed. Biological characterization of the cell-seeded scaffolds was performed to assess feasibility for use in liver tissue regeneration. The acute and humoral response of soy scaffolds implanted in an in vivo mouse subcutaneous model was also investigated. All fabricated soy scaffolds were modified using thermal, chemical, and enzymatic crosslinking to change properties and cell growth behavior. 3D printing allowed for control of scaffold pore size and geometry. Scaffold structure, porosity, and degradation rate significantly altered the in vivo response. Freeze-dried soy scaffolds had similar biocompatibility as freeze-dried collagen scaffolds of the same protein content. However, the soy scaffolds degraded at a much faster rate, minimizing immunogenicity. Interestingly, subcutaneously implanted soy scaffolds affected blood

  8. Applications of Biomaterials in Corneal Endothelial Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsung-Jen; Wang, I-Jong; Hu, Fung-Rong; Young, Tai-Horng

    2016-11-01

    When corneal endothelial cells (CECs) are diseased or injured, corneal endothelium can be surgically removed and tissue from a deceased donor can replace the original endothelium. Recent major innovations in corneal endothelial transplantation include replacement of diseased corneal endothelium with a thin lamellar posterior donor comprising a tissue-engineered endothelium carried or cultured on a thin substratum with an organized monolayer of cells. Repairing CECs is challenging because they have restricted proliferative ability in vivo. CECs can be cultivated in vitro and seeded successfully onto natural tissue materials or synthetic polymeric materials as grafts for transplantation. The optimal biomaterials for substrata of CEC growth are being investigated. Establishing a CEC culture system by tissue engineering might require multiple biomaterials to create a new scaffold that overcomes the disadvantages of single biomaterials. Chitosan and polycaprolactone are biodegradable biomaterials approved by the Food and Drug Administration that have superior biological, degradable, and mechanical properties for culturing substratum. We successfully hybridized chitosan and polycaprolactone into blended membranes, and demonstrated that CECs proliferated, developed normal morphology, and maintained their physiological phenotypes. The interaction between cells and biomaterials is important in tissue engineering of CECs. We are still optimizing culture methods for the maintenance and differentiation of CECs on biomaterials.

  9. Biomaterials and tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper provides an account of the rationale for the development of implantable medical devices over the last half-century and explains the criteria that have controlled the selection of biomaterials for these critical applications. In spite of some good successes and excellent materials, there are still serious limitations to ...

  10. Neural engineering from advanced biomaterials to 3D fabrication techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, David

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the principles of advanced 3D fabrication techniques, stem cells and biomaterials for neural engineering. Renowned contributors cover topics such as neural tissue regeneration, peripheral and central nervous system repair, brain-machine interfaces and in vitro nervous system modeling. Within these areas, focus remains on exciting and emerging technologies such as highly developed neuroprostheses and the communication channels between the brain and prostheses, enabling technologies that are beneficial for development of therapeutic interventions, advanced fabrication techniques such as 3D bioprinting, photolithography, microfluidics, and subtractive fabrication, and the engineering of implantable neural grafts. There is a strong focus on stem cells and 3D bioprinting technologies throughout the book, including working with embryonic, fetal, neonatal, and adult stem cells and a variety of sophisticated 3D bioprinting methods for neural engineering applications. There is also a strong focus on b...

  11. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  12. Future Prospects for Scaffolding Methods and Biomaterials in Skin Tissue Engineering: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Atul A; Vig, Komal; Baganizi, Dieudonné Radé; Sahu, Rajnish; Dixit, Saurabh; Dennis, Vida; Singh, Shree Ram; Pillai, Shreekumar R

    2016-11-25

    Over centuries, the field of regenerative skin tissue engineering has had several advancements to facilitate faster wound healing and thereby restoration of skin. Skin tissue regeneration is mainly based on the use of suitable scaffold matrices. There are several scaffold types, such as porous, fibrous, microsphere, hydrogel, composite and acellular, etc., with discrete advantages and disadvantages. These scaffolds are either made up of highly biocompatible natural biomaterials, such as collagen, chitosan, etc., or synthetic materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG), etc. Composite scaffolds, which are a combination of natural or synthetic biomaterials, are highly biocompatible with improved tensile strength for effective skin tissue regeneration. Appropriate knowledge of the properties, advantages and disadvantages of various biomaterials and scaffolds will accelerate the production of suitable scaffolds for skin tissue regeneration applications. At the same time, emphasis on some of the leading challenges in the field of skin tissue engineering, such as cell interaction with scaffolds, faster cellular proliferation/differentiation, and vascularization of engineered tissues, is inevitable. In this review, we discuss various types of scaffolding approaches and biomaterials used in the field of skin tissue engineering and more importantly their future prospects in skin tissue regeneration efforts.

  13. Future Prospects for Scaffolding Methods and Biomaterials in Skin Tissue Engineering: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul A. Chaudhari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Over centuries, the field of regenerative skin tissue engineering has had several advancements to facilitate faster wound healing and thereby restoration of skin. Skin tissue regeneration is mainly based on the use of suitable scaffold matrices. There are several scaffold types, such as porous, fibrous, microsphere, hydrogel, composite and acellular, etc., with discrete advantages and disadvantages. These scaffolds are either made up of highly biocompatible natural biomaterials, such as collagen, chitosan, etc., or synthetic materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL, and poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG, etc. Composite scaffolds, which are a combination of natural or synthetic biomaterials, are highly biocompatible with improved tensile strength for effective skin tissue regeneration. Appropriate knowledge of the properties, advantages and disadvantages of various biomaterials and scaffolds will accelerate the production of suitable scaffolds for skin tissue regeneration applications. At the same time, emphasis on some of the leading challenges in the field of skin tissue engineering, such as cell interaction with scaffolds, faster cellular proliferation/differentiation, and vascularization of engineered tissues, is inevitable. In this review, we discuss various types of scaffolding approaches and biomaterials used in the field of skin tissue engineering and more importantly their future prospects in skin tissue regeneration efforts.

  14. Biomaterials mediated microRNA delivery for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, M; Sainitya, R; Kalyanaraman, V; Dhivya, S; Selvamurugan, N

    2015-03-01

    Bone tissue engineering is an alternative strategy to overcome the problems associated with traditional treatments for bone defects. A number of bioactive materials along with new techniques like porous scaffold implantation, gene delivery, 3D organ printing are now-a-days emerging for traditional bone grafts and metal implants. Studying the molecular mechanisms through which these biomaterials induce osteogenesis is an equally hot field. Biomaterials could determine the fate of a cell via microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and play an essential role for regulation of cell specific lineages including osteogenesis. Thus, this review focuses the recent trends on establishing a link of biomaterials with miRNAs and their delivery for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mourik, P.; Van Dam, J.; Picken, S.J.; Ursem, B.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of living organisms produce biomaterials. Hence, in principle biomaterials are fully sustainable. This does not mean that their processing and application have no impact on the environment, e.g. the recycling of natural rubber remains a problem. Biomaterials are applied in a

  16. Nanoreinforced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering: Biomaterials that are Compatible with Load-Bearing and Electroactive Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Thakur, Ashish; Pennisi, Christian Pablo; Talebian, Sepehr; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza

    2017-02-01

    Given their highly porous nature and excellent water retention, hydrogel-based biomaterials can mimic critical properties of the native cellular environment. However, their potential to emulate the electromechanical milieu of native tissues or conform well with the curved topology of human organs needs to be further explored to address a broad range of physiological demands of the body. In this regard, the incorporation of nanomaterials within hydrogels has shown great promise, as a simple one-step approach, to generate multifunctional scaffolds with previously unattainable biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. Here, recent advances in the fabrication and application of nanocomposite hydrogels in tissue engineering applications are described, with specific attention toward skeletal and electroactive tissues, such as cardiac, nerve, bone, cartilage, and skeletal muscle. Additionally, some potential uses of nanoreinforced hydrogels within the emerging disciplines of cyborganics, bionics, and soft biorobotics are highlighted. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Preparation of hybrid biomaterials for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Conceição Costa

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering has evolved from the use of biomaterials for bone substitution that fulfill the clinical demands of biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-immunogeneity, structural strength and porosity. Porous scaffolds have been developed in many forms and materials, but few reached the need of adequate physical, biological and mechanical properties. In the present paper we report the preparation of hybrid porous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/bioactive glass through the sol-gel route, using partially and fully hydrolyzed polyvinyl alcohol, and perform structural characterization. Hybrids containing PVA and bioactive glass with composition 58SiO2-33CaO-9P2O5 were synthesized by foaming a mixture of polymer solution and bioactive glass sol-gel precursor solution. Sol-gel solution was prepared from mixing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS, triethylphosphate (TEP, and calcium chloride as chemical precursors. The hybrid composites obtained after aging and drying at low temperature were chemically and morphologically characterized through infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The degree of hydrolysis of PVA, concentration of PVA solution and different PVA-bioglass composition ratios affect the synthesis procedure. Synthesis parameters must be very well combined in order to allow foaming and gelation. The hybrid scaffolds obtained exhibited macroporous structure with pore size varying from 50 to 600 µm.

  18. Smart biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Narain, Ravin; Idota, Naokazu; Kim, Young-Jin; Hoffman, John M; Uto, Koichiro; Aoyagi, Takao

    2014-01-01

    This book surveys smart biomaterials, exploring the properties, mechanics and characterization of hydrogels, particles, assemblies, surfaces, fibers and conjugates. Reviews applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, bioseparation and more.

  19. Biomaterials and tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In spite of some good successes and excellent materials, there are still serious limitations to the performance of implants today, and the paper explains these limitations and develops this theme in order to describe the recent innovations in tissue engineering, which involves a different approach to reconstruction of the body.

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Biomaterials, Tissues, and Organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadpoor, Amir A; Malda, Jos

    The introduction of additive manufacturing (AM), often referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, has initiated what some believe to be a manufacturing revolution, and has expedited the development of the field of biofabrication. Moreover, recent advances in AM have facilitated further

  1. Additive Manufacturing of Biomaterials, Tissues, and Organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadpoor, Amir A; Malda, Jos

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of additive manufacturing (AM), often referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, has initiated what some believe to be a manufacturing revolution, and has expedited the development of the field of biofabrication. Moreover, recent advances in AM have facilitated further

  2. Biomaterials and Culture Technologies for Regenerative Therapy of Liver Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Roman A; Jung, Cho-Rok; Kim, Hae-Won

    2017-01-01

    Regenerative approach has emerged to substitute the current extracorporeal technologies for the treatment of diseased and damaged liver tissue. This is based on the use of biomaterials that modulate the responses of hepatic cells through the unique matrix properties tuned to recapitulate regenerative functions. Cells in liver preserve their phenotype or differentiate through the interactions with extracellular matrix molecules. Therefore, the intrinsic properties of the engineered biomaterials, such as stiffness and surface topography, need to be tailored to induce appropriate cellular functions. The matrix physical stimuli can be combined with biochemical cues, such as immobilized functional groups or the delivered actions of signaling molecules. Furthermore, the external modulation of cells, through cocultures with nonparenchymal cells (e.g., endothelial cells) that can signal bioactive molecules, is another promising avenue to regenerate liver tissue. This review disseminates the recent approaches of regenerating liver tissue, with a focus on the development of biomaterials and the related culture technologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Characterization of cell cultures in contact with different orthopedic implants biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouenzerfi, G.; Hannoun, A.; Hassler, M.; Brizuela, L.; Youjil, S.; Bougault, C.; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, A.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the role of biological and mechanical constraints (at the cellular level) surrounding living tissues (cartilage and bone) in the presence of different joint implant biomaterials. In this fact, cells cultures in the presence of different types of biomaterials (pyrolytic carbon, cobalt-Chromium, titanium) has been performed. These cell cultures were subjected to biological characterization tests and mechanical characterization. The obtained results correlate with the in vivo observations (a promotion of the creation of a neocartilagical tissue in contact with the Pyrolytic Carbon implants).

  4. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R [Institute of Applied Physics ' Nello Carrara' , National Research Council, via Madonna del Piano 10 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  5. Advanced biomaterials and their potential applications in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Guofeng; Feng, Zhihong; Dong, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Bei; Bai, Shizhu; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease is considered as a widespread infectious disease and the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. Attempts for developing periodontal disease treatment strategies, including drug delivery and regeneration approaches, provide a useful experimental model for the evaluation of future periodontal therapies. Recently, emerging advanced biomaterials including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and particles, hold great potential to be utilized as cell/drug carriers for local drug delivery and biomimetic scaffolds for future regeneration therapies. In this review, first, we describe the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, including plaque formation, immune response and inflammatory reactions caused by bacteria. Second, periodontal therapy and an overview of current biomaterials in periodontal regenerative medicine have been discussed. Third, the roles of state-of-the-art biomaterials, including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and micro/nanoparticles, developed for periodontal disease treatment and periodontal tissue regeneration, and their fabrication methods, have been presented. Finally, biological properties, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and immunogenicity of the biomaterials, together with their current applications strategies are given. Conclusive remarks and future perspectives for such advanced biomaterials are discussed.

  6. Piezoelectric smart biomaterials for bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jaicy; More, Namdev; Kalia, Kiran; Kapusetti, Govinda

    2018-01-01

    Tissues like bone and cartilage are remodeled dynamically for their functional requirements by signaling pathways. The signals are controlled by the cells and extracellular matrix and transmitted through an electrical and chemical synapse. Scaffold-based tissue engineering therapies largely disturb the natural signaling pathways, due to their rigidity towards signal conduction, despite their therapeutic advantages. Thus, there is a high need of smart biomaterials, which can conveniently generate and transfer the bioelectric signals analogous to native tissues for appropriate physiological functions. Piezoelectric materials can generate electrical signals in response to the applied stress. Furthermore, they can stimulate the signaling pathways and thereby enhance the tissue regeneration at the impaired site. The piezoelectric scaffolds can act as sensitive mechanoelectrical transduction systems. Hence, it is applicable to the regions, where mechanical loads are predominant. The present review is mainly concentrated on the mechanism related to the electrical stimulation in a biological system and the different piezoelectric materials suitable for bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

  7. Advances in Zirconia Toughened Alumina Biomaterials for Total Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Kocagöz, Sevi; Arnholt, Christina; Huet, Roland; Ueno, Masaru; Walter, William L.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an up-to-date overview of zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) components used in total hip arthroplasties. The structure, mechanical properties, and available data regarding the clinical performance of ZTA are summarized. The advancements that have been made in understanding the in vivo performance of ZTA are investigated. This article concludes with a discussion of gaps in the literature related to ceramic biomaterials and avenues for future research. PMID:23746930

  8. Lesions by tissue specific imaging characterize multiple sclerosis patients with more advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnato, Francesca; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N; van Gelderen, Peter; Auh, Sungyoung; Hanafy, Jailan; Cantor, Fredric K; Ohayon, Joan; Richert, Nancy; Duyn, Jeff

    2011-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid tissue specific imaging (CSF-TSI), a newly implemented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique, allows visualization of a subset of chronic black holes (cBHs) with MRI characteristics suggestive of the presence of CSF-like fluid, and representing lesions with extensive tissue destruction. To investigate the relationship between lesions in CSF-TSI and disease measures in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Twenty-six patients with MS were imaged at 3.0 T, obtaining T(1)-weighted (T(1)-w) and T(2)-w spin echo (SE), T(1) volumetric images and CSF-TSI images. We measured: (i) lesion volume (LV) in T(1)-w (cBH-LV) and T(2)-w SE images, and in CSF-TSI; (ii) brain parenchyma fraction (BPF). Differences between patients with and without CSF-TSI lesions were analyzed and association between clinical and MRI metrics were investigated. cBHs were seen in 92% of the patients while lesions in CSF-TSI were seen in 40%. Patients with CSF-TSI lesions were older, with longer disease duration, higher disability scores, larger cBH-LV and T(2)-LV, and lower BPF than patients without CSF-TSI lesions (≤0.047). Partial correlation analysis correcting for T(2)-LV, cBH-LV and BPF showed an association (p TSI LV and disability score. CSF-TSI lesions characterize patients with more advanced disease and probably contribute to the progress of disability.

  9. Tissue engineered bone versus alloplastic commercial biomaterials in craniofacial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucaciu, Ondine; Băciuţ, Mihaela; Băciuţ, G; Câmpian, R; Soriţău, Olga; Bran, S; Crişan, B; Crişan, Liana

    2010-01-01

    This research was developed in order to demonstrate the tissue engineering method as an alternative to conventional methods for bone reconstruction, in order to overcome the frequent failures of alloplastic commercial biomaterials, allografts and autografts. Tissue engineering is an in vitro method used to obtain cell based osteoinductive bone grafts. This study evaluated the feasibility of creating tissue-engineered bone using mesenchymal cells seeded on a scaffold obtained from the deciduous red deer antler. We have chosen mesenchymal stem cells because they are easy to obtain, capable to differentiate into cells of mesenchymal origin (osteoblasts) and to produce tissue such as bone. As scaffold, we have chosen the red deer antler because it has a high level of porosity. We conducted a case control study, on three groups of mice type CD1--two study groups (n=20) and a control group (n=20). For the study groups, we obtained bone grafts through tissue engineering, using mesenchymal stem cells seeded on the scaffold made of deciduous red deer antler. Bone defects were surgically induced on the left parietal bone of all subjects. In the control group, we grafted the bone defects with commercial biomaterials (OsteoSet, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, Federal USA). Subjects were sacrificed at two and four months, the healing process was morphologically and histologically evaluated using descriptive histology and the golden standard - histological scoring. The grafts obtained in vivo through tissue engineering using adult stem cell, seeded on the scaffold obtained from the red deer antler using osteogenic medium have proven their osteogenic properties.

  10. Advances in Porous Biomaterials for Dental and Orthopaedic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arndt F. Schilling

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The connective hard tissues bone and teeth are highly porous on a micrometer scale, but show high values of compression strength at a relatively low weight. The fabrication of porous materials has been actively researched and different processes have been developed that vary in preparation complexity and also in the type of porous material that they produce. Methodologies are available for determination of pore properties. The purpose of the paper is to give an overview of these methods, the role of porosity in natural porous materials and the effect of pore properties on the living tissues. The minimum pore size required to allow the ingrowth of mineralized tissue seems to be in the order of 50 µm: larger pore sizes seem to improve speed and depth of penetration of mineralized tissues into the biomaterial, but on the other hand impair the mechanical properties. The optimal pore size is therefore dependent on the application and the used material.

  11. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  12. Survey of the Distribution of a Newly Characterized Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Brett, Jerold; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Yan, Shi Du; Zou, Yu Shan; Weidman, Elliott; Pinsky, David; Nowygrod, Roman; Neeper, Michael; Przysiecki, Craig; Shaw, Alan; Migheli, Antonio; Stern, David

    1993-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the final products of nonenzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins, are found in the plasma and accumulate in the tissues during aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. A novel integral membrane protein, termed receptor for AGE (RAGE), forms a central part of the cell surface binding site for AGEs. Using monospecific, polyclonal antibody raised to human recombinant and bovine RAGE, immunostaining of bovine tissues showed RAGE in the vasculatur...

  13. A Review of Injectable and Implantable Biomaterials for Treatment and Repair of Soft Tissues in Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Feng Chou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The two major topics concerning the development of nanomedicine are drug delivery and tissue engineering. With the advance in nanotechnology, scientists and engineers now have the ability to fabricate functional drug carriers and/or biomaterials that deliver and release drugs locally as well as promote tissue regeneration. In this short review, we address the use of nanotechnology in the fabrication of biomaterials (i.e., nanoparticles and nanofibers and their therapeutic function in wound healing as dressing materials. Furthermore, we discuss the use of surface nanofeatures to regulate cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation, which is a crucial step in wound healing associated with tissue regeneration. Given that nanotechnology-based biomaterials exhibit superior pharmaceutical performance as compared to the traditional medicine, this short review provides current status and future directions of how nanotechnology is and will be used in biomedical field, especially in wound healing.

  14. Characterization of Biomaterials by Soft X-Ray Spectromicroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam P. Hitchcock

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy techniques are emerging as useful tools to characterize potentially biocompatible materials and to probe protein interactions with model biomaterial surfaces. Simultaneous quantitative chemical analysis of the near surface region of the candidate biomaterial, and adsorbed proteins, peptides or other biological species can be obtained at high spatial resolution via scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM and X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM. Both techniques use near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectral contrast for chemical identification and quantitation. The capabilities of STXM and X-PEEM for the analysis of biomaterials are reviewed and illustrated by three recent studies: (1 characterization of hydrophobic surfaces, including adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg or human serum albumin (HSA to hydrophobic polymeric thin films, (2 studies of HSA adsorption to biodegradable or potentially biocompatible polymers, and (3 studies of biomaterials under fully hydrated conditions. Other recent applications of STXM and X-PEEM to biomaterials are also reviewed.

  15. Bone Tissue Engineering: Recent Advances and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Ami R.; Laurencin, Cato T.; Nukavarapu, Syam P.

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has trended steeply upward and is expected to double by 2020, especially in populations where aging is coupled with increased obesity and poor physical activity. Engineered bone tissue has been viewed as a potential alternative to the conventional use of bone grafts, due to their limitless supply and no disease transmission. However, bone tissue engineering practices have not proceeded to clinical practice due to several limitations or challenges. Bone tissue engineering aims to induce new functional bone regeneration via the synergistic combination of biomaterials, cells, and factor therapy. In this review, we discuss the fundamentals of bone tissue engineering, highlighting the current state of this field. Further, we review the recent advances of biomaterial and cell-based research, as well as approaches used to enhance bone regeneration. Specifically, we discuss widely investigated biomaterial scaffolds, micro- and nano-structural properties of these scaffolds, and the incorporation of biomimetic properties and/or growth factors. In addition, we examine various cellular approaches, including the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs), adult stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and their clinical application strengths and limitations. We conclude by overviewing the challenges that face the bone tissue engineering field, such as the lack of sufficient vascularization at the defect site, and the research aimed at functional bone tissue engineering. These challenges will drive future research in the field. PMID:23339648

  16. A comparison of different nanostructured biomaterials in subcutaneous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Julia C; Brandes, Gudrun; Krüger, Ilka; Behrens, Peter; Nolte, Ingo; Lenarz, Thomas; Stieve, Martin

    2008-07-01

    The nanostructured surface of a material can improve its interaction with cells and its acceptance as an implant. We compared two novel biomaterials with different nanostructures: Bioverit II with a coating of nanoporous silica and chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite materials. Pure Bioverit II served as a control. Platelets of these materials were implanted for 28, 85 and 300 days in the subcutaneous tissue in the neck of 38 rabbits. After excising the specimens they were fixed, embedded in epoxy resin and analyzed histologically. All coated Bioverit II implants showed a thin capsule of connective tissue. After 300 days, these capsules tended to be thicker than in pure Bioverit II. No signs of inflammation were observed and the materials appeared unaltered by visual inspection. In case of chitosan-hydroxyapatite composites, massive capsules consisting of dense connective tissue were found, and the material showed signs of biodegradation in form of fissures and cavities. In conclusion, the nanoporous coating showed no obvious positive effect with regard to capsule formation; the chitosan-hydroxyapatite implants provoked a stronger interaction between cells and material. However, most Bioverit II implants showed no alterations optically, whereas chitosan-hydroxyapatite was partly degraded in all cases.

  17. Esthetic prevention with soft tissue and biomaterial grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Margonar

    Full Text Available Gingival recessions are periodontal defects that may need the association of surgical techniques in order to be successfully treated. The absence of treatment of these defects may lead to local esthetics being compromised, patient dissatisfaction, and reduced time and duration of treatment. When dealing with dental implants, the esthetic condition is no different, with the aggravating factor that the lack of this protective tissue may accelerate vestibular bone loss and lead to loss of the implant. The clinical case presented report the performance of a conjunctive tissue grafting technique, associated with vestibular filling with biomaterial, to prevent a gingival recession in an immediate implant with immediate loading. The aim of the procedure was to prevent gingival recession, which would lead to a severe esthetic defect, and also to reinforce the vestibular bone wall. After three years of follow-up of the case, it was possible to conclude that the association of thetechniques had predictable and satisfactory results for preventing periimplant gingival recession.

  18. Cell-Biomaterial Mechanical Interaction in the Framework of Tissue Engineering: Insights, Computational Modeling and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Herrera, Jose A.; Reina-Romo, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of research which combines the use of cell-seeded biomaterials both in vitro and/or in vivo with the aim of promoting new tissue formation or regeneration. In this context, how cells colonize and interact with the biomaterial is critical in order to get a functional tissue engineering product. Cell-biomaterial interaction is referred to here as the phenomenon involved in adherent cells attachment to the biomaterial surface, and their related cell functions such as growth, differentiation, migration or apoptosis. This process is inherently complex in nature involving many physico-chemical events which take place at different scales ranging from molecular to cell body (organelle) levels. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the mechanical environment at the cell-biomaterial location may play an important role in the subsequent cell function, which remains to be elucidated. In this paper, the state-of-the-art research in the physics and mechanics of cell-biomaterial interaction is reviewed with an emphasis on focal adhesions. The paper is focused on the different models developed at different scales available to simulate certain features of cell-biomaterial interaction. A proper understanding of cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the development of predictive models in this sense, may add some light in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine fields. PMID:22174660

  19. Tissue response to a new type of biomaterial implanted subcutaneously in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boennelycke, Marie; Christensen, Lise; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov

    2011-01-01

    A new type of resorbable biomaterial intended for pelvic reconstruction was tested with respect to tissue regeneration and biocompatibility in rats. The biomaterial consisted of methoxypolyethyleneglycol-poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (MPEG-PLGA). Implants were pure, enriched with extra...

  20. Viscoelastic Properties of Dental Pulp Tissue and Ramifications on Biomaterial Development for Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erisken, Cevat; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Zhou, Jian; Kim, Sahng G; Mao, Jeremy J

    2015-10-01

    A critical step in biomaterial selection effort is the determination of material as well as the biological properties of the target tissue. Previously, the selection of biomaterials and carriers for dental pulp regeneration has been solely based on empirical experience. In this study, first, the linear viscoelastic material functions and compressive properties of miniature pig dental pulp were characterized using small-amplitude oscillatory shear and uniaxial compression at a constant rate. They were then compared with the properties of hydrogels (ie, agarose, alginate, and collagen) that are widely used in tissue regeneration. The comparisons of the linear viscoelastic material functions of the native pulp tissue with those of the 3 hydrogels revealed the gel-like behavior of the pulp tissue over a relatively large range of time scales (ie, over the frequency range of 0.1-100 rps). At the constant gelation agent concentration of 2%, the dynamic properties (ie, storage and loss moduli and the tanδ) of the collagen-based gel approached those of the native tissue. Under uniaxial compression, the peak normal stresses and compressive moduli of the agarose gel were similar to those of the native tissue, whereas alginate and collagen exhibited significantly lower compressive properties. The linear viscoelastic and uniaxial compressive properties of the dental pulp tissue reported here should enable the more appropriate selection of biogels for dental pulp regeneration via the better tailoring of gelation agents and their concentrations to better mimic the dynamic and compressive properties of native pulp tissue. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A high throughput array microscope for the mechanical characterization of biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribb, Jeremy; Osborne, Lukas D.; Hsiao, Joe Ping-Lin; Vicci, Leandra; Meshram, Alok; O'Brien, E. Tim; Spero, Richard Chasen; Taylor, Russell; Superfine, Richard

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade, the emergence of high throughput screening has enabled the development of novel drug therapies and elucidated many complex cellular processes. Concurrently, the mechanobiology community has developed tools and methods to show that the dysregulation of biophysical properties and the biochemical mechanisms controlling those properties contribute significantly to many human diseases. Despite these advances, a complete understanding of the connection between biomechanics and disease will require advances in instrumentation that enable parallelized, high throughput assays capable of probing complex signaling pathways, studying biology in physiologically relevant conditions, and capturing specimen and mechanical heterogeneity. Traditional biophysical instruments are unable to meet this need. To address the challenge of large-scale, parallelized biophysical measurements, we have developed an automated array high-throughput microscope system that utilizes passive microbead diffusion to characterize mechanical properties of biomaterials. The instrument is capable of acquiring data on twelve-channels simultaneously, where each channel in the system can independently drive two-channel fluorescence imaging at up to 50 frames per second. We employ this system to measure the concentration-dependent apparent viscosity of hyaluronan, an essential polymer found in connective tissue and whose expression has been implicated in cancer progression.

  2. 3D printing of functional biomaterials for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Ma, Xuanyi; Gou, Maling; Mei, Deqing; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-08-01

    3D printing is emerging as a powerful tool for tissue engineering by enabling 3D cell culture within complex 3D biomimetic architectures. This review discusses the prevailing 3D printing techniques and their most recent applications in building tissue constructs. The work associated with relatively well-known inkjet and extrusion-based bioprinting is presented with the latest advances in the fields. Emphasis is put on introducing two relatively new light-assisted bioprinting techniques, including digital light processing (DLP)-based bioprinting and laser based two photon polymerization (TPP) bioprinting. 3D bioprinting of vasculature network is particularly discussed for its foremost significance in maintaining tissue viability and promoting functional maturation. Limitations to current bioprinting approaches, as well as future directions of bioprinting functional tissues are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of stem cell/biomaterial combinations for stem cell-based tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Sabine; Apel, Christian; Buttler, Patricia; Denecke, Bernd; Dhanasingh, Anandhan; Ding, Xiaolei; Grafahrend, Dirk; Groger, Andreas; Hemmrich, Karsten; Herr, Alexander; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Mastitskaya, Svetlana; Perez-Bouza, Alberto; Rosewick, Stephanie; Salber, Jochen; Wöltje, Michael; Zenke, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Biomaterials are used in tissue engineering with the aim to repair or reconstruct tissues and organs. Frequently, the identification and development of biomaterials is an iterative process with biomaterials being designed and then individually tested for their properties in combination with one specific cell type. However, recent efforts have been devoted to systematic, combinatorial and parallel approaches to identify biomaterials, suitable for specific applications. Embryonic and adult stem cells represent an ideal cell source for tissue engineering. Since stem cells can be readily isolated, expanded and transplanted, their application in cell-based therapies has become a major focus of research. Biomaterials can potentially influence e.g. stem cell proliferation and differentiation in both, positive or negative ways and biomaterial characteristics have been applied to repel or attract stem cells in a niche-like microenvironment. Our consortium has now established a grid-based platform to investigate stem cell/biomaterial interactions. So far, we have assessed 140 combinations of seven different stem cell types and 19 different polymers performing systematic screening assays to analyse parameters such as morphology, vitality, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and proliferation. We thus can suggest and advise for and against special combinations for stem cell-based tissue engineering.

  4. Regeneration of damaged osteoporotic bone tissue with synthetic biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Nenad D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In some cases in oral and maxillofacial surgery, bone regeneration is required in large quantities. One of these cases is osteoporosis. This paper aims to show the new approach to solving this problem of impaired healing of bone defects in the jaw, as well as in other bones, with the use of synthetic biomaterials whose properties resemble the natural bone. Latest development in this area present an effort to create local drug-delivery systems for BMPs and growth factors, direct delivery of MSCs, as well as scaffolds for osteoconduction and also to utilize nanotechnology to synthesize composite biomaterials, predominantly based on HAp and polymers, that would mimic the natural bone nanocomposite architecture. There is also a tendency to create injectable biomaterials for simplified application.

  5. Studies by nuclear and physico-chemical methods of tissue's metallic contamination located around biomaterials. Toxicity measurements of several biomaterials residual radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibert, Geoffroy

    2004-01-01

    Implants used as biomaterials fulfill conditions of functionality, compatibility and occasionally bio-activity. There are four main families of biomaterials: metals and metal alloys, polymers, bio-ceramics and natural materials. Because of corrosion and friction in the human body, implants generate debris. These debris develop different problems: toxicity, inflammatory reactions, prosthetic unsealing by osseous dissolution. Nature, size, morphology and amount of debris are the parameters which have an influence on tissue response. We characterize metallic contamination coming from knee prosthesis into surrounding capsular tissue by depth migration, in vivo behaviours, content, size and nature of debris. The PIXE-RBS and STEM-EDXS methods, that we used, are complementary, especially about characterization scale. Debris contamination distributed in the whole articulation is very heterogeneous. Debris migrate on several thousands μm in tissue. Solid metallic particles, μm, are found in the most polluted samples, for both kinds of alloys TA6V and CrCoMo. In the mean volume analysed by PIXE, the in vivo mass ratios [Ti]/[V] and [Co]/[Cr] confirm the chemical stability of TA6V debris and chemical evolution of CrCoMo debris. Complementary measures of TA6V grains, on a nano-metric scale by STEM-EDXS, show a dissolution of coarse grain (μm) in smaller grains (nm). Locally, TA6V grains of a phase are detected and could indicate a preferential dissolution of β phase (grain boundaries) with dropping of Al and V, both toxic and carcinogenic elements. A thin target protocol development correlates PIXE and histological analysis on the same zone. This protocol allows to locate other pathologies in relationship with weaker metal contamination, μg/g, thanks to the great sensitivity of PIXE method. Harmlessness with respect to the residual radioactivity of several natural or synthetic biomaterials is established, using ultra low background noise γ detection system. (author)

  6. Review paper: critical issues in tissue engineering: biomaterials, cell sources, angiogenesis, and drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Hojjat; Matin, Maryam M; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2011-11-01

    Tissue engineering is a newly emerging biomedical technology, which aids and increases the repair and regeneration of deficient and injured tissues. It employs the principles from the fields of materials science, cell biology, transplantation, and engineering in an effort to treat or replace damaged tissues. Tissue engineering and development of complex tissues or organs, such as heart, muscle, kidney, liver, and lung, are still a distant milestone in twenty-first century. Generally, there are four main challenges in tissue engineering which need optimization. These include biomaterials, cell sources, vascularization of engineered tissues, and design of drug delivery systems. Biomaterials and cell sources should be specific for the engineering of each tissue or organ. On the other hand, angiogenesis is required not only for the treatment of a variety of ischemic conditions, but it is also a critical component of virtually all tissue-engineering strategies. Therefore, controlling the dose, location, and duration of releasing angiogenic factors via polymeric delivery systems, in order to ultimately better mimic the stem cell niche through scaffolds, will dictate the utility of a variety of biomaterials in tissue regeneration. This review focuses on the use of polymeric vehicles that are made of synthetic and/or natural biomaterials as scaffolds for three-dimensional cell cultures and for locally delivering the inductive growth factors in various formats to provide a method of controlled, localized delivery for the desired time frame and for vascularized tissue-engineering therapies.

  7. Cell-based and biomaterial approaches to connective tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalling, Simone Suzette

    Connective tissue injuries of skin, tendon and ligament, heal by a reparative process in adults, filling the wound site with fibrotic, disorganized scar tissue that poorly reflects normal tissue architecture or function. Conversely, fetal skin and tendon have been shown to heal scarlessly. Complete regeneration is not intrinsically ubiquitous to all fetal tissues; fetal diaphragmatic and gastrointestinal injuries form scars. In vivo studies suggest that the presence of fetal fibroblasts is essential for scarless healing. In the orthopaedic setting, adult anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) heals poorly; however, little is known about the regenerative capacity of fetal ACL or fetal ACL fibroblasts. We characterized in vitro wound healing properties of fetal and adult ACL fibroblasts demonstrating that fetal ACL fibroblasts migrate faster and elaborate greater quantities of type I collagen, suggesting the healing potential of the fetal ACL may not be intrinsically poor. Similar to fetal ACL fibroblasts, fetal dermal fibroblasts also exhibit robust cellular properties. We investigated the age-dependent effects of dermal fibroblasts on tendon-to-bone healing in rat supraspinatus tendon injuries, a reparative injury model. We hypothesized delivery of fetal dermal fibroblasts would increase tissue organization and mechanical properties in comparison to adult dermal fibroblasts. However, at 1 and 8 weeks, the presence of dermal fibroblasts, either adult or fetal, had no significant effect on tissue histology or mechanical properties. There was a decreasing trend in cross-sectional area of repaired tendons treated with fetal dermal fibroblasts in comparison to adult, but this finding was not significant in comparison to controls. Finally, we synthesized a novel polysaccharide, methacrylated methylcellulose (MA-MC), and fabricated hydrogels using a well-established photopolymerization technique. We characterized the physical and mechanical properties of MA-MC hydrogels in

  8. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Biomaterials Out of Thin Air: in Situ, On-Demand Printing of Advanced Biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Gentry, Diana M.; Micks, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Upmass is the single most significant limitation of our current space mission capability. Although biomaterials and biocomposites have mass, strength, flexibility, and self-healing properties that could significantly reduce upmass, their use is limited by the following drawbacks: Expensive, specific production. Many biomaterials can only be produced as part of significant support ecosystem; Inaccessible functional customization. The grain of wood, the porosity of bone, and so on are an integral part of the materials' desired mechanical properties, but are not deterministic when the material is naturally grown; Limited compositions. Most biomaterials (unlike metal, plastic, etc.) cannot be easily combined or modified to produce new materials. This project builds on recent advances in: Synthetic biology. Libraries of standardized genetic parts which can be used for controlled cellular material production, delivery, and binding; 3D printing. Commercial off-the-shelf components which can be used to make of a pico- to nanoliter cell deposition system; Tissue engineering. Proven cell-compatible support hydrogels and scaffolds can be modified to bind the deposited biomaterials of interest. Objectives: Feasibility and benefit analysis. Two mission contexts span the concept's scope (see below); Proof-of-concept demonstration. A simple grid of two proteins, fluorescent for easy detection, to validate the core technology concept; Proposed implementations for follow-on work. Avenues for future work on each core component (host cell, production control, material delivery, material binding, etc.); Complementary studies exploration. A survey of other emerging areas (in situ resource utilization, protein engineering, etc.) with the potential to multiply our technology's impact. Potential Impacts: This application could dramatically expand manufacturing capabilities on Earth and in space: In situ resource utilization. A far greater range of materials and products will be available

  10. Recent advances in 3D printing of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Helena N; Wu, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    3D Printing promises to produce complex biomedical devices according to computer design using patient-specific anatomical data. Since its initial use as pre-surgical visualization models and tooling molds, 3D Printing has slowly evolved to create one-of-a-kind devices, implants, scaffolds for tissue engineering, diagnostic platforms, and drug delivery systems. Fueled by the recent explosion in public interest and access to affordable printers, there is renewed interest to combine stem cells with custom 3D scaffolds for personalized regenerative medicine. Before 3D Printing can be used routinely for the regeneration of complex tissues (e.g. bone, cartilage, muscles, vessels, nerves in the craniomaxillofacial complex), and complex organs with intricate 3D microarchitecture (e.g. liver, lymphoid organs), several technological limitations must be addressed. In this review, the major materials and technology advances within the last five years for each of the common 3D Printing technologies (Three Dimensional Printing, Fused Deposition Modeling, Selective Laser Sintering, Stereolithography, and 3D Plotting/Direct-Write/Bioprinting) are described. Examples are highlighted to illustrate progress of each technology in tissue engineering, and key limitations are identified to motivate future research and advance this fascinating field of advanced manufacturing.

  11. Biomaterials based strategies for skeletal muscle tissue engineering: existing technologies and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Taimoor H; Mooney, David J; Pumberger, Matthias; Geissler, Sven; Duda, Georg N

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscles have a robust capacity to regenerate, but under compromised conditions, such as severe trauma, the loss of muscle functionality is inevitable. Research carried out in the field of skeletal muscle tissue engineering has elucidated multiple intrinsic mechanisms of skeletal muscle repair, and has thus sought to identify various types of cells and bioactive factors which play an important role during regeneration. In order to maximize the potential therapeutic effects of cells and growth factors, several biomaterial based strategies have been developed and successfully implemented in animal muscle injury models. A suitable biomaterial can be utilized as a template to guide tissue reorganization, as a matrix that provides optimum micro-environmental conditions to cells, as a delivery vehicle to carry bioactive factors which can be released in a controlled manner, and as local niches to orchestrate in situ tissue regeneration. A myriad of biomaterials, varying in geometrical structure, physical form, chemical properties, and biofunctionality have been investigated for skeletal muscle tissue engineering applications. In the current review, we present a detailed summary of studies where the use of biomaterials favorably influenced muscle repair. Biomaterials in the form of porous three-dimensional scaffolds, hydrogels, fibrous meshes, and patterned substrates with defined topographies, have each displayed unique benefits, and are discussed herein. Additionally, several biomaterial based approaches aimed specifically at stimulating vascularization, innervation, and inducing contractility in regenerating muscle tissues are also discussed. Finally, we outline promising future trends in the field of muscle regeneration involving a deeper understanding of the endogenous healing cascades and utilization of this knowledge for the development of multifunctional, hybrid, biomaterials which support and enable muscle regeneration under compromised conditions

  12. Biomaterials in co-culture systems: towards optimizing tissue integration and cell signaling within scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Kyle G; Cheung, Jane W C; Jain, Devika; Santerre, J Paul

    2014-05-01

    Most natural tissues consist of multi-cellular systems made up of two or more cell types. However, some of these tissues may not regenerate themselves following tissue injury or disease without some form of intervention, such as from the use of tissue engineered constructs. Recent studies have increasingly used co-cultures in tissue engineering applications as these systems better model the natural tissues, both physically and biologically. This review aims to identify the challenges of using co-culture systems and to highlight different approaches with respect to the use of biomaterials in the use of such systems. The application of co-culture systems to stimulate a desired biological response and examples of studies within particular tissue engineering disciplines are summarized. A description of different analytical co-culture systems is also discussed and the role of biomaterials in the future of co-culture research are elaborated on. Understanding the complex cell-cell and cell-biomaterial interactions involved in co-culture systems will ultimately lead the field towards biomaterial concepts and designs with specific biochemical, electrical, and mechanical characteristics that are tailored towards the needs of distinct co-culture systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of cell and biomaterial-based tissue engineering methods in the treatment of cartilage, menisci and ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak, Tomasz; Richter, Magdalena; Suchorska, Wiktoria; Augustyniak, Ewelina; Lach, Michał; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Over 20 years ago it was realized that the traditional methods of the treatment of injuries to joint components: cartilage, menisci and ligaments, did not give satisfactory results and so there is a need of employing novel, more effective therapeutic techniques. Recent advances in molecular biology, biotechnology and polymer science have led to both the experimental and clinical application of various cell types, adapting their culture conditions in order to ensure a directed differentiation of the cells into a desired cell type, and employing non-toxic and non-immunogenic biomaterial in the treatment of knee joint injuries. In the present review the current state of knowledge regarding novel cell sources, in vitro conditions of cell culture and major important biomaterials, both natural and synthetic, used in cartilage, meniscus and ligament repair by tissue engineering techniques are described, and the assets and drawbacks of their clinical application are critically evaluated.

  14. HR007: a family of biomaterials based on glycosaminoglycans for tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Mendez, A; Palomares, T; Castro, B; Herrero, J; Granado, M H; Bejar, J M; Alonso-Varona, A

    2017-04-01

    Most new advances in tissue engineering (TE) focus on the creation of adequate microenvironments that may accelerate the repair processes of damaged tissues. Extracellular matrix (ECM) of Wharton's jelly (WJ) from umbilical cords is very rich in sulphated GAGs (sGAGs) and hyaluronic acid (HA), components which have special properties that could positively influence the regeneration of several types of tissue. Previously, we described the methodology for the extraction and purification of GAGs from WJ and, importantly, the separation of sGAGs and HA to develop various scaffolds for regenerative medicine. In this new study we hypothesized that the biomaterials obtained, called HR007s, would be excellent candidates for two different applications, chondral and dermal repair. First, we have confirmed that the GAGs obtained are biocompatible, as they do not cause cytotoxicity, haemolysis or an inflammatory response. Second, we have developed three-dimensional (3D) structures through the combination of different ratios of GAGs and their subsequent stabilization, which can be properly adapted to target tissues, cartilage or skin. Finally, we have combined these scaffolds with adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or fibroblasts for application to chondral or dermal defects, respectively, with the goal of promoting fast reparative processes. The results show that HR007 scaffolds induce cell proliferation, enhance the expression of specific gene markers, increase the production of tissue ECM proteins and have chemotactic effects over the studied cells. In summary, the bioactive properties of HR007 scaffolds make them promising candidates for use in regenerative medicine, at least for chondral and dermal repair. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A Trifunctional, Modular Biomaterial Coating : Nonadhesive to Bacteria, Chlorhexidine-Releasing and Tissue-Integrating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjollema, Jelmer; Keul, Heidrun; van der Mei, Henny; Dijkstra, Rene; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; de Vries, Joop; Loontjens, Ton; Dirks, Ton; Busscher, Henk

    Various potential anti-infection strategies can be thought of for biomaterial implants and devices. Permanent, tissue-integrated implants such as artificial joint prostheses require a different anti-infection strategy than, for instance, removable urinary catheters. The different requirements set to

  16. Piezoelectric polymers as biomaterials for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sencadas, Vítor; Correia, Daniela M; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2015-12-01

    Tissue engineering often rely on scaffolds for supporting cell differentiation and growth. Novel paradigms for tissue engineering include the need of active or smart scaffolds in order to properly regenerate specific tissues. In particular, as electrical and electromechanical clues are among the most relevant ones in determining tissue functionality in tissues such as muscle and bone, among others, electroactive materials and, in particular, piezoelectric ones, show strong potential for novel tissue engineering strategies, in particular taking also into account the existence of these phenomena within some specific tissues, indicating their requirement also during tissue regeneration. This referee reports on piezoelectric materials used for tissue engineering applications. The most used materials for tissue engineering strategies are reported together with the main achievements, challenges and future needs for research and actual therapies. This review provides thus a compilation of the most relevant results and strategies and a start point for novel research pathways in the most relevant and challenging open questions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The design, synthesis, and characterization of poly(carbonate-ester)s based on dihydroxyacetone for use as potential biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Jennifer Rose

    The creation of new devices and materials with desirable biomedical characteristics, such as biocompatibility and easily tunable physico-chemical parameters, has played a key role in the advancement of the biomedical industry. In recent years, the combination of classical engineering principles with polymer chemistry has led to a wide range of materials that influence the manner in which drugs are delivered, tissues are engineered, and surgery is performed. The work presented in this thesis is focused on the design, synthesis, and characterization of a poly(carbonate-ester) biomaterial based on lactic acid (LA) and a carbonate form of dihydroxyacetone (DHAC) as vehicles for controlled release. The goal of this work was to synthesize a variety of pLAx- co-DHACy copolymers and characterize their behavior to better understand their structure/function relationships. The results show that random copolymers based on dihydroxyacetone and lactic acid are easily and reliably producible, with unique characteristics. In vitro degradation studies showed that the poly(carbonate-ester)s had an unexpected degradation pattern, in that the carbonate bond was more labile to hydrolysis than that of the ester bond. The resulting degradation pattern made from these biomaterials did not appear to have an acidic interior environment, due to a lack of visible viscous core commonly seen with bulk degrading lactic acid based polymers. Due to the insolubility of the poly(carbonate-ester)s, exploration of copolymer degradation was determined by the development of a newly discovered technique to quantify dihydroxyacetone release from the matrix using the bicinchoninic acid assay. Finally, the release kinetics and mechanism from these poly(carbonate-ester)s was studied following the incorporation of two different model proteins, bovine serum albumin and lysozyme. Their release behaviors and activities were analyzed to explore the controlled release capabilities of these materials and to

  18. Marine-derived collagen biomaterials from echinoderm connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Cinzia; Leggio, Livio; Leone, Roberta; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Guidetti, Luca; Coccè, Valentina; Ascagni, Miriam; Bonasoro, Francesco; La Porta, Caterina A M; Candia Carnevali, M Daniela; Sugni, Michela

    2017-07-01

    The use of marine collagens is a hot topic in the field of tissue engineering. Echinoderms possess unique connective tissues (Mutable Collagenous Tissues, MCTs) which can represent an innovative source of collagen to develop collagen barrier-membranes for Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR). In the present work we used MCTs from different echinoderm models (sea urchin, starfish and sea cucumber) to produce echinoderm-derived collagen membranes (EDCMs). Commercial membranes for GTR or soluble/reassembled (fibrillar) bovine collagen substrates were used as controls. The three EDCMs were similar among each other in terms of structure and mechanical performances and were much thinner and mechanically more resistant than the commercial membranes. Number of fibroblasts seeded on sea-urchin membranes were comparable to the bovine collagen substrates. Cell morphology on all EDCMs was similar to that of structurally comparable (reassembled) bovine collagen substrates. Overall, echinoderms, and sea urchins particularly, are alternative collagen sources to produce efficient GTR membranes. Sea urchins display a further advantage in terms of eco-sustainability by recycling tissues from food wastes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Marine-derived collagen biomaterials from echinoderm connective tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Ferrario, Cinzia

    2016-03-31

    The use of marine collagens is a hot topic in the field of tissue engineering. Echinoderms possess unique connective tissues (Mutable Collagenous Tissues, MCTs) which can represent an innovative source of collagen to develop collagen barrier-membranes for Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR). In the present work we used MCTs from different echinoderm models (sea urchin, starfish and sea cucumber) to produce echinoderm-derived collagen membranes (EDCMs). Commercial membranes for GTR or soluble/reassembled (fibrillar) bovine collagen substrates were used as controls. The three EDCMs were similar among each other in terms of structure and mechanical performances and were much thinner and mechanically more resistant than the commercial membranes. Number of fibroblasts seeded on sea-urchin membranes were comparable to the bovine collagen substrates. Cell morphology on all EDCMs was similar to that of structurally comparable (reassembled) bovine collagen substrates. Overall, echinoderms, and sea urchins particularly, are alternative collagen sources to produce efficient GTR membranes. Sea urchins display a further advantage in terms of eco-sustainability by recycling tissues from food wastes.

  20. Versatility of Chitosan-Based Biomaterials and Their Use as Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Viana Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a naturally occurring polysaccharide obtained from chitin, present in abundance in the exoskeletons of crustaceans and insects. It has aroused great interest as a biomaterial for tissue engineering on account of its biocompatibility and biodegradation and its affinity for biomolecules. A significant number of research groups have investigated the application of chitosan as scaffolds for tissue regeneration. However, there is a wide variability in terms of physicochemical characteristics of chitosan used in some studies and its combinations with other biomaterials, making it difficult to compare results and standardize its properties. The current systematic review of literature on the use of chitosan for tissue regeneration consisted of a study of 478 articles in the PubMed database, which resulted, after applying inclusion criteria, in the selection of 61 catalogued, critically analysed works. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of chitosan-based biomaterials in 93.4% of the studies reviewed, whether or not combined with cells and growth factors, in the regeneration of various types of tissues in animals. However, the absence of clinical studies in humans, the inadequate experimental designs, and the lack of information concerning chitosan’s characteristics limit the reproducibility and relevance of studies and the clinical applicability of chitosan.

  1. Engineering of biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    dos Santos, Venina; Savaris, Michele

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on biomaterials of different forms used for medical implants. The authors introduce the characteristics and properties of biomaterials and then dedicate special chapters to metallic, ceramic, polymeric and composite biomaterials. Case studies on sterilization methods by biomaterials are also presented. Finally, the authors describe the degradation and effects of biomaterials in living tissue.

  2. Biomaterials for the programming of cell growth in oral tissues: The possible role of APA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Marco; Giacomelli, Luca; Larosa, Claudio

    2011-01-06

    Examples of programmed tissue response after the interaction of cells with biomaterials are a hot topic in current dental research. We propose here the use of anodic porous alumina (APA) for the programming of cell growth in oral tissues. In particular, APA may trigger cell growth by the controlled release of specific growth factors and/or ions. Moreover, APA may be used as a scaffold to promote generation of new tissue, due to the high interconnectivity of pores and the high surface roughness displayed by this material.

  3. Nano-hydroxyapatite composite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, significant development has been achieved in the construction of artificial bone with ceramics, polymers and metals. Nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) is widely used bioceramic material for bone graft substitute owing to its biocompatibility and osteoconductive properties. nHA with chitin, chitosan, collagen, gelatin, fibrin, polylactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid, polyamide, polyvinyl alcohol, polyurethane and polyhydroxybutyrate based composite scaffolds have been explored in the present review for bone graft substitute. This article further reviews the preparative methods, chemical interaction, biocompatibiity, biodegradation, alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization effect, mechanical properties and delivery of nHA-based nanocomposites for bone tissue regeneration. The nHA based composite biomaterials proved to be promising biomaterials for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Advances and perspectives in tooth tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Nelson; Yelick, Pamela C

    2017-09-01

    Bio-engineered teeth that can grow and remodel in a manner similar to that of natural teeth have the potential to serve as permanent replacements to the currently used prosthetic teeth, such as dental implants. A major challenge in designing functional bio-engineered teeth is to mimic both the structural and anisotropic mechanical characteristics of the native tooth. Therefore, the field of dental and whole tooth regeneration has advanced towards the molecular and nanoscale design of bio-active, biomimetic systems, using biomaterials, drug delivery systems and stem cells. The focus of this review is to discuss recent advances in tooth tissue engineering, using biomimetic scaffolds that provide proper architectural cues, exhibit the capacity to support dental stem cell proliferation and differentiation and sequester and release bio-active agents, such as growth factors and nucleic acids, in a spatiotemporal controlled manner. Although many in vitro and in vivo studies on tooth regeneration appear promising, before tooth tissue engineering becomes a reality for humans, additional research is needed to perfect methods that use adult human dental stem cells, as opposed to embryonic dental stem cells, and to devise the means to generate bio-engineered teeth of predetermined size and shape. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of Fibrin-Based Interpenetrating Polymer Networks as Potential Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfat Gsib

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs have gained great attention for a number of biomedical applications due to their improved properties compared to individual components alone. In this study, we investigated the capacity of newly-developed naturally-derived IPNs as potential biomaterials for tissue engineering. These IPNs combine the biologic properties of a fibrous fibrin network polymerized at the nanoscale and the mechanical stability of polyethylene oxide (PEO. First, we assessed their cytotoxicity in vitro on L929 fibroblasts. We further evaluated their biocompatibility ex vivo with a chick embryo organotypic culture model. Subcutaneous implantations of the matrices were subsequently conducted on nude mice to investigate their biocompatibility in vivo. Our preliminary data highlighted that our biomaterials were non-cytotoxic (viability above 90%. The organotypic culture showed that the IPN matrices induced higher cell adhesion (across all the explanted organ tissues and migration (skin, intestine than the control groups, suggesting the advantages of using a biomimetic, yet mechanically-reinforced IPN-based matrix. We observed no major inflammatory response up to 12 weeks post implantation. All together, these data suggest that these fibrin-based IPNs are promising biomaterials for tissue engineering.

  6. Biomaterials with persistent growth factor gradients in vivo accelerate vascularized tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Banu; Jiang, Bin; Somo, Sami I; Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Brey, Eric M

    2015-12-01

    Gradients of soluble factors play an important role in many biological processes, including blood vessel assembly. Gradients can be studied in detail in vitro, but methods that enable the study of spatially distributed soluble factors and multi-cellular processes in vivo are limited. Here, we report on a method for the generation of persistent in vivo gradients of growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) biomaterial system. Fibrin loaded porous poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) scaffolds were generated using a particulate leaching method. Platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) was encapsulated into poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres which were placed distal to the tissue-material interface. PLGA provides sustained release of PDGF-BB and its diffusion through the porous structure results in gradient formation. Gradients within the scaffold were confirmed in vivo using near-infrared fluorescence imaging and gradients were present for more than 3 weeks. The diffusion of PDGF-BB was modeled and verified with in vivo imaging findings. The depth of tissue invasion and density of blood vessels formed in response to the biomaterial increased with magnitude of the gradient. This biomaterial system allows for generation of sustained growth factor gradients for the study of tissue response to gradients in vivo. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Applied Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Combination With Biomaterials in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza

    2017-10-01

    Due to increasing of the orthopedic lesions and fractures in the world and limitation of current treatment methods, researchers, and surgeons paid attention to the new treatment ways especially to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Innovation in stem cells and biomaterials accelerate during the last decade as two main important parts of the tissue engineering. Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) introduced as cells with highly proliferation and differentiation potentials that hold great promising features for used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. As another main part of tissue engineering, synthetic, and natural polymers have been shown daily grow up in number to increase and improve the grade of biopolymers that could be used as scaffold with or without stem cells for implantation. One of the developed areas of tissue engineering is bone tissue engineering; the aim of this review is present studies were done in the field of bone tissue engineering while used iPSCs in combination with natural and synthetic biomaterials. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3034-3042, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Creating biomaterials with spatially organized functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lesley W; Fischer, Jacob F

    2016-05-01

    Biomaterials for tissue engineering provide scaffolds to support cells and guide tissue regeneration. Despite significant advances in biomaterials design and fabrication techniques, engineered tissue constructs remain functionally inferior to native tissues. This is largely due to the inability to recreate the complex and dynamic hierarchical organization of the extracellular matrix components, which is intimately linked to a tissue's biological function. This review discusses current state-of-the-art strategies to control the spatial presentation of physical and biochemical cues within a biomaterial to recapitulate native tissue organization and function. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  9. Preparation and characterization of Ti-15Mo alloy used as biomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    José Roberto Severino Martins Júnior; Renata Abdallah Nogueira; Raul Oliveira de Araújo; Tatiani Ayako Goto Donato; Vitor Elias Arana-Chavez; Ana Paula Rosifini Alves Claro; João Carlos Silos Moraes; Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf; Carlos Roberto Grandini

    2011-01-01

    With the increase in life expectancy, biomaterials have become an increasingly important focus of research because they are used to replace parts and functions of the human body, thus contributing to improved quality of life. In the development of new biomaterials, the Ti-15Mo alloy is particularly significant. In this study, the Ti-15Mo alloy was produced using an arc-melting furnace and then characterized by density, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, hardness and dynamic elasticity mod...

  10. Monocytes and macrophages in tissue repair: Implications for immunoregenerative biomaterial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Molly E; Segar, Claire E; Sridhar, Sraeyes; Botchwey, Edward A

    2016-05-01

    Monocytes and macrophages play a critical role in tissue development, homeostasis, and injury repair. These innate immune cells participate in guiding vascular remodeling, stimulation of local stem and progenitor cells, and structural repair of tissues such as muscle and bone. Therefore, there is a great interest in harnessing this powerful endogenous cell source for therapeutic regeneration through immunoregenerative biomaterial engineering. These materials seek to harness specific subpopulations of monocytes/macrophages to promote repair by influencing their recruitment, positioning, differentiation, and function within a damaged tissue. Monocyte and macrophage phenotypes span a continuum of inflammatory (M1) to anti-inflammatory or pro-regenerative cells (M2), and their heterogeneous functions are highly dependent on microenvironmental cues within the injury niche. Increasing evidence suggests that division of labor among subpopulations of monocytes and macrophages could allow for harnessing regenerative functions over inflammatory functions of myeloid cells; however, the complex balance between necessary functions of inflammatory versus regenerative myeloid cells remains to be fully elucidated. Historically, biomaterial-based therapies for promoting tissue regeneration were designed to minimize the host inflammatory response; although, recent appreciation for the roles that innate immune cells play in tissue repair and material integration has shifted this paradigm. A number of opportunities exist to exploit known signaling systems of specific populations of monocytes/macrophages to promote repair and to better understand the biological and pathological roles of myeloid cells. This review seeks to outline the characteristics of distinct populations of monocytes and macrophages, identify the role of these cells within diverse tissue injury niches, and offer design criteria for immunoregenerative biomaterials given the intrinsic inflammatory response to their

  11. Biomaterials and therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    A number of organic and inorganic, synthetic or natural derived materials have been classified as not harmful for the human body and are appropriate for medical applications. These materials are usually named biomaterials since they are suitable for introduction into living human tissues of prosthesis, as well as for drug delivery, diagnosis, therapies, tissue regeneration and many other clinical applications. Recently, nanomaterials and bioabsorbable polymers have greatly enlarged the fields of application of biomaterials attracting much more the attention of the biomedical community. In this review paper I am going to discuss the most recent advances in the use of magnetic nanoparticles and biodegradable materials as new biomedical tools.

  12. Immobilization of Murine Anti-BMP-2 Monoclonal Antibody on Various Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Ansari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials are widely used as scaffolds for tissue engineering. We have developed a strategy for bone tissue engineering that entails application of immobilized anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to capture endogenous BMPs in vivo and promote antibody-mediated osseous regeneration (AMOR. The purpose of the current study was to compare the efficacy of immobilization of a specific murine anti-BMP-2 mAb on three different types of biomaterials and to evaluate their suitability as scaffolds for AMOR. Anti-BMP-2 mAb or isotype control mAb was immobilized on titanium (Ti microbeads, alginate hydrogel, and ACS. The treated biomaterials were surgically implanted in rat critical-sized calvarial defects. After 8 weeks, de novo bone formation was assessed using micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses. Results showed de novo bone regeneration with all three scaffolds with immobilized anti-BMP-2 mAb, but not isotype control mAb. Ti microbeads showed the highest volume of bone regeneration, followed by ACS. Alginate showed the lowest volume of bone. Localization of BMP-2, -4, and -7 antigens was detected on all 3 scaffolds with immobilized anti-BMP-2 mAb implanted in calvarial defects. Altogether, these data suggested a potential mechanism for bone regeneration through entrapment of endogenous BMP-2, -4, and -7 proteins leading to bone formation using different types of scaffolds via AMOR.

  13. 3D printing of biomaterials with mussel-inspired nanostructures for tumor therapy and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongshi; Luo, Jian; Sun, Zhe; Xia, Lunguo; Shi, Mengchao; Liu, Mingyao; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2016-12-01

    Primary bone cancer brings patients great sufferings. To deal with the bone defects resulted from cancer surgery, biomaterials with good bone-forming ability are necessary to repair bone defects. Meanwhile, in order to prevent possible tumor recurrence, it is essential that the remaining tumor cells around bone defects are completely killed. However, there are few biomaterials with the ability of both cancer therapy and bone regeneration until now. Here, we fabricated a 3D-printed bioceramic scaffold with a uniformly self-assembled Ca-P/polydopamine nanolayer surface. Taking advantage of biocompatibility, biodegradability and the excellent photothermal effect of polydopamine, the bifunctional scaffolds with mussel-inspired nanostructures could be used as a satisfactory and controllable photothermal agent, which effectively induced tumor cell death in vitro, and significantly inhibited tumor growth in mice. In addition, owing to the nanostructured surface, the prepared polydopamine-modified bioceramic scaffolds could support the attachment and proliferation of rabbit bone mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), and significantly promoted the formation of new bone tissues in rabbit bone defects even under photothermal treatment. Therefore, the mussel-inspired nanostructures in 3D-printed bioceramic exhibited a remarkable capability for both cancer therapy and bone regeneration, offering a promising strategy to construct bifunctional biomaterials which could be widely used for therapy of tumor-induced tissue defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of the T cell repertoire by deep T cell receptor sequencing in tissues and blood from patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kenji; Hazama, Shoichi; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Takenouchi, Hiroko; Inoue, Yuka; Kanekiyo, Shinsuke; Shindo, Yoshitaro; Miyano, Satoru; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kiyotani, Kazuma

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize infiltrated T cell clones that define the tumor immune environment and are important in the response to treatment in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). In order to explore predictive biomarkers for the efficacy of immunochemotherapies, T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire analysis was performed using blood samples and tumor tissues obtained from patients with advanced CRC that had been treated with a combination of five-cancer peptide vaccines and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The TCR-α/β complementary DNAs (cDNAs), prepared from the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) obtained from 17 tumor tissues and 39 peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 9 CRC patients at various time points, were sequenced. The oligoclonal enrichment of certain TCR sequences was identified in tumor tissues and blood samples; however, only a few TCR sequences with a frequency of >0.1% were commonly detected in pre- and post-treatment tumor tissues, or in post-treatment blood and tissue samples. The average correlation coefficients of the TCR-α and TCR-β clonotype frequencies between the post-treatment tumor tissues and blood samples were 0.023 and 0.035, respectively, and were much lower compared with the correlation coefficients of the TCR-α and TCR-β clonotype frequencies between pre- and post-treatment blood samples (0.430 and 0.370, respectively), suggesting that T cell populations in tumor tissues vary from those in blood. Although the sample size was small, a tendency for the TCR diversity in tumor tissues to drastically decrease during the treatment was indicated in two patients, who exhibited a longer progression-free survival time. The results of the present study suggest that TCR diversity scores in tissues may be a useful predictive biomarker for the therapeutic effect of immunochemotherapy for patients with advanced CRC.

  15. Cartilage tissue engineering: From biomaterials and stem cells to osteoarthritis treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinatier, C; Guicheux, J

    2016-06-01

    Articular cartilage is a non-vascularized and poorly cellularized connective tissue that is frequently damaged as a result of trauma and degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthrtis. Because of the absence of vascularization, articular cartilage has low capacity for spontaneous repair. Today, and despite a large number of preclinical data, no therapy capable of restoring the healthy structure and function of damaged articular cartilage is clinically available. Tissue-engineering strategies involving the combination of cells, scaffolding biomaterials and bioactive agents have been of interest notably for the repair of damaged articular cartilage. During the last 30 years, cartilage tissue engineering has evolved from the treatment of focal lesions of articular cartilage to the development of strategies targeting the osteoarthritis process. In this review, we focus on the different aspects of tissue engineering applied to cartilage engineering. We first discuss cells, biomaterials and biological or environmental factors instrumental to the development of cartilage tissue engineering, then review the potential development of cartilage engineering strategies targeting new emerging pathogenic mechanisms of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomaterials innovation for next generation ex vivo immune tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ankur

    2017-06-01

    Primary and secondary lymphoid organs are tissues that facilitate differentiation of B and T cells, leading to the induction of adaptive immune responses. These organs are present in the body from birth and are also recognized as locations where self-reactive B and T cells can be eliminated during the natural selection process. Many insights into the mechanisms that control the process of immune cell development and maturation in response to infection come from the analysis of various gene-deficient mice that lack some or all hallmark features of lymphoid tissues. The complexity of such animal models limits our ability to modulate the parameters that control the process of immune cell development, differentiation, and immunomodulation. Engineering functional, living immune tissues using biomaterials can grant researchers the ability to reproduce immunological events with tunable parameters for more rapid development of immunotherapeutics, cell-based therapy, and enhancing our understanding of fundamental biology as well as improving efforts in regenerative medicine. Here the author provides his review and perspective on the bioengineering of primary and secondary lymphoid tissues, and biomaterials innovation needed for the construction of these immune organs in tissue culture plates and on-chip. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of biomaterials to advance induced pluripotent stem cell research and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhixiang; Solanki, Aniruddh; Hamilos, Allison; Levy, Oren; Wen, Kendall; Yin, Xiaolei; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Derived from any somatic cell type and possessing unlimited self-renewal and differentiation potential, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are poised to revolutionize stem cell biology and regenerative medicine research, bringing unprecedented opportunities for treating debilitating human diseases. To overcome the limitations associated with safety, efficiency, and scalability of traditional iPSC derivation, expansion, and differentiation protocols, biomaterials have recently been considered. Beyond addressing these limitations, the integration of biomaterials with existing iPSC culture platforms could offer additional opportunities to better probe the biology and control the behavior of iPSCs or their progeny in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we discuss the impact of biomaterials on the iPSC field, from derivation to tissue regeneration and modeling. Although still exploratory, we envision the emerging combination of biomaterials and iPSCs will be critical in the successful application of iPSCs and their progeny for research and clinical translation. PMID:25766254

  18. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A.; Wepasnick, Kevin A.; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  19. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A; Wepasnick, Kevin A; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  20. Methodology of citrate-based biomaterial development and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, M. Richard

    meet the needs of a particular application. Next, we introduced a new porogen generation technique, and showed the potential application of the newly developed materials through the fabrication and characterization of scaffold sheets, multiphasic small diameter vascular grafts, and multichanneled nerve guides. Finally, the in vivo applications of citrate-based materials are exemplified through the evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration using multichanneled guides and the ability to assist in injection-based endoscopic mucosal resection therapy. The results presented in this work show that citric acid can be utilized as a cornerstone in the development of novel biodegradable materials, and combined with microengineering approaches to produce the next generation of tissue engineering scaffolding. These enabling new biomaterials and scaffolding strategies should address many of the existing challenges in tissue engineering and advance the field as a whole.

  1. Advancing cartilage tissue engineering: the application of stem cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Joanne; Salacinski, Henryk J; Sales, Kevin M; Butler, Peter E; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2005-10-01

    The treatment of cartilage pathology and trauma face the challenges of poor regenerative potential and inferior repair. Nevertheless, recent advances in tissue engineering indicate that adult stem cells could provide a source of chondrocytes for tissue engineering that the isolation of mature chondrocytes has failed to achieve. Various adjuncts to their propagation and differentiation have been explored, such as biomaterials, bioreactors and growth hormones. To date, all tissue engineered cartilage has been significantly mechanically inferior to its natural counterparts and further problems in vivo relate to poor integration and deterioration of tissue quality over time. However, adult stem cells--with their high rate of proliferation and ease of isolation--are expected to greatly further the development and usefulness of tissue engineered cartilage.

  2. Preventing tissue fibrosis by local biomaterials interfacing of specific cryptic extracellular matrix information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejs, Christine-Maria; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Ojala, Juha R. M.; Steele, Joseph A. M.; da Silva, Patricia Barros; Rynne-Vidal, Angela; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Hansel, Catherine S.; Rodríguez-Fernández, Clara; Mazo, Manuel M.; You, Amanda Y. F.; Wang, Alex J.; von Erlach, Thomas; Tryggvason, Karl; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to the breakdown of tissue structures such as the basement membrane, promoting tissue fibrosis. Here we developed an electrospun membrane biofunctionalized with a fragment of the laminin β1-chain to modulate the expression of MMP2 in this context. We demonstrate that interfacing of the β1-fragment with the mesothelium of the peritoneal membrane via a biomaterial abrogates the release of active MMP2 in response to transforming growth factor β1 and rescues tissue integrity ex vivo and in vivo in a mouse model of peritoneal fibrosis. Importantly, our data demonstrate that the membrane inhibits MMP2 expression. Changes in the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related molecules further point towards a contribution of the modulation of EMT. Biomaterial-based presentation of regulatory basement membrane signals directly addresses limitations of current therapeutic approaches by enabling a localized and specific method to counteract MMP2 release applicable to a broad range of therapeutic targets.

  3. Advances in polymeric systems for tissue engineering and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-03-01

    The characteristics of tissue engineered scaffolds are major concerns in the quest to fabricate ideal scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. The polymer scaffolds employed for tissue engineering applications should possess multifunctional properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability and favorable mechanical properties as it comes in direct contact with the body fluids in vivo. Additionally, the polymer system should also possess biomimetic architecture and should support stem cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. As the progress in polymer technology continues, polymeric biomaterials have taken characteristics more closely related to that desired for tissue engineering and clinical needs. Stimuli responsive polymers also termed as smart biomaterials respond to stimuli such as pH, temperature, enzyme, antigen, glucose and electrical stimuli that are inherently present in living systems. This review highlights the exciting advancements in these polymeric systems that relate to biological and tissue engineering applications. Additionally, several aspects of technology namely scaffold fabrication methods and surface modifications to confer biological functionality to the polymers have also been discussed. The ultimate objective is to emphasize on these underutilized adaptive behaviors of the polymers so that novel applications and new generations of smart polymeric materials can be realized for biomedical and tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Anisotropic silk biomaterials containing cardiac extracellular matrix for cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, Whitney L; Hu, Dongjian; Domian, Ibrahim J; Kaplan, David L; Black, Lauren D

    2015-03-31

    Cardiac malformations and disease are the leading causes of death in the United States in live-born infants and adults, respectively. In both of these cases, a decrease in the number of functional cardiomyocytes often results in improper growth of heart tissue, wound healing complications, and poor tissue repair. The field of cardiac tissue engineering seeks to address these concerns by developing cardiac patches created from a variety of biomaterial scaffolds to be used in surgical repair of the heart. These scaffolds should be fully degradable biomaterial systems with tunable properties such that the materials can be altered to meet the needs of both in vitro culture (e.g. disease modeling) and in vivo application (e.g. cardiac patch). Current platforms do not utilize both structural anisotropy and proper cell-matrix contacts to promote functional cardiac phenotypes and thus there is still a need for critically sized scaffolds that mimic both the structural and adhesive properties of native tissue. To address this need, we have developed a silk-based scaffold platform containing cardiac tissue-derived extracellular matrix (cECM). These silk-cECM composite scaffolds have tunable architectures, degradation rates, and mechanical properties. Subcutaneous implantation in rats demonstrated that addition of the cECM to aligned silk scaffold led to 99% endogenous cell infiltration and promoted vascularization of a critically sized scaffold (10 × 5 × 2.5 mm) after 4 weeks in vivo. In vitro, silk-cECM scaffolds maintained the HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes and human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and promoted a more functional phenotype in both cell types. This class of hybrid silk-cECM anisotropic scaffolds offers new opportunities for developing more physiologically relevant tissues for cardiac repair and disease modeling.

  5. Orbital implants: State-of-the-art review with emphasis on biomaterials and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baino, Francesco; Potestio, Isabel

    2016-12-01

    In the treatment of severe oculo-orbital traumas, intraocular malignancies or other life-threatening conditions it is sometimes necessary to surgically remove the patient's diseased eye. Following the removal of the eye, an orbital implant is inserted into the anophthalmic socket in order to provide satisfactory volume replacement and restore the aesthetic appearance of a normal eye. Over the last decades, the implant design and the criteria of materials selection evolved from simple non-porous polymeric sphere to devices with more complex shape and functionalities for ensuring better clinical outcomes in the long-term. Polymeric and ceramic porous implants have gained prominence since their highly interconnected porous architecture allows them to act as a passive framework for fibrovascular in-growth offering reduced complication rates and the possibility of pegging to enhance the motility of the artificial eye. However, there are still drawbacks to these materials. Some critical aspects of today's orbital implants include the risk of migration and extrusion, postoperative infections and low motility transmitted to the aesthetic ocular prosthesis. Hence, the development of novel biomaterials with enhanced functionalities (e.g. angiogenesis, antibacterial effect, in situ mouldability) which enable an improved outcome of eye replacement is more than ever desirable and represents one of the most challenging topics of research in the field of ocular implants. This review summarizes the evolution of orbital implants and provides an overview of the most recent advances in the field as well as some critical remarks for materials design, selection, characterization and translation to clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Advanced biomaterials for skeletal tissue regeneration: Instructive and smart functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrère, F.; Mahmood, T.A.; de Groot, K.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2008-01-01

    The past half century has seen explosive growth in the use of medical implants. Orthopedic, cardiac, oral, maxillofacial and plastic surgeons are examples of medical specialists treating millions of patients each year by implanting devices varying from pace makers, artificial hip joints, breast and

  7. Chitosan-Based Hyaluronic Acid Hybrid Polymer Fibers as a Scaffold Biomaterial for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintarou Yamane

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An ideal scaffold material is one that closely mimics the natural environment in the tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM. Therefore, we have applied hyaluronic acid (HA, which is a main component of the cartilage ECM, to chitosan as a fundamental material for cartilage regeneration. To mimic the structural environment of cartilage ECM, the fundamental structure of a scaffold should be a three-dimensional (3D system with adequate mechanical strength. We structurally developed novel polymer chitosan-based HA hybrid fibers as a biomaterial to easily fabricate 3D scaffolds. This review presents the potential of a 3D fabricated scaffold based on these novel hybrid polymer fibers for cartilage tissue engineering.

  8. Preparation and characterization of Ti-15Mo alloy used as biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Severino Martins Júnior

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in life expectancy, biomaterials have become an increasingly important focus of research because they are used to replace parts and functions of the human body, thus contributing to improved quality of life. In the development of new biomaterials, the Ti-15Mo alloy is particularly significant. In this study, the Ti-15Mo alloy was produced using an arc-melting furnace and then characterized by density, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, hardness and dynamic elasticity modulus measurements, and cytotoxicity tests. The microstructure was obtained with β predominance. Microhardness, elasticity modulus, and cytotoxicity testing results showed that this material has great potential for use as biomaterial, mainly in orthopedic applications.

  9. Biomaterial stiffness determines stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongwei; Wang, Heping; Zhang, Zhijun; Yang, Wang; Liu, Wenbin; Li, Yulin; Li, Lisha

    2017-06-01

    Stem cells have potential to develop into numerous cell types, thus they are good cell source for tissue engineering. As an external physical signal, material stiffness is capable of regulating stem cell fate. Biomaterial stiffness is an important parameter in tissue engineering. We summarize main measurements of material stiffness under different condition, then list and compare three main methods of controlling stiffness (material amount, crosslinking density and photopolymeriztion time) which interplay with one another and correlate with stiffness positively, and current advances in effects of biomaterial stiffness on stem cell fate. We discuss the unsolved problems and future directions of biomaterial stiffness in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The Effect of Biomaterials Used for Tissue Regeneration Purposes on Polarization of Macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S.A. ter Hoeve-Boersema (Simone); N. Grotenhuis (Nienke); Y. Bayon (Yves); J.F. Lange (Johan); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractActivation of macrophages is critical in the acute phase of wound healing after implantation of surgical biomaterials. To understand the response of macrophages, they are often cultured in vitro on biomaterials. Since a wide range of biomaterials is currently used in the clinics, we

  11. Suitability of Different Natural and Synthetic Biomaterials for Dental Pulp Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, Kerstin M; Brandl, Ferdinand P; Kirchhof, Susanne; Widbiller, Matthias; Eidt, Andreas; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Göpferich, Achim; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2018-02-01

    Dental pulp tissue engineering is possible after insertion of pulpal stem cells combined with a scaffold into empty root canals. Commonly used biomaterials are collagen or poly(lactic) acid, which are either difficult to modify or to insert into such a narrow space. New hydrogel scaffolds with bioactive, specifically tailored functions could optimize the conditions for this approach. Different synthetic and natural hydrogels were tested for their suitability to engineer dental pulp. Two functionalized modifications of polyethylene glycol were developed in this study and compared to a self-assembling peptide, as well as to collagen and fibrin. Cell viability of dental pulp stem cells in test materials was assessed over two weeks. Cells in selected test materials laden with dentin-derived growth factors were inserted into human tooth roots and implanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. In vitro cell culture exhibited distinct differences between scaffold types, where viability was significantly higher in natural compared to synthetic materials. In vivo experiments showed considerable differences regarding scaffold degradation, soft tissue formation, vascularization, and odontoblast-like cell differentiation. Fibrin appeared most suitable to enable generation of a pulp-like tissue and differentiation of cells into odontoblasts at the cell-dentin interface. In conclusion, natural materials, especially fibrin, proved to be superior compared to synthetic scaffolds regarding cell viability and dental pulp-like tissue formation.

  12. Advanced biomaterials and microengineering technologies to recapitulate the stepwise process of cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peela, Nitish; Truong, Danh; Saini, Harpinder; Chu, Hunghao; Mashaghi, Samaneh; Ham, Stephanie L; Singh, Sunil; Tavana, Hossein; Mosadegh, Bobak; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2017-07-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death globally according to the World Health Organization. Although improved treatments and early diagnoses have reduced cancer related mortalities, metastatic disease remains a major clinical challenge. The local tumor microenvironment plays a significant role in cancer metastasis, where tumor cells respond and adapt to a plethora of biochemical and biophysical signals from stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Due to these complexities, there is a critical need to understand molecular mechanisms underlying cancer metastasis to facilitate the discovery of more effective therapies. In the past few years, the integration of advanced biomaterials and microengineering approaches has initiated the development of innovative platform technologies for cancer research. These technologies enable the creation of biomimetic in vitro models with physiologically relevant (i.e. in vivo-like) characteristics to conduct studies ranging from fundamental cancer biology to high-throughput drug screening. In this review article, we discuss the biological significance of each step of the metastatic cascade and provide a broad overview on recent progress to recapitulate these stages using advanced biomaterials and microengineered technologies. In each section, we will highlight the advantages and shortcomings of each approach and provide our perspectives on future directions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ventricular wall biomaterial injection therapy after myocardial infarction: Advances in material design, mechanistic insight and early clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yang; Matsumura, Yasumoto; Wagner, William R

    2017-06-01

    Intramyocardial biomaterial injection therapy for myocardial infarction has made significant progress since concept initiation more than 10 years ago. The interim successes and progress in the first 5 years have been extensively reviewed. During the last 5 years, two phase II clinical trials have reported their long term follow up results and many additional biomaterial candidates have reached preclinical and clinical testing. Also in recent years deeper investigations into the mechanisms behind the beneficial effects associated with biomaterial injection therapy have been pursued, and a variety of process and material parameters have been evaluated for their impact on therapeutic outcomes. This review explores the advances made in this biomaterial-centered approach to ischemic cardiomyopathy and discusses potential future research directions as this therapy seeks to positively impact patients suffering from one of the world's most common sources of mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Morphogenesis and tissue engineering of bone and cartilage: inductive signals, stem cells, and biomimetic biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, A H

    2000-08-01

    Morphogenesis is the developmental cascade of pattern formation, body plan establishment, and the architecture of mirror-image bilateral symmetry of many structures and asymmetry of some, culminating in the adult form. Tissue engineering is the emerging discipline of design and construction of spare parts for the human body to restore function based on principles of molecular developmental biology and morphogenesis governed by bioengineering. The three key ingredients for both morphogenesis and tissue engineering are inductive signals, responding stem cells, and the extracellular matrix. Among the many tissues in the human body, bone has considerable powers for regeneration and is a prototype model for tissue engineering based on morphogenesis. Implantation of demineralized bone matrix into subcutaneous sites results in local bone induction. This model mimics sequential limb morphogenesis and permitted the isolation of bone morphogens. Although it is traditional to study morphogenetic signals in embryos, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), the inductive signals for bone, were isolated from demineralized bone matrix from adults. BMPs and related cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins (CDMPs) initiate, promote, and maintain chondrogenesis and osteogenesis and have actions beyond bone. The symbiosis of bone inductive and conductive strategies are critical for tissue engineering, and is in turn governed by the context and biomechanics. The context is the microenvironment, consisting of extracellular matrix, which can be duplicated by biomimetic biomaterials such as collagens, hydroxyapatite, proteoglycans, and cell adhesion proteins including fibronectins. Thus, the rules of architecture for tissue engineering are an imitation of the laws of developmental biology and morphogenesis, and thus may be universal for all tissues, including bones and joints.

  15. Mechanical Property Characterization of Electrospun Recombinant Human Tropoelastin for Vascular Graft Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    McKenna, Kathryn A.; Hinds, Monica T.; Sarao, Rebecca C.; Wu, Ping-Cheng; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Glanville, Robert W.; Babcock, Darcie; Gregory, Kenton W.

    2011-01-01

    The development of vascular grafts has focused on finding a biomaterial that is non-thrombogenic, minimizes intimal hyperplasia, matches the mechanical properties of native vessels and allows for regeneration of arterial tissue. In this study, the structural and mechanical properties and the vascular cell compatibility of electrospun recombinant human tropoelastin (rTE) were evaluated as a potential vascular graft support matrix. Disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS) was used to cross-link electrospu...

  16. Collagenous Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering: Lessons from the Common Sea Urchin Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Lim Goh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolds for tissue engineering application may be made from a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM of connective tissues because the ECM can mimic the functions of the target tissue. The primary sources of collagenous ECM material are calf skin and bone. However, these sources are associated with the risk of having bovine spongiform encephalopathy or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Alternative sources for collagenous ECM materials may be derived from livestock, e.g., pigs, and from marine animals, e.g., sea urchins. Collagenous ECM of the sea urchin possesses structural features and mechanical properties that are similar to those of mammalian ones. However, even more intriguing is that some tissues such as the ligamentous catch apparatus can exhibit mutability, namely rapid reversible changes in the tissue mechanical properties. These tissues are known as mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs. The mutability of these tissues has been the subject of on-going investigations, covering the biochemistry, structural biology and mechanical properties of the collagenous components. Recent studies point to a nerve-control system for regulating the ECM macromolecules that are involved in the sliding action of collagen fibrils in the MCT. This review discusses the key attributes of the structure and function of the ECM of the sea urchin ligaments that are related to the fibril-fibril sliding action—the focus is on the respective components within the hierarchical architecture of the tissue. In this context, structure refers to size, shape and separation distance of the ECM components while function is associated with mechanical properties e.g., strength and stiffness. For simplicity, the components that address the different length scale from the largest to the smallest are as follows: collagen fibres, collagen fibrils, interfibrillar matrix and collagen molecules. Application of recent theories of stress transfer and fracture mechanisms in fibre

  17. Collagenous Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering: Lessons from the Common Sea Urchin Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Kheng Lim; Holmes, David F

    2017-04-25

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering application may be made from a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues because the ECM can mimic the functions of the target tissue. The primary sources of collagenous ECM material are calf skin and bone. However, these sources are associated with the risk of having bovine spongiform encephalopathy or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Alternative sources for collagenous ECM materials may be derived from livestock, e.g., pigs, and from marine animals, e.g., sea urchins. Collagenous ECM of the sea urchin possesses structural features and mechanical properties that are similar to those of mammalian ones. However, even more intriguing is that some tissues such as the ligamentous catch apparatus can exhibit mutability, namely rapid reversible changes in the tissue mechanical properties. These tissues are known as mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs). The mutability of these tissues has been the subject of on-going investigations, covering the biochemistry, structural biology and mechanical properties of the collagenous components. Recent studies point to a nerve-control system for regulating the ECM macromolecules that are involved in the sliding action of collagen fibrils in the MCT. This review discusses the key attributes of the structure and function of the ECM of the sea urchin ligaments that are related to the fibril-fibril sliding action-the focus is on the respective components within the hierarchical architecture of the tissue. In this context, structure refers to size, shape and separation distance of the ECM components while function is associated with mechanical properties e.g., strength and stiffness. For simplicity, the components that address the different length scale from the largest to the smallest are as follows: collagen fibres, collagen fibrils, interfibrillar matrix and collagen molecules. Application of recent theories of stress transfer and fracture mechanisms in fibre reinforced

  18. Microscale characterization of the viscoelastic properties of hydrogel biomaterials using dual-mode ultrasound elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-05-01

    Characterization of the microscale mechanical properties of biomaterials is a key challenge in the field of mechanobiology. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography (DUE) uses high frequency focused ultrasound to induce compression in a sample, combined with interleaved ultrasound imaging to measure the resulting deformation. This technique can be used to non-invasively perform creep testing on hydrogel biomaterials to characterize their viscoelastic properties. DUE was applied to a range of hydrogel constructs consisting of either hydroxyapatite (HA)-doped agarose, HA-collagen, HA-fibrin, or preosteoblast-seeded collagen constructs. DUE provided spatial and temporal mapping of local and bulk displacements and strains at high resolution. Hydrogel materials exhibited characteristic creep behavior, and the maximum strain and residual strain were both material- and concentration-dependent. Burger's viscoelastic model was used to extract characteristic parameters describing material behavior. Increased protein concentration resulted in greater stiffness and viscosity, but did not affect the viscoelastic time constant of acellular constructs. Collagen constructs exhibited significantly higher modulus and viscosity than fibrin constructs. Cell-seeded collagen constructs became stiffer with altered mechanical behavior as they developed over time. Importantly, DUE also provides insight into the spatial variation of viscoelastic properties at sub-millimeter resolution, allowing interrogation of the interior of constructs. DUE presents a novel technique for non-invasively characterizing hydrogel materials at the microscale, and therefore may have unique utility in the study of mechanobiology and the characterization of hydrogel biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanical characterization of structurally porous biomaterials built via additive manufacturing: experiments, predictive models, and design maps for load-bearing bone replacement implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melancon, D; Bagheri, Z S; Johnston, R B; Liu, L; Tanzer, M; Pasini, D

    2017-11-01

    space. Results capture the shift in geometry and mechanical properties between as-designed and as-manufactured biomaterials induced by additive manufacturing. Characterization of this shift is crucial to ensure appropriate manufacturing of bone replacement implants that enable biological fixation through bone ingrowth as well as mechanical property harmonization with the native bone tissue. In addition, we propose a method to include manufacturing imperfections in the numerical models that can reduce the discrepancy between predicted and tested properties. The results give insight into the use of structurally porous biomaterials for the design and additive fabrication of load-bearing implants for bone replacement. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electro fluido dynamic techniques to design instructive biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarino, Vincenzo, E-mail: vguarino@unina.it; Altobelli, Rosaria; Cirillo, Valentina; Ambrosio, Luigi [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, Department of Chemical Sciences & Materials Technology, National Research Council of Italy, V.le Kennedy 54, Naples (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    A large variety of processes and tools is continuously investigated to discover new solutions to design instructive materials with controlled chemical, physical and biological properties for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Among them, electro fluido dynamic techniques (EFDTs) are emerging as an interesting strategy, based on highly flexible and low-cost processes, to revisit old biomaterial’s manufacturing approach by utilizing electrostatic forces as the driving force for the fabrication of 3D architectures with controlled physical and chemical functionalities to guide in vitro and in vivo cell activities. By a rational selection of polymer solution properties and process conditions, EFDTs allow to produce fibres and/or particles at micro and/or nanometric size scale which may be variously assembled by tailored experimental setups, thus giving the chance to generate a plethora of different 3D devices able to incorporate biopolymers (i.e., proteins, polysaccharides) or active molecules (e.g., drugs) for different applications. Here, we focus on the optimization of basic EFDTs - namely electrospinning, electrospraying and electrodynamic atomization - to develop active platforms (i.e., monocomponent, protein and drug loaded scaffolds and µ-scaffolds) made of synthetic (PCL, PLGA) or natural (chitosan, alginate) polymers. In particular, we investigate how to set materials and process parameters to impart specific morphological, biochemical or physical cues to trigger all the fundamental cell–biomaterial and cell– cell cross-talking elicited during regenerative processes, in order to reproduce the complex microenvironment of native or pathological tissues.

  1. Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Keim, S.; Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is attracting increasing attention as an effective technique for the processing of biomaterials, specifically bioactive coatings and biomedical nanostructures. The well-known advantages of EPD for the production of a wide range of microstructures and nanostructures as well as unique and complex material combinations are being exploited, starting from well-dispersed suspensions of biomaterials in particulate form (microsized and nanoscale particles, nanotubes, nanoplatelets). EPD of biological entities such as enzymes, bacteria and cells is also being investigated. The review presents a comprehensive summary and discussion of relevant recent work on EPD describing the specific application of the technique in the processing of several biomaterials, focusing on (i) conventional bioactive (inorganic) coatings, e.g. hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass coatings on orthopaedic implants, and (ii) biomedical nanostructures, including biopolymer–ceramic nanocomposites, carbon nanotube coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds, deposition of proteins and other biological entities for sensors and advanced functional coatings. It is the intention to inform the reader on how EPD has become an important tool in advanced biomaterials processing, as a convenient alternative to conventional methods, and to present the potential of the technique to manipulate and control the deposition of a range of nanomaterials of interest in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. PMID:20504802

  2. Marine-derived biological macromolecule-based biomaterials for wound healing and skin tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandika, Pathum; Ko, Seok-Chun; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process that depends on the wound condition, the patient's health, and the physicochemical support given through external materials. The development of bioactive molecules and engineered tissue substitutes to provide physiochemical support to enhance the wound healing process plays a key role in advancing wound-care management. Thus, identification of ideal molecules in wound treatment is still in progress. The discovery of natural products that contain ideal molecules for skin tissue regeneration has been greatly advanced by exploration of the marine bioenvironment. Consequently, tremendously diverse marine organisms have become a great source of numerous biological macromolecules that can be used to develop tissue-engineered substitutes with wound healing properties. This review summarizes the wound healing process, the properties of macromolecules from marine organisms, and the involvement of these molecules in skin tissue regeneration applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multifunctional bioactive glass and glass-ceramic biomaterials with antibacterial properties for repair and regeneration of bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, João S; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Pires, Ricardo A; Reis, Rui L; Hatton, Paul V

    2017-09-01

    Bioactive glasses (BGs) and related glass-ceramic biomaterials have been used in bone tissue repair for over 30years. Previous work in this field was comprehensively reviewed including by their inventor Larry Hench, and the key features and properties of BGs are well understood. More recently, attention has focused on their modification to further enhance the osteogenic behaviour, or further compositional changes that may introduce additional properties, such as antimicrobial activity. Evidence is emerging that BGs and related glass-ceramics may be modified in such a way as to simultaneously introduce more than one desirable property. The aim of this review is therefore to consider the evidence that these more recent inorganic modifications to glass and glass-ceramic biomaterials are effective, and whether or not these new compositions represent sufficiently versatile systems to underpin the development of a new generation of truly multifunctional biomaterials to address pressing clinical needs in orthopaedic and dental surgery. Indeed, a number of classical glass compositions exhibited antimicrobial activity, however the structural design and the addition of specific ions, i.e. Ag + , Cu + , and Sr 2+ , are able to impart a multifunctional character to these systems, through the combination of, for example, bioactivity with bactericidal activity. In this review we demonstrate the multifunctional potential of bioactive glasses and related glass-ceramics as biomaterials for orthopaedic and craniofacial/dental applications. Therefore, it considers the evidence that the more recent inorganic modifications to glass and glass-ceramic biomaterials are able to impart antimicrobial properties alongside the more classical bone bonding and osteoconduction. These properties are attracting a special attention nowadays that bacterial infections are an increasing challenge in orthopaedics. We also focus the manuscript on the versatility of these systems as a basis to underpin

  4. Optical projection tomography can be used to investigate spatial distribution of chondrocytes in three-dimensional biomaterial scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Elina; Muhonen, Virpi; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been used in autologous chondrocyte implantation to facilitate the repair of large lesions and to advance the formation of articular cartilage [Exp. Biol. Med. (Maywood) 237(1) (2012), 10-17]. Biomaterial scaffolds are usually three-dimensional (3-D) porous structures consisting of biodegradable materials to support articular cartilage formation. Adequate porosity of the scaffold is necessary for uniform cell distribution and cell attachment, and the density of the cells in the scaffold should be appropriate for cartilage formation [Cartilage 3(2) (2012), 108-117]. There have been only a restricted number of studies on the spatial distribution of cells in scaffolds, and on the role of this to cartilage formation [J. Biotechnol. 129 (2007), 516-531; Biotechnol. Progr. 14 (1998), 193-202; Biotechnol. Bioeng. 84 (2003), 205-214]. This may be due to the limited availability of appropriate visualization methods. Acquiring 3-D images throughout the scaffold by histology or confocal methods are not applicable to all types of scaffolds, and moreover, they are time consuming, laborious and thus not very feasible for a large scale analysis. To make the visualization of the spatial distribution of the cells easier in biomaterial scaffolds we have applied optical projection tomography (OPT). OPT microscope produces high-resolution 3-D images of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent specimens [Science 296(5567) (2002), 541-545]. Here we demonstrate that the OPT method can be used for the evaluation and visualization of the cell seeding method, spatial distribution and density of cells in biomaterial scaffolds and thus establish the OPT as a valid tool for analysis of cell distribution in cartilage tissue engineering samples.

  5. Hydrogel derived from porcine decellularized nerve tissue as a promising biomaterial for repairing peripheral nerve defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Shihao; Qiu, Shuai; Rao, Zilong; Liu, Jianghui; Zhu, Shuang; Yan, Liwei; Mao, Haiquan; Zhu, Qingtang; Quan, Daping; Liu, Xiaolin

    2018-04-09

    Decellularized matrix hydrogels derived from tissues or organs have been used for tissue repair due to their biocompatibility, tunability, and tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components. However, the preparation of decellularized peripheral nerve matrix hydrogels and their use to repair nerve defects have not been reported. Here, we developed a hydrogel from porcine decellularized nerve matrix (pDNM-G), which was confirmed to have minimal DNA content and retain collagen and glycosaminoglycans content, thereby allowing gelatinization. The pDNM-G exhibited a nanofibrous structure similar to that of natural ECM, and a ∼280-Pa storage modulus at 10 mg/mL similar to that of native neural tissues. Western blot and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the pDNM-G consisted mostly of ECM proteins and contained primary ECM-related proteins, including fibronectin and collagen I and IV). In vitro experiments showed that pDNM-G supported Schwann cell proliferation and preserved cell morphology. Additionally, in a 15-mm rat sciatic nerve defect model, pDNM-G was combined with electrospun poly(lactic-acid)-co-poly(trimethylene-carbonate)conduits to bridge the defect, which did not elicit an adverse immune response and promoted the activation of M2 macrophages associated with a constructive remodeling response. Morphological analyses and electrophysiological and functional examinations revealed that the regenerative outcomes achieved by pDNM-G were superior to those by empty conduits and closed to those using rat decellularized nerve matrix allograft scaffolds. These findings indicated that pDNM-G, with its preserved ECM composition and nanofibrous structure, represents a promising biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration. Decellularized nerve allografts have been widely used to treat peripheral nerve injury. However, given their limited availability and lack of bioactive factors, efforts have been made to improve the efficacy

  6. Biological biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge-Herrero, E. [Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    There are a number of situations in which substances of biological origin are employed as biomaterials. Most of them are macromolecules derived from isolated connective tissue or the connective tissue itself in membrane form, in both cases, the tissue can be used in its natural form or be chemically treated. In other cases, certain blood vessels can be chemically pretreated and used as vascular prostheses. Proteins such as albumin, collagen and fibrinogen are employed to coat vascular prostheses. Certain polysaccharides have also been tested for use in controlled drug release systems. Likewise, a number of tissues, such as dura mater, bovine pericardium, procine valves and human valves, are used in the preparation of cardiac prostheses. We also use veins from animals or humans in arterial replacement. In none of these cases are the tissues employed dissimilar to the native tissues as they have been chemically modified, becoming a new bio material with different physical and biochemical properties. In short, we find that natural products are being utilized as biomaterials and must be considered as such; thus, it is necessary to study both their chemicobiological and physicomechanical properties. In the present report, we review the current applications, problems and future prospects of some of these biological biomaterials. (Author) 84 refs.

  7. Combinatorial cell-3D biomaterials cytocompatibility screening for tissue engineering using bioinspired superhydrophobic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Christiane L; Oliveira, Mariana B; Mano, João F

    2012-03-01

    We report on the development of a new array-based screening flat platform with the potential to be used as a high-throughput device based on biomimetic polymeric substrates for combinatorial cell/3D biomaterials screening assays in the context of tissue engineering. Polystyrene was used to produce superhydrophobic surfaces based on the so-called lotus effect. Arrays of hydrophilic regions could be patterned in such surfaces using UV/ozone radiation, generating devices onto which combinatorial hydrogel spots were deposited. The biological performance of encapsulated cells in hydrogels could be tested in an in vitro 3D environment assuming that each site was isolated from the others due to the high contrast of wettability between the patterned spots and the superhydrophobic surroundings. Three different polymers-chitosan, collagen and hyaluronic acid-were combined with alginate in different proportions in order to obtain combinatorial binary alginate-based polymeric arrays. The effect of the addition of gelatin to the binary structures was also tested. The gels were chemically analyzed by FTIR microscopic mapping. Cell culture results varied according to the hydrogel composition and encapsulated cell types (L929 fibroblast cells and MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells). Cell viability and number could be assessed by conventional methods, such as MTS reduction test and dsDNA quantification. Non-destructive image analysis was performed using cytoskeleton and nuclei staining agents and the results were consistent with the ones obtained by conventional sample-destructive techniques. Briefly, L929 cells showed higher number and viability for higher alginate-content and collagen-containing hydrogels, while MC3T3-E1 showed higher cell viability and cell number in lower alginate-content and chitosan containing hydrogels. The addition of gelatin did not influence significantly cell metabolic activity or cell number in any of the encapsulated cell types. This journal is © The Royal

  8. Nanocomposites for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Pan, Yong Zheng; Li, Lin; He, Chao Bin

    2013-04-01

    Natural bone tissue possesses a nanocomposite structure that provides appropriate physical and biological properties. For bone tissue regeneration, it is crucial for the biomaterial to mimic living bone tissue. Since no single type of material is able to mimic the composition, structure and properties of native bone, nanocomposites are the best choice for bone tissue regeneration as they can provide the appropriate matrix environment, integrate desirable biological properties, and provide controlled, sequential delivery of multiple growth factors for the different stages of bone tissue regeneration. This article reviews the composition, structure and properties of advanced nanocomposites for bone tissue regeneration. It covers aspects of interest such as the biomimetic synthesis of bone-like nanocomposites, guided bone regeneration from inert biomaterials and bioactive nanocomposites, and nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. The design, fabrication, and in vitro and in vivo characterization of such nanocomposites are reviewed.

  9. Advances in Meniscal Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umile Giuseppe Longo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscal tears are the most common knee injuries and have a poor ability of healing. In the last few decades, several techniques have been increasingly used to optimize meniscal healing. Current research efforts of tissue engineering try to combine cell-based therapy, growth factors, gene therapy, and reabsorbable scaffolds to promote healing of meniscal defects. Preliminary studies did not allow to draw definitive conclusions on the use of these techniques for routine management of meniscal lesions. We performed a review of the available literature on current techniques of tissue engineering for the management of meniscal tears.

  10. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Maiorana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to replace the missing bone, allowing for a prosthetic driven implant placement. Soft tissues deficiency was corrected by means of a combined epithelialized and subepithelial connective tissue graft. The 3-year clinical and radiological follow-up demonstrated symmetric gingival levels of the upper canines, with physiological peri-implant probing depths and bone loss. Thus, the use of autogenous tissues combined with biomaterials might be considered a reliable technique in case of highly aesthetic demanding cases.

  11. Biomaterials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Reza Rezaie, Hamid; Öchsner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This short book presents an overview of different types of biomaterial such as bio ceramics, bio polymers, metals and bio composites, while especially focusing on nano biomaterials and their applications in different tissues. It provides a compact introduction to nano materials for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering and implants, while also reviewing essential trends in the biomaterial field over the last few decades and the latest developments.

  12. The rapid manufacture of uniform composite multicellular-biomaterial micropellets, their assembly into macroscopic organized tissues, and potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babur, Betul Kul; Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Klein, Travis Jacob; Lott, William B; Doran, Michael Robert

    2015-01-01

    We and others have published on the rapid manufacture of micropellet tissues, typically formed from 100-500 cells each. The micropellet geometry enhances cellular biological properties, and in many cases the micropellets can subsequently be utilized as building blocks to assemble complex macrotissues. Generally, micropellets are formed from cells alone, however when replicating matrix-rich tissues such as cartilage it would be ideal if matrix or biomaterials supplements could be incorporated directly into the micropellet during the manufacturing process. Herein we describe a method to efficiently incorporate donor cartilage matrix into tissue engineered cartilage micropellets. We lyophilized bovine cartilage matrix, and then shattered it into microscopic pieces having average dimensions tissues. Generically, this is a versatile method that enables the rapid and uniform integration of biomaterials into multicellular micropellets that can then be used as tissue building blocks. In this study, the addition of CD resulted in an approximate 8-fold volume increase in the micropellets, with the donor matrix functioning to contribute to an increase in total cartilage matrix content. Composite micropellets were readily assembled into macroscopic cartilage tissues; the incorporation of CD enhanced tissue size and matrix content, but did not enhance chondrogenic gene expression.

  13. Insight on stem cell preconditioning and instructive biomaterials to enhance cell adhesion, retention, and engraftment for tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells are a promising solution for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the limited survival and engraftment of transplanted cells due to a hostile ischemic environment is a bottleneck for effective utilization and commercialization. Within this environment, the majority of transplanted cells undergo apoptosis prior to participating in lineage differentiation and cellular integration. Therefore, in order to maximize the clinical utility of stem/progenitor cells, strategies must be employed to increase their adhesion, retention, and engraftment in vivo. Here, we reviewed key strategies that are being adopted to enhance the survival, retention, and engraftment of transplanted stem cells through the manipulation of both the stem cells and the surrounding environment. We describe how preconditioning of cells or cell manipulations strategies can enhance stem cell survival and engraftment after transplantation. We also discuss how biomaterials can enhance the function of stem cells for effective tissue regeneration. Biomaterials can incorporate or mimic extracellular function (ECM) function and enhance survival or differentiation of transplanted cells in vivo. Biomaterials can also promote angiogenesis, enhance engraftment and differentiation, and accelerate electromechanical integration of transplanted stem cells. Insight gained from this review may direct the development of future investigations and clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Researching in biomaterials optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María. M.; Ionescu, Ana; Yebra, Ana; Cardona, Juan C.; Herrera, Luis J.; Rivas, María. José; Pecho, Óscar E.; Ghinea, Razvan

    2017-08-01

    The optical properties of a tissue or a biomaterial can be described in terms of the absorption coefficient (μa), the scattering coefficient (μs), the scattering function p(θ,ψ) and the real refractive index of the biomaterial. The Inverse Adding-Doubling, IAD, Method and relationship between the Kubelka- Munk parameters and the transport coefficients are used to describe optical properties at different wavelengths for a large variety of tissues and tissue like biomaterials, such as native cornea, tissue engineered cornea, tissue engineered oral mucosa, natural dentin and dental resin nanocomposites, among others

  15. Extracellular matrix-based biomaterial scaffolds and the host response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, Joseph M; Grainger, David W

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) collectively represents a class of naturally derived proteinaceous biomaterials purified from harvested organs and tissues with increasing scientific focus and utility in tissue engineering and repair. This interest stems predominantly from the largely unproven concept that processed ECM biomaterials as natural tissue-derived matrices better integrate with host tissue than purely synthetic biomaterials. Nearly every tissue type has been decellularized and processed for re-use as tissue-derived ECM protein implants and scaffolds. To date, however, little consensus exists for defining ECM compositions or sources that best constitute decellularized biomaterials that might better heal, integrate with host tissues and avoid the foreign body response (FBR). Metrics used to assess ECM performance in biomaterial implants are arbitrary and contextually specific by convention. Few comparisons for in vivo host responses to ECM implants from different sources are published. This review discusses current ECM-derived biomaterials characterization methods including relationships between ECM material compositions from different sources, properties and host tissue response as implants. Relevant preclinical in vivo models are compared along with their associated advantages and limitations, and the current state of various metrics used to define material integration and biocompatibility are discussed. Commonly applied applications of these ECM-derived biomaterials as stand-alone implanted matrices and devices are compared with respect to host tissue responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An introduction to biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Hollinger, Jeffrey O

    2011-01-01

    Consensus Definitions, Fundamental Concepts, and a Standardized Approach to Applied Biomaterials Sciences, J.O. HollingerBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Wound Healing BiologyCutaneous Wound Pathobiology: Raison d'etre for Tissue Engineering, L.K. Macri and R.A.F. ClarkOsseous Wound Healing, A. Nawab, M. Wong, D. Kwak, L. Schutte, A. Sharma, and J.O. HollingerBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Cellular MechanicsCell and Tissue Mechanobiology, W. Guo, P. Alvarez, and Y. WangBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Materials-Host InteractionsCell-Material In

  17. Advances of radiation sterilisation in tissue banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Norimah

    2017-10-11

    Under the auspices of the IAEA tissue banking programme on "Radiation Sterilisation of Tissue Graft" conducted from 1985 to 2004, many scientists and surgeons were involved in various regional research and development (R&D) projects mainly in dealing with radiation dose selection, radiation effects on human tissues and quality system in radiation sterilisation. New findings on radiation effects, tissue processing and preservation were shared during the regional and interregional meetings and workshops. Many tissue banks started to use radiation (25 kGy) to sterilize tissue grafts for tissue safety and efficacy and still continue to use it. The IAEA Code of Practice for Radiation Sterilization of Tissues Allografts developed in 2007 offered simpler methods to conduct radiation dose setting and dose validation experiments for tissue grafts. Advances in dose selection and dose mapping are continued under the quality management system when banks need to be certified to continue their operation. The combination of good tissue processing and preservation as well as good radiation practice will ensure the tissue products are properly sterilised thus safe and of high quality. Experience in meeting challenges in using radiation sterilisation and achievements reported by the tissue bankers are shared here.

  18. Mechanical property characterization of electrospun recombinant human tropoelastin for vascular graft biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Kathryn A; Hinds, Monica T; Sarao, Rebecca C; Wu, Ping-Cheng; Maslen, Cheryl L; Glanville, Robert W; Babcock, Darcie; Gregory, Kenton W

    2012-01-01

    The development of vascular grafts has focused on finding a biomaterial that is non-thrombogenic, minimizes intimal hyperplasia, matches the mechanical properties of native vessels and allows for regeneration of arterial tissue. In this study, the structural and mechanical properties and the vascular cell compatibility of electrospun recombinant human tropoelastin (rTE) were evaluated as a potential vascular graft support matrix. Disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS) was used to cross-link electrospun rTE fibers to produce a polymeric recombinant tropoelastin (prTE) matrix that is stable in aqueous environments. Tubular 1cm diameter prTE samples were constructed for uniaxial tensile testing and 4mm small-diameter prTE tubular scaffolds were produced for burst pressure and cell compatibility evaluations from 15 wt.% rTE solutions. Uniaxial tensile tests demonstrated an average ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 0.36±0.05 MPa and elastic moduli of 0.15±0.04 and 0.91±0.16 MPa, which were comparable to extracted native elastin. Burst pressures of 485±25 mm Hg were obtained from 4mm internal diameter scaffolds with 453±74 μm average wall thickness. prTE supported endothelial cell growth with typical endothelial cell cobblestone morphology after 48 h in culture. Cross-linked electrospun rTE has promising properties for utilization as a vascular graft biomaterial with customizable dimensions, a compliant matrix and vascular cell compatibility. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Looking into the Future: Toward Advanced 3D Biomaterials for Stem-Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongmin; Tang, Mingliang; Zhao, Jinping; Chai, Renjie; Kang, Jiuhong

    2018-02-16

    Stem-cell-based therapies have the potential to provide novel solutions for the treatment of a variety of diseases, but the main obstacles to such therapies lie in the uncontrolled differentiation and functional engraftment of implanted tissues. The physicochemical microenvironment controls the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells, and the key step in mimicking the stem cell microenvironment is to construct a more physiologically relevant 3D culture system. Material-based 3D assemblies of stem cells facilitate the cellular interactions that promote morphogenesis and tissue organization in a similar manner to that which occurs during embryogenesis. Both natural and artificial materials can be used to create 3D scaffolds, and synthetic organic and inorganic porous materials are the two main kinds of artificial materials. Nanotechnology provides new opportunities to design novel advanced materials with special physicochemical properties for 3D stem cell culture and transplantation. Herein, the advances and advantages of 3D scaffold materials, especially with respect to stem-cell-based therapies, are first outlined. Second, the stem cell biology in 3D scaffold materials is reviewed. Third, the progress and basic principles of developing 3D scaffold materials for clinical applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are reviewed. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Carbon nanotubes reinforced chitosan films: mechanical properties and cell response of a novel biomaterial for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustalli, A; Zisimopoulou, A E; Koch, S; Rongen, L; Deligianni, D; Diamantouros, S; Athanassiou, G; Kokozidou, M; Mavrilas, D; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been proposed as fillers to reinforce polymeric biomaterials for the strengthening of their structural integrity to achieve better biomechanical properties. In this study, a new polymeric composite material was introduced by incorporating various low concentrations of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into chitosan (CS), aiming at achieving a novel composite biomaterial with superior mechanical and biological properties compared to neat CS, in order to be used in cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Both mechanical and biological characteristics in contact with the two relevant cell types (endothelial cells and vascular myofibroblasts) were studied. Regarding the mechanical behavior of MWCNT reinforced CS (MWCNT/CS), 5 and 10 % concentrations of MWCNTs enhanced the mechanical behavior of CS, with that of 5 % exhibiting a superior mechanical strength compared to 10 % concentration and neat CS. Regarding biological properties, MWCNT/CS best supported proliferation of endothelial and myofibroblast cells, MWCNTs and MWCNT/CS caused no apoptosis and were not toxic of the examined cell types. Conclusively, the new material could be suitable for tissue engineering (TE) and particularly for cardiovascular TE applications.

  1. Designing Biomaterials for 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvendiren, Murat; Molde, Joseph; Soares, Rosane M D; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-10-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is becoming an increasingly common technique to fabricate scaffolds and devices for tissue engineering applications. This is due to the potential of 3D printing to provide patient-specific designs, high structural complexity, rapid on-demand fabrication at a low-cost. One of the major bottlenecks that limits the widespread acceptance of 3D printing in biomanufacturing is the lack of diversity in "biomaterial inks". Printability of a biomaterial is determined by the printing technique. Although a wide range of biomaterial inks including polymers, ceramics, hydrogels and composites have been developed, the field is still struggling with processing of these materials into self-supporting devices with tunable mechanics, degradation, and bioactivity. This review aims to highlight the past and recent advances in biomaterial ink development and design considerations moving forward. A brief overview of 3D printing technologies focusing on ink design parameters is also included.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial activity and mechanism of a novel hydroxyapatite whisker/nano zinc oxide biomaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jian; Zhang, Wenyun; Li, Yang; Wang, Gang; Yang, Lidou; Jin, Jianfeng; Chen, Qinghua; Huang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections remain a risk factor that leads to failures in oral and maxillofacial artificial bone transplantation. This study aimed to synthesize and evaluate a novel hydroxyapatite whisker (HAPw) / nano zinc oxide (n-ZnO) antimicrobial bone restorative biomaterial. A scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize and analyze the material. Antibacterial capabilities against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans were determined by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), and kinetic growth inhibition assays were performed under darkness and simulated solar irradiation. The mode of antibiotic action was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The MIC and MBC were 0.078–1.250 mg ml −1 and 0.156–2.500 mg ml −1 , respectively. The inhibitory function on the growth of the microorganisms was achieved even under darkness, with gram-positive bacteria found to be more sensitive than gram-negative, and enhanced antimicrobial activity was exhibited under simulated solar excitation compared to darkness. TEM and CLSM images revealed a certain level of bacterial cell membrane destruction after treatment with 1 mg ml −1 of the material for 12 h, causing the leakage of intracellular contents and bacteria death. These results suggest favorable antibiotic properties and a probable mechanism of the biomaterial for the first time, and further studies are needed to determine its potential application as a postoperative anti-inflammation method in bone transplantation. (paper)

  3. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  4. Revolutionizing orthopaedic biomaterials: The potential of biodegradable and bioresorbable magnesium-based materials for functional tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farraro, Kathryn F; Kim, Kwang E; Woo, Savio L-Y; Flowers, Jonquil R; McCullough, Matthew B

    2014-06-27

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in magnesium (Mg) and its alloys as biomaterials for orthopaedic applications, as they possess desirable mechanical properties, good biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Also shown to be osteoinductive, Mg-based materials could be particularly advantageous in functional tissue engineering to improve healing and serve as scaffolds for delivery of drugs, cells, and cytokines. In this paper, we will present two examples of Mg-based orthopaedic devices: an interference screw to accelerate ACL graft healing and a ring to aid in the healing of an injured ACL. In vitro tests using a robotic/UFS testing system showed that both devices could restore function of the goat stifle joint. Under a 67-N anterior tibial load, both the ACL graft fixed with the Mg-based interference screw and the Mg-based ring-repaired ACL could restore anterior tibial translation (ATT) to within 2mm and 5mm, respectively, of the intact joint at 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion. In-situ forces in the replacement graft and Mg-based ring-repaired ACL were also similar to those of the intact ACL. Further, early in vivo data using the Mg-based interference screw showed that after 12 weeks, it was non-toxic and the joint stability and graft function reached similar levels as published data. Following these positive results, we will move forward in incorporating bioactive molecules and ECM bioscaffolds to these Mg-based biomaterials to test their potential for functional tissue engineering of musculoskeletal and other tissues. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured CaSiO3 biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadale, Pramod N.; Kulal, Shivaji R.; Joshi, Meghanath G.; Jagtap, Pramod P.; Khetre, Sanjay M.; Bamane, Sambhaji R.

    2013-04-01

    Here we report a successful preparation of nanostructured calcium silicate by wet chemical approach. The synthesized sample was characterized by various physico-chemical methods. Thermal stability was investigated using thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). Structural characterization of the sample was carried out by the X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) which confirmed its single phase hexagonal structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study the nanostructure of the ceramics while homogeneous grain distribution was revealed by scanning electron microscopy studies (SEM). The elemental analysis data obtained from energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) were in close agreement with the starting composition used for the synthesis. Superhydrophilic nature of CaSiO3 was investigated at room temperature by sessile drop technique. Effect of porous nanosized CaSiO3 on early adhesion and proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and cord blood mesenchymal stem (CBMSCs) cells was measured in vitro. MTT cytotoxicity test and cell adhesion test showed that the material had good biocompatibility and promoted cell viability and cell proliferation. It has been stated that the cell viability and proliferation are significantly affected by time and concentration of CaSiO3. These findings indicate that the CaSiO3 ceramics has good biocompatibility and that it is promising as a biomaterial.

  6. Development of biomaterial self-assembling based platforms to obtain human cartilage tissue in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Recha Sancho, Lourdes Georgina

    2016-01-01

    El cartílag articular té una capacitat limitada de creixement i regeneració i, els tractaments per restaurar la funció del teixit, després d’una lesió, són limitats i poc entesos per la comunitat mèdica. Existeix, per tant, un gran interès en trobar una solució pràctica i agradable pel pacient que aconsegueixi la reparació del cartílag. La enginyeria de teixits va sorgir per restablir teixits danyats usant noves plataformes terapèutiques basades en cèl·lules i/o biomaterials. Aquestes noves t...

  7. The amelioration of cardiac dysfunction after myocardial infarction by the injection of keratin biomaterials derived from human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Deliang; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Li, Jingyi; Cheng, Ke; Zhang, Jinying

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac dysfunction following acute myocardial infarction is a major cause of advanced cardiomyopathy. Conventional pharmacological therapies rely on prompt reperfusion and prevention of repetitive maladaptive pathways. Keratin biomaterials can be manufactured in an autologous fashion and are effective in various models of tissue regeneration. However, its potential application in cardiac regeneration has not been tested. Keratin biomaterials were derived from human hair and its structure morphology, carryover of beneficial factors, biocompatibility with cardiomyocytes, and in vivo degradation profile were characterized. After delivery into infarcted rat hearts, the keratin scaffolds were efficiently infiltrated by cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Injection of keratin biomaterials promotes angiogenesis but does not exacerbate inflammation in the post-MI hearts. Compared to control-injected animals, keratin biomaterials-injected animals exhibited preservation of cardiac function and attenuation of adverse ventricular remodeling over the 8 week following time course. Tissue western blot analysis revealed up-regulation of beneficial factors (BMP4, NGF, TGF-beta) in the keratin-injected hearts. The salient functional benefits, the simplicity of manufacturing and the potentially autologous nature of this biomaterial provide impetus for further translation to the clinic. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Photographic-Based Optical Evaluation of Tissues and Biomaterials Used for Corneal Surface Repair: A New Easy-Applied Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gonzalez-Andrades

    Full Text Available Tissues and biomaterials used for corneal surface repair require fulfilling specific optical standards prior to implantation in the patient. However, there is not a feasible evaluation method to be applied in clinical or Good Manufacturing Practice settings. In this study, we describe and assess an innovative easy-applied photographic-based method (PBM for measuring functional optical blurring and transparency in corneal surface grafts.Plastic compressed collagen scaffolds (PCCS and multilayered amniotic membranes (AM samples were optically and histologically evaluated. Transparency and image blurring measures were obtained by PBM, analyzing photographic images of a standardized band pattern taken through the samples. These measures were compared and correlated to those obtained applying the Inverse Adding-Doubling (IAD technique, which is the gold standard method.All the samples used for optical evaluation by PBM or IAD were histological suitable. PCCS samples presented transmittance values higher than 60%, values that increased with increasing wavelength as determined by IAD. The PBM indicated that PCCS had a transparency ratio (TR value of 80.3 ± 2.8%, with a blurring index (BI of 50.6 ± 4.2%. TR and BI obtained from the PBM showed a high correlation (ρ>|0.6| with the diffuse transmittance and the diffuse reflectance, both determined using the IAD (p<0.005. The AM optical properties showed that there was a largely linear relationship between the blurring and the number of amnion layers, with more layers producing greater blurring.This innovative proposed method represents an easy-applied technique for evaluating transparency and blurriness of tissues and biomaterials used for corneal surface repair.

  9. Biomaterials in Artificial Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambic, Helen E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Biomaterials are substances or combinations of substances that can be used in a system that treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ, or body function. The nature and role of these substances, particularly in the cadiovascular system, are discussed. (JN)

  10. Olaratumab for advanced soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Alexander; O'brien, Michael P; Agulnik, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Olaratumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that blocks the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Its antagonistic behavior inhibits the receptor's tyrosine kinase activity, thereby, turning off the downstream signaling cascades responsible for soft tissue sarcoma tumorigenesis. In October 2016, olaratumab received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for its use in combination with doxorubicin for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma. Areas covered: This drug profile takes a comprehensive look at the clinical studies leading to FDA approval of olaratumab as well as its safety and efficacy as a front-line treatment option for sarcoma patients. The literature search was primarily conducted using PubMed. Expert commentary: The combination of olaratumab plus doxorubicin has provided a new front-line therapeutic option for soft tissue sarcoma patients. An open-label phase Ib and randomized phase II trial in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma demonstrated that the addition of olaratumab to doxorubicin prolonged progression-free survival by 2.5 months and overall survival by 11.8 months when compared to doxorubicin alone. Of importance, this clinically meaningful increase in overall survival did not come at the expense of a significantly greater number of toxicities. A phase III confirmatory trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02451943) will be completed in 2020.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of α-alumina col-gel nanometric: elaboration of biomaterials nanostructured for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passoni, L.S.; Feit, G.; Camargo, N.H.A.

    2010-01-01

    The production of nanostructured biomaterials are research themes for these present new characteristics of biocompatibility and bioactivity. The sol-gel process allows obtaining α-alumina nanometric with purity 99.99%. The use of nanoparticles of Al 2 O 3 -α, SiO 2 and TiO 2 are being employed as a second stage in the development of nanocomposites biomaterials. The presence of the second phase within a ceramic matrix leads to obtaining nanomaterials with micropores in micro and nanostructures interconnected, what contributes within the processes of osseous integration, osseous induction. The goal of this work focused on synthesis and characterization of an α- alumina by sol-gel process. Characterization studies were conducted using the various techniques: X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, exploratory differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectrometry by Fourier transforms. The preliminary results showed the attainment the nanometric α-alumina powder. (author)

  12. Modulation of the tissue reaction to biomaterials. II. The function of T cells in the inflammatory reaction to crosslinked collagen implanted in T-cell-deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Luyn, MJA; Khouw, IMSL; van Wachem, PB; Blaauw, EH; Werkmeister, JA

    1998-01-01

    Unwanted tissue reactions are often observed resulting in events such as early resorption of the biomaterial, loosening of the implant, or a chronic (immunologic) response. From immunologic studies it is known that inflammatory reactions can be modulated by use of (anti)-growth factors or

  13. Biomaterials and biotechnology: from the discovery of the first angiogenesis inhibitors to the development of controlled drug delivery systems and the foundation of tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Robert

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the discovery of the first inhibitors of angiogenesis; the discoveries that led to the development of the first biocompatible controlled release systems for macromolecules, and findings that helped to create the field of tissue engineering. In addition, new paradigms for creating biomaterials, early work on nanotechnology in medicine and intelligent drug delivery systems are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Characterization of biomaterial-free cell sheets cultured from human oral mucosal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Dong Won; Kim, Yun Hee; Koh, Ah Young; Lee, Hyun Ju; Wee, Won Ryang; Jeon, Saewha; Kim, Mee Kum

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the characteristics of biomaterial-free sheets cultured from human oral mucosal epithelial cells without fibrin support, in vitro and after transplantation to limbal-deficient models. Human oral mucosal epithelial cells and limbal epithelial cells were cultured for 2 weeks, and the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) rates were compared. Markers of stem cells (p63), cell proliferation (Ki-67) and epithelial differentiation (cytokeratin; K1, K3, K4, K13) were observed in colonies and in biomaterial-free sheets. Biomaterial-free sheets which had been detached with 1% dispase or biomaterial-free sheets generated by fibrin support were transplanted to 12 limbal-deficient rabbit models. In vitro cell viability, in vivo stability and cytokeratin characteristics of biomaterial-free sheets were compared with those of sheets formed by fibrin-coated culture 1 week after transplantation. Mean CFE rate was significantly higher in human oral mucosal epithelial cells (44.8%) than in human limbal epithelial cells(17.7%). K3 and K4 were well expressed in both colonies and sheets. Biomaterial-free sheets had two to six layers of stratified cells and showed an average of 79.8% viable cells in the sheets after detachment. Cytokeratin expressions of biomaterial-free sheets were comparable to those of sheets cultured by fibrin support, in limbal-deficient models. Both p63 and Ki-67 were well expressed in colonies, isolated sheets and sheets transplanted to limbal-deficient models. Our results suggest that biomaterial-free sheets cultured from human oral mucosal epithelial cells without fibrin support can be an alternative option for cell therapy in use for the treatment of limbal-deficient diseases. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Photoactivated Composite Biomaterial for Soft Tissue Restoration in Rodents and in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Hillel, Alexander T.; Unterman, Shimon; Nahas, Zayna; Reid, Branden; Coburn, Jeannine M.; Axelman, Joyce; Chae, Jemin J.; Guo, Qiongyu; Trow, Robert; Thomas, Andrew; Hou, Zhipeng; Lichtsteiner, Serge; Sutton, Damon; Matheson, Christine; Walker, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Soft tissue reconstruction often requires multiple surgical procedures that can result in scars and disfiguration. Facial soft tissue reconstruction represents a clinical challenge because even subtle deformities can severely affect an individual’s social and psychological function. We therefore developed a biosynthetic soft tissue replacement composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and hyaluronic acid (HA) that can be injected and photocrosslinked in situ with transdermal ligh...

  16. Recombinant human lactoferrin as a biomaterial for bone tissue engineering: mechanism of antiapoptotic and osteogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Ashley A; Nair, Lakshmi S

    2014-06-01

    Lactoferrin is a bioactive globular protein with unique properties towards musculo-skeletal cells and anabolic to bone in vivo. Even though the potent anti-apoptotic and osteogenic activity of lactoferrin has been reported, the mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. The study demonstrates that the anti-apoptotic effect of rhLF towards MC3T3 pre-osteoblast cells is mediated by Wnt5a/PKA pathway and the stabilization of β-catenin by rhLF is dependent on PKA/LRP6 signaling pathway. The study also investigates the feasibility of developing rhLF as a biomaterial for cell delivery. The injectable rhLF cell delivery vehicles are prepared by enzymatic crosslinking of tyramine-modified rhLF in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and horseradish peroxidase. The modified rhLF shows bioactivity similar to unmodified rhLF. The rhLF gels support encapsulated MC3T3 cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation, as well as phosphorylation of signaling proteins. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the involvement of Wnt5a, LRP6, and PKA signaling in rhLF-mediated bioactivity towards MC3T3 cells and the feasibility of developing an injectable cell delivery vehicle from rhLF. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. 3D Printing of Scaffold for Cells Delivery: Advances in Skin Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury or damage to tissue and organs is a major health problem, resulting in about half of the world’s annual healthcare expenditure every year. Advances in the fields of stem cells (SCs and biomaterials processing have provided a tremendous leap for researchers to manipulate the dynamics between these two, and obtain a skin substitute that can completely heal the wounded areas. Although wound healing needs a coordinated interplay between cells, extracellular proteins and growth factors, the most important players in this process are the endogenous SCs, which activate the repair cascade by recruiting cells from different sites. Extra cellular matrix (ECM proteins are activated by these SCs, which in turn aid in cellular migrations and finally secretion of growth factors that can seal and heal the wounds. The interaction between ECM proteins and SCs helps the skin to sustain the rigors of everyday activity, and in an attempt to attain this level of functionality in artificial three-dimensional (3D constructs, tissue engineered biomaterials are fabricated using more advanced techniques such as bioprinting and laser assisted printing of the organs. This review provides a concise summary of the most recent advances that have been made in the area of polymer bio-fabrication using 3D bio printing used for encapsulating stem cells for skin regeneration. The focus of this review is to describe, in detail, the role of 3D architecture and arrangement of cells within this system that can heal wounds and aid in skin regeneration.

  18. How Can Nanotechnology Help to Repair the Body? Advances in Cardiac, Skin, Bone, Cartilage and Nerve Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Marchal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologists have become involved in regenerative medicine via creation of biomaterials and nanostructures with potential clinical implications. Their aim is to develop systems that can mimic, reinforce or even create in vivo tissue repair strategies. In fact, in the last decade, important advances in the field of tissue engineering, cell therapy and cell delivery have already been achieved. In this review, we will delve into the latest research advances and discuss whether cell and/or tissue repair devices are a possibility. Focusing on the application of nanotechnology in tissue engineering research, this review highlights recent advances in the application of nano-engineered scaffolds designed to replace or restore the followed tissues: (i skin; (ii cartilage; (iii bone; (iv nerve; and (v cardiac.

  19. Characterization of Human Dental Pulp Tissue Under Oscillatory Shear and Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Burak; Bayrak, Ece; Erisken, Cevat

    2016-06-01

    Availability of material as well as biological properties of native tissues is critical for biomaterial design and synthesis for regenerative engineering. Until recently, selection of biomaterials and biomolecule carriers for dental pulp regeneration has been done randomly or based on experience mainly due to the absence of benchmark data for dental pulp tissue. This study, for the first time, characterizes the linear viscoelastic material functions and compressive properties of human dental pulp tissue harvested from wisdom teeth, under oscillatory shear and compression. The results revealed a gel-like behavior of the pulp tissue over the frequency range of 0.1-100 rps. Uniaxial compression tests generated peak normal stress and compressive modulus values of 39.1 ± 20.4 kPa and 5.5 ± 2.8 kPa, respectively. Taken collectively, the linear viscoelastic and uniaxial compressive properties of the human dental pulp tissue reported here should enable the better tailoring of biomaterials or biomolecule carriers to be employed in dental pulp regeneration.

  20. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of collagen peptide-based biomaterials for tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Gordillo, Victor

    The transition from in vitro to in vivo use of stem cells in regenerative medicine requires biomaterial scaffolds that can maintain stem cell viability and at the same time allow cell differentiation. We have previously reported the design of a collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) that assembles into a mesh-like three-dimensional (3D) structure upon the addition of metal ions and its potential for the culture of human cells. The addition of a chelating solution, such as EDTA, results in disassembly of the 3D structure, demonstrating the flexibility in the assembly/disassembly process. In the second chapter of this dissertation, we report the design of CMPs that can be functionalized with His-tagged cargoes within the 3D scaffold, via metal coordination. We show that the addition of GFP-His8 and human epidermal growth factor (hEGF-His6) has minimal effect in the assembly process. Additionally, we show that the bound hEGF-His6 can be released gradually in vitro for 5 days and induces cell proliferation in an EGF-dependent cell line. Furthermore, we functionalized the CMPs with the cell adhesion sequence (RGDS) to promote cell differentiation of two human non-tumorigenic cells lines, MCF10A and 3522-S1. In the third chapter, we evaluated the possibility of using the collagen mimetic-peptide-based (CMP) scaffolds for cell encapsulation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). We show that hMSC encapsulated within the CMP scaffold are viable for up to 24 days post encapsulation. Moreover, hMSC at days 1, 4 and 8 days after encapsulation can be recovered from the scaffold and retain their stemness properties when analyzed for in vitro differentiation. We also demonstrate by real time PCR (RT-PCR) that genes important for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation are over-expressed in the absence of stimulating factors when the cells are encapsulated in the 3D scaffold at 8 and 24 days post encapsulation. Lastly, the incorporation of the cell adhesion

  2. Advanced Diffusion-weighted Imaging Modeling for Prostate Cancer Characterization: Correlation with Quantitative Histopathologic Tumor Tissue Composition-A Hypothesis-generating Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hectors, Stefanie J; Semaan, Sahar; Song, Christopher; Lewis, Sara; Haines, George K; Tewari, Ashutosh; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Taouli, Bachir

    2018-03-01

    Purpose To correlate quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) parameters derived from conventional monoexponential DWI, stretched exponential DWI, diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) with quantitative histopathologic tumor tissue composition in prostate cancer in a preliminary hypothesis-generating study. Materials and Methods This retrospective institutional review board-approved study included 24 patients with prostate cancer (mean age, 63 years) who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, including high-b-value DWI and DTI at 3.0 T, before prostatectomy. The following parameters were calculated in index tumors and nontumoral peripheral zone (PZ): apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) obtained with monoexponential fit (ADC ME ), ADC obtained with stretched exponential modeling (ADC SE ), anomalous exponent (α) obtained at stretched exponential DWI, ADC obtained with DKI modeling (ADC DKI ), kurtosis with DKI, ADC obtained with DTI (ADC DTI ), and fractional anisotropy (FA) at DTI. Parameters in prostate cancer and PZ were compared by using paired Student t tests. Pearson correlations between tumor DWI and quantitative histologic parameters (nuclear, cytoplasmic, cellular, stromal, luminal fractions) were determined. Results All DWI parameters were significantly different between prostate cancer and PZ (P < .012). ADC ME , ADC SE , and ADC DKI all showed significant negative correlation with cytoplasmic and cellular fractions (r = -0.546 to -0.435; P < .034) and positive correlation with stromal fractions (r = 0.619-0.669; P < .001). ADC DTI and FA showed correlation only with stromal fraction (r = 0.512 and -0.413, respectively; P < .045). α did not correlate with histologic parameters, whereas kurtosis showed significant correlations with histopathologic parameters (r = 0.487, 0.485, -0.422 for cytoplasmic, cellular, and stromal fractions, respectively; P < .040). Conclusion Advanced DWI methods showed significant

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells: Identification, phenotypic characterization, biological properties and potential for regenerative medicine through biomaterial micro-engineering of their niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobolak, Julianna; Dinnyes, Andras; Memic, Adnan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-04-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells. Although they were originally identified in bone marrow and described as 'marrow stromal cells', they have since been identified in many other anatomical locations in the body. MSCs can be isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue, umbilical cord and other tissues but the richest tissue source of MSCs is fat. Since they are adherent to plastic, they may be expanded in vitro. MSCs have a distinct morphology and express a specific set of CD (cluster of differentiation) molecules. The phenotypic pattern for the identification of MSCs cells requires expression of CD73, CD90, and CD105 and lack of CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR antigens. Under appropriate micro-environmental conditions MSCs can proliferate and give rise to other cell types. Therefore, they are ideally suited for the treatment of systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. They have also been implicated as key players in regenerating injured tissue following injury and trauma. MSC populations isolated from adipose tissue may also contain regulatory T (Treg) cells, which have the capacity for modulating the immune system. The immunoregulatory and regenerative properties of MSCs make them ideal for use as therapeutic agents in vivo. In this paper we review the literature on the identification, phenotypic characterization and biological properties of MSCs and discuss their potential for applications in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We also discuss strategies for biomaterial micro-engineering of the stem cell niche. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Design and synthesis of polyphosphazenes: Hard tissue scaffolding biomaterials and physically crosslinked elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzelewski, Tomasz

    The work in this thesis is divided into two main parts. The first part examines the synthesis and characterization of polyphosphazenes as potential scaffolding materials usable for hard tissue repair. The goal of this work was to design polymers containing acidic functional groups in an attempt to encourage the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite when the polymer is exposed to simulated body fluids. The second part examines the development of a new polymeric architecture which generates elastomeric properties without the use of traditional covalent or physical crosslinks. The goal was to examine the effects of this new architecture on the physical and mechanical properties of the final polymers. Chapter 1 provides a general background for the two main focus areas mentioned above. More specifically: a brief explanation is provided of the necessary physical and chemical properties of a suitable hard tissue engineering scaffolding substrate, and the basis of those requirements; together with an examination of the traditional ways in which elastomeric properties are introduced into a polymeric sample. Chapter 2 details the design and synthesis of polyphosphazenes bearing phosphonic acid and phosphoester side groups using two different routes. The first route utilized a linker unit which was functionalized with phosphoesters prior to its attachment to the polyphosphazene backbone, while the second route involved attachment of the same linking group to the polyphosphazene backbone before the introduction of the phosphoester moieties. In both cases, the samples were treated with iodotrimethylsilane to cleave the ester bonds and afford the parent phosphonic acid. Both routes proved successful. However, varying difficulties were encountered for each route. In Chapter 3 we examine the ability of the phosphonic acid functionalized polyphosphazenes described in Chapter 2 to mineralize calcium hydroxyapatite when exposed to simulated body fluid, which has the same ion

  5. Determination of optical properties of tissue and other bio-materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Singh, A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available utilise some form of light, a laser, LED etc. Therefore knowledge about the interaction between the tissue and these light sources is important. Spiritually many cultures and religions refer to the curative effects of light and scientifically studies...

  6. Photoactivated Composite Biomaterial for Soft Tissue Restoration in Rodents and in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahas, Zayna; Reid, Branden; Coburn, Jeannine M.; Axelman, Joyce; Chae, Jemin J.; Guo, Qiongyu; Trow, Robert; Thomas, Andrew; Hou, Zhipeng; Lichtsteiner, Serge; Sutton, Damon; Matheson, Christine; Walker, Patricia; David, Nathaniel; Mori, Susumu; Taube, Janis M.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue reconstruction often requires multiple surgical procedures that can result in scars and disfiguration. Facial soft tissue reconstruction represents a clinical challenge because even subtle deformities can severely affect an individual’s social and psychological function. We therefore developed a biosynthetic soft tissue replacement composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and hyaluronic acid (HA) that can be injected and photocrosslinked in situ with transdermal light exposure. Modulating the ratio of synthetic to biological polymer allowed us to tune implant elasticity and volume persistence. In a small-animal model, implanted photocrosslinked PEG-HA showed a dose-dependent relationship between increasing PEG concentration and enhanced implant volume persistence. In direct comparison with commercial HA injections, the PEG-HA implants maintained significantly greater average volumes and heights. Reversibility of the implant volume was achieved with hyaluronidase injection. Pilot clinical testing in human patients confirmed the feasibility of the transdermal photocrosslinking approach for implantation in abdomen soft tissue, although an inflammatory response was observed surrounding some of the materials. PMID:21795587

  7. An in vitro evaluation of various biomaterials for the development of a tissue-engineered lacrimal gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, Shivaram

    The most common cause of ocular morbidity in developed countries is dry eye, many cases of which are due to lacrimal insufficiency. It has been established that lacrimal insufficiency results from processes caused by both immune-related and non-immune related events such as Sjogren's syndrome, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, chemical and thermal injuries and ocular cicatricial pemphigoid. Patients with these conditions would benefit from repair of their damaged lacrimal tissue by the creation of a replacement for the lacrimal gland. The new field of tissue engineering built on the interface between principles and methods of the life sciences with those of engineering to develop biocompatible materials has created the possibility for repairing or replacing damaged tissues. This thesis explores the use of tissue engineering principles for the development of a tissue-engineered lacrimal gland. This thesis also contributes to the development of a novel model for addressing lacrimal gland physiology and epithelial fluid transport. The first part of the research work focused on the evaluation of morphological and physiological properties of purified lacrimal gland acinar cells (pLGACs) cultured on various biopolymers: silicone, collagen I, poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA; 85:15 and 50:50), and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) in the presence and absence of an extracellular matrix, MatrigelRTM. Results indicated that PLLA demonstrated the best support expression of acinar cell-like morphology. The second part demonstrated the ex vivo reconstitution of an electrophysiologically functional lacrimal gland tissue on porous polyester membrane scaffolds. Results showed that pLGACs were capable of establishing continuous epithelial monolayers that generate active ionic fluxes consistent with current models for Na +-dependent Cl-- secretion. The third part outlined the fabrication of porous PLLA membranes, the optimal biomaterial for culturing lacrimal epithelial cells. Microporous PLLA

  8. Regeneration Approaches for Dental Pulp and Periapical Tissues with Growth Factors, Biomaterials, and Laser Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizu Hirata

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In current dental practice, restorative and endodontic procedures have been developed in an attempt to preserve the vitality of dental pulp after exposure to external stimuli such as caries infection. When damage to dental pulp is reversible, pulp wound healing can proceed, whereas irreversible damage induces pathological changes in dental pulp, eventually requiring its removal. Furthermore, dentists sometimes extract non-vital teeth because of severe caries progression, critical size of periapical lesion, and tooth fracture. To overcome the limitations of presently available therapies, it is important to develop regeneration therapy for dental pulp and periapical tissues. In this review, we focus on the regeneration of dental pulp and periapical tissues by application of exogenous growth factors and scaffolds, as well as low-intensity laser irradiation as an auxiliary therapy for regeneration therapy.

  9. Wear Characteristics of Metallic Biomaterials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Hussein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metals are extensively used in a variety of applications in the medical field for internal support and biological tissue replacements, such as joint replacements, dental roots, orthopedic fixation, and stents. The metals and alloys that are primarily used in biomedical applications are stainless steels, Co alloys, and Ti alloys. The service period of a metallic biomaterial is determined by its abrasion and wear resistance. A reduction in the wear resistance of the implant results in the release of incompatible metal ions into the body that loosen the implant. In addition, several reactions may occur because of the deposition of wear debris in tissue. Therefore, developing biomaterials with high wear resistance is critical to ensuring a long life for the biomaterial. The aim of this work is to review the current state of knowledge of the wear of metallic biomaterials and how wear is affected by the material properties and conditions in terms of the type of alloys developed and fabrication processes. We also present a brief evaluation of various experimental test techniques and wear characterization techniques that are used to determine the tribological performance of metallic biomaterials.

  10. Biomaterials in Relation to Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sanjukta; Chana, Simran

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries remains a challenge in the improvement of oral health. It is the most common and widespread biofilm-dependent oral disease, resulting in the destruction of tooth structure by the acidic attack from cariogenic bacteria. The tooth is a heavily mineralised tissue, and both enamel and dentine can undergo demineralisation due to trauma or dietary conditions. The adult population worldwide affected by dental caries is enormous and despite significant advances in caries prevention and tooth restoration, treatments continue to pose a substantial burden to healthcare. Biomaterials play a vital role in the restoration of the diseased or damaged tooth structure and, despite providing reasonable outcomes, there are some concerns with clinical performance. Amalgam, the silver grey biomaterial that has been widely used as a restorative material in dentistry, is currently in throes of being phased out, especially with the Minimata convention and treaty being signed by a number of countries (January 2013; http://mercuryconvention.org/Convention/) that aims to control the anthropogenic release of mercury in the environment, which naturally impacts the use of amalgam, where mercury is a component. Thus, the development of alternative restoratives and restoration methods that are inexpensive, can be used under different climatic conditions, withstand storage and allow easy handling, the main prerequisites of dental biomaterials, is important. The potential for using biologically engineered tissue and consequent research to replace damaged tissues has also seen a quantum leap in the last decade. Ongoing research in regenerative treatments in dentistry includes alveolar ridge augmentation, bone tissue engineering and periodontal ligament replacement, and a future aim is bioengineering of the whole tooth. Research towards developing bioengineered teeth is well underway and identification of adult stem cell sources to make this a viable treatment is advancing; however, this

  11. A new approach to the rationale discovery of polymeric biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Joachim; Welsh, William J.; Knight, Doyle

    2007-01-01

    This paper attempts to illustrate both the need for new approaches to biomaterials discovery as well as the significant promise inherent in the use of combinatorial and computational design strategies. The key observation of this Leading Opinion Paper is that the biomaterials community has been slow to embrace advanced biomaterials discovery tools such as combinatorial methods, high throughput experimentation, and computational modeling in spite of the significant promise shown by these discovery tools in materials science, medicinal chemistry and the pharmaceutical industry. It seems that the complexity of living cells and their interactions with biomaterials has been a conceptual as well as a practical barrier to the use of advanced discovery tools in biomaterials science. However, with the continued increase in computer power, the goal of predicting the biological response of cells in contact with biomaterials surfaces is within reach. Once combinatorial synthesis, high throughput experimentation, and computational modeling are integrated into the biomaterials discovery process, a significant acceleration is possible in the pace of development of improved medical implants, tissue regeneration scaffolds, and gene/drug delivery systems. PMID:17644176

  12. Stepping into the omics era: Opportunities and challenges for biomaterials science and engineering☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitz, Herschel; Welsh, William J.; Kohn, Joachim; de Boer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The research paradigm in biomaterials science and engineering is evolving from using low-throughput and iterative experimental designs towards high-throughput experimental designs for materials optimization and the evaluation of materials properties. Computational science plays an important role in this transition. With the emergence of the omics approach in the biomaterials field, referred to as materiomics, high-throughput approaches hold the promise of tackling the complexity of materials and understanding correlations between material properties and their effects on complex biological systems. The intrinsic complexity of biological systems is an important factor that is often oversimplified when characterizing biological responses to materials and establishing property-activity relationships. Indeed, in vitro tests designed to predict in vivo performance of a given biomaterial are largely lacking as we are not able to capture the biological complexity of whole tissues in an in vitro model. In this opinion paper, we explain how we reached our opinion that converging genomics and materiomics into a new field would enable a significant acceleration of the development of new and improved medical devices. The use of computational modeling to correlate high-throughput gene expression profiling with high throughput combinatorial material design strategies would add power to the analysis of biological effects induced by material properties. We believe that this extra layer of complexity on top of high-throughput material experimentation is necessary to tackle the biological complexity and further advance the biomaterials field. PMID:26876875

  13. Maltose conjugation to PCL: Advanced structural characterization and preliminary biological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Valeria; Guizzardi, Roberto; Russo, Laura; Pastori, Valentina; Lecchi, Marzia; Franchi, Stefano; Iucci, Giovanna; Battocchio, Chiara; Cipolla, Laura

    2018-05-01

    The emerging trends in regenerative medicine rely among others on biomaterial-based therapies, with the use of biomaterials as a central delivery system for biochemical and physical cues to manipulate transplanted or ingrowth cells and to orchestrate tissue regeneration. Cell adhesion properties of a biomaterial strongly depend on its surface characteristics. Among others poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) is a biocompatible and biodegradable material with low cytotoxicity that is widely adopted as synthetic polymer in several applications. However, it is hydrophobic, which limits its use in tissue engineering. In order to improve its hydrophilicity and cellular compatibility, PCL surface was grafted with maltose through a two-step procedure in which controlled aminolysis of PCL ester bonds by hexanediamine was followed by reductive amination with the carbohydrate reducing end. The modified PCL surface was then characterized in detail by x-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Near Edge x-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopies. In addition, the biocompatibility of the proposed biomaterial was investigated in preliminary biological assays.

  14. Teriparatide Therapy as an Adjuvant for Tissue Engineering and Integration of Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinder S. Dhillon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Critically sized large bone defects commonly result from trauma, radical tumor resections or infections. Currently, massive allografting remain as the clinical standard to treat these critical defects. Unfortunately, allograft healing is limited by the lack of osteogenesis and bio-integration of the graft to the host bone. Based on its widely studied anabolic effects on the bone, we have proposed that teriparatide [recombinant parathyroid hormone (PTH1–34] could be an effective adjuvant for massive allograft healing. In support of this theory, here we review studies that have demonstrated that intermittent PTH1–34 treatment enhances and accelerates the skeletal repair process via a number of mechanisms including: effects on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, bone formation and remodeling. We also review the current literature on the effects of PTH1–34 therapy on bone healing, and discuss this drug’s long term potential as an adjuvant for endogenous tissue engineering.

  15. In situ foamable, degradable polyurethane as biomaterial for soft tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Thorsten; Weisser, Jürgen; Berger, Stefan; Börner, Stefan; Bischoff, Sabine; Schubert, Harald; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Bräuer, Rolf; Schnabelrauch, Matthias

    2017-09-01

    Degradable foams which can be inserted endoscopically as liquid or pasty mixtures into soft tissue defects possess a promising potential for the surgical treatment of such defects. The defects can be sealed under in situ foaming and simultaneous material expansion. We developed an in situ foamable (l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone)-based, star-shaped prepolymer by ring opening polymerization of l-lactide and ε-caprolactone in the presence of meso-erythritol as starter. By conversion of the terminal hydroxyl groups of the formed oligoester with lysine diisocyanate ethyl ester (LDI) an isocyanate-endcapped, reactive prepolymer has been received. Foaming can be initiated by addition of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane (DABCO), water, LDI and DMSO. By varying the composition of these additives, the foaming and curing time could be varied within a clinically acceptable range. A porosity of approximately 90%, and an average tensile strength of 0.3MPa with elongations of 90% were determined for the foams. In vitro cytotoxicity on cured foams was assayed on 3T3 fibroblasts and demonstrated an excellent cytocompatibility. This was also confirmed in an in vivo study using an established rat model, where prefabricated foams and in situ hardening material were inserted into subdermal skin incisions in parallel. The feature of chronic inflammation was only weakly developed in both groups and slightly more pronounced and persisted for longer time in the group of in situ foamed material. In both groups the foreign materials were vascularized, degraded and substituted by connective tissue. The results encourage to proceed with trials where the materials are used to fill more heavily loaded defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 3D Biomaterial Microarrays for Regenerative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) biomaterial microarrays hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine because of their ability to accelerate the design and fabrication of biomimetic materials. Such tissue-like biomaterials can provide an appropriate microenvironment for stimulating and controlling stem...

  17. The role of biocompatible coatings of biomaterials for creation of direct and appropriate chemical bounding between bioimplant and bone tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Shirzadian, Touraj; Bagheri, Seyedreza; SaeidiBorojeni, Hamidreza; Ghaffari, Parviz; Foroughi, Fezollah; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Nowadays, the surface modification of biomaterials to increase biocompatibility and improve other aspects of environmental performance is widely prevalent and is developing. Biological host response depends on the primary interactions of biological and biomaterials systems at the molecular surfaces. Therefore, the surface properties at the atomic scale influence on compatibility and optimal performance of the material in body. The present study aims to survey the most co...

  18. Elastomeric degradable biomaterials by photopolymerization-based CAD-CAM for vascular tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudis, Stefan; Nehl, Franziska; Ligon, S Clark; Liska, Robert [Institute of Applied Synthetic Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/163MC, A-1060 Vienna (Austria); Nigisch, Anneliese; Bernhard, David [Department of Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bergmeister, Helga [Core Unit for Biomedical Research, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Stampfl, Juergen, E-mail: robert.liska@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Material Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Favoritenstrasse 9-11, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    A predominant portion of mortalities in industrial countries can be attributed to diseases of the cardiovascular system. In the last decades great efforts have been undertaken to develop materials for artificial vascular constructs. However, bio-inert materials like ePTFE or PET fail as material for narrow blood vessel replacements (coronary bypasses). Therefore, we aim to design new biocompatible materials to overcome this. In this paper we investigate the use of photoelastomers for artificial vascular constructs since they may be precisely structured by means of additive manufacturing technologies. Hence, 3D computer aided design and manufacturing technologies (CAD-CAM) offer the possibility of creating cellular structures within the grafts that might favour ingrowth of tissue. Different monomer formulations were screened concerning their suitability for this application but all had drawbacks, especially concerning the suture tear resistance. Therefore, we chose to modify the original network architecture by including dithiol chain transfer agents which effectively co-react with the acrylates and reduce crosslink density. A commercial urethane diacrylate was chosen as base monomer. In combination with reactive diluents and dithiols, the properties of the photopolymers could be tailored and degradability could be introduced. The optimized photoelastomers were in good mechanical accordance with native blood vessels, showed good biocompatibility in in vitro tests, degraded similar to poly(lactic acid) and were successfully manufactured with the 3D CAD-CAM technology.

  19. Fabrication of duck's feet collagen-silk hybrid biomaterial for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Hyeon; Park, Hae Sang; Lee, Ok Joo; Chao, Janet Ren; Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Jung Min; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Ye Ri; Song, Jeong Eun; Khang, Gilson; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-04-01

    Collagen constituting the extracellular matrix has been widely used as biocompatible material for human use. In this study, we have selected duck's feet for extracting collagen. A simple method not utilizing harsh chemical had been employed to extract collagen from duck's feet. We fabricated duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold for the purpose of modifying the degradation rate of duck's feet collagen. This study suggests that extracted collagen from duck's feet is biocompatible and resembles collagen extracted from porcine which is commercially used. Duck's feet collagen is also economically feasible and it could therefore be a good candidate as a tissue engineering material. Further, addition of silk to fabricate a duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold could enhance the biostability of duck's feet collagen scaffold. Duck's feet collagen/silk scaffold increased the cell viability compared to silk alone. Animal studies also showed that duck's feet collagen/silk scaffold was more biocompatible than silk alone and more biostable than duck's feet or porcine collagen alone. Additionally, the results revealed that duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold had high porosity, cell infiltration and proliferation. We suggest that duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold could be used as a dermal substitution for full thickness skin defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biomaterials a basic introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qizhi

    2014-01-01

    Part IBiomaterials ScienceBiomaterials Science and EngineeringLearning ObjectivesMaterials Science and EngineeringMultilevels of Structure and Categorization of MaterialsFour Categories of MaterialsDefinitions of Biomaterials, Biomedical Materials, and Biological MaterialsBiocompatibilityChapter HighlightsActivitiesSimple Questions in ClassProblems and ExercisesBibliographyToxicity and CorrosionLearning ObjectivesElements in the BodyBiological Roles and Toxicities of Trace ElementsSelection of Metallic Elements in Medical-Grade AlloysCorrosion of MetalsEnvironment inside the BodyMinimization of Toxicity of Metal ImplantsChapter HighlightsLaboratory Practice 1Simple Questions in ClassProblems and ExercisesAdvanced Topic: Biological Roles of Alloying ElementsBibliographyMechanical Properties of BiomaterialsLearning ObjectivesRole of Implant BiomaterialsMechanical Properties of General ImportanceHardnessElasticity: Resilience and StrechabilityMechanical Properties Terms Used in the Medical CommunityFailureEssent...

  1. Biomaterials/scaffolds. Design of bioactive, multiphasic PCL/collagen type I and type II-PCL-TCP/collagen composite scaffolds for functional tissue engineering of osteochondral repair tissue by using electrospinning and FDM techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Detlef; Ekaputra, Andrew K; Lam, Christopher X F; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2007-01-01

    Current clinical therapies for traumatic or chronic injuries involving osteochondral tissue result in temporary pain reduction and filling of the defect but with biomechanically inferior repair tissue. Tissue engineering of osteochondral repair tissue using autologous cells and bioactive biomaterials has the potential to overcome the current limitations and results in native-like repair tissue with good integration capabilities. For this reason, we applied two modem biomaterial design techniques, namely, electrospinning and fused deposition modeling (FDM), to produce bioactive poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/collagen (PCL/Col) type I and type II-PCL-tri-calcium phosphate (TCP)/Col composites for precursor cell-based osteochondral repair. The application of these two design techniques (electrospinning and FDM) allowed us to specifically produce the a suitable three-dimensional (3D) environment for the cells to grow into a particular tissue (cartilage and bone) in vitro prior to in vivo implantation. We hypothesize that our new designed biomaterials, seeded with autologous bone marrow-derived precursor cells, in combination with bioreactor-stimulated cell-culture techniques can be used to produce clinically relevant osteochondral repair tissue.

  2. Advancing Tissue Engineering: A Tale of Nano-, Micro-, and Macroscale Integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Zhang, Y.S.; Nasajpour, A.; Dokmeci, M.R.; Khademhosseini, A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering has the potential to revolutionize the health care industry. Delivering on this promise requires the generation of efficient, controllable and predictable implants. The integration of nano- and microtechnologies into macroscale regenerative biomaterials plays an essential role in

  3. Advances in pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells: from biomaterials to organ regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Kathy O

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), by virtue of their capability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of cell types, represent the first type of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to be used in clinical transplantation during recent phase-I trials; however, it is still unclear whether hESC-derived tissues can self-organize and form part of the vascularized, functional organ following transplantation. Recently, endothelial cells (ECs) or angiogenic factors such as VEGFA have been demonstrated to support development and regeneration of multiple organ systems, including the heart, pancreas, liver, lung and bone marrow. Therefore, co-transplantation of ECs derived from the same parental PSCs that differentiate into cell types of interest; or overexpression of the inductive angiogenic factors responsible for organ regeneration might be beneficial to support function of hPSC-derived tissues. In this special issue, we discuss how protein kinases (Ng and colleagues); DNA methylation and histone modification (Tsui and colleagues) regulate cellular pluripotency and cell-fate specification of PSCs. In addition, we discuss how ECs and angiogenic factors could contribute to repair and regeneration of organs such as the heart (Yuan and colleagues), the cardiovascular system (Tse and colleagues) and the pancreas (Lui). We also discuss the role of mesenchymal stem cells or paracrine factors secreted by them in tissue repair (Li and colleagues). Lastly, we discuss how to generate self-organized and vascularized tissues derived from PSCs in a 2- or 3-dimensional format by fusing tissue bioengineering approaches with stem cell technology (Chen).

  4. γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles filled polyvinyl alcohol as potential biomaterial for tissue engineering scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngadiman, Nor Hasrul Akhmal; Idris, Ani; Irfan, Muhammad; Kurniawan, Denni; Yusof, Noordin Mohd; Nasiri, Rozita

    2015-09-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticle with its unique magnetic properties is recently known to enhance the cell growth rate. In this study, γ-Fe2O3 is mixed into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix and then electrospun to form nanofibers. Design of experiments was used to determine the optimum parameter settings for the electrospinning process so as to produce elctrospun mats with the preferred characteristics such as good morphology, Young's modulus and porosity. The input factors of the electrospinnning process were nanoparticles content (1-5%), voltage (25-35 kV), and flow rate (1-3 ml/h) while the responses considered were Young's modulus and porosity. Empirical models for both responses as a function of the input factors were developed and the optimum input factors setting were determined, and found to be at 5% nanoparticle content, 35 kV voltage, and 1 ml/h volume flow rate. The characteristics and performance of the optimum PVA/γ-Fe2O3 nanofiber mats were compared with those of neat PVA nanofiber mats in terms of morphology, thermal properties, and hydrophilicity. The PVA/γ-Fe2O3 nanofiber mats exhibited higher fiber diameter and surface roughness yet similar thermal properties and hydrophilicity compared to neat PVA PVA/γ-Fe2O3 nanofiber mats. Biocompatibility test by exposing the nanofiber mats with human blood cells was performed. In terms of clotting time, the PVA/γ-Fe2O3 nanofibers exhibited similar behavior with neat PVA. The PVA/γ-Fe2O3 nanofibers also showed higher cells proliferation rate when MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay was done using human skin fibroblast cells. Thus, the PVA/γ-Fe2O3 electrospun nanofibers can be a promising biomaterial for tissue engineering scaffolds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel biomaterial for transdermal application: in vitro and in vivo characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundada, A S; Avari, J G

    2011-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate a novel film forming biomaterial for its potential application in the preparation of unilaminate transdermal adhesive matrix systems. The biomaterial, Damar Batu (DB), was tried alone and in combination with Eudragit RL100 as a matrixing agent in the preparation of transdermal patches. Developed transdermal patches of Diltiazem hydrochloride (DH) were evaluated for thickness uniformity, weight uniformity, folding endurance and drug content. USP dissolution apparatus V was used for in vitro drug release studies. Modified Franz diffusion cell used for permeation study using excised human cadaver skin. Total 6 formulations were developed and on the basis of in vitro drug release and in vitro skin permeation profile F5 composed of DB: Eudragit RL100 (60:40) and carrying 20 %w/w DH was selected as an optimized formulation for in vivo study. The in vivo study results showed that F5 achieved the Cmax of about 269.76 ± 1.52 ng/mL in 6 h and sustained the release of the drug till 24 h. The skin irritation study results proved that the novel biomaterial is non-sensitizing and non-irritating. Drug-polymer interaction study carried out to check the compatibility of drug and polymer showed the intactness of the drug in the formulation proving the compatibility of the polymer. It can be proposed from the outcome of the present study that by applying suitable adhesive layer and backing membrane, DB: Eudragit RL100 (60:40) transdermal patches can be of potential therapeutic use.

  6. The structural characterization of some biomaterials, type AISI 310, used in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minciuna, M. G.; Vizureanu, P.; Hanganu, C.; Achitei, D. C.; Popescu, D. C.; Focsaneanu, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    Orthopedics biomaterials are intended for implantation in the human body and substituted or help to repair of bones, cartilage or organ transplant, and tendons. At the end of the 20th century, the availability of materials for the manufacture implants used in medicine has been the same as for other industrial applications. The most used metals for manufacturing the orthopedics implants are: stainless steels, cobalt-chrome-molybdenum alloys, titanium and his alloys. The structural researches which are made in this paper, offer a complete analysis of AISI310 stainless steels, using: optical spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electronic microscopy.

  7. Evaluation of silk biomaterials in combination with extracellular matrix coatings for bladder tissue engineering with primary and pluripotent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Debra; Gil, Eun Seok; Adam, Rosalyn M; Kaplan, David L; Chung, Yeun Goo; Estrada, Carlos R; Mauney, Joshua R

    2013-01-01

    Silk-based biomaterials in combination with extracellular matrix (ECM) coatings were assessed as templates for cell-seeded bladder tissue engineering approaches. Two structurally diverse groups of silk scaffolds were produced by a gel spinning process and consisted of either smooth, compact multi-laminates (Group 1) or rough, porous lamellar-like sheets (Group 2). Scaffolds alone or coated with collagen types I or IV or fibronectin were assessed independently for their ability to support attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of primary cell lines including human bladder smooth muscle cells (SMC) and urothelial cells as well as pluripotent cell populations, such as murine embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. AlamarBlue evaluations revealed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds promoted the highest degree of primary SMC and urothelial cell attachment in comparison to uncoated Group 2 controls and all Group 1 scaffold variants. Real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses demonstrated that both fibronectin-coated silk groups were permissive for SMC contractile differentiation as determined by significant upregulation of α-actin and SM22α mRNA and protein expression levels following TGFβ1 stimulation. Prominent expression of epithelial differentiation markers, cytokeratins, was observed in urothelial cells cultured on both control and fibronectin-coated groups following IHC analysis. Evaluation of silk matrices for ESC and iPS cell attachment by alamarBlue showed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds promoted the highest levels in comparison to all other scaffold formulations. In addition, real time RT-PCR and IHC analyses showed that fibronectin-coated Group 2 scaffolds facilitated ESC and iPS cell differentiation toward both urothelial and smooth muscle lineages in response to all trans retinoic acid as assessed by induction of uroplakin and contractile gene and protein expression. These results

  8. 3D printing of hybrid biomaterials for bone tissue engineering: Calcium-polyphosphate microparticles encapsulated by polycaprolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong; Wang, Shunfeng; Steffen, Renate; Ackermann, Maximilian; Haep, Natalie D; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2017-12-01

    Here we describe the formulation of a morphogenetically active bio-ink consisting of amorphous microparticles (MP) prepared from Ca 2+ and the physiological inorganic polymer, polyphosphate (polyP). Those MP had been fortified by mixing with poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) to allow 3D-bioprinting. The resulting granular PCL/Ca-polyP-MP hybrid material, liquefied by short-time heating to 100 °C, was used for the 3D-printing of tissue-like scaffolds formed by strands with a thickness of 400 µm and a stacked architecture leaving ≈0.5 mm 2 -sized open holes enabling cell migration. The printed composite scaffold turned out to combine suitable biomechanical properties (Young's modulus of 1.60 ± 0.1 GPa; Martens hardness of 153 ± 28 MPa), matching those of cortical and trabecular bone, with morphogenetic activity. This scaffold was capable of attracting and promoting the growth of human bone-related SaOS-2 cells as demonstrated by staining for cell viability (Calcein AM), cell density (DRAQ5) and SEM studies. Furthermore, the hybrid material was demonstrated to upregulate the steady-state-expression of the cell migration-inducing chemokine SDF-1α. EDX analysis and FTIR measurements revealed the presence of hydroxyapatite in the mineral deposits formed on the scaffold surface. Based on the results we conclude that granular PCL/Ca-polyP-MP hybrid material is suitable for the fabrication of bioprintable scaffold which comprises not only biomechanical stability but also morphogenetic potential. In present-day regenerative engineering efforts, biomaterial- and cell-based strategies are proposed that meet the required functional and spatial characteristics and variations, especially in the transition regions between soft (cartilage, tendon or ligament) and hard (bone) tissues. In a biomimetic approach we succeeded to fabricate amorphous Ca-polyP nanoparticles/microparticles which are highly biocompatible. Together with polycaprolactone (PCL), polyP can be

  9. Biomaterials: An Introduction for Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Renee B.

    1996-01-01

    Contains an overview of biomaterials, an interdisciplinary field in which research combines medicine, biological sciences, physical sciences, and engineering. Biomaterials are substances which improve quality of life by augmenting or replacing bodily tissues or functions. Highlights problems associated with collection development and literature…

  10. Control of Surface Modified Layer on Metallic Biomaterials by AN Advanced Elid Grinding System Eg-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Masayoshi; Komotori, Jun; Katahira, Kazutoshi; Ohmori, Hitoshi

    The biocompatibility of titanium implants with different surface properties is investigated. We prepared three types of specimens, one ground by the newly developed ELID grinding system, another ground by conventional ELID grinding, and the other polished by SiO2 powder. These surfaces were characterized and, the number of cell and cytotoxicity in in-vitro were measured. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) revealed that the modified ELID system can create a significantly thick oxide layer and a diffused oxide layer, and also can control the thickness of a modified layer. The results of cell number and cytotoxicity showed that the sample ground by the modified system had the highest biocompatibility. This may have been caused by improvement of chemical properties due to a surface modified layer. The above results suggest that this newly developed ELID grinding system can create the desirable surface properties. Consequently, this system appears to offer significant future promise for use in biomaterials and other engineering components.

  11. Obtaining and characterization of chitosan biocomposites / HAP for application as biomaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, R.C.A.; Nascimento, I.V.S.R.; Fook, M.V.L.; Furtado, G.T.F.S.

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxyapatite is one of the most biocompatible materials known by encouraging bone growth. However, the main drawback it is the poor mechanical strength. A method to overcome this problem is the addition of the biopolymer chitosan, suitable for applications as biomaterials. In this study was obtained a hydroxyapatite - chitosan biocomposites for application as a biomaterial. In the FTIR analysis it was identified characteristic bands of hydroxyapatite and a possible overlap of the amino group of chitosan by carbonate. XRD analysis showed that there was no change in the profile of HA after chitosan incorporation. In SEM analysis of the biocomposites HA / chitosan, it is observed that there wasn't a complete dispersion of HA particles in the chitosan. In the image of calcined biocomposite, it was found that after heat treatment at 900 ° C chitosan was eliminated, resulting in a porous material. The analysis has shown that the presence of chitosan did not cause significant changes in the phase of hydroxyapatite. (author)

  12. Processing and characterization of silk sericin from Bombyx mori and its application in biomaterials and biomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2016-04-01

    Bombyx mori silk is composed of 60-80% fibroin, 15-35% sericin and 1-5% non-sericin component including wax, pigments, sugars and other impurities. For two decades, the protein-based silk fibroin was extensively used in the research and development of medical biomaterials and biomedicines. Sericin is frequently ignored and abandoned as a byproduct or waste in the processing of traditional silk fabrics, silk floss or modern silk biomaterials. However, similar to fibroin, sericin is not only a highly useful biological material, but also a lot of biological activity. Moreover, the non-sericin component present with sericin in the cocoon shell also has a strong biological activity. In this review, the extraction and recovery methods of sericin and the non-sericin component from the cocoon layer are reported, and their composition, properties and biological activity are described to produce a comprehensive report on biomedical materials and biological drugs. In addition, related problems or concerns present in the research and development of sericin are discussed, and a potential application of sericin in sustainable development is also presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in regenerative therapies for spinal cord injury: a biomaterials approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalini Tsintou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury results in the permanent loss of function, causing enormous personal, social and economic problems. Even though neural regeneration has been proven to be a natural mechanism, central nervous system repair mechanisms are ineffective due to the imbalance of the inhibitory and excitatory factors implicated in neuroregeneration. Therefore, there is growing research interest on discovering a novel therapeutic strategy for effective spinal cord injury repair. To this direction, cell-based delivery strategies, biomolecule delivery strategies as well as scaffold-based therapeutic strategies have been developed with a tendency to seek for the answer to a combinatorial approach of all the above. Here we review the recent advances on regenerative/neural engineering therapies for spinal cord injury, aiming at providing an insight to the most promising repair strategies, in order to facilitate future research conduction.

  14. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N. D.; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement.

  15. Brillouin microspectroscopy of nanostructured biomaterials: photonics assisted tailoring mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Chitrakar, Chandani; Thakur, Teena; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Developing new biomaterials is essential for the next-generation of materials for bioenergy, bioelectronics, basic biology, medical diagnostics, cancer research, and regenerative medicine. Specifically, recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. The physical properties of nanocomposite biomaterials, including elasticity and viscosity, play key roles in controlling cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. Conventional mechanical tests, including uniaxial compression and tension, dynamic mechanical analysis and shear rheology, require mechanical forces to be directly exerted onto the sample and therefore may not be suitable for in situ measurements or continuous monitoring of mechanical stiffness. In this study, we employ spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy as a viscoelasticity-specific probing technique. We utilized a Brillouin spectrometer to characterize biomaterial's microscopic elasticity and correlated those with conventional mechanical tests (e.g., rheology).

  16. New operational techniques of implantation of biomaterials and titanium implants in the jaw with the atrophy of the bone and soft tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikityuk, D. B.; Urakov, A. L.; Reshetnikov, A. P.; Kopylov, M. V.; Baimurzin, D. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The research into dynamics of quality of clinical use in 2003 - 2012 of autologous and xenogeneic biomaterials at dental transplantation and implantation among 1,100 of adult patients was made. The analysis results show that at autologous bone transplantation implant survival is observed only in 72% of cases, and the "necessary" result of bone repair occurred only in 6 - 9 months. Transplantation of biomaterials of OsteoBiol® (materials "mp3", "Genos" and "Evolution") provided engraftment and bone regeneration in 100 % of cases and allowed the use of dental implantation immediately after transplantation even in case of reduction in the patient's alveolar crest down to 2.0 mm. Replace Select implants of Nobel Biocare® were used at plantation. In order to exclude Schneiderian membrane's perforation lighting of Highmore's sinus with the cold blue-violet light from inside at sinus elevation is recommended as well as deepening of dental instruments into the bone only until the blue-violet light appears under them. To exclude deficiency of soft tissue under the cervical part of the ceramic crown application of special anti-fissure technology involving biomaterial flap dissection and its laying around the implant is suggested.

  17. Design of a hybrid biomaterial for tissue engineering: Biopolymer-scaffold integrated with an autologous hydrogel carrying mesenchymal stem-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein-Oppenheimer, Caroline R; Brown, Donald I; Coloma, Rodrigo; Morales, Patricio; Reyna-Jeldes, Mauricio; Díaz, María J; Sánchez, Elizabeth; Acevedo, Cristian A

    2017-10-01

    Biologically active biomaterials as biopolymers and hydrogels have been used in medical applications providing favorable results in tissue engineering. In this research, a wound dressing device was designed by integration of an autologous clot hydrogel carrying mesenchymal stem-cells onto a biopolymeric scaffold. This hybrid biomaterial was tested in-vitro and in-vivo, and used in a human clinical case. The biopolymeric scaffold was made with gelatin, chitosan and hyaluronic acid, using a freeze-drying method. The scaffold was a porous material which was designed evaluating both physical properties (glass transition, melting temperature and pore size) and biological properties (cell viability and fibronectin expression). Two types of chitosan (120 and 300kDa) were used to manufacture the scaffold, being the high molecular weight the most biologically active and stable after sterilization with gamma irradiation (25kGy). A clot hydrogel was formulated with autologous plasma and calcium chloride, using an approach based on design of experiments. The optimum hydrogel was used to incorporate cells onto the porous scaffold, forming a wound dressing biomaterial. The wound dressing device was firstly tested in-vitro using human cells, and then, its biosecurity was evaluated in-vivo using a rabbit model. The in-vitro results showed high cell viability after one week (99.5%), high mitotic index (19.8%) and high fibronectin expression. The in-vivo application to rabbits showed adequate biodegradability capacity (between 1 and 2weeks), and the histological evaluation confirmed absence of rejection signs and reepithelization on the wound zone. Finally, the wound dressing biomaterial was used in a single human case to implant autologous cells on a skin surgery. The medical examination indicated high biocompatibility, partial biodegradation at one week, early regeneration capacity at 4weeks and absence of rejection signs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue engineering: technological advances to improve its applications in reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, C

    2012-01-01

    Tremendous advances in biomaterials science and nanotechnologies, together with thorough research on stem cells, have recently promoted an intriguing development of regenerative medicine/tissue engineering. The nanotechnology represents a wide interdisciplinary field that implies the manipulation of different materials at nanometer level to achieve the creation of constructs that mimic the nanoscale-based architecture of native tissues. The purpose of this article is to highlight the significant new knowledges regarding this matter. To widen the range of scaffold materials resort has been carried out to either recombinant DNA technology-generated materials, such as a collagen-like protein, or the incorporation of bioactive molecules, such as RDG (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid), into synthetic products. Both the bottom-up and the top-down fabrication approaches may be properly used to respectively obtain sopramolecular architectures or, instead, micro-/nanostructures to incorporate them within a preexisting complex scaffold construct. Computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) scaffold technique allows to achieve patient-tailored organs. Stem cells, because of their peculiar properties - ability to proliferate, self-renew and specific cell-lineage differentiate under appropriate conditions - represent an attractive source for intriguing tissue engineering/regenerative medicine applications. New developments in the realization of different organs tissue engineering will depend on further progress of both the science of nanoscale-based materials and the knowledge of stem cell biology. Moreover the in vivo tissue engineering appears to be the logical step of the current research.

  19. Expanded applications, shifting paradigms and an improved understanding of host-biomaterial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bryan N; Badylak, Stephen F

    2013-02-01

    The conventional approach to biomaterial design and development typically focuses upon the mechanical and material properties with long-term objectives that include an inert host immune response and long-lasting mechanical and structural support. The emergence of and interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have driven the development of novel cell-friendly biomaterials, materials with tailored degradation rates, materials with highly specific architectures and surfaces, and vehicles for delivery of bioactive molecules, among numerous other advancements. Each of these biomaterial developments supports specific strategies for tissue repair and reconstruction. These advancements in biomaterial form and function, combined with new knowledge of innate and acquired immune system biology, provide an impetus for re-examination of host-biomaterial interactions, including host-biomaterial interface events, spatial and temporal patterns of in vivo biomaterial remodeling, and related downstream functional outcomes. An examination of such issues is provided herein with a particular focus on macrophage polarization and its implications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparation and in vitro characterization of BC/PVA hydrogel composite for its potential use as artificial cornea biomaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jiehua [School of Agriculture and Bioengineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Gao Chuan; Zhang Yansen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wan Yizao, E-mail: yzwantju@yahoo.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology, Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Research Institute of Composite Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the potential use for bacterial cellulose (BC) as a novel artificial cornea replacement, BC/poly(vinyl alcohol) (BC/PVA) hydrogel composites were synthesized by freezing-thaw method. The BC/PVA composites were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometer (UV-Vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, mechanical property tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses. Our results showed that the resultant BC/PVA composites exhibited desirable properties as artificial cornea replacement biomaterial including high water content, high visible light transmittance and suitable UV absorbance, increased mechanical strength and appropriate thermal properties. Results of this work revealed that the BC/PVA composites exhibited some promising characteristics as artificial cornea composite material and may be improved further for its realistic applications.

  1. Multiscale Characterization of Engineered Cardiac Tissue Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Nancy K; Johnsen, Nicholas E; Core, Jason Q; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-11-01

    In a properly contracting cardiac muscle, many different subcellular structures are organized into an intricate architecture. While it has been observed that this organization is altered in pathological conditions, the relationship between length-scales and architecture has not been properly explored. In this work, we utilize a variety of architecture metrics to quantify organization and consistency of single structures over multiple scales, from subcellular to tissue scale as well as correlation of organization of multiple structures. Specifically, as the best way to characterize cardiac tissues, we chose the orientational and co-orientational order parameters (COOPs). Similarly, neonatal rat ventricular myocytes were selected for their consistent architectural behavior. The engineered cells and tissues were stained for four architectural structures: actin, tubulin, sarcomeric z-lines, and nuclei. We applied the orientational metrics to cardiac cells of various shapes, isotropic cardiac tissues, and anisotropic globally aligned tissues. With these novel tools, we discovered: (1) the relationship between cellular shape and consistency of self-assembly; (2) the length-scales at which unguided tissues self-organize; and (3) the correlation or lack thereof between organization of actin fibrils, sarcomeric z-lines, tubulin fibrils, and nuclei. All of these together elucidate some of the current mysteries in the relationship between force production and architecture, while raising more questions about the effect of guidance cues on self-assembly function. These types of metrics are the future of quantitative tissue engineering in cardiovascular biomechanics.

  2. Obtaining and characterization of chitosan biocomposites / HAP for application as biomaterial; Obtencao e caracterizacao de biocomposito quitosana/hidroxiapatita para aplicacao como biomaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, R.C.A.; Nascimento, I.V.S.R.; Fook, M.V.L.; Furtado, G.T.F.S., E-mail: ritaalvesleal@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2011-07-01

    The hydroxyapatite is one of the most biocompatible materials known by encouraging bone growth. However, the main drawback it is the poor mechanical strength. A method to overcome this problem is the addition of the biopolymer chitosan, suitable for applications as biomaterials. In this study was obtained a hydroxyapatite - chitosan biocomposites for application as a biomaterial. In the FTIR analysis it was identified characteristic bands of hydroxyapatite and a possible overlap of the amino group of chitosan by carbonate. XRD analysis showed that there was no change in the profile of HA after chitosan incorporation. In SEM analysis of the biocomposites HA / chitosan, it is observed that there wasn't a complete dispersion of HA particles in the chitosan. In the image of calcined biocomposite, it was found that after heat treatment at 900 ° C chitosan was eliminated, resulting in a porous material. The analysis has shown that the presence of chitosan did not cause significant changes in the phase of hydroxyapatite. (author)

  3. Bone substitute biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, K

    2014-01-01

    Bone substitute biomaterials are fundamental to the biomedical sector, and have recently benefitted from extensive research and technological advances aimed at minimizing failure rates and reducing the need for further surgery. This book reviews these developments, with a particular focus on the desirable properties for bone substitute materials and their potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration. Part I covers the principles of bone substitute biomaterials for medical applications. One chapter reviews the quantification of bone mechanics at the whole-bone, micro-scale, and non-scale levels, while others discuss biomineralization, osteoductivization, materials to fill bone defects, and bioresorbable materials. Part II focuses on biomaterials as scaffolds and implants, including multi-functional scaffolds, bioceramics, and titanium-based foams. Finally, Part III reviews further materials with the potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration, including cartilage grafts, chitosan, inorganic poly...

  4. Current Advance and Future Prospects of Tissue Engineering Approach to Dentin/Pulp Regenerative Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Gong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomaterial science and tissue engineering technology have greatly spurred the development of regenerative endodontics. This has led to a paradigm shift in endodontic treatment from simply filling the root canal systems with biologically inert materials to restoring the infected dental pulp with functional replacement tissues. Currently, cell transplantation has gained increasing attention as a scientifically valid method for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. This multidisciplinary approach which involves the interplay of three key elements of tissue engineering—stem cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules—has produced an impressive number of favorable outcomes in preclinical animal studies. Nevertheless, many practical hurdles need to be overcome prior to its application in clinical settings. Apart from the potential health risks of immunological rejection and pathogenic transmission, the lack of a well-established banking system for the isolation and storage of dental-derived stem cells is the most pressing issue that awaits resolution and the properties of supportive scaffold materials vary across different studies and remain inconsistent. This review critically examines the classic triad of tissue engineering utilized in current regenerative endodontics and summarizes the possible techniques developed for dentin/pulp regeneration.

  5. Current Advance and Future Prospects of Tissue Engineering Approach to Dentin/Pulp Regenerative Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ting; Heng, Boon Chin; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in biomaterial science and tissue engineering technology have greatly spurred the development of regenerative endodontics. This has led to a paradigm shift in endodontic treatment from simply filling the root canal systems with biologically inert materials to restoring the infected dental pulp with functional replacement tissues. Currently, cell transplantation has gained increasing attention as a scientifically valid method for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. This multidisciplinary approach which involves the interplay of three key elements of tissue engineering—stem cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules—has produced an impressive number of favorable outcomes in preclinical animal studies. Nevertheless, many practical hurdles need to be overcome prior to its application in clinical settings. Apart from the potential health risks of immunological rejection and pathogenic transmission, the lack of a well-established banking system for the isolation and storage of dental-derived stem cells is the most pressing issue that awaits resolution and the properties of supportive scaffold materials vary across different studies and remain inconsistent. This review critically examines the classic triad of tissue engineering utilized in current regenerative endodontics and summarizes the possible techniques developed for dentin/pulp regeneration. PMID:27069484

  6. [Orthopedic biomaterials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedel, L; Nizard, R; Meunier, A

    1995-03-01

    It is very challenging to insure long term security and effectiveness for joint arthroplasties, artificial ligaments, extensive bone replacement and some other orthopaedic biomaterials. How can we predict the long term security and efficacy of such an implant? Only an interdisciplinary approach can provide a satisfactory answer. The surgeon must define the needs, he must find the appropriate surgical techniques and conduct the clinical trial. The material scientist must elaborate safe and secure materials with regards to their biotolerance and mechanical resistance. This has to be performed in close connection with the biomechanics lab. Biomechanic Science must predict the expected stresses. It has to design special simulator to quantify in vitro material toughness, wear characteristics, lubrication, behaviour and surface deformation. Biological and mechanical standardized tests have to be carried on. Then it is possible to conduct a clinical trial, prospectively in comparison to another already developed material. Clinical studies could serve to measure efficacy and radiological modification. After failure, it is possible to analyse retrieved specimen, to measure the material degradation in real environment, to perform biological studies on retrieved tissues i.e. : macrophagic activities, tissue response, bone ingrowth, inflammatory or immunological reaction. For more than twenty years we worked on alumina against alumina total hips. The idea was to develop a low debris system to enhance long term longevity of the prosthesis. The Charnley design has proven its effectiveness for more than fifteen years, but polyethylene wear is responsible for late failures. This is specially crucial for young patients, male sex and high activity level patients. At the beginning, biological studies and mechanical tests were performed, it appeared that the biological tolerance of alumina ceramic was excellent, the fracture toughness was adequate, but there were some problems related

  7. A new biomaterial of nanofibers with the microalga Spirulina as scaffolds to cultivate with stem cells for use in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, D; Lersch, M; Rosa, A; Scher, C; Crestani, T; Morais, M G; Costa, J A V; Pranke, P

    2013-04-01

    The association of stem cells (SCs) with biomaterials promises to be the protagonist for future regenerative medicine in the treatment of tissue and organ lesions. Stem cells were cultivated in scaffolds constructed by the electrospinning technique, using poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA) associated or not with Spirulina biomass (PDLLA/Sp), which has bioactive components of interest for tissue engineering (TE). Physicochemical analyses were performed, such as morphology, fiber diameter, degradability, residual solvent, roughness, contact angle with water, among others. SCs adhesion, proliferation and scaffold cytotoxicity were also evaluated. Nanofibers without beads and with characteristics similar to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) in terms of mechanical and topographical properties were obtained. In biological tests it was found that SCs adhered more and had greater viability in the PDLLA/Sp molds, when compared with the PDLLA scaffolds. The scaffolds were shown to be atoxic for the SCs. It can be concluded that the scaffolds developed in this work have the characteristics to be a new biomaterial suitable for use in TE.

  8. Advanced Fine Particulate Characterization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Benson; Lingbu Kong; Alexander Azenkeng; Jason Laumb; Robert Jensen; Edwin Olson; Jill MacKenzie; A.M. Rokanuzzaman

    2007-01-31

    The characterization and control of emissions from combustion sources are of significant importance in improving local and regional air quality. Such emissions include fine particulate matter, organic carbon compounds, and NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} gases, along with mercury and other toxic metals. This project involved four activities including Further Development of Analytical Techniques for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} Characterization and Source Apportionment and Management, Organic Carbonaceous Particulate and Metal Speciation for Source Apportionment Studies, Quantum Modeling, and High-Potassium Carbon Production with Biomass-Coal Blending. The key accomplishments included the development of improved automated methods to characterize the inorganic and organic components particulate matter. The methods involved the use of scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis for the inorganic fraction and a combination of extractive methods combined with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure to characterize the organic fraction. These methods have direction application for source apportionment studies of PM because they provide detailed inorganic analysis along with total organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) quantification. Quantum modeling using density functional theory (DFT) calculations was used to further elucidate a recently developed mechanistic model for mercury speciation in coal combustion systems and interactions on activated carbon. Reaction energies, enthalpies, free energies and binding energies of Hg species to the prototype molecules were derived from the data obtained in these calculations. Bimolecular rate constants for the various elementary steps in the mechanism have been estimated using the hard-sphere collision theory approximation, and the results seem to indicate that extremely fast kinetics could be involved in these surface reactions. Activated carbon was produced from a blend of lignite coal from the Center Mine in North Dakota and

  9. Preparation and characterization of silk fibroin as a biomaterial with potential for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degummed silk fibroin from Bombyx mori (silkworm has potential carrier capabilities for drug delivery in humans; however, the processing methods have yet to be comparatively analyzed to determine the differential effects on the silk protein properties, including crystalline structure and activity. Methods In this study, we treated degummed silk with four kinds of calcium-alcohol solutions, and performed secondary structure measurements and enzyme activity test to distinguish the differences between the regenerated fibroins and degummed silk fibroin. Results Gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that Ca(NO32-methanol, Ca(NO32-ethanol, or CaCl2-methanol treatments produced more lower molecular weights of silk fibroin than CaCl2-ethanol. X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that CaCl2-ethanol produced a crystalline structure with more silk I (α-form, type II β-turn, while the other treatments produced more silk II (β-form, anti-parallel β-pleated sheet. Solid-State 13C cross polarization and magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance measurements suggested that regenerated fibroins from CaCl2-ethanol were nearly identical to degummed silk fibroin, while the other treatments produced fibroins with significantly different chemical shifts. Finally, enzyme activity test indicated that silk fibroins from CaCl2-ethanol had higher activity when linked to a known chemotherapeutic drug, L-asparaginase, than the fibroins from other treatments. Conclusions Collectively, these results suggest that the CaCl2-ethanol processing method produces silk fibroin with biomaterial properties that are appropriate for drug delivery.

  10. In vitro evaluation of three different biomaterials as scaffolds for canine mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oduvaldo Câmara Marques Pereira-Junior

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate in vitro ability the of three different biomaterials - purified hydroxyapatite, demineralized bone matrix and castor oil-based polyurethane - as biocompatible 3D scaffolds for canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC intending bone tissue engineering. METHODS: MSCs were isolated from canine bone marrow, characterized and cultivated for seven days with the biomaterials. Cell proliferation and adhesion to the biomaterial surface were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy while differentiation into osteogenic lineage was evaluated by Alizarin Red staining and Sp7/Osterix surface antibody marker. RESULTS: The biomaterials allowed cellular growth, attachment and proliferation. Osteogenic differentiation occurred in the presence of hydroxyapatite, and matrix deposition commenced in the presence of the castor oil-based polyurethane. CONCLUSION: All the tested biomaterials may be used as mesenchymal stem cell scaffolds in cell-based orthopedic reconstructive therapy.

  11. Materiomics for Oral Disease Diagnostics and Personal Health Monitoring: Designer Biomaterials for the Next Generation Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Khalili, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We live in exciting times for a new generation of biomarkers being enabled by advances in the design and use of biomaterials for medical and clinical applications, from nano- to macro-materials, and protein to tissue. Key challenges arise, however, due to both scientific complexity and compatibility of the interface of biology and engineered materials. The linking of mechanisms across scales by using a materials science approach to provide structure–process–property relations characterizes the emerging field of ‘materiomics,’ which offers enormous promise to provide the hitherto missing tools for biomaterial development for clinical diagnostics and the next generation biomarker applications towards personal health monitoring. Put in other words, the emerging field of materiomics represents an essentially systematic approach to the investigation of biological material systems, integrating natural functions and processes with traditional materials science perspectives. Here we outline how materiomics provides a game-changing technology platform for disruptive innovation in biomaterial science to enable the design of tailored and functional biomaterials—particularly, the design and screening of DNA aptamers for targeting biomarkers related to oral diseases and oral health monitoring. Rigorous and complementary computational modeling and experimental techniques will provide an efficient means to develop new clinical technologies in silico, greatly accelerating the translation of materiomics-driven oral health diagnostics from concept to practice in the clinic. PMID:26760957

  12. Biomaterials and bioengineering tomorrow’s healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Sumrita; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials are being used for the healthcare applications from ancient times. But subsequent evolution has made them more versatile and has increased their utility. Biomaterials have revolutionized the areas like bioengineering and tissue engineering for the development of novel strategies to combat life threatening diseases. Together with biomaterials, stem cell technology is also being used to improve the existing healthcare facilities. These concepts and technologies are being used for the treatment of different diseases like cardiac failure, fractures, deep skin injuries, etc. Introduction of nanomaterials on the other hand is becoming a big hope for a better and an affordable healthcare. Technological advancements are underway for the development of continuous monitoring and regulating glucose levels by the implantation of sensor chips. Lab-on-a-chip technology is expected to modernize the diagnostics and make it more easy and regulated. Other area which can improve the tomorrow’s healthcare is drug delivery. Micro-needles have the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional needles and are being studied for the delivery of drugs at different location in human body. There is a huge advancement in the area of scaffold fabrication which has improved the potentiality of tissue engineering. Most emerging scaffolds for tissue engineering are hydrogels and cryogels. Dynamic hydrogels have huge application in tissue engineering and drug delivery. Furthermore, cryogels being supermacroporous allow the attachment and proliferation of most of the mammalian cell types and have shown application in tissue engineering and bioseparation. With further developments we expect these technologies to hit the market in near future which can immensely improve the healthcare facilities. PMID:23628868

  13. Advances and Perspectives on Tissue Repair and Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; de Sousa, Ana Paula C.; Aciole, Jouber M. S.; Soares, Luiz G. P.

    2011-08-01

    Wound healing involves local and systemic responses that reflect the etiology of the lesion, type of tissue, systemic condition and others. Despite being essentially the same for different wounds, the pattern of healing may change due to intrinsic and/or extrinsic factors. The type of tissue has also to be considered. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to improve healing including phototherapies such as Laser, LEDs and Lamps. Their effects on soft and mineralized tissues are well reported. The choice of appropriated parameters is essential for the results of the treatment and includes wavelength, power density, energy, duration and frequency of application and others. We studied the effects of different types of light on the healing of both soft and mineralized tissues using different models. We found that the use of Laser and polarized light are effective on improving the healing of diabetic and undernourished animals. We also found that Laser light is capable of improving the healing of drug-induced impairment and on increasing the survival rate of flaps on both diabetic and non-diabetic animals. We have also studied and shown the influence of the laser parameters on the healing of surgical and laser wounds. Lately we verified the positive effect of LEDs on healing. We used Laser/LED light for improving bone healing in conditions such as in dental implants, autologous grafts, biomaterials and fractures. From these reports and our own experience we have no doubt whatsoever that the use of phototherapies, carried out with appropriate parameters, promotes quicker tissue repair.

  14. In vitro cross-linking of elastin peptides and molecular characterization of the resultant biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinz, Andrea; Ruttkies, Christoph K H; Jahreis, Günther

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elastin is a vital protein and the major component of elastic fibers which provides resilience to many vertebrate tissues. Elastin's structure and function are influenced by extensive cross-linking, however, the cross-linking pattern is still unknown. METHODS: Small peptides containin...

  15. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  16. Characterization of Metalloproteins and Biomaterials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl

    by estimation of the water content by thermogravimetric analysis. Bone tissue from dogs treated with strontiummalonate was studied using XAS. A new approach for analysing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model, from which the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone......-ray crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) applied to studying different hexameric insulin conformations. (iii) The structures of polymorphs of strontium ranelate and the distribution of strontium in bone tissue. A procedure for fast identification and verification of protein powders using XRPD...... and R6) were solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) to 1.40 Å, 1.30 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The zinc coordination in each conformation was studied by XAS including both extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES...

  17. Bioreactors Drive Advances in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    problems. It dawned on me that rotating the wall of the reactor would solve one of our fundamental fluid mechanical problems, specifically by removing the velocity gradient of the tissue culture fluid media near the reactor s walls, says Wolf. It looked as though it would allow us to suspend the growing cells within the reactor without introducing turbulent fluid mechanical conditions.

  18. Acellular Endocardium as a Novel Biomaterial for the Intima of Tissue-Engineered Small-Caliber Vascular Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Guan, Xin; Wu, TianYi; Qiao, JianOu; Han, ZhaoQing; Wu, JinLong; Yu, XiaoWei; You, QingJun

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to investigate whether acellular endocardium can be used as a useful biomaterial for the intima of engineered small-caliber vascular grafts. Fresh endocardium was harvested from the swine left atrium and was decellularized by digestion with the decellularization solution of Triton X-100 and SDS containing DNase I and RNase A. Surface morphological characteristics and Young's modulus were evaluated. To analyze the effect of mechanical characteristics on cell adhesion, the decellularized endocardium was stiffened with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. Small-caliber vascular grafts were constructed using decellularized endocardium treated with or without glutaraldehyde as the intima. CD34+ cells were seeded onto the luminal surface of the vascular grafts and linked to bioreactors that simulate a pulsatile blood stream. Acellular endocardium had distinct surface morphological characteristics, which were quite different from those of other materials. The compliance of acellular endocardium was higher than that of other materials tested by Young's modulus. CD34+ cells formed a monolayer structure and adhered to the inner face of the acellular endocardium. The glutaraldehyde treatment stiffened the acellular endocardium but had little impact on the surface morphological characteristics or static adhesiveness of the cells. Data from the bioreactor study showed that the detachment of the cells from the surface of glutaraldehyde-treated acellular endocardium increased dramatically when the pressure was equal or higher than 40 mm Hg, while the cells on the untreated acellular endocardium remained well and formed confluent monolayers and tight junctions under the same pressure. Acellular endocardium has distinct structures and mechanical characteristics that are beneficial for CD34+ cell adhesion and retention under dynamic fluid perfusion. Thus, it can be used as a useful biomaterial for the construction of the intima of engineered small-caliber vascular grafts. Copyright © 2016

  19. Advanced Fabrication Techniques for Precisely Controlled Micro and Nano Scale Environments for Complex Tissue Regeneration and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Benjamin

    As modern medicine advances, it is still very challenging to cure joint defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The current clinical standard for catastrophic or late stage joint degradation is a total joint implant, where the damaged joint is completely excised and replaced with a metallic or artificial joint. However, these procedures still only lasts for 10-15 years, and there are hosts of recovery complications which can occur. Thus, these studies have sought to employ advanced biomaterials and scaffold fabricated techniques to effectively regrow joint tissue, instead of merely replacing it with artificial materials. We can hypothesize here that the inclusion of biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials with highly functional electrospun and 3D printed scaffold can improve physical characteristics (mechanical strength, surface interactions and nanotexture) enhance cellular growth and direct stem cell differentiation for bone, cartilage and vascular growth as well as cancer metastasis modeling. Nanomaterial inclusion and controlled 3D printed features effectively increased nano surface roughness, Young's Modulus and provided effective flow paths for simulated arterial blood. All of the approaches explored proved highly effective for increasing cell growth, as a result of increasing micro-complexity and nanomaterial incorporation. Additionally, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, cell migration, cell to cell interaction and vascular formation were enhanced. Finally, growth-factor(gf)-loaded polymer nanospheres greatly improved vascular cell behavior, and provided a highly bioactive scaffold for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) co-culture and bone formation. In conclusion, electrospinning and 3D printing when combined effectively with biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials (i.e. carbon nanomaterials, collagen, nHA, polymer

  20. Design, production, and characterization of artificial protein- and silica-based biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, Wesley Darrell, II

    This work focused on a specific protein polymer, poly(EAK) n, denoting a protein with n repeats of the amino acid monomer sequence AEAEAKAKAEAEAKAK (where A=alanine, E=glutamic acid, and K=lysine). Previous work has focused on lower molecular weight versions of these proteins, where n=1 and n=9. Those studies showed that while poly(EAK)9 an order of magnitude increase in hydrogel strength over EAK1, even the higher molecular weight version forms a relatively weak hydrogel. The first part of this dissertation describes efforts to improve the mechanical properties of poly(EAK)n hydrogels by investigating the self-assembly of higher molecular weight versions of the protein, where n = 24 and n = 63. Genes encoding these proteins were constructed and expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli, and the proteins can be purified from cell culture by affinity chromatography. The solubility of these proteins, however, is significantly lower than the lower molecular weight versions of poly(EAK)n previously explored. Interestingly, despite decreased solubility, these proteins quickly form a stable gel-like matrix while in the milieu of the homogenized cell lysate. Congo Red binding assays and circular dichroism studies also indicate that poly(EAK)24 and poly(EAK)63 each self-assemble into stacked beta-sheet structures. While poor solubility prevents their use as a stand-alone biomaterial, these higher molecular weight protein polymers may prove useful as virtual crosslinking agents for hydrogels formed from lower molecular weight poly(EAK)n molecules. The second portion of this dissertation describes the generation of new biosilica matrices. Silica is one of the most abundant biominerals on Earth and is produced by a variety of organisms. One such organism is the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. From dilute aqueous solutions of silica and using relatively mild processing conditions, these unicellular organisms create silica frustules with exquisite microstructures having

  1. Polypyrrole/Alginate Hybrid Hydrogels: Electrically Conductive and Soft Biomaterials for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Culture and Potential Neural Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sumi; Jang, LindyK; Kim, Semin; Yang, Jongcheol; Yang, Kisuk; Cho, Seung-Woo; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-11-01

    Electrically conductive biomaterials that can efficiently deliver electrical signals to cells or improve electrical communication among cells have received considerable attention for potential tissue engineering applications. Conductive hydrogels are desirable particularly for neural applications, as they can provide electrical signals and soft microenvironments that can mimic native nerve tissues. In this study, conductive and soft polypyrrole/alginate (PPy/Alg) hydrogels are developed by chemically polymerizing PPy within ionically cross-linked alginate hydrogel networks. The synthesized hydrogels exhibit a Young's modulus of 20-200 kPa. Electrical conductance of the PPy/Alg hydrogels could be enhanced by more than one order of magnitude compared to that of pristine alginate hydrogels. In vitro studies with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) reveal that cell adhesion and growth are promoted on the PPy/Alg hydrogels. Additionally, the PPy/Alg hydrogels support and greatly enhance the expression of neural differentiation markers (i.e., Tuj1 and MAP2) of hMSCs compared to tissue culture plate controls. Subcutaneous implantation of the hydrogels for eight weeks induces mild inflammatory reactions. These soft and conductive hydrogels will serve as a useful platform to study the effects of electrical and mechanical signals on stem cells and/or neural cells and to develop multifunctional neural tissue engineering scaffolds. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Synthesization, Characterization, and in Vitro Evaluation of Cytotoxicity of Biomaterials Based on Halloysite Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Fernández, Antonio; Peña-Parás, Laura; Vidaltamayo, Román; Cué-Sampedro, Rodrigo; Mendoza-Martínez, Ana; Zomosa-Signoret, Viviana; Rivas-Estilla, Ana; Riojas, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    Halloysite is an aluminosilicate clay that has been widely used for controlled drug delivery, immobilization of enzymes, and for the capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Surface modification of halloysite by organosilanes has been explored to improve their properties. In this study halloysite clay nanotubes (HNTs) were functionalized by two different organosilanes: Trimethoxy(propyl)silane (TMPS), and Triethoxy(octyl)silane (EOS). Untreated and modified samples were characterized by sca...

  3. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Della Bona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different substrates, which has offered a great challenge to dental zirconia research and development. This study characterizes zirconia as a dental biomaterial, presenting the current consensus and challenges to its dental applications.

  4. Mechanics of additively manufactured biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadpoor, Amir A

    2017-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) has found many applications in healthcare including fabrication of biomaterials as well as bioprinting of tissues and organs. Additively manufactured (AM) biomaterials may possess arbitrarily complex micro-architectures that give rise to novel mechanical, physical, and biological properties. The mechanical behavior of such porous biomaterials including their quasi-static mechanical properties and fatigue resistance is not yet well understood. It is particularly important to understand the relationship between the designed micro-architecture (topology) and the resulting mechanical properties. The current special issue is dedicated to understanding the mechanical behavior of AM biomaterials. Although various types of AM biomaterials are represented in the special issue, the primary focus is on AM porous metallic biomaterials. As a prelude to this special issue, this editorial reviews some of the latest findings in the mechanical behavior of AM porous metallic biomaterials so as to describe the current state-of-the-art and set the stage for the other studies appearing in the issue. Some areas that are important for future research are also briefly mentioned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 3D bioprinting for biomedical devices and tissue engineering: A review of recent trends and advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroosh Derakhshanfar

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing, an additive manufacturing based technology for precise 3D construction, is currently widely employed to enhance applicability and function of cell laden scaffolds. Research on novel compatible biomaterials for bioprinting exhibiting fast crosslinking properties is an essential prerequisite toward advancing 3D printing applications in tissue engineering. Printability to improve fabrication process and cell encapsulation are two of the main factors to be considered in development of 3D bioprinting. Other important factors include but are not limited to printing fidelity, stability, crosslinking time, biocompatibility, cell encapsulation and proliferation, shear-thinning properties, and mechanical properties such as mechanical strength and elasticity. In this review, we recite recent promising advances in bioink development as well as bioprinting methods. Also, an effort has been made to include studies with diverse types of crosslinking methods such as photo, chemical and ultraviolet (UV. We also propose the challenges and future outlook of 3D bioprinting application in medical sciences and discuss the high performance bioinks.

  6. Synthesization, Characterization, and in Vitro Evaluation of Cytotoxicity of Biomaterials Based on Halloysite Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sánchez-Fernández

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Halloysite is an aluminosilicate clay that has been widely used for controlled drug delivery, immobilization of enzymes, and for the capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs. Surface modification of halloysite by organosilanes has been explored to improve their properties. In this study halloysite clay nanotubes (HNTs were functionalized by two different organosilanes: Trimethoxy(propylsilane (TMPS, and Triethoxy(octylsilane (EOS. Untreated and modified samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, thermogravimetrical analysis (TGA, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Results showed a strong interaction of organosilanes with the chemical groups present in HNTs. Biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these nanomaterials were determined using C6 rat glioblastoma cells. Our results indicate that prior to functionalization, HNTs show a high biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. However, HNTs functionalized with EOS and TMPS showed high cytotoxicity by inducing apoptosis. These results allow the identification of potential applications in biomedical areas for HNTs.

  7. Regenerative Therapies for Central Nervous System Diseases: a Biomaterials Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Fuehrmann, Tobias; Mitrousis, Nikolaos; Shoichet, Molly S

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a limited capacity to spontaneously regenerate following traumatic injury or disease, requiring innovative strategies to promote tissue and functional repair. Tissue regeneration strategies, such as cell and/or drug delivery, have demonstrated promising results in experimental animal models, but have been difficult to translate clinically. The efficacy of cell therapy, which involves stem cell transplantation into the CNS to replace damaged tissue, has been limited due to low cell survival and integration upon transplantation, while delivery of therapeutic molecules to the CNS using conventional methods, such as oral and intravenous administration, have been limited by diffusion across the blood–brain/spinal cord-barrier. The use of biomaterials to promote graft survival and integration as well as localized and sustained delivery of biologics to CNS injury sites is actively being pursued. This review will highlight recent advances using biomaterials as cell- and drug-delivery vehicles for CNS repair. PMID:24002187

  8. Anthemideae: advances in tissue culture, genetics and transgenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthemideae: advances in tissue culture, genetics and transgenic biotechnology. Jaime A Teixeira da Silva. Abstract. Members of the Anthemideae include important floricultural (cut-flower) and ornamental (pot and garden) crops, as well as plants of medicinal and ethno-pharmacological interest. Despite the use of many of ...

  9. Ultrasonic signal processing and tissue characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Zhiping

    Ultrasound imaging has become one of the most widely used diagnostic tools in medicine. While it has advantages, compared with other modalities, in terms of safety, low-cost, accessibility, portability and capability of real-time imaging, it has limitations. One of the major disadvantages of ultrasound imaging is the relatively low image quality, especially the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the low spatial resolution. Part of this dissertation is dedicated to the development of digital ultrasound signal and image processing methods to improve ultrasound image quality. Conventional B-mode ultrasound systems display the demodulated signals, i.e., the envelopes, in the images. In this dissertation, I introduce the envelope matched quadrature filtering (EMQF) technique, which is a novel demodulation technique generating optimal performance in envelope detection. In ultrasonography, the echo signals are the results of the convolution of the pulses and the medium responses, and the finite pulse length is a major source of the degradation of the image resolution. Based on the more appropriate complex-valued medium response assumption rather than the real-valued assumption used by many researchers, a nonparametric iterative deconvolution method, the Least Squares method with Point Count regularization (LSPC), is proposed. This method was tested using simulated and experimental data, and has produced excellent results showing significant improvements in resolution. During the past two decades, ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) has emerged as an active research field and shown potentials of applications in a variety of clinical areas. Particularly interesting to me is a group of methods characterizing the scatterer spatial distribution. For resolvable regular structures, a deconvolution based method is proposed to estimate parameters characterizing such structures, including mean scatterer spacing, and has demonstrated superior performance when compared to

  10. Biomaterial-Stabilized Soft Tissue Healing for Healing of Critical-Sized Bone Defects: the Masquelet Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarchala, Magdalena; Harvey, Edward J; Barralet, Jake

    2016-03-01

    Critical-sized bone defects present a significant burden to the medical community due to their challenging treatment. However, a successful limb-salvaging technique, the Masquelet Technique (MT), has significantly improved the prognosis of many segmental bone defects in helping to restore form and function. Although the Masquelet Technique has proven to be clinically effective, the physiology of the healing it induces is not well understood. Multiple modifiable factors have been implicated by various surgical and research teams, but no single factor has been proven to be critical to the success of the Masquelet Technique. In this review the most recent clinical and experimental evidence that supports and helps to decipher the traditional Masquelet, as well as the modifiable factors and their effect on the success of the technique are discussed. In addition, future developments for the integration of the traditional Masquelet Technique with the use of alternative biomaterials to increase the effectiveness and expand the clinical applicability of the Masquelet Technique are reviewed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Soft tissue sarcoma and radiation therapy advances, impact on toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bared, Nancy; Wong, Philip; Wang, Dian

    2015-05-01

    Since adjuvant radiotherapy was introduced in the 1970s for soft tissue sarcoma (STS), sequential clinical trials characterized the toxicities induced by radiotherapy when given post-operatively and pre-operatively. Gradual technological advancements led to more precise radiotherapy delivery through intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and more accurate targeting through image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) to minimize normal tissues from high-dose irradiation. These improvements ultimately reduced the long-term toxicities from radiotherapy. Due to the rarity and complexity of the disease, patients with STS should be treated at institutes where multidisciplinary discussion and care can be provided. Patients with STS should ideally be offered the choice of participating in clinical trials. International phase III trials are ongoing through COG-NRG Oncology (Pazopanib Neoadjuvant Trial in Non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas (PAZNTIS)) to define the role of radiotherapy in combination with pazopanib in the clinical care of extremity STS and through EORTC (STRASS) to define the role of pre-operative radiotherapy in the treatment of retroperitoneal STS. Outside of clinical trials, extremity STS should be treated at centers of expertise where high-quality IMRT-IGRT is administered to lessen acute and long-term toxicities. In patients with extremity STS, pre-operative IMRT-IGRT is preferred as better target delineation and image guidance can be achieved. While acute wound complication remains a concern, patients treated using pre-operative IMRT-IGRT are largely spared of severe chronic irreversible radiation-related side effects such as bone fracture, fibrosis, edema, and joint stiffness that alter limb functions. For STS originating from the retroperitoneum, if radiotherapy is recommended following multidisciplinary case discussion, pre-operative radiotherapy is preferred over post-operative radiotherapy. Post-operatively, normal radiosensitive organs fill the

  12. Biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevlin, R; McArdle, A; Atashroo, D; Walmsley, G G; Senarath-Yapa, K; Zielins, E R; Paik, K J; Longaker, M T; Wan, D C

    2014-12-01

    Conditions such as congenital anomalies, cancers, and trauma can all result in devastating deficits of bone in the craniofacial skeleton. This can lead to significant alteration in function and appearance that may have significant implications for patients. In addition, large bone defects in this area can pose serious clinical dilemmas, which prove difficult to remedy, even with current gold standard surgical treatments. The craniofacial skeleton is complex and serves important functional demands. The necessity to develop new approaches for craniofacial reconstruction arises from the fact that traditional therapeutic modalities, such as autologous bone grafting, present myriad limitations and carry with them the potential for significant complications. While the optimal bone construct for tissue regeneration remains to be elucidated, much progress has been made in the past decade. Advances in tissue engineering have led to innovative scaffold design, complemented by progress in the understanding of stem cell-based therapy and growth factor enhancement of the healing cascade. This review focuses on the role of biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering, highlighting key advances in scaffold design and development. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of a biomimetic UHMWPE-based interpenetrating polymer network for use as an orthopedic biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, Guy Patrick

    Semi-, gradient, sequential interpenetrating polymer networks (IPN) of poly-L-lysine (PLL) in host ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) have been synthesized in order to create a biomimetically-inspired orthopedic biomaterial. The synthesis process consists of five steps: (1) silylation of the PLL to PLL-SiMe3, (2) swelling the UHMWPE network in the presence of a solution of PLL-SiMe3 and xylenes, (3) crosslinking of the PLL-SiMe3 in situ, (4) drying the IPN of xylenes and unreacted crosslinker, (5) conditioning the IPN to form the cationic surface. Separate studies were conducted for the first three IPN synthesis steps. Silylation of the PLL to PLL-SiMe3 with bis(trimethylsilyl)acetamide was determined to be 100% at the carboxyl and alpha-amine sites and approximately 40% at the 3 -amine sites. Medical grade UHMWPE was determined to swell 18% in xylenes at 70°C. 1,8-diisocynatooctane (OMDI) was used to crosslink PLL-SiMe 3 ex situ and was determined to establish a crosslinked gel relatively quickly. Six IPNs were synthesized at 70°C. Two swelling times, 250 and 500 hours, and three OMDI concentrations, 10.0, 0.10, and 0.033 mul/ml, made up the six synthesis conditions. IPNs were characterized in terms of chemistry, morphology and coefficient of friction (COF) with SEM, EDS, FTIR, contact angles, XPS, Tof-SIMS and a COF pendulum comparator. PLL diffused at least 100 A into the surface of the UHMWPE, and probably much further. Crosslinked PLL was evident on the surface of several IPNs. Cationic species were identified in IPNs synthesized at 0.033 mul/ml OMDI concentration. The cationic surface formed by the IPN processed for 250 hours with an OMDI concentration of 0.10 mul/ml lowered the COF 28.7% relative to its paired UHMWPE control.

  14. How smart do biomaterials need to be? A translational science and clinical point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Boris Michael; Reichert, Johannes Christian; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; Gbureck, Uwe; Rackwitz, Lars; Nöth, Ulrich; Jakob, Franz; Rudert, Maximilian; Groll, Jürgen; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner

    2013-04-01

    Over the last 4 decades innovations in biomaterials and medical technology have had a sustainable impact on the development of biopolymers, titanium/stainless steel and ceramics utilized in medical devices and implants. This progress was primarily driven by issues of biocompatibility and demands for enhanced mechanical performance of permanent and non-permanent implants as well as medical devices and artificial organs. In the 21st century, the biomaterials community aims to develop advanced medical devices and implants, to establish techniques to meet these requirements, and to facilitate the treatment of older as well as younger patient cohorts. The major advances in the last 10 years from a cellular and molecular knowledge point of view provided the scientific foundation for the development of third-generation biomaterials. With the introduction of new concepts in molecular biology in the 2000s and specifically advances in genomics and proteomics, a differentiated understanding of biocompatibility slowly evolved. These cell biological discoveries significantly affected the way of biomaterials design and use. At the same time both clinical demands and patient expectations continued to grow. Therefore, the development of cutting-edge treatment strategies that alleviate or at least delay the need of implants could open up new vistas. This represents the main challenge for the biomaterials community in the 21st century. As a result, the present decade has seen the emergence of the fourth generation of biomaterials, the so-called smart or biomimetic materials. A key challenge in designing smart biomaterials is to capture the degree of complexity needed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural tissue. We are still a long way from recreating the molecular architecture of the ECM one to one and the dynamic mechanisms by which information is revealed in the ECM proteins in response to challenges within the host environment. This special issue on smart

  15. Solid-state 31P and 1H chemical MR micro-imaging of hard tissues and biomaterials with magic angle spinning at very high magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Maxime; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Scheler, Ulrich; Bouler, Jean-Michel; Bujoli, Bruno; Massiot, Dominique; Fayon, Franck

    2017-08-15

    In this work, we show that it is possible to overcome the limitations of solid-state MRI for rigid tissues due to large line broadening and short dephasing times by combining Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) with rotating pulsed field gradients. This allows recording ex vivo 31 P 3D and 2D slice-selected images of rigid tissues and related biomaterials at very high magnetic field, with greatly improved signal to noise ratio and spatial resolution when compared to static conditions. Cross-polarization is employed to enhance contrast and to further depict spatially localized chemical variations in reduced experimental time. In these materials, very high magnetic field and moderate MAS spinning rate directly provide high spectral resolution and enable the use of frequency selective excitation schemes for chemically selective imaging. These new possibilities are exemplified with experiments probing selectively the 3D spatial distribution of apatitic hydroxyl protons inside a mouse tooth with attached jaw bone with a nominal isotropic resolution nearing 100 µm.

  16. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    C. Maiorana; D. Andreoni; P. P. Poli

    2016-01-01

    Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to re...

  17. Stepping into the omics era: Opportunities and challenges for biomaterials science and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Nathalie; Guvendiren, Murat; Rabitz, Herschel; Welsh, William J; Kohn, Joachim; de Boer, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The research paradigm in biomaterials science and engineering is evolving from using low-throughput and iterative experimental designs towards high-throughput experimental designs for materials optimization and the evaluation of materials properties. Computational science plays an important role in this transition. With the emergence of the omics approach in the biomaterials field, referred to as materiomics, high-throughput approaches hold the promise of tackling the complexity of materials and understanding correlations between material properties and their effects on complex biological systems. The intrinsic complexity of biological systems is an important factor that is often oversimplified when characterizing biological responses to materials and establishing property-activity relationships. Indeed, in vitro tests designed to predict in vivo performance of a given biomaterial are largely lacking as we are not able to capture the biological complexity of whole tissues in an in vitro model. In this opinion paper, we explain how we reached our opinion that converging genomics and materiomics into a new field would enable a significant acceleration of the development of new and improved medical devices. The use of computational modeling to correlate high-throughput gene expression profiling with high throughput combinatorial material design strategies would add power to the analysis of biological effects induced by material properties. We believe that this extra layer of complexity on top of high-throughput material experimentation is necessary to tackle the biological complexity and further advance the biomaterials field. In this opinion paper, we postulate that converging genomics and materiomics into a new field would enable a significant acceleration of the development of new and improved medical devices. The use of computational modeling to correlate high-throughput gene expression profiling with high throughput combinatorial material design strategies would

  18. Additive Biomanufacturing : An Advanced Approach for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, Sarah-Sophia D; Vaquette, Cedryck; Ivanovski, Saso; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Malda, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is defined as a chronic inflammatory condition, characterized by destruction of the periodontium, composed of hard (i.e. alveolar bone and cementum) and soft tissues (i.e. gingiva and periodontal ligament) surrounding and supporting the teeth. In severe cases, reduced periodontal

  19. Additive Biomanufacturing : An Advanced Approach for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, Sarah Sophia D.; Costa, Pedro F.; Vaquette, Cedryck; Ivanovski, Saso; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.; Malda, Jos

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is defined as a chronic inflammatory condition, characterized by destruction of the periodontium, composed of hard (i.e. alveolar bone and cementum) and soft tissues (i.e. gingiva and periodontal ligament) surrounding and supporting the teeth. In severe cases, reduced periodontal

  20. Biomaterials in light amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Cyprych, Konrad; Sznitko, Lech; Miniewicz, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    Biologically produced or inspired materials can serve as optical gain media, i.e. they can exhibit the phenomenon of light amplification. Some of these materials, under suitable dye-doping and optical pumping conditions, show lasing phenomena. The emerging branch of research focused on obtaining lasing action in highly disordered and highly light scattering materials, i.e. research on random lasing, is perfectly suited for biological materials. The use of biomaterials in light amplification has been extensively reported in the literature. In this review we attempt to report on progress in the development of biologically derived systems able to show the phenomena of light amplification and random lasing together with the contribution of our group to this field. The rich world of biopolymers modified with molecular aggregates and nanocrystals, and self-organized at the nanoscale, offers a multitude of possibilities for tailoring luminescent and light scattering properties that are not easily replicated in conventional organic or inorganic materials. Of particular importance and interest are light amplification and lasing, or random lasing studies in biological cells and tissues. In this review we will describe nucleic acids and their complexes employed as gain media due to their favorable optical properties and ease of manipulation. We will report on research conducted on various biomaterials showing structural analogy to nucleic acids such as fluorescent proteins, gelatins in which the first distributed feedback laser was realized, and also amyloids or silks, which, due to their dye-doped fiber-like structure, allow for light amplification. Other materials that were investigated in that respect include polysaccharides, like starch exhibiting favorable photostability in comparison to other biomaterials, and chitosan, which forms photonic crystals or cellulose. Light amplification and random lasing was not only observed in processed biomaterials but also in living

  1. Radiation produced biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiak, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Medical advances that have prolonged the average life span have generated increased need for new materials that can be used as tissue and organ replacements, drug delivery systems and/or components of devices related to therapy and diagnosis. The first man-made plastic used as surgical implant was celluloid, applied for cranial defect repair. However, the first users applied commercial materials with no regard for their purity, biostability and post-operative interaction with the organism. Thus, these materials evoked a strong tissue reaction and were unacceptable. The first polymer which gained acceptance for man-made plastic was poly(methyl methacrylate). But the first polymer of choice, precursor of the broad class of materials known today as hydrogels, was poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) synthesized in the fifties by Wichterle and Lim. HEMA and its various combinations with other, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic, polymers are till now the most often used hydrogels for medical purposes. In the early fifties, the pioneers of the radiation chemistry of polymers began some experiments with radiation crosslinking, also with hydrophilic polymers. However, hydrogels were analyzed mainly from the point of view of phenomena associated with mechanism of reactions, topology of network, and relations between radiation parameters of the processes. Fundamental monographs on radiation polymer physics and chemistry written by Charlesby (1960) and Chapiro (1962) proceed from this time. The noticeable interest in application of radiation to obtain hydrogels for biomedical purposes began in the late sixties as a result of the papers and patents published by Japanese and American scientists. Among others, the team of the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment headed by Kaetsu as well as Hoffman and his colleagues from the Center of Bioengineering, University of Washington have created the base for spreading interest in the field of biomaterials formed by means of

  2. The influence of a biomaterial on the closure of a marginal hard tissue defect adjacent to implants. An experimental study in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticelli, Daniele; Berglundh, Tord; Lindhe, Jan

    2004-06-01

    The present experiment was performed to determine the influence of Bio-Oss on hard tissue formation at sites that, following implant installation, presented a 1-1.25 mm wide marginal defect. Four Labrador dogs were used. The premolars and first molars on both sides of the mandible were extracted. After 3 months, mucoperiosteal flaps were elevated and three experimental sites were prepared for implant installation in each side of the mandible. A step drill was used to widen the marginal 5 mm of the canal. Thus, following the placement of the implant (3.3 x 10 mm, SLA surface, Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland) a circumferential gap, about 1-1.25 wide and 5 mm deep, remained lateral to the titanium rod. The test sites in the left side of the mandible were first filled with a deproteinized cancellous bone mineral (Bio-Oss). The defect sites in the right side of the mandible (control sites) were left for spontaneous healing. A resorbable barrier membrane (Bio-Gide) was placed to cover the implant and the bone tissue in two sites of each quadrant, while the third site was left without membrane placement. The flaps were repositioned to cover all defect sites and were sutured. After 4 months of healing, block biopsies of each implant site were dissected and processed for ground sectioning. It was demonstrated that at 4 months, all types of defects were filled with newly formed bone and that the biomaterial placed in the marginal defect in conjunction with implant installation during healing became incorporated in the newly formed bone tissue. A high degree of contact was established between the Bio-Oss particles and the newly formed bone. Bio-Oss became integrated with the newly formed bone. In the model used, Bio-Oss did not enhance the process of bone formation and defect closure.

  3. Pharmaceutical and biomaterial engineering via electrohydrodynamic atomization technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Prina; Haj-Ahmad, Rita; Rasekh, Manoochehr; Arshad, Muhammad S; Smith, Ashleigh; van der Merwe, Susanna M; Li, Xiang; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2017-01-01

    Complex micro- and nano-structures enable crucial developments in the healthcare remit (e.g., pharmaceutical and biomaterial sciences). In recent times, several technologies have been developed and explored to address key healthcare challenges (e.g., advanced chemotherapy, biomedical diagnostics and tissue regeneration). Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) technologies are rapidly emerging as promising candidates to address these issues. The fundamental principle driving EHDA engineering relates to the action of an electric force (field) on flowing conducting medium (formulation) giving rise to a stable Taylor cone. Through careful optimization of process parameters, material properties and selection, nozzle and needle design, and collection substrate method, complex active micro- and nano-structures are engineered. This short review focuses on key selected recent and established advances in the field of pharmaceutical and biomaterial applications. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Trends in biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Kothiyal, G P

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials research requires the union of materials scientists, engineers, biologists, biomedical doctors, and surgeons. Societal implications have invoked tremendous interest in this area of research in recent years. What started as a search for strong and durable implant materials has now led to path-breaking developments in tissue engineering, targeted drug delivery, and tissue scaffolds. Viable applications of mesoporous structures, polymer biocomposites, and fibers (synthetic and natural) in the areas of clinical orthopedics, controlled drug delivery, tissue engineering, orthodontics, etc., have emerged as relatively recent concepts. This book presents recent results related to both materials aspects and implant issues. The focus is on structural, magnetic, antibacterial, bioactivity/compatibility, mechanical, and other related properties and the implication of these results on biomedical applications. The book discusses technical problems faced by the surgeon during implant fixation in total hip repla...

  5. Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering: Preclinical Validation to Bedside Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Cameron; Onwuka, Ekene; Pepper, Victoria; Sams, Malik; Breuer, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in biomaterial science and available cell sources have spurred the translation of tissue-engineering technology to the bedside, addressing the pressing clinical demands for replacement cardiovascular tissues. Here, the in vivo status of tissue-engineered blood vessels, heart valves, and myocardium is briefly reviewed, illustrating progress toward a tissue-engineered heart for clinical use. PMID:26661524

  6. Characterization of pediatric microtia cartilage: a reservoir of chondrocytes for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; García-López, J; Brena-Molina, A M; Gutiérrez-Gómez, C; Ibarra, C; Velasquillo, C

    2016-09-01

    The external ear is composed of elastic cartilage. Microtia is a congenital malformation of the external ear that involves a small reduction in size or a complete absence. The aim of tissue engineering is to regenerate tissues and organs clinically implantable based on the utilization of cells and biomaterials. Remnants from microtia represent a source of cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering. To examine the macromolecular architecture of microtia cartilage and behavior of chondrocytes, in order to enrich the knowledge of this type of cartilage as a cell reservoir. Auricular cartilage remnants were obtained from pediatric patients with microtia undergoing reconstructive procedures. Extracellular matrix composition was characterized using immunofluorescence and histological staining methods. Chondrocytes were isolated and expanded in vitro using a mechanical-enzymatic protocol. Chondrocyte phenotype was analyzed using qualitative PCR. Microtia cartilage preserves structural organization similar to healthy elastic cartilage. Extracellular matrix is composed of typical cartilage proteins such as type II collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. Chondrocytes displayed morphological features similar to chondrocytes derived from healthy cartilage, expressing SOX9, COL2 and ELN, thus preserving chondral phenotype. Cell viability was 94.6 % during in vitro expansion. Elastic cartilage from microtia has similar characteristics, both architectural and biochemical to healthy cartilage. We confirmed the suitability of microtia remnant as a reservoir of chondrocytes with potential to be expanded in vitro, maintaining phenotypical features and viability. Microtia remnants are an accessible source of autologous cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

  7. Advanced glycation end-products: Mechanics of aged collagen from molecule to tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautieri, Alfonso; Passini, Fabian S; Silván, Unai; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Carimati, Giulia; Volpi, Piero; Moretti, Matteo; Schoenhuber, Herbert; Redaelli, Alberto; Berli, Martin; Snedeker, Jess G

    2017-05-01

    Concurrent with a progressive loss of regenerative capacity, connective tissue aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs). Besides being part of the typical aging process, type II diabetics are particularly affected by AGE accumulation due to abnormally high levels of systemic glucose that increases the glycation rate of long-lived proteins such as collagen. Although AGEs are associated with a wide range of clinical disorders, the mechanisms by which AGEs contribute to connective tissue disease in aging and diabetes are still poorly understood. The present study harnesses advanced multiscale imaging techniques to characterize a widely employed in vitro model of ribose induced collagen aging and further benchmarks these data against experiments on native human tissues from donors of different age. These efforts yield unprecedented insight into the mechanical changes in collagen tissues across hierarchical scales from molecular, to fiber, to tissue-levels. We observed a linear increase in molecular spacing (from 1.45nm to 1.5nm) and a decrease in the D-period length (from 67.5nm to 67.1nm) in aged tissues, both using the ribose model of in vitro glycation and in native human probes. Multiscale mechanical analysis of in vitro glycated tendons strongly suggests that AGEs reduce tissue viscoelasticity by severely limiting fiber-fiber and fibril-fibril sliding. This study lays an important foundation for interpreting the functional and biological effects of AGEs in collagen connective tissues, by exploiting experimental models of AGEs crosslinking and benchmarking them for the first time against endogenous AGEs in native tissue. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Advanced polymers in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Puoci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The book provides an up-to-date overview of the diverse medical applications of advanced polymers. The book opens by presenting important background information on polymer chemistry and physicochemical characterization of polymers. This serves as essential scientific support for the subsequent chapters, each of which is devoted to the applications of polymers in a particular medical specialty. The coverage is broad, encompassing orthopedics, ophthalmology, tissue engineering, surgery, dentistry, oncology, drug delivery, nephrology, wound dressing and healing, and cardiology. The development of polymers that enhance the biocompatibility of blood-contacting medical devices and the incorporation of polymers within biosensors are also addressed. This book is an excellent guide to the recent advances in polymeric biomaterials and bridges the gap between the research literature and standard textbooks on the applications of polymers in medicine.

  9. An Overview of Poly(lactic-co-glycolic Acid (PLGA-Based Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piergiorgio Gentile

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA has attracted considerable interest as a base material for biomedical applications due to its: (i biocompatibility; (ii tailored biodegradation rate (depending on the molecular weight and copolymer ratio; (iii approval for clinical use in humans by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA; (iv potential to modify surface properties to provide better interaction with biological materials; and (v suitability for export to countries and cultures where implantation of animal-derived products is unpopular. This paper critically reviews the scientific challenge of manufacturing PLGA-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of current innovative techniques for scaffolds and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to prepare biomimetic PLGA substrates able to modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  10. Biomaterials in the repair of sports injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducheyne, Paul; Mauck, Robert L.; Smith, Douglas H.

    2012-08-01

    The optimal stimulation of tissue regeneration in bone, cartilage and spinal cord injuries involves a judicious selection of biomaterials with tailored chemical compositions, micro- and nanostructures, porosities and kinetic release properties for the delivery of relevant biologically active molecules.

  11. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  12. The in vivo evaluation of tissue-based biomaterials in a rat full-thickness abdominal wall defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Nicholas; Ahswin, Helen; Smart, Neil; Bayon, Yves; Wohlert, Stephen; Hunt, John A

    2014-05-01

    Hernias are defects in which an anatomical fascia is breached resulting in ectopic positioning of an organ into an orifice which routinely does not contain it. Intervention often involves repositioning translocated organs and repair of damaged fascia using exogenous grafts. Despite hernia prevalence, repairs can still fail due to postoperative complications, such as chronic pain and decreased mobility. This study compared repair capacities and characterized the foreign body response elicited by a number of hernia repair grafts to deduce their bulk inflammatory properties while also concluding the point in their fabrication when these are inferred. Materials derived from human dermis (Alloderm(®) ), porcine dermis (Permacol™, patch A, patch D and Strattice(®) ), porcine small-intestinal submucosa (Surgisis™) and a synthetic (multifilament Surgipro™) were implanted into a rat full-thickness abdominal wall excision model, incubated for up to 2 years and characterized histopathologically. Surgisis™ resorbed the fastest of the materials tested (1-3 months) resulting in a mechanically stable parietal peritoneum. Decellularization using sodium dodecyl sulfate (patch A) stimulated a large early inflammatory response which ultimately may have contributed to increased resorption of porcine dermal matrix however the remaining materials typically persisted throughout the 2-year incubation. Cross-linking porcine dermis using 1,6-hexamethylene disocyanate (vs. an identical noncross-linked counterpart) showed no difference in cell recruitment or material integration over 2 years. Typically Strattice(®) and Alloderm(®) recruited larger early populations of cells than Permacol™; however, over extended periods of time in vivo this response normalized. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Advances of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and dental tissue in craniofacial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Maobin; Zhang, Hongming; Gangolli, Riddhi

    2014-05-01

    Bone and dental tissues in craniofacial region work as an important aesthetic and functional unit. Reconstruction of craniofacial tissue defects is highly expected to ensure patients to maintain good quality of life. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been developed in the last two decades, and been advanced with the stem cell technology. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells are one of the most extensively studied post-natal stem cell population, and are widely utilized in cell-based therapy. Dental tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells are a relatively new stem cell population that isolated from various dental tissues. These cells can undergo multilineage differentiation including osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation, thus provide an alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the important issues in mesenchymal stem cell biology including the origin and functions of mesenchymal stem cells, compare the properties of these two types of mesenchymal cells, update recent basic research and clinic applications in this field, and address important future challenges.

  14. Tissue Damage Characterization Using Non-invasive Optical Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, David

    The ability to determine the degree of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue damage is essential for proper wound assessment and a significant factor for determining patient treatment and morbidity. Accurate characterization of tissue damage is critical for a number of medical applications including surgical removal of nonviable tissue, severity assessment of subcutaneous ulcers, and depth assessment of visually open wounds. The main objective of this research was to develop a non-invasive method for identifying the extent of tissue damage underneath intact skin that is not apparent upon visual examination. This work investigated the relationship between tissue optical properties, blood flow, and tissue viability by testing the hypotheses that (a) changes in tissue oxygenation and/or microcirculatory blood flow measurable by Diffuse Near Infrared Spectroscopy (DNIRS) and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) differ between healthy and damaged tissue and (b) the magnitude of those changes differs for different degrees of tissue damage. This was accomplished by developing and validating a procedure for measuring microcirculatory blood flow and tissue oxygenation dynamics at multiple depths (up to 1 centimeter) using non-invasive DCS and DNIRS technologies. Due to the lack of pressure ulcer animal models that are compatible with our optical systems, a proof of concept was conducted in a porcine burn model prior to conducting clinical trials in order to assess the efficacy of the system in-vivo. A reduction in total hemoglobin was observed for superficial (5%) and deep burns (35%) along with a statistically significant difference between the optical properties of superficial and deep burns (p injury observed in histological stains. After proof of concept in animals, a human study was conducted and optical data was collected from 20 healthy subjects and 8 patients at risk of developing pressure ulcers. Blood flow index (BFI) values from the sacral region of patients were

  15. Integrated Biomaterials for Biomedical Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi

    2012-01-01

    This cutting edge book provides all the important aspects dealing with the basic science involved in materials in biomedical technology, especially structure and properties, techniques and technological innovations in material processing and characterizations, as well as the applications. The volume consists of 12 chapters written by acknowledged experts of the biomaterials field and covers a wide range of topics and applications.

  16. Recent progresses in plastic surgery using adipose-derived stem cells, biomaterials and growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Farshad; Negahdari, Babak

    2017-11-01

    Plastic and reconstructive surgery is a distinct specialty, which entails craniofacial and hand surgery; trauma, oncologic and congenital reconstruction; burn care, and aesthetic surgery. However, advances in nanotechnology have significantly affected wound management, skin care, implant and prosthetic design, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems. Presently, plastic surgeons are applying the efficacy of stem cells (ADSCs), biomaterials and growth factors in different facets of plastic surgery. In this review, we will elucidate the applications of stem cells, biomaterials and growth factors in plastic surgeries.

  17. Chitin fulfilling a biomaterials promise

    CERN Document Server

    Khor, Eugene

    2001-01-01

    The second edition of Chitin underscores the important factors for standardizing chitin processing and characterization. It captures the essential interplay between chitin's assets and limitations as a biomaterial, placing the past promises of chitin in perspective, addressing its present realities and offering insight into what is required to realize chitin's destiny (including its derivative, chitosan) as a biomaterial of the twenty-first century. This book is an ideal guide for both industrialists and researchers with a vested interest in commercializing chitin.An upd

  18. Recent Advances in Application of Biosensors in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwarul Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors research is a fast growing field in which tens of thousands of papers have been published over the years, and the industry is now worth billions of dollars. The biosensor products have found their applications in numerous industries including food and beverages, agricultural, environmental, medical diagnostics, and pharmaceutical industries and many more. Even though numerous biosensors have been developed for detection of proteins, peptides, enzymes, and numerous other biomolecules for diverse applications, their applications in tissue engineering have remained limited. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in application of novel biosensors in cell culture and tissue engineering, for example, real-time detection of small molecules such as glucose, lactose, and H2O2 as well as serum proteins of large molecular size, such as albumin and alpha-fetoprotein, and inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-g and TNF-α. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advancements in biosensors for tissue engineering applications.

  19. Recent Advances in Application of Biosensors in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Arghya; Lee, Yong-kyu; Jaffa, Ayad A.

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors research is a fast growing field in which tens of thousands of papers have been published over the years, and the industry is now worth billions of dollars. The biosensor products have found their applications in numerous industries including food and beverages, agricultural, environmental, medical diagnostics, and pharmaceutical industries and many more. Even though numerous biosensors have been developed for detection of proteins, peptides, enzymes, and numerous other biomolecules for diverse applications, their applications in tissue engineering have remained limited. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in application of novel biosensors in cell culture and tissue engineering, for example, real-time detection of small molecules such as glucose, lactose, and H2O2 as well as serum proteins of large molecular size, such as albumin and alpha-fetoprotein, and inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-g and TNF-α. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advancements in biosensors for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25165697

  20. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water

  1. Next generation bioelectronics: Advances in fabrication coupled with clever chemistries enable the effective integration of biomaterials and organic conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Molino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic bioelectronics is making an enormous impact in the field of tissue engineering, providing not just biocompatible, but biofunctional conducting material platforms. For their true potential to be reached, it is critical to integrate organic conductors with other biopolymers in a targeted manner, allowing the development of devices and scaffold architectures capable of delivering a number of physical, chemical, and electrical stimuli. Herein, we provide an overview of the methods currently being employed to tailor organic conductors for bioapplications, with a focus on the development of fabrication techniques vital to the development of the next generation of intelligent bionic devices.

  2. Advanced electron microscopy characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Subarna Raj

    Research in noble metal nanoparticles has led to exciting progress in a versatile array of applications. For the purpose of better tailoring of nanoparticles activities and understanding the correlation between their structures and properties, control over the composition, shape, size and architecture of bimetallic and multimetallic nanomaterials plays an important role on revealing their new or enhanced functions for potentials application. Advance electron microscopy techniques were used to provide atomic scale insights into the structure-properties of different materials: PtPd, Au-Au3Cu, Cu-Pt, AgPd/Pt and AuCu/Pt nanoparticles. The objective of this work is to understand the physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials and describe synthesis, characterization, surface properties and growth mechanism of various bimetallic and multimetallic nanoparticles. The findings have provided us with novel and significant insights into the physical and chemical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. Different synthesis routes allowed us to synthesize bimetallic: Pt-Pd, Au-Au3Cu, Cu-Pt and trimetallic: AgPd/Pt, AuCu/Pt, core-shell and alloyed nanoparticles with monodispersed sizes, controlled shapes and tunable surface properties. For example, we have synthesized the polyhedral PtPd core-shell nanoparticles with octahedral, decahedral, and triangular plates. Decahedral PtPd core-shell structures are novel morphologies for this system. For the first time we fabricated that the Au core and Au3Cu alloyed shell nanoparticles passivated with CuS2 surface layers and characterized by Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The analysis of the high-resolution micrographs reveals that these nanoparticles have decahedral structure with shell periodicity, and that each of the particles is composed by Au core and Au3Cu ordered superlattice alloyed shell surrounded by CuS 2 surface layer. Additionally, we have described both experimental and theoretical methods of

  3. Biofunctionalized Plants as Diverse Biomaterials for Human Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Gianluca; Gershlak, Joshua; Adamski, Michal; Lee, Jae-Sung; Matsumoto, Shion; Le, Hau D; Binder, Bernard; Wirth, John; Gaudette, Glenn; Murphy, William L

    2017-04-01

    The commercial success of tissue engineering products requires efficacy, cost effectiveness, and the possibility of scaleup. Advances in tissue engineering require increased sophistication in the design of biomaterials, often challenging the current manufacturing techniques. Interestingly, several of the properties that are desirable for biomaterial design are embodied in the structure and function of plants. This study demonstrates that decellularized plant tissues can be used as adaptable scaffolds for culture of human cells. With simple biofunctionalization technique, it is possible to enable adhesion of human cells on a diverse set of plant tissues. The elevated hydrophilicity and excellent water transport abilities of plant tissues allow cell expansion over prolonged periods of culture. Moreover, cells are able to conform to the microstructure of the plant frameworks, resulting in cell alignment and pattern registration. In conclusion, the current study shows that it is feasible to use plant tissues as an alternative feedstock of scaffolds for mammalian cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Advanced biomatrix designs for regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Park, C H; Perez, R A; Lee, H Y; Jang, J H; Lee, H H; Wall, I B; Shi, S; Kim, H W

    2014-12-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth-supporting apparatus, including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. A broad range of treatment options is currently available to restore the structure and function of the periodontal tissues. A regenerative approach, among others, is now considered the most promising paradigm for this purpose, harnessing the unique properties of stem cells. How to make full use of the body's innate regenerative capacity is thus a key issue. While stem cells and bioactive factors are essential components in the regenerative processes, matrices play pivotal roles in recapitulating stem cell functions and potentiating therapeutic actions of bioactive molecules. Moreover, the positions of appropriate bioactive matrices relative to the injury site may stimulate the innate regenerative stem cell populations, removing the need to deliver cells that have been manipulated outside of the body. In this topical review, we update views on advanced designs of biomatrices-including mimicking of the native extracellular matrix, providing mechanical stimulation, activating cell-driven matrices, and delivering bioactive factors in a controllable manner-which are ultimately useful for the regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  5. Metallic Biomaterials: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthika Prasad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metallic biomaterials are engineered systems designed to provide internal support to biological tissues and they are being used largely in joint replacements, dental implants, orthopaedic fixations and stents. Higher biomaterial usage is associated with an increased incidence of implant-related complications due to poor implant integration, inflammation, mechanical instability, necrosis and infections, and associated prolonged patient care, pain and loss of function. In this review, we will briefly explore major representatives of metallic biomaterials along with the key existing and emerging strategies for surface and bulk modification used to improve biointegration, mechanical strength and flexibility of biometals, and discuss their compatibility with the concept of 3D printing.

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals as probes to characterize tumour tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Israt S.; Arshad, Mubarik A.; Nguyen, Quang-De; Aboagye, Eric O. [Imperial College London, Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Tumour cells exhibit several properties that allow them to grow and divide. A number of these properties are detectable by nuclear imaging methods. We discuss crucial tumour properties that can be described by current radioprobe technologies, further discuss areas of emerging radioprobe development, and finally articulate need areas that our field should aspire to develop. The review focuses largely on positron emission tomography and draws upon the seminal 'Hallmarks of Cancer' review article by Hanahan and Weinberg in 2011 placing into context the present and future roles of radiotracer imaging in characterizing tumours. (orig.)

  7. Tissue characterization using dimensionality reduction and fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekadir, Karim; Elson, Daniel S; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Dunsby, Christopher; McGinty, James; Galletly, Neil; Stamp, Gordon; French, Paul M W; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Multidimensional fluorescence imaging is a powerful molecular imaging modality that is emerging as an important tool in the study of biological tissues. Due to the large volume of multi-spectral data associated with the technique, it is often difficult to find the best combination of parameters to maximize the contrast between different tissue types. This paper presents a novel framework for the characterization of tissue compositions based on the use of time resolved fluorescence imaging without the explicit modeling of the decays. The composition is characterized through soft clustering based on manifold embedding for reducing the dimensionality of the datasets and obtaining a consistent differentiation scheme for determining intrinsic constituents of the tissue. The proposed technique has the benefit of being fully automatic, which could have significant advantages for automated histopathology and increasing the speed of intraoperative decisions. Validation of the technique is carried out with both phantom data and tissue samples of the human pancreas.

  8. Biomaterials in orthopaedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, M; Michiardi, A; Castaño, O; Planell, J.A

    2008-01-01

    At present, strong requirements in orthopaedics are still to be met, both in bone and joint substitution and in the repair and regeneration of bone defects. In this framework, tremendous advances in the biomaterials field have been made in the last 50 years where materials intended for biomedical purposes have evolved through three different generations, namely first generation (bioinert materials), second generation (bioactive and biodegradable materials) and third generation (materials designed to stimulate specific responses at the molecular level). In this review, the evolution of different metals, ceramics and polymers most commonly used in orthopaedic applications is discussed, as well as the different approaches used to fulfil the challenges faced by this medical field. PMID:18667387

  9. Advances in cellular and tissue engineering using layer-by-layer assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Anita; Almeida, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly is a self-assembly technique used to develop multilayer films based on complementary interactions between film components. These multilayer films have had a significant impact on the fields of cellular and tissue engineering. The aim of cellular engineering is to understand and control cell behavior, which not only impacts applications in regenerative medicine but also other biomedical therapies that rely on cell interactions with biomaterials, including treatments for autoimmune disorders and cancer. Tissue engineering approaches to tissue repair and regeneration utilize three-dimensional biomaterial scaffolds that interact favorably with cells. Cellular engineering studies can better inform the design of these scaffolds. The ease of tuning the chemical and mechanical properties of LbL films, the ability to coat a variety of medically relevant substrates (including cell culture surfaces and scaffolds), and the wide range of species that can be incorporated into these films (ranging from proteins to small molecules) have led to the successful use of LbL assembly for a variety of cellular and tissue engineering applications. The films used in these biomedical applications can be divided into those that release therapeutics, often with controlled stimuli-responsive release behavior, and those that act without releasing these agents. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Biomaterials innovation bundling technologies and life

    CERN Document Server

    Styhre, A

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in the life sciences means that there is now a far more detailed understanding of biological systems on the cellular, molecular and genetic levels. Sited at the intersection between the life sciences, the engineering sciences and the design sciences, innovations in the biomaterials industry are expected to garner increasing attention and play a key role in future development. This book examines the biomaterials innovations taking place in corporations and in academic research settings today.

  11. Special Issue “Biomaterials and Bioprinting”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kai Chua

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of bioprinting in recent years represents a marvellous advancement in 3D printing technology. It expands the range of 3D printable materials from the world of non-living materials into the world of living materials. Biomaterials play an important role in this paradigm shift. This Special Issue focuses on biomaterials and bioprinting and contains eight articles covering a number of recent topics in this emerging area.

  12. Advanced biomaterials from renewable resources: An investigation on cellulose nanocrystal composites and carbon dioxide extraction of rendered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Jose Luis

    The annual global consumption of petroleum-based plastics is approximately 280 million tons and is impacting the sustainability of our planet and prosperity of future generations. One solution is the development of bio-based polymer materials with advanced properties for commercial applications. Therefore, the ultimate goal of this dissertation is to investigate the properties of new bio-based materials for broader applications. This dissertation includes two research areas: cellulose nanocomposites, and CO2 extractions of rendered fat. In the first half, cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), which exhibit excellent mechanical and optical properties, were investigated for the reinforcement of a biodegradable polymer. The properties of these nanocomposites were studied to intellectually contribute to the understanding of the reinforcement mechanisms of CNC nanocomposites. In the second half, a more efficient and greener extraction of fat from rendered materials (RMs) was explored to broaden their potential applications, which include protein-based polymers and biofuels. Since CNCs are hydrophilic, surface modification with various surfactants was first accomplished in this research, increasing the dispersion stability in non-polar solvents by at least a month. Only 1 wt.% of surfactant with respect to CNCs was needed to afford a significant increase in the CNC stability, representing a much lower percentage than the values reported in the literature. Moreover, these CNCs showed the ability to selfassemble into local liquid crystal structures, a potential advantage for polymer reinforcement. CNCs were subsequently investigated as an additive for polylactic acid (PLA), which is the most widely used synthetic biopolymer in the market. CNC addition yielded a 61% increase in toughness at 1 wt.% CNC load. The tensile strength and modulus were not affected by the CNC addition, addressing one of the most frequent issues in the toughening of polymers. In addition, polarized

  13. Biocompatibility and Toxicity of Nano biomaterials 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Lee, S.Ch.; Zhang, Sh.; Akasaka, T.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that nano materials have developed rapidly over the past few decades. Based on their unique physicochemical properties and special mechanical properties, nano materials have provided application possibility in many different fields. Currently, as nano biomaterials, they are widely used in various biomedical applications, such as drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, dental/bone implant, and biosensors. For example, nano biomaterials have been used in tissue engineering because of their satisfactory bioactivity, high mechanical properties, and large surface area to adsorb specific proteins. Many kinds of nano biomaterials are used to prepare composite scaffolds to get better biocompatibility and higher ability in repairing specific tissues. Several antibacterial metallic nano biomaterials are used to coat implant surfaces to improve the speed of healing fractures. In addition, lots of nano biomaterials have the potential to break the limitations of the traditional delivery systems. They can load larger amount of drugs and provide stable drug release for long time at the targeted sites, such as tumors. Moreover, they can combine with polymers to furnish simultaneous drug delivery systems with the controllable release rate. Besides these applications, more and more nano biomaterials show great potential to be applied as highly sensitive biosensors because they have higher ability in loading firmly or interacting completely with recognition aptamers.

  14. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-05-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices. Failure of most biomaterials originates from the inability to predict and control the influence of their surface properties on biological phenomena, particularly protein adsorption, and cellular behaviour, which subsequently results in unfavourable host response. Here, we introduce a surface-proteomic screening approach using a label-free mass spectrometry technique to decipher the adsorption profile of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on different biomaterials, and correlate it with cellular behaviour. We demonstrated that the way a biomaterial selectively interacts with specific ECM proteins of a given tissue seems to determine the interactions between the cells of that tissue and biomaterials. Accordingly, this approach can

  15. Biomaterials for MEMS

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, Mu

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a guide for practicing engineers, researchers, and students interested in MEMS devices that use biomaterials and biomedical applications. It is also suitable for engineers and researchers interested in MEMS and its applications but who do not have the necessary background in biomaterials.Biomaterials for MEMS highlights important features and issues of biomaterials that have been used in MEMS and biomedical areas. Hence this book is an essential guide for MEMS engineers or researchers who are trained in engineering institutes that do not provide the background or knowledge

  16. Plant Products for Innovative Biomaterials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena M. Varoni

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental biomaterials and natural products represent two of the main growing research fields, revealing plant-derived compounds may play a role not only as nutraceuticals in affecting oral health, but also in improving physico-chemical properties of biomaterials used in dentistry. Therefore, our aim was to collect all available data concerning the utilization of plant polysaccharides, proteins and extracts rich in bioactive phytochemicals in enhancing performance of dental biomaterials. Although compelling evidences are suggestive of a great potential of plant products in promoting material-tissue/cell interface, to date, only few authors have investigated their use in development of innovative dental biomaterials. A small number of studies have reported plant extract-based titanium implant coatings and periodontal regenerative materials. To the best of our knowledge, this review is the first to deal with this topic, highlighting a general lack of research findings in an interesting field which still needs to be investigated.

  17. The recent progress of tribological biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. E

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tribological phenomena abundantly exist in living beings, especially in human beings, such as in teeth, eyes, bones, skins, heart valves and so on, and it is meaningful to reveal the mechanism of tribology in human body and fabricate artificial biomaterials to replace the damaged tissues to release the pain of patients. Alloys, ceramics and polymers are three uppermost materials used in engineering and some of them play a crucial role in biomedicine. In the paper, we provide an overview of the tribological behaviors of artificial biomaterials including alloys, ceramics and polymers. We aim to provide fundamental mechanistic and applications of tribological biomaterials, while emphasizing the advantages and disadvantages of various kinds of tribological biomaterials. Finally, some challenges and the potential promising breakthroughs are also succinctly highlighted in this field.

  18. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    Phantom and patient studies were performed to assess the potential of backscatter frequency dependence as a useful parameter for tissue characterization. A commercial phased-array ultrasonic scanner was adapted to allow digitization of the intermediate-frequency ultrasonic data, Studies of agar p...

  19. [Research advances of three-dimension printing technology in vertebrae and intervertebral disc tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zechuan; Li, Chunde; Sun, Haolin

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is characterized by "inside-out" stack manufacturing. Compared with conventional technologies, 3D printing has the advantage of personalization and precision. Therefore, the shape and internal structure of the scaffolds made by 3D printing technology are highly biomimetic. Besides, 3D bioprinting can precisely deposit the biomaterials, seeding cells and cytokines at the same time, which is a breakthrough in printing technique and material science. With the development of 3D printing, it will make great contributions to the reconstruction of vertebrae and intervertebral disc in the future.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of biological tissue phantoms with embedded nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaptsov, A. A.; Ustalkov, S. O.; Mohammed, A. H. M.; Savenko, O. A.; Novikova, A. S.; Kozlova, E. A.; Kochubey, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    Phantoms are imitations of biological tissue, which are used for modelling of the light propagation in biological tissues. Carrying out any biophysical experiments requires an indispensable constancy of the initial experiment conditions. The use of solid undegradable phantoms is the basis to obtain reliable reproducible experimental results. The fabrication of biological tissues phantoms containing high absorbance or fluorescence nanoparticles and corresponding to specific mechanical, optical properties is an actual task. This work describes development, fabrication and characterization of such solid tissue phantoms with embedded CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, gold and upconversion nanoparticles. Luminescence of samples with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and upconversion nanoparticles were recorded. A sample of gold nanorods was analyzed using thermal gravimetric analysis. It can be concluded that the samples are well suited for experiments on laser thermolysis.

  1. Laser characterization with advanced digital signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piels, Molly; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Zibar, Darko

    2015-01-01

    The use of machine learning techniques to characterize lasers with low output power is reviewed. Optimized phase tracking algorithms that can produce accurate noise spectra are discussed, and a method for inferring the amplitude noise spectrum and rate equation model of the laser under test is pr...

  2. Tracking of Drug Release and Material Fate for Naturally Derived Omega-3 Fatty Acid Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Keith M; Artzi, Natalie; Beck, Moshe; Beckerman, Rita; Moodie, Geoff; Albergo, Theresa; Conroy, Suzanne; Dale, Alicia; Corbeil, Scott; Martakos, Paul; Edelman, Elazer R

    2016-03-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted on omega-3 fatty acid-derived biomaterials to determine their utility as an implantable material for adhesion prevention following soft tissue hernia repair and as a means to allow for the local delivery of antimicrobial or antibiofilm agents. Naturally derived biomaterials offer several advantages over synthetic materials in the field of medical device development. These advantages include enhanced biocompatibility, elimination of risks posed by the presence of toxic catalysts and chemical crosslinking agents, and derivation from renewable resources. Omega-3 fatty acids are readily available from fish and plant sources and can be used to create implantable biomaterials either as a stand-alone device or as a device coating that can be utilized in local drug delivery applications. In-depth characterization of material erosion degradation over time using non-destructive imaging and chemical characterization techniques provided mechanistic insight into material structure: function relationship. This in turn guided rational tailoring of the material based on varying fatty acid composition to control material residence time and hence drug release. These studies demonstrate the utility of omega-3 fatty acid derived biomaterials as an absorbable material for soft tissue hernia repair and drug delivery applications.

  3. Biomaterials trigger endothelial cell activation when co-incubated with human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herklotz, Manuela; Hanke, Jasmin; Hänsel, Stefanie; Drichel, Juliane; Marx, Monique; Maitz, Manfred F; Werner, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial cell activation resulting from biomaterial contact or biomaterial-induced blood activation may in turn also affect hemostasis and inflammatory processes in the blood. Current in vitro hemocompatibility assays typically ignore these modulating effects of the endothelium. This study describes a co-incubation system of human whole blood, biomaterial and endothelial cells (ECs) that was developed to overcome this limitation. First, human endothelial cells were characterized in terms of their expression of coagulation- and inflammation-relevant markers in response to various activators. Subsequently, their capacity to regulate hemostasis as well as complement and granulocyte activation was monitored in a hemocompatibility assay. After blood contact, quiescent ECs exhibited anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. When they were co-incubated with surfaces exhibiting pro-coagulant or pro-inflammatory characteristics, the ECs down-regulated coagulation but not complement or leukocyte activation. Analysis of intracellular levels of the endothelial activation markers E-selectin and tissue factor showed that co-incubation with model surfaces and blood significantly increased the activation state of ECs. Finally, the coagulation- and inflammation-modulating properties of the ECs were tested after blood/biomaterial exposure. Pre-activation of ECs by biomaterials in the blood induced a pro-coagulant and pro-inflammatory state of the ECs, wherein the pro-coagulant response was higher for biomaterial/blood pre-activated ECs than for TNF-α-pre-activated cells. This work provides evidence that biomaterials, even without directly contacting the endothelium, affect the endothelial activation state with and have consequences for plasmatic and cellular reactions in the blood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interactions between biomaterials and the sclera: Implications on myopia progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, James

    Myopia prevalence has steadily climbed worldwide in recent decades with the most dramatic impact in East Asian countries. Treatments such as eyeglasses, contact lenses, and laser surgery for the refractive error are widely available, but none cures the underlying cause. In progressive high myopia, invasive surgical procedures using a scleral buckle for mechanical support are performed since the patient is at risk of becoming blind. The treatment outcome is highly dependent on the surgeon's skills and the patient's myopia progression rate, with limited choices in buckling materials. This dissertation, in four main studies, represents efforts made to control high myopia progression through the exploration and development of biomaterials that influence scleral growth. First, mRNA expression levels of the chick scleral matrix metalloproteinases, tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, and transforming growth factor-beta 2 were assessed for temporal and defocus power effects. The first study elucidated the roles that these factors play in scleral growth regulation and suggested potential motifs that can be incorporated in future biomaterials design. Second, poly(vinyl-pyrrolidone) as injectable gels and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) as solid strips were implanted in chicks to demonstrate the concept of posterior pole scleral reinforcements. This second study found that placing appropriate biomaterials at the posterior pole of the eye could directly influence scleral remodeling by interacting with the host cells. Both studies advanced the idea that scleral tissue remodeling could be potentially controlled by well-designed biomaterials. These findings led to the exploration of biomimetic hydrogels comprising enzymatically-degradable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (edsIPNs) to determine their biocompatibility and effects on the chick posterior eye wall. This third study demonstrated the feasibility of stimulating scleral growth by applying biomimetic

  5. Image-based characterization of foamed polymeric tissue scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, Melissa L; Morgan, Stephen P; Crowe, John A; White, Lisa J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Tai, Hongyun; Howdle, Steven M; Kockenberger, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Tissue scaffolds are integral to many regenerative medicine therapies, providing suitable environments for tissue regeneration. In order to assess their suitability, methods to routinely and reproducibly characterize scaffolds are needed. Scaffold structures are typically complex, and thus their characterization is far from trivial. The work presented in this paper is centred on the application of the principles of scaffold characterization outlined in guidelines developed by ASTM International. Specifically, this work demonstrates the capabilities of different imaging modalities and analysis techniques used to characterize scaffolds fabricated from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) using supercritical carbon dioxide. Three structurally different scaffolds were used. The scaffolds were imaged using: scanning electron microscopy, micro x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and terahertz pulsed imaging. In each case two-dimensional images were obtained from which scaffold properties were determined using image processing. The findings of this work highlight how the chosen imaging modality and image-processing technique can influence the results of scaffold characterization. It is concluded that in order to obtain useful results from image-based scaffold characterization, an imaging methodology providing sufficient contrast and resolution must be used along with robust image segmentation methods to allow intercomparison of results

  6. 2010 Panel on the Biomaterials Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, William “Monty”; Ratner, Buddy D.; Anderson, James; Coury, Art; Hoffman, Allan S.; Laurencin, Cato T.; Tirrell, David

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the National Academy for Engineering issued the Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century comprised of 14 technical challenges that must be addressed to build a healthy, profitable, sustainable, and secure global community (http://www.engineeringchallenges.org). Although crucial, none of the NEA Grand Challenges adequately addressed the challenges that face the biomaterials community. In response to the NAE Grand Challenges, Monty Reichert of Duke University organized a panel entitled Grand Challenges in Biomaterials at the at the 2010 Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting in Seattle. Six members of the National Academies—Buddy Ratner, James Anderson, Allan Hoffman, Art Coury, Cato Laurencin, and David Tirrell—were asked to propose a grand challenge to the audience that, if met, would significantly impact the future of biomaterials and medical devices. Successfully meeting these challenges will speed the 60-plus year transition from commodity, off-the-shelf biomaterials to bioengineered chemistries, and biomaterial devices that will significantly advance our ability to address patient needs and also to create new market opportunities. PMID:21171147

  7. Engineering Biomaterial Properties for Central Nervous System Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Christopher John

    Biomaterials offer unique properties that are intrinsic to the chemistry of the material itself or occur as a result of the fabrication process; iron oxide nanoparticles are superparamagnetic, which enables controlled heating in the presence of an alternating magnetic field, and a hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material provides minimally invasive placement of a fibrous, artificial extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. Utilization of these unique properties towards central nervous system disease and dysfunction requires a thorough definition of the properties in concert with full biological assessment. This enables development of material-specific features to elicit unique cellular responses. Iron oxide nanoparticles are first investigated for material-dependent, cortical neuron cytotoxicity in vitro and subsequently evaluated for alternating magnetic field stimulation induced hyperthermia, emulating the clinical application for enhanced chemotherapy efficacy in glioblastoma treatment. A hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material is first applied to a rat brain to evaluate biomaterial interface astrocyte accumulation as a function of hybrid material composition. The hybrid material is then utilized towards increasing functional engraftment of dopaminergic progenitor neural stem cells in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Taken together, these two scenarios display the role of material property characterization in development of biomaterial strategies for central nervous system repair and regeneration.

  8. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of locally advanced breast cancer by estimation of its scatterer properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory; Wirtzfeld, Lauren; Wright, Frances C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor grading is an important part of breast cancer diagnosis and currently requires biopsy as its standard. Here, the authors investigate quantitative ultrasound parameters in locally advanced breast cancers that can potentially separate tumors from normal breast tissue and differentiate tumor grades. Methods: Ultrasound images and radiofrequency data from 42 locally advanced breast cancer patients were acquired and analyzed. Parameters related to the linear regression of the power spectrum—midband fit, slope, and 0-MHz-intercept—were determined from breast tumors and normal breast tissues. Mean scatterer spacing was estimated from the spectral autocorrelation, and the effective scatterer diameter and effective acoustic concentration were estimated from the Gaussian form factor. Parametric maps of each quantitative ultrasound parameter were constructed from the gated radiofrequency segments in tumor and normal tissue regions of interest. In addition to the mean values of the parametric maps, higher order statistical features, computed from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were also determined and used for characterization. Finally, linear and quadratic discriminant analyses were performed using combinations of quantitative ultrasound parameters to classify breast tissues. Results: Quantitative ultrasound parameters were found to be statistically different between tumor and normal tissue (p < 0.05). The combination of effective acoustic concentration and mean scatterer spacing could separate tumor from normal tissue with 82% accuracy, while the addition of effective scatterer diameter to the combination did not provide significant improvement (83% accuracy). Furthermore, the two advanced parameters, including effective scatterer diameter and mean scatterer spacing, were found to be statistically differentiating among grade I, II, and III tumors (p = 0.014 for scatterer spacing, p = 0.035 for effective scatterer diameter). The separation of the tumor

  9. Strategies to Maximize the Potential of Marine Biomaterials as a Platform for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeongmin Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine biopolymers have been explored as a promising cell therapy system for efficient cell delivery and tissue engineering. However, the marine biomaterial-based systems themselves have exhibited limited performance in terms of maintenance of cell viability and functions, promotion of cell proliferation and differentiation as well as cell delivery efficiency. Thus, numerous novel strategies have been devised to improve cell therapy outcomes. The strategies include optimization of physical and biochemical properties, provision of stimuli-responsive functions, and design of platforms for efficient cell delivery and tissue engineering. These approaches have demonstrated substantial improvement of therapeutic outcomes in a variety of research settings. In this review, therefore, research progress made with marine biomaterials as a platform for cell therapy is reported along with current research directions to further advance cell therapies as a tool to cure incurable diseases.

  10. Strategies to Maximize the Potential of Marine Biomaterials as a Platform for Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeongmin; Lee, Jaehwi

    2016-01-01

    Marine biopolymers have been explored as a promising cell therapy system for efficient cell delivery and tissue engineering. However, the marine biomaterial-based systems themselves have exhibited limited performance in terms of maintenance of cell viability and functions, promotion of cell proliferation and differentiation as well as cell delivery efficiency. Thus, numerous novel strategies have been devised to improve cell therapy outcomes. The strategies include optimization of physical and biochemical properties, provision of stimuli-responsive functions, and design of platforms for efficient cell delivery and tissue engineering. These approaches have demonstrated substantial improvement of therapeutic outcomes in a variety of research settings. In this review, therefore, research progress made with marine biomaterials as a platform for cell therapy is reported along with current research directions to further advance cell therapies as a tool to cure incurable diseases. PMID:26821034

  11. PRESERVATION OF THE CELL-BIOMATERIAL INTERFACE AT THE ULTRASTRUCTURAL LEVEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHAKENRAAD, JM; OOSTERBAAN, JA; BLAAUW, EH

    1991-01-01

    Studying the tissue-biomaterial interface at the ultrastructural level is not without problems. Dissolution of the biomaterial in one of the dehydration or embedding media causes holes and shatter during sectioning or dislodgement of the biomaterial. The fine tuning of the hardness of both

  12. Transient processing and characterization of advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Sherif Omar Hassan

    The current study involves investigating the transient reactive processing of Ni3Al from nickel (Ni) and aluminum (Al) elemental metal powder during reaction synthesis (RS). The effect of incorporating ternary elements (interstitial) was also examined to produce boron-doped nickel-rich Ni3A1 with boron additions up to 2.0 wt %. Two transient reactive processes were studied; Reaction Pressing (RP) and a new process called Reaction Extrusion (RE) by which a near fully dense Ni3Al was simultaneously formed and shaped. These are seen as low-energy alternative to the hot processing of Ni3Al. Materials characterization was conducted using X-ray and Neutron diffraction, SEM/EDS, WDS, Image analysis and Archimedes principle. In the reactive sintering of B-doped Ni3Al, boron was found to rapidly dissolve during the reaction (leaving no residual boron) and occupy the grain boundaries as well as the Ni3Al superlattice (at boron content up to 0.3 wt %), in addition to combining with Ni and Al to form a complex boride (Ni41Al5B12) matrix above 0.5wt% content. Grain boundary strengthening, solid solution hardening and the formation of boride phase contributed to the observed increase in Rockwell hardness of Ni3Al with boron additions. The application of consolidation/deformation pressure was found to be most beneficial after the compact had reached the maximum combustion temperature and is cooling down. In the RP study, different consolidation pressures (100, 200 and 300 MPa) were applied to the reacted compact during cooling at different temperatures. It was found that with increasing pressing temperature and pressure, the percentage total porosity decreased reaching its minimum value of ˜1% at 1200°C and 300 MPa respectively. The grain size was almost independent of both pressing temperature and pressure. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  13. Designer biomaterials for mechanobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linqing; Eyckmans, Jeroen; Chen, Christopher S.

    2017-12-01

    Biomaterials engineered with specific bioactive ligands, tunable mechanical properties and complex architecture have emerged as powerful tools to probe cell sensing and response to physical properties of their material surroundings, and ultimately provide designer approaches to control cell function.

  14. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  15. Building blocks of Collagen based biomaterial devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Building blocks of Collagen based biomaterial devices. Collagen as a protein. Collagen in tissues and organs. Stabilizing and cross linking agents. Immunogenicity. Hosts (drugs). Controlled release mechanisms of hosts. Biodegradability, workability into devices ...

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy: A Powerful Tool to Address Scaffold Design in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Marrese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional polymers currently represent a basic component of a large range of biological and biomedical applications including molecular release, tissue engineering, bio-sensing and medical imaging. Advancements in these fields are driven by the use of a wide set of biodegradable polymers with controlled physical and bio-interactive properties. In this context, microscopy techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM are emerging as fundamental tools to deeply investigate morphology and structural properties at micro and sub-micrometric scale, in order to evaluate the in time relationship between physicochemical properties of biomaterials and biological response. In particular, AFM is not only a mere tool for screening surface topography, but may offer a significant contribution to understand surface and interface properties, thus concurring to the optimization of biomaterials performance, processes, physical and chemical properties at the micro and nanoscale. This is possible by capitalizing the recent discoveries in nanotechnologies applied to soft matter such as atomic force spectroscopy to measure surface forces through force curves. By tip-sample local interactions, several information can be collected such as elasticity, viscoelasticity, surface charge densities and wettability. This paper overviews recent developments in AFM technology and imaging techniques by remarking differences in operational modes, the implementation of advanced tools and their current application in biomaterials science, in terms of characterization of polymeric devices in different forms (i.e., fibres, films or particles.

  17. Marine Structural Biomaterials in Medical Biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    Marine biomaterials display properties, behaviors, and functions that have not been artificially matched in relation to their hierarchical construction, crack-stopping properties, growth adaptation, and energy efficiency. The discovery and understanding of such features that are characteristic of natural biomaterials can be used to manufacture more energy-efficient and lightweight materials. However, a more detailed understanding of the design of natural biomaterials with good performance and the mechanism of their design is required. Far-reaching biomolecular characterization of biomaterials and biostructures from the ocean world is possible with sophisticated analytical methods, such as whole-genome RNA-seq, and de novo transcriptome sequencing and mass spectrophotometry-based sequencing. In combination with detailed material characterization, the elements in newly discovered biomaterials and their properties can be reconstituted into biomimetic or bio-inspired materials. A major aim of harnessing marine biomaterials is their translation into biomimetic counterparts. To achieve full translation, the genome, proteome, and hierarchical material characteristics, and their profiles in space and time, have to be associated to allow for smooth biomimetic translation. In this article, we highlight the novel science of marine biomimicry from a materials perspective. We focus on areas of material design and fabrication that have excelled in marine biological models, such as embedded interfaces, chiral organization, and the use of specialized composite material-on-material designs. Our emphasis is primarily on key materials with high value in healthcare in which we evaluate their future prospects. Marine biomaterials are among the most exquisite and powerful aspects in materials science today.

  18. Mechanical and biological properties of keratose biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Roche C; Merrill, Michelle R; Richter, Jillian R; Hamzi, Rawad I; Greengauz-Roberts, Olga K; Van Dyke, Mark E

    2011-11-01

    The oxidized form of extractable human hair keratin proteins, commonly referred to as keratose, is gaining interest as a biomaterial for multiple tissue engineering studies including those directed toward peripheral nerve, spinal cord, skin, and bone regeneration. Unlike its disulfide cross-linked counterpart, kerateine, keratose does not possess a covalently cross-linked network structure and consequently displays substantially different characteristics. In order to understand its mode(s) of action and potential for clinical translatability, detailed characterization of the composition, physical properties, and biological responses of keratose biomaterials are needed. Keratose was obtained from end-cut human hair fibers by peracetic acid treatment, followed by base extraction, and subsequent dialysis. Analysis of lyophilized keratose powder determined that it contains 99% proteins by mass with amino acid content similar to human hair cortex. Metallic elements were also found in minute quantities. Protein oxidation led to disulfide bond cleavage and drastic reduction of free thiols due to conversion of sulfhydryl to sulfonic acid, chain fragmentation, and amino acid modifications. Mass spectrometry identified the major protein constituents as a heterogeneous mixture of 15 hair keratins (type I: K31-35 and K37-39, and type II: K81-86) with small amounts of epithelial keratins which exist in monomeric, dimeric, multimeric, and even degraded forms. Re-hydration with PBS enabled molecular assembly into an elastic solid-like hydrogel. Highly-porous scaffolds formed by lyophilization of the gel had the compression behavior of a cellular foam material and reverted back to gel upon wetting. Cytotoxicity assays showed that the EC50 for various cell lines were attained at 8-10 mg/mL keratose, indicating the non-toxic nature of the material. Implantation in mouse subcutaneous tissue pockets demonstrated that keratose resorption follows a rectangular hyperbolic regression

  19. Assessment of tissue ingrowth rates in polyurethane scaffolds for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramrattan, Navin N.; Heijkants, Ralf G.J.C.; Tienen, Tony G. van; Schouten, Arend Jan; Veth, Rene P.H.; Buma, Pieter; Ramrattan, [No Value

    The continuous development of new biomaterials for tissue engineering and the enhancement of tissue ingrowth into existing scaffolds, using growth factors, create the necessity for developing adequate tools to assess tissue ingrowth rates into porous biomaterials. Current histomorphometric

  20. Surface characterization and biological properties study of silicone rubber membrane grafted with phospholipid as biomaterial via plasma induced graft copolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiue, G H; Lee, S D; Chang, P C; Kao, C Y

    1998-10-01

    Poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (pMPC) was grafted onto the surface of a silicon rubber (SR) membrane (pMPC-SR) by plasma induced grafted copolymerization (PIP). Argon plasma was used to activate the SR surfaces. Determination was also made of the influences of grafted copolymerization reaction time, reaction temperature, and monomer concentration on polymerization yield. The surface properties of SR were characterized by ATR-FTIR, ESCA, and SEM. In those analyses the ATR-FTIR spectra indicated that the pMPC grafted onto the SR surface at 1720 and 3300 cm(-1). The elemental composition and different carbon bindings on the surface of the SR were examined by ESCA. An increasing P1s/C1s value g was obtained in the grafted polymerization yield with a concentration of 0.05-0.5M of MPC in the isolated ethanol solution. The surface morphologies of pMPC-SR differed more than those of control and Ar plasma treated surfaces. The difference could have been caused by the homogeneous graft polymerization of pMPC onto the SR membrane. In the biological analyses, protein adsorption on pMPC-SR surfaces was reduced. The reduced level increased with an increase in the pMPC grafted amount. The epithelial cell attachment and growth onto these samples were suppressed. The blood compatibility for a series of pMPC-SR surfaces was examined by platelet adhesion. Blood platelet morphologies in contact with the high ratio of pMPC-SR surfaces were maintained, meaning that in this case the release reaction for platelets never occurred. Consequently, the high amount of pMPC-SR surface had excellent blood compatibility, further suggesting that prevention of adhesion, activation of platelets, and adsorption of blood protein could be achieved.

  1. Mineral and physichocemical characterization of cockle (Anadara granosa) shells as an alternative biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazmi, A J Awang; Zuki, A B Z; Noordin, M M; Jalila, A; Norimah, Y

    2008-07-01

    This study was conducted based on the hypothesis that mineral and physicochemical properties of cockle shells similarly resemble the properties of corals (Porites sp.). Hence, the mineral and physicochemical evaluations of cockle shells were conducted to support the aforementioned hypothesis. The results indicated that cockle shells and coral exoskeleton shared similar mineral and physicochemical properties.

  2. Characterization Of The Advanced Radiographic Capability Front End On NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefner, C.; Heebner, J.; Dawson, J.; Fochs, S.; Shverdin, M.; Crane, J.K.; Kanz, V.K.; Halpin, J.; Phan, H.; Sigurdsson, R.; Brewer, W.; Britten, J.; Brunton, G.; Clark, W.; Messerly, M.J.; Nissen, J.D.; Nguyen, H.; Shaw, B.; Hackel, R.; Hermann, M.; Tietbohl, G.; Siders, C.W.; Barty, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    We have characterized the Advanced Radiographic Capability injection laser system and demonstrated that it meets performance requirements for upcoming National Ignition Facility fusion experiments. Pulse compression was achieved with a scaled down replica of the meter-scale grating ARC compressor and sub-ps pulse duration was demonstrated at the Joule-level

  3. System for tissue characterization using synchronous detection of diffuse reflectance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Lopez, Orestes M.; Stolik Isakina, Suren; La Rosa Vazquez, Jose Manuel de; Valor Reed, Alma

    2016-01-01

    The development of a system for the characterization of tissues optical properties in-vivo by synchronous detection of diffuse reflectance is presented. The system comprises an exploring probe with a linear spatial arrangement of optical fibers coupled to six lasers of 650 nm wavelength and a photodiode. The system also includes a preamplifier circuit for the photodiode, a driver for the amplitude modulation of the light signal of the lasers with optical power monitoring, a digital phase splitter for reference signal generation, an amplifying circuit with digitally switch able gain, a double phase demodulation circuit, an Arduino, and a control interface developed in LabVIEW. (Author)

  4. Innate Immunity and Biomaterials at the Nexus: Friends or Foes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan N. Christo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial implants are an established part of medical practice, encompassing a broad range of devices that widely differ in function and structural composition. However, one common property amongst biomaterials is the induction of the foreign body response: an acute sterile inflammatory reaction which overlaps with tissue vascularisation and remodelling and ultimately fibrotic encapsulation of the biomaterial to prevent further interaction with host tissue. Severity and clinical manifestation of the biomaterial-induced foreign body response are different for each biomaterial, with cases of incompatibility often associated with loss of function. However, unravelling the mechanisms that progress to the formation of the fibrotic capsule highlights the tightly intertwined nature of immunological responses to a seemingly noncanonical “antigen.” In this review, we detail the pathways associated with the foreign body response and describe possible mechanisms of immune involvement that can be targeted. We also discuss methods of modulating the immune response by altering the physiochemical surface properties of the biomaterial prior to implantation. Developments in these areas are reliant on reproducible and effective animal models and may allow a “combined” immunomodulatory approach of adapting surface properties of biomaterials, as well as treating key immune pathways to ultimately reduce the negative consequences of biomaterial implantation.

  5. Innate Immunity and Biomaterials at the Nexus: Friends or Foes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christo, Susan N.; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterial implants are an established part of medical practice, encompassing a broad range of devices that widely differ in function and structural composition. However, one common property amongst biomaterials is the induction of the foreign body response: an acute sterile inflammatory reaction which overlaps with tissue vascularisation and remodelling and ultimately fibrotic encapsulation of the biomaterial to prevent further interaction with host tissue. Severity and clinical manifestation of the biomaterial-induced foreign body response are different for each biomaterial, with cases of incompatibility often associated with loss of function. However, unravelling the mechanisms that progress to the formation of the fibrotic capsule highlights the tightly intertwined nature of immunological responses to a seemingly noncanonical “antigen.” In this review, we detail the pathways associated with the foreign body response and describe possible mechanisms of immune involvement that can be targeted. We also discuss methods of modulating the immune response by altering the physiochemical surface properties of the biomaterial prior to implantation. Developments in these areas are reliant on reproducible and effective animal models and may allow a “combined” immunomodulatory approach of adapting surface properties of biomaterials, as well as treating key immune pathways to ultimately reduce the negative consequences of biomaterial implantation. PMID:26247017

  6. Innate Immunity and Biomaterials at the Nexus: Friends or Foes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christo, Susan N; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterial implants are an established part of medical practice, encompassing a broad range of devices that widely differ in function and structural composition. However, one common property amongst biomaterials is the induction of the foreign body response: an acute sterile inflammatory reaction which overlaps with tissue vascularisation and remodelling and ultimately fibrotic encapsulation of the biomaterial to prevent further interaction with host tissue. Severity and clinical manifestation of the biomaterial-induced foreign body response are different for each biomaterial, with cases of incompatibility often associated with loss of function. However, unravelling the mechanisms that progress to the formation of the fibrotic capsule highlights the tightly intertwined nature of immunological responses to a seemingly noncanonical "antigen." In this review, we detail the pathways associated with the foreign body response and describe possible mechanisms of immune involvement that can be targeted. We also discuss methods of modulating the immune response by altering the physiochemical surface properties of the biomaterial prior to implantation. Developments in these areas are reliant on reproducible and effective animal models and may allow a "combined" immunomodulatory approach of adapting surface properties of biomaterials, as well as treating key immune pathways to ultimately reduce the negative consequences of biomaterial implantation.

  7. Advanced electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials for catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Su

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Transmission electron microscopy (TEM has become one of the most powerful techniques in the fields of material science, inorganic chemistry and nanotechnology. In terms of resolutions, advanced TEM may reach a high spatial resolution of 0.05 nm, a high energy-resolution of 7 meV. In addition, in situ TEM can help researchers to image the process happened within 1 ms. This paper reviews the recent technical progresses of applying advanced TEM characterization on nanomaterials for catalysis. The text is organized based on the perspective of application: for example, size, composition, phase, strain, and morphology. The electron beam induced effect and in situ TEM are also introduced. I hope this review can help the scientists in related fields to take advantage of advanced TEM to their own researches. Keywords: Advanced TEM, Nanomaterials, Catalysts, In situ

  8. Applications of biomaterials in corneal wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Lun Tsai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disease affecting the cornea is a common cause of blindness worldwide. To date, the amniotic membrane (AM is the most widely used clinical method for cornea regeneration. However, donor-dependent differences in the AM may result in variable clinical outcomes. To overcome this issue, biomaterials are currently under investigation for corneal regeneration in vitro and in vivo. In this article, we highlight the recent advances in hydrogels, bioengineered prosthetic devices, contact lenses, and drug delivery systems for corneal regeneration. In clinical studies, the therapeutic effects of biomaterials, including fibrin and collagen-based hydrogels and silicone contact lenses, have been demonstrated in damaged cornea. The combination of cells and biomaterials may provide potential treatment in corneal wound healing in the future.

  9. Manufacturing Cell Therapies Using Engineered Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, Amr A; Saha, Krishanu

    2017-10-01

    Emerging manufacturing processes to generate regenerative advanced therapies can involve extensive genomic and/or epigenomic manipulation of autologous or allogeneic cells. These cell engineering processes need to be carefully controlled and standardized to maximize safety and efficacy in clinical trials. Engineered biomaterials with smart and tunable properties offer an intriguing tool to provide or deliver cues to retain stemness, direct differentiation, promote reprogramming, manipulate the genome, or select functional phenotypes. This review discusses the use of engineered biomaterials to control human cell manufacturing. Future work exploiting engineered biomaterials has the potential to generate manufacturing processes that produce standardized cells with well-defined critical quality attributes appropriate for clinical testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Tissue engineering-based therapeutic strategies for vocal fold repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linqing; Stiadle, Jeanna M; Lau, Hang K; Zerdoum, Aidan B; Jia, Xinqiao; Thibeault, Susan L; Kiick, Kristi L

    2016-11-01

    Vocal folds are soft laryngeal connective tissues with distinct layered structures and complex multicomponent matrix compositions that endow phonatory and respiratory functions. This delicate tissue is easily damaged by various environmental factors and pathological conditions, altering vocal biomechanics and causing debilitating vocal disorders that detrimentally affect the daily lives of suffering individuals. Modern techniques and advanced knowledge of regenerative medicine have led to a deeper understanding of the microstructure, microphysiology, and micropathophysiology of vocal fold tissues. State-of-the-art materials ranging from extracecullar-matrix (ECM)-derived biomaterials to synthetic polymer scaffolds have been proposed for the prevention and treatment of voice disorders including vocal fold scarring and fibrosis. This review intends to provide a thorough overview of current achievements in the field of vocal fold tissue engineering, including the fabrication of injectable biomaterials to mimic in vitro cell microenvironments, novel designs of bioreactors that capture in vivo tissue biomechanics, and establishment of various animal models to characterize the in vivo biocompatibility of these materials. The combination of polymeric scaffolds, cell transplantation, biomechanical stimulation, and delivery of antifibrotic growth factors will lead to successful restoration of functional vocal folds and improved vocal recovery in animal models, facilitating the application of these materials and related methodologies in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomechanical Behavior of Bioprosthetic Heart Valve Heterograft Tissues: Characterization, Simulation, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joao S.; Feaver, Kristen R.; Zhang, Will; Kamensky, David; Aggarwal, Ankush; Sacks, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The use of replacement heart valves continues to grow due to the increased prevalence of valvular heart disease resulting from an ageing population. Since bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs) continue to be the preferred replacement valve, there continues to be a strong need to develop better and more reliable BHVs through and improved the general understanding of BHV failure mechanisms. The major technological hurdle for the lifespan of the BHV implant continues to be the durability of the constituent leaflet biomaterials, which if improved can lead to substantial clinical impact. In order to develop improved solutions for BHV biomaterials, it is critical to have a better understanding of the inherent biomechanical behaviors of the leaflet biomaterials, including chemical treatment technologies, the impact of repetitive mechanical loading, and the inherent failure modes. This review seeks to provide a comprehensive overview of these issues, with a focus on developing insight on the mechanisms of BHV function and failure. Additionally, this review provides a detailed summary of the computational biomechanical simulations that have been used to inform and develop a higher level of understanding of BHV tissues and their failure modes. Collectively, this information should serve as a tool not only to infer reliable and dependable prosthesis function, but also to instigate and facilitate the design of future bioprosthetic valves and clinically impact cardiology. PMID:27507280

  12. Biomaterial-Supported Cell Transplantation Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury: Challenges and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwen Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI, resulting in para- and tetraplegia caused by the partial or complete disruption of descending motor and ascending sensory neurons, represents a complex neurological condition that remains incurable. Following SCI, numerous obstacles comprising of the loss of neural tissue (neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, formation of a cavity, inflammation, loss of neuronal circuitry and function must be overcome. Given the multifaceted primary and secondary injury events that occur with SCI treatment options are likely to require combinatorial therapies. While several methods have been explored, only the intersection of two, cell transplantation and biomaterial implantation, will be addressed in detail here. Owing to the constant advance of cell culture technologies, cell-based transplantation has come to the forefront of SCI treatment in order to replace/protect damaged tissue and provide physical as well as trophic support for axonal regrowth. Biomaterial scaffolds provide cells with a protected environment from the surrounding lesion, in addition to bridging extensive damage and providing physical and directional support for axonal regrowth. Moreover, in this combinatorial approach cell transplantation improves scaffold integration and therefore regenerative growth potential. Here, we review the advances in combinatorial therapies of Schwann cells (SCs, astrocytes, olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs, mesenchymal stem cells, as well as neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs with various biomaterial scaffolds.

  13. Research advances on tissue-engineered corneal endothelial cells transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Jie Zhao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the serious shortage of donor cornea materials and the donor limit, clinical popularization of penetrating keratoplasty is severely restricted. It is a hot spot of current research that applying tissue engineering in vitro to culture corneal endothelial cells(CECwith high density, regular hexagonal shape and healthy endothelial function. In this article, we reviewed the latest progress in the study of source of CEC seeder cells, selection of cultivating carries, type of CEC transplantation and immune mechanism that summarized the current research problems and made a prospect to the future.

  14. Bioresorption and degradation of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debarun; Zhang, Ziyang; Winkler, Thomas; Mour, Meenakshi; Gunter, Christina; Morlock, Michael; Machens, Hans-Gunther; Schilling, Arndt F

    2012-01-01

    The human body is a composite structure, completely constructed of biodegradable materials. This allows the cells of the body to remove and replace old or defective tissue with new material. Consequently, artificial resorbable biomaterials have been developed for application in regenerative medicine. We discuss here advantages and disadvantages of these bioresorbable materials for medical applications and give an overview of typically used metals, ceramics and polymers. Methods for the quantification of bioresorption in vitro and in vivo are described. The next challenge will be to better understand the interface between cell and material and to use this knowledge for the design of “intelligent” materials that can instruct the cells to build specific tissue geometries and degrade in the process.

  15. Silk-Based Injectable Biomaterial as an Alternative to Cervical Cerclage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Asha J.; Socrate, Simona; Burke, Kelly A.; Norwitz, Errol R.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: New therapies to prevent preterm birth are needed. Our objective was to study an injectable biomaterial for human cervical tissue as an alternative to cervical cerclage. Study Design: Human cervical tissue specimens were obtained from premenopausal gynecological hysterectomies for benign indications. A 3-part biomaterial was formulated, consisting of silk protein solution blended with a 2-part polyethylene glycol gelation system. The solutions were injected into cervical tissue and the tissue was evaluated for mechanical properties, swelling, cytocompatibility, and histology. Results: The stiffness of cervical tissue more than doubled after injection (P = .02). Swelling properties of injected tissue were no different than native tissue controls. Cervical fibroblasts remained viable for at least 48 hours when cultured on the biomaterial. Conclusions: We report a silk-based, biocompatible, injectable biomaterial that increased the stiffness of cervical tissue compared to uninjected controls. Animal studies are needed to assess this biomaterial in vivo. PMID:23271162

  16. Silk-based injectable biomaterial as an alternative to cervical cerclage: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Asha J; Socrate, Simona; Burke, Kelly A; Norwitz, Errol R; Kaplan, David L; House, Michael D

    2013-08-01

    New therapies to prevent preterm birth are needed. Our objective was to study an injectable biomaterial for human cervical tissue as an alternative to cervical cerclage. Human cervical tissue specimens were obtained from premenopausal gynecological hysterectomies for benign indications. A 3-part biomaterial was formulated, consisting of silk protein solution blended with a 2-part polyethylene glycol gelation system. The solutions were injected into cervical tissue and the tissue was evaluated for mechanical properties, swelling, cytocompatibility, and histology. The stiffness of cervical tissue more than doubled after injection (P = .02). Swelling properties of injected tissue were no different than native tissue controls. Cervical fibroblasts remained viable for at least 48 hours when cultured on the biomaterial. We report a silk-based, biocompatible, injectable biomaterial that increased the stiffness of cervical tissue compared to uninjected controls. Animal studies are needed to assess this biomaterial in vivo.

  17. Synthesis and characterizations of alginate-α-tricalcium phosphate microparticle hybrid film with flexibility and high mechanical property as a biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Zhang, Shengmin; Noh, Insup

    2018-01-24

    A biocompatible hybrid film has been fabricated using alginate (Alg), α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) microparticle and calcium chloride through ionic crosslinking as a biomaterial. The 'screeding method' (like a concrete finishing process) has been employed to develop the Alg-α-TCP film. For this method, the Alg/α-TCP blend has been prepared using an ultra-sonicator and then put on a glass slide. After that, the excess volume of blend has been cut off by skidding another slide along with the surface of the blend to achieve proper grade and flatness. The mechanical strength and flexibility of the film (Alg-α-TCP) has been controlled by changing its compositions. The crosslinking phenomenon has been confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analyses. The ATR-FTIR and 13 C NMR analysis results suggest that carboxylate groups of the alginate are ionically cross-linked with Ca 2+ ions, while the α-TCP particles reside in the network by physical interaction. The micro-fatigue test results imply high tensile strength (up to 257 MPa) and flexibility (up to 13% elongation) of the Alg-α-TCP hybrid films. The SEM analysis suggests the α-TCP particles are homogeneously distributed on the surface of Alg-α-TCP films, whereas cross-sectional images confirmed the presence of α-TCP in the cross-linked network. TGA results demonstrated that thermal stability of the hybrid film was enhanced due to ionic crosslinking and interfacial interaction between alginate and α-TCP. The incorporation of α-TCP particles diminished the swelling ratio of the hybrid film. The in vitro bone cell (MC3T3) culture and cytotoxicity tests showed that the hybrid film is biocompatible. The hybrid film releases bovine serum albumin and dimethyloxaloylglycine in a controlled way at pH 7 and 7.4, and 37 °C. Overall, the biocompatible Alg-α-TCP hybrid film with

  18. Mapping and characterization of iron compounds in Alzheimer's tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collingwood, Joanna; Dobson, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the management of iron in the brain is of great importance in the study of neurodegeneration, where regional iron overload is frequently evident. A variety of approaches have been employed, from quantifying iron in various anatomical structures, to identifying genetic risk factors related to iron metabolism, and exploring chelation approaches to tackle iron overload in neurodegenerative disease. However, the ease with which iron can change valence state ensures that it is present in vivo in a wide variety of forms, both soluble and insoluble. Here, we review recent developments in approaches to locate and identify iron compounds in neurodegenerative tissue. In addition to complementary techniques that allow us to quantify and identify iron compounds using magnetometry, extraction, and electron microscopy, we are utilizing a powerful combined mapping/characterization approach with synchrotron X-rays. This has enabled the location and characterization of iron accumulations containing magnetite and ferritin in human Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue sections in situ at micron-resolution. It is hoped that such approaches will contribute to our understanding of the role of unusual iron accumulations in disease pathogenesis, and optimise the potential to use brain iron as a clinical biomarker for early detection and diagnosis.

  19. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from equine adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Carvalho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has shown promising results in tendinitis and osteoarthritis in equine medicine. The purpose of this work was to characterize the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs in horses through (1 the assessment of the capacity of progenitor cells to perform adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation; and (2 flow cytometry analysis using the stemness related markers: CD44, CD90, CD105 and MHC Class II. Five mixed-breed horses, aged 2-4 years-old were used to collect adipose tissue from the base of the tail. After isolation and culture of AdMSCs, immunophenotypic characterization was performed through flow cytometry. There was a high expression of CD44, CD90 and CD105, and no expression of MHC Class II markers. The tri-lineage differentiation was confirmed by specific staining: adipogenic (Oil Red O, osteogenic (Alizarin Red, and chondrogenic (Alcian Blue. The equine AdMSCs are a promising type of adult progenitor cell for tissue engineering in veterinary medicine.

  20. Biomaterials and host versus graft response: A short review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velnar, Tomaz; Bunc, Gorazd; Klobucar, Robert; Gradisnik, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials and biotechnology are increasing becoming an important area in modern medicine. The main aim in this area is the development of materials, which are biocompatible to normal tissue. Tissue-implant interactions with molecular, biological and cellular characteristics at the implant-tissue interface are important for the use and development of implants. Implantation may cause an inflammatory and immune response in tissue, foreign body reaction, systemic toxicity and imminent infection. Tissue-implant interactions determine the implant life-period. The aims of the study are to consider the biological response to implants. Biomaterials and host reactions to implants and their mechanisms are also briefly discussed. PMID:26894284

  1. Hydroxyapatite, a biomaterial: Its chemical synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydroxyapatite, a biomaterial: Its chemical synthesis, characterization and study of biocompatibility prepared from shell of garden snail,. Helix aspersa. ANJUVAN SINGH. Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144 411, India. MS received 10 February 2010; revised 20 July ...

  2. Characterization of tissue scaffolds using optics and ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, N. T.; Parker, N. G.; He, D.; Ruan, H.; Hayes-Gill, B. R.; Mather, M. L.; Crowe, J. A.; Rose, F. R. A. J.; Povey, M. J. W.; Morgan, S. P.

    2011-03-01

    Tissue scaffolds are an integral part of the tissue engineering process, assisting in the culturing of cells in three dimensions. It is important to understand both the properties of the scaffold and the growth of cells within the scaffold. This paper describes a system to characterise scaffolds using acoustic techniques alone and the development of an ultrasound modulated optical tomography system to study the growth of cells within the scaffolds. Our interest is in characterising the properties of gel-based and polymer foam-based scaffolds. Results from a purely acoustic system have been used to investigate the properties of foam scaffolds manufactured from synthetic polyesters poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) via a supercritical fluid process. As these are porous materials, they are particularly challenging acoustically as the pores scatter sound significantly. However, it is demonstrated that acoustic signals are detectable through a 6mm thick scaffold. Although acoustics alone can be used to characterize many properties of the scaffolds, useful information can also be obtained from optical techniques e.g. monitoring the growth of cells within the scaffold via optical absorption or fluorescence techniques. Light scattering is of course a significant problem for relatively thick engineered tissue (~5mm). The acoustic approach has been extended to include laser illumination and detection of the ultrasound modulated optical pulse. Images of optically-absorbing materials embedded in gel-based tissue phantoms will be presented demonstrating that a lateral resolution of 250μm and an axial resolution of ~90μm can be achieved in scattering samples.

  3. Biomaterials-based 3D cell printing for next-generation therapeutics and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jinah; Park, Ju Young; Gao, Ge; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2018-02-01

    Building human tissues via 3D cell printing technology has received particular attention due to its process flexibility and versatility. This technology enables the recapitulation of unique features of human tissues and the all-in-one manufacturing process through the design of smart and advanced biomaterials and proper polymerization techniques. For the optimal engineering of tissues, a higher-order assembly of physiological components, including cells, biomaterials, and biomolecules, should meet the critical requirements for tissue morphogenesis and vascularization. The convergence of 3D cell printing with a microfluidic approach has led to a significant leap in the vascularization of engineering tissues. In addition, recent cutting-edge technology in stem cells and genetic engineering can potentially be adapted to the 3D tissue fabrication technique, and it has great potential to shift the paradigm of disease modeling and the study of unknown disease mechanisms required for precision medicine. This review gives an overview of recent developments in 3D cell printing and bioinks and provides technical requirements for engineering human tissues. Finally, we propose suggestions on the development of next-generation therapeutics and diagnostics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomaterials for nanoparticle vaccine delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahdev, Preety; Ochyl, Lukasz J; Moon, James J

    2014-10-01

    Subunit vaccination benefits from improved safety over attenuated or inactivated vaccines, but their limited capability to elicit long-lasting, concerted cellular and humoral immune responses is a major challenge. Recent studies have demonstrated that antigen delivery via nanoparticle formulations can significantly improve immunogenicity of vaccines due to either intrinsic immunostimulatory properties of the materials or by co-entrapment of molecular adjuvants such as Toll-like receptor agonists. These studies have collectively shown that nanoparticles designed to mimic biophysical and biochemical cues of pathogens offer new exciting opportunities to enhance activation of innate immunity and elicit potent cellular and humoral immune responses with minimal cytotoxicity. In this review, we present key research advances that were made within the last 5 years in the field of nanoparticle vaccine delivery systems. In particular, we focus on the impact of biomaterials composition, size, and surface charge of nanoparticles on modulation of particle biodistribution, delivery of antigens and immunostimulatory molecules, trafficking and targeting of antigen presenting cells, and overall immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues. This review describes recent progresses in the design of nanoparticle vaccine delivery carriers, including liposomes, lipid-based particles, micelles and nanostructures composed of natural or synthetic polymers, and lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles.

  5. Microbiome Heterogeneity Characterizing Intestinal Tissue and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrea D; Kirsch, Richard; Milgrom, Raquel; Stempak, Joanne M; Kabakchiev, Boyko; Silverberg, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with differential abundance of numerous organisms when compared to healthy controls (HCs); however, few studies have investigated variability in the microbiome across intestinal locations and how this variability might be related to disease location and phenotype. In this study, we have analyzed the microbiome of a large cohort of individuals recruited at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Biopsies were taken from subjects with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and HC, and also individuals having undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for treatment of ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. Microbial 16S rRNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We observed a great deal of variability in the microbiome characterizing different sampling locations. Samples from pouch and afferent limb were comparable in microbial composition. When comparing sigmoid and terminal ileum samples, more differences were observed. The greatest number of differentially abundant microbes was observed when comparing either pouch or afferent limb samples to sigmoid or terminal ileum. Despite these differences, we were able to observe modest microbial variability between inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes and HCs, even when controlling for sampling location and additional experimental factors. Most detected associations were observed between HCs and Crohn's disease, with decreases in specific genera in the families Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae characterizing tissue samples from individuals with Crohn's disease. This study highlights important considerations when analyzing the composition of the microbiome and also provides useful insight into differences in the microbiome characterizing these seemingly related phenotypes.

  6. Advances in menopausal therapy: the tissue-selective estrogen complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, vulvar-vaginal atrophy, and/or bone loss. Although available estrogen and progestin therapies are effective in treating menopausal symptoms and preventing bone loss, some women may seek a therapy that provides symptom relief and has an improved tolerability profile. One option is a tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC), or the pairing of estrogen(s) with a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) to achieve the benefits of each component with fewer side effects. The first TSEC in clinical development combines the SERM bazedoxifene (BZA) with conjugated estrogens (CEs). The purpose of this article is to review published data for BZA/CE. Data were obtained from phase 3 BZA/CE clinical trial study articles. Daily BZA 20 mg/CE 0.625 mg or 0.45 mg effectively relieved hot flushes, maintained or increased bone mineral density, treated vulvar-vaginal atrophy, and improved quality of life. Further, BZA prevented stimulation of the endometrium by CE, and resulted in rates of amenorrhea and breast pain similar to placebo. These results support the use of a TSEC consisting of BZA/CE as a promising therapy for managing the signs and symptoms from reduced estrogen levels associated with menopause. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. Wildlife biomaterial banking in Africa for now and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Paul; Kotze, Antoinette

    2006-08-01

    The Wildlife Biological Resource Centre (wBRC) together with its partners in BioBank SA, have created a Biological Resource Bank (BRB) that is dedicated to the acquisition, processing, banking, using and provision of biomaterials to the scientific and conservation industry that are viable, diverse and representative of southern Africa's wildlife populations. Banked biomaterials include tissue such as muscle, kidney, fat, liver, embryos, fibroblast cultures, blood, sperm, hair, egg shells and other tissue, fluids and cells. Biomaterials are made available for research, biodiversity conservation and biotechnology development. Biomaterials are used in many disciplines, including genetics, reproduction, nutrition, and disease studies. Biomaterials from selected species are also useful for the detection and monitoring of Persistent Organic Pollutants and other potentially harmful substances found in the environment. Biomaterials are made available to third parties with prior consent from the biomaterials "owner" and only after the signing of a customised Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) or Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The training of staff from National and Provincial Game Reserves, Zoological Gardens, Animal Breeders and laboratories is carried out on a regular basis with the aim of securing good quality biomaterials. Sampling kits are made available to persons tasked with the collection of wildlife biomaterials. The Biobank SA consortium acts as an integrated resource centre linking partner collections. The consortium's operational arm, namely wBRC, is active in the development of relevant policy, regulations and legislation pertaining to biomaterials, including Access and Benefit Sharing systems. The main sponsor of the project is the Department of Science and Technology, National Government of South Africa.

  8. Encapsulation of biomaterials in porous glass-like matrices prepared via an aqueous colloidal sol-gel process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dean-Mo; Chen, I-Wei

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for the encapsulation of biologically important proteins into transparent, porous silica matrices by an alcohol-free, aqueous, colloidal sol-gel process, and to the biological materials encapsulated thereby. The process is exemplified by studies involving encapsulated cytochrome c, catalase, myoglobin, and hemoglobin, although non-proteinaceous biomaterials, such as active DNA or RNA fragments, cells or even tissues, may also be encapsulated in accordance with the present methods. Conformation, and hence activity of the biomaterial, is successfully retained after encapsulation as demonstrated by optical characterization of the molecules, even after long-term storage. The retained conformation of the biomaterial is strongly correlated to both the rate of gelation and the subsequent drying speed of the encapsulatng matrix. Moreover, in accordance with this process, gelation is accelerated by the use of a higher colloidal solid concentration and a lower synthesis pH than conventional methods, thereby enhancing structural stability and retained conformation of the biomaterials. Thus, the invention also provides a remarkable improvement in retaining the biological activity of the encapsulated biomaterial, as compared with those involved in conventional alkoxide-based processes. It further provides new methods for the quantitative and qualitative detection of test substances that are reactive to, or catalyzed by, the active, encapsulated biological materials.

  9. Bioengineered silk scaffolds in 3D tissue modeling with focus on mammary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghdouri-White, Yas; Bowlin, Gary L; Lemmon, Christopher A; Dréau, Didier

    2016-02-01

    In vitro generation of three-dimensional (3D) biological tissues and organ-like structures is a promising strategy to study and closely model complex aspects of the molecular, cellular, and physiological interactions of tissue. In particular, in vitro 3D tissue modeling holds promises to further our understanding of breast development. Indeed, biologically relevant 3D structures that combine mammary cells and engineered matrices have improved our knowledge of mammary tissue growth, organization, and differentiation. Several polymeric biomaterials have been used as scaffolds to engineer 3D mammary tissues. Among those, silk fibroin-based biomaterials have many biologically relevant properties and have been successfully used in multiple medical applications. Here, we review the recent advances in engineered scaffolds with an emphasis on breast-like tissue generation and the benefits of modified silk-based scaffolds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical characterization of hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, S., E-mail: smsilva@ineb.up.pt [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais, Porto (Portugal); Rodriguez, M.A.; Pena, P.; De Aza, A.H.; De Aza, S. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, 28049-Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Ferraz, M.P. [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude da Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Rua Carlos da Maia, 296, 4200-150 Porto (Portugal); Monteiro, F.J. [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais, Porto (Portugal)

    2009-06-01

    The present study refers to the preparation and characterization of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds to be used as matrices for bone regeneration or as specific release vehicles. Ceramics are widely used for bone tissue engineering purposes and in this study, hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds were produced using the polymer replication method. Polyurethane sponges were used as templates and impregnated with a ceramic slurry at different ratios, and sintered at 1300 deg. C following a specific thermal cycle. The characteristics of the hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds and respective powder used as starting material, were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, particle size distribution, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and compressive mechanical testing techniques. It was possible to produce highly porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds presenting micro and macropores and pore interconnectivity.

  11. Scale-up of nature’s tissue weaving algorithms to engineer advanced functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Joanna L.; Knothe, Lillian E.; Whan, Renee M.; Knothe, Ulf; Tate, Melissa L. Knothe

    2017-01-01

    We are literally the stuff from which our tissue fabrics and their fibers are woven and spun. The arrangement of collagen, elastin and other structural proteins in space and time embodies our tissues and organs with amazing resilience and multifunctional smart properties. For example, the periosteum, a soft tissue sleeve that envelops all nonarticular bony surfaces of the body, comprises an inherently “smart” material that gives hard bones added strength under high impact loads. Yet a paucity of scalable bottom-up approaches stymies the harnessing of smart tissues’ biological, mechanical and organizational detail to create advanced functional materials. Here, a novel approach is established to scale up the multidimensional fiber patterns of natural soft tissue weaves for rapid prototyping of advanced functional materials. First second harmonic generation and two-photon excitation microscopy is used to map the microscopic three-dimensional (3D) alignment, composition and distribution of the collagen and elastin fibers of periosteum, the soft tissue sheath bounding all nonarticular bone surfaces in our bodies. Then, using engineering rendering software to scale up this natural tissue fabric, as well as multidimensional weaving algorithms, macroscopic tissue prototypes are created using a computer-controlled jacquard loom. The capacity to prototype scaled up architectures of natural fabrics provides a new avenue to create advanced functional materials.

  12. Biomaterials and magnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetite (Fe34) is biocompatible and therefore is one of the most extensively used biomaterials for different applications ranging from cell separation and drug delivery to hyperthermia. Other than this, a large number of magnetic materials in bulk as well as in the form of nano particles have been exploited for a variety of ...

  13. Update on Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul A; Giori, Nicholas J; Lavernia, Carlos J; Villa, Jesus M; Greenwald, A Seth

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials are essential to the use and development of successful treatments for orthopaedic patients. Orthopaedic surgeons need to understand the expected clinical performance and the effects of implants in patients. Recent attempts to improve implant durability have resulted in adverse effects related to biomaterials and their relationship to patients. Examples of these adverse effects in hip arthroplasty include wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal bearings, trunnions, and tapered modular neck junctions. Conversely, polymers and ceramics have shown substantial improvements in durability. Improved implant compositions and manufacturing processes have resulted in ceramic head and acetabular liners with improved material properties and the avoidance of voids, which have, in the past, caused catastrophic fractures. Cross-linking of polyethylene with radiation and doping with antioxidants has substantially increased implant durability and is increasingly being used in joint prostheses other than the hip. Additive manufacturing is potentially a transformative process; it can lead to custom and patient-specific implants and to improvements in material properties, which can be optimized to achieve desired bone responses. Orthopaedic surgeons must understand the material properties and the biologic effects of new or altered biomaterials and manufacturing processes before use. In addition, a clear benefit to the patient must be proven based on superior preclinical results and high-quality clinical investigations before orthopaedic surgeons use new or altered biomaterials.

  14. Hot topics in biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Alton, Eric W; Griesenbach, Uta

    2014-01-01

    The expert coverage of the eight chapters in this book reflects the diverse nature of the field of biomaterials science and encompasses contributions from a wide range of fields, highlighting key classes of novel materials and exploring the underlying science and potential applications.

  15. Chapter 16: Lignin Visualization: Advanced Microscopy Techniques for Lignin Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yining [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Donohoe, Bryon S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-03

    Visualization of lignin in plant cell walls, with both spatial and chemical resolution, is emerging as an important tool to understand lignin's role in the plant cell wall's nanoscale architecture and to understand and design processes intended to modify the lignin. As such, this chapter reviews recent advances in advanced imaging methods with respect to lignin in plant cell walls. This review focuses on the importance of lignin detection and localization for studies in both plant biology and biotechnology. Challenges going forward to identify and delineate lignin from other plant cell wall components and to quantitatively analyze lignin in whole cell walls from native plant tissue and treated biomass are also discussed.

  16. Frontiers in biomaterials the design, synthetic strategies and biocompatibility of polymer scaffolds for biomedical application

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Shunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Frontiers in Biomaterials: The Design, Synthetic Strategies and Biocompatibility of Polymer Scaffolds for Biomedical Application, Volume 1" highlights the importance of biomaterials and their interaction with biological system. The need for the development of biomaterials as scaffold for tissue regeneration is driven by the increasing demands for materials that mimic functions of extracellular matrices of body tissues.This ebook covers the latest challenges on the biocompatibility of scaffold overtime after implantation and discusses the requirement of innovative technologies and strategies f

  17. Advances in characterizing ubiquitylation sites by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, K.B.; Young, C.; Nielsen, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    The attachment of one or more ubiquitin moieties to proteins plays a central regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Protein ubiquitylation regulates numerous cellular processes, including protein degradation, signal transduction, DNA repair and cell division. The characterization of ubiquityla......The attachment of one or more ubiquitin moieties to proteins plays a central regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Protein ubiquitylation regulates numerous cellular processes, including protein degradation, signal transduction, DNA repair and cell division. The characterization...... of ubiquitylation is a two-fold challenge that involves the mapping of ubiquitylation sites and the determination of ubiquitin chain topology. This review focuses on the technical advances in the mass spectrometry-based characterization of ubiquitylation sites, which have recently involved the large...

  18. Characterization of adipose tissue for autologous fat grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszynski, Thomas M; Sieber, David A; Van Beek, Allen L; Cunningham, Bruce L

    2015-02-01

    Fat grafting is a common procedure in aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery, but variable graft retention limits its utility. Unpredictable clinical outcomes with fat grafting can be explained in part by the lack of standardized protocols for harvesting, processing, and transplanting adipose tissue (AT). Historically, plastic surgeons have relied on trial and error and their clinical experience to develop fat grafting protocols. Optimization of fat grafting protocols requires systematic assessment of the impact that key variables have on the quality of the AT preparation at each step of the procedure. In this article, we review recent findings regarding the composition and quality of AT prepared for fat grafting and the strengths and limitations of existing AT characterization assays. We discuss the need for an assessment of the viability of intact AT (ie, conventionally harvested AT that has not been disrupted further) by means of an operator-independent, quantitative assay that can be performed in real time and generates reproducible data. Promising assays for the characterization of cell product quality have been developed for other therapeutic applications, such as transplantation of pancreatic islet cells. The development or adaptation of a gold-standard assay to determine the quality of an AT preparation may help to standardize fat grafting protocols and improve clinical outcomes. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Bone tissue engineering with a collagen–hydroxyapatite scaffold and culture expanded bone marrow stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Max M.; Wang, Liping; Huang, Jianping; Rowe, David W.; Wei, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Osteoprogenitor cells combined with supportive biomaterials represent a promising approach to advance the standard of care for bone grafting procedures. However, this approach faces challenges, including inconsistent bone formation, cell survival in the implant, and appropriate biomaterial degradation. We have developed a collagen–hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold that supports consistent osteogenesis by donor derived osteoprogenitors, and is more easily degraded than a pure ceramic scaffold. Herein, the material properties are characterized as well as cell attachment, viability, and progenitor distribution in vitro. Furthermore, we examined the biological performance in vivo in a critical-size mouse calvarial defect. To aid in the evaluation of the in-house collagen–HA scaffold, the in vivo performance was compared with a commercial collagen–HA scaffold (Healos®, Depuy). The in-house collagen–HA scaffold supported consistent bone formation by predominantly donor-derived osteoblasts, nearly completely filling a 3.5 mm calvarial defect with bone in all samples (n=5) after 3 weeks of implantation. In terms of bone formation and donor cell retention at 3 weeks postimplantation, no statistical difference was found between the in-house and commercial scaffold following quantitative histomorphometry. The collagen–HA scaffold presented here is an open and well-defined platform that supports robust bone formation and should facilitate the further development of collagen–hydroxyapatite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:24909953

  20. Characterizing human lung tissue microbiota and its relationship to epidemiological and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoqin; Gail, Mitchell H; Consonni, Dario; Carugno, Michele; Humphrys, Michael; Pesatori, Angela C; Caporaso, Neil E; Goedert, James J; Ravel, Jacques; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2016-07-28

    The human lung tissue microbiota remains largely uncharacterized, although a number of studies based on airway samples suggest the existence of a viable human lung microbiota. Here we characterized the taxonomic and derived functional profiles of lung microbiota in 165 non-malignant lung tissue samples from cancer patients. We show that the lung microbiota is distinct from the microbial communities in oral, nasal, stool, skin, and vagina, with Proteobacteria as the dominant phylum (60 %). Microbiota taxonomic alpha diversity increases with environmental exposures, such as air particulates, residence in low to high population density areas, and pack-years of tobacco smoking and decreases in subjects with history of chronic bronchitis. Genus Thermus is more abundant in tissue from advanced stage (IIIB, IV) patients, while Legionella is higher in patients who develop metastases. Moreover, the non-malignant lung tissues have higher microbiota alpha diversity than the paired tumors. Our results provide insights into the human lung microbiota composition and function and their link to human lifestyle and clinical outcomes. Studies among subjects without lung cancer are needed to confirm our findings.

  1. New biomaterials obtained with ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussens, G.

    1982-01-01

    In present-day surgery and medicine use is increasingly made of materials foreign to the organism in order to remedy a physiological defect either temporarily or permanently. These materials, known as ''biomaterials'', take widely varying forms: plastics, metals, cements, ceramics, etc. Biomaterials can be classified in accordance with their function: (a) Devices designed to be fully implanted in the human body in order to replace an anatomical structure, either temporarily or permanently, such as articular, vascular, mammary and osteosynthetic prostheses, etc.; (b) Devices having prolonged contact with mucous tissues, such as intra-uterine devices, contact lenses, etc.; (c) Extracorporeal devices designed to treat blood such as artificial kidneys, blood oxygenators, etc.; and (d) Biomaterials can also be taken to mean chemically inert, implantable materials designed to produce a continuous discharge of substances containing pharmacologically active molecules, such as contraceptive devices or ocular devices (for treating glaucoma). The two most important criteria for a biomaterial are those of biological compatibility and biological functionality. Techniques using ionizing radiation as an energy source provide an excellent tool for synthesizing or modifying the properties of plastics. The properties of polymers can be improved, new polymers can be synthesized without chemical additives (often the cause of incompatibility with tissue or blood) and without increased temperature, and polymerization can be induced in the solid state using deep-frozen monomers. Also, radiation-induced modifications in polymers can be applied to semi-finished or finished products. Examples are also given of marketed biomaterials that have been produced using radiation chemistry techniques

  2. GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

    1999-11-01

    Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require

  3. The Chernobyl Tissue Bank — A Repository for Biomaterial and Data Used in Integrative and Systems Biology Modeling the Human Response to Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Geraldine; Unger, Kristian; Krznaric, Marko; Galpine, Angela; Bethel, Jackie; Tomlinson, Christopher; Woodbridge, Mark; Butcher, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer post Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank (CTB: www.chernobyltissuebank.com) was established in 1998. Thus far it is has collected biological samples from 3,861 individuals, and provided 27 research projects with 11,254 samples. The CTB was designed from its outset as a resource to promote the integration of research and clinical data to facilitate a systems biology approach to radiation related thyroid cancer. The project has therefore developed as a multidisciplinary collaboration between clinicians, dosimetrists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians and serves as a paradigm for tissue banking in the omics era. PMID:24704918

  4. Effect of biomaterial properties on bone healing in a rabbit tooth extraction socket model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, J.P.; Lalani, Z.; Bossano, C.M.; Brey, E.M.; Demian, N.; Johnston, C.M.; Dean, D.; Jansen, J.A.; Wong, M.E.; Mikos, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we sought to understand the effect of biomaterial properties upon healing bone tissue. We hypothesized that a hydrophilic polymer gel implanted into a bone tissue defect would impede the healing process owing to the biomaterial's prevention of protein adsorption and thus cell adhesion.

  5. Biomaterials and mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippel, Nina; Schulze, Margit; Tobiasch, Edda

    2010-01-01

    The reconstruction of hard and soft tissues is a major challenge in regenerative medicine, since diseases or traumas are causing increasing numbers of tissue defects due to the aging of the population. Modern tissue engineering is increasingly using three-dimensional structured biomaterials in combination with stem cells as cell source, since mature cells are often not available in sufficient amounts or quality. Biomaterial scaffolds are developed that not only serve as cell carriers providing mechanical support, but actively influence cellular responses including cell attachment and proliferation. Chemical modifications such as the incorporation of chemotactic factors or cell adhesion molecules are examined for their ability to enhance tissue development successfully. E.g. growth factors have been investigated extensively as substances able to support cell growth, differentiation and angiogenesis. Thus, continuously new patents and studies are published, which are investigating the advantages and disadvantages of different biomaterials or cell types for the regeneration of specific tissues. This review focuses on biomaterials, including natural and synthetic polymers, ceramics and corresponding composites used as scaffold materials to support cell proliferation and differentiation for hard and soft tissues regeneration. In addition, the local delivery of drugs by scaffold biomaterials is discussed.

  6. Synthetic Biomaterials to Rival Nature's Complexity-a Path Forward with Combinatorics, High-Throughput Discovery, and High-Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Douglas; Lee, Junmin; Kilian, Kristopher A

    2017-10-01

    Cells in tissue receive a host of soluble and insoluble signals in a context-dependent fashion, where integration of these cues through a complex network of signal transduction cascades will define a particular outcome. Biomaterials scientists and engineers are tasked with designing materials that can at least partially recreate this complex signaling milieu towards new materials for biomedical applications. In this progress report, recent advances in high throughput techniques and high content imaging approaches that are facilitating the discovery of efficacious biomaterials are described. From microarrays of synthetic polymers, peptides and full-length proteins, to designer cell culture systems that present multiple biophysical and biochemical cues in tandem, it is discussed how the integration of combinatorics with high content imaging and analysis is essential to extracting biologically meaningful information from large scale cellular screens to inform the design of next generation biomaterials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. How Not To Drown in Data: A Guide for Biomaterial Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevich, Aliaksei S; Carlier, Aurélie; de Boer, Jan; Singh, Shantanu

    2017-08-01

    High-throughput assays that produce hundreds of measurements per sample are powerful tools for quantifying cell-material interactions. With advances in automation and miniaturization in material fabrication, hundreds of biomaterial samples can be rapidly produced, which can then be characterized using these assays. However, the resulting deluge of data can be overwhelming. To the rescue are computational methods that are well suited to these problems. Machine learning techniques provide a vast array of tools to make predictions about cell-material interactions and to find patterns in cellular responses. Computational simulations allow researchers to pose and test hypotheses and perform experiments in silico. This review describes approaches from these two domains that can be brought to bear on the problem of analyzing biomaterial screening data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biomaterial strategies for alleviation of myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Prabhakaran, Molamma P.; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Dan, Kai; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-01-01

    World Health Organization estimated that heart failure initiated by coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction (MI) leads to 29 per cent of deaths worldwide. Heart failure is one of the leading causes of death in industrialized countries and is expected to become a global epidemic within the twenty-first century. MI, the main cause of heart failure, leads to a loss of cardiac tissue impairment of left ventricular function. The damaged left ventricle undergoes progressive ‘remodelling’ and chamber dilation, with myocyte slippage and fibroblast proliferation. Repair of diseased myocardium with in vitro-engineered cardiac muscle patch/injectable biopolymers with cells may become a viable option for heart failure patients. These events reflect an apparent lack of effective intrinsic mechanism for myocardial repair and regeneration. Motivated by the desire to develop minimally invasive procedures, the last 10 years observed growing efforts to develop injectable biomaterials with and without cells to treat cardiac failure. Biomaterials evaluated include alginate, fibrin, collagen, chitosan, self-assembling peptides, biopolymers and a range of synthetic hydrogels. The ultimate goal in therapeutic cardiac tissue engineering is to generate biocompatible, non-immunogenic heart muscle with morphological and functional properties similar to natural myocardium to repair MI. This review summarizes the properties of biomaterial substrates having sufficient mechanical stability, which stimulates the native collagen fibril structure for differentiating pluripotent stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21900319

  9. Biomaterials surface science

    CERN Document Server

    Taubert, Andreas; Rodriguez-Cabello, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The book provides an overview of the highly interdisciplinary field of surface science in the context of biological and biomedical applications. The covered topics range from micro- and nanostructuring for imparting functionality in a top-down manner to the bottom-up fabrication of gradient surfaces by self-assembly, from interfaces between biomaterials and living matter to smart, stimuli-responsive surfaces, and from cell and surface mechanics to the elucidation of cell-chip interactions in biomedical devices.

  10. Trends in prosthetic biomaterials in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranjit Singh Bhasin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important criterion for the success of dental implants is the selection of a suitable implant biomaterial. To improve the biologic performance of an implant, it is necessary to select a material that does not elicit any negative biological response and at the same time maintains adequate function. It is mandatory for a dentist to have a comprehensive knowledge of various biomaterials used for dental implants. The material of choice for fabrication of the dental implant till date is titanium. With the advancements in the field of implants, zirconia seems to be propitious in the future. However, more advanced in vitro and in vivo studies are required before reaching any such conclusion. To increase the success of zirconia implants, care should be taken to reduce the incidence of mechanical failures. Such failures can be taken care of by having a thorough technical knowledge of implant designing and manufacturing defects. This article attempts to compare the advantages and disadvantages of various dental implant biomaterials. Focus is placed on the recent advances in this field with the recently introduced zirconia and its comparison to conventional titanium.

  11. Torsional Ultrasound Sensor Optimization for Soft Tissue Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Melchor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Torsion mechanical waves have the capability to characterize shear stiffness moduli of soft tissue. Under this hypothesis, a computational methodology is proposed to design and optimize a piezoelectrics-based transmitter and receiver to generate and measure the response of torsional ultrasonic waves. The procedure employed is divided into two steps: (i a finite element method (FEM is developed to obtain a transmitted and received waveform as well as a resonance frequency of a previous geometry validated with a semi-analytical simplified model and (ii a probabilistic optimality criteria of the design based on inverse problem from the estimation of robust probability of detection (RPOD to maximize the detection of the pathology defined in terms of changes of shear stiffness. This study collects different options of design in two separated models, in transmission and contact, respectively. The main contribution of this work describes a framework to establish such as forward, inverse and optimization procedures to choose a set of appropriate parameters of a transducer. This methodological framework may be generalizable for other different applications.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Biodegradable Polyurethane for Hypopharyngeal Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisen Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable crosslinked polyurethane (cPU was synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG, L-lactide (L-LA, and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI, with iron acetylacetonate (Fe(acac3 as the catalyst and PEG as the extender. Chemical components of the obtained polymers were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectra, and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC. The thermodynamic properties, mechanical behaviors, surface hydrophilicity, degradability, and cytotoxicity were tested via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, tensile tests, contact angle measurements, and cell culture. The results show that the synthesized cPU possessed good flexibility with quite low glass transition temperature (Tg, −22°C and good wettability. Water uptake measured as high as 229.7 ± 18.7%. These properties make cPU a good candidate material for engineering soft tissues such as the hypopharynx. In vitro and in vivo tests showed that cPU has the ability to support the growth of human hypopharyngeal fibroblasts and angiogenesis was observed around cPU after it was implanted subcutaneously in SD rats.

  13. Hybrid biomaterials based on calcium carbonate and polyaniline nanoparticles for application in photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira-Carrillo, Andrónico; Yslas, Edith; Marini, Yazmin Amar; Vásquez-Quitral, Patricio; Sánchez, Marianela; Riveros, Ana; Yáñez, Diego; Cavallo, Pablo; Kogan, Marcelo J; Acevedo, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Inorganic materials contain remarkable properties for drug delivery, such as a large surface area and nanoporous structure. Among these materials, CaCO3 microparticles (CMPs) exhibit a high encapsulation efficiency and solubility in acidic media. The extracellular pH of tumor neoplastic tissue is significantly lower than the extracellular pH of normal tissue facilitating the release of drug-encapsulating CMPs in this area. Conducting polyaniline (PANI) absorbs light energy and transforms it into localized heat to produce cell death. This work aimed to generate hybrid CMPs loaded with PANI for photothermal therapy (PTT). The hybrid nanomaterial was synthesized with CaCO3 and carboxymethyl cellulose in a simple, reproducible manner. The CMP-PANI-Cys particles were developed for the first time and represent a novel type of hybrid biomaterial. Resultant nanoparticles were characterized utilizing scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, UV-vis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. In vitro HeLa cells in dark and irradiated conditions showed that CMP-PANI-Cys and PANI-Cys are nontoxic at the assayed concentrations. Hybrid biomaterials displayed high efficiency for potential PTT compared with PANI-Cys. In summary, hierarchical hybrid biomaterials composed of CMPs and PANI-Cys combined with near infrared irradiation represents a useful alternative in PTT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent advances in the field of ovarian tissue cryopreservation and opportunities for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladanyi, Camille; Mor, Amir; Christianson, Mindy S; Dhillon, Namisha; Segars, James H

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the latest advances and successes in the field of ovarian tissue cryopreservation while identifying gaps in current knowledge that suggest opportunities for future research. A systematic review was performed according to PRISMA guidelines for all relevant full-text articles in PubMed published in English that reviewed or studied historical or current advancements in ovarian tissue cryopreservation and auto-transplantation techniques. Ovarian tissue auto-transplantation in post-pubertal women is capable of restoring fertility with over 80 live births currently reported with a corresponding pregnancy rate of 23 to 37%. The recently reported successes of live births from transplants, both in orthotopic and heterotopic locations, as well as the emerging methods of in vitro maturation (IVM), in vitro culture of primordial follicles, and possibility of in vitro activation (IVA) suggest new fertility options for many women and girls. Vitrification, as an ovarian tissue cryopreservation technique, has also demonstrated successful live births and may be a more cost-effective method to freezing with less tissue injury. Further, transplantation via the artificial ovary with an extracellular tissue matrix (ECTM) scaffolding as well as the effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate (SIP) and fibrin modified with heparin-binding peptide (HBP), heparin, and a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have demonstrated important advancements in fertility preservation. As a fertility preservation method, ovarian tissue cryopreservation and auto-transplantation are currently considered experimental, but future research may pave the way for these modalities to become a standard of care for women facing the prospect of sterility from ovarian damage.

  15. Functional Characterization of Preadipocytes Derived from Human Periaortic Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vargas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue can affect the metabolic control of the cardiovascular system, and its anatomic location can affect the vascular function differently. In this study, biochemical and phenotypical characteristics of adipose tissue from periaortic fat were evaluated. Periaortic and subcutaneous adipose tissues were obtained from areas surrounding the ascending aorta and sternotomy incision, respectively. Adipose tissues were collected from patients undergoing myocardial revascularization or mitral valve replacement surgery. Morphological studies with hematoxylin/eosin and immunohistochemical assay were performed in situ to quantify adipokine expression. To analyze adipogenic capacity, adipokine expression, and the levels of thermogenic proteins, adipocyte precursor cells were isolated from periaortic and subcutaneous adipose tissues and induced to differentiation. The precursors of adipocytes from the periaortic tissue accumulated less triglycerides than those from the subcutaneous tissue after differentiation and were smaller than those from subcutaneous adipose tissue. The levels of proteins involved in thermogenesis and energy expenditure increased significantly in periaortic adipose tissue. Additionally, the expression levels of adipokines that affect carbohydrate metabolism, such as FGF21, increased significantly in mature adipocytes induced from periaortic adipose tissue. These results demonstrate that precursors of periaortic adipose tissue in humans may affect cardiovascular events and might serve as a target for preventing vascular diseases.

  16. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  17. Mechanical characterization of stomach tissue under uniaxial tensile action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Z G; Li, W; Zhou, Z R

    2015-02-26

    In this article, the tensile properties of gastric wall were investigated by using biomechanical test and theoretical analysis. The samples of porcine stomach strips from smaller and greater curvature of the stomach were cut in longitudinal and circumferential direction, respectively. The loading-unloading, stress relaxation, strain creep, tensile fracture tests were performed at mucosa-submucosa, serosa-muscle and intact layer, respectively. Results showed that the biomechanical properties of the porcine stomach depended on the layers, orientations and locations of the gastric wall and presented typical viscoelastic, nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical properties. During loading-unloading test, the stress of serosa-muscle layer in the longitudinal direction was 15-20% more than that in the circumferential direction at 12% stretch ratio, while it could reach about 40% for the intact layer and 50% for the mucosa-submucosa layer. The results of stress relaxation and strain creep showed that the variation degree was obviously faster in the circumferential direction than that in the longitudinal direction, and the ultimate residual values were also different for the different layers, orientations and locations. In the process of fracture test, the serosa-muscle layer fractured firstly followed by the mucosa-submucosa layer when the intact layer was tested, the longitudinal strips firstly began to fracture and the required stress value was about twice as much as that in the circumferential strips. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of mechanical characterization of the porcine stomach were related to its complicated geometry, structure and functions. The results would help us to understand the biomechanics of soft organ tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of Elastomeric Polypeptide BIomaterials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urry, Dan

    1998-01-01

    To design elastic polypeptide biomaterials in order to achieve diverse forms of free energy transduction by these water-miscible hydrophobic folding and assembling macromolecules, thereby to elucidate...

  19. Novel antibacterial strategies to combat biomaterial-associated infection

    OpenAIRE

    Riool, M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of medical devices has grown significantly over the last decades, and has become a major part of modern medicine and our daily life. The risk of infection is a significant problem with any inserted or implanted foreign body material, and is the number one cause of failure of implanted biomaterials. These so-called biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) are mainly caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. This thesis describes the development and characterization...

  20. Biomaterials and scaffolds in reparative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikof, Elliot L.; Matthew, Howard; Kohn, Joachim; Mikos, Antonios G.; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Yip, Christopher M.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Most approaches currently pursued or contemplated within the framework of reparative medicine, including cell-based therapies, artificial organs, and engineered living tissues, are dependent on our ability to synthesize or otherwise generate novel materials, fabricate or assemble materials into appropriate 2-D and 3-D forms, and precisely tailor material-related physical and biological properties so as to achieve a desired clinical response. This paper summarizes the scientific and technological opportunities within the fields of biomaterials science and molecular engineering that will likely establish new enabling technologies for cellular and molecular therapies directed at the repair, replacement, or reconstruction of diseased or damaged organs and tissues.

  1. The pathology of the foreign body reaction against biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfleisch, R; Jung, F

    2017-03-01

    The healing process after implantation of biomaterials involves the interaction of many contributing factors. Besides their in vivo functionality, biomaterials also require characteristics that allow their integration into the designated tissue without eliciting an overshooting foreign body reaction (FBR). The targeted design of biomaterials with these features, thus, needs understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the FBR. Much effort has been put into research on the interaction of engineered materials and the host tissue. This elucidated many aspects of the five FBR phases, that is protein adsorption, acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, foreign body giant cell formation, and fibrous capsule formation. However, in practice, it is still difficult to predict the response against a newly designed biomaterial purely based on the knowledge of its physical-chemical surface features. This insufficient knowledge leads to a high number of factors potentially influencing the FBR, which have to be analyzed in complex animal experiments including appropriate data-based sample sizes. This review is focused on the current knowledge on the general mechanisms of the FBR against biomaterials and the influence of biomaterial surface topography and chemical and physical features on the quality and quantity of the reaction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 927-940, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Silicone containing biomaterials in cardiovascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, A.; Sartori, S.; Serafini, P.; Ferrando, P.; Mattu, C.; Milione, S.; Boccafoschi, F.; Ciardelli, G.

    2010-06-01

    A series of biostable polyurethane (PU) formulations, including a composite containing a biocompatible clay as filler, were prepared as new biomaterials for cardiovascular applications. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polytetramethylenoxide (PTMO) were selected as macrodiols because of their high hydrolysis resistance. 1,6-Diisocyanatohexane (HDI) and 1,4-cyclohexane dimethanol (CDM) were used as diisocyanate and chain extender, respectively. Chemical and mechanical characterizations of the obtained polymers highlight that they are promising materials for applications in the cardiovascular field.

  3. Evolving the use of peptides as biomaterials components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Joel H.; Segura, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript is part of a debate on the statement that “the use of short synthetic adhesion peptides, like RGD, is the best approach in the design of biomaterials that guide cell behavior for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering”. We take the position that although there are some acknowledged disadvantages of using short peptide ligands within biomaterials, it is not necessary to discard the notion of using peptides within biomaterials entirely, but rather to reinvent and evolve their use. Peptides possess advantageous chemical definition, access to non-native chemistries, amenability to de novo design, and applicability within parallel approaches. Biomaterials development programs that require such aspects may benefit from a peptide-based strategy. PMID:21515167

  4. Bio-Functional Design, Application and Trends in Metallic Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Zhou, Changchun; Fan, Hongsong; Fan, Yujiang; Jiang, Qing; Song, Ping; Fan, Hongyuan; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Xingdong

    2017-01-01

    Introduction of metals as biomaterials has been known for a long time. In the early development, sufficient strength and suitable mechanical properties were the main considerations for metal implants. With the development of new generations of biomaterials, the concepts of bioactive and biodegradable materials were proposed. Biological function design is very import for metal implants in biomedical applications. Three crucial design criteria are summarized for developing metal implants: (1) mechanical properties that mimic the host tissues; (2) sufficient bioactivities to form bio-bonding between implants and surrounding tissues; and (3) a degradation rate that matches tissue regeneration and biodegradability. This article reviews the development of metal implants and their applications in biomedical engineering. Development trends and future perspectives of metallic biomaterials are also discussed. PMID:29271916

  5. Advanced techniques for the chemical and physical characterization of beryllia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, T.D.; Jech, D.E.; Sepulveda, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    As performance demands for beryllia increase, so will the need for tools to adequately characterize various properties of this ceramic. Analytical techniques have emerged or are currently being adapted to reveal the surface chemical composition and electrical and thermal properties. This paper discusses the application of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and chemical imaging by windowless SEM/EDS to BeO ceramics. The use of SIMS has revealed extremely low levels of surface impurities which could not be detected by SEM/EDS or Auger. XPS has been applied in a study of gold adhesion on nickel-plated BeO substrates. Windowless EDS was used for determining the sintering aid dispersion by chemical mapping. Advanced techniques for geometrically independent measurements of dielectric constant, loss tangent and thermal conductivity are reviewed

  6. Materials characterization for advanced pressurized water reactors: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.A.; Gage, G.

    1994-01-01

    A compilation and overview is presented of the experimental techniques available for characterization of the microstructural changes induced by neutron irradiation of PWR pressure vessel steels, and directed towards monitoring of embrittlement processes by examination of surveillance samples from advanced reactor systems. The microstructural features of significance include copper precipitation, dislocation loop and/or microvoid matrix damage and grain boundary solute segregation. The techniques of transmission electron microscopy, field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy, small angle neutron scattering, positron annihilation and field-ion microscopy have all developed to a degree of sophistication such that they are capable of providing detailed microstructural information in these areas, and afford considerable insight into embrittlement processes when used in combination. (author)

  7. Mars Atmospheric Characterization Using Advanced 2-Micron Orbiting Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, U.; Engelund, W.; Refaat, T.; Kavaya, M.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.

    2015-01-01

    Mars atmospheric characterization is critical for exploring the planet. Future Mars missions require landing massive payloads to the surface with high accuracy. The accuracy of entry, descent and landing (EDL) of a payload is a major technical challenge for future Mars missions. Mars EDL depends on atmospheric conditions such as density, wind and dust as well as surface topography. A Mars orbiting 2-micron lidar system is presented in this paper. This advanced lidar is capable of measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles using the most abundant atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on Mars. In addition Martian winds and surface altimetry can be mapped, independent of background radiation or geographical location. This orbiting lidar is a valuable tool for developing EDL models for future Mars missions.

  8. Proceedings of national workshop on advanced methods for materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    During the past two decades there had been tremendous growth in the field of material science and a variety of new materials with user specific properties have been developed such as smart shape memory alloys, hybrid materials like glass-ceramics, cermets, met-glasses, inorganic- organic composite layered structures, mixed oxides with negative thermal expansion, functional polymer materials etc. Study of nano-particles and the materials assembled from such particles is another area of active research being pursued all over the world. Preparation and characterization of nano-sized materials is a challenge because of their dimensions and size dependent properties. This has led to the emergence of a variety of advanced techniques, which need to be brought to the attention of the researchers working in the field of material science which requires the expertise of physics, chemistry and process engineering. This volume deals with above aspects and papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  9. Characterization of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.; Schifer, Niholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress was made developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) 140-W radioisotope power system. While the ASRG flight development project has ended, the hardware that was designed and built under the project is continuing to be tested to support future Stirling-based power system development. NASA Glenn Research Center recently completed the assembly of the ASRG Engineering Unit 2 (EU2). The ASRG EU2 consists of the first pair of Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertor E3 (ASC-E3) Stirling convertors mounted in an aluminum housing, and Lockheed Martin's Engineering Development Unit (EDU) 4 controller (a fourth-generation controller). The ASC-E3 convertors and Generator Housing Assembly (GHA) closely match the intended ASRG Qualification Unit flight design. A series of tests were conducted to characterize the EU2, its controller, and the convertors in the flight-like GHA. The GHA contained an argon cover gas for these tests. The tests included measurement of convertor, controller, and generator performance and efficiency; quantification of control authority of the controller; disturbance force measurement with varying piston phase and piston amplitude; and measurement of the effect of spacecraft direct current (DC) bus voltage on EU2 performance. The results of these tests are discussed and summarized, providing a basic understanding of EU2 characteristics and the performance and capability of the EDU 4 controller.

  10. Engineering tolerance using biomaterials to target and control antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostanoski, Lisa H; Gosselin, Emily A; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when cells of the adaptive immune system incorrectly recognize and attack "self" tissues. Importantly, the proliferation and differentiation of these cells is triggered and controlled by interactions with antigen presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells. Thus, modulating the signals transduced by APCs (e.g., cytokines, costimulatory surface proteins) has emerged as a promising strategy to promote tolerance for diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and lupus. However, many approaches have been hindered by non-specific activity of immunosuppressive or immunoregulatory cues, following systemic administration of soluble factors via traditional injections routes (e.g., subcutaneous, intravenous). Biomaterials offer a unique opportunity to control the delivery of tolerogenic signals in vivo via properties such as controlled particle size, tunable release kinetics, and co-delivery of multiple classes of cargo. In this review, we highlight recent reports that exploit these properties of biomaterials to target APCs and promote tolerance via three strategies, i) passive or active targeting of particulate carriers to APCs, ii) biomaterial-mediated control over antigen localization and processing, and iii) targeted delivery of encapsulated or adsorbed immunomodulatory signals. These reports represent exciting advances toward the goal of more effective therapies for autoimmune diseases, without the broad suppressive effects associated with current clinically-approved therapies.

  11. Key Advances in the Systemic Therapy for Soft tissue Sarcomas: Current Status and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelesh Soman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue sarcomas (STS represent a heterogeneous group of diverse neoplasms of mesenchymal origin. Once relapsed from standard therapy, STS patients have limited treatment options especially those that present with advanced or metastatic disease. In this review article, we highlight recent clinical data that led to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval of pazopanib (Votrient® for STS and regorafenib (Stivarga®, BAY 73-4506 in gastrointestinal stromal tumours. We also review ongoing safety/efficacy data for trabectedin (Yondelis®, ET-743, and data from clinical studies of ridaforolimus (AP23573; MK-8669 and palifosfamide (ZIO-201. We provide a list of some promising ongoing trials in soft tissue sarcomas including first line studies of TH-302 and trabectedin. Finally, our article delves into recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of STS and novel therapies that might be explored as treatment options for specific STS histologies.

  12. Nondestructive mechanical characterization of developing biological tissues using inflation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomen, P J A; van Kelle, M A J; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Loerakker, S

    2017-10-01

    One of the hallmarks of biological soft tissues is their capacity to grow and remodel in response to changes in their environment. Although it is well-accepted that these processes occur at least partly to maintain a mechanical homeostasis, it remains unclear which mechanical constituent(s) determine(s) mechanical homeostasis. In the current study a nondestructive mechanical test and a two-step inverse analysis method were developed and validated to nondestructively estimate the mechanical properties of biological tissue during tissue culture. Nondestructive mechanical testing was achieved by performing an inflation test on tissues that were cultured inside a bioreactor, while the tissue displacement and thickness were nondestructively measured using ultrasound. The material parameters were estimated by an inverse finite element scheme, which was preceded by an analytical estimation step to rapidly obtain an initial estimate that already approximated the final solution. The efficiency and accuracy of the two-step inverse method was demonstrated on virtual experiments of several material types with known parameters. PDMS samples were used to demonstrate the method's feasibility, where it was shown that the proposed method yielded similar results to tensile testing. Finally, the method was applied to estimate the material properties of tissue-engineered constructs. Via this method, the evolution of mechanical properties during tissue growth and remodeling can now be monitored in a well-controlled system. The outcomes can be used to determine various mechanical constituents and to assess their contribution to mechanical homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of regulatory features of housekeeping and tissue-specific regulators within tissue regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengping; Hua, Xu; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jie; Wang, Jin

    2013-10-31

    Transcription factors (TFs) and miRNAs are essential for the regulation of gene expression; however, the global view of human gene regulatory networks remains poorly understood. For example, how is the expression of so many genes regulated by limited cohorts of regulators and how are genes differentially expressed in different tissues despite the genetic code being the same in all tissues? We analyzed the network properties of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes in gene regulatory networks from seven human tissues. Our results show that different classes of genes behave quite differently in these networks. Tissue-specific miRNAs show a higher average target number compared with non-tissue specific miRNAs, which indicates that tissue-specific miRNAs tend to regulate different sets of targets. Tissue-specific TFs exhibit higher in-degree, out-degree, cluster coefficient and betweenness values, indicating that they occupy central positions in the regulatory network and that they transfer genetic information from upstream genes to downstream genes more quickly than other TFs. Housekeeping TFs tend to have higher cluster coefficients compared with other genes that are neither housekeeping nor tissue specific, indicating that housekeeping TFs tend to regulate their targets synergistically. Several topological properties of disease-associated miRNAs and genes were found to be significantly different from those of non-disease-associated miRNAs and genes. Tissue-specific miRNAs, TFs and disease genes have particular topological properties within the transcriptional regulatory networks of the seven human tissues examined. The tendency of tissue-specific miRNAs to regulate different sets of genes shows that a particular tissue-specific miRNA and its target gene set may form a regulatory module to execute particular functions in the process of tissue differentiation. The regulatory patterns of tissue-specific TFs reflect their vital role in regulatory networks and their

  14. Experimental and computing strategies in advanced material characterization problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzon, G. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy gabriella.bolzon@polimi.it (Italy)

    2015-10-28

    The mechanical characterization of materials relies more and more often on sophisticated experimental methods that permit to acquire a large amount of data and, contemporarily, to reduce the invasiveness of the tests. This evolution accompanies the growing demand of non-destructive diagnostic tools that assess the safety level of components in use in structures and infrastructures, for instance in the strategic energy sector. Advanced material systems and properties that are not amenable to traditional techniques, for instance thin layered structures and their adhesion on the relevant substrates, can be also characterized by means of combined experimental-numerical tools elaborating data acquired by full-field measurement techniques. In this context, parameter identification procedures involve the repeated simulation of the laboratory or in situ tests by sophisticated and usually expensive non-linear analyses while, in some situation, reliable and accurate results would be required in real time. The effectiveness and the filtering capabilities of reduced models based on decomposition and interpolation techniques can be profitably used to meet these conflicting requirements. This communication intends to summarize some results recently achieved in this field by the author and her co-workers. The aim is to foster further interaction between engineering and mathematical communities.

  15. Recent advancements in electrospinning design for tissue engineering applications: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishan, Alysha P; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2017-10-01

    Electrospinning, a technique used to fabricate fibrous scaffolds, has gained popularity in recent years as a method to produce tissue engineered grafts with architectural similarities to the extracellular matrix. Beyond its versatility in material selection, electrospinning also provides many tools to tune the fiber morphology and scaffold geometry. Recent efforts have focused on extending the capabilities of electrospinning to produce scaffolds that better recapitulate tissue properties and enhance regeneration. This review highlights these advancements by providing an overview of the processing variables and setups used to modulate scaffold architecture, discussing strategies to improve cellular infiltration and guide cell behavior, and providing a summary of electrospinning applications in tissue engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2892-2905, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Current Advancements and Strategies in Tissue Engineering for Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jasmine; Walsh, Claire; Yue, Dominic; Dardik, Alan; Cheema, Umber

    2017-06-01

    Significance: With an aging population leading to an increase in diabetes and associated cutaneous wounds, there is a pressing clinical need to improve wound-healing therapies. Recent Advances: Tissue engineering approaches for wound healing and skin regeneration have been developed over the past few decades. A review of current literature has identified common themes and strategies that are proving successful within the field: The delivery of cells, mainly mesenchymal stem cells, within scaffolds of the native matrix is one such strategy. We overview these approaches and give insights into mechanisms that aid wound healing in different clinical scenarios. Critical Issues: We discuss the importance of the biomimetic niche, and how recapitulating elements of the native microenvironment of cells can help direct cell behavior and fate. Future Directions: It is crucial that during the continued development of tissue engineering in wound repair, there is close collaboration between tissue engineers and clinicians to maintain the translational efficacy of this approach.

  17. Characterization of poly (L-co-D,L Lactic Acid and a study of polymer-tissue interaction in subcutaneous implants in wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Serafino Ciambelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly (L-co-D,L lactic acid (PLDLA is an important biomaterial because of its biocompatibility properties that promote cellular regeneration and growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymer-tissue interaction of PLDLA implants in the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of male Wistar rats at various intervals (2, 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after implantation. Physical properties such as the glass transition point (Tg, degradation behavior and other mechanical properties were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and tension tests. Analysis of the degradation of PLDLA membranes in vitro showed that the polymer became crystalline as a function of the degradation time. Mechanical tension tests showed that the polymer behaved like a ductile material: when subjected to constant tension it initially suffered deformation, then elongation and finally ruptured. TGA/MEV provided evidence of PLDLA membrane degradation. For histological analysis, samples from each group were processed in xylol/paraffin, except for the 60 - and 90 - day samples. Each of the latter samples was divided in two: one half was treated with xylol/paraffin and the other with historesin. Light microscopy showed the adhesion of cells to the biomaterial, the formation of a conjunctive capsule around the implant, the presence of epithelioid cells, the formation of foreign body giant cells and angiogenesis. During degradation, the polymer showed a 'lace' - like appearance when processed in xylol/paraffin compared to the formation of "centripetal cracks in the form of glove fingers" when embedded in historesin.

  18. Barriers and strategies for the clinical translation of advanced orthopaedic tissue engineering protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Madry

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Research in orthopaedic tissue engineering has intensified over the last decade and new protocols continue to emerge. The clinical translation of these new applications, however, remains associated with a number of obstacles. This report highlights the major issues that impede the clinical translation of advanced tissue engineering concepts, discusses strategies to overcome these barriers, and examines the need to increase incentives for translational strategies. The statements are based on presentations and discussions held at the AO Foundation-sponsored symposium "Where Science meets Clinics 2013" held at the Congress Center in Davos, Switzerland, in September, 2013. The event organisers convened a diverse group of over one hundred stakeholders involved in clinical translation of orthopaedic tissue engineering, including scientists, clinicians, healthcare industry professionals and regulatory agency representatives. A major point that emerged from the discussions was that there continues to be a critical need for early trans-disciplinary communication and collaboration in the development and execution of research approaches. Equally importantly was the need to address the shortage of sustained funding programs for multidisciplinary teams conducting translational research. Such detailed discussions between experts contribute towards the development of a roadmap to more successfully advance the clinical translation of novel tissue engineering concepts and ultimately improve patient care in orthopaedic and trauma surgery.

  19. Barriers and strategies for the clinical translation of advanced orthopaedic tissue engineering protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, H; Alini, M; Stoddart, M J; Evans, C; Miclau, T; Steiner, S

    2014-05-06

    Research in orthopaedic tissue engineering has intensified over the last decade and new protocols continue to emerge. The clinical translation of these new applications, however, remains associated with a number of obstacles. This report highlights the major issues that impede the clinical translation of advanced tissue engineering concepts, discusses strategies to overcome these barriers, and examines the need to increase incentives for translational strategies. The statements are based on presentations and discussions held at the AO Foundation-sponsored symposium "Where Science meets Clinics 2013" held at the Congress Center in Davos, Switzerland, in September, 2013. The event organisers convened a diverse group of over one hundred stakeholders involved in clinical translation of orthopaedic tissue engineering, including scientists, clinicians, healthcare industry professionals and regulatory agency representatives. A major point that emerged from the discussions was that there continues to be a critical need for early trans-disciplinary communication and collaboration in the development and execution of research approaches. Equally importantly was the need to address the shortage of sustained funding programs for multidisciplinary teams conducting translational research. Such detailed discussions between experts contribute towards the development of a roadmap to more successfully advance the clinical translation of novel tissue engineering concepts and ultimately improve patient care in orthopaedic and trauma surgery.

  20. An Overview of Biomaterials in Periodontology and Implant Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Dan Cho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Material is a crucial factor for the restoration of the tooth or periodontal structure in dentistry. Various biomaterials have been developed and clinically applied for improved periodontal tissue regeneration and osseointegration, especially in periodontology and dental implantology. Furthermore, the biomimetic approach has been the subject of active research in recent years. In this review, the most widely studied biomaterials (bone graft material, barrier membrane, and growth or differentiation factors and biomimetic approaches to obtain optimal tissue regeneration by making the environment almost similar to that of the extracellular matrix are discussed and specifically highlighted.

  1. MR imaging tissue characterization by means of pattern recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranade, S.S.; Lindon, J.C.; Livingston, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of trace metal profiles as factors influencing tissue relaxation times, with the aim of better tissue discrimination and predictability of the neoplastic state. Proton spin-lattice relaxation times and trace metal contents of iron, copper, zinc, and magnesium were estimated from surgically resected, histopathologically diagnosed neoplasms from 10 body sites. Computer-based analysis with dimension reduction, mapping techniques, and supervised learning methods were used

  2. Advanced cell culture technology for generation of in vivo-like tissue models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Przyborski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human tissues are mostly composed of different cell types, that are often highly organised in relation to each other. Often cells are arranged in distinct layers that enable signalling and cell-to-cell interactions. Here we describe the application of scaffold-based technology, that can be used to create advanced organotypic 3D models of various tissue types that more closely resemble in vivo-like conditions (Knight et al., 2011. The scaffold comprises a highly porous polystyrene material, engineered into a 200 micron thick membrane that is presented in various ways including multi-welled plates and well inserts, for use with conventional culture plasticware and medium perfusion systems. This technology has been applied to generate numerous unique types of co-culture model. For example: 1 a full thickness human skin construct comprising dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes, raised to the air-liquid interface to induce cornification of the upper layers (Fig.1 (Hill et al., 2015; 2 a neuron-glial co-culture to enable the study of neurite outgrowth interacting with astroglial cells to model and investigate the glial scar found in spinal cord injury (Clarke et al., 2016; 3 formation of a sub-mucosa consisting of a polarised simple epithelium, layer of ECM proteins simulating the basement membrane, and underlying stromal tissues (e.g. intestinal mucosa. These organotypic models demonstrate the versatility of scaffold membranes and the creation of advanced in vivo-like tissue models. Creating a layered arrangement more closely simulates the true anatomy and organisation of cells within many tissue types. The addition of different cell types in a temporal and spatial fashion can be used to study inter-cellular relationships and create more physiologically relevant in vivo-like cell-based assays. Methods that are relatively straightforward to use and that recreate the organised structure of real tissues will become valuable research tools for use in

  3. Fabrication and characterization of scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue for skin tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sweta K; Dinda, Amit K; Potdar, Pravin D; Mishra, Narayan C

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to fabricate scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue and evaluate it for skin tissue engineering applications. Decellularized goat-lung scaffold was fabricated by removing cells from cadaver goat-lung tissue enzymatically, to have cell-free 3D-architecture of natural extracellular matrix. DNA quantification assay and Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the absence of cellular material in the decellularized lung-tissue. SEM analysis of decellularized scaffold shows the intrinsic porous structure of lung tissue with well-preserved pore-to-pore interconnectivity. FTIR analysis confirmed non-denaturation and well maintainance of collagenous protein structure of decellularized scaffold. MTT assay, SEM analysis and H&E staining of human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cell, seeded over the decellularized scaffold, confirms stem cell attachment, viability, biocompatibility and proliferation over the decellularized scaffold. Expression of Keratin18 gene, along with CD105, CD73 and CD44, by human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cells over decellularized scaffold signifies that the cells are viable, proliferating and migrating, and have maintained their critical cellular functions in the presence of scaffold. Thus, overall study proves the applicability of the goat-lung tissue derived decellularized scaffold for skin tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional characterization of detergent-decellularized equine tendon extracellular matrix for tissue engineering applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Youngstrom

    Full Text Available Natural extracellular matrix provides a number of distinct advantages for engineering replacement orthopedic tissue due to its intrinsic functional properties. The goal of this study was to optimize a biologically derived scaffold for tendon tissue engineering using equine flexor digitorum superficialis tendons. We investigated changes in scaffold composition and ultrastructure in response to several mechanical, detergent and enzymatic decellularization protocols using microscopic techniques and a panel of biochemical assays to evaluate total protein, collagen, glycosaminoglycan, and deoxyribonucleic acid content. Biocompatibility was also assessed with static mesenchymal stem cell (MSC culture. Implementation of a combination of freeze/thaw cycles, incubation in 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, trypsinization, treatment with DNase-I, and ethanol sterilization produced a non-cytotoxic biomaterial free of appreciable residual cellular debris with no significant modification of biomechanical properties. These decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS are suitable for complex tissue engineering applications, as they provide a clean slate for cell culture while maintaining native three-dimensional architecture.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue for skin tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sweta K. [Department of Polymer and Process Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Dinda, Amit K. [Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Potdar, Pravin D. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mishra, Narayan C., E-mail: mishrawise@gmail.com [Department of Polymer and Process Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2013-10-15

    The present study aims to fabricate scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue and evaluate it for skin tissue engineering applications. Decellularized goat-lung scaffold was fabricated by removing cells from cadaver goat-lung tissue enzymatically, to have cell-free 3D-architecture of natural extracellular matrix. DNA quantification assay and Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the absence of cellular material in the decellularized lung-tissue. SEM analysis of decellularized scaffold shows the intrinsic porous structure of lung tissue with well-preserved pore-to-pore interconnectivity. FTIR analysis confirmed non-denaturation and well maintainance of collagenous protein structure of decellularized scaffold. MTT assay, SEM analysis and H and E staining of human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cell, seeded over the decellularized scaffold, confirms stem cell attachment, viability, biocompatibility and proliferation over the decellularized scaffold. Expression of Keratin18 gene, along with CD105, CD73 and CD44, by human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cells over decellularized scaffold signifies that the cells are viable, proliferating and migrating, and have maintained their critical cellular functions in the presence of scaffold. Thus, overall study proves the applicability of the goat-lung tissue derived decellularized scaffold for skin tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • We successfully fabricated decellularized scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue. • Decellularized goat-lung scaffolds were found to be highly porous. • Skin derived MSC shows high cell viability and proliferation over the scaffold. • Phenotype of MSCs was well maintained over the scaffold. • The scaffold shows potential for applications in skin tissue engineering.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue for skin tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sweta K.; Dinda, Amit K.; Potdar, Pravin D.; Mishra, Narayan C.

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to fabricate scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue and evaluate it for skin tissue engineering applications. Decellularized goat-lung scaffold was fabricated by removing cells from cadaver goat-lung tissue enzymatically, to have cell-free 3D-architecture of natural extracellular matrix. DNA quantification assay and Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the absence of cellular material in the decellularized lung-tissue. SEM analysis of decellularized scaffold shows the intrinsic porous structure of lung tissue with well-preserved pore-to-pore interconnectivity. FTIR analysis confirmed non-denaturation and well maintainance of collagenous protein structure of decellularized scaffold. MTT assay, SEM analysis and H and E staining of human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cell, seeded over the decellularized scaffold, confirms stem cell attachment, viability, biocompatibility and proliferation over the decellularized scaffold. Expression of Keratin18 gene, along with CD105, CD73 and CD44, by human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cells over decellularized scaffold signifies that the cells are viable, proliferating and migrating, and have maintained their critical cellular functions in the presence of scaffold. Thus, overall study proves the applicability of the goat-lung tissue derived decellularized scaffold for skin tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • We successfully fabricated decellularized scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue. • Decellularized goat-lung scaffolds were found to be highly porous. • Skin derived MSC shows high cell viability and proliferation over the scaffold. • Phenotype of MSCs was well maintained over the scaffold. • The scaffold shows potential for applications in skin tissue engineering

  7. Peptides and polypeptides as scaffolds for optoelectronics and biomaterials applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charati, Manoj B.

    effects on peptide conformation. pi-orbital interactions at the molecular level were observed to be very sensitive to intermolecular distance and orientation of the chromophores attached to the alpha-helical peptide templates. When the methylstilbene or Oxa-PPV molecules were arranged on the same side of the helix with intermolecular spacing of 6A, the chromophores interacted strongly with each other forming excimers. Such interactions were absent when the molecules were arranged on the opposite side of the helix. These peptide-templated systems therefore offer enormous opportunities for the elucidation of complex photophysical phenomena that occur in relatively aggregated morphologies of conjugated species, but under dilute solution conditions in which the number of chromphores in the aggregate can be manipulated. Part 2. Synthesis and characterization of biocompatible polypeptide elastomer. Lately, the significance of mechanical forces and biological cues involved in tissue remodeling are highly valued; thus the capacity of a biomaterial to present a fitting mechanical and biological environment for optimal tissue generation has become a key parameter for biomaterial design. In addition to having suitable mechanical properties, materials used for these applications need to be biologically active, i.e. trigger dynamic interactions with cells and stimulate explicit cell and tissue responses. Thus, we have designed a resilin-based modular biomaterial incorporating both mechanically and biologically active domains to sense and aptly respond to the bio-mechanical demand or changes in their environment. The use of resilin-like polypeptides offers access to a class of hydrophilic elastomers with excellent resilience and high frequency responsiveness, which can be used for encapsulating hydrophilic drugs like proteins for drug delivery, and provides hydrophilic extracellular matrix mimicking cell adhesive and enzyme degradable substrate for tissue engineering. Hence, we have

  8. Biobanking for research in surgery: are surgeons in charge for advancing translational research or mere assistants in biomaterial and data preservation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thasler, Wolfgang E; Thasler, Reinhard M K; Schelcher, Celine; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2013-04-01

    High-quality biospecimens of human origin with annotated clinical and procedural data are an important tool for biomedical research, not only to map physiology, pathophysiology and aetiology but also to go beyond in translational research. This has opened a new special field of research known as 'biobanking', which focuses on how to collect, store and provide these specimens and data, and which is substantially supported by national and European funding. An overview on biobanking is given, with a closer look on a clinical setting, concerning a necessary distinction from clinical trials and studies as well as a comparison of prospective sample collection with secondary use of archived samples from diagnostics. Based on a summary of possible use and scientific impact of human tissue in research, it is shown how surgical expertise boosts the scientific value of specimens and data. Finally, an assessment of legal and ethical issues especially from a surgical perspective is given, followed by a model of interdisciplinary biobanking within a joint 'centre' that as synergistic structure merges essential input from surgery as well as laboratory medicine, pathology and biometry. Within the domain of biobanking, surgeons have to develop a better awareness of their role within translational research, not only on the level of medical faculties but also as nationally and internationally funded initiatives. Therefore, the authors suggest a platform for biobanking within the German association of surgeons in analogy to the existing special interest group for clinical trials.

  9. Wavelet based feature extraction and visualization in hyperspectral tissue characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denstedt, Martin; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Milanič, Matija; Randeberg, Lise Lyngsnes

    2014-12-01

    Hyperspectral images of tissue contain extensive and complex information relevant for clinical applications. In this work, wavelet decomposition is explored for feature extraction from such data. Wavelet methods are simple and computationally effective, and can be implemented in real-time. The aim of this study was to correlate results from wavelet decomposition in the spectral domain with physical parameters (tissue oxygenation, blood and melanin content). Wavelet decomposition was tested on Monte Carlo simulations, measurements of a tissue phantom and hyperspectral data from a human volunteer during an occlusion experiment. Reflectance spectra were decomposed, and the coefficients were correlated to tissue parameters. This approach was used to identify wavelet components that can be utilized to map levels of blood, melanin and oxygen saturation. The results show a significant correlation (p wavelet components. The tissue parameters could be mapped using a subset of the calculated components due to redundancy in spectral information. Vessel structures are well visualized. Wavelet analysis appears as a promising tool for extraction of spectral features in skin. Future studies will aim at developing quantitative mapping of optical properties based on wavelet decomposition.

  10. Tailoring of new polymeric biomaterials for the repair of medium-sized corneal perforations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, MJ; Blaauwgeers, HGT; Kuijer, R; Jongsma, FHM; de Brabander, J; Nuijts, RMMA; Koole, LH

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymeric biomaterials can be designed such that they become suitable for surgical closure of medium-sized perforations in the cornea, the transparent tissue in the front of the eye. Such a biomaterial must meet stringent requirements in terms of

  11. Rationally designed meta-implants: a combination of auxetic and conventional meta-biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolken, H.M.A.; Janbaz, S.; Leeflang, M.A.; Lietaert, K.; Weinans, H.H.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2018-01-01

    Rationally designed meta-biomaterials present unprecedented combinations of mechanical, mass transport, and biological properties favorable for tissue regeneration. Here we introduce hybrid meta-biomaterials with rationally-distributed values of negative (auxetic) and positive Poisson’s ratios, and

  12. New Models for Patient-specific Evaluation of the Effect of Biomaterials on Macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Grotenhuis (Nienke)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractBiomaterials are often used in many fields of medicine to restore or replace tissue. These biomaterials always elicit a reaction of the immune system, called the foreign body reaction, which can lead to complications in patients and failure of the device. Macrophages are key players

  13. Biomaterials and tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    the relationship between materials science and the biology of the human patient. Medical devices are ... example the best solution to the arthritic hip may be to remove the affected bone and cartilage and replace them ... tive procedures are dramatic and ambitious, involving major movements of the bones in the cranium and ...

  14. Nanomechanical characterization of living mammary tissues by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plodinec, Marija; Lim, Roderick Y H

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of living cells and tissues are important for a variety of functional processes in vivo, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation. Changes in mechano-cellular phenotype, for instance, are associated with cancer progression. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an enabling technique that topographically maps and quantifies the mechanical properties of complex biological matter in physiological aqueous environments at the nanometer length scale. Recently we applied AFM to spatially resolve the distribution of nanomechanical stiffness across human breast cancer biopsies in comparison to healthy tissue and benign tumors. This led to the finding that AFM provides quantitative mechano-markers that may have translational significance for the clinical diagnosis of cancer. Here, we provide a comprehensive description of sample preparation methodology, instrumentation, data acquisition and analysis that allows for the quantitative nanomechanical profiling of unadulterated tissue at submicron spatial resolution and nano-Newton (nN) force sensitivity in physiological conditions.

  15. Macrophages, Foreign Body Giant Cells and Their Response to Implantable Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biomaterials, when implanted in vivo, elicit cellular and tissue responses. These responses include the inflammatory and wound healing responses, foreign body reactions, and fibrous encapsulation of the implanted materials. Macrophages are myeloid immune cells that are tactically situated throughout the tissues, where they ingest and degrade dead cells and foreign materials in addition to orchestrating inflammatory processes. Macrophages and their fused morphologic variants, the multinucleated giant cells, which include the foreign body giant cells (FBGCs are the dominant early responders to biomaterial implantation and remain at biomaterial-tissue interfaces for the lifetime of the device. An essential aspect of macrophage function in the body is to mediate degradation of bio-resorbable materials including bone through extracellular degradation and phagocytosis. Biomaterial surface properties play a crucial role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first couple of weeks following implantation. The foreign body reaction may impact biocompatibility of implantation devices and may considerably impact short- and long-term success in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, necessitating a clear understanding of the foreign body reaction to different implantation materials. The focus of this review article is on the interactions of macrophages and foreign body giant cells with biomaterial surfaces, and the physical, chemical and morphological characteristics of biomaterial surfaces that play a role in regulating the foreign body response. Events in the foreign body response include protein adsorption, adhesion of monocytes/macrophages, fusion to form FBGCs, and the consequent modification of the biomaterial surface. The effect of physico-chemical cues on macrophages is not well known and there is a complex interplay between biomaterial properties and those that result from interactions with the local environment. By having a

  16. Electromagnetic Characterization of Advanced Composites by Voxel-Based Inverse Methods, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The nondestructive characterization of advanced composites, such as carbon-fiber reinforced polymers (cfrp), by electromagnetic means is well established. What is...

  17. Advanced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and adipose tissue fibrosis in patients with Alström syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathercole, Laura L; Hazlehurst, Jonathan M; Armstrong, Matthew J; Crowley, Rachel; Boocock, Sarah; O'Reilly, Michael W; Round, Maria; Brown, Rachel; Bolton, Shaun; Cramb, Robert; Newsome, Phillip N; Semple, Robert K; Paisey, Richard; Tomlinson, Jeremy W; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn

    2016-11-01

    Alström syndrome (AS) is a recessive monogenic syndrome characterized by obesity, extreme insulin resistance and multi-organ fibrosis. Despite phenotypically being high risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), there is a lack of data on the extent of fibrosis in the liver and its close links to adipose in patients with AS. Our aim was to characterize the hepatic and adipose phenotype in patients with AS. Observational cohort study with comprehensive assessment of metabolic liver phenotype including liver elastography (Fibroscan ® ), serum Enhanced Liver Fibrosis (ELF) Panel and liver histology. In addition, abdominal adipose histology and gene expression was assessed. We recruited 30 patients from the UK national AS clinic. A subset of six patients underwent adipose biopsies which was compared with control tissue from nine healthy participants. Patients were overweight/obese (BMI 29.3 (25.95-34.05) kg/m 2 ). A total of 80% (24/30) were diabetic; 74% (20/27) had liver ultrasound scanning suggestive of NAFLD. As judged by the ELF panel, 96% (24/25) were categorized as having fibrosis and 10/21 (48%) had liver elastography consistent with advanced liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. In 7/8 selected cases, there was evidence of advanced NAFLD on liver histology. Adipose tissue histology showed marked fibrosis as well as disordered pro-inflammatory and fibrotic gene expression profiles. NAFLD and adipose dysfunction are common in patients with AS. The severity of liver disease in our cohort supports the need for screening of liver fibrosis in AS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Soft tissue profile changes after Functional Mandibular Advancer or Herbst appliance treatment in class II patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourfar, Jan; Lisson, Jörg Alexander; Gross, Ulrich; Frye, Linda; Kinzinger, Gero Stefan Michael

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to compare the effects on soft tissue profile in class II patients after treatment with either "Functional Mandibular Advancer" (FMA) or Herbst appliance. The study included n = 42 patients treated with either FMA (n = 21) or Herbst appliance (n = 21) by the same experienced orthodontist. The treatment followed a single-step advancement protocol. Lateral cephalograms were analyzed through a set of customized measurements. The actual therapeutic effect was calculated using data from a growth survey. After testing for normal distribution and homogeneity of variance, data were analyzed by one-sample Student's t tests and independent Student's t tests. Statistical significance was set at p profile were found in FMA and Herbst appliance patients. All remaining variables revealed no significant differences. Treatment-related changes on the facial soft tissue profile could be regarded similar in class II patients treated with FMA or Herbst appliance. No treatment-related changes that were specific for FMA or Herbst appliance could be identified. Only moderate changes were noted comparing pre- and posttreatment soft tissue profiles. Despite proven differences in skeletal and dental treatment effects, the facial profile has not to be taken into consideration when choosing between FMA and Herbst appliance for class II treatment.

  19. Energy materials. Advances in characterization, modelling and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Eldrup, M.; Hansen, N.; Juul Jensen, D.; Nielsen, E.M.; Nielsen, S.F.; Soerensen, B.F.; Pedersen, A.S.; Vegge, T.; West, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Energy-related topics in the modern world and energy research programmes cover the range from basic research to applications and structural length scales from micro to macro. Materials research and development is a central part of the energy area as break-throughs in many technologies depend on a successful development and validation of new or advanced materials. The Symposium is organized by the Materials Research Department at Risoe DTU - National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy. The Department concentrates on energy problems combining basic and applied materials research with special focus on the key topics: wind, fusion, superconductors and hydrogen. The symposium is based on these key topics and focus on characterization of materials for energy applying neutron, X-ray and electron diffraction. Of special interest is research carried out at large facilities such as reactors and synchrotrons, supplemented by other experimental techniques and modelling on different length scales that underpins experiments. The Proceedings contain 15 key note presentations and 30 contributed presentations, covering the abovementioned key topics relevant for the energy materials. The contributions clearly show the importance of materials research when developing sustainable energy technologies and also that many challenges remain to be approached. (BA)

  20. High temperature material characterization and advanced materials development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. H. and others

    2005-03-15

    The study is to characterize the structural materials under the high temperature, one of the most significant environmental factors in nuclear systems. And advanced materials are developed for high temperature and/or low activation in neutron irradiation. Tensile, fatigue and creep properties have been carried out at high temperature to evaluate the mechanical degradation. Irradiation tests were performed using the HANARO. The optimum chemical composition and heat treatment condition were determined for nuclear grade 316NG stainless steel. Nitrogen, aluminum, and tungsten were added for increasing the creep rupture strength of FMS steel. The new heat treatment method was developed to form more stable precipitates. By applying the novel whiskering process, high density SiC/SiC composites with relative density above 90% could be obtained even in a shorter processing time than the conventional CVI process. Material integrated databases are established using data sheets. The databases of 6 kinds of material properties are accessible through the home page of KAERI material division.

  1. Characterization of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator EU2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress was made developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a 140-watt radioisotope power system. While the ASRG flight development project has ended, the hardware that was designed and built under the project is continuing to be tested to support future Stirling-based power system development. NASA GRC recently completed the assembly of the ASRG Engineering Unit 2 (EU2). The ASRG EU2 consists of the first pair of Sunpower's ASC-E3 Stirling convertors mounted in an aluminum housing, and Lockheed Martin's Engineering Development Unit (EDU) 4 controller (a fourth generation controller). The ASC-E3 convertors and Generator Housing Assembly (GHA) closely match the intended ASRG Qualification Unit flight design. A series of tests were conducted to characterize the EU2, its controller, and the convertors in the flight-like GHA. The GHA contained an argon cover gas for these tests. The tests included: measurement of convertor, controller, and generator performance and efficiency, quantification of control authority of the controller, disturbance force measurement with varying piston phase and piston amplitude, and measurement of the effect of spacecraft DC bus voltage on EU2 performance. The results of these tests are discussed and summarized, providing a basic understanding of EU2 characteristics and the performance and capability of the EDU 4 controller.

  2. Specific recruitment of circulating angiogenic cells using biomaterials as filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, Matthew; Molenda, James; Murphy, William L

    2017-07-01

    Endogenous recruitment of circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) is an emerging strategy to induce angiogenesis within a defect site, and multiple recent strategies have deployed soluble protein releasing biomaterials for this purpose. However, the way in which the design of biomaterials affects CAC recruitment and invasion are poorly understood. Here we used an enhanced-throughput cell invasion assay to systematically examine the effects of biomaterial design on CAC recruitment. The screens co-optimized hydrogel presentation of a stromal-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) gradient, hydrogel degradability, and hydrogel stiffness for maximal CAC invasion. We also examined the specificity of this invasion by assessing dermal fibroblast, mesenchymal stem cell, and lymphocyte invasion individually and in co-culture with CACs to identify hydrogels specific to CAC invasion. These screens suggested a subset of MMP-degradable hydrogels presenting a specific range of SDF-1α gradient slopes that induced specific invasion of CACs, and we posit that the design parameters of this subset of hydrogels may serve as instructive templates for the future design of biomaterials to specifically recruit CACs. We also posit that this design concept may be applied more broadly in that it may be possible to utilize these specific subsets of biomaterials as "filters" to control which types of cell populations invade into and populate the biomaterial. The recruitment of specific cell types for cell-based therapies in vivo is of great interest to the regenerative medicine community. Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs), CD133+ cells derived from the blood stream, are of particular interest for induction of angiogenesis in ischemic tissues, and recent studies utilizing soluble-factor releasing biomaterials to recruit these cells in vivo show great promise. However, these studies are largely "proof of concept" and are not systematic in nature. Thus, little is currently known about how biomaterial design

  3. Isolation, characterization and molecular weight determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collagen is a major structural protein of connective tissues. It can be used as a prosthetic biomaterial applicable to artificial skin, tendon ligaments and development collagen implants. In the present study, an attempt was made to isolate and characterize collagen from the marine sponge, Spirastrella inconstans. The total ...

  4. Characterizing and Diminishing Autofluorescence in Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Human Respiratory Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. Sally; Richter, Anke; Becker, Steven; Moyer, Jenna E.; Sandouk, Aline; Skinner, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Tissue autofluorescence frequently hampers visualization of immunofluorescent markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded respiratory tissues. We assessed nine treatments reported to have efficacy in reducing autofluorescence in other tissue types. The three most efficacious were Eriochrome black T, Sudan black B and sodium borohydride, as measured using white light laser confocal Λ2 (multi-lambda) analysis. We also assessed the impact of steam antigen retrieval and serum application on human tracheal tissue autofluorescence. Functionally fitting this Λ2 data to 2-dimensional Gaussian surfaces revealed that steam antigen retrieval and serum application contribute minimally to autofluorescence and that the three treatments are disparately efficacious. Together, these studies provide a set of guidelines for diminishing autofluorescence in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human respiratory tissue. Additionally, these characterization techniques are transferable to similar questions in other tissue types, as demonstrated on frozen human liver tissue and paraffin-embedded mouse lung tissue fixed in different fixatives. PMID:24722432

  5. Surface modification of biomaterials and biomedical devices using additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Susmita; Robertson, Samuel Ford; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2018-01-15

    The demand for synthetic biomaterials in medical devices, pharmaceutical products and, tissue replacement applications are growing steadily due to aging population worldwide. The use for patient matched devices is also increasing due to availability and integration of new technologies. Applications of additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing (3DP) in biomaterials have also increased significantly over the past decade towards traditional as well as innovative next generation Class I, II and III devices. In this review, we have focused our attention towards the use of AM in surface modified biomaterials to enhance their in vitro and in vivo performances. Specifically, we have discussed the use of AM to deliberately modify the surfaces of different classes of biomaterials with spatial specificity in a single manufacturing process as well as commented on the future outlook towards surface modification using AM. It is widely understood that the success of implanted medical devices depends largely on favorable material-tissue interactions. Additive manufacturing has gained traction as a viable and unique approach to engineered biomaterials, for both bulk and surface properties that improve implant outcomes. This review explores how additive manufacturing techniques have been and can be used to augment the surfaces of biomedical devices for direct clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of biomaterials on endothelial cell thrombogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Alison P.; Sefton, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    Driven by tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, endothelial cells are being used in combination with biomaterials in a number of applications for the purpose of improving blood compatibility and host integration. Endothelialized vascular grafts are beginning to be used clinically with some success in some centers, while endothelial seeding is being explored as a means of creating a vasculature within engineered tissues. The underlying assumption of this strategy is that when cultured on artificial biomaterials, a confluent layer of endothelial cells maintain their non-thrombogenic phenotype. In this review the existing knowledge base of endothelial cell thrombogenicity cultured on a number of different biomaterials is summarized. The importance of selecting appropriate endpoint measures that are most reflective of overall surface thrombogenicity is the focus of this review. Endothelial cells inhibit thrombosis through three interconnected regulatory systems (1) the coagulation cascade (2) the cellular components of the blood such as leukocytes and platelets and (3) the complement cascade, and also through effects on fibrinolysis and vascular tone, the latter which influences blood flow. Thus, in order to demonstrate the thromobgenic benefit of seeding a biomaterial with EC, the conditions under which EC surfaces are more likely to exhibit lower thrombogenicity than unseeded biomaterial surfaces need to be consistent with the experimental context. The endpoints selected should be appropriate for the dominant thrombotic process that occurs under the given experimental conditions. PMID:17316788

  7. Visual Analytics for the Exploration of Tumor Tissue Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raidou, R. G.; Van Der Heide, U. A.; Dinh, C. V.

    2015-01-01

    imaging data, to derive per voxel a number of features, indicative of tissue properties. However, the high dimensionality and complexity of this imaging-derived feature space is prohibiting for easy exploration and analysis - especially when clinical researchers require to associate observations from......, from which it is difficult to obtain the required insight. We propose a visual tool for: (1) easy exploration and visual analysis of the feature space of imaging-derived tissue characteristics and (2) knowledge discovery and hypothesis generation and confirmation, with respect to reference data used...... in clinical research. We employ, as central view, a 2D embedding of the imaging-derived features. Multiple linked interactive views provide functionality for the exploration and analysis of the local structure of the feature space, enabling linking to patient anatomy and clinical reference data. We performed...

  8. Tissue specific metal characterization of selected fish species in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mukhtiar; Ahmad, Taufiq; Liaquat, Muhammad; Abbasi, Kashif Sarfraz; Farid, Ibrahim Bayoumi Abdel; Jahangir, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Concentration of various metals, i.e., zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), and silver (Ag), was evaluated in five indigenous fish species (namely, silver carp, common carp, mahseer, thela fish, and rainbow trout), by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. It is proved from this study that, overall, mahseer and rainbow trout had high amount of zinc, whereas thela fish and silver carp had high concentration of copper, chromium, silver, nickel, and lead, while common carp had highest amount of iron contents. Furthermore, a tissue-specific discrimination among various fish species was observed, where higher metal concentrations were noticed in fish liver, with decreasing concentration in other organs like skin, gills, and finally the least contents in fish muscle. Multivariate data analysis showed not only a variation in heavy metals among the tissues but also discrimination among the selected fish species.

  9. Characterization of Soft Tissue Tumors by Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekcevik, Yeliz; Kahya, Mehmet Onur; Kaya, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a noninvasive method for investigation of tumor histological content. It has been applied for some musculoskeletal tumors and reported to be useful. The aim of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of benign and malignant soft tissue tumors and to determine if ADC can help differentiate these tumors. DWI was performed on 25 histologically proven soft tissue masses. It was obtained with a single-shot echo-planar imaging technique using a 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) machine. The mean ADC values were calculated. We grouped soft tissue tumors as benign cystic, benign solid or mixed, malignant cystic and malignant solid or mixed tumors and compared mean ADC values between these groups. There was only one patient with a malignant cystic tumor and was not included in the statistical analysis. The median ADC values of benign and malignant tumors were 2.31 ± 1.29 and 0.90 ± 0.70 (median ± interquartile range), respectively. The mean ADC values were different between benign and malignant tumors (P = 0.031). Benign cystic tumors had significantly higher ADC values than benign solid or mixed tumors and malignant solid or mixed tumors (p values were < 0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Malignant solid or mixed tumors had lower ADC values than benign solid or mixed tumors (P = 0.02). Our preliminary results have shown that although there is some overlap between benign and malignant tumors, adding DWI, MR imaging to routine soft tissue tumor protocols may improve diagnostic accuracy

  10. Use of Human Vascular Tissue Microarrays for Measurement of Advanced Glycation Endproducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halushka, Marc K.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Lu, Jie; Macgregor, Anne M.; Cornish, Toby C.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are present in the vasculature and are associated with vascular disease. We determined levels of AGEs in eight distinct adult vascular tissues using tissue microarray (TMA) technology and associated these levels with clinical characteristics. Medium-to-large caliber blood vessels were harvested from 100 adult autopsies to create 17 TMAs. AGE levels were evaluated by IHC using a polyclonal anti-AGE antibody on over 700 unique blood vessels. Slides were digitally scanned, and quantitative analysis was performed using a color deconvolution image analysis technique. Medial AGE staining was strongly correlated between all eight blood vessels. In the media, AGE staining levels were significantly higher at older ages (p=0.009), in white subjects (pcontains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:559–566, 2009) PMID:19223295

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of Biodegradable Reactive Isocyanate-Terminated Three-Armed- and Hyperbranched Block Copolymeric Tissue Adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochynska, Agnieszka I.; Hannink, Gerjon; Rongen, Jan J.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Buma, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Tissue adhesives are an attractive class of biomaterials, which can serve as a treatment for meniscus tears. In this study, physicochemical and adhesive properties of novel biodegradable three-armed- and hyperbranched block copolymeric adhesives are evaluated. Additionally, their degradation in

  12. Quantitative ultrasound tissue characterization in shoulder and thigh muscles – a new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P.K.; Jensen, B.R.; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2006-01-01

    Background: The echogenicity patterns of ultrasound scans contain information of tissue composition in muscles. The aim was: ( 1) to develop a quantitative ultrasound image analysis to characterize tissue composition in terms of intensity and structure of the ultrasound images, and ( 2) to use th...

  13. Recent advances in synthesis, characterization of hydroxyapatite/polyurethane composites and study of their biocompatible properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, L M; Piticescu, R M; Antonelli, A; Rusti, C F; Carboni, E; Sfara, C; Magnani, M; Badilita, V; Vasile, E; Trusca, R; Buruiana, T

    2013-11-01

    The development of engineered biomaterials that mimic bone tissues is a promising research area that benefits from a growing interest. Polymers and polymer-ceramic composites are the principle materials investigated for the development of synthetic bone scaffolds thanks to their proven biocompatibility and biostability. Several polymers have been combined with calcium phosphates (mainly hydroxyapatite) to prepare nanocomposites with improved biocompatible and mechanical properties. Here, we report the hydrothermal synthesis in high pressure conditions of nanostructured composites based on hydroxyapatite and polyurethane functionalized with carboxyl and thiol groups. Cell-material interactions were investigated for potential applications of these new types of composites as coating for orthopedic implants. Physical-chemical and morphological characteristics of hydroxyapatite/polyurethane composites were evaluated for different compositions, showing their dependence on synthesis parameters (pressure, temperature). In vitro experiments, performed to verify if these composites are biocompatible cell culture substrates, showed that they are not toxic and do not affect cell viability.

  14. Rapid Characterization of Molecular Chemistry, Nutrient Make-Up and Microlocation of Internal Seed Tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.; Block, H.; Niu, Z.; Doiron, K.

    2007-01-01

    Wheat differs from corn in biodegradation kinetics and fermentation characteristics. Wheat exhibits a relatively high rate (23% h 01 ) and extent (78% DM) of biodegradation, which can lead to metabolic problems such as acidosis and bloat in ruminants. The objective of this study was to rapidly characterize the molecular chemistry of the internal structure of wheat (cv. AC Barrie) and reveal both its structural chemical make-up and nutrient component matrix by analyzing the intensity and spatial distribution of molecular functional groups within the intact seed using advanced synchrotron-powered Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy. The experiment was performed at the U2B station of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, USA. The wheat tissue was imaged systematically from the pericarp, seed coat, aleurone layer and endosperm under the peaks at ∼1732 (carbonyl C(double b ond)O ester), 1515 (aromatic compound of lignin), 1650 (amide I), 1025 (non-structural CHO), 1550 (amide II), 1246 (cellulosic material), 1160, 1150, 1080, 930, 860 (all CHO), 3350 (OH and NH stretching), 2928 (CH 2 stretching band) and 2885 cm -1 (CH 3 stretching band). Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis were applied to analyze the molecular FTIR spectra obtained from the different inherent structures within the intact wheat tissues. The results showed that, with synchrotron-powered FTIR microspectroscopy, images of the molecular chemistry of wheat could be generated at an ultra-spatial resolution. The features of aromatic lignin, structural and non-structural carbohydrates, as well as nutrient make-up and interactions in the seeds, could be revealed. Both principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis methods are conclusive in showing that they can discriminate and classify the different inherent structures within the seed tissue. The wheat exhibited distinguishable differences in the

  15. Albumin removal from human fibrinogen preparations for manufacturing human fibrin-based biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available two component human fibrin sealants are commonly used to manufacture human fibrin-based biomaterials. However, this method is costly and allows little room for further tuning of the biomaterial. Human fibrinogen solutions offer a more cost-effective and versatile alternative to manufacture human fibrin-based biomaterials. Yet, human fibrinogen is highly unstable and contains certain impurities like human albumin. Within the context of biomaterials and tissue engineering we offer a simple yet novel solution based on classical biochemical techniques to significantly reduce albumin in human fibrinogen solutions. This method can be used for various tissue engineering and biomedical applications as an initial step in the manufacturing of human fibrin-based biomaterials to optimise their regenerative application.

  16. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Della Bona; Oscar E. Pecho; Rodrigo Alessandretti

    2015-01-01

    Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different subs...

  17. Biomaterials Influence Macrophage-Mesenchymal Stem Cell Interaction In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Grotenhuis (Nienke); S.F. De Witte (Samantha Fh); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); Y. Bayon (Yves); J.F. Lange (Johan); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Macrophages and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important cells in wound healing. We hypothesized that the cross-talk between macrophages and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ASCs) is biomaterial dependent, thereby influencing processes involved in wound healing. Materials and

  18. Some Biomaterials based on Collagen in Human Health care

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Some Biomaterials based on Collagen in Human Health care. Ophthalmology. Wound healing. Burn Dressing. Tumor Treatment. Tissue Engineered devices. for cardio-vascular functions; For managing chronic illnesses including diabetic ulcers and foot. Smart shoe.

  19. Characterization and tissue-specific expression of human LRIG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlund, Camilla; Nilsson, Jonas; Guo, Dongsheng; Starefeldt, Anna; Golovleva, Irina; Henriksson, Roger; Hedman, Håkan

    2004-05-12

    We have recently identified and cloned the human LRIG1 gene (formerly LIG1). LRIG1 is a predicted integral membrane protein with a domain organization reminiscent of the Drosophila epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor antagonist Kekkon-1. We have searched for additional members of the human LRIG family and identified LRIG2 (). The LRIG2 gene was localized to chromosome 1p13 and had an open reading frame of 1065 amino acids. The LRIG2 protein was predicted to have the same domain organization as LRIG1 with a signal peptide, an extracellular part containing15 leucine-rich repeats and three immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. The LRIG2 amino acid sequence was 47% identical to human LRIG1 and mouse Lrig1 (also known as Lig-1). Northern blotting and RT-PCR revealed LRIG2 transcripts in all tissues analyzed. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed the most prominent RNA expression in skin, uterus, ovary, kidney, brain, small intestine, adrenal gland, and stomach. Immunoblotting of COS-7 cell lysates demonstrated that heterologously expressed human LRIG2 had an apparent molecular weight of 132 kDa under reducing gel-running conditions. N-glycosidase F treatment resulted in a reduction of the apparent molecular weight to 107 kDa, showing that LRIG2 was a glycoprotein carrying N-linked oligosaccharides. Cell surface biotinylation experiments and confocal fluorescence laser microscopy demonstrated expression of LRIG2 both at the cell surface and in the cytoplasm. LRIG2 was detected in tissue lysates from stomach, prostate, lung, and fetal brain by immunoblotting. In conclusion, LRIG2 was found to be a glycoprotein which was encoded by a gene on human chromosome 1p13 and its mRNA was present in all tissues analyzed.

  20. Breast phantom for mammary tissue characterization by near infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, D A; Cristiano, K L; Gutiérrez, J C

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease associated to a high morbidity and mortality in the entire world. In the study of early detection of breast cancer the development of phantom is so important. In this research we fabricate a breast phantom using a ballistic gel with special modifications to simulate a normal and abnormal human breast. Optical properties of woman breast in the near infrared region were modelled with the phantom we developed. The developed phantom was evaluated with near infrared spectroscopy in order to study its relation with breast tissue. A good optical behaviour was achieved with the model fabricated

  1. Influence of hydroxyapatite granule size, porosity, and crystallinity on tissue reaction in vivo. Part A: synthesis, characterization of the materials, and SEM analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté Sánchez de Val, José E; Calvo-Guirado, José L; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Pérez-Albacete Martínez, Carlos; Mazón, Patricia; De Aza, Piedad N

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was the synthesis and analysis of the tissue reaction to three different Hydroxyapatite (HA)-based bone substitute materials differing only in granule size, porosity, and crystallinity through an animal experimental model at 60 days. Three different HA-based biomaterials were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and EDS analysis, the resultant product was ground in three particle sizes: Group I (2000-4000 μm), Group II (1000-2000 μm), and Group III (600-1000 μm). Critical size defects were created in both tibias of 15 rabbits. Four defects per rabbit for a total of 60 defects were grafted with the synthesized materials as follows: Group I (15 defects), Group II (15 defects), Group III (15 defects), and empty (15 defects control). After animals sacrifice at 60 days samples were obtained and processed for SEM and EDS evaluation of Ca/P ratios, elemental mapping was performed to determine the chemical degradation process and changes to medullary composition in all the four study groups. The tendency for the density was to increase with the increasing annealing temperature; in this way it was possible to observe that the sample that shows highest crystallinity and crystal size corresponding to that of group I. The SEM morphological examination showed that group III implant showed numerous resorption regions, group II implant presented an average resorption rate of all the implants. The group I displayed smoother surface features, in comparison with the other two implants. The data from this study show that changing the size, porosity, and crystallinity of one HA-based bone substitute material can influence the integration of the biomaterials within the implantation site and the new bone formation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of bio-engineered cardiac pseudo tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Tao; Boland, Thomas; Baicu, Catalin; Aho, Michael; Zile, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We report on fabricating functional three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs using an inkjet based bio-prototyping method. With the use of modified inkjet printers, contractile cardiac hybrids that exhibit the forms of the 3D rectangular sheet and even the 'half heart' (with two connected ventricles) have been fabricated by arranging alternate layers of biocompatible alginate hydrogels and mammalian cardiac cells according to pre-designed 3D patterns. In this study, primary feline adult and H1 cardiomyocytes were used as model cardiac cells. Alginate hydrogels with controlled micro-shell structures were built by spraying cross-linkers in micro-drops onto un-gelled alginic acid. The cells remained viable in constructs as thick as 1 cm due to the programmed porosity. Microscopic and macroscopic contractile functions of these cardiomyocyte constructs were observed in vitro. These results suggest that the inkjet bio-prototyping method could be used for hierarchical design of functional cardiac pseudo tissues, balanced with porosity for mass transport and structural support.

  3. A Multidisciplined Teaching Reform of Biomaterials Course for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Feng; Pu, Fang; Liu, Haifeng; Niu, Xufeng; Zhou, Gang; Li, Deyu; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The biomaterials science has advanced in a high speed with global science and technology development during the recent decades, which experts predict to be more obvious in the near future with a more significant position for medicine and health care. Although the three traditional subjects, such as medical science, materials science and biology…

  4. Preparation and characterization of electrospun PLCL/Poloxamer nanofibers and dextran/gelatin hydrogels for skin tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-feng Pan

    Full Text Available In this study, two different biomaterials were fabricated and their potential use as a bilayer scaffold for skin tissue engineering applications was assessed. The upper layer biomaterial was a Poly(ε-caprolactone-co-lactide/Poloxamer (PLCL/Poloxamer nanofiber membrane fabricated using electrospinning technology. The PLCL/Poloxamer nanofibers (PLCL/Poloxamer, 9/1 exhibited strong mechanical properties (stress/strain values of 9.37 ± 0.38 MPa/187.43 ± 10.66% and good biocompatibility to support adipose-derived stem cells proliferation. The lower layer biomaterial was a hydrogel composed of 10% dextran and 20% gelatin without the addition of a chemical crosslinking agent. The 5/5 dextran/gelatin hydrogel displayed high swelling property, good compressive strength, capacity to present more than 3 weeks and was able to support cells proliferation. A bilayer scaffold was fabricated using these two materials by underlaying the nanofibers and casting hydrogel to mimic the structure and biological function of native skin tissue. The upper layer membrane provided mechanical support in the scaffold and the lower layer hydrogel provided adequate space to allow cells to proliferate and generate extracellular matrix. The biocompatibility of bilayer scaffold was preliminarily investigated to assess the potential cytotoxicity. The results show that cell viability had not been affected when cocultured with bilayer scaffold. As a consequence, the bilayer scaffold composed of PLCL/Poloxamer nanofibers and dextran/gelatin hydrogels is biocompatible and possesses its potentially high application prospect in the field of skin tissue engineering.

  5. Advanced myocardial tissue characterisation by a multi-component CMR protocol in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greulich, Simon; Kaesemann, Philipp; Patrascu, Alexandru; Sechtem, Udo; Mahrholdt, Heiko [Robert-Bosch-Medical Center Stuttgart, Division of Cardiology, Stuttgart (Germany); Mayr, Agnes [University Hospital Innsbruck, Division of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Kitterer, Daniel; Latus, Joerg; Braun, Niko; Alscher, M.D. [Robert-Bosch-Medical Center Stuttgart, Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Stuttgart (Germany); Henes, Joerg [University Hospital Tuebingen, Centre for Interdisciplinary Clinical Immunology, Rheumatology and Auto-inflammatory Diseases and Department of Internal Medicine II (Oncology, Haematology, Immunology, Rheumatology, Pulmology), Tuebingen (Germany); Vecchio, Francesco [Robert-Bosch-Medical Center Stuttgart, Division of Cardiology, Stuttgart (Germany); Universita degli Studi di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Division of Cardiology, Rome (Italy); Greiser, Andreas; Groeninger, Stefan [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Romeo, Francesco [Universita degli Studi di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Division of Cardiology, Rome (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are at increased risk of suffering from adverse cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) mapping techniques might be appropriate tools to complement late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for the assessment of myocardial involvement. This study aimed to perform advanced myocardial tissue characterisation in RA patients by a multicomponent CMR protocol. 22 RA patients were prospectively enrolled and underwent CMR, including LGE and T1/T2 mapping sequences; 20 volunteers served as controls. Mean LV-EF was 66%; prevalence of LGE was 18%. RA patients had increased native T1 (985 vs. 959 ms, p = 0.03), expanded extracellular volume (ECV) (27 vs. 25%, p = 0.02) and higher T2 values (52 vs. 49 ms, p < 0.001) compared to controls irrespective of the presence of LGE. T2 mapping showed the highest prevalence of values beyond the 95% percentile of controls. RA patients demonstrated higher T1, ECV and T2 values compared to controls, with most significant differences for T2. Since these results seem to be independent of the presence of LGE, advanced myocardial tissue characterisation including CMR mapping techniques in addition to LGE-CMR might be useful in the evaluation of myocardial involvement in RA patients. (orig.)

  6. Western blotting as a method for studying cell-biomaterial interactions : The role of protein collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, T.G.; Klein, CL; Kirkpatrick, CJ

    2001-01-01

    Research of cell-biomaterial interactions is building on knowledge and methods available in cell and molecular biology. Western blotting is one of the options to characterize protein expression in cell populations. Method transfer to biomaterial model systems is not trivial because of the structure

  7. Comparison of Biocompatibility and Adsorption Properties of Different Plastics for Advanced Microfluidic Cell and Tissue Culture Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Midwoud, Paul M.; Janse, Arnout; Merema, M.T.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidic technology is providing new routes toward advanced cell and tissue culture models to better understand human biology and disease. Many advanced devices have been made from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) to enable experiments, for example, to study drug metabolism by use of precision cut

  8. Reference values for the Chinese population of skin autofluorescence as a marker of advanced glycation end products accumulated in tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, X.; Hu, H.; Koetsier, M.; Graaff, R.; Han, C.

    Aim Advanced glycation end products play an important role in the pathophysiology of several chronic and age-related diseases, especially diabetes mellitus. Skin autofluorescence is a non-invasive method for assessing levels of tissue advanced glycation end products. This study aims to establish the

  9. A mixed boundary representation to simulate the displacement of a biofluid by a biomaterial in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, René P; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2011-05-01

    Characterization of the biomaterial flow through porous bone is crucial for the success of the bone augmentation process in vertebroplasty. The biofluid, biomaterial, and local morphological bone characteristics determine the final shape of the filling, which is important both for the post-treatment mechanical loading and the risk of intraoperative extraosseous leakage. We have developed a computational model that describes the flow of biomaterials in porous bone structures by considering the material porosity, the region-dependent intrinsic permeability of the porous structure, the rheological properties of the biomaterial, and the boundary conditions of the filling process. To simulate the process of the substitution of a biofluid (bone marrow) by a biomaterial (bone cement), we developed a hybrid formulation to describe the evolution of the fluid boundary and properties and coupled it to a modified version of Darcy's law. The apparent rheological properties are derived from a fluid-fluid interface tracking algorithm and a mixed boundary representation. The region- specific intrinsic permeability of the bone is governed by an empirical relationship resulting from a fitting process of experimental data. In a first step, we verified the model by studying the displacement process in spherical domains, where the spreading pattern is known in advance. The mixed boundary model demonstrated, as expected, that the determinants of the spreading pattern are the local intrinsic permeability of the porous matrix and the ratio of the viscosity of the fluids that are contributing to the displacement process. The simulations also illustrate the sensitivity of the mixed boundary representation to anisotropic permeability, which is related to the directional dependent microstructural properties of the porous medium. Furthermore, we compared the nonlinear finite element model to different published experimental studies and found a moderate to good agreement (R(2)=0.9895 for a one

  10. Bone grafting with granular biomaterial in segmental maxillary osteotomy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orion Luiz Haas Junior

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first report of bone grafting with a granular biomaterial in segmental maxillary osteotomy. Successful formation of new bone with density greater than that of the surrounding tissue was achieved, preventing pseudarthrosis and postoperative instability.

  11. Design, clinical translation and immunological response of biomaterials in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Singh, Anirudha; Wolf, Matthew T.; Wang, Xiaokun; Pardoll, Drew M.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2016-07-01

    The field of regenerative medicine aims to replace tissues lost as a consequence of disease, trauma or congenital abnormalities. Biomaterials serve as scaffolds for regenerative medicine to deliver cells, provide biological signals and physical support, and mobilize endogenous cells to repair tissues. Sophisticated chemistries are used to synthesize materials that mimic and modulate native tissue microenvironments, to replace form and to elucidate structure-function relationships of cell-material interactions. The therapeutic relevance of these biomaterial properties can only be studied after clinical translation, whereby key parameters for efficacy can be defined and then used for future design. In this Review, we present the development and translation of biomaterials for two tissue engineering targets, cartilage and cornea, both of which lack the ability to self-repair. Finally, looking to the future, we discuss the role of the immune system in regeneration and the potential for biomaterial scaffolds to modulate immune signalling to create a pro-regenerative environment.

  12. Preparation and characterization of photocured poly (ε-caprolactone) diacrylate/poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate/chitosan for photopolymerization-type 3D printing tissue engineering scaffold application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yih-Lin; Chen, Freeman

    2017-12-01

    Because of its biocompatible, biodegradable and antimicrobial properties, chitosan is an attractive biomaterial for use in tissue engineering scaffolds. This work builds on previous research by incorporating 95% DD chitosan into a visible-light curable resin which is compatible with a digital light processing (DLP™) projection additive manufacturing (3D printing) system. Different concentrations of chitosan were added to a poly (ε-caprolactone)-diacrylate/poly (ethylene glycol)-diacrylate baseline resin and the samples were extensively characterized. Thermal and mechanical analysis conformed to established scaffold requirements. L929 cells were cultured on the photo-crosslinked films and MTT assays were performed at 1, 3, and 5days to assess cytocompatibility of the resins. Data and SEM images verified a correlation between the concentration of chitosan in the photocurable resin and the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of cell cultures. Finally, the processability of the resins with the dynamic masking DLP system was demonstrated by constructing multi-layer scaffolds with actual measurements that were consistent with the CAD models. These findings encourage the use of chitosan as an additive in visible-light curable resins to improve desired properties in tissue engineering scaffolds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Extraction and characterization of collagen from Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic squid and its potential application in hybrid scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rui C G; Marques, Ana L P; Oliveira, Sara M; Diogo, Gabriela S; Pirraco, Rogério P; Moreira-Silva, Joana; Xavier, José C; Reis, Rui L; Silva, Tiago H; Mano, João F

    2017-09-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein found in mammals and it exhibits a low immunogenicity, high biocompatibility and biodegradability when compared with others natural polymers. For this reason, it has been explored for the development of biologically instructive biomaterials with applications for tissue substitution and regeneration. Marine origin collagen has been pursued as an alternative to the more common bovine and porcine origins. This study focused on squid (Teuthoidea: Cephalopoda), particularly the Antarctic squid Kondakovia longimana and the Sub-Antarctic squid Illex argentinus as potential collagen sources. In this study, collagen has been isolated from the skins of the squids using acid-based and pepsin-based protocols, with the higher yield being obtained from I. argentinus in the presence of pepsin. The produced collagen has been characterized in terms of physicochemical properties, evidencing an amino acid profile similar to the one of calf collagen, but exhibiting a less preserved structure, with hydrolyzed portions and a lower melting temperature. Pepsin-soluble collagen isolated from I. argentinus was selected for further evaluation of biomedical potential, exploring its incorporation on poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) 3D printed scaffolds for the development of hybrid scaffolds for tissue engineering, exhibiting hierarchical features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The diagnostic capability of laser induced fluorescence in the characterization of excised breast tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmed, A. H.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2017-08-01

    Differentiating between normal, benign and malignant excised breast tissues is one of the major worldwide challenges that need a quantitative, fast and reliable technique in order to avoid personal errors in diagnosis. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is a promising technique that has been applied for the characterization of biological tissues including breast tissue. Unfortunately, only few studies have adopted a quantitative approach that can be directly applied for breast tissue characterization. This work provides a quantitative means for such characterization via introduction of several LIF characterization parameters and determining the diagnostic accuracy of each parameter in the differentiation between normal, benign and malignant excised breast tissues. Extensive analysis on 41 lyophilized breast samples using scatter diagrams, cut-off values, diagnostic indices and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, shows that some spectral parameters (peak height and area under the peak) are superior for characterization of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues with high sensitivity (up to 0.91), specificity (up to 0.91) and accuracy ranking (highly accurate).

  15. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands.

  16. Current advances in tissue repair and regeneration: the future is bright.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninov, Nikolay; Yun, Maximina H

    2015-04-01

    The fifth EMBO conference on 'The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Regeneration and Repair' took place in the peaceful coastal town of Sant Feliu de Guixols (Spain) on September 2014. The meeting was organised by Emili Saló (U. Barcelona, Spain), Kimberly Mace (U. Manchester, UK), Patrizia Ferretti (University College London, UK) and Michael Brand (Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, Germany) and received the generous support of Society for Developmental Biology, The Company of Biologists, Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, Garland Science and the journals Regeneration and Cell Signalling. The natural surroundings provided an inspiring setting for 185 researchers from all over the world to share their latest findings and views on the field. The conference showcased the great diversity of model organisms used for studying regeneration and tissue repair, including invertebrate and vertebrate species (Fig. 1). Importantly, this diversity in animal models allowed for a global overview of the mechanisms that promote regeneration. In addition, it highlighted some of the unique aspects that confer differences in regenerative capacities among different species. These differences might lie in each of the different steps involved in performing regeneration, including triggering the regenerative response, controlling cellular plasticity, re-stablishing the correct tissue patterns, as well as determining the roles of extrinsic factors, such as the role of inflammation in regeneration. A deeper understanding of these processes in the naturally regenerating species is a prerequisite for advancing the field of regenerative medicine and tissue repair in humans.

  17. Mechanically-competent and cytocompatible polycaprolactone-borophosphosilicate hybrid biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Dibakar; Dixon, S Jeffrey; Mequanint, Kibret; Rizkalla, Amin S

    2017-11-01

    Organic-inorganic class II hybrid materials have domain sizes at the molecular level and chemical bonding between the organic and inorganic phases. We have previously reported the synthesis of class II hybrid biomaterials from alkoxysilane-functionalized polycaprolactone (PCL) and borophosphosilicate (B 2 O 3 -P 2 O 5 -SiO 2 ) glass (BPSG) through a non-aqueous sol-gel process. In the present study, the mechanical properties and degradability of these PCL/BPSG hybrid biomaterials were studied and compared to those of their conventional composite counterparts. The compressive strength, modulus and toughness of the hybrid biomaterials were significantly greater compared to the conventional composites, likely due to the covalent bonding between the organic and inorganic phases. A hybrid biomaterial (50wt% PCL and 50wt% BPSG) exhibited compressive strength, modulus and toughness values of 32.2 ± 3.5MPa, 573 ± 85MPa and 1.54 ± 0.03MPa, respectively; whereas the values for composite of similar composition were 18.8 ± 1.6MPa, 275 ± 28MPa and 0.76 ± 0.03MPa, respectively. Degradation in phosphate-buffered saline was slower for hybrid biomaterials compared to their composite counterparts. Thus, these hybrid materials possess superior mechanical properties and more controlled degradation characteristics compared to their corresponding conventional composites. To assess in vitro cytocompatibility, MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells were seeded onto the surfaces of hybrid biomaterials and polycaprolactone (control). Compared to polycaprolactone, cells on the hybrid material displayed enhanced spreading, focal adhesion formation, and cell number, consistent with excellent cytocompatibility. Thus, based on their mechanical properties, degradability and cytocompatibility, these novel biomaterials have potential for use as scaffolds in bone tissue engineering and related applications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Biomaterials and Magnetic fields for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstanty

    2003-01-01

    The field of biomaterials has emerged as an important topic in the purview of NASA s new vision of research activities in the Microgravity Research Division. Although this area has an extensive track record in the medical field as borne out by the routine use of polymeric sutures, implant devices, and prosthetics, novel applications such as tissue engineering, artificial heart valves and controlled drug delivery are beginning to be developed. Besides the medical field, biomaterials and bio-inspired technologies are finding use in a host of emerging interdisciplinary fields such as self-healing and self-assembling structures, biosensors, fuel systems etc. The field of magnetic fluid technology has several potential applications in medicine. One of the emerging fields is the area of controlled drug delivery, which has seen its evolution from the basic oral delivery system to pulmonary to transdermal to direct inoculations. In cancer treatment by chemotherapy for example, targeted and controlled drug delivery has received vast scrutiny and substantial research and development effort, due to the high potency of the drugs involved and the resulting requirement to keep the exposure of the drugs to surrounding healthy tissue to a minimum. The use of magnetic particles in conjunction with a static magnetic field allows smart targeting and retention of the particles at a desired site within the body with the material transport provided by blood perfusion. Once so located, the therapeutical aspect (radiation, chemotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) of the treatment, now highly localized, can be implemented.

  19. Graphite Oxide to Graphene. Biomaterials to Bionics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brianna C; Murray, Eoin; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-12-09

    The advent of implantable biomaterials has revolutionized medical treatment, allowing the development of the fields of tissue engineering and medical bionic devices (e.g., cochlea implants to restore hearing, vagus nerve stimulators to control Parkinson's disease, and cardiac pace makers). Similarly, future materials developments are likely to continue to drive development in treatment of disease and disability, or even enhancing human potential. The material requirements for implantable devices are stringent. In all cases they must be nontoxic and provide appropriate mechanical integrity for the application at hand. In the case of scaffolds for tissue regeneration, biodegradability in an appropriate time frame may be required, and for medical bionics electronic conductivity is essential. The emergence of graphene and graphene-family composites has resulted in materials and structures highly relevant to the expansion of the biomaterials inventory available for implantable medical devices. The rich chemistries available are able to ensure properties uncovered in the nanodomain are conveyed into the world of macroscopic devices. Here, the inherent properties of graphene, along with how graphene or structures containing it interface with living cells and the effect of electrical stimulation on nerves and cells, are reviewed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Treatment Outcome Following Transarterial Chemoembolization in Advanced Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Chunyu; Wang, Jianbo, E-mail: a602131499@163.com [Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (China); Wang, Yonggang [Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Department of Oncology (China); Zhao, Jungong; Zhu, Yueqi; Ma, Xu; Zhou, Jia [Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (China); Yan, Xuebing [Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Department of General Surgery (China)

    2016-10-15

    PurposeTransarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is used to treat unresectable bone and soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and as a pre-surgical adjuvant treatment. However, its efficiency for advanced STS is undetermined. This study evaluated TACE’s efficiency in treating advanced STS and prognostic factors for patient survival.Materials and MethodsWe enrolled 39 patients with unresectable STS who underwent TACE as an alternative treatment during 2010–2014, with overall survival (OS) as the primary end point. Cancer pain was evaluated by visual analogue scores (VAS) before and after TACE procedures. Factors that affect survival were evaluated by multivariate analyses (Cox proportional hazard model).ResultsMean OS after TACE was 23.7 ± 2.1 months, with 1-year OS 71.5 %, 2-year OS 45.8 %, and 3-year OS 32.5 %. Lesion number and tumor stage were key predictors of survival. TACE was found to decrease cancer pain VAS and increase relapse interval. Size of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particle diameter (P = 0.03) and imaging response (P = 0.044) were also found to affect relapse interval.ConclusionTACE was an effective treatment for advanced STS, with a 32.5 % 3-year OS rate, and led to lower cancer pain VAS and longer relapse intervals than chemoinfusion only. Smaller PVA particles are preferable during the TACE procedure.

  1. Recent advances in characterization of Echinococcus antigen B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamuti, Wulamu; Sako, Yasuhito; Nakao, Minoru; Xiao, Ning; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Yuji; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Lightowlers, Marshall W; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Antigen B (AgB) in hydatid cyst fluid of Echinococcus granulosus is a polymeric lipoprotein of 160 kDa and a highly immunogenic major antigen in echinococcal infection. The antigen is comprised of a group of subunit monomers of approximately 8 kDa in molecular size. Recent studies have revealed that the E. granulosus AgB (EgAgB) shows a high degree of genetic variability and the genes encoding the EgAgB 8-kDa subunit monomers that have been identified to date could be grouped into four clades, corresponding to the genes EgAgB8/1, EgAgB8/2, EgAgB8/3 and EgAgB8/4. It has been suggested that the recombinant EgAgB8/2 (rEgAgB8/2) provides better performance in serodiagnosis of human cystic echinococcosis (CE) than does the recombinant EgAgB8/1 (rEgAgB8/1). The EgAgB has been identified as a protease inhibitor with an ability to inhibit recruitment of neutrophils and exploit activation of T helper cells by eliciting a non-protective Th2 cell response, predominantly in patients with progressive CE. Recently it has been revealed that AgB also exists in the cyst fluid of Echinococcus multilocularis. Five different cDNAs encoding the EgAgB homologues have been identified in vesicles, protoscoleces and/or immature adult worms of E. multilocularis and named as EmAgB8/1, EmAgB8/2, EmAgB8/3, EmAgB8/4 and EmAgB8/5. These genes appeared to be expressed in a developmentally regulated manner in the parasite life cycle. This review focuses on recent advances in molecular biological and immunological characterization of AgB from both of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis.

  2. Host response to biomaterials the impact of host response on biomaterial selection

    CERN Document Server

    Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Host Response to Biomaterials: The Impact of Host Response on Biomaterial Selection explains the various categories of biomaterials and their significance for clinical applications, focusing on the host response to each biomaterial. It is one of the first books to connect immunology and biomaterials with regard to host response. The text also explores the role of the immune system in host response, and covers the regulatory environment for biomaterials, along with the benefits of synthetic versus natural biomaterials, and the transition from simple to complex biomaterial solutions. Fiel

  3. Characterizing viscoelastic properties of breast cancer tissue in a mouse model using indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Suhao; Zhao, Xuefeng; Chen, Jiayao; Zeng, Jianfeng; Chen, Shuangqing; Chen, Lei; Meng, You; Liu, Biao; Shan, Hong; Gao, Mingyuan; Feng, Yuan

    2018-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading cancer forms affecting females worldwide. Characterizing the mechanical properties of breast cancer tissue is important for diagnosis and uncovering the mechanobiology mechanism. Although most of the studies were based on human cancer tissue, an animal model is still describable for preclinical analysis. Using a custom-build indentation device, we measured the viscoelastic properties of breast cancer tissue from 4T1 and SKBR3 cell lines. A total of 7 samples were tested for each cancer tissue using a mouse model. We observed that a viscoelastic model with 2-term Prony series could best describe the ramp and stress relaxation of the tissue. For long-term responses, the SKBR3 tissues were stiffer in the strain levels of 4-10%, while no significant differences were found for the instantaneous elastic modulus. We also found tissues from both cell lines appeared to be strain-independent for the instantaneous elastic modulus and for the long-term elastic modulus in the strain level of 4-10%. In addition, by inspecting the cellular morphological structure of the two tissues, we found that SKBR3 tissues had a larger volume ratio of nuclei and a smaller volume ratio of extracellular matrix (ECM). Compared with prior cellular mechanics studies, our results indicated that ECM could contribute to the stiffening the tissue-level behavior. The viscoelastic characterization of the breast cancer tissue contributed to the scarce animal model data and provided support for the linear viscoelastic model used for in vivo elastography studies. Results also supplied helpful information for modeling of the breast cancer tissue in the tissue and cellular levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of nasal cavity-associated lymphoid tissue in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haihong; Yan, Mengfei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2014-05-01

    The nasal mucosa is involved in immune defense, as it is the first barrier for pathogens entering the body through the respiratory tract. The nasal cavity-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), which is found in the mucosa of the nasal cavity, is considered to be the main mucosal immune inductive site in the upper respiratory tract. NALT has been found in humans and many mammals, which contributes to local and systemic immune responses after intranasal vaccination. However, there are very few data on NALT in avian species, especially waterfowl. For this study, histological sections of the nasal cavities of Cherry Valley ducks were used to examine the anatomical location and histological characteristics of NALT. The results showed that several lymphoid aggregates are present in the ventral wall of the nasal cavity near the choanal cleft, whereas several more lymphoid aggregates were located on both sides of the nasal septum. In addition, randomly distributed intraepithelial lymphocytes and isolated lymphoid follicles were observed in the regio respiratoria of the nasal cavity. There were also a few lymphoid aggregates located in the lamina propria of the regio vestibularis, which was covered with a stratified squamous epithelium. This study focused on the anatomic and histological characteristics of the nasal cavity of the duck and performed a systemic overview of NALT. This will be beneficial for further understanding of immune mechanisms after nasal vaccination and the development of effective nasal vaccines for waterfowls. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Multicenter Clinical Trial of Keratin Biomaterial for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    the issues associated w ith the use of autografts, nerve gui dance conduits have been developed to bridge the gap between the trans ected nerve ends...Biomaterial Hydrogel" Western North Carolina Society for Neuroscience : Winston-Salem, NC 11/2011; North Carolina Tissue Engineering and Regenerative...Technology Applications for Combat Casualty Care: St. Pete Beach, FL 8/2010; Society for Neuroscience : San Diego, CA 11/2010; Tissue Engineering and

  6. Structural Characterization of Pharmaceutical Heparins Prepared from Different Animal Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    FU, LI; LI, GUOYUN; YANG, BO; ONISHI, AKIHIRO; LI, LINGYUN; SUN, PEILONG; ZHANG, FUMING; LINHARDT, ROBERT J.

    2013-01-01

    Although most pharmaceutical heparin used today is obtained from porcine intestine, heparin has historically been prepared from bovine lung and ovine intestine. There is some regulatory concern about establishing the species origin of heparin. This concern began with the outbreak of mad cow disease in the 1990s and was exacerbated during the heparin shortage in the 2000s and the heparin contamination crisis of 2007–2008. Three heparins from porcine, ovine, and bovine were characterized through state-of-the-art carbohydrate analysis methods with a view profiling their physicochemical properties. Differences in molecular weight, monosaccharide and disaccharide composition, oligosaccharide sequence, and antithrombin III-binding affinity were observed. These data provide some insight into the variability of heparins obtained from these three species and suggest some analytical approaches that may be useful in confirming the species origin of a heparin active pharmaceutical ingredient. PMID:23526651

  7. Novel Biomaterials Used in Medical 3D Printing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Tappa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of an implant depends on the type of biomaterial used for its fabrication. An ideal implant material should be biocompatible, inert, mechanically durable, and easily moldable. The ability to build patient specific implants incorporated with bioactive drugs, cells, and proteins has made 3D printing technology revolutionary in medical and pharmaceutical fields. A vast variety of biomaterials are currently being used in medical 3D printing, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. With continuous research and progress in biomaterials used in 3D printing, there has been a rapid growth in applications of 3D printing in manufacturing customized implants, prostheses, drug delivery devices, and 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The current review focuses on the novel biomaterials used in variety of 3D printing technologies for clinical applications. Most common types of medical 3D printing technologies, including fused deposition modeling, extrusion based bioprinting, inkjet, and polyjet printing techniques, their clinical applications, different types of biomaterials currently used by researchers, and key limitations are discussed in detail.

  8. Novel Biomaterials Used in Medical 3D Printing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappa, Karthik; Jammalamadaka, Udayabhanu

    2018-02-07

    The success of an implant depends on the type of biomaterial used for its fabrication. An ideal implant material should be biocompatible, inert, mechanically durable, and easily moldable. The ability to build patient specific implants incorporated with bioactive drugs, cells, and proteins has made 3D printing technology revolutionary in medical and pharmaceutical fields. A vast variety of biomaterials are currently being used in medical 3D printing, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. With continuous research and progress in biomaterials used in 3D printing, there has been a rapid growth in applications of 3D printing in manufacturing customized implants, prostheses, drug delivery devices, and 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The current review focuses on the novel biomaterials used in variety of 3D printing technologies for clinical applications. Most common types of medical 3D printing technologies, including fused deposition modeling, extrusion based bioprinting, inkjet, and polyjet printing techniques, their clinical applications, different types of biomaterials currently used by researchers, and key limitations are discussed in detail.

  9. Biomaterial-Based Implantable Devices for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Sue Anne; Danti, Serena

    2017-01-01

    This review article focuses on the current local therapies mediated by implanted macroscaled biomaterials available or proposed for fighting cancer and also highlights the upcoming research in this field. Several authoritative review articles have collected and discussed the state-of-the-art as well as the advancements in using biomaterial-based micro- and nano-particle systems for drug delivery in cancer therapy. On the other hand, implantable biomaterial devices are emerging as highly versatile therapeutic platforms, which deserve an increased attention by the healthcare scientific community, as they are able to offer innovative, more effective and creative strategies against tumors. This review summarizes the current approaches which exploit biomaterial-based devices as implantable tools for locally administrating drugs and describes their specific medical applications, which mainly target resected brain tumors or brain metastases for the inaccessibility of conventional chemotherapies. Moreover, a special focus in this review is given to innovative approaches, such as combined delivery therapies, as well as to alternative approaches, such as scaffolds for gene therapy, cancer immunotherapy and metastatic cell capture, the later as promising future trends in implantable biomaterials for cancer applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Advanced composites characterization with x-ray technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, George Y.

    1993-12-01

    Recognizing the critical need to advance new composites for the aeronautics and aerospace industries, we are focussing on advanced test methods that are vital to successful modeling and manufacturing of future generations of high temperature and durable composite materials. These newly developed composites are necessary to reduce propulsion cost and weight, to improve performance and reliability, and to address longer-term national strategic thrusts for sustaining global preeminence in high speed air transport and in high performance military aircraft.

  11. Characterization and mechanical performance study of silk/PVA cryogels: towards nucleus pulposus tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Puay Yong; Shi, Pujiang; Goh, James Cho-Hong; Toh, Siew Lok

    2014-10-20

    Poly (vinyl) alcohol (PVA) cryogels are reported in the literature for application in nucleus pulposus (NP) replacement strategies. However, these studies are mainly limited to acellular approaches-in part due to the high hydrophilicity of PVA gels that renders cellular adhesion difficult. Silk is a versatile biomaterial with excellent biocompatibility. We hypothesize that the incorporation of silk with PVA will (i) improve the cell-hosting abilities of PVA cryogels and (ii) allow better tailoring of physical properties of the composite cryogels for an NP tissue engineering purpose. 5% (wt/vol) PVA is blended with 5% silk fibroin (wt/vol) to investigate the effect of silk : PVA ratios on the cryogels' physical properties. Results show that the addition of silk results in composite cryogels that are able to swell to more than 10 times its original dry weight and rehydrate to at least 70% of its original wet weight. Adding at least 20% silk significantly improves surface hydrophobicity and is correlated with an improvement in cell-hosting abilities. Cell-seeded cryogels also display an increment in compressive modulus and hoop stress values. In all, adding silk to PVA creates cryogels that can be potentially used as NP replacements.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of crosslinked gellan/PVA nanofibers for tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashisth, Priya; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-10-01

    Electrospun nanofibers based on gellan are considered as promising biomaterial for tissue engineering and wound healing applications. However, major hurdles in usage of these nanofibers are their poor stability and deprived structural consistency in aqueous medium which is a prerequisite for their application in the biomedical sector. In this investigation, three dimensional nanofibers, consisting of gellan and PVA have been fabricated and then stabilized under various crosslinking conditions in order to improve their physiochemical stability. The impacts of different crosslinking procedures on the gellan/PVA nanofibers were examined in terms of changes in morphological, mechanical, swelling and biological properties. Superior tensile strength and strain was recorded in case of crosslinked nanofibers as compared to non-crosslinked nanofibers. Contact angles and swelling properties of fabricated gellan/PVA nanofibers were found to vary with the crosslinking method. All crosslinking conditions were evaluated with regard to their response towards human dermal fibroblast (3T3L1) cells. Biocompatibility studies suggested that the fabricated crosslinked gellan/PVA nanofibers hold a great prospective in the biomedical engineering arena. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of chitosan-multiwalled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Hu, Jingxiao; Shen, Xinyu; Tong, Hua

    2013-08-01

    Chitosan-multiwalled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites were synthesized by a novel in situ precipitation method. The electrostatic adsorption between multiwalled carbon nanotubes and chitosan was investigated and explained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. Morphology studies showed that uniform distribution of hydroxyapatite particles and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix was observed. In chitosan-multiwalled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites, the diameters of multiwalled carbon nanotubes were about 10 nm. The mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated by measuring their compressive strength and elastic modulus. The elastic modulus and compressive strength increased sharply from 509.9 to 1089.1 MPa and from 33.2 to 105.5 MPa with an increase of multiwalled carbon/chitosan weight ratios from 0 to 5 %, respectively. Finally, the cell biocompatibility of the composites was tested in vitro, which showed that they have good biocompatibility. These results suggest that the chitosan-multiwalled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites are promising biomaterials for bone tissue engineering.

  14. MRI characterization of brown adipose tissue in obese and normal-weight children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Shore, Richard M. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Schoeneman, Samantha E. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Huiyuan [John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County, Collaborative Research Unit, Chicago, IL (United States); Kwon, Soyang [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Stanley Manne Children' s Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Pediatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Josefson, Jami L. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Endocrinology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Pediatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is identified in mammals as an adaptive thermogenic organ for modulation of energy expenditure and heat generation. Human BAT may be primarily composed of brown-in-white (BRITE) adipocytes and stimulation of BRITE may serve as a potential target for obesity interventions. Current imaging studies of BAT detection and characterization have been mainly limited to PET/CT. MRI is an emerging application for BAT characterization in healthy children. To exploit Dixon and diffusion-weighted MRI methods to characterize cervical-supraclavicular BAT/BRITE properties in normal-weight and obese children while accounting for pubertal status. Twenty-eight healthy children (9-15 years old) with a normal or obese body mass index participated. MRI exams were performed to characterize supraclavicular adipose tissues by measuring tissue fat percentage, T2*, tissue water mobility, and microvasculature properties. We used multivariate linear regression models to compare tissue properties between normal-weight and obese groups while accounting for pubertal status. MRI measurements of BAT/BRITE tissues in obese children showed higher fat percentage (P < 0.0001), higher T2* (P < 0.0001), and lower diffusion coefficient (P = 0.015) compared with normal-weight children. Pubertal status was a significant covariate for the T2* measurement, with higher T2* (P = 0.0087) in pubertal children compared to prepubertal children. Perfusion measurements varied by pubertal status. Compared to normal-weight children, obese prepubertal children had lower perfusion fraction (P = 0.003) and pseudo-perfusion coefficient (P = 0.048); however, obese pubertal children had higher perfusion fraction (P = 0.02) and pseudo-perfusion coefficient (P = 0.028). This study utilized chemical-shift Dixon MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI methods to characterize supraclavicular BAT/BRITE tissue properties. The multi-parametric evaluation revealed evidence of morphological differences in brown

  15. MRI characterization of brown adipose tissue in obese and normal-weight children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Shore, Richard M.; Schoeneman, Samantha E.; Zhang, Huiyuan; Kwon, Soyang; Josefson, Jami L.

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is identified in mammals as an adaptive thermogenic organ for modulation of energy expenditure and heat generation. Human BAT may be primarily composed of brown-in-white (BRITE) adipocytes and stimulation of BRITE may serve as a potential target for obesity interventions. Current imaging studies of BAT detection and characterization have been mainly limited to PET/CT. MRI is an emerging application for BAT characterization in healthy children. To exploit Dixon and diffusion-weighted MRI methods to characterize cervical-supraclavicular BAT/BRITE properties in normal-weight and obese children while accounting for pubertal status. Twenty-eight healthy children (9-15 years old) with a normal or obese body mass index participated. MRI exams were performed to characterize supraclavicular adipose tissues by measuring tissue fat percentage, T2*, tissue water mobility, and microvasculature properties. We used multivariate linear regression models to compare tissue properties between normal-weight and obese groups while accounting for pubertal status. MRI measurements of BAT/BRITE tissues in obese children showed higher fat percentage (P < 0.0001), higher T2* (P < 0.0001), and lower diffusion coefficient (P = 0.015) compared with normal-weight children. Pubertal status was a significant covariate for the T2* measurement, with higher T2* (P = 0.0087) in pubertal children compared to prepubertal children. Perfusion measurements varied by pubertal status. Compared to normal-weight children, obese prepubertal children had lower perfusion fraction (P = 0.003) and pseudo-perfusion coefficient (P = 0.048); however, obese pubertal children had higher perfusion fraction (P = 0.02) and pseudo-perfusion coefficient (P = 0.028). This study utilized chemical-shift Dixon MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI methods to characterize supraclavicular BAT/BRITE tissue properties. The multi-parametric evaluation revealed evidence of morphological differences in brown

  16. Isolation and characterization of heparan sulfate from various murine tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warda, Mohamad; Toida, Toshihiko; Zhang, Fuming; Sun, Peilong; Munoz, Eva; Xie, Jin; Linhardt, Robert J

    2006-11-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS), is a proteoglycan (PG) found both in the extracellular matrix and on cell surface. It may represent one of the most biologically important glycoconjugates, playing an essential role in a variety of different events at molecular level. The publication of the mouse genome, and the intensive investigations aimed at understanding the proteome it encodes, has motivated us to initiate studies in mouse glycomics focused on HS. The current study is aimed at determining the quantitative and qualitative organ distribution of HS in mice. HS from brain, eyes, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, intestine and skin was purified from 6-8 week old male and female mice. The recovered yield of HS from these organs is compared with the recovered whole body yield of HS. Structural characterization of the resulting HS relied on disaccharide analysis and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Different organs revealed a characteristic HS structure. These data begin to provide a structural understanding of the role of HS in cell-cell interactions, cell signaling and sub-cellular protein trafficking as well as a fundamental understanding of certain aspects of protein-carbohydrate interactions.

  17. Soft tissue sarcomas in the precision medicine era: new advances in clinical practice and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Messina, Carlo; De Luca, Ida; Musso, Emmanuela; Casarin, Alessandra; Incorvaia, Lorena

    2018-04-04

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) represent a rare and heterogeneous group of solid tumours derived from mesenchymal progenitors and account for 1% of all adult malignancies. Although in the last decade anthracycline-based chemotherapy single agent or in combinations has been able to improve clinical benefits, prognosis is still poor and STSs represent an important unmet medical need. Continuous advances in cancer genetics and genomics have contributed to change management paradigms of STSs as it occurred for other solid tumours. Several treatments have been recently developed with the specific aim of targeting different cell pathways and immune-checkpoints that have been recognized to drive tumour progression. The following attempts to provide a review of literature focusing on the available data concerning novel treatments and future prospective for the management of metastatic STSs.

  18. Advanced tissue culture used by Twyfords to build up jojoba clones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Twyford Plant Laboratories Ltd. in the UK, using their own advanced methods of plant tissue culture, have built up a bank of 30 different male and female clones of jojoba, the arid land crop whose seeds produced a liquid wax which - amongst other uses - can be substituted for sperm whale oil. The technique involves growing microscopic parts of a parent plant on a medium containing all the necessary growth hormones, salts, vitamins and other nutrients. Growth takes place under artificial light in an all-electric controlled, air-conditioned environment. No other method is so successful for rapidly multiplying plants, particularly those that do not breed true from seed. These include most fruits and some flowers and vegetables.

  19. Biomaterials A Tantalus Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Helsen, Jozef A

    2010-01-01

    Replacement of a failing hip joint or other defective organs in the human body by artificial ‘spare parts’ has significantly improved our quality of life. These spare parts have to meet a wide spectrum of mechanical, chemical and design requirements.  In this book, the properties and selection of materials for such `spare parts’ are deduced from case studies at the start of each chapter. Hard tissue replacements (joints, long bones, dental), soft tissue (heart valves) and tissue engineering are included. The chapters also detail the three generic classes of materials: alloys (including shape memory alloys), ceramics & glasses and polymers. Separate chapters are devoted to the toxicity of implants, the metals zirconium(-zirconium oxide), tantalum, niobium and metallic glasses, soluble metals and Rapid Prototyping techniques for the fabrication of custom made prostheses.  The book concludes by a chapter on water as water is always ‘there’ and conditions the interaction between body and implant. ...

  20. Corneal stem cells and tissue engineering: Current advances and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Aline Lütz; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira

    2015-06-26

    Major advances are currently being made in regenerative medicine for cornea. Stem cell-based therapies represent a novel strategy that may substitute conventional corneal transplantation, albeit there are many challenges ahead given the singularities of each cellular layer of the cornea. This review recapitulates the current data on corneal epithelial stem cells, corneal stromal stem cells and corneal endothelial cell progenitors. Corneal limbal autografts containing epithelial stem cells have been transplanted in humans for more than 20 years with great successful rates, and researchers now focus on ex vivo cultures and other cell lineages to transplant to the ocular surface. A small population of cells in the corneal endothelium was recently reported to have self-renewal capacity, although they do not proliferate in vivo. Two main obstacles have hindered endothelial cell transplantation to date: culture protocols and cell delivery methods to the posterior cornea in vivo. Human corneal stromal stem cells have been identified shortly after the recognition of precursors of endothelial cells. Stromal stem cells may have the potential to provide a direct cell-based therapeutic approach when injected to corneal scars. Furthermore, they exhibit the ability to deposit organized connective tissue in vitro and may be useful in corneal stroma engineering in the future. Recent advances and future perspectives in the field are discussed.

  1. Evaluating polymeric biomaterial-environment interfaces by Langmuir monolayer techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, Anne-Christin; Roch, Toralf; Schulz, Burkhard; Lendlein, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are of specific relevance in medical and pharmaceutical applications due to their wide range of tailorable properties and functionalities. The knowledge about interactions of biomaterials with their biological environment is of crucial importance for developing highly sophisticated medical devices. To achieve optimal in vivo performance, a description at the molecular level is required to gain better understanding about the surface of synthetic materials for tailoring their properties. This is still challenging and requires the comprehensive characterization of morphological structures, polymer chain arrangements and degradation behaviour. The review discusses selected aspects for evaluating polymeric biomaterial-environment interfaces by Langmuir monolayer methods as powerful techniques for studying interfacial properties, such as morphological and degradation processes. The combination of spectroscopic, microscopic and scattering methods with the Langmuir techniques adapted to polymers can substantially improve the understanding of their in vivo behaviour. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. A Tubular Biomaterial Construct Exhibiting a Negative Poisson's Ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Lee

    Full Text Available Developing functional small-diameter vascular grafts is an important objective in tissue engineering research. In this study, we address the problem of compliance mismatch by designing and developing a 3D tubular construct that has a negative Poisson's ratio νxy (NPR. NPR constructs have the unique ability to expand transversely when pulled axially, thereby resulting in a highly-compliant tubular construct. In this work, we used projection stereolithography to 3D-print a planar NPR sheet composed of photosensitive poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate biomaterial. We used a step-lithography exposure and a stitch process to scale up the projection printing process, and used the cut-missing rib unit design to develop a centimeter-scale NPR sheet, which was rolled up to form a tubular construct. The constructs had Poisson's ratios of -0.6 ≤ νxy ≤ -0.1. The NPR construct also supports higher cellular adhesion than does the construct that has positive νxy. Our NPR design offers a significant advance in the development of highly-compliant vascular grafts.

  3. Stem cells in skin regeneration: biomaterials and computational models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele eTartarini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased incidence of diabetes and tumors, associated with global demographic issues (aging and life styles, has pointed out the importance to develop new strategies for the effective management of skin wounds. Individuals affected by these diseases are in fact highly exposed to the risk of delayed healing of the injured tissue that typically leads to a pathological inflammatory state and consequently to chronic wounds. Therapies based on stem cells have been proposed for the treatment of these wounds, thanks to the ability of stem cells to self-renew and specifically differentiate in response to the target bimolecular environment. Here we discuss how advanced biomedical devices can be developed by combining stem cells with properly engineered biomaterials and computational models. Examples include composite skin substitutes and bioactive dressings with controlled porosity and surface topography for controlling the infiltration and differentiation of the cells. In this scenario, mathematical frameworks for the simulation of cell population growth can provide support for the design of bio-constructs, reducing the need of expensive, time-consuming and ethically controversial animal experimentation.

  4. Engineering functional bladder tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Maya; Madduri, Srinivas; Gobet, Rita; Sulser, Tullio; Milleret, Vinzent; Hall, Heike; Atala, Anthony; Eberli, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    End stage bladder disease can seriously affect patient quality of life and often requires surgical reconstruction with bowel tissue, which is associated with numerous complications. Bioengineering of functional bladder tissue using tissue-engineering techniques could provide new functional tissues for reconstruction. In this review, we discuss the current state of this field and address different approaches to enable physiologic voiding in engineered bladder tissues in the near future. In a collaborative effort, we gathered researchers from four institutions to discuss the current state of functional bladder engineering. A MEDLINE® and PubMed® search was conducted for articles related to tissue engineering of the bladder, with special focus on the cells and biomaterials employed as well as the microenvironment, vascularisation and innervation strategies used. Over the last decade, advances in tissue engineering technology have laid the groundwork for the development of a biological substitute for bladder tissue that can support storage of urine and restore physiologic voiding. Although many researchers have been able to demonstrate the formation of engineered tissue with a structure similar to that of native bladder tissue, restoration of physiologic voiding using these constructs has never been demonstrated. The main issues hindering the development of larger contractile tissues that allow physiologic voiding include the development of correct muscle alignment, proper innervation and vascularization. Tissue engineering of a construct that will support the contractile properties that allow physiologic voiding is a complex process. The combination of smart scaffolds with controlled topography, the ability to deliver multiple trophic factors and an optimal cell source will allow for the engineering of functional bladder tissues in the near future. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Photographic image tissue characterization of the ulcerated diabetic foot during treatment: technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Hugo Honorato Pereira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of an ulcerated diabetic foot was documented photographically. We adapted the ultrasonographic tissue characterization (USTC or CATUS technique to develop a photographic image tissue characterization (p-IMTC or CATIM method. Five photographs, taken during medical treatment of an ulcerated diabetic foot following digital amputation, were quantified using imaging software designed to determine brightness intensity in grey scale images. The grey scale median (GSM changed from 127 to 98; 86; 76; and 83 (out of 255 during follow-up. The area of lesion was estimated by number of pixels and reduced from 17.85 cm² to 12.44; 3.68; 2.11; and 0.15 cm². The percentage of total number of pixels showing granulation tissue increased from 11% to 34%; 56%; 62%; and 75%. p-IMTC quantified treatment progress. GSM quantified generalized changes in tissues, while the area of lesion and granulation tissue were documented quantitatively. Lesions, ulcers, wounds or other tissues can be analyzed using p-IMTC, allowing quantification, characterization and control of the progression of a condition or treatment.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of hydroxyapatite-coated forsterite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Fabrication and characterization of hydroxyapatite-coated forsterite scaffold for tissue regeneration applications. ROYA SAIDI1,*, MOHAMMAD HOSSEIN FATHI1,2 and HAMIDREZA SALIMIJAZI3. 1Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology,. Isfahan 8415683111 ...

  7. Surface Sensitive Techniques for Advanced Characterization of Luminescent Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrik C. Swart

    2017-01-01

    The important role of surface sensitive characterization techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight scanning ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) for the characterization of different phosphor materials is discussed in this short review by giving selective examples from previous obtained results. AES is used to monitor surface reactions during electron bombardment and al...

  8. Technical advances in the sectioning of dental tissue and of on-section cross-linked collagen detection in mineralized teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhrao, Sim K; Sloan, Alastair J; Smith, Emma L; Archer, Charles W

    2010-08-01

    Immunohistochemical detection of cross-linked fibrillar collagens in mineralized tissues is much desired for exploring the mechanisms of biomineralization in health and disease. Mineralized teeth are impossible to section when embedded in conventional media, thus limiting on-section characterization of matrix proteins by immunohistochemistry. We hypothesized that by using an especially formulated acrylic resin suitable for mineralized dental tissues, not only sectioning of teeth would be possible, but also our recently developed immunofluorescence labeling technique would be amenable to fully calcified tissues for characterization of dentinal fibrillar collagens, which remains elusive. The hypothesis was tested on fixed rodent teeth embedded in Technovit 9100 New. It was possible to cut thin (1 mum) sections of mineralized teeth, and immunofluorescence characterization of cross-linked type I fibrillar collagen was selected due to its abundance in dentine. Decalcified samples of teeth embedded in paraffin wax were also used to compare immunolabeling from either method using the same immunoreagents in equivalent concentrations. In the decalcified tissue sections, type I collagen labeling in the dentine along the tubules was "patchy" and the signal in the predentine was very weak. However, enhanced signal in mineralized samples with type I collagen was detected not only in the predentine but also at the limit between intertubular dentine, within the elements of the enamel organ and subgingival stroma. This report offers advances in sectioning mineralized dental tissues and allows the application of immunofluorescence not only for on-section protein detection but importantly for detecting cross-linked fibrous collagens in both soft and mineralized tissue sections.

  9. A method to obtain reference images for evaluation of ultrasonic tissue characterization techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M.S.; Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Sahl, B.

    2002-01-01

    on the corresponding ultrasound images (identified via the fiducial markers) and modified to encompass what appeared to be tissue regions on the ultrasound images and subsequently re-applied to the macroscopic image. This modified macroscopic outline was used as guideline when drawing outlines identifying regions......A general problem when evaluating ultrasonic methods for tissue characterization is that "a golden standard" is seldom known. This paper describes a manual method to obtain a reference image, with the same geometry as the ultrasound image, indicating spatial location of the different tissue types...... present in the biological tissue scanned in vitro. A 30 x 10 x 2 mm(3) piece of formalin fixed porcine tissue was molded into an agar block, which on the top surface, contained a set of fiducial markers, spaced 2.5 mm. The block was submerged into 20 degreesC water and a set of parallel 7.5 MHz spatial...

  10. Application of cluster analysis and unsupervised learning to multivariate tissue characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momenan, R.; Insana, M.F.; Wagner, R.F.; Garra, B.S.; Loew, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure for classifying tissue types from unlabeled acoustic measurements (data type unknown) using unsupervised cluster analysis. These techniques are being applied to unsupervised ultrasonic image segmentation and tissue characterization. The performance of a new clustering technique is measured and compared with supervised methods, such as a linear Bayes classifier. In these comparisons two objectives are sought: a) How well does the clustering method group the data?; b) Do the clusters correspond to known tissue classes? The first question is investigated by a measure of cluster similarity and dispersion. The second question involves a comparison with a supervised technique using labeled data

  11. Characterization of the mechanical properties of resected porcine organ tissue using optical fiber photoelastic polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, Alexa W; Babaei, Behzad; Liu, Sonya; Larson, Brent K; Mumenthaler, Shannon M; Armani, Andrea M

    2017-10-01

    Characterizing the mechanical behavior of living tissue presents an interesting challenge because the elasticity varies by eight orders of magnitude, from 50Pa to 5GPa. In the present work, a non-destructive optical fiber photoelastic polarimetry system is used to analyze the mechanical properties of resected samples from porcine liver, kidney, and pancreas. Using a quasi-linear viscoelastic fit, the elastic modulus values of the different organ systems are determined. They are in agreement with previous work. In addition, a histological assessment of compressed and uncompressed tissues confirms that the tissue is not damaged during testing.

  12. Advanced Gun System (AGS) Dynamic Characterization: Modal Test and Analysis, High-Frequency Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berman, Morris

    1999-01-01

    Dynamic characterization tests were performed on the Advanced Gun System (AGS) vehicle. The tests were designed to provide modeling information for high-frequency shock prediction codes, as well as finite element codes...

  13. Use of radiation in biomaterials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Roberto S. E-mail: rbenson1@utk.edu

    2002-05-01

    Radiation is widely used in the biomaterials science for surface modification, sterilization and to improve bulk properties. Radiation is also used to design of biochips, and in situ photopolymerizable of bioadhesives. The energy sources most commonly used in the irradiation of biomaterials are high-energy electrons, gamma radiation, ultraviolet (UV) and visible light. Surface modification involves placement of selective chemical moieties on the surface of a material by chemical reactions to improve biointeraction for cell adhesion and proliferation, hemocompatibility and water absorption. The exposure of a polymer to radiation, especially ionizing radiation, can lead to chain scission or crosslinking with changes in bulk and surface properties. Sterilization by irradiation is designed to inactivate most pathogens from the surface of biomedical devices. An overview of the use of gamma and UV radiation to improve surface tissue compatibility, bulk properties and surface properties for wear resistance, formation of hydrogels and curing dental sealants and bone adhesives is presented. Gamma and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiated ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) exhibit improvement in surface modulus and hardness. The surface modulus and hardness of UHMWPE showed a dependence on type of radiation, dosage and processing. VUV surface modified e-PTFE vascular grafts exhibit increases in hydrophilicity and improvement towards adhesion of fibrin glue.

  14. Plasma assisted surface treatments of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, L; Migliaresi, C; Lunelli, L; Viero, G; Dalla Serra, M; Speranza, G

    2017-10-01

    The biocompatibility of an implant depends upon the material it is composed of, in addition to the prosthetic device's morphology, mechanical and surface properties. Properties as porosity and pore size should allow, when required, cells penetration and proliferation. Stiffness and strength, that depend on the bulk characteristics of the material, should match the mechanical requirements of the prosthetic applications. Surface properties should allow integration in the surrounding tissues by activating proper communication pathways with the surrounding cells. Bulk and surface properties are not interconnected, and for instance a bone prosthesis could possess the necessary stiffness and strength for the application omitting out prerequisite surface properties essential for the osteointegration. In this case, surface treatment is mandatory and can be accomplished using various techniques such as applying coatings to the prosthesis, ion beams, chemical grafting or modification, low temperature plasma, or a combination of the aforementioned. Low temperature plasma-based techniques have gained increasing consensus for the surface modification of biomaterials for being effective and competitive compared to other ways to introduce surface functionalities. In this paper we review plasma processing techniques and describe potentialities and applications of plasma to tailor the interface of biomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The case study of biomaterials and biominerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    The teaching of biomaterials as case study by on-line platform , susceptible to develop both individually and in groups, got different objectives proposed by the European Higher Education System, among which include: participate actively in the teaching-learning process by students, interpreting situations, adapt processes and solutions. It also improves oral and written communication, analytical skills and synthesis and also the ability to think critically. Biomaterials have their origin in biominerals. These are solid inorganic compounds of defined structure, consisting of molecular control mechanisms that operate in biological systems. Its main functions are: structural support, a reservoir of essential elements, sensors, mechanical protection and storage of toxic elements. Following the demand of materials compatible with certain functional systems of our body, developed biomaterials. Always meet the condition of biocompatibility. Should be tolerated by the body and do not provoke rejection. This involves a comprehensive study of physiological conditions and the anatomy of the body where a biomaterial has to be implemented. The possibility of generating new materials from biominerals has a major impact in medicine and other fields could reach as geology, construction, crystallography, etc. While the study of these issues is in its infancy today, can be viewed as an impact on the art and future technology. Planning case study that students would prepare its report for discussion in subgroups. Occurs then the pooling of individual analysis, joint case discussion and adoption by the subgroup of a consensual solution to the problem. The teacher as facilitator and coordinator of the final case analysis, sharing leads to group-wide class and said the unanimous decision reached by the students and gives his opinion on the resolution of the case. REFERENCES D.P. Ausubel. Psicología Educativa. Un punto de vista cognoscitivo. Trillas. Ed. 1983. E.W. Eisner. Procesos

  16. Unusual contiguous soft tissue spread of advanced malignant mesothelioma detected by FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu Yang; Edwards, Jamie; Williams, Hadyn; Hao, Zhong Lin; Khleif, Samir; Pucar, Darko [Medical College of Georgia at Augusta UniversityAugusta (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a tumor of mesodermal origin that arises from the serosa of the pleura, peritoneum, pericardium or tunica vaginalis. MPM is well known to have a poor prognosis with a median survival time of 12 months. Accurate diagnosis, staging and restaging of MPM are crucial with [18F] flurodeoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET/CT) playing an increasingly important role. Here we report a case of MPM with unusual contiguous soft tissue spread of the tumor along the dermal and fascial planes characterized by PET/CT. Given that the loco-regional tumor in the thorax was under control on PET/CT, the death of the patient was most likely associated with physiologic or metabolic causes associated with an extra-thoracic tumor.

  17. Gluteus Maximus Advancement Flap Procedure for Reconstruction of Posterior Soft Tissue Deficiency in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Henderson, Peter W; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Bostrom, Mathias P; Gayle, Lloyd B

    2017-05-01

    The current study describes the surgical technique and early outcomes of a gluteus maximus advancement flap procedure for the treatment of posterior soft tissue insufficiency among patients with complex revision total hip arthroplasty. This retrospective case series was conducted with a prospective, single-institution arthroplasty registry. Patients who underwent a gluteus maximus advancement flap procedure in the setting of revision total hip arthroplasty between January 2012 and January 2016 were eligible for inclusion (N=7). Primary indications for the gluteus maximus flap procedure included periprosthetic infection with persistent wound breakdown (n=4), persistent symptomatic aseptic pseudotumor in the setting of adverse local tissue reaction after unsuccessful operative debridement (n=2), and abductor insufficiency with recurrent hip instability after unsuccessful placement of a constrained liner (n=1). All patients who underwent a gluteus maximus advancement flap procedure for chronic periprosthetic infection or adverse local tissue reaction had healing of the wound and were infection-free at the last follow-up. In the early postoperative period, 2 patients had recurrent wound infection that required flap elevation. The patients remained infection-free after the subsequent procedure. No patient had repeat instability, and no complications of flap necrosis or nerve palsy occurred. The gluteus maximus advancement flap procedure provides a diverse range of soft tissue coverage options for patients with recalcitrant periprosthetic joint infection, adverse local tissue reaction with pseudotumor, or recurrent instability. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):e495-e500.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Withania somnifera: Advances and Implementation of Molecular and Tissue Culture Techniques to Enhance Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibha Pandey

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera, commonly known as Ashwagandha an important medicinal plant largely used in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine for over 3,000 years. Being a medicinal plant, dried powder, crude extract as well as purified metabolies of the plant has shown promising therapeutic properties. Withanolides are the principal metabolites, responsible for the medicinal properties of the plant. Availability and amount of particular withanolides differ with tissue type and chemotype and its importance leads to identification characterization of several genes/ enzymes related to withanolide biosynthetic pathway. The modulation in withanolides can be achieved by controlling the environmental conditions like, different tissue culture techniques, altered media compositions, use of elicitors, etc. Among all the in vitro techniques, hairy root culture proved its importance at industrial scale, which also gets benefits due to more accumulation (amount and number of withanolides in roots tissues of W. somnifera. Use of media compostion and elicitors further enhances the amount of withanolides in hairy roots. Another important modern day technique used for accumulation of desired secondary metabolites is modulating the gene expression by altering environmental conditions (use of different media composition, elicitors, etc. or through genetic enginnering. Knowing the significance of the gene and the key enzymatic step of the pathway, modulation in withanolide contents can be achieved upto required amount in therapeutic industry. To accomplish maximum productivity through genetic enginnering different means of Withania transformation methods have been developed to obtain maximum transformation efficiency. These standardized transformation procedues have been used to overexpress/silence desired gene in W. somnifera to understand the outcome and succeed with enhanced metabolic production for the ultimate benefit of human race.

  19. Withania somnifera: Advances and Implementation of Molecular and Tissue Culture Techniques to Enhance Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vibha; Ansari, Waquar Akhter; Misra, Pratibha; Atri, Neelam

    2017-01-01

    Withania somnifera, commonly known as Ashwagandha an important medicinal plant largely used in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine for over 3,000 years. Being a medicinal plant, dried powder, crude extract as well as purified metabolies of the plant has shown promising therapeutic properties. Withanolides are the principal metabolites, responsible for the medicinal properties of the plant. Availability and amount of particular withanolides differ with tissue type and chemotype and its importance leads to identification characterization of several genes/ enzymes related to withanolide biosynthetic pathway. The modulation in withanolides can be achieved by controlling the environmental conditions like, different tissue culture techniques, altered media compositions, use of elicitors, etc. Among all the in vitro techniques, hairy root culture proved its importance at industrial scale, which also gets benefits due to more accumulation (amount and number) of withanolides in roots tissues of W. somnifera. Use of media compostion and elicitors further enhances the amount of withanolides in hairy roots. Another important modern day technique used for accumulation of desired secondary metabolites is modulating the gene expression by altering environmental conditions (use of different media composition, elicitors, etc.) or through genetic enginnering. Knowing the significance of the gene and the key enzymatic step of the pathway, modulation in withanolide contents can be achieved upto required amount in therapeutic industry. To accomplish maximum productivity through genetic enginnering different means of Withania transformation methods have been developed to obtain maximum transformation efficiency. These standardized transformation procedues have been used to overexpress/silence desired gene in W. somnifera to understand the outcome and succeed with enhanced metabolic production for the ultimate benefit of human race. PMID:28848589

  20. Liver regenerative medicine: advances and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the standard care for many end-stage liver diseases. However, donor organs are scarce and some people succumb to liver failure before a donor is found. Liver regenerative medicine is a special interdisciplinary field of medicine focused on the development of new therapies incorporating stem cells, gene therapy and engineered tissues in order to repair or replace the damaged organ. In this review we consider the emerging progress achieved in the hepatic regenerative medicine within the last decade. The review starts with the characterization of liver organogenesis, fetal and adult stem/progenitor cells. Then, applications of primary hepatocytes, embryonic and adult (mesenchymal, hematopoietic and induced pluripotent) stem cells in cell therapy of liver diseases are considered. Current advances and challenges in producing mature hepatocytes from stem/progenitor cells are discussed. A section about hepatic tissue engineering includes consideration of synthetic and natural biomaterials in engineering scaffolds, strategies and achievements in the development of 3D bioactive matrices and 3D hepatocyte cultures, liver microengineering, generating bioartificial liver and prospects for fabrication of the bioengineered liver. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Surface Sensitive Techniques for Advanced Characterization of Luminescent Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Hendrik C

    2017-08-04

    The important role of surface sensitive characterization techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight scanning ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) for the characterization of different phosphor materials is discussed in this short review by giving selective examples from previous obtained results. AES is used to monitor surface reactions during electron bombardment and also to determine the elemental composition of the surfaces of the materials, while XPS and TOF-SIMS are used for determining the surface chemical composition and valence state of the dopants. The role of XPS to determine the presence of defects in the phosphor matrix is also stated with the different examples. The role of HRTEM in combination with Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) for nanoparticle characterization is also pointed out.

  2. Surface Sensitive Techniques for Advanced Characterization of Luminescent Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik C. Swart

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The important role of surface sensitive characterization techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS, time of flight scanning ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM for the characterization of different phosphor materials is discussed in this short review by giving selective examples from previous obtained results. AES is used to monitor surface reactions during electron bombardment and also to determine the elemental composition of the surfaces of the materials, while XPS and TOF-SIMS are used for determining the surface chemical composition and valence state of the dopants. The role of XPS to determine the presence of defects in the phosphor matrix is also stated with the different examples. The role of HRTEM in combination with Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS for nanoparticle characterization is also pointed out.

  3. Microgel mechanics in biomaterial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shalini; Hansen, Caroline E; Lyon, L Andrew

    2014-08-19

    The field of polymeric biomaterials has received much attention in recent years due to its potential for enhancing the biocompatibility of systems and devices applied to drug delivery and tissue engineering. Such applications continually push the definition of biocompatibility from relatively straightforward issues such as cytotoxicity to significantly more complex processes such as reducing foreign body responses or even promoting/recapitulating natural body functions. Hydrogels and their colloidal analogues, microgels, have been and continue to be heavily investigated as viable materials for biological applications because they offer numerous, facile avenues in tailoring chemical and physical properties to approach biologically harmonious integration. Mechanical properties in particular are recently coming into focus as an important manner in which biological responses can be altered. In this Account, we trace how mechanical properties of microgels have moved into the spotlight of research efforts with the realization of their potential impact in biologically integrative systems. We discuss early experiments in our lab and in others focused on synthetic modulation of particle structure at a rudimentary level for fundamental drug delivery studies. These experiments elucidated that microgel mechanics are a consequence of polymer network distribution, which can be controlled by chemical composition or particle architecture. The degree of deformability designed into the microgel allows for a defined response to an imposed external force. We have studied deformation in packed colloidal phases and in translocation events through confined pores; in all circumstances, microgels exhibit impressive deformability in response to their environmental constraints. Microgels further translate their mechanical properties when assembled in films to the properties of the bulk material. In particular, microgel films have been a large focus in our lab as building blocks for self

  4. LCA of Biofuels and Biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Susanne Vedel; Hansen, Sune Balle

    2017-01-01

    Biofuels and biomaterials can today substitute many commodities produced from fossil resources, and the bio-based production is increasing worldwide. As fossil resources are limited, and the use of such resources is a major contributor to global warming and other environmental impacts, the potent...

  5. Predoctoral Curriculum Guidelines for Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' predoctoral guidelines for biomaterials curricula includes notes on interrelationships between this and other fields, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives for each content area, and information on sequencing, faculty and…

  6. Tissue engineering in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Salih, Vehid M; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. The authors used "PUBMED" to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., "tissue engineering", "approaches", "strategies" "dentistry", "dental stem cells", "dentino-pulp complex", "guided tissue regeneration", "whole tooth", "TMJ", "condyle", "salivary glands", and "oral mucosa". Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Considering the

  7. Nanostructured Biomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Parratt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most important advances in the life sciences have come from transitioning to thinking of materials and their properties on the nanoscale rather than the macro or even microscale. Improvements in imaging technology have allowed us to see nanofeatures that directly impact chemical and mechanical properties of natural and man-made materials. Now that these can be imaged and quantified, substantial advances have been made in the fields of biomimetics, tissue engineering, and drug delivery. For the first time, scientists can determine the importance of nanograins and nanoasperities in nacre, direct the nucleation of apatite and the growth of cells on nanostructured scaffolds, and pass drugs tethered to nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier. This review examines some of the most interesting materials whose nanostructure and hierarchical organization have been shown to correlate directly with favorable properties and their resulting applications.

  8. Characterization of adipose tissue macrophages and adipose-derived stem cells in critical wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Sung Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Subcutaneous adipose tissue is a rich source of adipose tissue macrophages and adipose-derived stem cells which both play a key role in wound repair. While macrophages can be divided into the classically-activated M1 and the alternatively-activated M2 phenotype, ASCs are characterized by the expression of specific stem cell markers. Methods In the present study, we have investigated the expression of common macrophage polarization and stem cell markers in acutely inflamed adipose tissue. Subcutaneous adipose tissue adjacent to acutely inflamed wounds of 20 patients and 20 healthy subjects were harvested and underwent qPCR and flow cytometry analysis. Results Expression levels of the M1-specific markers CD80, iNOS, and IL-1b were significantly elevated in inflammatory adipose tissue when compared to healthy adipose tissue, whereas the M2-specific markers CD163 and TGF-β were decreased. By flow cytometry, a significant shift of adipose tissue macrophage populations towards the M1 phenotype was confirmed. Furthermore, a decrease in the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD29, CD34, and CD105 was observed whereas CD73 and CD90 remained unchanged. Discussion This is the first report describing the predominance of M1 adipose tissue macrophages and the reduction of stem cell marker expression in acutely inflamed, non-healing wounds.

  9. Characterization of adipose tissue macrophages and adipose-derived stem cells in critical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong-Sung; Tilstam, Pathricia V; Springenberg-Jung, Katrin; Boecker, Arne Hendrick; Schmitz, Corinna; Heinrichs, Daniel; Hwang, Soo Seok; Stromps, Jan Philipp; Ganse, Bergita; Kopp, Ruedger; Knobe, Matthias; Bernhagen, Juergen; Pallua, Norbert; Bucala, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue is a rich source of adipose tissue macrophages and adipose-derived stem cells which both play a key role in wound repair. While macrophages can be divided into the classically-activated M1 and the alternatively-activated M2 phenotype, ASCs are characterized by the expression of specific stem cell markers. In the present study, we have investigated the expression of common macrophage polarization and stem cell markers in acutely inflamed adipose tissue. Subcutaneous adipose tissue adjacent to acutely inflamed wounds of 20 patients and 20 healthy subjects were harvested and underwent qPCR and flow cytometry analysis. Expression levels of the M1-specific markers CD80, iNOS, and IL-1b were significantly elevated in inflammatory adipose tissue when compared to healthy adipose tissue, whereas the M2-specific markers CD163 and TGF- β were decreased. By flow cytometry, a significant shift of adipose tissue macrophage populations towards the M1 phenotype was confirmed. Furthermore, a decrease in the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD29, CD34, and CD105 was observed whereas CD73 and CD90 remained unchanged. This is the first report describing the predominance of M1 adipose tissue macrophages and the reduction of stem cell marker expression in acutely inflamed, non-healing wounds.

  10. Characterization of laser-tissue interaction processes by low-boiling emitted substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigmann, Hans-Juergen; Lademann, Juergen; Serfling, Ulrike; Lehnert, W.; Sterry, Wolfram; Meffert, H.

    1996-01-01

    Main point in this study was the investigation of the gaseous and low-boiling substances produced in the laser plume during cw CO2 laser and XeCl laser irradiation of tissue by gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry. The characteristic emitted amounts of chemicals were determined quantitatively using porcine muscular tissue. The produced components were used to determine the character of the chemical reaction conditions inside the interaction zone. It was found that the temperature, and the water content of the tissue are the main parameter determining kind and amount of the emitted substances. The relative intensity of the GC peak of benzene corresponds to a high temperature inside the interaction area while a relative strong methylbutanal peak is connected with a lower temperature which favors Maillard type reaction products. The water content of the tissue determines the extent of oxidation processes during laser tissue interaction. For that reason the moisture in the tissue is the most important parameter to reduce the emission of harmful chemicals in the laser plume. The same methods of investigation are applicable to characterize the interaction of a controlled and an uncontrolled rf electrosurgery device with tissue. The results obtained with model tissue are in agreement with the situation characteristic in laser surgery.

  11. Preparation and characterization of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT)/ Hydroxyapatite (HAp)-Nylon hybridized composite biomaterial to study the mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Suraj; Leventouri, Theodora; Mahfuz, Hassan; Rondinone, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) bears poor mechanical properties that limit its applicability in orthopedics. We study the possibility of overcoming such limitations by incorporating functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT) in a biocompatible/bioactive nano-composite. We present results from synthesis and characterization of samples prepared under different processing parameters. Ultra sonication method was to disperse functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT) in HAp followed by a simple hot assorting method to incorporate with polymerized ɛ-caprolactam. The fracture toughness of the composite materials was tested in compliance with the ASTM D-5045 standard. We have found that while the fracture toughness strongly depends on the processing parameters, a value comparable to the one for cortical bone is achieved. Mechanical properties, electron microscopy and crystal structure properties of the composite materials will be discussed.

  12. Characterization of tissue metabolism of thyroid hormones in very premature infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelka, S.; Kopecky, J.; Brauner, P.

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid status was characterized in very preterm infants (gestational age 23-32 wk; n = 61) from birth through day 14; in those infants who died within 16 days of delivery (n = 10) it was also correlated with the metabolism of thyroid hormones in peripheral tissues (brain, liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, and different localities of adipose tissue). The results obtained support the view that peripheral tissues of very premature infants are involved in local generation of triiodothyronine (T 3 ) and inactivation of thyroid hormones, but do not represent a major source of circulating T 3 . In this study observations on postnatal development of plasma thyroid hormone levels in normal and critically ill premature neonates are presented. Enzyme activities of all three types of iodothyronine deiodinases were followed in autopsy samples from brain, liver, kidney, muscle, and adipose tissue depots, to better characterize the relationships between peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones and thyroid status in critically ill very preterm newborns. Plasma concentrations of total T 3 , total T 4 , and total rT 3 were estimated by competitive radioimmunoassay. Plasma TSH concentrations were measured by microparticle enzyme immunoassay. Measurable activities of deiodinases of type I, II and II were detected post mortem in all tissue samples, except for type II activity in kidney. No correlation between postnatal age and the enzyme activities was found in in different tissues in the group of infants who died by 16 days of age. All activities were the highest in liver and differed significantly in particular tissues. Obtained results suggest tat, in contrast to adults, iodothyronine metabolism in peripheral tissues of premature newborns seems to be dominated by thyroid hormones inactivation, and T 3 production mainly for local use inside tissues. (authors)

  13. Developments in the management of advanced soft-tissue sarcoma – olaratumab in context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moroncini G

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Gianluca Moroncini,1,* Elena Maccaroni,2,* Ilaria Fiordoliva,2 Chiara Pellei,2 Armando Gabrielli,1 Rossana Berardi2 1Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Azienda