WorldWideScience

Sample records for adults collaborative analyses

  1. Body-mass index and cause-specific mortality in 900 000 adults: collaborative analyses of 57 prospective studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whitlock, G.; Lewington, S.; Sherliker, P.; Clarke, R.; Kromhout, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background - The main associations of body-mass index (BMI) with overall and cause-specific mortality can best be assessed by long-term prospective follow-up of large numbers of people. The Prospective Studies Collaboration aimed to investigate these associations by sharing data from many studies. M

  2. Body-mass index and cause-specific mortality in 900 000 adults: collaborative analyses of 57 prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NN, NN; Whitlock, Gary; Lewington, Sarah;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main associations of body-mass index (BMI) with overall and cause-specific mortality can best be assessed by long-term prospective follow-up of large numbers of people. The Prospective Studies Collaboration aimed to investigate these associations by sharing data from many studies....

  3. Persuading Collaboration: Analysing Persuasion in Online Collaboration Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McHugh, Ronan; Larsen, Birger

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose that online collaborative production sites can be fruitfully analysed in terms of the general theoretical framework of Persuasive Design. OpenStreetMap and The Pirate Bay are used as examples of collaborative production sites. Results of a quantitative analysis of persuas...

  4. Collaborative Language Learning for Professional Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Joy Mesh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable support for educational development using new technologies in higher education depends on having a basic roadmap that links current demands for developmental support to a plan for ways in which longer term needs will be recognized and met. The growing demand for lifelong learning of a second language is evident within the workplace where new technologies offer flexible solutions. In order to meet the special needs of working adults, the University of Siena Language Center (CLA has developed a multiple-level series of blended English courses from beginner to intermediate level for both university technical-administrative personnel and the hospital staff of the Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese (AOUS. The pedagogical approach takes into consideration both the needs of adults who are working full-time and the aims of the curriculum, which are to develop the four linguistic abilities of reading, writing, listening and speaking up to the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR Level B1. Taking into consideration a constructive use of both teaching hours and classrooms, as well as the limited time available to adult learners, a blended approach was chosen. The face-to-face (f2f lessons provide activities concentrating on the development of speaking and listening skills. The online lessons provide a collaborative workspace for interaction in the second language and present a flexible solution for working adults who can structure their study time when and where it is most convenient. This paper will attempt to draw several conclusions regarding the effectiveness of blending approaches for lifelong learning of a second language based on both learner and teacher interviews as well as quantitative and qualitative data collection through questionnaires and end of course evaluation.

  5. Emotional Intelligence and Collaborative Learning in Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    The changing social and economic reality of our world continues to shape how learning is conducted and acquired in the adult classroom and beyond. Given the pivotal importance for an adult to develop a variety of cognitive and emotional skills and given the need to work in collaboration with others, within educational environments and the…

  6. Collaborative Language Learning for Professional Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Joy Mesh

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable support for educational development using new technologies in higher education depends on having a basic roadmap that links current demands for developmental support to a plan for ways in which longer term needs will be recognized and met. The growing demand for lifelong learning of a second language is evident within the workplace where new technologies offer flexible solutions. In order to meet the special needs of working adults, the University of Siena Language Center (CLA) ha...

  7. Accelerate Healthcare Data Analytics: An Agile Practice to Perform Collaborative and Reproducible Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Bibo; Sun, Wen; Yu, Yiqin; Li, Jing; Hu, Gang; Xie, Guotong

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in cloud computing and machine learning made it more convenient for researchers to gain insights from massive healthcare data, while performing analyses on healthcare data in current practice still lacks efficiency for researchers. What's more, collaborating among different researchers and sharing analysis results are challenging issues. In this paper, we developed a practice to make analytics process collaborative and analysis results reproducible by exploiting and extending Jupyter Notebook. After applying this practice in our use cases, we can perform analyses and deliver results with less efforts in shorter time comparing to our previous practice. PMID:27577444

  8. [Meta-analyses of quarks, baryons and mesons--a "Cochrane Collaboration" in particle physics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerland, Stefan; Sauerland, Thankmar; Antes, Gerd; Barnett, R Michael

    2002-02-01

    Within the last 20 years meta-analysis has become an important research technique in medicine for integrating the results of independent studies. Meta-analytical techniques, however, are much older. In particle physics for 50 years now the properties of huge numbers of particles have been assessed in meta-analyses. The Cochrane Collaboration's counterpart in physics is the Particle Data Group. This article compares methodological and organisational aspects of meta-analyses in medicine and physics. Several interesting parallels exist, especially with regard to methodology.

  9. Collaborative Learning and Dialogue: Democratic Learning in Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Joseph; Hyslop-Margison, Emery

    2006-01-01

    Building on the framework of Peters and Armstrong's (1998) three Types of Teaching/Learning, this article explores the use of dialogue to foster a collaborative and democratic learning experience. There are three conditions under which dialogue can be facilitated as a part of the collaborative learning experience: (a) intent, (b) a dialogical…

  10. Coauthorship and institutional collaborations on cost-effectiveness analyses: a systematic network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrán Catalá-López

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA has been promoted as an important research methodology for determining the efficiency of healthcare technology and guiding medical decision-making. Our aim was to characterize the collaborative patterns of CEA conducted over the past two decades in Spain. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A systematic analysis was carried out with the information obtained through an updated comprehensive literature review and from reports of health technology assessment agencies. We identified CEAs with outcomes expressed as a time-based summary measure of population health (e.g. quality-adjusted life-years or disability-adjusted life-years, conducted in Spain and published between 1989 and 2011. Networks of coauthorship and institutional collaboration were produced using PAJEK software. One-hundred and thirty-one papers were analyzed, in which 526 authors and 230 institutions participated. The overall signatures per paper index was 5.4. Six major groups (one with 14 members, three with 7 members and two with 6 members were identified. The most prolific authors were generally affiliated with the private-for-profit sector (e.g. consulting firms and the pharmaceutical industry. The private-for-profit sector maintains profuse collaborative networks including public hospitals and academia. Collaboration within the public sector (e.g. healthcare administration and primary care was weak and fragmented. CONCLUSIONS: This empirical analysis reflects critical practices among collaborative networks that contributed substantially to the production of CEA, raises challenges for redesigning future policies and provides a framework for similar analyses in other regions.

  11. Short-term and long-term collaboration benefits on individual recall in younger and older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Helena M Blumen; Stern, Yaakov

    2011-01-01

    A recent study of younger adults suggests that, compared to repeated individual recall trials, repeated collaborative recall trials produce better individual recall after a short delay (Blumen & Rajaram, 2008). Our study was designed to determine if such collaboration benefits would remain after a one-week delay, in both younger and older adults. Sixty younger (M age = 24.60) and 60 older (M age = 67.35) adults studied a list of words and then completed either two collaborative recall trials ...

  12. Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Meme; Pryor, Boori Monty

    2000-01-01

    Describes, in the words of two Australian authors (one Aboriginal and one European-Australian), how they work together when they write books together, and how their collaboration goes beyond the two of them. (SR)

  13. Analysing collaboration among HIV agencies through combining network theory and relational coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Nidhi; Marsteller, Jill Ann; Hsu, Yea Jen; Elliott, David L

    2016-02-01

    Agencies with different foci (e.g. nutrition, social, medical, housing) serve people living with HIV (PLHIV). Serving needs of PLHIV comprehensively requires a high degree of coordination among agencies which often benefits from more frequent communication. We combined Social Network theory and Relational Coordination theory to study coordination among HIV agencies in Baltimore. Social Network theory implies that actors (e.g., HIV agencies) establish linkages amongst themselves in order to access resources (e.g., information). Relational Coordination theory suggests that high quality coordination among agencies or teams relies on the seven dimensions of frequency, timeliness and accuracy of communication, problem-solving communication, knowledge of agencies' work, mutual respect and shared goals. We collected data on frequency of contact from 57 agencies using a roster method. Response options were ordinal ranging from 'not at all' to 'daily'. We analyzed data using social network measures. Next, we selected agencies with which at least one-third of the sample reported monthly or more frequent interaction. This yielded 11 agencies whom we surveyed on seven relational coordination dimensions with questions scored on a Likert scale of 1-5. Network density, defined as the proportion of existing connections to all possible connections, was 20% when considering monthly or higher interaction. Relational coordination scores from individual agencies to others ranged between 1.17 and 5.00 (maximum possible score 5). The average scores for different dimensions across all agencies ranged between 3.30 and 4.00. Shared goals (4.00) and mutual respect (3.91) scores were highest, while scores such as knowledge of each other's work and problem-solving communication were relatively lower. Combining theoretically driven analyses in this manner offers an innovative way to provide a comprehensive picture of inter-agency coordination and the quality of exchange that underlies

  14. Blood Pressure in Young Adults Born at Very Low Birth Weight: Adults Born Preterm International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovi, Petteri; Vohr, Betty; Ment, Laura R; Doyle, Lex W; McGarvey, Lorcan; Morrison, Katherine M; Evensen, Kari Anne I; van der Pal, Sylvia; Grunau, Ruth E; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Andersson, Sture; Saigal, Saroj; Kajantie, Eero

    2016-10-01

    Adults born preterm at very low birth weight (VLBW; adults are at risk or whether higher blood pressure could be attributed to some of the specific conditions underlying or accompanying preterm birth. To identify possible risk or protective factors, we combined individual-level data from 9 cohorts that measured blood pressure in young adults born at VLBW or with a more stringent birth weight criterion. In the absence of major heterogeneity, we performed linear regression analysis in our pooled sample of 1571 adults born at VLBW and 777 controls. Adults born at VLBW had 3.4 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 2.2-4.6) higher systolic and 2.1 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.0) higher diastolic pressure, with adjustment for age, sex, and cohort. The difference in systolic pressure was present in men (1.8 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-3.5) but was stronger in women (4.7 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.2-6.3). Among the VLBW group, blood pressure was unrelated to gestational age, maternal smoking, multiple pregnancy, retinopathy of prematurity, or bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Blood pressure was higher than that of controls among VLBW adults unexposed to maternal preeclampsia. Among those exposed, it was even higher, especially if born appropriate for gestational age. In conclusion, although female sex and maternal preeclampsia are additional risk factors, the risk of higher blood pressure is not limited to any etiologic subgroup of VLBW adults, arguing for vigilance in early detection of high blood pressure in all these individuals. PMID:27572149

  15. You Can Be in a Group and Still Not Cooperate. Collaborative Approaches and Cooperative Learning Activities for Adult Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma City School District, OH.

    This handbook defines and describes the benefits of both collaborative approaches and cooperative techniques. An introduction uses watercolor marbling as a metaphor for collaborative approaches and cooperative activities. Section I provides research results regarding problems of adult literacy programs, skills employers want, and Bloom's taxonomy.…

  16. The ENIGMA Consortium : large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E.; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Almeida, Jorge; Alpert, Kathryn; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Appel, Katja; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Aribisala, Benjamin; Bastin, Mark E.; Bauer, Michael; Bearden, Carrie E.; Bergmann, Orjan; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Blangero, John; Bockholt, Henry J.; Boen, Erlend; Bois, Catherine; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Booth, Tom; Bowman, Ian J.; Bralten, Janita; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Brunner, Han G.; Brohawn, David G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan; Bulayeva, Kazima; Bustillo, Juan R.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cantor, Rita M.; Carless, Melanie A.; Caseras, Xavier; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chang, Kiki D.; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Christoforou, Andrea; Cichon, Sven; Clark, Vincent P.; Conrod, Patricia; Coppola, Giovanni; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; Deary, Ian J.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; den Braber, Anouk; Delvecchio, Giuseppe; Depondt, Chantal; de Haan, Lieuwe; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dima, Danai; Dimitrova, Rali; Djurovic, Srdjan; Dong, Hongwei; Donohoe, Gary; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Dyer, Thomas D.; Ehrlich, Stefan; Ekman, Carl Johan; Elvsashagen, Torbjorn; Emsell, Louise; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fagerness, Jesen; Fears, Scott; Fedko, Iryna; Fernandez, Guillen; Fisher, Simon E.; Foroud, Tatiana; Fox, Peter T.; Francks, Clyde; Frangou, Sophia; Frey, Eva Maria; Frodl, Thomas; Frouin, Vincent; Garavan, Hugh; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Glahn, David C.; Godlewska, Beata; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Gollub, Randy L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grimm, Oliver; Gruber, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.; Goering, Harald H. H.; Hagenaars, Saskia; Hajek, Tomas; Hall, Geoffrey B.; Hall, Jeremy; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hass, Johanna; Hatton, Sean N.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hickie, Ian B.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoehn, David; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J.; Homuth, Georg; Hoogman, Martine; Hong, L. Elliot; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Hwang, Kristy S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnston, Caroline; Joensson, Erik G.; Kahn, Rene S.; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kelly, Sinead; Kim, Sungeun; Kochunov, Peter; Koenders, Laura; Kraemer, Bernd; Kwok, John B. J.; Lagopoulos, Jim; Laje, Gonzalo; Landen, Mikael; Landman, Bennett A.; Lauriello, John; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Lee, Phil H.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Lemaitre, Herve; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Li, Chiang-shan; Liberg, Benny; Liewald, David C.; Liu, Xinmin; Lopez, Lorna M.; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Luciano, Michelle; Macciardi, Fabio; Machielsen, Marise W. J.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Malt, Ulrik F.; Mandl, Rene; Manoach, Dara S.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Derek W.; Moses, Eric K.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Munoz Maniega, Susana; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Mwangi, Benson; Nauck, Matthias; Nho, Kwangsik; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars-Goeran; Nugent, Allison C.; Nyberg, Lars; Olvera, Rene L.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou, Melina; Papmeyer, Martina; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peterson, Charles P.; Pfennig, Andrea; Phillips, Mary; Pike, G. Bruce; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Potkin, Steven G.; Puetz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rietschel, Marcella; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roiz-Santianez, Roberto; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rose, Emma J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rujescu, Dan; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Salami, Alireza; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Savitz, Jonathan; Saykin, Andrew J.; Scanlon, Cathy; Schmaal, Lianne; Schnack, Hugo G.; Schork, Andrew J.; Schulz, S. Charles; Schuer, Remmelt; Seidman, Larry; Shen, Li; Shoemaker, Jody M.; Simmons, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soares, Jair C.; Sponheim, Scott R.; Sprooten, Emma; Starr, John M.; Steen, Vidar M.; Strakowski, Stephen; Strike, Lachlan; Sussmann, Jessika; Saemann, Philipp G.; Teumer, Alexander; Toga, Arthur W.; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trost, Sarah; Turner, Jessica; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J.; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G. M.; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; van 't Ent, Dennis; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Hernandez, Maria C. Valdes; Veltman, Dick J.; Versace, Amelia; Voelzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Walter, Henrik; Wang, Lei; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; Westlye, Lars T.; Whalley, Heather C.; Whelan, Christopher D.; White, Tonya; Winkler, Anderson M.; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Zilles, David; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Schofield, Peter R.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Lawrence, Natalia S.; Drevets, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics

  17. The ENIGMA Consortium: Large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Thompson (Paul); J.L. Stein; S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); D.P. Hibar (Derrek); A.A. Vásquez (Arias); M.E. Rentería (Miguel); R. Toro (Roberto); N. Jahanshad (Neda); G. Schumann (Gunter); B. Franke (Barbara); M.J. Wright (Margaret); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); I. Agartz (Ingrid); M. Alda (Martin); S. Alhusaini (Saud); L. Almasy (Laura); J. Almeida (Julia); K. Alpert (Kathryn); N.C. Andreasen; O.A. Andreassen (Ole); L.G. Apostolova (Liana); K. Appel (Katja); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); M.E. Bastin (Mark); M. Bauer (Michael); C.E. Bearden (Carrie); Ø. Bergmann (Ørjan); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth); J. Blangero (John); H.J. Bockholt; E. Bøen (Erlend); M. Bois (Monique); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); T. Booth (Tom); I.J. Bowman (Ian); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); R.M. Brouwer (Rachel); H.G. Brunner; D.G. Brohawn (David); M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); J. Bustillo; V.D. Calhoun (Vince); D.M. Cannon (Dara); R.M. Cantor; M.A. Carless (Melanie); X. Caseras (Xavier); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); K.D. Chang (Kiki); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); A. Christoforou (Andrea); S. Cichon (Sven); V.P. Clark; P. Conrod (Patricia); D. Coppola (Domenico); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); I.J. Deary (Ian); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); A. den Braber (Anouk); G. Delvecchio (Giuseppe); C. Depondt (Chantal); L. de Haan (Lieuwe); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); D. Dima (Danai); R. Dimitrova (Rali); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); H. Dong (Hongwei); D.J. Donohoe (Dennis); A. Duggirala (Aparna); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); S.M. Ehrlich (Stefan); C.J. Ekman (Carl Johan); T. Elvsåshagen (Torbjørn); L. Emsell (Louise); S. Erk; T. Espeseth (Thomas); J. Fagerness (Jesen); S. Fears (Scott); I. Fedko (Iryna); G. Fernandez (Guillén); S.E. Fisher (Simon); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); C. Francks (Clyde); S. Frangou (Sophia); E.M. Frey (Eva Maria); T. Frodl (Thomas); V. Frouin (Vincent); H. Garavan (Hugh); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); D.C. Glahn (David); B. Godlewska (Beata); R.Z. Goldstein (Rita); R.L. Gollub (Randy); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); O. Grimm (Oliver); O. Gruber (Oliver); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); R.E. Gur (Raquel); R.C. Gur (Ruben); H.H.H. Göring (Harald); S. Hagenaars (Saskia); T. Hajek (Tomas); G.B. Hall (Garry); J. Hall (Jeremy); J. Hardy (John); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); J. Hass (Johanna); W. Hatton; U.K. Haukvik (Unn); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); I.B. Hickie (Ian); B.C. Ho (Beng ); D. Hoehn (David); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); M. Hollinshead (Marisa); A.J. Holmes (Avram); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Hoogman (Martine); L.E. Hong (L.Elliot); N. Hosten (Norbert); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); H.E. Hulshoff Pol (Hilleke); K.S. Hwang (Kristy); C.R. Jack Jr. (Clifford); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); C. Johnston; E.G. Jönsson (Erik); R.S. Kahn (René); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); S. Kelly (Steve); S. Kim (Shinseog); P. Kochunov (Peter); L. Koenders (Laura); B. Krämer (Bernd); J.B.J. Kwok (John); J. Lagopoulos (Jim); G. Laje (Gonzalo); M. Landén (Mikael); B.A. Landman (Bennett); J. Lauriello; S. Lawrie (Stephen); P.H. Lee (Phil); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); H. Lemaître (Herve); C.D. Leonardo (Cassandra); C.-S. Li (Chiang-shan); B. Liberg (Benny); D.C. Liewald (David C.); X. Liu (Xinmin); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); E. Loth (Eva); A. Lourdusamy (Anbarasu); M. Luciano (Michelle); F. MacCiardi (Fabio); M.W.J. Machielsen (Marise); G.M. MacQueen (Glenda); U.F. Malt (Ulrik); R. Mandl (René); D.S. Manoach (Dara); J.-L. Martinot (Jean-Luc); M. Matarin (Mar); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); M. Mattingsdal (Morten); A. Meyer-Lindenberg; C. McDonald (Colm); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); F.J. Mcmahon (Francis J); K.L. Mcmahon (Katie); E. Meisenzahl (Eva); I. Melle (Ingrid); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); D.W. Morris (Derek W); E.K. Moses (Eric); B.A. Mueller (Bryon ); S. Muñoz Maniega (Susana); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); B. Müller-Myhsok (Bertram); B. Mwangi (Benson); M. Nauck (Matthias); K. Nho (Kwangsik); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); L.G. Nilsson; A.C. Nugent (Allison); L. Nyberg (Lisa); R.L. Olvera (Rene); J. Oosterlaan (Jaap); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); M. Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou (Melina); M. Papmeyer (Martina); T. Paus (Tomas); Z. Pausova (Zdenka); G. Pearlson (Godfrey); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C.P. Peterson (Charles); A. Pfennig (Andrea); M. Phillips (Mary); G.B. Pike (G Bruce); J.B. Poline (Jean Baptiste); S.G. Potkin (Steven); B. Pütz (Benno); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); J. Rasmussen (Jerod); M. Rietschel (Marcella); M. Rijpkema (Mark); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); J.L. Roffman (Joshua); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); N. Romanczuk-Seiferth (Nina); E.J. Rose (Emma); N.A. Royle (Natalie); D. Rujescu (Dan); M. Ryten (Mina); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); A. Salami (Alireza); T.D. Satterthwaite (Theodore); J. Savitz (Jonathan); A.J. Saykin (Andrew); C. Scanlon (Cathy); L. Schmaal (Lianne); H. Schnack (Hugo); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); S.C. Schulz (S.Charles); R. Schür (Remmelt); L.J. Seidman (Larry); L. Shen (Li); L. Shoemaker (Lawrence); A. Simmons (Andrew); S.M. Sisodiya (Sanjay); C. Smith (Colin); J.W. Smoller; J.C. Soares (Jair); S.R. Sponheim (Scott); R. Sprooten (Roy); J.M. Starr (John); V.M. Steen (Vidar); S. Strakowski (Stephen); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); J. Sussmann (Jessika); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); A. Teumer (Alexander); A.W. Toga (Arthur); D. Tordesillas-Gutierrez (Diana); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S. Trost (Sarah); J. Turner (Jessica); M. van den Heuvel (Martijn); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); T.G.M. van Erp (Theo G.); N.E.M. van Haren (Neeltje E.); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); M.C. Valdés Hernández (Maria); D.J. Veltman (Dick); A. Versace (Amelia); H. Völzke (Henry); R. Walker (Robert); H.J. Walter (Henrik); L. Wang (Lei); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); M.E. Weale (Michael); M.W. Weiner (Michael); W. Wen (Wei); L.T. Westlye (Lars); H.C. Whalley (Heather); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); T.J.H. White (Tonya); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); D. Zilles (David); M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); N.B. Freimer (Nelson); N.S. Lawrence (Natalia); D.A. Drevets (Douglas)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscien

  18. Using a Collaborative Process to Develop Goals and Self-Management Interventions to Support Young Adults with Disabilities at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Christine L.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Pickens, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the impact of using a collaborative process with person-centered teams and a functional assessment of problems in the workplace to design individualized goals and self-management interventions to support young adults with disabilities. These young adults had achieved employment through a customized employment process…

  19. Pre-service teachers’ meaning-making when collaboratively analysing video from school practice for the bachelor project at college

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2015-01-01

    The study follows a group of student teachers (STs) facilitated in collaboratively analysing video recordings of their school practice experiences, required for their bachelor projects. Their meaning-making is examined in terms of what they experienced as outcomes, how they constructed understand......The study follows a group of student teachers (STs) facilitated in collaboratively analysing video recordings of their school practice experiences, required for their bachelor projects. Their meaning-making is examined in terms of what they experienced as outcomes, how they constructed...... understanding and how their interpretation of classroom experiences developed. The findings reveal that the structured collaborative analysis supported the STs in a more nuanced consideration of concrete incidents and in reconstructing their experiences with a focus on student learning. They noted the benefit...... of the peer support and had a positive view of the structured approach. Additionally, they emphasised insights gained by starting from a fine-grained analysis of concrete problems encountered in their school practice before applying theory. They did, however, resort to more general abstractions...

  20. Recycling and Ambivalence: Quantitative and Qualitative Analyses of Household Recycling among Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Theories about ambivalence, as well as quantitative and qualitative empirical approaches, are applied to obtain an understanding of recycling among young adults. A questionnaire was mailed to 422 Swedish young people. Regression analyses showed that a mix of negative emotions (worry) and positive emotions (hope and joy) about the environmental…

  1. Pre-service teachers' meaning-making when collaboratively analysing video from school practice for the bachelor project at college

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2015-01-01

    The study follows a group of student teachers (STs) facilitated in collaboratively analysing video recordings of their school practice experiences, required for their bachelor projects. Their meaning-making is examined in terms of what they experienced as outcomes, how they constructed...... of the peer support and had a positive view of the structured approach. Additionally, they emphasised insights gained by starting from a fine-grained analysis of concrete problems encountered in their school practice before applying theory. They did, however, resort to more general abstractions...

  2. Global collaborative networks on meta-analyses of randomized trials published in high impact factor medical journals: a social network analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Alonso-Arroyo, Adolfo; Hutton, Brian; Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Moher, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Research collaboration contributes to the advancement of knowledge by exploiting the results of scientific efforts more efficiently, but the global patterns of collaboration on meta-analysis are unknown. The purpose of this research was to describe and characterize the global collaborative patterns in meta-analyses of randomized trials published in high impact factor medical journals over the past three decades. Methods This was a cross-sectional, social network analysis. ...

  3. The Galaxy platform for accessible, reproducible and collaborative biomedical analyses: 2016 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afgan, Enis; Baker, Dannon; van den Beek, Marius; Blankenberg, Daniel; Bouvier, Dave; Čech, Martin; Chilton, John; Clements, Dave; Coraor, Nate; Eberhard, Carl; Grüning, Björn; Guerler, Aysam; Hillman-Jackson, Jennifer; Von Kuster, Greg; Rasche, Eric; Soranzo, Nicola; Turaga, Nitesh; Taylor, James; Nekrutenko, Anton; Goecks, Jeremy

    2016-07-01

    High-throughput data production technologies, particularly 'next-generation' DNA sequencing, have ushered in widespread and disruptive changes to biomedical research. Making sense of the large datasets produced by these technologies requires sophisticated statistical and computational methods, as well as substantial computational power. This has led to an acute crisis in life sciences, as researchers without informatics training attempt to perform computation-dependent analyses. Since 2005, the Galaxy project has worked to address this problem by providing a framework that makes advanced computational tools usable by non experts. Galaxy seeks to make data-intensive research more accessible, transparent and reproducible by providing a Web-based environment in which users can perform computational analyses and have all of the details automatically tracked for later inspection, publication, or reuse. In this report we highlight recently added features enabling biomedical analyses on a large scale. PMID:27137889

  4. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Vining, Robert D;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most...... commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient......-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. METHODS/DESIGN: This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least...

  5. The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Paul M; Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Hibar, Derrek P; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Almeida, Jorge; Alpert, Kathryn; Andreasen, Nancy C; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Appel, Katja; Armstrong, Nicola J; Aribisala, Benjamin; Bastin, Mark E; Bauer, Michael; Bearden, Carrie E; Bergmann, Orjan; Binder, Elisabeth B; Blangero, John; Bockholt, Henry J; Bøen, Erlend; Bois, Catherine; Boomsma, Dorret I; Booth, Tom; Bowman, Ian J; Bralten, Janita; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Brohawn, David G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan; Bulayeva, Kazima; Bustillo, Juan R; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Caseras, Xavier; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chang, Kiki D; Ching, Christopher R K; Christoforou, Andrea; Cichon, Sven; Clark, Vincent P; Conrod, Patricia; Coppola, Giovanni; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Deary, Ian J; de Geus, Eco J C; den Braber, Anouk; Delvecchio, Giuseppe; Depondt, Chantal; de Haan, Lieuwe; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dima, Danai; Dimitrova, Rali; Djurovic, Srdjan; Dong, Hongwei; Donohoe, Gary; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Dyer, Thomas D; Ehrlich, Stefan; Ekman, Carl Johan; Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Emsell, Louise; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fagerness, Jesen; Fears, Scott; Fedko, Iryna; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Foroud, Tatiana; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Frangou, Sophia; Frey, Eva Maria; Frodl, Thomas; Frouin, Vincent; Garavan, Hugh; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Glahn, David C; Godlewska, Beata; Goldstein, Rita Z; Gollub, Randy L; Grabe, Hans J; Grimm, Oliver; Gruber, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Göring, Harald H H; Hagenaars, Saskia; Hajek, Tomas; Hall, Geoffrey B; Hall, Jeremy; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hass, Johanna; Hatton, Sean N; Haukvik, Unn K; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hickie, Ian B; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoehn, David; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hoogman, Martine; Hong, L Elliot; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Hwang, Kristy S; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnston, Caroline; Jönsson, Erik G; Kahn, René S; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kelly, Sinead; Kim, Sungeun; Kochunov, Peter; Koenders, Laura; Krämer, Bernd; Kwok, John B J; Lagopoulos, Jim; Laje, Gonzalo; Landen, Mikael; Landman, Bennett A; Lauriello, John; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lee, Phil H; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Lemaître, Herve; Leonardo, Cassandra D; Li, Chiang-Shan; Liberg, Benny; Liewald, David C; Liu, Xinmin; Lopez, Lorna M; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Luciano, Michelle; Macciardi, Fabio; Machielsen, Marise W J; Macqueen, Glenda M; Malt, Ulrik F; Mandl, René; Manoach, Dara S; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Moses, Eric K; Mueller, Bryon A; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Mwangi, Benson; Nauck, Matthias; Nho, Kwangsik; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Nugent, Allison C; Nyberg, Lars; Olvera, Rene L; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou, Melina; Papmeyer, Martina; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Penninx, Brenda W; Peterson, Charles P; Pfennig, Andrea; Phillips, Mary; Pike, G Bruce; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Potkin, Steven G; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rietschel, Marcella; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roffman, Joshua L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Salami, Alireza; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Savitz, Jonathan; Saykin, Andrew J; Scanlon, Cathy; Schmaal, Lianne; Schnack, Hugo G; Schork, Andrew J; Schulz, S Charles; Schür, Remmelt; Seidman, Larry; Shen, Li; Shoemaker, Jody M; Simmons, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soares, Jair C; Sponheim, Scott R; Sprooten, Emma; Starr, John M; Steen, Vidar M; Strakowski, Stephen; Strike, Lachlan; Sussmann, Jessika; Sämann, Philipp G; Teumer, Alexander; Toga, Arthur W; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trost, Sarah; Turner, Jessica; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Haren, Neeltje E M; van 't Ent, Dennis; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Veltman, Dick J; Versace, Amelia; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Walter, Henrik; Wang, Lei; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westlye, Lars T; Whalley, Heather C; Whelan, Christopher D; White, Tonya; Winkler, Anderson M; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Zilles, David; Zwiers, Marcel P; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Schofield, Peter R; Freimer, Nelson B; Lawrence, Natalia S; Drevets, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of findings, in a total of 24,997 subjects. By meta-analyzing results from many sites, ENIGMA has detected factors that affect the brain that no individual site could detect on its own, and that require larger numbers of subjects than any individual neuroimaging study has currently collected. ENIGMA's first project was a genome-wide association study identifying common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume or intracranial volume. Continuing work is exploring genetic associations with subcortical volumes (ENIGMA2) and white matter microstructure (ENIGMA-DTI). Working groups also focus on understanding how schizophrenia, bipolar illness, major depression and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affect the brain. We review the current progress of the ENIGMA Consortium, along with challenges and unexpected discoveries made on the way. PMID:24399358

  6. Activating Older Adults With Serious Mental Illness for Collaborative Primary Care Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rolin, Stephanie A.; Hendrick, Delia Cimpean; Naslund, John A.; Faber, Marjan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Persons with serious mental illness frequently receive inadequate medical care and are more likely to experience difficulty navigating the health care system compared with the general population. To address this gap in quality, we developed a program of peer co-led collaborative activation training for primary care (CAT-PC) designed to improve “patient activation” and person-centered care in primary care visits for middle-aged and older adults with serious mental illness and cardiovascular risk. This report presents pilot study feasibility and participant outcomes for CAT-PC. Method A pre-post pilot evaluation of CAT-PC included N = 17 adults (age ≥ 50) with serious mental illness and cardiovascular health risk conditions, and N = 6 primary care providers. CAT-PC consists of 9 weekly peer co-led patient education and skills training sessions and a 45-min video-based training for primary care providers. Pre-post measures included the Patient Activation Measure (PAM), Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions (PEPPI), Autonomy Preference Index (API) for preferred role in primary care encounters, and Social Skills Performance Assessment (SSPA) role-play test for medical visits. Results All 17 participants attended 5 or more sessions. Post-intervention improvement was found for patient activation and simulated performance of medical visit communication skills. Trends were observed for improved self-efficacy in provider interactions and greater preference for a more collaborative role in decision-making. Conclusions and Implications CAT-PC is a brief, peer co-led education and skills training intervention potentially improving patient activation in primary care encounters and providing an important missing component in emerging models of “patient-centered behavioral health homes” for this high-risk group. PMID:24219769

  7. Immunohistochemical analyses of a case of extralobar pulmonary sequestration with chest pain in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ohtsuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography of a Japanese man in his mid-forties with a complaint of right-side chest pain showed a dome-shaped smooth-surfaced mediastinal mass, which was extirpated. The cut surface was highly hemorrhagic and necrotic and not related to the original pulmonary tissues. Although routine sectioning detected bronchial cartilage, immunohistochemical analyses clearly showed the presence of alveolar type II cells; only the alveolar type II cells located at the periphery of this mass showed positive staining for cytokeratins, thyroid transcription factor 1, surfactant protein A, epithelial membrane antigen and Krebs von den Lungen-6. Thus, these analyses are useful for the detection of pulmonary components, even in severely hemorrhagic and necrotic tissues with marked sequestration. The clinical diagnosis was a rare, adult type of extralobar pulmonary sequestration accompanied by chest pain.

  8. A review of instruments to measure interprofessional collaboration for chronic disease management for community-living older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Markle-Reid, Maureen; McKey, Colleen; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori

    2016-01-01

    It is acknowledged internationally that chronic disease management (CDM) for community-living older adults (CLOA) is an increasingly complex process. CDM for older adults, who are often living with multiple chronic conditions, requires coordination of various health and social services. Coordination is enabled through interprofessional collaboration (IPC) among individual providers, community organizations, and health sectors. Measuring IPC is complicated given there are multiple conceptualisations and measures of IPC. A literature review of several healthcare, psychological, and social science electronic databases was conducted to locate instruments that measure IPC at the team level and have published evidence of their reliability and validity. Five instruments met the criteria and were critically reviewed to determine their strengths and limitations as they relate to CDM for CLOA. A comparison of the characteristics, psychometric properties, and overall concordance of each instrument with salient attributes of IPC found the Collaborative Practice Assessment Tool to be the most appropriate instrument for measuring IPC for CDM in CLOA. PMID:27026190

  9. A review of instruments to measure interprofessional collaboration for chronic disease management for community-living older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Markle-Reid, Maureen; McKey, Colleen; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori

    2016-01-01

    It is acknowledged internationally that chronic disease management (CDM) for community-living older adults (CLOA) is an increasingly complex process. CDM for older adults, who are often living with multiple chronic conditions, requires coordination of various health and social services. Coordination is enabled through interprofessional collaboration (IPC) among individual providers, community organizations, and health sectors. Measuring IPC is complicated given there are multiple conceptualisations and measures of IPC. A literature review of several healthcare, psychological, and social science electronic databases was conducted to locate instruments that measure IPC at the team level and have published evidence of their reliability and validity. Five instruments met the criteria and were critically reviewed to determine their strengths and limitations as they relate to CDM for CLOA. A comparison of the characteristics, psychometric properties, and overall concordance of each instrument with salient attributes of IPC found the Collaborative Practice Assessment Tool to be the most appropriate instrument for measuring IPC for CDM in CLOA.

  10. Post Hoc Analyses of Anxiety Measures in Adult Patients With Generalized Anxiety Disorder Treated With Vilazodone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif; Durgam, Suresh; Tang, Xiongwen; Ruth, Adam; Mathews, Maju; Gommoll, Carl P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate vilazodone, currently approved for major depressive disorder in adults, for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Method Three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies showing positive results for vilazodone (2,040 mg/d) in adult patients with GAD (DSM-IV-TR) were pooled for analyses; data were collected from June 2012 to March 2014. Post hoc outcomes in the pooled intent-to-treat population (n = 1,462) included mean change from baseline to week 8 in Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) total score, psychic and somatic anxiety subscale scores, and individual item scores; HARS response (≥ 50% total score improvement) and remission (total score ≤ 7) at week 8; and category shifts, defined as HARS item score ≥ 2 at baseline (moderate to very severe symptoms) and score of 0 at week 8 (no symptoms). Results The least squares mean difference was statistically significant for vilazodone versus placebo in change from baseline to week 8 in HARS total score (−1.83, P anxiety (−1.21, P anxiety (−0.63, P < .01) subscale scores; differences from placebo were significant on 11 of 14 HARS items (P < .05). Response rates were higher with vilazodone than placebo (48% vs 39%, P < .001), as were remission rates (27% vs 21%, P < .01). The percentage of patients who shifted to no symptoms was significant for vilazodone on several items: anxious mood, tension, intellectual, depressed mood, somatic-muscular, somatic-sensory, cardiovascular, respiratory, and autonomic symptoms (P < .05). Conclusions Treatment with vilazodone versus placebo was effective in adult GAD patients, with significant differences between treatment groups found on both psychic and somatic HARS items. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT01629966, NCT01766401, NCT01844115.

  11. Assistance multimodale pour l'interaction 3D collaborative : étude et analyse des performances pour le travail collaboratif

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Sehat

    2011-01-01

    The recent advancement in the field of high quality computer graphics and the capability of inexpensive computers to render realistic 3D scenes have made it possible to develop virtual environments where two or more users can co-exist and work collaboratively to achieve a common goal. Such environments are called Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVEs). The potential application domains of CVEs are many, such as military, medical, assembling, computer aided designing, teleoperation, educati...

  12. Adult Perceptions of In-Class Collaborative Problem Solving as Mitigation for Statistics Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkead, Karl J.; Miller, Heather; Hammett, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Two purposes existed for initiating this qualitative case study involving adults who had completed a college-level business statistics course. The first purpose was to explore adult challenges with stress and anxiety during the course: a phenomenon labeled statistics anxiety in the literature. The second purpose was to gain insight into adult…

  13. The Acute Effects of Grape Polyphenols Supplementation on Endothelial Function in Adults: Meta-Analyses of Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Hua Li; Hong-Bo Tian; Hong-Jin Zhao; Liang-Hua Chen; Lian-Qun Cui

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The acute effects of grape polyphenols on endothelial function in adults are inconsistent. Here, we performed meta-analyses to determine these acute effects as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). METHODS: Trials were searched in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library database. Summary estimates of weighted mean differences (WMDs) and 95% CIs were obtained by using random-effects models. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses were performed to identify the source of heterogen...

  14. Activating older adults with serious mental illness for collaborative primary care visits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, S.J.; Aschbrenner, K.A.; Rolin, S.A.; Hendrick, D.C.; Naslund, J.A.; Faber, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Persons with serious mental illness frequently receive inadequate medical care and are more likely to experience difficulty navigating the health care system compared with the general population. To address this gap in quality, we developed a program of peer co-led collaborative activatio

  15. A multicentre comparative trial of sodium valproate and carbamazepine in adult onset epilepsy. Adult EPITEG Collaborative Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Richens, A; Davidson, D L; Cartlidge, N. E.; Easter, D J

    1994-01-01

    The long-term efficacy and safety of sodium valproate and carbamazepine in adult outpatients with newly diagnosed primary generalised or partial and secondarily generalised seizures were compared in a randomised, open, multicentre study at 22 neurology outpatient clinics. Patients were randomised to oral sodium valproate (Epilim EC enteric coated 200 mg tablets twice daily, n = 149) or oral carbamazepine (100 mg twice daily increasing to 200 mg twice daily in week 2, n = 151) and followed up ...

  16. Age-related changes of normal adult brain structure: analysed with diffusion tensor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yun-ting; ZHANG Chun-yan; ZHANG Jing; LI Wei

    2005-01-01

    Background It is known that the brain structure changes with normal aging. The objective of this study was to quantify the anisotropy and average diffusion coefficient (DCavg) of the brain in normal adults to demonstrate the microstructure changes of brain with aging.Methods One hundred and six normal adults were examined with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The fractional anisotropy (FA), 1-volume ratio (1-VR), relative anisotropy (RA) and average diffusion coefficient (DCavg) of different anatomic sites of brain were measured, correlated with age and compared among three broad age groups.Results Except in lentiform nucleus, the anisotropy increased and DCavg decreased with aging. Both anisotropy and DCavg of lentiform nucleus increased with aging. The normal reference values of DTI parameters of normal Chinese adult in major anatomic sites were acquired. Conclusions DTI data obtained noninvasively can reflect the microstructural changes with aging. The normal reference values acquired can serve as reference standards in differentiation of brain white matter diseases.

  17. Modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD study and CKD epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI equations for Taiwanese adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-I Chen

    Full Text Available Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD study or the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equations may not be accurate for Asians; thus, we developed modified eGFR equations for Taiwanese adults.This cross-sectional study compared the Taiwanese eGFR equations, the MDRD study, and the CKD-EPI equations with inulin clearance (Cin. A total of 695 adults including 259 healthy volunteers and 436 CKD patients were recruited. Participants from the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital were used as the development set (N = 556 to develop the Taiwanese eGFR equations, whereas participants from the National Taiwan University Hospital were used as the validation set (N = 139 for external validation.The Taiwanese eGFR equations were developed by using the extended Bland-Altman plot in the development set. The Taiwanese MDRD equation was 1.309 × MDRD0.912, Taiwanese CKD-EPI was 1.262×CKD-EPI0.914 and Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI was 1.205 × four-level CKD-EPI0.914. In the validation set, the Taiwanese equations had the lowest bias, the Taiwanese equations and the Japanese CKD-EPI equation had the lowest RMSE, whereas the Taiwanese and the Japanese equations had the best precision and the highest P30 among all equations. However, the Taiwanese MDRD equation had higher concordance correlation than did the Taiwanese CKD-EPI, the Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI and the Japanese equations. Moreover, only the Taiwanese equations had no proportional bias among all of the equations. Finally, the Taiwanese MDRD equation had the best diagnostic performance in terms of ordinal logistic regression among all of the equations.The Taiwanese MDRD equation is better than the MDRD, CKD-EPI, Japanese, Asian, Thai, Taiwanese CKD-EPI, and Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI equations for Taiwanese adults.

  18. Body composition analyses by air displacement plethysmography in adults ranging from normal weight to extremely obese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Kazanna C.; Anthony, Steven J.; Thornton, John C.; Gallagher, Dympna; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare body composition parameters estimated by air displacement plethysmography (ADP) to dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in body mass index (BMI) classifications that include extremely obese (BMI≥40.0kg/m2), and to examine if differences between analyses were influenced by BMI. Design and Methods Fat free mass (FFM,kg), fat mass (FM,kg) and body fat (BF,%) were analyzed with both technologies. Results All outcome measures of ADP and DXA were highly correlated (r≥0.95,Pobese classification; ADP estimated lower FFM and greater FM and BF (Pobese. PMID:24170704

  19. Body composition analyses by air displacement plethysmography in adults ranging from normal weight to extremely obese

    OpenAIRE

    Hames, Kazanna C.; Anthony, Steven J.; Thornton, John C; Gallagher, Dympna; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare body composition parameters estimated by air displacement plethysmography (ADP) to dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in body mass index (BMI) classifications that include extremely obese (BMI≥40.0kg/m2), and to examine if differences between analyses were influenced by BMI. Design and Methods Fat free mass (FFM,kg), fat mass (FM,kg) and body fat (BF,%) were analyzed with both technologies. Results All outcome measures of ADP and DXA were highly correlated (r≥0.95,P

  20. Validation of endogenous normalizing genes for expression analyses in adult human testis and germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svingen, T; Jørgensen, Anne; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2014-01-01

    expressed across the samples analysed: a so-called normalizing or housekeeping gene. Although this is a valid strategy, the identification of stable normalizing genes has proved challenging and a gene showing stable expression across all cells or tissues is unlikely to exist. Therefore, it is necessary...... and associated testicular pathologies. OCT4 and SALL4 can be used with caution as second-tier normalizers when determining changes in gene expression in germ cells and germ cell tumour components, but the relative transcript abundance appears variable between different germ cell tumour types. We further...

  1. Comparative microarray analyses of adult female midgut tissues from feeding Rhipicephalus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, Willem A; Stutzer, Christian; Olivier, Nicholas A; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2015-02-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, has a debilitating effect on the livestock industry worldwide, owing to its being a vector of the causative agents of bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. In South Africa, co-infestation with R. microplus and R. decoloratus, a common vector species on local livestock, occurs widely in the northern and eastern parts of the country. An alternative to chemical control methods is sought in the form of a tick vaccine to control these tick species. However, sequence information and transcriptional data for R. decoloratus is currently lacking. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying genes that are shared between midgut tissues of feeding adult female R. microplus and R. decoloratus ticks. In this regard, a custom oligonucleotide microarray comprising of 13,477 R. microplus sequences was used for transcriptional profiling and 2476 genes were found to be shared between these Rhipicephalus species. In addition, 136 transcripts were found to be more abundantly expressed in R. decoloratus and 1084 in R. microplus. Chi-square analysis revealed that genes involved in lipid transport and metabolism are significantly overrepresented in R. microplus and R. decoloratus. This study is the first transcriptional profiling of R. decoloratus and is an additional resource that can be evaluated further in future studies for possible tick control. PMID:25448423

  2. Meditative Movement Therapies and Health-Related Quality-of-Life in Adults: A Systematic Review of Meta-Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A Kelley

    Full Text Available Poor health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL is a significant public health issue while the use of meditative movement therapies has been increasing. The purpose of this investigation was to carry out a systematic review of previous meta-analyses that examined the effects of meditative movement therapies (yoga, tai chi and qigong on HRQOL in adults. Previous meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials published up through February, 2014 were included by searching nine electronic databases and cross-referencing. Dual-selection and data abstraction occurred. The Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews Instrument (AMSTAR was used to assess methodological quality. Standardized mean differences that were pooled using random-effects models were included. In addition, 95% prediction intervals were calculated as well as the number needed-to-treat and percentile improvements. Of the 510 citations screened, 10 meta-analyses representing a median of 3 standardized mean differences in 82 to 528 participants (median = 270 with breast cancer, schizophrenia, low back pain, heart failure and diabetes, were included. Median methodological quality was 70%. Median length, frequency and duration of the meditative movement therapies were 12 weeks, 3 times per week, for 71 minutes per session. The majority of results (78.9% favored statistically significant improvements (non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals in HRQOL, with standardized mean differences ranging from 0.18 to 2.28. More than half of the results yielded statistically significant heterogeneity (Q ≤ 0.10 and large or very large inconsistency (I2 ≥ 50%. All 95% prediction intervals included zero. The number-needed-to-treat ranged from 2 to 10 while percentile improvements ranged from 9.9 to 48.9. The results of this study suggest that meditative movement therapies may improve HRQOL in adults with selected conditions. However, a need exists for a large, more inclusive meta-analysis (PROSPERO

  3. The influence of interdisciplinary collaboration on decision making: a framework to analyse stakeholder coalitions, evolution and learning in strategic delta planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermoolen, Myrthe; Hermans, Leon

    2015-04-01

    interdisciplinary collaboration. The question here is how to combine policy science frameworks (e.g. the Advocacy Coalition Framework) and social network methods (e.g. Social Network Analysis) with frameworks that allow a connection with the physical delta systems. This will result in a new framework for analysing interdisciplinary stakeholder coalitions, evolution and learning in strategic delta planning. The use of this framework will be illustrated with an example from strategic delta planning in the Dutch Southwest Delta. With this, we want to see how spatial planning and water management disciplines have combined into new policies for delta management in the Netherlands over the past 25 years.

  4. Population genetic analyses of Helicobacter pylori isolates from Gambian adults and children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousman Secka

    Full Text Available The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is one of the most genetically diverse of bacterial species. Much of its diversity stems from frequent mutation and recombination, preferential transmission within families and local communities, and selection during persistent gastric mucosal infection. MLST of seven housekeeping genes had identified multiple distinct H. pylori populations, including three from Africa: hpNEAfrica, hpAfrica1 and hpAfrica2, which consists of three subpopulations (hspWAfrica, hspCAfrica and hspSAfrica. Most detailed H. pylori population analyses have used strains from non-African countries, despite Africa's high importance in the emergence and evolution of humans and their pathogens. Our concatenated sequences from seven H. pylori housekeeping genes from 44 Gambian patients (MLST identified 42 distinct sequence types (or haplotypes, and no clustering with age or disease. STRUCTURE analysis of the sequence data indicated that Gambian H. pylori strains belong to the hspWAfrica subpopulation of hpAfrica1, in accord with Gambia's West African location. Despite Gambia's history of invasion and colonisation by Europeans and North Africans during the last millennium, no traces of Ancestral Europe1 (AE1 population carried by those people were found. Instead, admixture of 17% from Ancestral Europe2 (AE2 was detected in Gambian strains; this population predominates in Nilo-Saharan speakers of North-East Africa, and might have been derived from admixture of hpNEAfrica strains these people carried when they migrated across the Sahara during the Holocene humid period 6,000-9,000 years ago. Alternatively, shared AE2 ancestry might have resulted from shared ancestral polymorphisms already present in the common ancestor of sister populations hpAfrica1 and hpNEAfrica.

  5. Effect of traffic pollution on respiratory and allergic disease in adults: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whyatt Duncan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological research into the role of traffic pollution on chronic respiratory and allergic disease has focused primarily on children. Studies in adults, in particular those based on objective outcomes such as bronchial hyperresponsiveness, skin sensitisation, and lung function, are limited. Methods We have used an existing cohort of 2644 adults aged 18–70 living in Nottingham, UK, for whom baseline health and demographic data were collected in 1991 and computed two markers of exposure to traffic: distance between the home and nearest main road and modelled outdoor nitrogen dioxide (NO2 concentration at the home location. Using multiple regression techniques, we analysed cross-sectional associations with bronchial hyperresponsiveness, FEV1, spirometry-defined COPD, skin test positivity, total IgE and questionnaire-reported wheeze, asthma, eczema and hayfever in 2599 subjects, and longitudinal associations with decline in FEV1 in 1329 subjects followed-up nine years later in 2000. Results There were no significant cross-sectional associations between home proximity to the roadside or NO2 level on any of the outcomes studied (adjusted OR of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in relation to living ≤150 m vs >150 m from a road = 0.92, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.24. Furthermore, neither exposure was associated with a significantly greater decline in FEV1 over time (adjusted mean difference in ΔFEV1 for living ≤150 m vs >150 m of a road = 10.03 ml, 95% CI, -33.98 to 54.04. Conclusion This study found no evidence to suggest that living in close proximity to traffic is a major determinant of asthma, allergic disease or COPD in adults.

  6. Adult Learning and the Generation of New Knowledge and Meaning: Creating Liberating Spaces for Fostering Adult Learning Through Practitioner-Based Collaborative Action Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorks,Lyle

    2005-01-01

    Practitioner research is a topic of growing interest and scholarly writing in the field of education in general and adult education in particular. This article describes a particular form of practitioner research that rests on a participatory worldview and draws heavily from theory and practice in adult learning and action research.…

  7. Large-Scale Genome-Wide Association Studies and Meta-Analyses of Longitudinal Change in Adult Lung Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenbo; Kowgier, Matthew; Loth, Daan W.; Soler Artigas, María; Joubert, Bonnie R.; Hodge, Emily; Gharib, Sina A.; Smith, Albert V.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Mathias, Rasika A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hansel, Nadia N.; Launer, Lenore J.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Hansen, Joyanna G.; Albrecht, Eva; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Allerhand, Michael; Barr, R. Graham; Brusselle, Guy G.; Couper, David J.; Curjuric, Ivan; Davies, Gail; Deary, Ian J.; Dupuis, Josée; Fall, Tove; Foy, Millennia; Franceschini, Nora; Gao, Wei; Gläser, Sven; Gu, Xiangjun; Hancock, Dana B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hofman, Albert; Imboden, Medea; Ingelsson, Erik; James, Alan; Karrasch, Stefan; Koch, Beate; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Kumar, Ashish; Lahousse, Lies; Li, Guo; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Lumley, Thomas; McArdle, Wendy L.; Meibohm, Bernd; Morris, Andrew P.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Musk, Bill; North, Kari E.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schulz, Holger; Smith, Lewis J.; Sood, Akshay; Starr, John M.; Strachan, David P.; Teumer, Alexander; Uitterlinden, André G.; Völzke, Henry; Voorman, Arend; Wain, Louise V.; Wells, Martin T.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Williams, O. Dale; Heckbert, Susan R.; Stricker, Bruno H.; London, Stephanie J.; Fornage, Myriam; Tobin, Martin D.; O′Connor, George T.; Hall, Ian P.; Cassano, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci influencing cross-sectional lung function, but less is known about genes influencing longitudinal change in lung function. Methods We performed GWAS of the rate of change in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) in 14 longitudinal, population-based cohort studies comprising 27,249 adults of European ancestry using linear mixed effects model and combined cohort-specific results using fixed effect meta-analysis to identify novel genetic loci associated with longitudinal change in lung function. Gene expression analyses were subsequently performed for identified genetic loci. As a secondary aim, we estimated the mean rate of decline in FEV1 by smoking pattern, irrespective of genotypes, across these 14 studies using meta-analysis. Results The overall meta-analysis produced suggestive evidence for association at the novel IL16/STARD5/TMC3 locus on chromosome 15 (P  =  5.71 × 10-7). In addition, meta-analysis using the five cohorts with ≥3 FEV1 measurements per participant identified the novel ME3 locus on chromosome 11 (P  =  2.18 × 10-8) at genome-wide significance. Neither locus was associated with FEV1 decline in two additional cohort studies. We confirmed gene expression of IL16, STARD5, and ME3 in multiple lung tissues. Publicly available microarray data confirmed differential expression of all three genes in lung samples from COPD patients compared with controls. Irrespective of genotypes, the combined estimate for FEV1 decline was 26.9, 29.2 and 35.7 mL/year in never, former, and persistent smokers, respectively. Conclusions In this large-scale GWAS, we identified two novel genetic loci in association with the rate of change in FEV1 that harbor candidate genes with biologically plausible functional links to lung function. PMID:24983941

  8. Large-scale genome-wide association studies and meta-analyses of longitudinal change in adult lung function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Tang

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified numerous loci influencing cross-sectional lung function, but less is known about genes influencing longitudinal change in lung function.We performed GWAS of the rate of change in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 in 14 longitudinal, population-based cohort studies comprising 27,249 adults of European ancestry using linear mixed effects model and combined cohort-specific results using fixed effect meta-analysis to identify novel genetic loci associated with longitudinal change in lung function. Gene expression analyses were subsequently performed for identified genetic loci. As a secondary aim, we estimated the mean rate of decline in FEV1 by smoking pattern, irrespective of genotypes, across these 14 studies using meta-analysis.The overall meta-analysis produced suggestive evidence for association at the novel IL16/STARD5/TMC3 locus on chromosome 15 (P  =  5.71 × 10(-7. In addition, meta-analysis using the five cohorts with ≥3 FEV1 measurements per participant identified the novel ME3 locus on chromosome 11 (P  =  2.18 × 10(-8 at genome-wide significance. Neither locus was associated with FEV1 decline in two additional cohort studies. We confirmed gene expression of IL16, STARD5, and ME3 in multiple lung tissues. Publicly available microarray data confirmed differential expression of all three genes in lung samples from COPD patients compared with controls. Irrespective of genotypes, the combined estimate for FEV1 decline was 26.9, 29.2 and 35.7 mL/year in never, former, and persistent smokers, respectively.In this large-scale GWAS, we identified two novel genetic loci in association with the rate of change in FEV1 that harbor candidate genes with biologically plausible functional links to lung function.

  9. The association of fetal and early childhood growth with adult mental distress: evidence from the Johns Hopkins Collaborative Perinatal Study birth cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Andrew Alford

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Early childhood physical growth may have an impact on the development of adult mental distress. The primary objectives were to (1 assess the association of early growth in weight (adjusted for height with adult mental distress, and (2 determine if specific sub-types, or patterns, of early physical growth are associated with adult mental distress.Methods: Subjects were all Johns Hopkins Collaborative Perinatal Study cohort subjects with complete birth size information that successfully completed the Pathways to Adulthood follow-up in early adulthood. Variability in the timing of growth in weight adjusted for height from birth to age 7.5 years was taken into account using a nonhierarchical linear model. Two critical periods of growth were considered as tertiles of change in weight adjusted for height from birth to age seven and birth to age 1 year. Mental distress in adulthood (ages 29-32 was measured using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28.Results: Small for gestational age subjects were at increased risk of later mental distress, but not uniformly so. Those born with low weight and length for gestational age were a distinct subgroup of those born small for gestational age, and had unique patterns of risk for adult mental distress when early growth was considered.Conclusions: Acceleration and deceleration in weight for height change is associated with mental distress over multiple periods of early life and acts differentially between those periods. Furthermore, the association of early childhood growth with the likelihood of adult mental distress is dependent on prenatal growth.

  10. Constancy of Adult Personality Structure in Males: Longitudinal, Cross-Sectional and Times-of-Measurement Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Robert R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The invariance of factor structures in the Guilford Zimmerman Temperament Survey is clearly evident. Basic personality structure appears little affected by social and historical change. Results favor the stability model for objectively measured personality traits in adult males. (JAC)

  11. Technology Training for Older Job-Seeking Adults: The Efficacy of a Program Offered through a University-Community Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Jessica; Czaja, Sara J.; Sharit, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Many older adults who lose their jobs face challenges in finding new employment due to fundamental limitations in their technology skills. While training could give them the skills they need, older workers often have less access to training programs than younger workers. This study examined the feasibility of using an e-learning training program…

  12. Collaboration and Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, O; Manten-Horst, E; van der Graaf, W T A

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the need for collaboration across pediatric and adult cancer to care for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) arose from the recognition of the unique characteristics of AYAs with cancer. Neither pediatric nor adult oncology hospital departments are able to provide age-appropriate care single handedly. The best way to bridge the gap in care of AYA cancer patients is to centralize aspects of their care within dedicated AYA care programs, including the following essential components: provision of developmentally appropriate and multidisciplinary (supportive) care, availability of AYA inpatient and outpatient facilities and healthcare professional AYA expertise as collaboration between adult and pediatric departments. Barriers are related to the slowly emerging evidence of benefit, cultural differences (collaboration between pediatric and adult oncology professionals), administrative and logistic challenges (small number of AYAs makes it difficult to create an AYA program in every hospital) and financial aspects (dependency on philanthropic funds). The sustainable development of an AYA program requires acceptance as a standard of care at the clinical and patient community and at government level. To improve the quality, equity and quantity of research and innovation in AYA cancer care across the world, it is necessary to join forces and collaborate in international networks to study issues such as the features of quality care, collaboration between pediatric and adult clinical teams, trial groups and professional societies, and AYA-specific groups such as Critical Mass, Canteen or European Network for Teenagers and Young Adults with Cancer. PMID:27595356

  13. Analyses of regenerative wave patterns in adult hair follicle populations reveal macro-environmental regulation of stem cell activity

    OpenAIRE

    Plikus, Maksim V; Widelitz, Randall B; Maxson, Rob; Chuong, Cheng-ming

    2009-01-01

    The control of hair growth in the adult mammalian coat is a fascinating topic which has just begun to be explored with molecular genetic tools. Complex hair cycle domains and regenerative hair waves are present in normal adult (> 2 month) mice, but more apparent in mutants with cyclic alopecia phenotypes. Each hair cycle domain consists of initiation site(s), a propagating wave and boundaries. By analyzing the dynamics of hair growth, time required for regeneration after plucking, in situ hyb...

  14. Public-academic partnerships: the University of Hawai'i Rural Health Collaboration: partnerships to provide adult telepsychiatry services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Susana; Koyanagi, Chad; Else, 'Iwalani; Horton, Michelle; Fukuda, Michael

    2010-10-01

    To address the twofold problem of mental health disparities and limited access to health resources in rural areas, the University of Hawai'i Rural Health Collaboration aims to increase access to behavioral health services to rural areas across the state, primarily via telepsychiatry. The authors highlight lessons learned in regard to forging a university-community partnership, specifically community engagement for patient referral, the shift toward integrated services and away from a specialty clinic model, the importance of community diversity and contextual relevance, and ethical research and practice with indigenous communities. PMID:20889630

  15. Collaboration 'Engineerability'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn L.; de Vreede, Gert-Jan; Briggs, Robert O.; Sol, Henk G.

    2010-01-01

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key assum

  16. Trust repertoires for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars

    This case study analyses the role of trust in a public private innovation network that involved a private consultancy company as a facilitator. We know that collaboration is a important for innovation, and that collaboration across organizational boundaries is not a trivial issue. But we know very...... little about how such processes develop and how trust, understood as “confident positive expectations” (Lewicki et al. 1998) to collaborative activities, arises out of collaboration. The paper contributes by showing how trust and collaboration are intertwined. The main finding is that a facilitator can...

  17. EFFECTIVENESS OF DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR THERAPY VERSUS COLLABORATIVE ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF SUICIDALITY TREATMENT FOR REDUCTION OF SELF-HARM IN ADULTS WITH BORDERLINE PERSONALITY TRAITS AND DISORDER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, Kate; Krogh, Jesper; Wenneberg, Christina;

    2016-01-01

    were: severity of borderline symptoms, depressive symptoms, hopelessness, suicide ideation, and self-esteem. RESULTS: At 28 weeks, the number of participants with new self-harm in the DBT group was 21 of 57 (36.8%) versus 12 of 51 (23.5%) in the CAMS treatment (OR: 1.90; 95% CI: 0.80-4.40; P = .14......BACKGROUND: Many psychological treatments have shown effect on reducing self-harm in adults with borderline personality disorder. There is a need of brief psychotherapeutical treatment alternative for suicide prevention in specialized outpatient clinics. METHODS/DESIGN: The DiaS trial was designed...... behavior therapy (DBT) versus up to 16 weeks of collaborative assessment and management of suicidality (CAMS) treatment. The primary composite outcome was the number of participants with a new self-harm (nonsuicidal self-injury [NSSI] or suicide attempt) at week 28 from baseline. Other exploratory outcomes...

  18. Item Response Theory Analyses of Adult Self-Ratings of the ADHD Symptoms in the Current Symptoms Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rapson

    2011-01-01

    The graded response model, which is based on item response theory, was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of adult self-ratings (N = 852) of the attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity symptoms presented in the Current Symptoms Scale. This scale has four ordered response categories. The…

  19. Mean and Covariance Structures Analyses: An Examination of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale among Adolescents and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Corwyn, Robert Flynn

    2003-01-01

    Examined the cross-age comparability of the widely used Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) in 414 adolescents and 900 adults in families receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children. Found similarities of means in the RSES across groups. (SLD)

  20. On the stability of a variety of organic photovoltaic devices by IPCE and in situ IPCE analyses – the ISOS-3 inter-laboratory collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teran-Escobar, Gerardo; Tanenbaum, David; Voroshazi, Eszter;

    2012-01-01

    This work is part of the inter-laboratory collaboration to study the stability of seven distinct sets of state-of-the-art organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices prepared by leading research laboratories. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at RISØ-DTU up to 1830 hours in accordance...... with established ISOS-3 protocols under defined illumination conditions. In this work, we apply the Incident Photon-to-Electron Conversion Efficiency (IPCE) and the in situ IPCE techniques to determine the relation between solar cell performance and solar cell stability. Different ageing conditions were considered......: accelerated full sun simulation, low level indoor fluorescent lighting and dark storage. The devices were also monitored under conditions of ambient and inert (N2) atmospheres, which allows for the identification of the solar cell materials more susceptible to degradation by ambient air (oxygen and moisture...

  1. Determination of Labeled Fatty Acids Content in Milk Products, Infant Formula, and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Capillary Gas Chromatography: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2012.13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, Pierre-Alain; Moulin, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted on AOAC First Action Method 2012.13 "Determination of Labeled Fatty Acids Content in Milk Products and Infant Formula by Capillary Gas Chromatography," which is based on an initial International Organization for Standardization (ISO)-International Dairy Federation (IDF) New Work Item that has been moved forward to ISO 16958:2015|IDF 231:2015 in November 2015. It was decided to merge the two activities after the agreement signed between ISO and AOAC in June 2012 to develop common standards and to avoid duplicate work. The collaborative study was performed after having provided highly satisfactory single-laboratory validation results [Golay, P.A., & Dong, Y. (2015) J. AOAC Int. 98, 1679-1696] that exceeded the performance criteria defined in AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirement (SMPR(®)) 2012.011 (September 29, 2012) on 12 products selected by the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula (SPIFAN). After a qualification period of 1 month, 18 laboratories participated in the fatty acids analysis of 12 different samples in duplicate. Six samples were selected to meet AOAC SPIFAN requirements (i.e., infant formula and adult nutritionals in powder and liquid formats), and the other Six samples were selected to meet ISO-IDF requirements (i.e., dairy products such as milk powder, liquid milk, cream, butter, infant formula with milk, and cheese). The fatty acids were analyzed directly in all samples without preliminary fat extraction, except in one sample (cheese). Powdered samples were analyzed after dissolution (i.e., reconstitution) in water, whereas liquid samples (or extracted fat) were analyzed directly. After addition of the internal standards solution [C11:0 fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and C13:0 triacylglycerols (TAG)] to the samples, fatty acids attached to lipids were transformed into FAMEs by direct transesterification using methanolic sodium methoxide. FAMEs were separated using highly polar capillary GLC and were

  2. Determination of Labeled Fatty Acids Content in Milk Products, Infant Formula, and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Capillary Gas Chromatography: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2012.13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, Pierre-Alain; Moulin, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted on AOAC First Action Method 2012.13 "Determination of Labeled Fatty Acids Content in Milk Products and Infant Formula by Capillary Gas Chromatography," which is based on an initial International Organization for Standardization (ISO)-International Dairy Federation (IDF) New Work Item that has been moved forward to ISO 16958:2015|IDF 231:2015 in November 2015. It was decided to merge the two activities after the agreement signed between ISO and AOAC in June 2012 to develop common standards and to avoid duplicate work. The collaborative study was performed after having provided highly satisfactory single-laboratory validation results [Golay, P.A., & Dong, Y. (2015) J. AOAC Int. 98, 1679-1696] that exceeded the performance criteria defined in AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirement (SMPR(®)) 2012.011 (September 29, 2012) on 12 products selected by the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula (SPIFAN). After a qualification period of 1 month, 18 laboratories participated in the fatty acids analysis of 12 different samples in duplicate. Six samples were selected to meet AOAC SPIFAN requirements (i.e., infant formula and adult nutritionals in powder and liquid formats), and the other Six samples were selected to meet ISO-IDF requirements (i.e., dairy products such as milk powder, liquid milk, cream, butter, infant formula with milk, and cheese). The fatty acids were analyzed directly in all samples without preliminary fat extraction, except in one sample (cheese). Powdered samples were analyzed after dissolution (i.e., reconstitution) in water, whereas liquid samples (or extracted fat) were analyzed directly. After addition of the internal standards solution [C11:0 fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and C13:0 triacylglycerols (TAG)] to the samples, fatty acids attached to lipids were transformed into FAMEs by direct transesterification using methanolic sodium methoxide. FAMEs were separated using highly polar capillary GLC and were

  3. Cancer risk of anti-TNF-α at recommended doses in adult rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis with intention to treat and per protocol analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Moulis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of malignancies on TNF-α antagonists is controversial. The aim of this survey was to assess cancer risk on TNF-α antagonists in adult rheumatoid arthritis patients, including the five marketed drugs (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab and certolizumab used in line with the New Drug Application. Furthermore, the relative interest of modified intention to treat or per protocol analyses to assess such sparse events remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data sources were MEDLINE, CENTRAL, ISI Web of Science, ACR and EULAR meeting abstracts, scientific evaluation of the drugs leading to their marketing approval, and clinicaltrials.gov, until 31 December 2012.We selected double-blind randomized controlled trials in adult rheumatoid arthritis patients, including at least one treatment arm in line with New Drug Application. We performed random effect meta-analysis, with modified intention to treat and per protocol analyses. Thirty-three trials were included. There was no excess risk of malignancies on anti-TNF-α administered in line with New Drug Application in the per protocol model (OR, 0.93 95%CI[0.59-1.44], as well as in the modified intention to treat model (OR, 1.27 95%CI[0.82-1.98]. There was a non-significant tendency for an excess non-melanoma skin cancer risk in both models (respectively, 1.37 [0.71-2.66] and 1.90 [0.98-3.67]. With fixed effect Peto model restricting to trials during at least 52 weeks, the overall cancer risk was respectively 1.60 [0.97-2.64] and 1.22 [0.72-2.08]. Whatever the model, modified intention to treat analysis led to higher estimations than per protocol analysis. The later may underestimate the treatment effect when assessing very sparse events and when many patients dropped out in placebo arms. In metaregression, there was no differential risk among the five drugs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study did not find any evidence for an excess cancer risk on TNF

  4. Resurrecting Brinley Plots for a Novel Use: Meta-Analyses of Functional Brain Imaging Data in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M. Peiffer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available By plotting response times of young and older adults across a variety of tasks, Brinley spurred investigation and debate into the theory of general cognitive slowing. Though controversial, Brinley plots can assess between-task differences, the impact of increasing task demand, and the relationship between responses in two groups of subjects. Since a relationship exists between response times and the blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal of functional MRI (fMRI, Brinley's plotting method could be applied as a meta-analysis tool in fMRI studies of aging. Here, fledgling “Peiffer plots” are discussed for their potential impact on understanding general cognitive brain activity in aging. Preliminary results suggest that general cognitive slowing may be localized at the sensorimotor transformation in the precentral gyrus. Although this meta-analysis method is naturally used with imaging studies of aging, theoretically it may be applied to other study pairs (e.g., schizophrenic versus normal or imaging datasets (e.g., PET.

  5. 2H NMR and 13C-IRMS analyses of acetic acid from vinegar, 18O-IRMS analysis of water in vinegar: International collaborative study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international collaborative study of isotopic methods applied to control the authenticity of vinegar was organized in order to support the recognition of these procedures as official methods. The determination of the 2H/1H ratio of the methyl site of acetic acid by SNIF-NMR (site-specific natural isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance) and the determination of the 13C/12C ratio, by IRMS (isotope ratio mass spectrometry) provide complementary information to characterize the botanical origin of acetic acid and to detect adulterations of vinegar using synthetic acetic acid. Both methods use the same initial steps to recover pure acetic acid from vinegar. In the case of wine vinegar, the determination of the 18O/16O ratio of water by IRMS allows to differentiate wine vinegar from vinegars made from dried grapes. The same set of vinegar samples was used to validate these three determinations. The precision parameters of the method for measuring δ13C (carbon isotopic deviation) were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or sugars extracted from fruit juices: the average repeatability (r) was 0.45 per mille , and the average reproducibility (R) was 0.91 per mille . As expected from previous in-house study of the uncertainties, the precision parameters of the method for measuring the 2H/1H ratio of the methyl site were found to be slightly higher than the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or fermentation ethanol in fruit juices: the average repeatability was 1.34 ppm, and the average reproducibility was 1.62 ppm. This precision is still significantly smaller than the differences between various acetic acid sources (δ13C and δ18O) and allows a satisfactory discrimination of vinegar types. The precision parameters of the method for measuring δ18O were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for other methods applied to wine and fruit juices: the

  6. Breakdowns in collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative information seeking is integral to many professional activities. In hospital work, the medication process encompasses continual seeking for information and collaborative grounding of information. This study investigates breakdowns in collaborative information seeking through analyses...... of the use of the electronic medication record adopted in a Danish healthcare region and of the reports of five years of medication incidents at Danish hospitals. The results show that breakdowns in collaborative information seeking is a major source of medication incidents, that most of these breakdowns...

  7. Collaborative Learning is an Effective Method for Improving the E-health Literacy of Older Adults in the Community. A Review of: Xie, B. (2011. Older adults, e-health literacy, and collaborative learning: An experimental study. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 62(5, 933-946. doi: 10.1002/asi.21507

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa S. Arndt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine whether collaborative learning strategies in an informal class setting can improve electronic health literacy skills of older adults.Design – Pre- and post-test instruments used to measure effects of an educational intervention.Setting – Small group classes offered at two branches of a large, publicly funded, urban public library in Maryland.Subjects – A total of 111 adults aged 52 to 91, mean age 70.4 (SD 8.0, completed the study. The majority of participants were from minority populations (66% African American, 3% Latino, 3% Asian. Thirty three percent of participants reported an annual household income below $20,000. Eight percent were non-native English speakers. The majority of participants had low-level or no computer/Internet experience prior to the study.Methods – Collaborative learning strategies were used in small group hands-on computer classes to deliver a standardized curriculum (Helping Older Adults Search for Health Information Online: A Toolkit for Trainers from the National Institute on Aging. Strategies employed were: explicit statement of group/participatory nature of class, periodic peer shared reflection times during class, active encouragement of discussion between peers, hands-on work with partners, group discussion of real-life questions from participants, and structured shared reflection time at the close of each session. Participants were recruited through local advertisements. No incentive other than the free classes was offered. Groups met for two hours, twice a week for four weeks. Assessment was via pre and post-tests. General computing knowledge/skills were measured using objective tests of abilities. Questions from several established scales were adapted for additional assessment. E-health literacy was measured using questions of perceived skill and comfort in finding health information online; perceived usefulness of the Internet for help making health decisions; and perceived

  8. A Model of Transformative Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Ann L.; Triscari, Jacqlyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Two collaborative writing partners sought to deepen their understanding of transformative learning by conducting several spirals of grounded theory research on their own collaborative relationship. Drawing from adult education, business, and social science literature and including descriptive analysis of their records of activity and interaction…

  9. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore......, it tries to measure the impact of technology on students’ satisfaction with collaboration outcomes. In particular, the study aims to address the following research questions: Which demographic information (e.g. gender and place of origin) is significant for collaboration and ecollaboration? and Which...... are the perceived factors that influence the students’ group performance? The findings of this study emphasize that there are gender and cultural differences with respect to the perception of e-collaboration. Furthermore, the article summarizes in a model the most significant factors influencing group performance....

  10. Collaboration during visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolmson, Kelly A; Reynolds, Michael G; Smilek, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Two experiments examine how collaboration influences visual search performance. Working with a partner or on their own, participants reported whether a target was present or absent in briefly presented search displays. We compared the search performance of individuals working together (collaborative pairs) with the pooled responses of the individuals working alone (nominal pairs). Collaborative pairs were less likely than nominal pairs to correctly detect a target and they were less likely to make false alarms. Signal detection analyses revealed that collaborative pairs were more sensitive to the presence of the target and had a more conservative response bias than the nominal pairs. This pattern was observed even when the presence of another individual was matched across pairs. The results are discussed in the context of task-sharing, social loafing and current theories of visual search. PMID:17972737

  11. Innovation and network collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances;

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from network collaboration by enhancing opportunities for innovation. Managing the necessary collaboration to benefit from network participation may however be particularly challenging for SMEs due to their size and thei......Research suggests that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from network collaboration by enhancing opportunities for innovation. Managing the necessary collaboration to benefit from network participation may however be particularly challenging for SMEs due to their size...... in particular, and HRM, we analyse and evaluate the potential applicability of existing models for supporting innovation in SMEs participating in networks. Finally, we propose several lines of inquiry arising from our analysis that provide directions for future research....

  12. A Metrics Approach for Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian CIUREA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents different types of collaborative systems, their structure and classification. This paper defines the concept of virtual campus as a collaborative system. It builds architecture for virtual campus oriented on collaborative training processes. It analyses the quality characteristics of collaborative systems and propose techniques for metrics construction and validation in order to evaluate them. The article analyzes different ways to increase the efficiency and the performance level in collaborative banking systems.

  13. Polycystic liver in the adult (PLA in Spain: analysis of a structured survey analysing the experience and attitude of gastroenterologists in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ampuero

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic liver in the adult (PLA is a rare disease characterized by chronic liver enlargement. Objective: To analyse gastroenterologists' involvement in, experience with, and attitude toward diagnosing, monitoring, and treating patients with PLA in Spain. Methods: Each of seven study coordinators contacted 15 specialists in their geographic area about participating in the study via an online structured survey. Results: Of the 105 clinics contacted, 88 completed the questionnaire, with a mean of 3 patients being followed per practice, although 6 clinics were following more than 20 patients with PLA. Patients were being followed mainly by the Department of Hepatology (81 % and/or the Department of Gastroenterology (33 %. The majority of patients were diagnosed (98 % and monitored (97 % using liver ultrasound. When diagnosed, 76 % of patients were under 50 years of age, females predominating. The primary treatment objective for the patients was symptomatic management. Pharmacotherapy was prescribed by 28 % of physicians: Somatostatin analogues, primarily, followed by mTOR inhibitors. One-third of the clinics indicated that they had patients who had undergone liver transplant and/or surgery. Conclusions: Ultrasound is the diagnosing and monitoring method of choice. Among the clinics using pharmacotherapy for symptomatic management, somatostatin analogues were the drugs of choice. These clinics' infrequent use of invasive procedures suggests that they perceive the various invasive techniques as not very effective.

  14. Characterization and novel analyses of acute stress response patterns in a population-based cohort of young adults: influence of gender, smoking, and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbison, Carly E; Henley, David; Marsh, Julie; Atkinson, Helen; Newnham, John P; Matthews, Stephen G; Lye, Stephen J; Pennell, Craig E

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the biological stress response system has been implicated in the development of psychological, metabolic, and cardiovascular disease. Whilst changes in stress response are often quantified as an increase or decrease in cortisol levels, three different patterns of stress response have been reported in the literature for the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) (reactive-responders (RR), anticipatory-responders (AR) and non-responders (NR)). However, these have never been systematically analyzed in a large population-based cohort. The aims of this study were to examine factors that contribute to TSST variation (gender, oral contraceptive use, menstrual cycle phase, smoking, and BMI) using traditional methods and novel analyses of stress response patterns. We analyzed the acute stress response of 798, 18-year-old participants from a community-based cohort using the TSST. Plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone, plasma cortisol, and salivary cortisol levels were quantified. RR, AR, and NR patterns comprised 56.6%, 26.2%, and 17.2% of the cohort, respectively. Smokers were more likely to be NR than (RR or AR; adjusted, p stress-response patterns, in addition to other parameters vary with gender, smoking, and BMI. The distribution of these patterns has the potential to vary with adult health and disease and may represent a biomarker for future investigation.

  15. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies...... learn how to improve operations in (hopefully) a win-win like manner through collaboration....

  16. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...

  17. Thematising Intercultural Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte; Askehave, Inger

    2013-01-01

    Taking a critical discursive approach (Potter and Wetherell, 1987; Wetherell and Potter, 1988, 1992) to analysing interview data, the article discusses the possible implications of top and middle managers’ constructions of intercultural collaboration for the day-to-day workings of a Danish...

  18. Cardiovascular and Renal Outcomes of Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade in Adult Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review with Network Meta-Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrán Catalá-López

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Medications aimed at inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system (RAS have been used extensively for preventing cardiovascular and renal complications in patients with diabetes, but data that compare their clinical effectiveness are limited. We aimed to compare the effects of classes of RAS blockers on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in adults with diabetes.Eligible trials were identified by electronic searches in PubMed/MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (1 January 2004 to 17 July 2014. Interventions of interest were angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and direct renin (DR inhibitors. The primary endpoints were cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke-singly and as a composite endpoint, major cardiovascular outcome-and end-stage renal disease [ESRD], doubling of serum creatinine, and all-cause mortality-singly and as a composite endpoint, progression of renal disease. Secondary endpoints were angina pectoris and hospitalization for heart failure. In all, 71 trials (103,120 participants, with a total of 14 different regimens, were pooled using network meta-analyses. When compared with ACE inhibitor, no other RAS blocker used in monotherapy and/or combination was associated with a significant reduction in major cardiovascular outcomes: ARB (odds ratio [OR] 1.02; 95% credible interval [CrI] 0.90-1.18, ACE inhibitor plus ARB (0.97; 95% CrI 0.79-1.19, DR inhibitor plus ACE inhibitor (1.32; 95% CrI 0.96-1.81, and DR inhibitor plus ARB (1.00; 95% CrI 0.73-1.38. For the risk of progression of renal disease, no significant differences were detected between ACE inhibitor and each of the remaining therapies: ARB (OR 1.10; 95% CrI 0.90-1.40, ACE inhibitor plus ARB (0.97; 95% CrI 0.72-1.29, DR inhibitor plus ACE inhibitor (0.99; 95% CrI 0.65-1.57, and DR inhibitor plus ARB (1.18; 95% CrI 0.78-1.84. No significant differences were showed between ACE inhibitors and ARBs with

  19. Cardiovascular and Renal Outcomes of Renin–Angiotensin System Blockade in Adult Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review with Network Meta-Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Macías Saint-Gerons, Diego; González-Bermejo, Diana; Rosano, Giuseppe M.; Davis, Barry R.; Ridao, Manuel; Zaragoza, Abel; Montero-Corominas, Dolores; Tobías, Aurelio; de la Fuente-Honrubia, César; Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Hutton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background Medications aimed at inhibiting the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) have been used extensively for preventing cardiovascular and renal complications in patients with diabetes, but data that compare their clinical effectiveness are limited. We aimed to compare the effects of classes of RAS blockers on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in adults with diabetes. Methods and Findings Eligible trials were identified by electronic searches in PubMed/MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (1 January 2004 to 17 July 2014). Interventions of interest were angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and direct renin (DR) inhibitors. The primary endpoints were cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke—singly and as a composite endpoint, major cardiovascular outcome—and end-stage renal disease [ESRD], doubling of serum creatinine, and all-cause mortality—singly and as a composite endpoint, progression of renal disease. Secondary endpoints were angina pectoris and hospitalization for heart failure. In all, 71 trials (103,120 participants), with a total of 14 different regimens, were pooled using network meta-analyses. When compared with ACE inhibitor, no other RAS blocker used in monotherapy and/or combination was associated with a significant reduction in major cardiovascular outcomes: ARB (odds ratio [OR] 1.02; 95% credible interval [CrI] 0.90–1.18), ACE inhibitor plus ARB (0.97; 95% CrI 0.79–1.19), DR inhibitor plus ACE inhibitor (1.32; 95% CrI 0.96–1.81), and DR inhibitor plus ARB (1.00; 95% CrI 0.73–1.38). For the risk of progression of renal disease, no significant differences were detected between ACE inhibitor and each of the remaining therapies: ARB (OR 1.10; 95% CrI 0.90–1.40), ACE inhibitor plus ARB (0.97; 95% CrI 0.72–1.29), DR inhibitor plus ACE inhibitor (0.99; 95% CrI 0.65–1.57), and DR inhibitor plus ARB (1.18; 95% CrI 0.78–1.84). No significant

  20. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis is based on a multiple-­‐‑case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new...... to the new phenomenon of fashion libraries and does not cover other types of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry (Swap-­‐‑parties, etc.). Originality/value: The paper is one of the first attempts to examine new business models of collaborative consumption in general and the fashion library...... concept in particular. The study contributes to the discussions of whether and how fashion sharing and collaboration holds promise as a viable business model and as a means to promote sustainability....

  1. The benefits of yoga for adults with type 2 diabetes: a review of the evidence and call for a collaborative, integrated research initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de G R Hansen, Elizabeth; Innes, Kim E

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a global public health crisis. Research suggests that yoga holds promise for T2DM management. This article summarizes evidence regarding the efficacy of yoga for T2DM management and encourages the development of an integrated research agenda and a collaborative work group to test it. We present a brief overview of the global rise in T2DM and its consequences and costs, review the evidence regarding the potential benefits of yoga for T2DM management, outline limitations in the literature, discuss possible mechanisms underlying the effects of yoga on T2DM, and suggest how a collaborative, multinational effort by yoga therapist and research communities might contribute to research and inform clinical practice. Yoga protocols that serve T2DM patients and a research framework for creating an evidence base to support the use of yoga for T2DM management are clearly needed. PMID:24165527

  2. Interprofessional Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Prentice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, we examined the experience of interprofessional collaboration from the perspective of nursing and medical students. Seventeen medical and nursing students from two different universities participated in the study. We used guiding questions in face-to-face, conversational interviews to explore students’ experience and expectations of interprofessional collaboration within learning situations. Three themes emerged from the data: the great divide, learning means content, and breaking the ice. The findings suggest that the experience of interprofessional collaboration within learning events is influenced by the natural clustering of shared interests among students. Furthermore, the carry-forward of impressions about physician–nurse relationships prior to the educational programs and during clinical placements dominate the formation of new relationships and acquisition of new knowledge about roles, which might have implications for future practice.

  3. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    processes. Our analysis reveals two levels of prototyping. Besides the more formal managerial level, we identify the informal designer level, where the actual practice of prototyping takes place. On this level, collaborative prototyping transforms the act of prototyping from an activity belonging...... changes, and it detects emerging usability problems through active engagement and experimentation. As such, the collaborative prototype acts as a boundary object to represent, understand, and transform knowledge across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries. Our study also identifies some...... constraints in involving the appropriate stakeholders at the right time. The paper specifically elaborates on the role of users in collaborative prototyping, which is important in order to cover all phases of the problem-solving cycle but triggers an interesting challenge due to the “reverse empathy...

  4. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    -called Extended Manufacturing Enterprises (EMEs). In effect, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of EMEs. Consequently, new approaches must be developed not only to enhance the business performance of EMEs, but also, in particular, the inter-organisational......Many companies have gradually moved from vertically aligned operations to horizontally aligned operations, a change implying that co-ordination is shifting from the hierarchy to the market place with emphasis on collaboration with other companies. One form of collaboration with companies is so...

  5. Collaborative Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This…

  6. Collaborative engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

    2004-09-01

    A need exists for United States military forces to perform collaborative engagement operations between unmanned systems. This capability has the potential to contribute significant tactical synergy to the Joint Force operating in the battlespace of the future. Collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. Collaborative engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. This paper will address a multiphase U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC) Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL) program to assess information requirements, Joint Architecure for Unmanned Systems (JAUS), on-going Science and Technology initiatives, and conduct simulation based experiments to identify and resolve technical risks required to conduct collaborative engagements using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGV). The schedule outlines an initial effort to expand, update and exercise JAUS, provide early feedback to support user development of Concept of Operations (CONOPs) and Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs), and develop a Multiple Unified Simulation Environment (MUSE) system with JAUS interfaces necessary to support an unmanned system of systems collaboartive engagement.

  7. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach – The analysis is based on a multiple-case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new, clo...

  8. Determination of Vitamin E and Vitamin A in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals by Normal-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2012.10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Adrienne

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) project is to establish international consensus methods for infant formula and adult nutritionals, which will benefit intermarket supply and dispute resolution. A collaborative study was conducted on AOAC First Action Method 2012.10 Simultaneous Determination of 13-cis and All-trans Vitamin A Palmitate (Retinyl Palmitate), Vitamin A Acetate (Retinyl Acetate), and Total Vitamin E (α-Tocopherol and D-α-tocopherol acetate) in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals by Normal-Phase HPLC. Fifteen laboratories from 11 countries participated in an interlaboratory study to determine 13-cis and all-trans vitamin A palmitate (retinyl palmitate), vitamin A acetate (retinyl acetate), and total vitamin E (α-tocopherol and D-α-tocopherol acetate) in infant formula and adult nutritionals by normal-phase HPLC and all laboratories returned valid data. Eighteen test portions of nine blind duplicates of a variety of infant formula and adult nutritional products were used in the study. The matrixes included milk-based and soy-based hydrolyzed protein as well as a low fat product. Each of the samples was prepared fresh and analyzed in singlicate. As the number of samples exceeded the recommended number to be prepared in a single day, analysis took place over 2 days running 12 samples on day one and 10 samples on day two. The reference standard stock was prepared once and the six-point curve diluted freshly on each day. Results obtained from all 15 laboratories are reported. The RSDR for total vitamin A (palmitate or acetate) ranged from 6.51 to 22.61% and HorRat values ranged from 0.33 to 1.25. The RSDR for total vitamin E (as tocopherol equivalents) ranged from 3.84 to 10.78% and HorRat values ranged from 0.27 to 1.04. Except for an adult low fat matrix which generated reproducibility RSD >40% for some isomers, most SPIFAN matrixes gave results within the acceptance criteria of <16

  9. Mobile Collaborative Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Bye, Gunhild Griff

    2008-01-01

    Mobile technology is a well-known part of life for the most children and adults in Norway today. Over the last several years, a lot of research has been done to improve this technology and it seems like a mobile collaborative learning system can be an important tool for learning in the future. By using ubiquitous computing and context-aware computing, the technologies are integrated into the environment and enable the user to move around and learn in a natural environment. This leads to many ...

  10. Extreme Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Tony

    2014-01-01

    This talk will focus on collaborations with artists and designers and the new research and commercial applications it has spawned. Serendipity plays a great part in research and I met Helen Storey because of a radio programme called Material World. We worked together on Wonderland, an Art/Science project that argued that drastic new thinking is required to address today's environmental issues with regard to branding and the ethical implications of packaging. Begun in 2005 with ...

  11. How Family Support and Internet Self-Efficacy Influence the Effects of E-Learning among Higher Aged Adults--Analyses of Gender and Age Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Regina Ju-chun

    2010-01-01

    Gender and age differences in the effects of e-learning, including students' satisfaction and Internet self-efficacy, have been supported in prior research. What is less understood is how these differences are shaped, especially for higher aged adults. This article examines the utility of family support (tangible and emotional) and Internet…

  12. Effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions in improving emotional and functional status in hearing or visually impaired older adults : a systematic review with meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roets-Merken, Lieve M.; Draskovic, Irena; Zuidema, Sytse U.; van Erp, Willemijn S.; Graff, Maud J. L.; Kempen, Gertrudis I. J. M.; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J. F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of non-equipment based rehabilitation interventions for older adults with an age-related hearing or visual impairment. Data sources: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Review methods: Two autho

  13. Effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions in improving emotional and functional status in hearing or visually impaired older adults: a systematic review with meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roets-Merken, L.M.; Draskovic, I.; Zuidema, S.U.; Erp, W.S. van; Graff, M.J.L.; Kempen, G.I.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of non-equipment based rehabilitation interventions for older adults with an age-related hearing or visual impairment. DATA SOURCES: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. REVIEW METHODS: Two autho

  14. Calcium requirements for Chinese adults by cross-sectional statistical analyses of calcium balance studies: an individual participant data and aggregate data meta-regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Aiping; Li Keji; Shi Haoyu; He Jingjing; Li He

    2014-01-01

    Background Chinese dietary reference intakes for calcium are largely based on foreign studies.We undertook metaregression to estimate calcium requirements for Chinese adults derived from calcium balance data in Chinese adults.Methods We searched PubMed,Cochrane CENTRAL,and SinoMed from inception to March 5,2014,by using a structured search strategy.The bibliographies of any relevant papers and journals were also screened for potentially eligible studies.We extracted a standardized data set from studies in Chinese adults that reported calcium balance data.The relationship between calcium intake and output was examined by an individual participant data (IPD) and aggregate data (AD) meta-regression.Results We identified 11 metabolic studies in Chinese adults within 18-60 years of age.One hundred and forty-one IPD (n=35) expressed as mg/d,127 IPD (n=32) expressed as mg·kg body wt-1·d-1,and 44 AD (n=132) expressed as mg/d were collected.The models predicted a neutral calcium balance (defined as calcium output (Y) equal to calcium intake (C)) at intakes of 460 mg/d (Y=0.60C+183.98) and 8.27 mg·kg body wt-1·d-1 (Y=0.60C+3.33)for IPD,or 409 mg/d (Y=0.66C+139.00) for AD.Calcium requirements at upper intakes were higher than that at lower intakes in all these models.Conclusion Calcium requirement for Chinese adults 18-60 years of age approximately ranges between 400 mg/d and 500 mg/d when consuming traditional plant-based Chinese diets.

  15. Willamette Oxygen Supplementation Studies : Scale Analyses, Dexter Water Quality Parameters, and Adult Recoveries: Annual Progress Report, September 30, 1998-September 29, 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.D.

    1999-09-01

    This report examines the relationship between scale characteristics of returning adults to determine the fork length at which they entered the ocean. These lengths are then related to the length frequencies of fish in the various experimental groups at the time they left the hatchery. This report summarizes the water quality parameters at Dexter Rearing Ponds and presents the complete returns for all experimental groups.

  16. Collaborative Environments. Considerations Concerning Some Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela I. MUNTEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious, that all collaborative environments (workgroups, communities of practice, collaborative enterprises are based on knowledge and between collaboration and knowledge management there is a strong interdependence. The evolution of information systems in these collaborative environments led to the sudden necessity to adopt, for maintaining the virtual activities and processes, the latest technologies/systems, which are capable to support integrated collaboration in business services. In these environments, portal-based IT platforms will integrate multi-agent collaborative systems, collaborative tools, different enterprise applications and other useful information systems.

  17. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  18. Technology collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jacob [Halliburton (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present Halliburton's Brazilian technology center. Halliburton has technology centers in the United States, Saudi Arabia, India, Singapore and Brazil, all of which aim at delivering accelerated innovation in the oil sector. The technology centers engage in research and development activities with the help of various universities and in collaboration with the customer or supplier. The Halliburton Brazil technology center provides its customers with timely research and development solutions for enhancing recovery and mitigating reservoir uncertainty; they are specialized in finding solutions for pre- and post-salt carbonate drilling and in the enhancement of production from mature fields. This presentation showcased the work carried out by the Halliburton Brazil technology center to help customers develop their deepwater field activities.

  19. Why Does Collaboration Work? Linking Positive Psychology and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conoley, Jane Close; Conoley, Collie Wyatt

    2010-01-01

    Authors in this special issue edited by Cook and Friend provide analyses of many important relationships within a school: teacher to teacher; teacher to paraprofessional, educators, and home caregivers; and whole-building systems. Their focus on collaboration prompted these authors to reflect on a possible theoretical mechanism behind the success…

  20. Collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Since common ground is pivotal to collaboration, this paper proposes to define collaborative information seeking as the combined activity of information seeking and collaborative grounding. While information-seeking activities are necessary for collaborating actors to acquire new information......, the activities involved in information seeking are often performed by varying subgroups of actors. Consequently, collaborative grounding is necessary to share information among collaborating actors and, thereby, establish and maintain the common ground necessary for their collaborative work. By focusing...... on the collaborative level, collaborative information seeking aims to avoid both individual reductionism and group reductionism, while at the same time recognizing that only some information and understanding need be shared....

  1. Remembering and Retelling Stories in Individual and Collaborative Contexts

    OpenAIRE

    GAGNON, LISA M.; Dixon, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative cognition, in which two or more people work together on a cognitive task, may be typical of everyday life, and may even represent an important aspect of everyday cognitive adaptation for older adults. We examined collaborative memory for stories by comparing younger (n = 64) older (n = 66) individuals and dyads with collaborative performance produced by married spouses and stranger dyads. Overall, across four collaborative recall products (two positive and two negative performan...

  2. Oblivious Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Afek, Yehuda; Feige, Uriel; Gafni, Eli; Linial, Nati; Sudakov, Benny

    2011-01-01

    Communication is a crucial ingredient in every kind of collaborative work. But what is the least possible amount of communication required for a given task? We formalize this question by introducing a new framework for distributed computation, called {\\em oblivious protocols}. We investigate the power of this model by considering two concrete examples, the {\\em musical chairs} task $MC(n,m)$ and the well-known {\\em Renaming} problem. The $MC(n,m)$ game is played by $n$ players (processors) with $m$ chairs. Players can {\\em occupy} chairs, and the game terminates as soon as each player occupies a unique chair. Thus we say that player $P$ is {\\em in conflict} if some other player $Q$ is occupying the same chair, i.e., termination means there are no conflicts. By known results from distributed computing, if $m \\le 2n-2$, no strategy of the players can guarantee termination. However, there is a protocol with $m = 2n-1$ chairs that always terminates. Here we consider an oblivious protocol where in every time step ...

  3. Collaborative networks: Reference modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Camarinha-Matos; H. Afsarmanesh

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative Networks: Reference Modeling works to establish a theoretical foundation for Collaborative Networks. Particular emphasis is put on modeling multiple facets of collaborative networks and establishing a comprehensive modeling framework that captures and structures diverse perspectives of

  4. Developing Collaborative Product Development Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Tran, Yen

    2012-01-01

    innovation strategies’. Our analyses suggest that developing such collaboration capabilities benefits from the search for complementary practices, the combination of learning styles, and the development of weak and strong ties. Results also underscore the crucial importance of co-evolution of multi......Collaborative product development capabilities support a company’s product innovation activities. In the context of the fast fashion sector, this paper examines the development of the product development capabilities (PDC) that align product development capabilities in a dual innovation context......, one, slow paced, where the firm is well established and the other, fast paced, which represents a new competitive arena in which the company competes. To understand the process associated with collaborative capability development, we studied three Scandinavian fashion companies pursuing ‘dual...

  5. Collaborative Systems Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocatilu, Paul; Ciurea, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative systems are widely used today in various activity fields. Their complexity is high and the development involves numerous resources and costs. Testing collaborative systems has a very important role for the systems' success. In this paper we present taxonomy of collaborative systems. The collaborative systems are classified in many…

  6. Collaborative Language Learning for Professional Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesh, Linda Joy

    2010-01-01

    Institutions of higher education realise the importance of the role of learning organisations in terms of providing personnel training and updating. Yet further consideration should be given to flexible and accessible means for meeting the growing request for continuous learning. Jason Hughes describes an organization's capability to "learn how to…

  7. {sup 2}H NMR and {sup 13}C-IRMS analyses of acetic acid from vinegar, {sup 18}O-IRMS analysis of water in vinegar: International collaborative study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Freddy [Eurofins Scientific Analytics, BP42301, 44323 Nantes (France); Jamin, Eric, E-mail: ericjamin@eurofins.com [Eurofins Scientific Analytics, BP42301, 44323 Nantes (France)

    2009-09-01

    An international collaborative study of isotopic methods applied to control the authenticity of vinegar was organized in order to support the recognition of these procedures as official methods. The determination of the {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H ratio of the methyl site of acetic acid by SNIF-NMR (site-specific natural isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance) and the determination of the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio, by IRMS (isotope ratio mass spectrometry) provide complementary information to characterize the botanical origin of acetic acid and to detect adulterations of vinegar using synthetic acetic acid. Both methods use the same initial steps to recover pure acetic acid from vinegar. In the case of wine vinegar, the determination of the {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratio of water by IRMS allows to differentiate wine vinegar from vinegars made from dried grapes. The same set of vinegar samples was used to validate these three determinations. The precision parameters of the method for measuring {delta}{sup 13}C (carbon isotopic deviation) were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or sugars extracted from fruit juices: the average repeatability (r) was 0.45 per mille , and the average reproducibility (R) was 0.91 per mille . As expected from previous in-house study of the uncertainties, the precision parameters of the method for measuring the {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H ratio of the methyl site were found to be slightly higher than the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or fermentation ethanol in fruit juices: the average repeatability was 1.34 ppm, and the average reproducibility was 1.62 ppm. This precision is still significantly smaller than the differences between various acetic acid sources ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O) and allows a satisfactory discrimination of vinegar types. The precision parameters of the method for measuring {delta}{sup 18}O were found to be similar

  8. The use of collaboration in the making of Wikipedia

    OpenAIRE

    Ranum Danielsen, Niels; Verner Nielsen, Jens; Sloth, Jarl Joachim; Holm, Nynne

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we want to analyse/account for the collaboration within Wikipedia. To explain Wikipedia’s user generated content we determine the Internets historic development as the technologically backbone for the collaboration. We further explore the Wikipedia community to find an explanation for the users motivations and how the collaboration works within Wikipedia. To analyse on the content created on Wikipedia we used a theory by Lars Qvortrup to categorize the content on Wikipedia....

  9. Collaborating with McGregor and ASTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Joan E.; Freeland, D. Kim

    A descriptive study using survey research techniques investigated the degree to which managerial philosophy was related to training and development professionals' acceptance and practice of those adult learning principles that support the collaborative teaching-learning mode. Data were collected from a random sample of 400 members of the American…

  10. Collaboration in Agricultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Roland L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Theme articles discuss environment, food, agriculture, and renewal resources as they relate to science education, learning partnerships, collaboration in Kyrghyzstan, leadership development, opportunities for collaboration, networking, and the creation of a shared course between agribusiness and biology. (JOW)

  11. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  12. Collaborative Contracting in Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suprapto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Project practitioners have increasingly recognized the importance of collaborative relationships to ensure successful executions of projects. However, the ability to sustain and consistenly drive real collaborative attitudes and behavior for achieving the desired outcomes remains of enduring practic

  13. Collaboration in teacher teams

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwer, P

    2011-01-01

    In order to deal with innovations and the associated complexity of work, ongoing collaboration between teachers has become more important in secondary education. Teacher collaboration is one of the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of innovations in secondary schools. However, there is no consensus regarding the definition of the concept of collaboration. As a consequence, there is little agreement as to whether and to what degree collaborative processes actually occur ...

  14. Breaching barriers to collaboration in public spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemann, Trine; Mitchell, Robb

    2014-01-01

    Technology provoking disparate individuals to collaborate or share experiences in the public space faces a difficult barrier, namely the ordinary social order of urban places. We employed the notion of the breaching experiment to explore how this barrier might be overcome. We analyse responses...... of life in public spaces. Arising from this, we argue for the importance of qualities such as availability, facilitation, perspicuous settings, and perspicuous participants to encourage and support co-located strangers to collaborate and share experiences....

  15. Human Centered Hardware Modeling and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian Damon; Lawrence, Brad; Stelges, Katrine; Henderson, Gena

    2013-01-01

    In order to collaborate engineering designs among NASA Centers and customers, to in clude hardware and human activities from multiple remote locations, live human-centered modeling and collaboration across several sites has been successfully facilitated by Kennedy Space Center. The focus of this paper includes innovative a pproaches to engineering design analyses and training, along with research being conducted to apply new technologies for tracking, immersing, and evaluating humans as well as rocket, vehic le, component, or faci lity hardware utilizing high resolution cameras, motion tracking, ergonomic analysis, biomedical monitoring, wor k instruction integration, head-mounted displays, and other innovative human-system integration modeling, simulation, and collaboration applications.

  16. Collaborative Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Steve

    Collaborative Data Mining is a setting where the Data Mining effort is distributed to multiple collaborating agents - human or software. The objective of the collaborative Data Mining effort is to produce solutions to the tackled Data Mining problem which are considered better by some metric, with respect to those solutions that would have been achieved by individual, non-collaborating agents. The solutions require evaluation, comparison, and approaches for combination. Collaboration requires communication, and implies some form of community. The human form of collaboration is a social task. Organizing communities in an effective manner is non-trivial and often requires well defined roles and processes. Data Mining, too, benefits from a standard process. This chapter explores the standard Data Mining process CRISP-DM utilized in a collaborative setting.

  17. Perceptions of collaboration: A comparison of educators and scientists for COSEE Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chankook

    The Great Lakes region of North America, holding 20% of the world's fresh water and home to ¼ of the U.S. population, can provide its 13 million K-12 learners with a relevant context for science learning, unique opportunities for exploring local environmental issues, and connections to global issues. By linking Great Lakes research scientists with educators, students, and the public, the COSEE (Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence) Great Lakes pursues its goal of enhancing science and environmental literacy of both adults and students. This doctoral research had a three-fold purpose in the COSEE Great Lakes context. First, this study aimed to characterize the population of Great Lakes scientists and K-12 teachers in the Great Lakes region targeted as potential audiences for activities of COSEE Great Lakes. Second, this study aimed to identify factors that may affect educational collaboration between teachers and scientists. Third, this study was conducted as a part of an ongoing process of evaluating overall COSEE program outcomes related to increasing educational collaborations. This dissertation consists of three research reports on professional development and interprofessional collaboration of K-12 teachers and scientists. The first report in Chapter 2 investigates primary and secondary teachers' views of collaboration with scientists and incorporates the findings of teacher surveys into discussions about professional development programs for educators. From 180 schools randomly selected in the eight Great Lakes States, 194 primary and secondary educators responded to a mailed survey. Through the survey responses, the educators reported that while they have positive attitudes toward their collaboration with scientists, their professional preparation has not equipped them with enough understanding of the process of science and the professions of scientists. Regression analysis shows that five predictor variables account for a majority of the variance

  18. Persistent Homology of Collaboration Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Carstens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, network science has introduced several statistical measures to determine the topological structure of large networks. Initially, the focus was on binary networks, where edges are either present or not. Thus, many of the earlier measures can only be applied to binary networks and not to weighted networks. More recently, it has been shown that weighted networks have a rich structure, and several generalized measures have been introduced. We use persistent homology, a recent technique from computational topology, to analyse four weighted collaboration networks. We include the first and second Betti numbers for the first time for this type of analysis. We show that persistent homology corresponds to tangible features of the networks. Furthermore, we use it to distinguish the collaboration networks from similar random networks.

  19. The dynamic creation of knowledge: Analysing public - private collaborations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, I.; Jørgensen, B.H.

    2005-01-01

    The paper explores several dimensions of Danish industry's innovative performance with respect to the paradigm of the fifth generation innovation model that was suggested by Rothwell [Int. Market. Rev. 11 (1994) 7]. These dimensions include a general status of innovativeness in Danish companies...

  20. Collaborative Practice in Early Childhood Intervention from the Perspectives of Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Hung; Hossain, Syeda Zakia; Sitharthan, Gomathi

    2013-01-01

    Effective early childhood intervention (ECI) relies on collaboration among agencies, service providers, and families. Although previous literature has primarily focused on segments of collaboration within ECI service delivery, the actual process and how the adult stakeholders perceive and engage in collaborative practice have important…

  1. Computer Supported Collaborative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Hinze-Hoare, Vita

    2009-01-01

    Although the areas of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), Computer Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW), and Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) are now relatively well established, the related field of Computer Supported Collaborative Research (CSCR) is newly proposed here. An analysis of the principles and issues behind CSCR is performed leading to a full definition and specification of the CSCR domain is provided with a view to setting up an e-laboratory designed to support...

  2. Collaborative authoring workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Schmitz, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    Klemke, R., & Schmitz, B. (2009). Collaborative authoring workshop. Workshop presentation at the Joint Technology Enhanced Learning Summerschool (JTELSS 2009). May, 30-June, 6, 2009, Terchova, Slovakia.

  3. The Collaborative Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Marlowe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration has become an important goal in modern ventures, across the spectrum of commercial, social, and intellectual activities, sometimes as a mediating factor, and sometimes as a driving, foundational principle. Research, development, social programs, and ongoing ventures of all sorts benefit from interactions between teams, groups, and organizations, across intellectual disciplines and across facets and features of the inquiry, product, entity, or activity under consideration. We present a survey of the state of collaboration and collaborative enterprise, in the context of papers and presentations at the International Symposium on Collaborative Enterprises 2011 (CENT 2011, and the extended papers appearing in this special issue.

  4. Emergence of multiplex communities in collaboration networks

    CERN Document Server

    Battiston, Federico; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Bianconi, Ginestra; Latora, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Community structures in collaboration networks reflect the natural tendency of individuals to organize their work in groups in order to better achieve common goals. In most of the cases, individuals exploit their connections to introduce themselves to new areas of interests, giving rise to multifaceted collaborations which span different fields. In this paper, we analyse collaborations in science and among movie actors as multiplex networks, where the layers represent respectively research topics and movie genres, and we show that communities indeed coexist and overlap at the different layers of such systems. We then propose a model to grow multiplex networks based on two mechanisms of intra and inter-layer triadic closure which mimic the real processes in which collaborations evolve. We show that our model is able to explain the multiplex community structure observed empirically, and we infer the strength of the two underlying social mechanisms from real-world systems. Being also able to correctly reproduce ...

  5. Patients report positive impacts of collaborative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John H; Johnson, Deborah J; Benjamin, Regina; Phillips, Jill; MacKenzie, Todd A

    2006-01-01

    Collaborative Care refers to a partnership between healthcare professionals and patients who feel confident to manage their health conditions. Using an Internet-based assessment of health needs and healthcare quality, we surveyed 24,609 adult Americans aged 19 to 69 who had common chronic diseases or significant dysfunction. In these patients, we examined the association of Collaborative Care with specific measures for treatment effect, disease control, prevention, and economic impacts. These measures were adjusted for respondents' demographic characteristics, burden of illness, health behaviors, and overall quality of healthcare. Only 21% of respondents participated in good Collaborative Care, 36% attained fair Collaborative Care, and 43% experienced poor Collaborative Care. Regardless of overall care quality or the respondents' personal characteristics, burden of illness, or health behaviors, good Collaborative Care was associated with better control of blood pressure, blood glucose level, serum cholesterol level, and treatment effectiveness for pain and emotional problems. Some preventive actions were better, and some adverse economic impacts of illness were mitigated. PMID:16788352

  6. Collaborative care for anxiety disorders in primary care: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Muntingh, A.D.T.; Feltz-Cornelis, C.M. van der; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Spinhoven, P.; van Balkom, A J L M

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies evaluating collaborative care for anxiety disorders are recently emerging. A systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the effect of collaborative care for adult patients with anxiety disorders in primary care is therefore warranted. Methods A literature search was performed. Data sources: PubMed, Psycinfo, Embase, Cinahl, and the Cochrane library. Study eligibility criteria: Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of collaborative care for adult primary ca...

  7. Modes of collaborative reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Degeling, Martin; Prilla, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe different modes of collaborative reflection as processes of learning at the workplace. We explain why reflection is a decisive means of learning and - based on the modes we describe - how groups of people can be supported in reflection together. For this, we describe how scheduled, concurrent and spontaneous collaborative reflection can be supported by articulation, guidance and synergizing.

  8. Enhancing performance through collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation examines how co-operation and collaboration are keys to high performing organizations and attempts to provoke some thinking about how one can improve the game to meet the challenges of today. The presentation discusses the origins of the belief system and gives examples of the benefits of collaborative approaches.

  9. Writing as collaborative inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Christina Hee; Novak, Martin

    2015-01-01

    in the not-yet-known. Over the years, we have shared and analyzed personal stories about our collaborative experiences in an on-going reflective learning process. We draw on writing methodologies, including memory-work (Haug, Davies) and collaborative writing such as by Wyatt, Gale, Gannon & Davies. Our...

  10. Negotiating Collaboration across Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Binaya; Rhee, Jeong-eun

    2008-01-01

    Through auto-ethnographic approach, this article extends contemporary debates on the need to further conceptualize and practice collaborative approaches to research. By exploring the complex dimensions of collaboration, this discussion traces the challenges of researching communities one affiliates with, particularly in relation to ethnic,…

  11. Solo Librarians Working Collaboratively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Robbie

    2011-01-01

    The Elko County School District in Nevada has elementary school librarians that are "solo" librarians. Over the last several years they have worked to collaborate on meeting monthly--even though the district covers 17,100 square miles--and on providing professional development face to face and online. Sharing and collaboration help them to problem…

  12. Enabling distributed collaborative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maglaughlin, K.;

    2000-01-01

    To enable collaboration over distance, a collaborative environment that uses a specialized scientific instrument called a nanoManipulator is evaluated. The nanoManipulator incorporates visualization and force feedback technology to allow scientists to see, feel, and modify biological samples bein...

  13. Collaborative augmented reality environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büscher, Monika; Christensen, Michael; Grønbæk, Kaj;

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes Manufaktur, a prototype of a concept and infrastructure that goes beyond the classical CVE systems toward a collaborative augmented reality environment, where users? documents and objects appear as live representations in a 3D workspace. Manufaktur supports collaborative...

  14. Collaboration in teacher teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, P.

    2011-01-01

    In order to deal with innovations and the associated complexity of work, ongoing collaboration between teachers has become more important in secondary education. Teacher collaboration is one of the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of innovations in secondary schools. However,

  15. Hvad måler Campbell Collaboration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Inge; Hansen, Helle Rabøl; Søndergaard, Dorte Marie

    Campbell Collaboration har gennemført et omfattende arbejde med at indsamle data til en forskningsoversigt over antimobbeprogrammer. Der er meget information at hente i de 44 programmer, som rapporten inkluderer, og hvis hovedelementer er beskrevet i rapportens indledning. Campbells analyser har ...

  16. OGC Collaborative Platform undercover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, G.; Arctur, D. K.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    The mission of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is to serve as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC coordinates with over 400 institutions in the development of geospatial standards. OGC has a dedicated staff supported by a Collaborative Web Platform to enable sophisticated and successful coordination among its members. Since its origins in the early 1990s, the OGC Collaborative Web Platform has evolved organically to be the collaboration hub for standards development in the exchange of geospatial and related types of information, among a global network of thousands of technical, scientific and management professionals spanning numerous disparate application domains. This presentation describes the structure of this collaboration hub, the relationships enabled (both among and beyond OGC members), and how this network fits in a broader ecosystem of technology development and information standards organizations.

  17. Nurse-patient collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Groefte, Thorbjoern;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This paper provides a theoretical account of nurses’ collaboration with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during non-invasive ventilation treatment in hospital. Background: Despite strong evidence for the effect of non-invasive ventilation treatment, success remains...... a huge challenge. Nurse-patient collaboration may be vital for treatment tolerance and success. A better understanding of how nurses and patients collaborate during non-invasive ventilation may therefore contribute to improvement in treatment success. Design: A constant comparative classical grounded...... at three intensive care units and one general respiratory ward in Denmark. Results: Succeeding emerged as the nurses’ main concern in the nurse-patient collaboration during non-invasive ventilation treatment. Four collaborative typologies emerged as processing their main concern: (1) twofold oriented...

  18. Nurse–patient collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Grøfte, Thorbjørn;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This paper provides a theoretical account of nurses’ collaboration with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during non-invasive ventilation treatment in hospital. Background: Despite strong evidence for the effect of non-invasive ventilation treatment, success remains...... a huge challenge. Nurse-patient collaboration may be vital for treatment tolerance and success. A better understanding of how nurses and patients collaborate during non-invasive ventilation may therefore contribute to improvement in treatment success. Design: A constant comparative classical grounded...... at three intensive care units and one general respiratory ward in Denmark. Results: Succeeding emerged as the nurses’ main concern in the nurse-patient collaboration during non-invasive ventilation treatment. Four collaborative typologies emerged as processing their main concern: (1) twofold oriented...

  19. Electronic Collaboration Logbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysin, Suzanne; Mandrichenko, Igor; Podstavkov, Vladimir; Vittone, Margherita

    2012-12-01

    In HEP, scientific research is performed by large collaborations of organizations and individuals. The logbook of a scientific collaboration is an important part of the collaboration record. Often it contains experimental data. At Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), we developed an Electronic Collaboration Logbook (ECL) application, which is used by about 20 different collaborations, experiments and groups at FNAL. The ECL is the latest iteration of the project formerly known as the Control Room Logbook (CRL). We have been working on mobile (IOS and Android) clients for the ECL. We will present the history, current status and future plans of the project, as well as design, implementation and support solutions made by the project.

  20. EVALUATING DISTRIBUTED COLLABORATIVE SYSTEMS FROM A KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Marilena DUMITRACHE; Cristian CIUREA

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of distributed and collaborative systems from the knowledge point of view, the most important asset of these kinds of systems. The paper analyses the quality characteristics of distributed collaborative systems and proposes a metric to evaluate the aspects of knowledge management process.

  1. Collaborative Practice: A Model of Successful Working in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, C. R.; Dunning, G.; Connolly, M.; Elliott, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop the notion of collaborative practice from theoretical and empirical bases. Design/methodology/approach: The research analysed the concepts of collaboration, reflective practice and the primary task. It also examined the ways of working of 18 primary schools in Wales where the level of student…

  2. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  3. How Barriers to Collaboration Prevent Progress in Demand for Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goduscheit, René Chester; Knudsen, Mette Præst

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the challenging collaboration between small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and knowledge institutions. The aim of the article is to shed light on the barriers, which hinder collaboration, and to investigate the particular role of research and technology organizations...

  4. Collaborative Environmental Institutions: All Talk and No Action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Many analysts view collaborative institutions that attempt to forge consensus and build cooperation among conflicting stakeholders as a potential remedy to the pathologies of conventional environmental policy. However, few analyses have demonstrated that collaborative institutions actually increase levels of cooperation, and critics accuse…

  5. Theoretical foundations for collaboration engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    Collaboration is often presented as the solution to numerous problems in business and society. However, collaboration is challenging, and collaboration support is not an off-the-shelf-product. This research offers theoretical foundations for Collaboration Engineering. Collaboration Engineering is an

  6. Collaborative Policy Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Boch Waldorff, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    of collaborative policy innovation in the area of mental health care in Denmark indicates that collaboration can contribute to qualify the politicians’ understanding of wicked policy problems, and to fostering new creative policy solutions. The study also shows, however, that the new problem understandings......Governments all over the Western world currently face wicked problems that call for policy innovation. A new strand of research in public innovation points to collaboration between public authorities and relevant and affected stakeholders as an important driver of public innovation. A case study...

  7. Collaboration in experiential therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdondini, Lucia; Elliott, Robert; Shearer, Joan

    2012-02-01

    We offer a view of the nature and role of client-therapist collaboration in experiential psychotherapy, focusing on Gestalt and emotion-focused therapy (EFT). We distinguish between the necessary condition of mutual trust (the emotional bond between client and therapist) and effective collaboration (regarding the goals and tasks of therapy). Using a case study of experiential therapy for social anxiety, we illustrate how the development of collaboration can be both complex and pivotal for therapeutic success, and how it can involve client and therapist encountering one another through taking risks by openly and nonjudgementally disclosing difficult experiences in order to enrich and advance the work. PMID:23616296

  8. Collaborative Policy Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Boch Waldorff, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Governments all over the Western world currently face wicked problems that call for policy innovation. A new strand of research in public innovation points to collaboration between public authorities and relevant and affected stakeholders as an important driver of public innovation. A case study...... of collaborative policy innovation in the area of mental health care in Denmark indicates that collaboration can contribute to qualify the politicians’ understanding of wicked policy problems, and to fostering new creative policy solutions. The study also shows, however, that the new problem understandings...

  9. Second graders’ collaborative learning around touchscreens in their classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob

    In “Second graders’ collaborative learning around touchscreens in their classroom”, Jacob Davidsen explores, analyses and discusses how eight- and nine-year-old children’s embodied collaborative interactions around touchscreens unfold in classroom settings. Having conducted micro...... and ethnographic observations, all from a year-long study of naturally occurring activities in two second grade classrooms at a public school in Denmark. The way of seeing and making visible children’s collaboration around touchscreens presented in this thesis is informed by CSCL, ethnomethodology and embodied......-studies contribute findings regarding children’s embodied practices of moment-to-moment co-operation of collaborative activities around touchscreens....

  10. Prognosis of HIV-1-infected patients up to 5 years after initiation of HAART: collaborative analysis of prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, M; Sterne, JAC; Sabin, C;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prognosis over 5 years of HIV-1-infected, treatment-naive patients starting HAART, taking into account the immunological and virological response to therapy. DESIGN: A collaborative analysis of data from 12 cohorts in Europe and North America on 20,379 adults who started...... HAART between 1995 and 2003. METHODS: Parametric survival models were used to predict the cumulative incidence at 5 years of a new AIDS-defining event or death, and death alone, first from the start of HAART and second from 6 months after the start of HAART. Data were analysed by intention......: On the basis of data collected routinely in HIV care, prognostic models with high discriminatory power over 5 years were developed for patients starting HAART in industrialized countries. A risk calculator that produces estimates for progression rates at years 1 to 5 after starting HAART is available from www.art-cohort-collaboration.org....

  11. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States. Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated. Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  12. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States.Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated.Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  13. Configurable Project Collaboration Portal

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SplashNote Systems is proposing to develop a more effective and innovative approach to project collaboration in distributed teams. The proposed system uniquely...

  14. Indico: CERN Collaboration Hub

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Indico development is also moving towards a broader collaboration where other institutes, hosting their own Indico instance, can contribute to the project in order make it a better and more complete tool.

  15. CMS Collaboration Board Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The first CMS Collaboration Board meeting of the year (2013) provided an opportunity to thank Teresa Rodrigo, Matthias Kasemann and Randy Ruchti, the 2011-12 CB Chair, Deputy Chair and Secretary, respectively.

  16. Framing the Collaborative Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Gruszka, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of multiple crises and change, a range of practices discussed under the umbrella term of collaborative (or sharing) economy have been gaining considerable attention. Supporters build an idealistic vision of collaborative societies. Critics have been stripping the concept of its visionary potential, questioning its revolutionary nature. In the study, these debates are brought down to the local level in search for common perceptions among the co-creators of the concept in Vie...

  17. Supply Chain Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Meca, Ana; Timmer, Judith

    2008-01-01

    In this chaper, we have reviewed and surveyed the literature on supply chain collaboration. As mentioned above, the game theory models that include cooperative behaviour among retailers seem to be a natural framework to model cooperation (collaboration) in supply chains that consist of a supplier and a finite number of retailers. Various researchers in this area have already adopted several cooperative models dealing with supply chain coordination, and it is expected to see many more in the n...

  18. Joint collaborative technology experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Michael; Ciccimaro, Donny; Yee, See; Denewiler, Thomas; Stroumtsos, Nicholas; Messamore, John; Brown, Rodney; Skibba, Brian; Clapp, Daniel; Wit, Jeff; Shirts, Randy J.; Dion, Gary N.; Anselmo, Gary S.

    2009-05-01

    Use of unmanned systems is rapidly growing within the military and civilian sectors in a variety of roles including reconnaissance, surveillance, explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), and force-protection and perimeter security. As utilization of these systems grows at an ever increasing rate, the need for unmanned systems teaming and inter-system collaboration becomes apparent. Collaboration provides a means of enhancing individual system capabilities through relevant data exchange that contributes to cooperative behaviors between systems and enables new capabilities not possible if the systems operate independently. A collaborative networked approach to development holds the promise of adding mission capability while simultaneously reducing the workload of system operators. The Joint Collaborative Technology Experiment (JCTE) joins individual technology development efforts within the Air Force, Navy, and Army to demonstrate the potential benefits of interoperable multiple system collaboration in a force-protection application. JCTE participants are the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Airbase Technologies Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/RXQF); the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center Software Engineering Directorate (AMRDEC SED); and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - Pacific (SSC Pacific) Unmanned Systems Branch operating with funding provided by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE). This paper will describe the efforts to date in system development by the three partner organizations, development of collaborative behaviors and experimentation in the force-protection application, results and lessons learned at a technical demonstration, simulation results, and a path forward for future work.

  19. Reputational Information and Strategic Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Bendix, Henrik B.

    1998-01-01

    What types of information do decision-makers use when deciding on collaboration? What are the role of reputational information in relation to decisions on collaboration......What types of information do decision-makers use when deciding on collaboration? What are the role of reputational information in relation to decisions on collaboration...

  20. Cochlear Implant in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Samadi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is the result of a great combination and collaboration of engineering and medicine. It is mainly because it has the most conflict with the human nervous system among all prosthesis. Cochlear implant helps a child with profound hearing loss to understand and articulate speech and let an adult person with hearing loss communicate with people by phone. Although these wonderful results could not be seen in all patients, will let us know about the great scientific findings.

  1. Trust in interprofessional collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Paul A. M.; Austin, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trust is integral to effective interprofessional collaboration. There has been scant literature characterizing how trust between practitioners is formed, maintained or lost. The objective of this study was to characterize the cognitive model of trust that exists between pharmacists and family physicians working in collaborative primary care settings. Methods: Pharmacists and family physicians who work collaboratively in primary care were participants in this study. Family health teams were excluded from this study because of the distinct nature of these settings. Through a snowball convenience sampling method, a total of 11 pharmacists and 8 family physicians were recruited. A semistructured interview guide was used to guide discussion around trust, relationships and collaboration. Constant-comparative coding was used to identify themes emerging from these data. Results: Pharmacists and family physicians demonstrate different cognitive models of trust in primary care collaboration. For pharmacists, trust appears to be conferred on physicians based on title, degree, status and positional authority. For family physicians, trust appears to be earned based on competency and performance. These differences may lead to interprofessional tension when expectations of reciprocal trust are not met. Conclusions: Further work in characterizing how trust is developed in interprofessional relationships is needed to support effective team formation and functioning.

  2. Distance collaborations with industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, A.; Swyler, K.

    1998-06-01

    The college industry relationship has been identified as a key policy issue in Engineering Education. Collaborations between academic institutions and the industrial sector have a long history and a bright future. For Engineering and Engineering Technology programs in particular, industry has played a crucial role in many areas including advisement, financial support, and practical training of both faculty and students. Among the most important and intimate interactions are collaborative projects and formal cooperative education arrangements. Most recently, such collaborations have taken on a new dimension, as advances in technology have made possible meaningful technical collaboration at a distance. There are several obvious technology areas that have contributed significantly to this trend. Foremost is the ubiquitous presence of the Internet. Perhaps almost as important are advances in computer based imaging. Because visual images offer a compelling user experience, it affords greater knowledge transfer efficiency than other modes of delivery. Furthermore, the quality of the image appears to have a strongly correlated effect on insight. A good visualization facility offers both a means for communication and a shared information space for the subjects, which are among the essential features of both peer collaboration and distance learning.

  3. COLLABORATION BOARD (CB55)

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Cousins

    Open Access Publication Policy ATLAS had recently issued a short statement in support of open access publishing. The mood of the discussions in the December CMS Collaboration Board had appeared to be in favour and so it was being proposed that CMS issue the same statement as that made by ATLAS (the statement is attached to the agenda of this meeting). The Collaboration Board agreed. Election of the Chair of the Collaboration Board Following the agreement to shorten the terms of both the Spokesperson and the Collaboration Board Chair, and to introduce a longer overlap period between the election and the start of the term, the election for the next Collaboration Board Chair was due in December 2007. If the old standard schedule specified in the Constitution were adapted to this date, then the Board should be informed at the present meeting that the election was being prepared. However, it was felt that the experience of the previous year's election of the Spokesperson had shown that it would be desirable to...

  4. Collaborative research, knowledge and emergence

    OpenAIRE

    Zittoun, Tania; Baucal, Aleksandar; Cornish, Flora; Gillespie, Alex

    2009-01-01

    We use the notion of emergence to consider the sorts of knowledge that can be produced in a collaborative research project. The notion invites us to see collaborative work as a developmental dynamic system in which various changes constantly occur. Among these we examine two sorts of knowledge that can be produced: scientific knowledge, and collaborative knowledge. We argue that collaborative knowledge can enable researchers to reflectively monitor their collaborative project, so as to encour...

  5. Role of Scientific Societies in International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2007-12-01

    Geophysical research increasingly requires global multidisciplinary approaches. Understanding how deeply interrelated are Earth components and processes, population growth, increased needs of mineral and energy resources, global impact of human activities, and view of our planet as an interconnected system emphasizes the need of international cooperation. International research collaboration has an immense potential and is needed for further development of Earth science research and education. The Union Session is planned to provide a forum for analysis and discussion of the status of research and education of geosciences in developing countries, international collaboration programs and new initiatives for promoting and strengthening scientific cooperation. A theme of particular relevance in the analyses and discussions is the role of scientific societies in international collaboration. Societies organize meetings, publish journals and books and promote cooperation through academic exchange activities. They may further assist communities in developing countries in providing and facilitating access to scientific literature, attendance to international meetings, short and long-term stays and student and young researcher mobility. What else can be done? This is a complex subject and scientific societies may not be seen independently from the many factors involved in research and education. Developing countries present additional challenges resulting from limited economic resources and social and political problems, while urgently requiring improved educational and research programs. Needed are in-depth analyses of infrastructure and human resources, and identification of major problems and needs. What are the major limitations and needs in research and postgraduate education in developing countries? What and how should international collaboration do? What are the roles of individuals, academic institutions, funding agencies, scientific societies? Here we attempt to

  6. The collaboration imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidumolu, Ram; Ellison, Jib; Whalen, John; Billman, Erin

    2014-04-01

    Addressing global sustainability challenges--including climate change, resource depletion, and ecosystem loss--is beyond the individual capabilities of even the largest companies. To tackle these threats, and unleash new value, companies and other stakeholders must collaborate in new ways that treat fragile and complex ecosystems as a whole. In this article, the authors draw on cases including the Latin American Water Funds Partnership, the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (led by Nike, Patagonia, and Walmart), and Action to Accelerate Recycling (a partnership between Alcoa, consumer packaged goods companies, and local governments, among others) to describe four new collaboration models that create shared value and address environmental protection across the value stream. Optimal collaborations focus on improving either business processes or outcomes. They start with a small group of key organizations, bring in project management expertise, link self-interest to shared interest, encourage productive competition, create quick wins, and, above all, build and maintain trust.

  7. The collaboration imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidumolu, Ram; Ellison, Jib; Whalen, John; Billman, Erin

    2014-04-01

    Addressing global sustainability challenges--including climate change, resource depletion, and ecosystem loss--is beyond the individual capabilities of even the largest companies. To tackle these threats, and unleash new value, companies and other stakeholders must collaborate in new ways that treat fragile and complex ecosystems as a whole. In this article, the authors draw on cases including the Latin American Water Funds Partnership, the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (led by Nike, Patagonia, and Walmart), and Action to Accelerate Recycling (a partnership between Alcoa, consumer packaged goods companies, and local governments, among others) to describe four new collaboration models that create shared value and address environmental protection across the value stream. Optimal collaborations focus on improving either business processes or outcomes. They start with a small group of key organizations, bring in project management expertise, link self-interest to shared interest, encourage productive competition, create quick wins, and, above all, build and maintain trust. PMID:24830283

  8. Designing collaborative policy innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Sørensen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Recent approaches to enhancing public innovation suffer from two shortcomings: They overemphasize competition as a driver of innovation and overlook the fact that public sector innovation involves policy innovation as well as service innovation. Drawing on governance research and innovation theor...... policy arenas do contribute to policy innovation but also that the degree to which they do so depends on the institutional design of these arenas.......Recent approaches to enhancing public innovation suffer from two shortcomings: They overemphasize competition as a driver of innovation and overlook the fact that public sector innovation involves policy innovation as well as service innovation. Drawing on governance research and innovation theory......, the chapter investigates the extent to which and how collaboration between politicians and relevant stakeholders can spur the formulation, implementation and diffusion of new innovative policies. A case study of a process of collaborative policy innovation in a Danish municipality shows that collaborative...

  9. Indico: A Collaboration Hub

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P; Bossy, C; Gonzalez, J B; Pugh, M; Resco, A; Trzaskoma, J; Wachter, C

    2012-01-01

    Since 2009, the development of Indico has focused on usability, performance and new features, especially the ones related to meeting collaboration. Usability studies have resulted in the biggest change Indico has experienced up to now, a new web layout that makes user experience better. Performance improvements were also a key goal since 2010; the main features of Indico have been optimized remarkably. Along with usability and performance, new features have been added to Indico such as webchat integration, video services bookings, webcast and recording requests, designed to really reinforce Indico position as the main hub for all CERN collaboration services, and many others which aim is to complete the conference lifecycle management. Indico development is also moving towards a broader collaboration where other institutes, hosting their own Indico instance, can contribute to the project in order make it a better and more complete tool.

  10. Communication and collaboration technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of columns exploring health information technology (HIT) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first column provided background information on the implementation of information technology throughout the health care delivery system, as well as the requisite informatics competencies needed for nurses to fully engage in the digital era of health care. The second column focused on information and resources to master basic computer competencies described by the TIGER initiative (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) as learning about computers, computer networks, and the transfer of data.1 This column will provide additional information related to basic computer competencies, focusing on communication and collaboration technologies. Computers and the Internet have transformed the way we communicate and collaborate. Electronic communication is the ability to exchange information through the use of computer equipment and software.2 Broadly defined, any technology that facilitates linking one or more individuals together is a collaborative tool. Collaboration using technology encompasses an extensive range of applications that enable groups of individuals to work together including e-mail, instant messaging (IM ), and several web applications collectively referred to as Web 2.0 technologies. The term Web 2.0 refers to web applications where users interact and collaborate with each other in a collective exchange of ideas generating content in a virtual community. Examples of Web 2.0 technologies include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, and mashups. Many organizations are developing collaborative strategies and tools for employees to connect and interact using web-based social media technologies.3. PMID:22397797

  11. Communication and collaboration technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of columns exploring health information technology (HIT) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first column provided background information on the implementation of information technology throughout the health care delivery system, as well as the requisite informatics competencies needed for nurses to fully engage in the digital era of health care. The second column focused on information and resources to master basic computer competencies described by the TIGER initiative (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) as learning about computers, computer networks, and the transfer of data.1 This column will provide additional information related to basic computer competencies, focusing on communication and collaboration technologies. Computers and the Internet have transformed the way we communicate and collaborate. Electronic communication is the ability to exchange information through the use of computer equipment and software.2 Broadly defined, any technology that facilitates linking one or more individuals together is a collaborative tool. Collaboration using technology encompasses an extensive range of applications that enable groups of individuals to work together including e-mail, instant messaging (IM ), and several web applications collectively referred to as Web 2.0 technologies. The term Web 2.0 refers to web applications where users interact and collaborate with each other in a collective exchange of ideas generating content in a virtual community. Examples of Web 2.0 technologies include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, and mashups. Many organizations are developing collaborative strategies and tools for employees to connect and interact using web-based social media technologies.3.

  12. Playful Collaboration (or Not)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Sproedt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    also be conducive to deep learning. As such, a game can engage different dimensions of learning and embed elements of active, collaborative, cooperative and problem-based learning. Building on this logic, we present an exploratory case study of the use of a particular board game in a class of a course......This paper explores how games and play, which are deeply rooted in human beings as a way to learn and interact, can be used to teach certain concepts and practices related to open collaborative innovation. We discuss how playing games can be a source of creativity, imagination and fun, while it can...

  13. Playful Collaboration (Or Not)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Sproedt, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how playing games can be used to teach intangible social interaction across boundaries, in particular within open collaborative innovation. We present an exploratory case study of how students learned from playing a board game in a graduate course of the international...... and interdisciplinary Innovation and Business master's program in Denmark. We identify several important themes related to the process of learning through playing and the social dynamics of open collaborative innovation, while we also highlight possible caveats of “playing” and practicing open innovation. Our findings...

  14. Collaborative Knowledge Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on the conditions for working with collaborative research in current academic settings. On the basis of reflections on goals, challenges and results of earlier projects, the author looks into how economic and political shifts and transformations in work have...... activities and other working practices and the identities of academics and other professionals who are inscribed as subjects in these regimes. The conclusion is, that we have to look for cracks in the wall and insist on collaborative research because it is it the process of “being in relation that forms the...

  15. Linear and non-linear analyses of Conner’s Continuous Performance Test-II discriminate adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder from patients with mood and anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Mjeldheim, Kristin; Førland, Wenche; Hansen, Anita Lill; Syrstad, Vigdis Elin Giæver; Ødegaard, Ketil Joachim; Berle, Jan Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a heterogeneous disorder. Therefore it is important to look for factors that can contribute to better diagnosis and classification of these patients. The aims of the study were to characterize adult psychiatric out-patients with a mixture of mood, anxiety and attentional problems using an objective neuropsychological test of attention combined with an assessment of mood instability. Method: Newly referred patients (n = 9...

  16. Collaborative semantic editing of linked data lexica.

    OpenAIRE

    Montiel-Ponsoda, Elena; McCrae, J.; Cimiano, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    The creation of language resources is a time-consuming process requiring the efforts of many people. The use of resources collaboratively created by non-linguists can potentially ameliorate this situation. However, such resources often contain more errors compared to resources created by experts. For the particular case of lexica, we analyse the case of Wiktionary, a resource created along wiki principles and argue that through the use of a principled lexicon model, namely lemon, the resultin...

  17. Towards the collaborative hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Hasle, Peter; Edwards, Kasper;

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals are increasingly faced with conflicting demands as they have to respond to increasing patient demands as well as financial, clinical and quality challenges. To handle these demands the hospital need to reconfigure its organization, and we propose to build on a concept for the collaborat......Hospitals are increasingly faced with conflicting demands as they have to respond to increasing patient demands as well as financial, clinical and quality challenges. To handle these demands the hospital need to reconfigure its organization, and we propose to build on a concept...... for the collaborative hospital as new organizational form which is better equipped to respond to the challenges facing modern hospitals. The collaborative hospital is an ambidextrous organization that opens for pursuing both exploration and exploitation within the same organizational structure. The basic principles...... of the collaborative hospital concern the creation of an appropriate balance between standardization and local autonomy, shared purpose centred around providing the best possible care, and use of enabling structures that sustain the new ways of collaborative work. The chapter builds on the theoretical framework...

  18. Partnerships - Communications / Collaborations

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Joyce Brown: Life Planning - It Begins with Communication. Steven W. Burr: Extension Efforts in Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Development in the New West. Daniel F. Perkins: Collaboration and Other Levels of Working Together. Gregory P. Siek: Using “Exchange Theory” to Overcome Turf Issues. Leslee D. Spivey: Team Buddies.

  19. Intercultural Collaboration Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertsen, Martine Cardel; Søderberg, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    to elucidate intercultural collaboration processes by analyzing how each member of a dyad of interacting managers narrates the same chain of events. We show how the narratological concepts of peripeteia and anagnorisis are well suited to identifying focal points in their stories: situations where change...

  20. Collaborative Movie Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zad, Damon Daylamani; Agius, Harry

    In this paper, we focus on metadata for self-created movies like those found on YouTube and Google Video, the duration of which are increasing in line with falling upload restrictions. While simple tags may have been sufficient for most purposes for traditionally very short video footage that contains a relatively small amount of semantic content, this is not the case for movies of longer duration which embody more intricate semantics. Creating metadata is a time-consuming process that takes a great deal of individual effort; however, this effort can be greatly reduced by harnessing the power of Web 2.0 communities to create, update and maintain it. Consequently, we consider the annotation of movies within Web 2.0 environments, such that users create and share that metadata collaboratively and propose an architecture for collaborative movie annotation. This architecture arises from the results of an empirical experiment where metadata creation tools, YouTube and an MPEG-7 modelling tool, were used by users to create movie metadata. The next section discusses related work in the areas of collaborative retrieval and tagging. Then, we describe the experiments that were undertaken on a sample of 50 users. Next, the results are presented which provide some insight into how users interact with existing tools and systems for annotating movies. Based on these results, the paper then develops an architecture for collaborative movie annotation.

  1. Driving collaborative improvement processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, R.; Gieskes, J.; Fisscher, O.

    2005-01-01

    Continuous improvement is a consolidated concept in theory and practice, mainly in the context of stand-alone companies. However, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of organizational settings based on loose company boundaries and collabor

  2. Driving collaborative improvement processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, Rick; Gieskes, José; Fisscher, Olaf

    2002-01-01

    Continuous Improvement is a consolidated concept in theory and practice, mainly in the context of stand-alone companies. However, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of organisational settings based on loose company boundaries and collabor

  3. Team Collaboration Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Schrock, Mitchell; Baldwin, John R.; Borden, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ground Resource Allocation and Planning Environment (GRAPE 1.0) is a Web-based, collaborative team environment based on the Microsoft SharePoint platform, which provides Deep Space Network (DSN) resource planners tools and services for sharing information and performing analysis.

  4. Collaboration in Print

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    During the Second World War, Germany's National Socialist regime mobilized German universities in order to support the war efforts through academic collaboration and a number of publications that were meant to legitimize Germany's territorial ambitions. The rector of the University of Kiel, Dr Paul...

  5. The Promise of Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauml, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Whether a teacher loves it or dreads it, lesson planning is a crucial step in the teaching process. Done effectively, collaborative lesson planning--in which teachers work together to design lessons--leads to increased professional learning, higher job satisfaction for teachers, and better lesson plans. The process poses challenges for both…

  6. Collaborative Communities of Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøllingtoft, Anne; Müller, Sabine; Ulhøi, John Parm;

    2011-01-01

    Both small and medium-size entrepreneurial firms face liabilities such as resource scarcity and scale diseconomies, making it difficult for them to innovate on a continuous basis. In response, experimentation with new ways of organizing for innovation has increased. One successful result is an or...... of collaborative communities of firms from different sectors: the U.S.-based Blade.org and two Denmark-based communities, the Kalundborg Industrial Symbiosis and MG50. Implications for the theory and practice of organization design are discussed....... is an organizational model called the collaborative community of firms. This chapter addresses an important organizational role in a collaborative community, that of the shared services provider. The shared services provider acts as a facilitator in the community, helping member firms collaborate with one another...... and developing strategic initiatives that aid the community as a whole. We discuss the facilitator role of the shared services provider, contrasting it with the coordinator role found in other multi-firm organizations, and we show how shared services providers function by describing three examples...

  7. Negotiating Collaborative Governance Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plotnikof, Mie

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the design and implementation issues of collaborative governance, a public-management practice aimed at involving stakeholders in problem solving and public innovation. Although aspects of for example stakeholder inclusion and power are conceptualized in the literature, the...

  8. Collaboration Between Multistakeholder Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Maclean, Camilla

    responsibility is unlikely to support a great variety of partly competing and overlapping standards. Increased collaboration between these standards would enhance both their impact and their adoption by firms. This report examines the nature, benefits, and shortcomings of existing multistakeholder standards...

  9. Learning Music from Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    2008-01-01

    I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how…

  10. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M.; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they int

  11. Using Collaborative Strategic Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Janette K.; Vaughn, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    Describes collaborative strategic reading (CSR), a technique for teaching students, such as those with learning disabilities, reading comprehension and vocabulary skills in a cooperative setting. Covers teaching the four strategies of CSR (preview, click and clunk, get the gist, and wrap up), as well as teaching students cooperative learning group…

  12. Sensemaking in collaborative networks:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul; Brix, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to advance research on open business models as activity systems (Zott and Amit, 2010) in collaborative networks. We utilize Bradley’s (1995) theory of exchange behavior to discuss how new joint activities can be explored as well as how existing activities can be redesi......The purpose of the study is to advance research on open business models as activity systems (Zott and Amit, 2010) in collaborative networks. We utilize Bradley’s (1995) theory of exchange behavior to discuss how new joint activities can be explored as well as how existing activities can...... be redesigned to strengthen the collaboration between companies. To enable this discussion we delve into the sensemaking literature and theory from loosely coupled systems. Our discussion leads to the development of the Balanced Activity System (BAS) model. The paper’s key contribution is the prescriptive BAS...... model that can be used strategically in collaborative networks to redesign or create new joint activities....

  13. The Role of Context in a Collaborative Problem-Solving Task during Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritella, Giuseppe; Ligorio, Maria Beatrice; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses how a group of teachers managed the resources available while performing computer-supported collaborative problem-solving tasks in the context of professional development. The authors video-recorded and analysed collaborative sessions during which the group of teachers used a digital environment to prepare a pedagogical…

  14. Adult Strabismus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Adult Strabismus En Español Read in Chinese Can anything be done for adults with strabismus (misaligned eyes)? Yes. Adults can benefit ...

  15. Factors influencing e-collaboration for knowledge development and innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tendani J. Lavhengwa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge development and innovation are at the heart of the progress of academic and research institutions (ARIs through individual and coordinated research projects. Collaboration initiatives remain a challenge for many researchers for a myriad of reasons which are further intensified by the many technology options that are available both freely and at varying prices. Although multiple theories were considered, the focus on electronic communication supported by the interest in how innovation is diffused and the richness of media motivated the focus on diffusion of innovations (DOI and media richness theory (MRT.Objectives: The objective was to develop a multi-dimensional matrix of e-collaboration factors for research institutions. This study investigated collaboration by ARIs while focusing on the supporting and enabling technologies.Method: The grounded theory method (GTM was adopted. E-collaboration literature was reviewed followed by data collection using observations, interviews and a blog. DOI and MRT were considered as theories that assist in the implementation of collaboration. A blog was developed as an e-collaboration platform to examine the emergent ideas and to collect data. Data was analysed through the coding method which led to the development of the multi-dimensional e-collaboration factors matrix.Results: The findings reveal that e-collaboration has multiple factors that must be considered. Collaboration by participants was improved through knowledge development and innovation.Conclusion: The multi-dimensional matrix of e-collaboration factors presented collaborators with a checklist that will enhance and improve their work. ARIs continue to collaborate at multiple levels depending on their needs and objectives.

  16. Exploring How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Synchronous Collaborative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hui-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative writing (CW) research has gained prevalence in recent years. However, the ways in which students interact socially to produce written texts through synchronous collaborative writing (SCW) is rarely studied. This study aims to investigate the effects of SCW on students' writing products and how collaborative dialogues facilitate…

  17. Mortality, AIDS-morbidity and loss to follow-up by current CD4 cell count among HIV-1 infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Africa and Asia: data from the ANRS 12222 collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabillard, Delphine; Lewden, Charlotte; Ndoye, Ibra; Moh, Raoul; Ségéral, Olivier; Tonwe-Gold, Besigin; Etard, Jean-François; Pagnaroat, Men; Fournier-Nicolle, Isabelle; Eholié, Serge; Konate, Issouf; Minga, Albert; Mpoudi-Ngolé, Eitel; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Anglaret, Xavier; Laurent, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background In resource-limited countries, estimating CD4-specific incidence rates of mortality and morbidity among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) may help assess the effectiveness of care and treatment programmes, identify program weaknesses and inform decisions. Methods We pooled data from 13 research cohorts in five sub-Saharan African (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire and Senegal) and two Asian (Cambodia and Laos) countries. HIV-infected adults (≥18 years) who received ART in 1998-2008 and had at least one CD4 count available were eligible. Changes in CD4 counts over time were estimated by a linear mixed regression. CD4-specific incidence rates were estimated as the number of first events occurring in a given CD4 stratum divided by the time spent within the stratum. Results Overall 3,917 adults (62% women) on ART were followed-up during 10,154 person-years. In the ≤50, 51-100, 101-200, 201-350, 351-500, 501-650 and >650/mm3 CD4 cells strata, death rates were: 20.6, 11.8, 6.7, 3.3, 1.8, 0.9 and 0.3 per 100 person-years; AIDS rates were: 50.5, 32.9, 11.5, 4.8, 2.8, 2.2 and 2.2 per 100 person-years; and loss to follow-up rates were: 4.9, 6.1, 3.5, 3.1, 2.9, 1.7 and 1.2 per 100 person-years, respectively. Mortality and morbidity were higher during the first year following ART initiation. Conclusion In these resource-limited settings, death and AIDS rates remained substantial after ART initiation, even in individuals with high CD4 cell counts. Ensuring earlier ART initiation and optimizing case finding and treatment for AIDS-defining diseases should be seen as priorities. PMID:23274931

  18. The PACA Project : Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2014-04-01

    The Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy (PACA) project is the next stage of evolution of the paradigm developed for the observational campaign of C/2012 S1 or C/ISON. Four different phases of collaboration are identified, and illustrate the integration of scientific investigations with amateur astronomer community via observations, and models; and the rapid dissemination of the results via a multitude of social media for rapid global access. The success of the paradigm shift in scientific research is now implemented in other comet observing campaigns. Both communities (scientific and amateur astronomers) benefit from these collective, collaborative partnerships; while outreach is the instantaneous deliverable that provides both a framework for future data analyses and the dissemination of the results. While PACA identifies a collaborative approach to pro-am collaborations, given the volume of data generated for each campaign, new ways of rapid data analysis, mining access and storage are needed.

  19. Project-based learning in Geotechnics: cooperative versus collaborative teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Lopes, Margarida; Macedo, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Since 2007/2008 project-based learning models have been used to deliver two fundamental courses on Geotechnics in University of Aveiro, Portugal. These models have evolved and have encompassed either cooperative or collaborative teamwork. Using data collected in five editions of each course (Soil Mechanics I and Soil Mechanics II), the different characteristics of the models using cooperative or collaborative teamwork are pointed out and analysed, namely in terms of the students' perceptions. The data collected include informal feedback from students, monitoring of their marks and academic performance, and answers to two sets of questionnaires: developed for these courses, and institutional. The data indicate students have good opinion of the project-based learning model, though collaborative teamwork is the best rated. The overall efficacy of the models was analysed (sum of their effectiveness, efficiency and attractiveness). The collaborative model was found more adequate.

  20. Petroleum R and D collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conditions for collaboration in research and development (R and D) were developed based on a decision-tree analysis. A key requirement for effective R and D collaboration was stated to be the company's ability to internalize a significant portion of the benefits. This was seen as the principal factor that determined good collaborators and good industries for collaboration. It was noted that collaboration benefits can also be improved through R and D exchanges in collaborative associations. Simple decision-tree analysis tended to understate the advantages of collaboration. Portfolio risk reduction and inter-project synergies were significant additional advantages. Collaborative R and D was said to be the preferred route for the development of a broad base of petroleum-related technologies. 5 tabs., 2 figs

  1. Silence in Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verouden, Nick W.; Sanden, van der Maarten C.A.; Aarts, Noelle

    2016-01-01

    Solving publicly important issues asks for the development of socio-technical approaches, which demands collaboration between researchers with different perspectives, values, and interests. In these complex interdisciplinary collaborations, the course of communication is of utmost importance, inc

  2. Collaborations in Open Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard

    2015-01-01

    This thesis researches automated services for professionals aiming at starting collaborative learning projects in open learning environments, such as MOOCs. It investigates the theoretical backgrounds of team formation for collaborative learning. Based on the outcomes, a model is developed describin

  3. Dialogues across Disciplines: Preparing English-as-a-Second-Language Teachers for Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliCarpini, Margo

    2009-01-01

    This study examines interdisciplinary collaboration between mainstream-English and English-as-a-second-language (ESL) in-service and pre-service teachers enrolled in graduate methods courses in their respective fields. During the semester, TESOL and secondary English Education teacher candidates collaborated to develop young adult literature based…

  4. Computer-Supported Collaborative Production

    OpenAIRE

    Howarth, Jonathan; Yost, Beth; Rosson, Mary Beth; Isenhour, Philip L.; John M. Carroll

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes the concept of collaborative production as a focus of concern within the general area of collaborative work. We position the concept with respect to McGrath's framework for small group dynamics and the more familiar collaboration processes of awareness, coordination, and communication (McGrath 1991). After reviewing research issues and computer-based support for these interacting aspects of collaboration, we turn to a discussion of implications for how to design improved s...

  5. Collaboration in scientific practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann

    2014-01-01

    This monograph investigates the collaborative creation of scientific knowledge in research groups. To do so, I combine philosophical analysis with a first-hand comparative case study of two research groups in experimental science. Qualitative data are gained through observation and interviews......, and I combine empirical insights with existing approaches to knowledge creation in philosophy of science and social epistemology. On the basis of my empirically-grounded analysis I make several conceptual contributions. I study scientific collaboration as the interaction of scientists within research...... groups. Thereby, I argue that research groups and their role in scientific practice deserve more philosophical attention than they have hitherto received. In contemporary natural science, research groups are key to the formulation and corroboration of scientific knowledge claims prior...

  6. The Collaborative Heliophysics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlburt, N.; Freeland, S.; Cheung, M.; Bose, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Collaborative Heliophysics Observatory (CHO) would provide a robust framework and enabling tools to fully utilize the VOs for scientific discovery and collaboration. Scientists across the realm of heliophysics would be able to create, use and share applications -- either as services using familiar tools or through intuitive workflows -- that orchestrate access to data across all virtual observatories. These applications can be shared freely knowing that proper recognition of data and processing components are acknowledged; that erroneous use of data is flagged; and that results from the analysis runs will in themselves be shared Ð all in a transparent and automatic fashion. In addition, the CHO would incorporate cross-VO models and tools to weave the various virtual observatories into a unified system. These provide starting points for interactions across the solar/heliospheric and heliospheric/magnetospheric boundaries.

  7. Supporting computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) in conceptual design

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, P.; Aczel, J.; Scanlon, E; Cooper, M.

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of online conceptual collaborative design processes this paper investigates how student designers make use of a shared virtual synchronous environment when engaged in conceptual design. The software enables users to talk to each other and share sketches when they are remotely located. The paper describes a novel methodology for observing and analysing collaborative design processes by adapting the concepts of grounded theory. Rather than concentrating o...

  8. Collaboration in computer science: a network science approach. Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Franceschet, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Co-authorship in publications within a discipline uncovers interesting properties of the analysed field. We represent collaboration in academic papers of computer science in terms of differently grained networks, including those sub-networks that emerge from conference and journal co-authorship only. We take advantage of the network science paraphernalia to take a picture of computer science collaboration including all papers published in the field since 1936. We investigate typical bibliomet...

  9. Micro-Processes of Collaborative Innovation in Danish Welfare Settings:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda

    2015-01-01

    , performance and learning, which can produce important results. However, by analysing learning in collaborative innovation processes from a psychosocial perspective I also demonstrate how identification, ambivalence, idealisation and defence are significant features of the professionals’ learning and......This chapter explores micro processes of collaborative innovation from a learning perspective. The point of departure for the chapter is my ongoing research with welfare service professionals who display considerable ambivalence towards innovation, feeling both enthusiastic towards it and burdened...

  10. Project-based learning in Geotechnics: cooperative versus collaborative teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    M. Pinho-Lopes; Macedo, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007/2008 project-based learning models have been used to deliver two fundamental courses on Geotechnics in University of Aveiro, Portugal. These models have evolved and have encompassed either cooperative or collaborative teamwork. Using data collected in five editions of each course (Soil Mechanics I and Soil Mechanics II), the different characteristics of the models using cooperative or collaborative teamwork are pointed out and analysed, namely in terms of the students’ perceptions....

  11. Drivers of Collaborative Advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Weihe, Guri

    2006-01-01

    Drawing upon extant alliance literature, this article substantiates the argument that we need to look beyond mere structural and formative aspects of cooperation in order to fully understand the performance antecedents of public-private partnerships. Currently, scholarly work on operational processes and behavioural dimensions is practically non-existent. This article tries to remedy the current gap in the literature by reviewing research findings on interfirm collaboration (alliances). On th...

  12. Making Collaborative Innovation Accountable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    The public sector is increasingly expected to be innovative, but the prize for a more innovative public sector might be that it becomes difficult to hold public authorities to account for their actions. The article explores the tensions between innovative and accountable governance, describes...... the foundation for these tensions in different accountability models, and suggest directions to take in analyzing the accountability of collaborative innovation processes....

  13. Driving collaborative improvement processes

    OpenAIRE

    Middel, Rick; Gieskes, José; Fisscher, Olaf

    2002-01-01

    Continuous Improvement is a consolidated concept in theory and practice, mainly in the context of stand-alone companies. However, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of organisational settings based on loose company boundaries and collaborative relations among different units, such as the Extended Manufacturing Enterprises (EMEs). The concept of continuous improvement has hardly been applied in inter-organisational settings. The pur...

  14. Onlincolnshire Knowledge Base Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, Ted; Bosworth, Gary; Deville, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the Onlincolnshire Knowledge Base Collaboration project undertaken by Lincoln Business School between May 2014 and September 2015. Onlincolnshire is a Lincolnshire County Council-run project which is part-funded by the East Midlands European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) Programme 2007 to 2013. As well as improving the broadband infrastructure, Onlincolnshire delivered a range of support to Lincolnshire’s Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) through the “Business...

  15. Collaborative research with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Dorte

    2016-01-01

    The chapter addresses the methodological challenge of how to develop knowledge about the often unattended processes of persons conducting their everyday life in a complex and contradictory world. Examples from research processes that follow children’s lives and transitions across their different...... life contexts and investigate practices from different positions and perspectives are used to discuss possibilities for arranging participatory research collaboration that enables exploration and critical reflections about contradictory life conditions in and across social practices....

  16. Towards mobile collaborative exergaming

    OpenAIRE

    Gorgu, Levent; O'Hare, G. M. P. (Greg M. P.); O'Grady, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Today’s high calorie diets and low physical activity levels contributes towards childhood obesity. Exergaming, a combination of ”exercise” and ”gaming” was conceived as a means of addressing this problem. In this paper a mobile collaborative exergame, which is designed to be enjoyable and physically challenging, is presented. The long term objective is to harness conventional mobile computing technologies to deliver a platform for games that are adaptive to the exercise requirements ...

  17. Making Collaborative Innovation Accountable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    The public sector is increasingly expected to be innovative, but the prize for a more innovative public sector might be that it becomes difficult to hold public authorities to account for their actions. The article explores the tensions between innovative and accountable governance, describes the...... foundation for these tensions in different accountability models, and suggest directions to take in analyzing the accountability of collaborative innovation processes....

  18. International Scientific Collaboration of China: Collaborating Countries, Institutions and Individuals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xianwen; Wang, Zhi; Peng, Lian; Wang, Chuanli

    2014-01-01

    Using bibliometric methods, we investigate China's international scientific collaboration from 3 levels of collaborating countries, institutions and individuals. We design a database in SQL Server, and make analysis of Chinese SCI papers based on the corresponding author field. We find that China's international scientific collaboration is focused on a handful of countries. Nearly 95% international co-authored papers are collaborated with only 20 countries, among which the USA account for more than 40% of all. Results also show that Chinese lineage in the international co-authorship is obvious, which means Chinese immigrant scientists are playing an important role in China's international scientific collaboration, especially in English-speaking countries.

  19. Regulating Collaboration in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobber, Marjolein; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration in teacher education can be seen as a way to prepare student teachers for future social practices at school. When people collaborate with each other, they have to regulate their collaboration. In the Dutch teacher education programme that was investigated, student teachers were members of different types of groups, each of which had…

  20. Collaborative Learning in the Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Kathrin; Razmerita, Liana

    2015-01-01

    This present study aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and identifies associated technologies used to collaborate. In particular we aim to address the following research questions: What are the factors that impact satisfaction with collaboration? How do these factors differ in...

  1. Collaboration in a Pressure Cooker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Terry R.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the purpose and effects of collaborative writing in proposal development projects. Suggests how collaboration serves the larger social functions of the modern corporation. Discusses how the circumstances of proposal development affect collaboration. Describes storyboarding--a common and often highly effective tool for fostering…

  2. Task modeling for collaborative authoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, van der Gerrit; Kulyk, Olga; Vyas, Dhaval; Kubbe, Onno; Ebert, Achim; Dittmar, A.; Forbrig, P.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation –Task analysis for designing modern collaborative work needs a more fine grained approach. Especially in a complex task domain, like collaborative scientific authoring, when there is a single overall goal that can only be accomplished only by collaboration between multiple roles, each req

  3. Realities of Supply Chain Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampstra, R.P.; Ashayeri, J.; Gattorna, J.

    2006-01-01

    Successful supply chain collaboration (SCC) practices are rather exceptional, yet collaboration is believed to be the single most pressing need in supply chain management.In this paper we discuss the realities of SCC, present prerequisites for the collaboration process, indicate where the process st

  4. Collaborative Public Management and Collaborative Governance: Conceptual Similarities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Kapucu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable interest among Public Administration scholars in collaborative public management and governance. However, there is a need for conceptual analysis of the two terms which share common aspects and differ essentially in scope and substance. We found that collaborative public management has a more local approach and focuses on the substance of collaboration practiced to solve societal problems and reach community goals at the organizational level. On the other hand, widely researched in management, political science, and public administration disciplines, collaborative governance has a global scope and focuses on both substance and process of collaboration in effectively solving societal problems with improved structures of nonhierarchical and decentralized institutions and mechanisms of citizen participation both through partnership projects and e-governance tools. The paper contributes to the better understanding of collaborative public management and collaborative governance with implications for both future research and practice.

  5. Emergence of Multiplex Communities in Collaboration Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Battiston

    Full Text Available Community structures in collaboration networks reflect the natural tendency of individuals to organize their work in groups in order to better achieve common goals. In most of the cases, individuals exploit their connections to introduce themselves to new areas of interests, giving rise to multifaceted collaborations which span different fields. In this paper, we analyse collaborations in science and among movie actors as multiplex networks, where the layers represent respectively research topics and movie genres, and we show that communities indeed coexist and overlap at the different layers of such systems. We then propose a model to grow multiplex networks based on two mechanisms of intra and inter-layer triadic closure which mimic the real processes by which collaborations evolve. We show that our model is able to explain the multiplex community structure observed empirically, and we infer the strength of the two underlying social mechanisms from real-world systems. Being also able to correctly reproduce the values of intra-layer and inter-layer assortativity correlations, the model contributes to a better understanding of the principles driving the evolution of social networks.

  6. Services supporting collaborative alignment of engineering networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Kim; Uoti, Mikko; Karvonen, Iris

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale facilities such as power plants, process factories, ships and communication infrastructures are often engineered and delivered through geographically distributed operations. The competencies required are usually distributed across several contributing organisations. In these complicated projects, it is of key importance that all partners work coherently towards a common goal. VTT and a number of industrial organisations in the marine sector have participated in a national collaborative research programme addressing these needs. The main output of this programme was development of the Innovation and Engineering Maturity Model for Marine-Industry Networks. The recently completed European Union Framework Programme 7 project COIN developed innovative solutions and software services for enterprise collaboration and enterprise interoperability. One area of focus in that work was services for collaborative project management. This article first addresses a number of central underlying research themes and previous research results that have influenced the development work mentioned above. This article presents two approaches for the development of services that support distributed engineering work. Experience from use of the services is analysed, and potential for development is identified. This article concludes with a proposal for consolidation of the two above-mentioned methodologies. This article outlines the characteristics and requirements of future services supporting collaborative alignment of engineering networks.

  7. Emergence of Multiplex Communities in Collaboration Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Federico; Iacovacci, Jacopo; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Bianconi, Ginestra; Latora, Vito

    2016-01-01

    Community structures in collaboration networks reflect the natural tendency of individuals to organize their work in groups in order to better achieve common goals. In most of the cases, individuals exploit their connections to introduce themselves to new areas of interests, giving rise to multifaceted collaborations which span different fields. In this paper, we analyse collaborations in science and among movie actors as multiplex networks, where the layers represent respectively research topics and movie genres, and we show that communities indeed coexist and overlap at the different layers of such systems. We then propose a model to grow multiplex networks based on two mechanisms of intra and inter-layer triadic closure which mimic the real processes by which collaborations evolve. We show that our model is able to explain the multiplex community structure observed empirically, and we infer the strength of the two underlying social mechanisms from real-world systems. Being also able to correctly reproduce the values of intra-layer and inter-layer assortativity correlations, the model contributes to a better understanding of the principles driving the evolution of social networks. PMID:26815700

  8. WIKIPEDIA AND THE POLITICS OF MASS COLLABORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Tkacz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Working together to produce socio-technological objects, based on emergent platforms of economic production, is of great importance in the task of political transformation and the creation of new subjectivities. Increasingly, “collaboration” has become a veritable buzzword used to describe the human associations that create such new media objects. In the language of “Web 2.0”, “participatory culture”, “user-generated content”, “peer production” and the “produser”, first and foremost we are all collaborators. In this paper I investigate recent literature that stresses the collaborative nature of Web 2.0, and in particular, works that address the nascent processes of peer production. I contend that this material positions such projects as what Chantal Mouffe has described as the “post-political”; a fictitious space far divorced from the clamour of the everyday. I analyse one Wikipedia entry to demonstrate the distance between this post-political discourse of collaboration and the realities it describes, and finish by arguing for a more politicised notion of collaboration.

  9. Adult Education Literacy Instruction: A Review of the Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruidenier, John R.; MacArthur, Charles A.; Wrigley, Heide S.

    2010-01-01

    The Adult Literacy Research Working Group (ALRWG), a panel of experts on adult reading research and practice, was established by the National Institute for Literacy (NIFL) in collaboration with the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL). It was part of the Institute's efforts to provide educators, parents and others…

  10. Characteristics and comprehensiveness of adult HIV care and treatment programmes in Asia-Pacific, sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas: results of a site assessment conducted by the International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephany N Duda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV care and treatment programmes worldwide are transforming as they push to deliver universal access to essential prevention, care and treatment services to persons living with HIV and their communities. The characteristics and capacity of these HIV programmes affect patient outcomes and quality of care. Despite the importance of ensuring optimal outcomes, few studies have addressed the capacity of HIV programmes to deliver comprehensive care. We sought to describe such capacity in HIV programmes in seven regions worldwide. Methods: Staff from 128 sites in 41 countries participating in the International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS completed a site survey from 2009 to 2010, including sites in the Asia-Pacific region (n=20, Latin America and the Caribbean (n=7, North America (n=7, Central Africa (n=12, East Africa (n=51, Southern Africa (n=16 and West Africa (n=15. We computed a measure of the comprehensiveness of care based on seven World Health Organization-recommended essential HIV services. Results: Most sites reported serving urban (61%; region range (rr: 33–100% and both adult and paediatric populations (77%; rr: 29–96%. Only 45% of HIV clinics that reported treating children had paediatricians on staff. As for the seven essential services, survey respondents reported that CD4+ cell count testing was available to all but one site, while tuberculosis (TB screening and community outreach services were available in 80 and 72%, respectively. The remaining four essential services – nutritional support (82%, combination antiretroviral therapy adherence support (88%, prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT (94% and other prevention and clinical management services (97% – were uniformly available. Approximately half (46% of sites reported offering all seven services. Newer sites and sites in settings with low rankings on the UN Human Development Index (HDI, especially those in the President's Emergency

  11. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy

  12. Adult Education and Adult Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Knud

    Kort beskrivelse Bogen, 'Adult Education og Adult Learning', giver et fyldestgørende overblik over forståelsen af voksenuddannelse og læring. Abstract I "Adult Education and Adult Learning' ser Knud Illeris på voksenuddannelse fra to perspektiver. På den ene side beskrives de aktuelle udfordringer...

  13. Organizing for Asymmetric Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr; Sørensen, Henrik B.

    ' different motives and different situational factors appear in an interorganizational setting. We classify interfaces according to the symmetry/asymmetry in the respective parent organizations' resources, commitment, and control of representatives and indicate how  classification schemes can be used......  The vision of new organizational forms consists of less-organized networks and alliances between organizations, in which collaborative capabilities are assumed to be crucial (Miles et al., 2005). The path to such new forms may go through fragile cooperative efforts. Despite the good will of many...

  14. Blade reliability collaborative :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2013-04-01

    The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

  15. Collaborative form(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy

    the process of research rather than its object. In its temporal orientation, anthropology by means of design moves, ‘…forward with people in tandem with their desires and aspirations rather than going back over times passed’ (ibid 2013: 141). Doing design by means of anthropology takes as its most fundamental......Gunn asks us to consider beauty as collaborative forms of action generated by moving between design by means of anthropology and anthropology by means of design. Specifically, she gives focus to play-like reflexions on practices of designing energy products, systems and infrastructure. Design...

  16. Collaboratively Constructed Contradictory Accounts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tunby Gulbrandsen, Ib; Just, Sine Nørholm

    2013-01-01

    Based on a mixed-method case study of online communication about the Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk, this article argues that online communication plays out as a centrifugal narration process with centripetal consequences. Through a content analysis of communication about Novo Nordisk...... the theoretical and methodological implications of the empirical findings. It is argued that although the findings are not in themselves surprising, they adequately reflect that online meaning formation is, indeed, a collaborative process in which centrifugal forces have centripetal consequences. Furthermore...

  17. Interactive Collaborative Books

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mutawa, Abdullah M.

    2007-01-01

    Books are one of the most important tools to convey knowledge, they survived to be a convenient and portable source of information. On the other side, Electronic books (e-books) are playing a big role in attracting a huge number of readers, but still paper books are preferable by many people due to some drawbacks in e-books. Yet, Interactive books combines all positive features in ordinary books as well as e-books, the author is introducing a new Interactive Collaborative book that might chan...

  18. The Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avital, Michel; Andersson, Magnus; Nickerson, Jeffrey;

    2014-01-01

    An economy based on the exchange of capital, assets and services between individuals has grown significantly, spurred by proliferation of internet-based platforms that allow people to share underutilized resources and trade with reasonably low transaction costs. The movement toward this economy...... as evidenced by the large number of peer-to-peer based services that have captured impressive market shares sectors ranging from transportation and hospitality to banking and risk capital. The panel explores economic, social, and technological implications of the collaborative economy, how digital technologies...

  19. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  20. Advances in Collaborative Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Yehuda; Bell, Robert

    The collaborative filtering (CF) approach to recommenders has recently enjoyed much interest and progress. The fact that it played a central role within the recently completed Netflix competition has contributed to its popularity. This chapter surveys the recent progress in the field. Matrix factorization techniques, which became a first choice for implementing CF, are described together with recent innovations. We also describe several extensions that bring competitive accuracy into neighborhood methods, which used to dominate the field. The chapter demonstrates how to utilize temporal models and implicit feedback to extend models accuracy. In passing, we include detailed descriptions of some the central methods developed for tackling the challenge of the Netflix Prize competition.

  1. COLLABORATION IN SOUTH AFRICAN ENGINEERING RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sooryamoorthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The production of scientific publications in engineering in South Africa has expanded over the last three decades. Because engineering is an important science, this expansion has implications for the growth and development of the economy. Drawing on a sample range of years of the publications stored in the ISI Web of Knowledge, the engineering publications of South Africans for a 30-year period from 1975-2005 are analysed. This analysis shows that the production of scientific publications in engineering by South African researchers has increased during the analysed period; that the number of researchers per publication has grown; that the number of countries collaborating with South Africa has increased; and that the number of sole-authored papers has decreased. Domestic collaboration (between researchers within South Africa has decreased, while international collaboration has grown considerably. The key objective of the paper is to find out whether the production of publications is related to the level of collaboration, and to see how collaboration can be regressed from other known variables. It is clear from the study that collaboration is a decisive factor in the production of scientific publications in engineering in South Africa.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING Die produksie van wetenskaplike publikasies in ingenieurswese in Suid-Afrika het oor die afgelope drie dekades toegeneem. Aangesien ingenieurswese ‘n belangrike wetenskap is, beïnvloed dié toename die groei en ontwikkeling van die ekonomie. Deur na ‘n monster van voormalige publikasies op die “ISI Web of Science” te kyk, is die publikasies in ingenieurswese deur Suid-Afrikaners oor ‘n 30 jaar periode van 1975-2005 geanaliseer. Die analise toon dat die produksie van wetenskaplike publikasies in ingenieurswese deur Suid-Afrikaanse navorsers toegeneem het oor dié tydperk; dat die aantal navorsers per publikasie gegroei het; dat daar ‘n toename was in die

  2. A neighbourly collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2014-01-01

    CERN and its host territories in France have created a new partnership aimed at reinforcing and making permanent numerous projects for the people who live in the region.   Over the last four years, CERN has developed a number of initiatives with its partners in Geneva and neighbouring France. To formalise and improve the structure of this collaboration, CERN, the French government, the Conseil général de l’Ain and the Communauté de communes du Pays de Gex have recently formed a quadripartite partnership. The CERN Director-General has been appointed Chair of the committee leading the partnership for this year. “Due to its geographical location, activities and aims, CERN has always placed great emphasis on dialogue with its neighbours,” explains Friedemann Eder, Head of the Relations with the Host States Service.  “The current Director-General wanted to boost dialogue and collaboration – an aim that the auth...

  3. A collaborative adventure

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    At the start of a new year, I’d like to wish all of you and your families a happy, successful and peaceful 2014. It’s a year that holds particular significance for CERN, as on 29 September it will be 60 years since the Organization was founded.   As CERN turns 60, it is still going strong, maintaining its underlying attraction of international collaboration for basic science. Since its foundation in 1954, it has grown steadily and this year begins well as we welcome a new Member State, Israel. CERN and Israel already have a long history of mutual collaboration and now we can look forward to increasingly fruitful scientific cooperation. Israel’s accession brings the total number of Member States to 21, and other countries are in the stages leading up to becoming Members or Associates, while still others are expressing interest. CERN is becoming a global success, while retaining its original, European flavour. This year’s events for the 60th anniversary ...

  4. Collaboration in Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Pin, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The very notion of social network implies that linked individuals interact repeatedly with each other. This allows them not only to learn successful strategies and adapt to them, but also to condition their own behavior on the behavior of others, in a strategic forward looking manner. Game theory of repeated games shows that these circumstances are conducive to the emergence of collaboration in simple games of two players. We investigate the extension of this concept to the case where players are engaged in a local contribution game and show that rationality and credibility of threats identify a class of Nash equilibria -- that we call "collaborative equilibria" -- that have a precise interpretation in terms of sub-graphs of the social network. For large network games, the number of such equilibria is exponentially large in the number of players. When incentives to defect are small, equilibria are supported by local structures whereas when incentives exceed a threshold they acquire a non-local nature, which r...

  5. Building collaborative enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Paul; Heckscher, Charles; Prusak, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Can large companies be both innovative and efficient? Yes, argue Adler, of the University of Southern California; Heckscher, of Rutgers; and Prusak, an independent consultant. But they must develop new organizational capabilities that will create the atmosphere of trust that knowledge work requires--and the coordinating mechanisms to make it scalable. Specifically, such organizations must learn to: Define a shared purpose that guides what people at all levels of the organization are trying to achieve together; Cultivate an ethic of contribution in which the highest value is accorded to people who look beyond their specific roles and advance the common purpose; Develop scalable procedures for coordinating people's efforts so that process-management activities become truly interdependent; and Create an infrastructure in which individuals' spheres of influence overlap and collaboration is both valued and rewarded. These four goals may sound idealized, but the imperative to achieve them is practical, say the authors. Only the truly collaborative enterprises that can tap into everyone's ideas---in an organized way--will compete imaginatively, quickly, and cost-effectively enough to become the household names of this century. PMID:21800474

  6. Globally Collaborative Experiential Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi UTSUMI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Global University System (GUS [Utsumi, et al, 2003] is a worldwide initiative to create advanced telecommunications infrastructure for access to educational resources across national and cultural boundaries for global peace. GUS aims to create a worldwide consortium of universities to provide the underdeveloped world with access to 21st Century education via broadband Internet technologies. The aim is to achieve “education and healthcare for all,” anywhere, anytime and at any pace. The GUS works in the major regions of the globe with partnerships of higher education and healthcare institutions. Learners in these regions will be able to take their courses from member institutions around the world to receive a GUS degree. These learners and their professors from partner institutions will also form a global forum for exchange of ideas and information and for conducting collaborative research and development with emerging global GRID computer network technology. Globally Collaborative Environmental Peace Gaming (GCEPG project [Utsumi, 2003] with a globally distributed computer simulation system, focusing on the issue of environment and sustainable development in developing countries, is to train would-be decision-makers in crisis management, conflict resolution, and negotiation techniques basing on “facts and figures.” The GUS will supply game players from around the world.

  7. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  8. Collaborative Developmental Action Inquiry: An Opportunity for Transformative Learning to Occur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaides, Aliki; Dzubinski, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    Life in the 21st century is increasingly complex, paradoxical, and ambiguous, bringing into question the ways that graduate adult education programs function. In this article, we describe an action research study involving the method of collaborative developmental action inquiry conducted with key stakeholders of a program in adult education at a…

  9. "Whose Inquiry Is This Anyway?" Money, Power, Reports, and Collaborative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasl, Elizabeth; Yorks, Lyle

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative/cooperative inquiry (CI) is both a method for engaging in new paradigm human inquiry and a strategy for facilitating adult learning. Adult educators who use CI in institutional settings must be aware of potential corrupting influences. The authors alert educators to three factors interjected by institutional affiliation that…

  10. Collaboration between paediatric surgery and other medical specialties in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon E Okoro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quality of service and success of patient care and research in most fields of medicine depend on effective collaboration between different specialties. Paediatric surgery is a relatively young specialty in Nigeria and such collaborations are desirable. This survey assesses the nature and extent of collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a questionnaire survey carried out in November 2008 among paediatric surgeons and their trainees practising in Nigeria. Questionnaires were distributed and retrieved either by hand or e-mailing. The responses were then collated and analysed using the SPSS 17.0. Results: Forty-seven respondents were included in the survey. Forty-five (95.7% respondents thought that there was inadequate collaboration and that there was a need for an increased collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties. Anaesthesia, paediatrics and radiology are among the specialties where collaborations were most required but not adequately received. Collaboration had been required from these specialties in areas of patient care, training and research. Reasons for inadequate collaboration included the paucity of avenues for inter-specialty communication and exchange of ideas 33 (70.3%, lack of awareness of the need for collaboration 32 (68.1%, tendency to apportion blames for bad outcome 13 (27.7%, and mutual suspicion 8 (17%. Conclusion: There is presently inadequate collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties in Nigeria. There is a need for more inter-specialty support, communication, and exchange of ideas in order to achieve desirable outcomes.

  11. COLLABORATIVE DESIGN OF MULTIPHYSICS PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Shaoyun; LI Shiqi

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative design is recommendedto solve multiphysics problems (MPPS). Firstly,mathematical model of MPPS is constructed and solved by a proposed partitioned method, analysis of which suggests that collaborative design be feasible to solve MPPS. As the key technology of collaborative design of MPPS, a task collaboration algorithm is then proposed. To develop the application framework of collaborative design, applied unified process(AUP) is proposed based on rational unified process(RUP). Then AUP is used to develop the collaborative design platform, whose function framework is constructed according to the process of project management. Finally three MPPS are solved on this platform and the results suggest that the proposed model, algorithm and framework be feasible.

  12. Supply chain collaboration under uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Saad; Eckert, Claudia; Earl, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In fluctuating economic conditions such as global recession, supply chains operate under changing conditions of uncertainty. The impact of this uncertainty and associated risk might be mitigated by collaboration. This paper proposes a model of supply chain collaboration based on information exchange and decision coordination at both the strategic and tactical levels. However, a collaborative supply chain can be exposed to associated risks such as the failure of individual actors. Governance r...

  13. Geographical distance of innovation collaborations

    OpenAIRE

    Jeroen de Jong; Mark Freel

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the geographical distance of innovation collaborations in high tech small firms. We test if absorptive capacity is a key determinant. Drawing on survey data from a sample of 316 Dutch high-tech small firms, engaging in 1.245 collaborations, we find most partners to be ‘local’. However, controlling for a variety of potential influences, higher R&D expenditure is positively related to collaboration with more distant organisations.

  14. COLLABORATIVE CONSUMPTION THROUGH NEW TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Quinson, Enora

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present paper is to present the raise of collaborative consumption through new technologies, and find out the impact of this new economic system on the contemporary society. In a first place the theoretical part provide an overview of the collaborative consumption in general, with definitions, consideration of the levels of sharing economy, and main success of the collaborative organizations in the 21th century. Then a part highlighting the key role of new technologies and ...

  15. Collaborative Culture at Roskilde Festival

    OpenAIRE

    Kortbæk Mutuku, Allan; Køster Madsen, Thomas; Löffler, Anne-Margreth Ingeborg; Dilintas Nielsen, Michalis; Bottalico, Edoardo Dougie Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This project attempts to unveil how events such as the cultural phenomenon Roskilde Festival promotes and contributes towards collaborative culture, mainly through the discipline of History & Culture, but also through a philosophical account. The project gives an account of the term of collaborative culture using theorists such as Dave Pollard and Emile Durkheim, and how events and collaborative culture historically leads back to the Dionysian mysteries, using Bakhtin, Nietzsche a...

  16. Facilitating Collaboration through Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Messeter, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    In recent years both companies and research communities call for collaborative work practices and user-centered approaches in various design fields. There are several challenges and issues to take into consideration. For instance there is a need to find ways of collaborating across various...... in collaboration with industrial partners and potential users, and use of the games in three educational settings.The overall aim of the design games is to help facilitate a user-centered design process for cross-disciplinary design groups early in the design process. Framing collaborative design activities...

  17. International collaborations through the internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Gary M.; David, Paul A.; Eksteen, Johan;

    2007-01-01

    . The emergence of advanced cyberinfrastructure and associated tools is changing the landscape for international collaborations. However, as the papers in this session show, there is much more than good engineering involved. There is a complex interplay of social, organizational, legal, and technical issues. Just...... of these issues. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.......The past decade has seen remarkable advances in the availability of tools to support scientific collaboration at a distance. This is especially good news for international collaborations, where in the past constraints on collocation and travel have made such collaborations a major challenge...

  18. Information handling in collaborative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Collins

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available UK public policy makers have a growing interest in collaborative research, where academics work with public, private or third sector partners on a joint project which supports the partner’s aims. This paper reports on the findings of five case studies, looking at how information is sourced, managed, used and shared within collaborative research projects. It finds that researchers within collaborative projects have similar information management issues as are known to exist within academia more broadly, but that the specific conditions which govern research collaborations mean that interventions to improve or support information management must be carefully tailored.

  19. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program started in 1966 and conducted epidemiologic research to quantify the potential adverse effects of prescription drugs, utilizing in-hospital monitoring.

  20. Young Adult Smoking Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Pamela M.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Young adults have the highest smoking rate of any age group in the U.S., and new strategies to decrease young adult smoking are needed. The objective of the current study was to identify psychographic and demographic factors associated with current smoking and quitting behaviors among young adults. Methods Attitudes, social groups, and self-descriptors, including supporting action against the tobacco industry, advertising receptivity, depression, alcohol use, and other factors associated with smoking were tested for associations with smoking behaviors in a 2005 cross-sectional survey of 1528 young adults (aged 18–25 years) from a web-enabled panel. Analyses were conducted in 2007. Results Being older was associated with current smoking, whereas having some higher education and being African American or Hispanic were negatively associated with smoking. Supporting action against the tobacco industry was negatively associated with smoking (AOR=0.34 [95% CI=0.22, 0.52]). Perceived usefulness of smoking, exposure to smokers, increased perceived smoking prevalence, receptivity to tobacco advertising, binge drinking, and exposure to tobacco advertising in bars and clubs were associated with smoking. Supporting action against the tobacco industry was associated with intentions to quit smoking (AOR= 4.43 [95% CI=2.18, 8.60]). Conclusions Young adults are vulnerable to tobacco-industry advertising. Media campaigns that denormalize the tobacco industry and appeal to young adults appear to be a powerful intervention to decrease young adult smoking. PMID:19269128

  1. Collaboration or contestation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middleton, Geoff; Evans, Adam Brian; Henderson, Hannah;

    2016-01-01

    to the development, implementation and evaluation of such programmes (Middleton et al., 2014, Kleij et al., 2015). This includes leadership issues, competing agendas and priorities, the unwieldy nature of large multi-agency networks and the complexities around making a sustained impact. Those involved....... Often described as the ‘invisible work’ in health promotion, capacity building first establishes what structural limitations exist to prevent adoption of healthier lifestyles in communities, with a view to empowering community members to establish healthy behaviours. Typically, programmes attempt......-agency approach. The strength of health promotion initiatives relies on formed ‘coalitions’ or partnerships and the subsequent collaboration in the design, delivery and administration of the programme’s multiple components. Advantages of partnership are the pooling of resources, avoiding duplication...

  2. Collaboration in R & D

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Line Gry

    2008-01-01

    The increasing challenges of globalization call for a more adept utilization of existing  knowledge and resources through more efficient  and effective collaborations between universities,  research organizations and businesses.  The aim of this report is to establish the drivers  and forms of such integrated networks in the knowledge  triangle of education, research and innovation.  The empirical context of this project is the field  of climate and energy research.  ...

  3. Additive Manufacturing Cloud via Peer-robot Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When building a 3D printing cloud manufacturing platform, self-sensing and collaboration on manufacturing resources present challenging problems. This paper proposes a peer-robot collaboration framework to deal with these issues. Each robot combines heterogeneous additive manufacturing hardware and software, acting as an intelligent agent. Through collaboration with other robots, it forms a dynamic and scalable integration manufacturing system. The entire distributed system is managed by rules that employ an internal rule engine, which supports rule conversion and conflict resolution. Two additive manufacturing service scenarios are designed to analyse the efficiency and scalability of the framework. Experiments show that the presented method performs well in tasks requiring large-scale access to resources and collaboration.

  4. Adaptive Collaboration Support Systems: Designing Collaboration Support for Dynamic Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janeiro, J.; Knoll, S.W.; Lukosch, S.G.; Kolfschoten, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Today, engineering systems offer a variety of local and webbased applications to support collaboration by assisting groups in structuring activities, generating and sharing data, and improving group communication. To ensure the quality of collaboration, engineering system design needs to analyze and

  5. Communication 678 – Atelier 12 : TICE « Coopération vs collaboration dans les classes virtuelles »

    OpenAIRE

    Coutant, Christine; Caillet, Claude

    2015-01-01

    International audience The present article focuses on cooperative and collaborative team learning using virtual class room. It describes and assesses the experiment of a training in a virtual class room. This study investigates cooperative and collaborative learning. Cooperative team learning is regarded as a part of collaborative learning. This communication analyses how virtual classroom could improve cooperative and collaborative learning. L'objet de cette communication est d'observe...

  6. Exploiting Publication Contents and Collaboration Networks for Collaborator Recommendation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjie Kong

    Full Text Available Thanks to the proliferation of online social networks, it has become conventional for researchers to communicate and collaborate with each other. Meanwhile, one critical challenge arises, that is, how to find the most relevant and potential collaborators for each researcher? In this work, we propose a novel collaborator recommendation model called CCRec, which combines the information on researchers' publications and collaboration network to generate better recommendation. In order to effectively identify the most potential collaborators for researchers, we adopt a topic clustering model to identify the academic domains, as well as a random walk model to compute researchers' feature vectors. Using DBLP datasets, we conduct benchmarking experiments to examine the performance of CCRec. The experimental results show that CCRec outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall and F1 score.

  7. Sproglig Metode og Analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    le Fevre Jakobsen, Bjarne

    Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011......Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011...

  8. Collaboration, interdisciplinarity, and the epistemology of contemporary science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Hanne

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, science has grown increasingly collaborative and interdisciplinary and has come to depart in important ways from the classical analyses of the development of science that were developed by historically inclined philosophers of science half a century ago. In this paper, I shall provide a new account of the structure and development of contemporary science based on analyses of, first, cognitive resources and their relations to domains, and second of the distribution of cognitive resources among collaborators and the epistemic dependence that this distribution implies. On this background I shall describe different ideal types of research activities and analyze how they differ. Finally, analyzing values that drive science towards different kinds of research activities, I shall sketch the main mechanisms underlying the perceived tension between disciplines and interdisciplinarity and argue for a redefinition of accountability and quality control for interdisciplinary and collaborative science. PMID:27083079

  9. Collaboration, interdisciplinarity, and the epistemology of contemporary science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Hanne

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, science has grown increasingly collaborative and interdisciplinary and has come to depart in important ways from the classical analyses of the development of science that were developed by historically inclined philosophers of science half a century ago. In this paper, I shall provide a new account of the structure and development of contemporary science based on analyses of, first, cognitive resources and their relations to domains, and second of the distribution of cognitive resources among collaborators and the epistemic dependence that this distribution implies. On this background I shall describe different ideal types of research activities and analyze how they differ. Finally, analyzing values that drive science towards different kinds of research activities, I shall sketch the main mechanisms underlying the perceived tension between disciplines and interdisciplinarity and argue for a redefinition of accountability and quality control for interdisciplinary and collaborative science.

  10. THE ROLE OF SUPPLY CHAIN COLLABORATION ON SUSTAINABLE SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Ince, Huseyin; Ince, Andac Sahinbey

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable supply chain management and collaboration have taken big attention from academicians and practitioners. The extensive literature review is conducted to analyse the relationship between Sustainable Supply Chain Management and collaboration and its effects on performance of SSCM dimensions. Then, a framework is proposed to explain the relationship between sustainable supply chain management and collaboration. For further studies the proposed framework should be tested empirically.

  11. The network of collaboration among rappers and its community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Reginald D.

    2006-02-01

    The social network formed by the collaboration between rappers is studied using standard statistical techniques for analysing complex networks. In addition, the community structure of the rap music community is analysed using a new method that uses weighted edges to determine which connections are most important and revealing among all the communities. The results of this method as well as possible reasons for the structure of the rap music community are discussed.

  12. The Collaborative Coordination of Special Interest Groups on the Telemedicine University Network (RUTE) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Verde Brito, Thiago Delevidove; Baptista, Roberto Silva; de Lima Lopes, Paulo Roberto; Haddad, Ana Estela; Messina, Luiz Ary; Torres Pisa, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil the Telemedicine University Network (Rede Universitária de Telemedicina RUTE) is an initiative that among others promotes collaboration between university hospitals, universities, and health professionals through information technology infrastructure and special interest groups (SIGs) support. This paper presents results of analyses on collaboration during implementation and coordination activities of RUTE SIGs. This study is based on descriptive statistics and data visualization previously collected by RUTE national coordination relative to the status in July 2014. The analysis through collaboration graph identified the strongest collaboration RUTE units. The graph also highlights the collaborative relationship of RUTE units in form of communities, the most collaborative with each other in a communion in the same SIGs, and the less the collaborative units in the network. It should be stated that the most active units are also the oldest in the community.

  13. Accounting Experiences in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Tracie; Tiggeman, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses incorporating collaborative learning into accounting classes as a response to the Accounting Education Change Commission's call to install a more active student learner in the classroom. Collaborative learning requires the students to interact with each other and with the material within the classroom setting. It is a…

  14. Children's Views of Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnard, Sandra; Sharp, John

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative learning is a widely used and popular strategy in many primary schools. In this article, the authors review the nature and purpose of collaborative learning and present a summary of how one small group of Year 5/6 children view its effectiveness. (Contains 3 tables.)

  15. Humanitarian Research Group Interagency Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Humanitarian Research Group

    2013-01-01

    Humanitarian organizations offer stability during disaster through relief operations. Identifying attributes of disaster response through collaboration at all levels increases effectiveness of operations. Past experience reveals the critical need for collaboration and coordination not only among the non-governmental, humanitarian organizations but also among the military, and private sectors. Proximity and understanding of the neighboring countries’ political, social and geographic environmen...

  16. Illinois: Child Care Collaboration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Care Collaboration Program promotes collaboration between child care and other early care and education providers, including Early Head Start (EHS), by creating policies to ease blending of funds to extend the day or year of existing services. While no funding is provided through the initiative, participating programs may take…

  17. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  18. Geo-collaboration under stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Brake, G.M. te; Neerincx, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    “Most of the science and decision making involved in geo-information is the product of collaborative teams. Current geospatial technologies are a limiting factor because they do not provide any direct support for group efforts. In this paper we present a method to enhance geo-collaboration by commun

  19. Community Collaboration for Inquiry Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Cherry; Kearley, Donna; Byerly, Gayla; Ramin, Lilly

    2014-01-01

    Synergy may be defined as the collaboration between two or more parties to produce a combined effect greater than the sum of their separate parts. That is exactly what happened in Denton, Texas, when all types of librarians collaborated on a community reading initiative. In 2007 Denton Reads--a One Book, One Community organization--was formed with…

  20. Collaborative interactive visualization: exploratory concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Marielle; Lavigne, Valérie; Drolet, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    Dealing with an ever increasing amount of data is a challenge that military intelligence analysts or team of analysts face day to day. Increased individual and collective comprehension goes through collaboration between people. Better is the collaboration, better will be the comprehension. Nowadays, various technologies support and enhance collaboration by allowing people to connect and collaborate in settings as varied as across mobile devices, over networked computers, display walls, tabletop surfaces, to name just a few. A powerful collaboration system includes traditional and multimodal visualization features to achieve effective human communication. Interactive visualization strengthens collaboration because this approach is conducive to incrementally building a mental assessment of the data meaning. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the envisioned collaboration architecture and the interactive visualization concepts underlying the Sensemaking Support System prototype developed to support analysts in the context of the Joint Intelligence Collection and Analysis Capability project at DRDC Valcartier. It presents the current version of the architecture, discusses future capabilities to help analyst(s) in the accomplishment of their tasks and finally recommends collaboration and visualization technologies allowing to go a step further both as individual and as a team.

  1. Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students…

  2. Collaborative argumentation in academic education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, A.; Andriessen, J.; Kanselaar, G.

    2002-01-01

    The general purpose of this research is to discover principles for the design of educational tasks that provoke collaborative argumentation. The specific research question concentrates on the relationship between question asking and argumentation and is examined in three different collaborative lear

  3. Training Teachers for Virtual Collaboration: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the development of teachers' competences when trained in virtual collaboration. In order to do so, we analyse the data gathered from a group of nine in-service teachers who were trained in a forum and a wiki to become future telecollaborative teachers (TTs). During the course, participants worked in small groups and they…

  4. Elementary Students' Participation Style in Synchronous Online Communication and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, C. H.; Yang, H. Y.; Liang, T. H.; Chen, H. P.

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated how differently elementary school students participate in synchronous online collaborative learning by analysing their discussions with their partners. Two hundred and seventy-eight Taiwanese students, ranging in age from 11 to 12 years old, were involved in this study. The students were randomly arranged within-class…

  5. Collaboration, Interdisciplinarity, and the Epistemology of Contemporary Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decades, science has grown increasingly collaborative and interdisciplinary and has come to depart in important ways from the classical analyses of the development of science that were developed by historically inclined philosophers of science half a century ago. In this paper, I sh...

  6. CollaborationViz: interactive visual exploration of biomedical research collaboration networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Bian

    Full Text Available Social network analysis (SNA helps us understand patterns of interaction between social entities. A number of SNA studies have shed light on the characteristics of research collaboration networks (RCNs. Especially, in the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA community, SNA provides us a set of effective tools to quantitatively assess research collaborations and the impact of CTSA. However, descriptive network statistics are difficult for non-experts to understand. In this article, we present our experiences of building meaningful network visualizations to facilitate a series of visual analysis tasks. The basis of our design is multidimensional, visual aggregation of network dynamics. The resulting visualizations can help uncover hidden structures in the networks, elicit new observations of the network dynamics, compare different investigators and investigator groups, determine critical factors to the network evolution, and help direct further analyses. We applied our visualization techniques to explore the biomedical RCNs at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences--a CTSA institution. And, we created CollaborationViz, an open-source visual analytical tool to help network researchers and administration apprehend the network dynamics of research collaborations through interactive visualization.

  7. Collaboration for rare disease drug discovery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litterman, Nadia K; Rhee, Michele; Swinney, David C; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Rare disease research has reached a tipping point, with the confluence of scientific and technologic developments that if appropriately harnessed, could lead to key breakthroughs and treatments for this set of devastating disorders. Industry-wide trends have revealed that the traditional drug discovery research and development (R&D) model is no longer viable, and drug companies are evolving their approach. Rather than only pursue blockbuster therapeutics for heterogeneous, common diseases, drug companies have increasingly begun to shift their focus to rare diseases. In academia, advances in genetics analyses and disease mechanisms have allowed scientific understanding to mature, but the lack of funding and translational capability severely limits the rare disease research that leads to clinical trials. Simultaneously, there is a movement towards increased research collaboration, more data sharing, and heightened engagement and active involvement by patients, advocates, and foundations. The growth in networks and social networking tools presents an opportunity to help reach other patients but also find researchers and build collaborations. The growth of collaborative software that can enable researchers to share their data could also enable rare disease patients and foundations to manage their portfolio of funded projects for developing new therapeutics and suggest drug repurposing opportunities. Still there are many thousands of diseases without treatments and with only fragmented research efforts. We will describe some recent progress in several rare diseases used as examples and propose how collaborations could be facilitated. We propose that the development of a center of excellence that integrates and shares informatics resources for rare diseases sponsored by all of the stakeholders would help foster these initiatives.

  8. Age and cystatin C in healthy adults : a collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odden, Michelle C.; Tager, Ira B.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Katz, Ronit; Fried, Linda F.; Newman, Anne B.; Canada, Robert B.; Harris, Tamara; Sarnak, Mark J.; Siscovick, David; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Methods. The authors pooled individual-level cross-sectional data from 18 253 persons aged 28-100 years in four studies: the Cardiovascular Health Study; the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study; the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease

  9. Construction of Latent Hypotheses on Collaborative Learning from the Perceptions of Future Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Bernal, Bartolomé; Jiménez-Perez, Roque

    2013-01-01

    This work analyses the perceptions of future teachers at both primary education and secondary/university level, in relation to the use of virtual collaborative learning platforms. The collaborative working method was different at each level, in line with students' course requirements, skills, access to technology and the time available. An…

  10. Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social…

  11. Evolutionary convergence of the patterns of international research collaborations across scientific fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Coccia, M.

    2015-01-01

    Frame and Carpenter (1979) analysed the pattern of international research collaboration among scientific fields in 1970s. Starting from this pioneering work, this paper investigates international collaborations over 1997-2012 and compares the critical results with earlier studies to detect the evolu

  12. Technology Trends in Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning in Elementary Education from 2009 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapina, Mia; Boticki, Ivica

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses mobile computer supported collaborative learning in elementary education worldwide focusing on technology trends for the period from 2009 to 2014. The results present representation of device types used to support collaborative activities, their distribution per users (1:1 or 1:m) and if students are learning through or around…

  13. Wikis and Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Binbin; Niiya, Melissa; Warschauer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    While collaborative learning and collaborative writing can be of great value to student learning, the implementation of a technology-supported collaborative learning environment is a challenge. With their built-in features for supporting collaborative writing and social communication, wikis are a promising platform for collaborative learning;…

  14. Collaboration Scripts--A Conceptual Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollar, Ingo; Fischer, Frank; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual analysis of collaboration scripts used in face-to-face and computer-mediated collaborative learning. Collaboration scripts are scaffolds that aim to improve collaboration through structuring the interactive processes between two or more learning partners. Collaboration scripts consist of at least five components:…

  15. Collaboratively Patching Linked Data

    CERN Document Server

    Knuth, Magnus; Sack, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Today's Web of Data is noisy. Linked Data often needs extensive preprocessing to enable efficient use of heterogeneous resources. While consistent and valid data provides the key to efficient data processing and aggregation we are facing two main challenges: (1st) Identification of erroneous facts and tracking their origins in dynamically connected datasets is a difficult task, and (2nd) efforts in the curation of deficient facts in Linked Data are exchanged rather rarely. Since erroneous data often is duplicated and (re-)distributed by mashup applications it is not only the responsibility of a few original publishers to keep their data tidy, but progresses to be a mission for all distributers and consumers of Linked Data too. We present a new approach to expose and to reuse patches on erroneous data to enhance and to add quality information to the Web of Data. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated by example of a collaborative game that patches statements in DBpedia data and provides notifications ...

  16. Collaborating on Referring Expressions

    CERN Document Server

    Heeman, P A; Heeman, Peter A.; Hirst, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a computational model of how conversational participants collaborate in order to make a referring action successful. The model is based on the view of language as goal-directed behavior. We propose that the content of a referring expression can be accounted for by the planning paradigm. Not only does this approach allow the processes of building referring expressions and identifying their referents to be captured by plan construction and plan inference, it also allows us to account for how participants clarify a referring expression by using meta-actions that reason about and manipulate the plan derivation that corresponds to the referring expression. To account for how clarification goals arise and how inferred clarification plans affect the agent, we propose that the agents are in a certain state of mind, and that this state includes an intention to achieve the goal of referring and a plan that the agents are currently considering. It is this mental state that sanctions the adoption of g...

  17. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  18. Collaborative Windows – A User Interface Concept for Distributed Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    of software development where the production of software is carried out by geographically dispersed people. Such work however, is challenged by the distance between people and a strategy for handling the complex dependencies that exists in distributed software development is to engage in closely coupled work...... development companies and the design, implementation and evaluation of the two video-communication based collaboration tools SideBar and dBoard. Based on these studies I present the concept of collaborative windows - a user interface concept for a special kind of collaborative video-mediated systems...... behaviour to the surrounding environment. The dissertation explains the concept and presents a design space analysis for collaborative window systems....

  19. Robotic Assistance During Ambulation by Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Judith; Engberg, Sandra; Montemerlo, Michael; Pineau, Joelle; Roy, Nicholas; Rogers, Joan; Thrun, Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Some older adults require assistance with ambulation due to physical mobility limitations. Others lack the cognitive ability, either alone or in combination with physical impairment, to get where they need to go. Investigation of older adults' gait speed, social interaction, and responsiveness to a robot during ambulation is part of the Nursebot Project, a unique collaboration of health care professionals and technologists focused on developing a personal robotic assistant for frail elderly a...

  20. ICP (ITER Collaborative Platform)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER organization has the necessity to manage a massive amount of data and processes. Each team requires different process and databases often interconnected with those of others teams. ICP (ITER Collaborative Platform) is the current central ITER repository of structured and unstructured data. All data in ICP is served and managed via a web interface that provides global accessibility with a common user friendly interface. This paper will explain the model used by ICP and how it serves the ITER project by providing a robust and agile platform. ICP is developed in ASP.NET using MSSQL Server for data storage. It currently houses 15 data driven applications, 150 different types of record, 500 k objects and 2.5 M references. During European working hours the system averages 150 concurrent users and 20 requests per second. ICP connects to external database applications to provide a single entry point to ITER data and a safe shared storage place to maintain this data long-term. The Core model provides an easy to extend framework to meet the future needs of the Organization. ICP follows a multi-tier architecture, providing logical separation of process. The standard three-tier architecture is expanded, with the data layer separated into data storage, data structure, and data access components. The business or applications logic layer is broken up into a common business functionality layer, a type specific logic layer, and a detached work-flow layer. Finally the presentation tier comprises a presentation adapter layer and an interface layer. Each layer is built up from small blocks which can be combined to create a wide range of more complex functionality. Each new object type developed gains access to a wealth of existing code functionality, while also free to adapt and extend this. The hardware structure is designed to provide complete redundancy, high availability and to handle high load. This document is made of the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  1. Project Learning and Virtual Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fibiger, Bo; Nielsen, Janni; Sorensen, Elsebeth;

    2005-01-01

    This paper will introduce a master program in ICT and Learning (MIL) and present some of the experiences we have gained so far. MIL is a result of a collaborative initiative taken by five Danish universities, and it is an accredited part-time 2-year master program. It is unique in the sense...... that it builds on the pedagogical framework of project pedagogy and is based on online collaboration.The paper will describe MIL, the universities involved, the administrative organization, and the profile of the students. We will discuss the pedagogical framework and the project collaboration in relation...

  2. Collaborative writing: Tools and tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eapen Bell

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Majority of technical writing is done by groups of experts and various web based applications have made this collaboration easy. Email exchange of word processor documents with tracked changes used to be the standard technique for collaborative writing. However web based tools like Google docs and Spreadsheets have made the process fast and efficient. Various versioning tools and synchronous editors are available for those who need additional functionality. Having a group leader who decides the scheduling, communication and conflict resolving protocols is important for successful collaboration.

  3. Collaborate The Art of We

    CERN Document Server

    Sanker, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The hands-on guide for the new way to compete: collaboration The 21st Century's counterpart to Sun Tzu's The Art of War: Dan Sanker's Collaborate: The Art of We, gives a new generation of pioneering business enthusiasts a practical guide to capture tomorrow's business opportunities. Globalization, technology advances, and cultural changes have opened the door for a new winning formula that combines traditional competition with contemporary collaborative business practices. Readers change their mindsets and learn practical tools to tap into talent, overcome organizational obstacles, and create

  4. External Factors Influencing Interorganizational Collaboration: The Strategic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Golonka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this paper is to present the phenomenon of interorganizational collaboration from the strategic perspective, as a complex phenomenon, infl uenced by environmental factors, such as institutions � both formal and informal. Additional aims of the paper are: to present a model including all signifi cant elements and identifying important research gaps.Methodology: The paper presents the results of literature analyses as well as the fi ndings of the latest research studies in the fi eld of interorganizational collaboration, taking into account the environment of the organization.Conclusions: The external environment of the organization, in particular socio-cultural factors, has a significant impact on the formation, development, evolution and management of interorganizational collaboration. There are still many research gaps in this fi eld, and some of them have been presented in this paper.Research limitations: This paper is a theoretical and conceptual study. It forms an introduction to further empirical research.Originality: The paper presents the phenomenon of interorganizational collaboration in a broader context, taking into account the external environment as an element infl uencing such collaboration. Most of the works in this fi eld focus on organizations managing or coping with the environment. This paper presents a different approach. It indicates the external factors that infl uence interorganizational collaboration from a strategic perspective, and subsequently presents them in the form of a model.

  5. Supporting tactical intelligence using collaborative environments and social networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollocko, Arthur B.; Farry, Michael P.; Stark, Robert F.

    2013-05-01

    Modern military environments place an increased emphasis on the collection and analysis of intelligence at the tactical level. The deployment of analytical tools at the tactical level helps support the Warfighter's need for rapid collection, analysis, and dissemination of intelligence. However, given the lack of experience and staffing at the tactical level, most of the available intelligence is not exploited. Tactical environments are staffed by a new generation of intelligence analysts who are well-versed in modern collaboration environments and social networking. An opportunity exists to enhance tactical intelligence analysis by exploiting these personnel strengths, but is dependent on appropriately designed information sharing technologies. Existing social information sharing technologies enable users to publish information quickly, but do not unite or organize information in a manner that effectively supports intelligence analysis. In this paper, we present an alternative approach to structuring and supporting tactical intelligence analysis that combines the benefits of existing concepts, and provide detail on a prototype system embodying that approach. Since this approach employs familiar collaboration support concepts from social media, it enables new-generation analysts to identify the decision-relevant data scattered among databases and the mental models of other personnel, increasing the timeliness of collaborative analysis. Also, the approach enables analysts to collaborate visually to associate heterogeneous and uncertain data within the intelligence analysis process, increasing the robustness of collaborative analyses. Utilizing this familiar dynamic collaboration environment, we hope to achieve a significant reduction of time and skill required to glean actionable intelligence in these challenging operational environments.

  6. Endurability and profitability analysis of collaborative networks

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemi, Hassan; Sinderen, van, Marten; Wieringa, Roel; Razo-Zapata, Ivan S.

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative network is a network consisting of a variety of autonomous actors (e.g. enterprises, organizations and people) that collaborate to better achieve common or compatible goals. A collaborative network starts with a contract and then the collaboration partners conduct business as described in the contract. Before engaging in such a collaboration, partners need to reach an agreement regarding their responsibilities in the collaboration and develop a shared understanding regarding t...

  7. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove;

    2007-01-01

    The quantitative and qualitative description of laser beam characteristics is important for process implementation and optimisation. In particular, a need for quantitative characterisation of beam diameter was identified when using fibre lasers for micro manufacturing. Here the beam diameter limits...... the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...

  8. Training Residential Staff to Conduct Trial-Based Functional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Joseph M.; Bloom, Sarah E.; Kunnavatana, S. Shanun; Collins, Shawnee D.; Clay, Casey J.

    2013-01-01

    We taught 6 supervisors of a residential service provider for adults with developmental disabilities to train 9 house managers to conduct trial-based functional analyses. Effects of the training were evaluated with a nonconcurrent multiple baseline. Results suggest that house managers can be trained to conduct trial-based functional analyses with…

  9. From management to leadership: a shift towards understanding the organizational complexity of multidisciplinary collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Anne Marie Anker; Kristensen, Ole Steen

    2015-01-01

    is to explore managerial roles and perspectives during an organizational process of developing multidisciplinary collaboration. Eighteen management meetings, held during a two-year period, are analysed. The analysis reveals that the management gradually grasps the complexity of multidisciplinary collaboration......; negotiations on the concept are ongoing while their point of view changes from distant to involved. The management takes leadership towards multidisciplinary collaboration through a series of legitimacy-related negotiations, illustrating the organizational and managerial contexts of multidisciplinary...... collaboration as well as introducing it as a new type of managerial task....

  10. Interdisciplinary Educational Collaborations: Chemistry and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Ronald S.; Woo, Daniel T.; Hudson, Benjamin T.; Mori, Joji C.; Ngan, Evey S. M.; Pak, Wing-Yee

    2007-01-01

    Research collaborations between chemists and other scientists resulted in significant outcomes such as development of software. Such collaboration provided a realistic learning experience for computer science students.

  11. Report sensory analyses veal

    OpenAIRE

    Veldman, M.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    On behalf of a client of Animal Sciences Group, different varieties of veal were analyzed by both instrumental and sensory analyses. The sensory evaluation was performed with a sensory analytical panel in the period of 13th of May and 31st of May, 2005. The three varieties of veal were: young bull, pink veal and white veal. The sensory descriptive analyses show that the three groups Young bulls, pink veal and white veal, differ significantly in red colour for the raw meat as well as the baked...

  12. Proactive Assessment for Collaboration Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L. Ju

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a government–academia–industry joint training project that produces Vietnamese midlevel technical managers. To ensure collaboration success, a proactive assessment methodology was developed as a supplement to the conventional project management practices. In the postproject feedback, the funding agencies acknowledged that the project fulfilled its contractual obligations and achieved its objectives. The implementing university was pleased as it broke ground in this type of collaboration in Taiwan. The industrial partners, however, were not so sure about the effectiveness of this collaborative training endeavor because there were many skirmishes between company supervisors and Vietnamese interns caused by the interns’ self-interested perception and expectation. Consequently, a theoretical framework for predicting internship acceptance and preventing unfavorable perceptions was proposed to strengthen the proactive assessment methodology. Collaboration research, funding agencies, academia, and industry could all benefit from this study.

  13. Introduction to the Cochrane Collaboration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Cochrane Collaboration was established in 1993, and named after the epidemiologist, Archie Cochrane (1909-1988), a British medical researcher who contributed greatly to the development of epidemiology as a science.The organisation benefits from thousands of contributors worldwide,working collaboratively from w ithin many independent groups of people ('entities').For this reason,the term 'collaboration' is used.The Cochrane Collaboration's principles include fostering good communication, open decision-making and teamwork; reducing barriers to contributing; and encouraging diversity.These things cannot be achieved without people co-operating with each other, setting aside self-interest,and working together to provide evidence with which to improve health care.

  14. Microarray profiling to analyse adult cardiac fibroblast identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena B. Furtado

    2014-12-01

    We have recently uncovered a unique molecular identity for fibroblasts isolated from the heart [9], expressing a set of cardiogenic transcription factors that have been previously associated with cardiomyocyte ontogenesis. This signature suggests that cardiac fibroblasts may be ideal for use in stem cell replacement therapies, as they may retain the memory of where they derive from embryologically. Our data also revealed that about 90% of fibroblasts from both tail and heart origins share a cell surface signature that has previously been described for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, raising the possibility that fibroblasts and MSCs may in fact be the same cell type. Thus, our findings carry profound implications for the field of regenerative medicine. Here, we describe detailed methodology and quality controls related to the gene expression profiling of cardiac fibroblasts, deposited at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO under the accession number GSE50531. We also provide the R code to easily reproduce the data quantification and analysis processes.

  15. Social inertia in collaboration networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ramasco, Jose J.; Morris, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    This work is a study of the properties of collaboration networks employing the formalism of weighted graphs to represent their one-mode projection. The weight of the edges is directly the number of times that a partnership has been repeated. This representation allows us to define the concept of "social inertia" that measures the tendency of authors to keep on collaborating with previous partners. We use a collection of empirical datasets to analyze several aspects of the social inertia: 1) i...

  16. Reading Together: Computers and Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Littleton, Karen; Wood, Clare; Chera, Pav

    2004-01-01

    About the book: The study of collaborative learning has a relatively brief history, yet there have been notable changes in the nature of the research being undertaken in this field. Initially, the primary aim was to determine whether and when collaborative learning was more effective than learning alone and there is a substantial body of empirical evidence demonstrating that, whilst not an educational panacea, it can have positive effects of social interaction for learning. More recently, how...

  17. Systems Support for Collaborative Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Allison, Collin; Ruddle, Alan; Michaelson, Rosa

    2002-01-01

    One of the distinguishing features of novel network based learning environments is their capability to support group work and collaboration. TAGS, the Tutor and Groups Support Scheme, is an inter-disciplinary, inter-institutional project, which brings together software systems builders, subject-specialists and educational content developers. Collaborative Learning is central to the pedagogical goals of TAGS, and this has lead to the concept of groups being used as a fundamental organising pri...

  18. Collaborative trial on groundwater sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Ghestem, Jean Philippe; Fisicaro, Paula; Champion, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The trial presented here was conducted by BRGM in collaboration with LNE under the work program AQUAREF 2009 with the support of ONEMA. This is a collaborative trial on groundwater sampling and on field physico chemical measurement. It is not a proficiency test. He had three goals: * Observe and evaluate the practices of groundwater sampling to improve future guides, standards and specifications. * Assess the impact of sampling on variability of results. * Study the accuracy of field measurem...

  19. Adult medulloblastoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Pobereskin, L; Treip, C

    1986-01-01

    Twelve cases of adult onset medulloblastoma are presented. Clinical features, treatment and outcome are discussed. It was found that the survival rates for adults are no better than for children. There were no clinical or histological features that distinguished these tumours from those occurring in childhood, except for a higher incidence of hemisphere lesions.

  20. Global SOF and Interagency Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Lamb

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM has emphasized the importance of international SOF collaboration, or what USSOCOM refers to as a “global SOF network.” It is difficult to achieve requisite levels of collaboration even among departments and agencies within a single country, much less on an international basis. Yet USSOCOM has been rightly praised for its trailblazing collaboration efforts in counterterrorism operations, so perhaps it can extend successful collaboration to its “global SOF network.” This article argues collaboration lessons from the past decade of counterterrorism operations can be used to facilitate better international SOF collaboration. Even if the lessons are well recognized they will be hard to act upon, especially when USSOCOM is using its indirect approach to SOF missions managed out of U.S. embassies overseas. But the first step in solving any problem is recognizing the nature of the problem and what is required to solve it. The rest is all disciplined, aggressive and intelligent implementation, which Special Operations Forces do well.

  1. Meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.A.; Luyten, J.W.; Scheerens, J.; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Scheerens, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter results of a research synthesis and quantitative meta-analyses of three facets of time effects in education are presented, namely time at school during regular lesson hours, homework, and extended learning time. The number of studies for these three facets of time that could be used

  2. Probabilistic safety analyses (PSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guide shows how the probabilistic safety analyses (PSA) are used in the design, construction and operation of light water reactor plants in order for their part to ensure that the safety of the plant is good enough in all plant operational states

  3. Wavelet Analyses and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeianu, Cristian C.; Landau, Rubin H.; Paez, Manuel J.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how a modern extension of Fourier analysis known as wavelet analysis is applied to signals containing multiscale information. First, a continuous wavelet transform is used to analyse the spectrum of a nonstationary signal (one whose form changes in time). The spectral analysis of such a signal gives the strength of the signal in each…

  4. Report sensory analyses veal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, M.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    On behalf of a client of Animal Sciences Group, different varieties of veal were analyzed by both instrumental and sensory analyses. The sensory evaluation was performed with a sensory analytical panel in the period of 13th of May and 31st of May, 2005. The three varieties of veal were: young bull,

  5. Divergent conceptions : obstacles to collaboration in addressing the needs of children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Widmark, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    Children and adolescents with complex psychosocial needs calls for collaboration between professionals, due to their own problems and due to problems related to the adults and peers in their environment. Since cares about children and youth in the welfare sector are largely organized through specialization the complex needs can only be met through efforts from several welfare organizations, and thus simultaneously. This makes collaboration inevitable and requires that the profe...

  6. Understanding Innovation: Youth-Adult Partnerships in Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldin, Shepherd; Petrokubi, Julie

    2006-01-01

    In the United States, the concept of youth-adult partnership remains innovative. The notion that youth and adults can collaborate on issues of importance runs counter to prevailing societal norms, public policies, structures and standards of practice. There is not much cultural or policy support for managers seeking to integrate youth-adult…

  7. Nanotechnology researchers' collaboration relationships: a gender analysis of access to scientific information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Felez, Africa; Woolley, Richard; Cañibano, Carolina

    2015-02-01

    Women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, particularly at higher levels of organizations. This article investigates the impact of this underrepresentation on the processes of interpersonal collaboration in nanotechnology. Analyses are conducted to assess: (I) the comparative tie strength of women's and men's collaborations, (2) whether women and men gain equal access to scientific information through collaborators, (3) which tie characteristics are associated with access to information for women and men, and (4) whether women and men acquire equivalent amounts of information by strengthening ties. Our results show that the overall tie strength is less for women's collaborations and that women acquire less strategic information through collaborators. Women and men rely on different tie characteristics in accessing information, but are equally effective in acquiring additional information resources by strengthening ties. This article demonstrates that the underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics has an impact on the interpersonal processes of scientific collaboration, to the disadvantage of women scientists.

  8. Multilateral Collaborations in Analog Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, R. l.

    2016-01-01

    International collaborations in studies utilizing ground-based space flight analogs are an effective means for answering research questions common to participating agencies. These collaborations bring together worldwide experts to solve important space research questions. By collaborating unnecessary duplication of science is reduced, and the efficiency of analog use is improved. These studies also share resources among agencies for cost effective solutions to study implementation. Recently, NASA has engaged in collaborations with international partners at a variety of analog sites. The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) is currently hosting investigator studies from NASA and from the German Space Agency (DLR). These isolation studies will answer questions in the areas of team cohesion, sleep and circadian rhythms, and neurobehavioral correlates to function. Planning for the next HERA campaign is underway as proposal selections are being made from the International Life Sciences Research Announcement (ILSRA). Studies selected from the ILSRA will be conducted across 4 HERA missions in 2017. NASA is planning collaborative studies with DLR at the :envihab facility in Cologne, Germany. Investigations were recently selected to study the effects of 0.5% CO2 exposure over 30 days of bed rest. These studies will help to determine the fidelity of this ground-based analog for studying the visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. NASA is also planning a multilateral collaboration at :envihab with DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA) to examine artificial gravity as a countermeasure to mitigate the effects of 60 days of bed rest. NASA is also considering collaborations with the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems (IBMP) in studies that will utilize their Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK is comprised of 4 interconnected modules and a Martian surface simulator. This isolation analog can support 3 -10 crew members for long duration

  9. Possible future HERA analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Geiser, Achim

    2015-01-01

    A variety of possible future analyses of HERA data in the context of the HERA data preservation programme is collected, motivated, and commented. The focus is placed on possible future analyses of the existing $ep$ collider data and their physics scope. Comparisons to the original scope of the HERA programme are made, and cross references to topics also covered by other participants of the workshop are given. This includes topics on QCD, proton structure, diffraction, jets, hadronic final states, heavy flavours, electroweak physics, and the application of related theory and phenomenology topics like NNLO QCD calculations, low-x related models, nonperturbative QCD aspects, and electroweak radiative corrections. Synergies with other collider programmes are also addressed. In summary, the range of physics topics which can still be uniquely covered using the existing data is very broad and of considerable physics interest, often matching the interest of results from colliders currently in operation. Due to well-e...

  10. Statistisk analyse med SPSS

    OpenAIRE

    Linnerud, Kristin; Oklevik, Ove; Slettvold, Harald

    2004-01-01

    Dette notatet har sitt utspring i forelesninger og undervisning for 3.års studenter i økonomi og administrasjon ved høgskolen i Sogn og Fjordane. Notatet er særlig lagt opp mot undervisningen i SPSS i de to kursene ”OR 685 Marknadsanalyse og merkevarestrategi” og ”BD 616 Økonomistyring og analyse med programvare”.

  11. Reflexively exploring knowledge and power in collaborative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte Ravn; Pedersen, Chistina Hee; Frølunde, Lisbeth;

    research stem from the methodological, epistemological and ethical problems and dilemmas that are inherent in collaborative knowledge production and communication and which relate to the inexorable workings of knowledge/power. The problems and dilemmas arise in the meeting between participants’ multiple......The proposed workshop will take its starting point in the challenges which collaborative research practices share. The aim of the workshop is to work with, and further develop, a range of critical, reflexive strategies for understanding, analysing and dealing with those challenges. The workshop...... will be designed in order to stimulate dialogue across different analytical perspectives and empirical research. The analytical perspectives on which facilitation will be based are rooted in social constructionist approaches to dialogic communication theory and action research. The challenges of collaborative...

  12. Biomass feedstock analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Moilanen, A.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    The overall objectives of the project `Feasibility of electricity production from biomass by pressurized gasification systems` within the EC Research Programme JOULE II were to evaluate the potential of advanced power production systems based on biomass gasification and to study the technical and economic feasibility of these new processes with different type of biomass feed stocks. This report was prepared as part of this R and D project. The objectives of this task were to perform fuel analyses of potential woody and herbaceous biomasses with specific regard to the gasification properties of the selected feed stocks. The analyses of 15 Scandinavian and European biomass feed stock included density, proximate and ultimate analyses, trace compounds, ash composition and fusion behaviour in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. The wood-derived fuels, such as whole-tree chips, forest residues, bark and to some extent willow, can be expected to have good gasification properties. Difficulties caused by ash fusion and sintering in straw combustion and gasification are generally known. The ash and alkali metal contents of the European biomasses harvested in Italy resembled those of the Nordic straws, and it is expected that they behave to a great extent as straw in gasification. Any direct relation between the ash fusion behavior (determined according to the standard method) and, for instance, the alkali metal content was not found in the laboratory determinations. A more profound characterisation of the fuels would require gasification experiments in a thermobalance and a PDU (Process development Unit) rig. (orig.) (10 refs.)

  13. Possible future HERA analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiser, Achim

    2015-12-15

    A variety of possible future analyses of HERA data in the context of the HERA data preservation programme is collected, motivated, and commented. The focus is placed on possible future analyses of the existing ep collider data and their physics scope. Comparisons to the original scope of the HERA pro- gramme are made, and cross references to topics also covered by other participants of the workshop are given. This includes topics on QCD, proton structure, diffraction, jets, hadronic final states, heavy flavours, electroweak physics, and the application of related theory and phenomenology topics like NNLO QCD calculations, low-x related models, nonperturbative QCD aspects, and electroweak radiative corrections. Synergies with other collider programmes are also addressed. In summary, the range of physics topics which can still be uniquely covered using the existing data is very broad and of considerable physics interest, often matching the interest of results from colliders currently in operation. Due to well-established data and MC sets, calibrations, and analysis procedures the manpower and expertise needed for a particular analysis is often very much smaller than that needed for an ongoing experiment. Since centrally funded manpower to carry out such analyses is not available any longer, this contribution not only targets experienced self-funded experimentalists, but also theorists and master-level students who might wish to carry out such an analysis.

  14. The Roles of Size and Size Difference in Australian and Chinese Inter-firm Collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available There has been considerable debate on the contribution and significance of firm size to the establishment, operation and success of business collaboration. One important source of this debate arises from differing definitions of firm size used in previous research. This paper uses firm size categories and size differences between collaborating firms to examine their contribution to the formation and performance of inter-firmcollaboration in Australia and China. Both qualitative case study and quantitative data analyses are adopted in this paper. Results from both the qualitative case study and quantitative study in Australia and China show that size plays a significant positive role in the formation and performance of business collaboration. Firmsprefer collaborating with larger partners. Bigger firms are more likely to achieve success collaborations. However, size difference plays a negative role in business collaboration. Collaborating with a bigger partner makes it harder to succeed. On the other hand, size and size difference play very different roles in performanceand outcomes of business collaboration in different countries.This paper compares the roles of firm size and size difference in Australian and Chinese inter-firm collaboration. The results provide important strategic implications for business managers, industry regulators, and policy decision makers regarding international business collaboration.

  15. Improving enterprise efficiency using IT collaboration systems

    OpenAIRE

    Markovski, Goran; Koceska, Natasa; Saso KOCESKI

    2013-01-01

    Technology and globalization have created an environment in which teams communicate and collaborate, across time, geography, and organizations. Team members possess knowledge and must communicate and collaborate to accomplish tasks. Communication and collaboration lead to better results, reducing organizational costs, and preventing and solving conflict between participants. Enterprise collaboration systems (ECS) are basically an information systems that enhance communication, coordination an...

  16. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbos, J. -W.

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS)CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the issue of assessment of collaborative learning has…

  17. Endurability and profitability analysis of collaborative networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatemi, Hassan; Sinderen, van Marten; Wieringa, Roel; Razo-Zapata, Ivan S.

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative network is a network consisting of a variety of autonomous actors (e.g. enterprises, organizations and people) that collaborate to better achieve common or compatible goals. A collaborative network starts with a contract and then the collaboration partners conduct business as describ

  18. Interprofessional collaboration and collaboration among nurses in Northern Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstadinidou-Straukou A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A I M : This study aimed at assessing satisfaction from collaboration among nursing staff members as well as betweennurses and physicians, and to determine factors influencing their collaboration.B A C K G R O U N D : Studies investigating the collaboration among nursing staff members are mainly focusedon its negative effects in their work, on horizontal violence among nurses, on colleagues’ aggression, and on verbalabuse. Multidisciplinary and interprofessional working is currently a priority in health care.M A T E R I A L - M E T H O D : The study is descriptive. The data collection was carried out through a self-administeredquestionnaire, which was developed by the researchers. The participants were 336 nursing staff membersworking in hospitals in the greater area of Thessaloniki.R E S U L T S : 87.8% agree that colleagues in the hospital help one the other, and 76.9% agree that there is teamworkand collaboration between the various levels of nursing staff. Almost half (50.5% disagree that no-one doesnot undermine the efforts of the other. Many nursing staff members (50.6% agree that physicians collaborate verywell with them. More than a half of the sample (56% disagree that physicians have a complete picture of the activitiesof a nurse and 57.7% disagree that physicians underestimate too much the nursing staff.C O N C L U S I O N S : Since the nursing work environment has a critical impact on patient safety, nursing staffmembers and physicians should make an effort to collaborate well and to provide quality services.

  19. Professionalisation processes among adult educators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Larson, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In light of the increased interest in adult education and training (AET) in the EU as well as in national policy, the article looks into policy and practice when it comes to the professionalisation of those responsible for providing the AET – the adult educators. The article takes its theoretical...... is an increase in the provision of AET. A second is a tendency for official requirements for teaching adults to be higher in general and vocational AET than in liberal AE. Also, in spite of the huge interest in AET, qualification of adult educators seems to be a non-issue in the analysed policy papers...... and strategies, especially in Denmark and Sweden. The fi nal common trend is a tendency that most courses and programmes for adult educators are targeted people already working within the field or people interested in a career shift. Very few options exist in the three countries for initial qualifi cation prior...

  20. Collaborative Inquiry Learning: Models, tools, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thorsten; Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Ploetzner, Rolf

    2010-02-01

    Collaborative inquiry learning is one of the most challenging and exciting ventures for today's schools. It aims at bringing a new and promising culture of teaching and learning into the classroom where students in groups engage in self-regulated learning activities supported by the teacher. It is expected that this way of learning fosters students' motivation and interest in science, that they learn to perform steps of inquiry similar to scientists and that they gain knowledge on scientific processes. Starting from general pedagogical reflections and science standards, the article reviews some prominent models of inquiry learning. This comparison results in a set of inquiry processes being the basis for cooperation in the scientific network NetCoIL. Inquiry learning is conceived in several ways with emphasis on different processes. For an illustration of the spectrum, some main conceptions of inquiry and their focuses are described. In the next step, the article describes exemplary computer tools and environments from within and outside the NetCoIL network that were designed to support processes of collaborative inquiry learning. These tools are analysed by describing their functionalities as well as effects on student learning known from the literature. The article closes with challenges for further developments elaborated by the NetCoIL network.

  1. Electronic Commerce and Collaboration Between Competing Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard Stickel

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Investments in electronic commerce technology typically require large sums of money and the realisation of possible benefits is often highly uncertain. Possible investors may also be confronted with the so-called free rider-problem. Innovators have to bear all development costs. Once standards are established followers (free riders may easily imitate the investment. Hence, innovators may not be able to build up sustaining competitive advantages that make their investments worthwhile. As a result, available technology may not be used in an efficient way. A typical prisoner's dilemma scenario prevails. Pre-competitive collaboration may be a possible solution to this problem. The term "pre-competitive" refers to the possibility of joint application development and/or sharing of information, knowledge and ability. It should not be confused with collusion which may be legally restricted or even forbidden. The goal of the paper is to analyse whether there are economic incentives for pre-competitive collaboration as sketched above. The analysis is carried out with the help of a microeconomic model and techniques from game theory.

  2. Gender differences in collaboration patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaohan; Duch, Jordi; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Radicchi, Filippo; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Amaral, Luis A. N.

    2014-03-01

    Collaboration plays an increasingly important role in research productivity and impact. However, it remains unclear whether female and male researchers in science, technology, engineering and mathematical (STEM) disciplines differ significantly from each other in their collaboration propensity. Here, we report on an empirical analysis of the complete publication records of 3,920 faculty members in six STEM disciplines at selected top U.S. research universities. We find that while female faculty have significantly fewer co-authors over their careers, this can be fully explained by their lower number of publications. Indeed, we also find that females tend to distribute their co-authoring opportunities among their co-authors more evenly than males do. Our results suggest that females have had a greater propensity to collaborate, in order to succeed in a historically men-dominated academic world. Surprisingly, we find evidence that in molecular biology there has been a gender segregation within sub-disciplines. Female faculty in molecular biology departments tend to collaborate with smaller teams and publish in journals and fields where typical team size is smaller. Our results identify gender-specific collaborative behaviors as well as disciplines with distinct patterns. The authors thank the support from the following grants: NSF SBE 0624318, NSF IIS 0830388, and Spanish DGICYT under project FIS2010-18639.

  3. Adult Strabismus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will likely improve the double vision and depth perception. Also, strabismus affects adults in emotional, social, and ... muscle surgery is usually not severe. Headache, pulling sensation with eye movement and foreign body sensation in ...

  4. 山东地区成人正常殆软组织侧貌唇突度6种分析法的X线头影测量研究%Cephalometric study of the horizontal lip position in Shandong adults with normal occlusion by the six different soft tissue analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寇波; 李爱群; 李民; 王春玲

    2010-01-01

    Objective To obtain the norms of lip position in six different soft tissue analyses in Shandong adults with normal occlusion. Methods 123 subjects (male 60, female 63), age range 19~26 years old, were chosen from 3700 students in Shandong University. Lateral cephalogramsof each patient was taken by the same operator. Distance of S1UL, S1LL, EUL, ELL, BUL, BLL, S2UL,S2LL, HLL, H angle and Z angle from Steiner(S1), Ricketts (E), Burstone(B), Sushner(S2),Holdaway(H), Merrifield(Z) analysis, were measured. Results The norms on lip position of six different soft tissue analyses in Shandong adults with normal occlusion were obtained. There was no significant difference between male and female in each measurement except S2UL and H angle,Conclusions There are some regional characteristics on lip position in Shandong adults with normal occlusion, and significant differences between male and female are noted in several measurements.%目的 建立山东地区成人正常(牙合)软组织侧貌唇突度6种分析法的X线头影测量正常值范围.方法 按照同一标准严格筛选出山东地区成人正常骀123名,男性60名,女性63名,年龄19~26岁.拍摄X线头颅定位侧位片.测量包括Steiner(S1),Ricketts(E),Burstone(B),Sushner(S2),Holdaway(H),Merrifield(Z)6种分析法的11项测量指标-S1UL,S1LL;EUL,ELL;BUL,BLL;S2UL,S2LL;HLL,H角;Z角.计算各测量指标的均数与标准差,对男性与女性样本间进行t检验.所有数据采用SPSS10.0统计软件包进行统计学分析.结果 建立了山东地区成人正常(牙合)软组织侧貌唇突度6种分析法的X线头影测量正常值范围;男性与女性相比,仅在S2UL和H角两项指标上存在显著性差异,且男性大于女性.结论 山东地区成人正常胎软组织侧貌唇突度具有其地域性特点,部分测量指标具有男女性别间差异.

  5. Collaboration with East African security organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, Johannes Riber; Jacobsen, Katja L.

    2012-01-01

    of the concept. At the same time the three organisations represent different constellations of member nations and thus different national interests, and locally they have different legitimacy and political strength. Thus, when choosing collaboration partners for a security project it is not simply a question...... of looking at these organisations’ military capabilities. There are other concerns, such as their aims, their internal relations, regional legitimacy and so on, to take into consideration. In this DIIS Policy Brief the authors sketch some of the differences that should be taken into consideration when...... planning to work with these organisations. The brief is the first outcome of a research project that analyses the regional security actors in East Africa and how Denmark can contribute to the regional security through them....

  6. Some Remarks on Collaborative Systems Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Ioan NITCHI; Rodica AVRAM-NITCHI; Alin MIHAILA

    2007-01-01

    DARPA Intelligent Collaboration and Visualization Program [DARPA1997] developed a general framework for the collaborative systems architecture for the audit of these systems. The authors applied the framework for different applications and for collaborative project management [Nitchi2006]. In different particular type of collaborative systems were developed other frameworks. By these, but also from our experience we developed a new general framework for collaborative systems. This note would ...

  7. Ontology development for computersupported collaborative learning scripts

    OpenAIRE

    Papakonstantinou, Aliki; Demetriadis, Stavros; Bassiliades, Nick

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an ongoing effort to develop an ontology for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Scripts. Our work merges the field of collaborative learning with the field of semantic web and provides a framework for the formalization of collaboration scripts using the OWL language. Collaboration scripts are didactic scenarios that prescribe learners' interactions in collaborative settings. A script comprises a number of phases and each phase specifies the activity that lear...

  8. Collaborative Environment and Agile Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan GHILIC-MICU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over time, information and communications technology development has made a direct impact on human activity in the individual context as well as familial, economic and social. This has laid the premise for adoption of new and modern paradigms in individual and organizational activity management. The evolutionary climax of the social universe is called nowadays knowledge society. The knowledge society succeeds the information society, emphasizing the development of the opportunities brought by collaborative work environment and agile approach. In this paper we will highlight the use of collaborative environment in agile software development, as an instrument for managing organizations in knowledge society. Thus, we will emphasize the paradigms of agile testing, validation and verification in collaborative environment.

  9. Performative Tools and Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minder, Bettina; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    The use of performative tools can support collaborative learning across knowledge domains (i.e. science and practice), because they create new spaces for dialog. However, so far innovation literature provides little answers to the important discussion of how to describe the effects and requirements...... of performative tools used in transdisciplinary events for collaborative learning. The results of this single case study add to extant knowledge- and learning literature by providing the reader with a rich description of characteristics and learning functions of performative tools in transdisciplinary events...... and a description of how they interrelate with the specific setting of such an event. Furthermore, they complement previous findings by relating performative tools to collaborative learning for knowledge intensive ideas....

  10. The collaborative Economy and Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne; Gyimóthy, Szilvia

    2015-01-01

    of social, economic and technological factors including a shift away from ownership towards temporary access to goods; the use of technology mediated transactions between producers and consumers; direct host-guest relationships that contribute to a higher level of perceived authenticity of tourism...... experiences; and higher levels of consumer risk-taking balanced against mechanisms such as peer-to-peer feedback designed to engender trust between producers and consumers. This paper explores and critically assesses the collaborative economy and its implications for tourism industrial systems. It achieves...... this by mapping out the current knowledge dynamics characterising tourism and the collaborative economy, paying particular attention to the asymmetries of knowledge that are emerging. The paper then identifies and critically discusses five pervasive claims being made about the collaborative economy, arguing...

  11. Collaborative Mobile Charging and Coverage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰

    2014-01-01

    Wireless energy charging using mobile vehicles has been a viable research topic recently in the area of wireless networks and mobile computing. This paper gives a short survey of recent research conducted in our research group in the area of collaborative mobile charging. In collaborative mobile charging, multiple mobile chargers work together to accomplish a given set of ob jectives. These ob jectives include charging sensors at different frequencies with a minimum number of mobile chargers and reaching the farthest sensor for a given set of mobile chargers, subject to various constraints, including speed and energy limits of mobile chargers. Through the process of problem formulation, solution construction, and future work extension for problems related to collaborative mobile charging and coverage, we present three principles for good practice in conducting research. These principles can potentially be used for assisting graduate students in selecting a research problem for a term project, which can eventually be expanded to a thesis/dissertation topic.

  12. India joins the ISOLDE collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    On 18 April India signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the ISOLDE collaboration, thus strengthening its links with CERN. Three experiments led by Indian scientists at ISOLDE have been recommended by the Research Board and will be performed in the coming months, and more projects are being designed for the future HIE-ISOLDE scientific programme.   Shaking hands: Rüdiger Voss (left), adviser for India in CERN’s International Relations Office, and SINP Director Milan Kumar Sanyal (right). Also photographed: ISOLDE spokesperson Yorick Blumenfeld, (centre left) and Sunanda Banerjee, head of high-energy at SINP (centre right).  The new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed in Kolkata at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP). India thus becomes the 15th member of the ISOLDE collaboration, after having signed similar collaboration documents with the CMS and ALICE experiments. “This agreement will a...

  13. Collaborative on-line teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin

    2007-01-01

      It is often stressed that the pedagogic models and approaches of Collaborative Online Learning support learners' shared knowledge building within collaborating groups of learners, the individual construction of knowledge as well as the formation of an ongoing learning Community of Practice....... With a starting point in a recent case study of a Danish master's programme, this paper demonstrates that emerging collaborative practice displays tendencies contrary to the generally accepted assumptions. The outcome is not only based on the models and their attributes, it is also affected by the emerging...... practice and interaction among participants during a course. From this perspective it is relevant to look at the possibilities and obstacles teachers meet in their efforts to become aware of slowly emerging tendencies which may lead to major misinterpretations of the subject matter or marginalize or even...

  14. Hypoallometric scaling in international collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiehchen, David; Espinoza, Magdalena; Hsieh, Antony

    2016-02-01

    Collaboration is a vital process and dominant theme in knowledge production, although the effectiveness of policies directed at promoting multinational research remains ambiguous. We examined approximately 24 million research articles published over four decades and demonstrated that the scaling of international publications to research productivity for each country obeys a universal and conserved sublinear power law. Inefficient mechanisms in transborder team dynamics or organization as well as increasing opportunity costs may contribute to the disproportionate growth of international collaboration rates with increasing productivity among nations. Given the constrained growth of international relationships, our findings advocate a greater emphasis on the qualitative aspects of collaborations, such as with whom partnerships are forged, particularly when assessing research and policy outcomes.

  15. Digital differential analysers

    CERN Document Server

    Shilejko, A V; Higinbotham, W

    1964-01-01

    Digital Differential Analysers presents the principles, operations, design, and applications of digital differential analyzers, a machine with the ability to present initial quantities and the possibility of dividing them into separate functional units performing a number of basic mathematical operations. The book discusses the theoretical principles underlying the operation of digital differential analyzers, such as the use of the delta-modulation method and function-generator units. Digital integration methods and the classes of digital differential analyzer designs are also reviewed. The te

  16. Wavelet analyses and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordeianu, Cristian C [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, RO 077125 (Romania); Landau, Rubin H [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Paez, Manuel J [Department of Physics, University of Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia)], E-mail: cristian.bordeianu@brahms.fizica.unibuc.ro, E-mail: rubin@science.oregonstate.edu, E-mail: mpaez@fisica.udea.edu.co

    2009-09-15

    It is shown how a modern extension of Fourier analysis known as wavelet analysis is applied to signals containing multiscale information. First, a continuous wavelet transform is used to analyse the spectrum of a nonstationary signal (one whose form changes in time). The spectral analysis of such a signal gives the strength of the signal in each frequency as a function of time. Next, the theory is specialized to discrete values of time and frequency, and the resulting discrete wavelet transform is shown to be useful for data compression. This paper is addressed to a broad community, from undergraduate to graduate students to general physicists and to specialists in other fields than wavelets.

  17. Systemdynamisk analyse av vannkraftsystem

    OpenAIRE

    Rydning, Anja

    2007-01-01

    I denne oppgaven er det gjennomført en dynamisk analyse av vannkraftverket Fortun kraftverk. Tre fenomener er særlig vurdert i denne oppgaven: Sjaktsvingninger mellom svingesjakt og magasin, trykkstøt ved turbinen som følge av retardasjonstrykk ved endring i turbinvannføringen og reguleringsstabilitet. Sjaktsvingningene og trykkstøt beregnes analytisk ut fra kontinuitets- og bevegelsesligningen. Modeller av Fortun kraftverk er laget for å beregne trykkstøt og sjaktsvingninger. En modell e...

  18. AMS analyses at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, E.M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Physics Division

    1998-03-01

    The major use of ANTARES is Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) with {sup 14}C being the most commonly analysed radioisotope - presently about 35 % of the available beam time on ANTARES is used for {sup 14}C measurements. The accelerator measurements are supported by, and dependent on, a strong sample preparation section. The ANTARES AMS facility supports a wide range of investigations into fields such as global climate change, ice cores, oceanography, dendrochronology, anthropology, and classical and Australian archaeology. Described here are some examples of the ways in which AMS has been applied to support research into the archaeology, prehistory and culture of this continent`s indigenous Aboriginal peoples. (author)

  19. Network effects on scientific collaborations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahadat Uddin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The analysis of co-authorship network aims at exploring the impact of network structure on the outcome of scientific collaborations and research publications. However, little is known about what network properties are associated with authors who have increased number of joint publications and are being cited highly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Measures of social network analysis, for example network centrality and tie strength, have been utilized extensively in current co-authorship literature to explore different behavioural patterns of co-authorship networks. Using three SNA measures (i.e., degree centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality, we explore scientific collaboration networks to understand factors influencing performance (i.e., citation count and formation (tie strength between authors of such networks. A citation count is the number of times an article is cited by other articles. We use co-authorship dataset of the research field of 'steel structure' for the year 2005 to 2009. To measure the strength of scientific collaboration between two authors, we consider the number of articles co-authored by them. In this study, we examine how citation count of a scientific publication is influenced by different centrality measures of its co-author(s in a co-authorship network. We further analyze the impact of the network positions of authors on the strength of their scientific collaborations. We use both correlation and regression methods for data analysis leading to statistical validation. We identify that citation count of a research article is positively correlated with the degree centrality and betweenness centrality values of its co-author(s. Also, we reveal that degree centrality and betweenness centrality values of authors in a co-authorship network are positively correlated with the strength of their scientific collaborations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Authors' network positions in co

  20. Improving Virtual Team Collaboration Outcomes through Collaboration Process Structuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittman, Dawn R.; Hawkes, Mark; Deokar, Amit V.; Sarnikar, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    The ability to collaborate in a virtual team is a necessary skill set for today's knowledge workers and students to be effective in their work. Past research indicates that knowledge workers and students need to establish a formal process to perform work, develop clear goals and objectives, and facilitate better communication among team members.…

  1. On the conditions for generative collaboration: learning through collaborative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontecorvo, Clotilde

    2007-06-01

    Drawing on autobiographical recollections, I propose to see collaborative research as a learning experience. I assume a sociocultural psychological approach to the social understanding and interpretation of different scientific research practices. I examine the modalities of collaboration in my first experience of managing an important national research project on Italian families' dinner table conversations, and in a larger collaborative research endeavor concerning the everyday life of middle-class Italian, Swedish and US families from a comparative view (the Sloan project). On the basis of these experiences, I highlight some of the difficulties met by two other projects presented in this special issue, the DUNES project (Tartas and Muller Mirza, this issue) and the Transition project (Markova and Plichtova, this issue). I conclude by suggesting a provisional criterion for generativity in collaborative research. I suggest that generativity occurs when the more expert and academically oldest ones become conscious that they are learning something new from the group and from some other, independently from age and experience.

  2. Rules for collaborative scientific writing

    CERN Document Server

    Budker, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Several years ago, one of us, having noticed that inexperienced scientists tend to make largely the same mistakes while writing their first papers, was compelled to write a one-page note summarizing some dos and don'ts intended to help take care of common problems before they occur. Since these days the majority of research papers are written collaboratively by groups of co-authors, we are compelled to extend these recommendations to collaborative writing as we observe groups of co-authors falling into the same traps again and again.

  3. Designing for Transformations in Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus; Thomsen, Anders Bo

    2005-01-01

    Transformations in collaborative work due to the introduction of new technology are inevitable, but are often difficult to study. In this paper, we consider the patterns of transformation that are seen in a patient-physician relationship based on the introduction of homecare monitoring equipment....... We report findings from interviews and fieldwork with patients and physicians participating in a clinical experiment of homecare monitoring. By studying both the group of patients who receive homecare-based treatment and the control group we were able to identify transformations in the collaborative...

  4. International collaboration clusters in Africa

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Jonathan; Hook, Daniel; Leydesdorff, Loet

    2013-01-01

    Recent discussion about the increase in international research collaboration suggests a comprehensive global network centred around a group of core countries and driven by generic socio-economic factors where the global system influences all national and institutional outcomes. In counterpoint, we demonstrate that the collaboration pattern for countries in Africa is far from universal. Instead, it exhibits layers of internal clusters and external links that are explained not by monotypic global influences but by regional geography and, perhaps even more strongly, by history, culture and language. Analysis of these bottom-up, subjective, human factors is required in order to provide the fuller explanation useful for policy and management purposes.

  5. Benefits of international technical collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the benefits associated with international technical collaboration in the area of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) maintains a proactive role in and has achieved significant benefits from international collaboration focused on geologic repository development, spent fuel storage and transportation, licensing, and public relations issues. Any one nation's confidence in these categories of activities associated with HLW waste management programs will be significantly affected by the success or failure of similar programs in other nations

  6. Handbook of Collaborative Management Research

    CERN Document Server

    Shani, A B Rami B; Pasmore, William A A; Stymne, Dr Bengt; Adler, Niclas

    2007-01-01

    This handbook provides the latest thinking, methodologies and cases in the rapidly growing area of collaborative management research. What makes collaborative management research different is its emphasis on creating a close partnership between scholars and practitioners in the search for knowledge concerning organizations and complex systems. In the ideal situation, scholars and their managerial partners would work together to define the research focus, develop the methods to be used for data collection, participate equally in the analysis of data, and work together in the application and dis

  7. Novelties on Sharepoint Collaboration Workspace

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    Your Sharepoint Collaboration workspaces will have to migrate to the new Sharepoint 2010 version. As soon as you will create a new site or subsite within your own site or as soon as you will click on “Update my site”, you will be forced to migrate to Sharepoint 2010. In order to anticipate these changes, the technical training invites you to discover all the new features of this interface in a new one day course called “Novelties on Sharepoint Collaboration Workspace 2010”. To sign in, please click on our training catalogue.

  8. Phenylketonuria in adulthood: a collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, R; Burton, B; Hoganson, G; Peterson, R; Rhead, W; Rouse, B; Scott, R; Wolff, J; Stern, A M; Guttler, F; Nelson, M; de la Cruz, F; Coldwell, J; Erbe, R; Geraghty, M T; Shear, C; Thomas, J; Azen, C

    2002-09-01

    During 1967-1983, the Maternal and Child Health Division of the Public Health Services funded a collaborative study of 211 newborn infants identified on newborn screening as having phenylketonuria (PKU). Subsequently, financial support was provided by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The infants were treated with a phenylalanine (Phe)-restricted diet to age 6 years and then randomized either to continue the diet or to discontinue dietary treatment altogether. One hundred and twenty-five of the 211 children were then followed until 10 years of age. In 1998, NICHD scheduled a Consensus Development Conference on Phenylketonuria and initiated a study to follow up the participants from the original Collaborative Study to evaluate their present medical, nutritional, psychological, and socioeconomic status. Fourteen of the original clinics (1967-1983) participated in the Follow-up Study effort. Each clinic director was provided with a list of PKU subjects who had completed the original study (1967-1983), and was asked to evaluate as many as possible using a uniform protocol and data collection forms. In a subset of cases, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS) were performed to study brain Phe concentrations. The medical evaluations revealed that the subjects who maintained a phenylalanine-restricted diet reported fewer problems than the diet discontinuers, who had an increased rate of eczema, asthma, mental disorders, headache, hyperactivity and hypoactivity. Psychological data showed that lower intellectual and achievement test scores were associated with dietary discontinuation and with higher childhood and adult blood Phe concentrations. Abnormal MRI results were associated with higher brain Phe concentrations. Early dietary discontinuation for subjects with PKU is associated with poorer outcomes not only in intellectual ability, but also in achievement test scores and increased rates of medical and behavioural

  9. A framework for effective collaboration: a case study of collaboration in nursing education in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Felicity M; Khanyile, Thembisile D

    2013-09-01

    A fundamental purpose of mergers between higher education institutions (HEIs) in 2002 was to enable sharing of scarce resources between more advanced universities and those historically disadvantaged by the apartheid system of the South African Government. A common teaching platform for undergraduate nursing education in the Western Cape was established in 2005, in line with the transformation of the higher education system, as a collaborative initiative between three universities. In order to evaluate the common teaching platform, Stuffelbeam's context, input, process, product (CIPP) research model was employed. A sample of 108 participants was selected through stratified purposive sampling, and included three deputy vice-chancellors, three deans, three heads of department, 18 lecturers and 81 students. Semi-structured interviews were held with the staff members, whilst the students participated in focus group interviews. Open-ended questions informed by literature and the CIPP evaluation model were developed and used to guide the interviews. This enabled the researcher to obtain a rich description of the participants' experiences. The data were analysed inductively. The results revealed that the main purpose of collaboration was not achieved due to the lack of a common understanding of the concept of collaboration and its purpose; a lack of readiness to collaborate and a lack of sharing of resources. A framework for effective collaboration was developed based on the results. PMID:23196002

  10. Improving the Collaboration Between the Finnish and International Business Students

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Hien

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the research was to analyse the current situation of the internationality at the Department of Business management in Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences (MAMK) and thus draw a conclusion to improve the collaboration between the Finnish and international students. The thesis consists of four parts through which a reader can have a deeper knowledge about internationality at Finnish universities of applied sciences and the real situation in the Department of Business ma...

  11. A Social Network Analysis of Teaching and Research Collaboration in a Teachers' Virtual Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaofan; Hu, Xiaoyong; Hu, Qintai; Liu, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Analysing the structure of a social network can help us understand the key factors influencing interaction and collaboration in a virtual learning community (VLC). Here, we describe the mechanisms used in social network analysis (SNA) to analyse the social network structure of a VLC for teachers and discuss the relationship between face-to-face…

  12. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  13. Network class superposition analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Carl A B; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., ≈ 10(30) for the yeast cell cycle process), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix T, which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for T derived from boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying T to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with T. We show how to generate Derrida plots based on T. We show that T-based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on T. We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for T, for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses. PMID:23565141

  14. Use of an Interculturally Enriched Collaboration Script in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Kuznetsov, A.N.; Mulder, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors introduced an interculturally enriched collaboration script (IECS) for working in culturally diverse groups within a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment and then assessed student online collaborative behaviour, learning performance and

  15. Therapists Value of Interprofessional Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Dawn R.

    2012-01-01

    The work of occupational (OT), physical (PT), and recreational therapists (RT), as well as speech- language pathologists (SLP), is interrelated and requires effective teamwork and collaboration to optimize patient outcomes and satisfaction. Literature shows that health care professionals are ill prepared to work in an interprofessional manner due…

  16. Mapping the Collaborative Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Julie Reed; Scholz, Carrie; Garcia, Alicia N.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant federal investments in the production of high-quality education research, the direct use of that research in policy and practice is not evident. Some education researchers are increasingly employing collaborative research models that use structures and processes to integrate practitioners into the research process in an effort…

  17. Collaborative Stakeholder Engagement. Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Matt; Chrislip, David; Workman, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement and collaboration are essential to the development of an effective state plan. Engaging a diverse group of stakeholders tasked with working together to create education policies that will have a positive, lasting impact on students is not as easy as it sounds. Experts in the field argue that the traditional stakeholder…

  18. Collaboration Meets Interactive Surfaces (CMIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anslow, Craig; Campos, Pedro; Grisoni, Laurent;

    2015-01-01

    This workshop proposes to bring together researchers who are interested in improving collaborative experiences through the combination of multiple interaction surfaces with diverse sizes and formats, ranging from large-scale walls, to tables, mobiles, and wearables. The opportunities for innovation...

  19. Collaborative development of embedded systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, Marcel; Pierce, Kenneth; Gamble, Carl; Broenink, Jan; Fitzgerald, John; Larsen, Peter Gorm; Verhoef, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents motivation for taking a collaborative multi-disciplinary approach to the model-based development of embedded systems. Starting from a consideration of the ubiquity of embedded systems in daily life it identifies challenges faced by industry in developing products in a timely ma

  20. Indigenous Continuance: Collaboration and Syncretism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    In this keynote address, the author talks about Indigenous peoples who are presently in a dynamic circumstance of constant change that they are facing courageously with creative collaboration and syncretism. In the address, the author speaks "of" an Indigenous consciousness and he speaks "with" an Indigenous consciousness so that Indigenous…

  1. Global Collaboration Enhances Technology Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Linda A.; Bell, Meredith L.; Nugent, Jill; Smith, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Today's learners routinely use technology outside of school to communicate, collaborate, and gather information about the world around them. Classroom learning experiences are relevant when they include communication technologies such as social networking, blogging, and video conferencing, and information technologies such as databases, browsers,…

  2. Policy Development Fosters Collaborative Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Daniel M; Kaste, Linda M; Lituri, Kathy M;

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an example of interprofessional collaboration for policy development regarding environmental global health vis-à-vis the Minamata Convention on Mercury. It presents an overview of mercury and mercury-related environmental health issues; public policy processes and stakeholde...

  3. Enhancing Collaboration through Assessment & Reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phielix, C.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest among educational settings, especially in higher education, in letting people learn and work together in small groups. This is known as collaborative learning (CL). However, working in a group can be very frustrating, especially when a fellow group member is failing his/h

  4. Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, June G.

    2002-01-01

    The feature story in this issue, "Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment," focuses on the growing emphasis on teamwork in the workplace. It discusses how the concept of empowering employees in the workplace is evolving and the benefits--faster decision making, lower costs and absenteeism, higher productivity and quality, and increased…

  5. Children of Dutch Nazi collaborators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tames, I.

    2015-01-01

    This article looks into what happened to the children of Dutch Nazi collaborators after the liberation of the Netherlands in May 1945. The author first outlines the historical context in which these children lived and the manner in which they recounted and recorded their memories much later. In comb

  6. Incorporating Brokers within Collaboration Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R.; de Torcy, A.

    2013-12-01

    A collaboration environment, such as the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS - http://irods.diceresearch.org), provides interoperability mechanisms for accessing storage systems, authentication systems, messaging systems, information catalogs, networks, and policy engines from a wide variety of clients. The interoperability mechanisms function as brokers, translating actions requested by clients to the protocol required by a specific technology. The iRODS data grid is used to enable collaborative research within hydrology, seismology, earth science, climate, oceanography, plant biology, astronomy, physics, and genomics disciplines. Although each domain has unique resources, data formats, semantics, and protocols, the iRODS system provides a generic framework that is capable of managing collaborative research initiatives that span multiple disciplines. Each interoperability mechanism (broker) is linked to a name space that enables unified access across the heterogeneous systems. The collaboration environment provides not only support for brokers, but also support for virtualization of name spaces for users, files, collections, storage systems, metadata, and policies. The broker enables access to data or information in a remote system using the appropriate protocol, while the collaboration environment provides a uniform naming convention for accessing and manipulating each object. Within the NSF DataNet Federation Consortium project (http://www.datafed.org), three basic types of interoperability mechanisms have been identified and applied: 1) drivers for managing manipulation at the remote resource (such as data subsetting), 2) micro-services that execute the protocol required by the remote resource, and 3) policies for controlling the execution. For example, drivers have been written for manipulating NetCDF and HDF formatted files within THREDDS servers. Micro-services have been written that manage interactions with the CUAHSI data repository, the Data

  7. The complexity of collaboration: Opportunities and challenges in contracted research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Bowl

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores some of the challenges of utilising collaborative research approaches when undertaking contracted research projects for government and non-government agencies in the adult and community education (ACE sector. To discuss these challenges, the article draws on three recent examples of research projects undertaken for ACE sector organisations in Aotearoa New Zealand. These challenges include managing relationships with the different parties to the research; dealing with conflicting expectations of funding agencies, commissioning organisations and practitioners; and ownership and dissemination of findings. We highlight the complexity of notions of collaboration and the importance of deliberate trust-building in establishing credibility. We also open up for discussion the thorny issues of who owns the right to disseminate research findings and how far should researchers’ and universities’ responsibilities extend to ensure that research findings are put in the public domain?

  8. Some Remarks on Collaborative Systems Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available DARPA Intelligent Collaboration and Visualization Program [DARPA1997] developed a general framework for the collaborative systems architecture for the audit of these systems. The authors applied the framework for different applications and for collaborative project management [Nitchi2006]. In different particular type of collaborative systems were developed other frameworks. By these, but also from our experience we developed a new general framework for collaborative systems. This note would be a short presentation of this framework used by the authors in development of the CSCW for the collaborative systems in business and also in education.

  9. Fragmentation and connection of frames in collaborative water governance: a case study of river catchment management in Southern Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewulf, A.; Mancero, M.; Cárdenas, G.; Sucozhañay, D.

    2011-01-01

    In collaborative water governance, the variety of frames that actors bring to the discussion constitutes an important challenge. In this study, we analyse the fragmentation and connection of frames in collaborative water governance projects in the Paute catchment and its sub-catchment Tabacay in the

  10. Getting into networks and clusters: evidence from the Midi-Pyrenean Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Collaboration Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vicente, J.; Balland, P.M.A.; Brossard, O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses clusters from collaborative knowledge relations. Focusing on the interface of clusters and networks contributes to a better understanding of collaboration, within and across places and cognitive domains. We propose an empirical analysis of the Midi-Pyrenean GNSS (Global Navigatio

  11. "Old Wine in Even Newer Bottles": The Uneasy Relationship between Web 2.0 Technologies and European School Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouseti, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    The idea of using digital technologies and in particular web 2.0 tools to enhance school collaboration has recently been received with great enthusiasm and a range of new collaborative initiatives has emerged. Through a comparative qualitative case study of four schools in the UK and Greece, this article analyses how online tools are supporting…

  12. Enhancing collaborative learning by means of collaborative serious games:providing requirements to collaborative serious games' design

    OpenAIRE

    Parzhetskaya, L. (Lyana)

    2014-01-01

    The current study is a theoretical overview which aim is to define collaborative serious games, identify the problems arising in using and implementation of these games in learning and education and search of ways of improvement of the collaborative process by means of providing the requirements to collaborative serious games’ design. The study makes connections among the following concepts: collaboration, gaming and technology and shows how they can be combined into a one study in order to i...

  13. Website-analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    planlægning af de funktionelle og indholdsmæssige aspekter ved websites. Der findes en stor mængde teori- og metodebøger, som har specialiseret sig i de tekniske problemstillinger i forbindelse med interaktion og navigation, samt det sproglige indhold på websites. Den danske HCI (Human Computer Interaction...... hyperfunktionelle websites. Det primære ærinde for HCI-eksperterne er at udarbejde websites, som er brugervenlige. Ifølge deres direktiver skal websites være opbygget med hurtige og effektive navigations- og interaktionsstrukturer, hvor brugeren kan få sine informationer ubesværet af lange downloadingshastigheder...... eller blindgyder, når han/hun besøger sitet. Studier i design og analyse af de visuelle og æstetiske aspekter i planlægning og brug af websites har imidlertid kun i et begrænset omfang været under reflektorisk behandling. Det er baggrunden for dette kapitel, som indleder med en gennemgang af æstetikkens...

  14. Risk Management Collaboration through Sharing Interactive Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slingsby, Aidan; Dykes, Jason; Wood, Jo; Foote, Matthew

    2010-05-01

    Risk management involves the cooperation of scientists, underwriters and actuaries all of whom analyse data to support decision-making. Results are often disseminated through static documents with graphics that convey the message the analyst wishes to communicate. Interactive graphics are increasingly popular means of communicating the results of data analyses because they enable other parties to explore and visually analyse some of the data themselves prior to and during discussion. Discussion around interactive graphics can occur synchronously in face-to-face meetings or with video-conferencing and screen sharing or they can occur asynchronously through web-sites such as ManyEyes, web-based fora, blogs, wikis and email. A limitation of approaches that do not involve screen sharing is the difficulty in sharing the results of insights from interacting with the graphic. Static images accompanied can be shared but these themselves cannot be interacted, producing a discussion bottleneck (Baker, 2008). We address this limitation by allowing the state and configuration of graphics to be shared (rather than static images) so that a user can reproduce someone else's graphic, interact with it and then share the results of this accompanied with some commentary. HiVE (Slingsby et al, 2009) is a compact and intuitive text-based language that has been designed for this purpose. We will describe the vizTweets project (a 9-month project funded by JISC) in which we are applying these principles to insurance risk management in the context of the Willis Research Network, the world's largest collaboration between the insurance industry and the academia). The project aims to extend HiVE to meet the needs of the sector, design, implement free-available web services and tools and to provide case studies. We will present a case study that demonstrate the potential of this approach for collaboration within the Willis Research Network. Baker, D. Towards Transparency in Visualisation Based

  15. Examining the Influence of Structured Collaborative Learning Experiences for Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Classroom experiences influence a diverse array of student outcomes, such as academic and cognitive development, interpersonal skills, and the amount of time students engage in academic activities. Collaborative learning is an important pedagogy that is particularly meaningful for graduate students, who are often adults returning to college. This…

  16. CPR: Adult

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  17. Learning to Collaborate by Collaborating: A Face-to-Face Collaborative Activity for Measuring and Learning Basics about Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Woywood, G.; Aravena, R.

    2009-01-01

    In today's fast-changing business environment, teams have emerged as a requirement for business success. However, in schools and universities, students are usually not taught teamwork skills. In this paper, we introduce learning to collaborate by collaborating, a process that enables collaboration and teamwork skills to be taught and measured…

  18. Taxonomy of collaborative networks forms: FInES Task Force on Collaborative Networks and SOCOLNET - Society of Collaborative Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Camarinha-Matos; H. Afsarmanesh

    2012-01-01

    This chapter is intended as a contribution to the consolidation of base terminology in collaborative networks and thus facilitate the dialogue and collaboration among the Factories of the Future projects included in the FInES cluster. The main current forms of collaborative networks, both in industr

  19. Collaborative pharmacy practice: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law AV

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anandi V Law, Eric K Gupta, Micah Hata, Karl M Hess, Roger S Klotz, Quang A Le, Emmanuelle Schwartzman, Bik-Wai Bilvick Tai Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA, USA Abstract: Collaborative practice among health professionals is slowly coming of age, given the global focus on efficiency and effectiveness of care to achieve positive patient outcomes and to reduce the economic burden of fragmented care. Collaborative pharmacy practice (CPP is accordingly evolving within different models including: disease management, medication therapy management, patient centered medical home, and accountable care organizations. Pharmacist roles in these models relate to drug therapy management and include therapy introduction, adjustment, or discontinuation, patient counseling and education, and identification, resolution, and prevention of problems leading to drug interactions and adverse reactions. Most forms of CPP occur with physicians in various settings. Collaborative practice agreements exist in many states in the US and are mentioned in the International Pharmaceutical Federation policy statement. Impetus for CPP comes from health system and economic concerns, as well as from a regulatory push. There are positive examples in community, ambulatory care, and inpatient settings that have well documented protocols, indicators of care, and measurement and reporting of clinical, economic, and patient reported outcomes; however, implementation of the practice is still not widespread. Conceptual and implementation challenges include health professional training, attitudes, confidence and comfort levels, power and communication issues, logistic barriers of time, workload, proximity, resistance to establish and adopt regulations, and importantly, payment models. Some of the attitudinal and perceptual challenges can be mitigated by incorporation of interprofessional concepts and

  20. Wiring Role Taking in Collaborative Learning Environments. SNA and Semantic Web can improve CSCL script?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Capuano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years the concept of role in distance education has become a promising construct for analysing and facilitating collaborative processes and outcomes. Designing effective collaborative learning processes is a complex task that can be supported by existing good practices formulated as pedagogical patterns or scripts. Over the past years, the research on technology enhanced learning has shown that collaborative scripts for learning act as mediating artefacts not only designing educational scenarios but also structuring and prescribing roles and activities. Conversely, existing learning systems are not able to provide dynamic role management in the definition and execution of collaborative scripts. This work proposes the application of Social Network Analysis in order to evaluate the expertise level of a learner when he/she is acting, with an assigned role, within the execution of a collaborative script. Semantic extensions to both IMS Learning Design and Information Packaging specifications are also proposed to support roles management.

  1. A collaboration process for enterprise architecture creation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakakawa, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    Designing an enterprise architecture involves architect-specific tasks (those that are executed by enterprise architects) and collaboration dependent tasks (those whose proper execution requires enterprise architects to collaborate with organizational stakeholders). Enterprise architecture framework

  2. Proximity and Collaboration in European Nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunningham, S.W.; Werker, C.

    2011-01-01

    Collaborations are particularly important for the development and deployment of technology. We analyze the influence of organizational, technological and geographical proximity on European nanotechnology collaborations with the help of a publication dataset and additional geographical information. W

  3. Behavioral aspects in collaborative enterprise networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Camarinha-Matos; H. Afsarmanesh

    2011-01-01

    The collaborative networks paradigm can empower enterprises with the needed agility and survival capability to face market turbulence. However, the success and sustainability of collaboration requires proper understanding and modeling of the involved behavioral aspects, a basis for sound development

  4. AN ARRANGED MARRIAGE: POLICE - MEDIA CONFLICT & COLLABORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrismas, Bob

    2012-01-01

    é avec des médias locaux en vue d’améliorer leur relation de travail. On y souligne l’importance de l’analyse des conflits suivie de stratégies efficaces de gestion du changement dans la mise en œuvre de solutions axées sur la collaboration et répondant aux besoins de tous. Cette étude présente les dynamiques communes aux organismes indépendants dont la culture d’entreprise est bien affirmée, et devant travailler en partenariat. Parmi ces organisations, on compte l’armée, les gardes de prison, le secteur universitaire, le corps médical, les travailleurs sociaux, les enseignants, les avocats et la plupart des organismes gouvernementaux.

  5. The Role of Collaborative Learning on Training and Development Practices within the Australian Men's Shed Movement: A Study of Five Men's Sheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Jillian; Southcombe, Amie; Bartram, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the role and impact of collaborative learning on training and development practices in Australian Men's Sheds. We use a case study approach, underpinned by Peters and Armstrong's theoretical framework of collaborative learning in adult education, to investigate five Men's Sheds. Semi-structured interviews were…

  6. Bibliometric methods for detecting and analysing emerging research topics

    OpenAIRE

    Glänzel, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    This study gives an overview of the process of clustering scientific disciplines using hybrid methods, detecting and labelling emerging topics and analysing the results using bibliometrics methods. The hybrid clustering techniques are based on biblographic coupling and text-mining and ‘core documents’, and cross-citation links are used to identify emerging fields. The collaboration network of those countries that proved to be most active in the underlying disciplines, in combination with a...

  7. Supporting Teachers Intervention in Collaborative Knowledge Building

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weiqin

    2004-01-01

    In the context of distributed collaborative learning, the teacher's role is different from traditional teacher-centered environments, they are coordinators/facilitators, guides, and co-learners. They monitor the collaboration activities within a group, detect problems and intervene in the collaboration to give advice and learn alongside students at the same time. We have designed an Assistant to support teachers intervention in collaborative knowledge building. The Assistant monitors the coll...

  8. Designing distributed collaborative visual analytics systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nobarany, Syavash

    2010-01-01

    Analysts should be able to collaboratively work on enormous amount of available information and share their findings and understandings to effectively and efficiently make sense of the situation under investigation. The general question this thesis addresses is “How can a distributed collaborative analytics system support efficient and effective distributed (in time and space) collaboration among analysts?” and we focus on answering “How can a collaborative analytics system support efficient ...

  9. Identification of collaborative skills with serious games

    OpenAIRE

    Berdun, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative skills are de ned as a subset of learned behaviors that involve people in interpersonal situations to get or keep strengthening the environment. If the collaborative skills of a group members is insu cient, individual behaviors might arise. These individual behaviors can negatively impact the performance of the group and prevent to achieve an adequate collaborative work. Collaborative skills are essential in the software development market, since the increasing complexity of app...

  10. Process model patterns for collaborative work

    OpenAIRE

    Lonchamp, Jacques

    1998-01-01

    Colloque avec actes et comité de lecture. As most real work is collaborative in nature, process model developers have to model collaborative situations. This paper defines generic collaborative patterns, ie, pragmatic and abstract building blocks for modelling recurrent situations. The first part specifies the graphical notation for the solution description. The second part gives some current patterns for the collaborative production of a single document in isolation and for the synchroniz...

  11. Supporting collaboration in multidisciplinary home care teams.

    OpenAIRE

    Pinelle, David; Gutwin, Carl

    2002-01-01

    Collaboration is an important part of healthcare delivery. However, in home care, collaboration is difficult due to the mobility and schedule variability of the workers. In this paper, we investigate the difficulties inherent in home care collaboration. We present the results of a study carried out with home care clinicians in Saskatoon District Health, and identify five areas of collaboration that are difficult for home care workers: scheduling, information dissemination, information retriev...

  12. Collaborative Approaches in Emerging Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Han, Yang

    2011-01-01

    , in order to increase innovation performance. The theoretical framework is based on theories on trust, as well as institutional theory. The findings suggest that cognition-based trust as well as affect-based trust is needed for successful innovative collaboration, however, in emerging markets affect......The paper investigates innovative collaboration undertaken by newly established foreign invested R&D units in emerging markets. In particular, the paper investigates how foreign invested newly established R&D centers in emerging markets can leverage local knowledge networks, such as universities......-based trust is more important than Westerners are used to. This is due to the different institutional backgrounds, in emerging markets and developed markets respectively....

  13. Online University-Industry Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Helle Alsted; Bergenholtz, Carsten; Juhl, Hans Jørn

    , the main drivers for engagement are organizational and individual learning, and establishing connections, rather than monetary incentives. In contrast to offline studies on university-industry interactions, well-connected academics are less interested in online communities of academics and industry......Extant studies have shown how online communities can promote collaborative and innovative activities in general. Studies on university-industry collaborations have so far focused less on online activities. We therefore set out to examine the individual and organizational drivers and barriers...... for academics and industrial professionals to contribute to online community-based platforms. We use a mixed method approach using both survey data and in-depth interviews with respondents from the Danish food sector. Findings show that in line with known studies on online innovation communities in general...

  14. Organizing for the Collaborative Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Hasle, Peter; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    To meet demands for high quality and efficient care, hospitals increasingly organize horizontally around standardized processes (like lean and care pathways) and/or set-up formal structural arrangements such as using performance boards, having daily huddles or assigning specific roles. This trend...... highlights a management paradox that calls for balancing a both/and approach to bureaucratization and collaboration in hospitals. Through a qualitative multiple, embedded case study of four hospitals, the paper investigates how standardized processes and structural arrangements—instances of organizational...... design—facilitate collaboration in hospitals. This is important as the literature on formal organization is disconnected from the informal aspects of the organization, thereby limiting the understanding of how hospitals function. Findings suggest that hospitals use many different types of organizational...

  15. Interprofessional collaborative practice: a deconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thistlethwaite, Jill; Jackson, Ann; Moran, Monica

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses (and perhaps abuses) deconstruction to revisit the meanings of collaboration and practice. We start with a description of deconstruction itself, as espoused by Jacques Derrida, and then move onto challenging the notion that words, such as collaboration, can have fixed meanings. And, in the spirit of Derrida, "I can foresee the impatience of the bad reader: this is the way I name or accuse the fearful reader, the reader in a hurry to be determined, decided upon deciding (in order to annul, in other words to bring back to oneself, one has to wish to know in advance what to expect...)" (Derrida, 1987, p. 4--original italics), we move straight into the text. PMID:23126420

  16. Therapists and researchers: advancing collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Ann F; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative partnerships between community-based clinicians and academic researchers have the potential to improve the relevance, utility, and feasibility of research, as well as the effectiveness of practice. Collaborative partnership research from a variety of fields can inform the development and maintenance of effective partnerships. In this paper we present a conceptual model of research-community practice partnership derived from literature across disciplines and then illustrate application of this model to one case example. The case example is a multi-year partnership between an interdisciplinary group of community-based psychotherapists and a team of mental health researchers. This partnership was initiated to support federally funded research on community-based outpatient mental health care for children with disruptive behavior problems, but it has evolved to drive and support new intervention studies with different clinical foci. Lessons learned from this partnership process will be shared and interpreted in the context of the presented research-practice partnership model. PMID:24224554

  17. Meaning Negotiations of Collaborative Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plotnikof, Mie

    2016-01-01

    engages with recent debates about the complexity of such new governance forms, as well as discussions on the relationship between discourse and materiality and the calls made to develop multi-method approaches to study complex organizational phenomena. In effect, the chapter develops empirical and...... analytical approaches to unfold discourse-material aspects of the negotiations of meanings and matters of such new governance form in practice. The chapter provides examples based on ethnographic fieldwork in collaborations across actors from the welfare area of education. In conclusion, the author reflects......This chapter explores the potential for developing organizational discourse approaches through ethnographic fieldwork in the context of collaborative governance: a procedure to involve stakeholders in public problem solving of, for example, policy and service innovation. In doing so, the researcher...

  18. Collaboration systems for classroom instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y. Roger; Meliksetian, Dikran S.; Chang, Martin C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we discuss how classroom instruction can benefit from state-of-the-art technologies in networks, worldwide web access through Internet, multimedia, databases, and computing. Functional requirements for establishing such a high-tech classroom are identified, followed by descriptions of our current experimental implementations. The focus of the paper is on the capabilities of distributed collaboration, which supports both synchronous multimedia information sharing as well as a shared work environment for distributed teamwork and group decision making. Our ultimate goal is to achieve the concept of 'living world in a classroom' such that live and dynamic up-to-date information and material from all over the world can be integrated into classroom instruction on a real-time basis. We describe how we incorporate application developments in a geography study tool, worldwide web information retrievals, databases, and programming environments into the collaborative system.

  19. Meaning Negotiations of Collaborative Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plotnikof, Mie; Zandee, Danielle P.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores the potential for developing organizational discourse approaches through ethnographic fieldwork in the context of collaborative governance: a procedure to involve stakeholders in public problem solving of, for example, policy and service innovation. In doing so, the researcher...... engages with recent debates about the complexity of such new governance forms, as well as discussions on the relationship between discourse and materiality and the calls made to develop multi-method approaches to study complex organizational phenomena. In effect, the chapter develops empirical...... and analytical approaches to unfold discourse-material aspects of the negotiations of meanings and matters of such new governance form in practice. The chapter provides examples based on ethnographic fieldwork in collaborations across actors from the welfare area of education. In conclusion, the author reflects...

  20. Visioning future emergency healthcare collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2010-01-01

    New video technologies are emerging to facilitate collaboration in emergency healthcare. One such technology is 3D telepresence technology for medical consultation (3DMC) that may provide richer visual information to support collaboration between medical professionals to, ideally, enhance patient...... care in real time. Today only an early prototype of 3DMC exists. To better understand 3DMC's potential for adoption and use in emergency healthcare before large amounts of development resources are invested we conducted a visioning study. That is, we shared our vision of 3DMC with emergency room...... physicians, nurses, administrators, and information technology (IT) professionals working at large and small medical centers, and asked them to share their perspectives regarding 3DMC's potential benefits and disadvantages in emergency healthcare and its compatibility and/or lack thereof...

  1. ATLAS Live: Collaborative Information Streams

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfarb, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    I report on a pilot project launched in 2010 focusing on facilitating communication and information exchange within the ATLAS Collaboration, through the combination of digital signage software and webcasting. The project, called ATLAS Live, implements video streams of information, ranging from detailed detector and data status to educational and outreach material. The content, including text, images, video and audio, is collected, visualised and scheduled using the SCALA digital signage software system. The system is robust and flexible, allowing for the usage of scripts to input data from remote sources, such as the CERN Document Server, Indico, or any available URL, and to integrate these sources into professional-quality streams, including text scrolling, transition effects, inter and intrascreen divisibility. The video is made available to the collaboration or public through the encoding and webcasting of standard video streams, viewable on all common platforms, using a web browser or other common video t...

  2. Improving Creativity in Collaborative Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Purushothaman, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to build a theoretical framework by a literature review that is focusing on how a learning model based on Communities of Practice (CoP) can be useful in collaborative processes in organizational learning contexts. In the light of social approach to learning theories and knowledge...... types of knowledge. (3) These points drive this paper to develop a knowledge creation model by discussing how CoP can be used to improve creativity in collaborative processes in organizational learning contexts. The point of departure for the learning model is the learning framework proposed...... by the theory of CoP. The learning framework provides a design dimension which can offer the organizational members scope for participation and engagement in the communities for facilitating learning as an identity change in the specific sociocultural context of the organization....

  3. A Win-Win Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beth Parkinson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This brief article reports on a collaborative book-borrowing policy between The Brendlinger Library of Montgomery County Community College and the Wissahickon Valley Public Library (WVPL, both located in Blue Bell, PA.  Beginning in January 2013, WVPL will donate books periodically to the Brendlinger Library in support of the students enrolled in Reading classes.  Circulation statistics will be reported to WVPL, and the books will be returned to WVPL for sale in the WVPL Friends of the Library book sale. Keywords: academic library; public library,  community college library; collaboration; developmental readers; reading programs; reading instruction; literacy; Montgomery County Community College; Wissahickon Valley Public Library

  4. Collaborative Lea(r)ning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jacob S.

    , the strategies of companies, and the work of managers. Alliances are both a cause and an effect of intensive competition. Collaboration can help firms to lower costs and risks, to expand markets, to develop new products and to learn or create new knowledge. One of the challenges is building capability...... to establishing a joint improvement and learning culture with these organisations. Simply, if companies want to create new capabilities and improve their competitiveness, they must combine their knowledge and skills in a unique way, and create improvement and learning links to enable personal and information......The inter-organisational collaboration perspective is not new. Phoenician merchants have used this perspective while setting up joint ventures to limit their risks in overseas trading. What is new are the ways in which efficiency alliances are interacting and changing the terms of competition...

  5. E-learning systems support of collaborative agreements: a theoretical model

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre Herrera, Sandra; Quemada Vives, Juan

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a theoretical model for developing integrated degree programmes through e-learning systems as stipulated by a collaboration agreement signed by two universities. We have analysed several collaboration agreements between universities at the national, European, and transatlantic level as well as various e-learning frameworks. A conceptual model, a business model, and the architecture design are presented as part of the theoretical model. The paper presents a way of impleme...

  6. The collaborative roots of corruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Ori; Shalvi, Shaul

    2015-08-25

    Cooperation is essential for completing tasks that individuals cannot accomplish alone. Whereas the benefits of cooperation are clear, little is known about its possible negative aspects. Introducing a novel sequential dyadic die-rolling paradigm, we show that collaborative settings provide fertile ground for the emergence of corruption. In the main experimental treatment the outcomes of the two players are perfectly aligned. Player A privately rolls a die, reports the result to player B, who then privately rolls and reports the result as well. Both players are paid the value of the reports if, and only if, they are identical (e.g., if both report 6, each earns €6). Because rolls are truly private, players can inflate their profit by misreporting the actual outcomes. Indeed, the proportion of reported doubles was 489% higher than the expected proportion assuming honesty, 48% higher than when individuals rolled and reported alone, and 96% higher than when lies only benefited the other player. Breaking the alignment in payoffs between player A and player B reduced the extent of brazen lying. Despite player B's central role in determining whether a double was reported, modifying the incentive structure of either player A or player B had nearly identical effects on the frequency of reported doubles. Our results highlight the role of collaboration-particularly on equal terms-in shaping corruption. These findings fit a functional perspective on morality. When facing opposing moral sentiments-to be honest vs. to join forces in collaboration-people often opt for engaging in corrupt collaboration. PMID:26261341

  7. Freaky: Collaborative Enactments of Emotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leahu, Lucian; Sengers, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    The field of CSCW is increasingly drawing on theories and approaches from feminist philosophy of science. To date such efforts have focused on understanding users and their practices. We present a research prototype showing that feminist theories can lead to novel design solutions. Freaky...... is a mobile, interactive system that collaborates with its users in the enactment of emotion. Informed by the feminist literature, the system introduces a novel approach to emotion: designing for human-machine co-production of emotion....

  8. The collaborative roots of corruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Ori; Shalvi, Shaul

    2015-08-25

    Cooperation is essential for completing tasks that individuals cannot accomplish alone. Whereas the benefits of cooperation are clear, little is known about its possible negative aspects. Introducing a novel sequential dyadic die-rolling paradigm, we show that collaborative settings provide fertile ground for the emergence of corruption. In the main experimental treatment the outcomes of the two players are perfectly aligned. Player A privately rolls a die, reports the result to player B, who then privately rolls and reports the result as well. Both players are paid the value of the reports if, and only if, they are identical (e.g., if both report 6, each earns €6). Because rolls are truly private, players can inflate their profit by misreporting the actual outcomes. Indeed, the proportion of reported doubles was 489% higher than the expected proportion assuming honesty, 48% higher than when individuals rolled and reported alone, and 96% higher than when lies only benefited the other player. Breaking the alignment in payoffs between player A and player B reduced the extent of brazen lying. Despite player B's central role in determining whether a double was reported, modifying the incentive structure of either player A or player B had nearly identical effects on the frequency of reported doubles. Our results highlight the role of collaboration-particularly on equal terms-in shaping corruption. These findings fit a functional perspective on morality. When facing opposing moral sentiments-to be honest vs. to join forces in collaboration-people often opt for engaging in corrupt collaboration.

  9. A Classification of Collaborative Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Marlowe; Vassilka Kirova; Norbert Jastroch; Mojgan Mohtashami

    2011-01-01

    Efforts involving multiple institutions, whether aimed at sharing resources, at product development or production, at research, or in other directions, often rely on effective knowledge generation and knowledge management. However, there are inherent new difficulties in knowledge management for such inter-institutional collaborations, arising from the need to standardize and synthesize knowledge from multiple sources, and from the need to provide adequate protections for confidential and prop...

  10. A Win-Win Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Beth Parkinson

    2013-01-01

    This brief article reports on a collaborative book-borrowing policy between The Brendlinger Library of Montgomery County Community College and the Wissahickon Valley Public Library (WVPL), both located in Blue Bell, PA.  Beginning in January 2013, WVPL will donate books periodically to the Brendlinger Library in support of the students enrolled in Reading classes.  Circulation statistics will be reported to WVPL, and the books will be returned to WVPL for sale in the WVPL Friends of the Libra...

  11. Atrial fibrillation care improvement collaborative

    OpenAIRE

    Robelia, Paul; Kopecky, Stephen; Thacher, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common cardiac arrhythmia. Many patients with new onset or recurrent AF present to the emergency department and are subsequently admitted to the hospital and seen by cardiology specialists for follow up. In an attempt to address this high utilization of acute health care resources, reduce costs, and improve patient care, our institution instituted a collaborative project between the departments of emergency medicine, cardiology, family medicine, and...

  12. Collaborative MOOCs : a challenging experience

    OpenAIRE

    Soares-Frazao, S.; Zech, Y.; Gratiot, Nicolas; Meunier, F

    2015-01-01

    RESCIF is a French-speaking network with 14 faculties of technology from the North and from the South. One of their research themes is water and four partner institutions decided to build together a MOOC as tentative tool for disseminating knowledge and contribute to education of southern engineers. This MOOC “Rivers and Men” is thus an example of collaborative work. The paper gives some facts about the building process and the success of the course. Some reflection...

  13. COLLABORATION SYSTEM IN VIRTUAL ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADINA CRETAN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to provide a collaboration support for small and medium enterprises which cannot or do not want to fulfill a major contract alone. In that case, in order to better meet a higher external demand, the managers are willing to subcontract parts of their contracts even to competitors. This approach is illustrated by a business-to-business interaction, being proposed a sample scenario where partners are autonomous gas stations grouped in a virtual organization.

  14. Innovating through collaborative business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Allan Næs; Kringelum, Louise Tina Brøns

    -ered as a coherent system. The generalization is explicated in terms of different domi-nant market logics in which collaborative efforts can be positioned. Underlying this presentation, the paper argues that business model innovation involves uncertainty to the degree that innovation is based on cooperative efforts......, and that there exists a dialec-tical relationship between sources of selection and sources of survival, which tend to re-inforce one another. This constitutes a new aspect of business model innovation....

  15. Analysis and evaluation of collaborative modeling processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssebuggwawo, D.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis and evaluation of collaborative modeling processes is confronted with many challenges. On the one hand, many systems design and re-engineering projects require collaborative modeling approaches that can enhance their productivity. But, such collaborative efforts, which often consist of the

  16. Utilizing Collaboration Theory to Evaluate Strategic Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly, "collaboration" between business, non-profit, health and educational agencies is being championed as a powerful strategy to achieve a vision otherwise not possible when independent entities work alone. But the definition of collaboration is elusive and it is often difficult for organizations to put collaboration into practice and…

  17. Computer Supported Collaborative Processes in Virtual Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Paszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Cellary, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    In global economy, turbulent organization environment strongly influences organization's operation. Organizations must constantly adapt to changing circumstances and search for new possibilities of gaining competitive advantage. To face this challenge, small organizations base their operation on collaboration within Virtual Organizations (VOs). VO operation is based on collaborative processes. Due to dynamism and required flexibility of collaborative processes, existing business information s...

  18. Scientific collaboration: genuine and false motivators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VOLPATO, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, I emphasize the need for collaborative research among scientists. Such collaboration should aim to address the genuine integrative need to build knowledge rather than searching for visibility based on the international prestige of a collaborator, increased productivity, or funding. Scientists must provide a valid and honest counterpart, such as a solid scientific proposal and performance, and avoid opportunistic motivators.

  19. The Informatics Audit - A Collaborative Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian CIUREA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper present issues regarding the audit in informatics field, the audit seen as a collaborative process and how the collaborative banking systems are audited. In this paper, the methodology and techniques for an effective audit process are described. There are highlighted some aspects regarding the assessment of collaborative systems and specific flows of informatics audit.

  20. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuing collaboration. 9701.105... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a) In... determine the number of employee representatives to be engaged in the continuing collaboration process....

  1. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS) CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the iss

  2. Coordination processes in computer supported collaborative writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Erkens, Gijsbert; Jaspers, Jos; Prangsma, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    In the COSAR-project a computer-supported collaborative learning environment enables students to collaborate in writing an argumentative essay. The TC3 groupware environment (TC3: Text Composer, Computer supported and Collaborative) offers access to relevant information sources, a private notepad, a

  3. Optimizing Distributed Collaborative Filtering in Mobile Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Gratz, Patrick; Andronache, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative filtering mechanisms filter information by using collaboration among multiple data sources, typically involving large data sets. In this work we optimize the communication and computational load of a distributed collaborative filtering protocol designed to augment the information exchange in mobile networks.

  4. Evaluation Framework for Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos; Andreas, Konstantinidis; Pomportsis, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we will focus on a specific category of Collaborative Virtual Environments that aims to support Collaborative Learning. We call these environments Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments. Our aim is to analyze the evaluation process through the study of relevant bibliography and by doing so reveal the existing research gap…

  5. Social Media Collaboration in the Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    (including challenges) that influence the students’ overall satisfaction with collaboration? Does the usage of e-collaboration tools and social media usage influence collaboration satisfaction? The findings of the study are summarized in a model that point towards the main factors influencing student overall...

  6. Inter-Organizational Collaborative Capacity (ICC) Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Hocevar, Susan Page; Jansen, Erik; Thomas, Gail Fann

    2012-01-01

    Effective collaboration across organizational boundaries is important for achieving governance reform. But, given the complexities of both aligning and competing interests, collaboration is often a challenge. The Inter-­‐Organizational Collaborative Capacity (ICC) model was originally developed to help public sector agencies (municipal, state, regional and federa...

  7. Rocinante, a virtual collaborative visualizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the goal of improving the ability of people around the world to share the development and use of intelligent systems, Sandia National Laboratories' Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center is developing new Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) and Virtual Collaborative Control (VCC) technologies. A key area of VCE and VCC research is in shared visualization of virtual environments. This paper describes a Virtual Collaborative Visualizer (VCV), named Rocinante, that Sandia developed for VCE and VCC applications. Rocinante allows multiple participants to simultaneously view dynamic geometrically-defined environments. Each viewer can exclude extraneous detail or include additional information in the scene as desired. Shared information can be saved and later replayed in a stand-alone mode. Rocinante automatically scales visualization requirements with computer system capabilities. Models with 30,000 polygons and 4 Megabytes of texture display at 12 to 15 frames per second (fps) on an SGI Onyx and at 3 to 8 fps (without texture) on Indigo 2 Extreme computers. In its networked mode, Rocinante synchronizes its local geometric model with remote simulators and sensory systems by monitoring data transmitted through UDP packets. Rocinante's scalability and performance make it an ideal VCC tool. Users throughout the country can monitor robot motions and the thinking behind their motion planners and simulators

  8. Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

    2008-12-01

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

  9. Rocinante, a virtual collaborative visualizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center; Ice, L.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    With the goal of improving the ability of people around the world to share the development and use of intelligent systems, Sandia National Laboratories` Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center is developing new Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) and Virtual Collaborative Control (VCC) technologies. A key area of VCE and VCC research is in shared visualization of virtual environments. This paper describes a Virtual Collaborative Visualizer (VCV), named Rocinante, that Sandia developed for VCE and VCC applications. Rocinante allows multiple participants to simultaneously view dynamic geometrically-defined environments. Each viewer can exclude extraneous detail or include additional information in the scene as desired. Shared information can be saved and later replayed in a stand-alone mode. Rocinante automatically scales visualization requirements with computer system capabilities. Models with 30,000 polygons and 4 Megabytes of texture display at 12 to 15 frames per second (fps) on an SGI Onyx and at 3 to 8 fps (without texture) on Indigo 2 Extreme computers. In its networked mode, Rocinante synchronizes its local geometric model with remote simulators and sensory systems by monitoring data transmitted through UDP packets. Rocinante`s scalability and performance make it an ideal VCC tool. Users throughout the country can monitor robot motions and the thinking behind their motion planners and simulators.

  10. Collaborating

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes Horner; Alessandro Bonatti

    2009-01-01

    We find that sequential division of labor and deadlines help alleviate the free rider problem. Conversely,indivisibility of tasks, the number of partners, and asymmetries between agents are shown to increase the expected time to completion. The model may be applied to academic co-authorship, as well as to research and development joint ventures.

  11. Collaborative Advantage in Public and Social Services: the Case of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Janina SZYMANKIEWICZ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to analyse the relationships between the third and the public sector, with a particular focus on relations with local government units (LGUs on the example of Poland. The article characterises the essence and rules of collaboration between the social and public sectors in Poland, and determines the meaning of the cooperative development of strategy of collaborative advantage. It also presents a useful tool which facilitates the realisation of such a task – a model of strategic cross-sector collaboration.

  12. COLLABORATIVE NETWORK SECURITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BASED ON ASSOCIATION MINING RULE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Mariam Varughese

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Security is one of the major challenges in open network. There are so many types of attacks which follow fixed patterns or frequently change their patterns. It is difficult to find the malicious attack which does not have any fixed patterns. The Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS attacks like Botnets are used to slow down the system performance. To address such problems Collaborative Network Security Management System (CNSMS is proposed along with the association mining rule. CNSMS system is consists of collaborative Unified Threat Management (UTM, cloud based security centre and traffic prober. The traffic prober captures the internet traffic and given to the collaborative UTM. Traffic is analysed by the Collaborative UTM, to determine whether it contains any malicious attack or not. If any security event occurs, it will reports to the cloud based security centre. The security centre generates security rules based on association mining rule and distributes to the network. The cloud based security centre is used to store the huge amount of tragic, their logs and the security rule generated. The feedback is evaluated and the invalid rules are eliminated to improve the system efficiency.

  13. Collaborative modelling for interactive participation in urban flood risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents an attempt to enhance the role of local stakeholders in dealing with urban floods. The concept is based on the DIANE-CM project (Decentralised Integrated Analysis and Enhancement of Awareness through Collaborative Modelling and Management of Flood Risk) of the ERANET CRUE programme. The main objective of the project was to develop and test the advanced methodology for enhancing the resilience of the local communities to flooding by a participative and interactive approach. Through collaborative modelling, a social learning process was initiated which will enhance the social capacity of the stakeholders due to the interaction process. The other aim of the project was to better understand how data from hazard and vulnerability analyses and improved maps, as well as from the near real time flood prediction, can be used to initiate a public dialogue (i.e. collaborative mapping and planning activities) in order to carry out more informed and shared decision making processes and to enhance flood risk awareness - which will improve the flood resilience situation. The concept of collaborative modelling was applied in two case studies: (1) the Roding river/Cranbrook catchment in the UK, with focus on pluvial flooding, and (2) the Alster catchment in Germany, with focus on fluvial flooding.

  14. International Collaboration for Venus Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, James; Limaye, Sanjay; Zasova, Ludmila; Wilson, Colin; Ocampo, Adriana; Glaze, Lori; Svedhem, H.; Nakamura, Masato; Widemann, Thomas

    The Venus Exploration Analysis Group (VEXAG) was established by NASA in July 2005 to identify scientific priorities and strategy for exploration of Venus. From the outset, VEXAG has been open to the international community participation and has followed the progress of the ESA Venus Express Mission and the JAXA Akasuki mission as well exploring potential broad international partnerships for Venus exploration through coordinated science and missions. This paper discussed three mechanisms through which these collaborations are being explored in which VEXAG members participate One pathway for international collaboration has been through COSPAR. The International Venus Exploration Working Group (IVEWG) was formed during the 2012 COSPAR general assembly in Mysore, India. Another potentially significant outcome has been the IVEWG’s efforts to foster a formal dialog between IKI and NASA/PSD on the proposed Venera D mission resulting in a meeting in June 2013 to be followed by a discussion at the 4MS3 conference in October 2013. This has now resulted in an agreement between NASA/PSD and IKI to form a joint Science Definition Team for Venera D. A second pathway has been through an international focus on comparative climatology. Scientists from the established space faring nations participated in a first international conference on Comparative Climatology for Terrestrial Planet (CCTP) in Boulder Colorado in June 2012 sponsored by several international scientific organizations. A second conference is planned for 2015. The Planetary Robotics Exploration Coordinating Group (PRECG) of International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) the IAA has been focusing on exploring affordable contributions to the robotic exploration by non-space-faring nations wishing to get involved in planetary exploration. PRECG has sponsored a two year study of Comparative Climatology for which Venus is the focal point and focused on engaging nations without deep space exploration capabilities. A third

  15. Collaborative Clustering for Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff. Loro :/; Green Jillian; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, nodes in a sensor network simply collect data and then pass it on to a centralized node that archives, distributes, and possibly analyzes the data. However, analysis at the individual nodes could enable faster detection of anomalies or other interesting events, as well as faster responses such as sending out alerts or increasing the data collection rate. There is an additional opportunity for increased performance if individual nodes can communicate directly with their neighbors. Previously, a method was developed by which machine learning classification algorithms could collaborate to achieve high performance autonomously (without requiring human intervention). This method worked for supervised learning algorithms, in which labeled data is used to train models. The learners collaborated by exchanging labels describing the data. The new advance enables clustering algorithms, which do not use labeled data, to also collaborate. This is achieved by defining a new language for collaboration that uses pair-wise constraints to encode useful information for other learners. These constraints specify that two items must, or cannot, be placed into the same cluster. Previous work has shown that clustering with these constraints (in isolation) already improves performance. In the problem formulation, each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. Each learner clusters its data and then selects a pair of items about which it is uncertain and uses them to query its neighbors. The resulting feedback (a must and cannot constraint from each neighbor) is combined by the learner into a consensus constraint, and it then reclusters its data while incorporating the new constraint. A strategy was also proposed for cleaning the resulting constraint sets, which may contain conflicting constraints; this improves performance significantly. This approach has been applied to collaborative

  16. [Adult twins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlemaine, Christiane

    2006-12-31

    This paper explores the deep roots of closeness that twins share in their youngest age and their effect on their destiny at the adult age. Psychologists believe the bond between twins begins in utero and develops throughout the twins' lives. The four patterns of twinship described show that the twin bond is determined by the quality of parenting that twins receive in their infancy and early childhood. Common problems of adult twins bring about difficulties to adapt in a non-twin world. The nature versus nurture controversy has taken on new life focusing on inter-twin differences and the importance of parent-child interaction as fundamental to the growth and development of personality. PMID:17352324

  17. With Whom Does LANL Publish? – A look at LANL collaborations from 1990 -2015 using the Web of Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Everett P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-17

    Collaborations are critical to the science, technology, and engineering achievements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report analyzed the collaborations as measured through peer-reviewed publications from the Web of Science (WoS) database for LANL for the 1990 – 2015 period. Both a cumulative analysis over the entire time period and annual analyses were performed. The results found that the Department of Energy national laboratories, University of California campuses, and other academic institutions collaborate with LANL on regular basis. Results provide insights into trends in peer-reviewed papers collaborations for LANL.

  18. Adult Immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Omer Coskun

    2008-01-01

    Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years) require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored t...

  19. Adult Leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Lyall K.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past several years, advances have been made in the classification, diagnosis and therapy of the adult leukemias. The overall prognosis and quality of life have improved greatly, especially for patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemias. Some of the advances are described in this article. The importance of the clinical, laboratory and diagnostic tests for acute, chronic granulocytic and chronic lymphocytic leukemia are stressed. The therapy and prognosis for patients with the vari...

  20. A Test-Replicate Approach to Candidate Gene Research on Addiction and Externalizing Disorders: A Collaboration Across Five Longitudinal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, Diana R; Bailey, Jennifer; Hill, Karl G; Wilson, Sylia; Lee, Susanne; Keyes, Margaret A; Epstein, Marina; Smolen, Andrew; Miller, Michael; Winters, Ken C; Hawkins, J David; Catalano, Richard F; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2016-09-01

    This study presents results from a collaboration across five longitudinal studies seeking to test and replicate models of gene-environment interplay in the development of substance use and externalizing disorders (SUDs, EXT). We describe an overview of our conceptual models, plan for gene-environment interplay analyses, and present main effects results evaluating six candidate genes potentially relevant to SUDs and EXT (MAOA, 5-HTTLPR, COMT, DRD2, DAT1, and DRD4). All samples included rich longitudinal and phenotypic measurements from childhood/adolescence (ages 5-13) through early adulthood (ages 25-33); sample sizes ranged from 3487 in the test sample, to ~600-1000 in the replication samples. Phenotypes included lifetime symptom counts of SUDs (nicotine, alcohol and cannabis), adult antisocial behavior, and an aggregate externalizing disorder composite. Covariates included the first 10 ancestral principal components computed using all autosomal markers in subjects across the data sets, and age at the most recent assessment. Sex, ancestry, and exposure effects were thoroughly evaluated. After correcting for multiple testing, only one significant main effect was found in the test sample, but it was not replicated. Implications for subsequent gene-environment interplay analyses are discussed. PMID:27444553

  1. Major Depression Among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  2. Panic Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  3. Bipolar Disorder Among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  4. Collaborative Software Engineering: Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistrík, Ivan; Grundy, John; van der Hoek, André; Whitehead, Jim

    Much work is presently ongoing in collaborative software engineering research. This work is beginning to make serious inroads into our ability to more effectively practice collaborative software engineering, with best practices, processes, tools, metrics, and other techniques becoming available for day-to-day use. However, we have not yet reached the point where the practice of collaborative software engineering is routine, without surprises, and generally as optimal as possible. This chapter summarizes the main findings of this book, draws some conclusions on these findings and looks at the prospects for software engineers in dealing with the challenges of collaborative software development. The chapter ends with prospects for collaborative software engineering.

  5. MRI of medulloblastoma in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malheiros, S.M.F.; Santos, A.J.; Borges, L.R.R.; Guimaraes, I.F.; Franco, C.M.R.; Gabbai, A.A. [Department of Neurology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Carrete, H. [Department of Radiology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Stavale, J.N.; Pelaez, M.P. [Department of Pathology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Medulloblastoma has variable appearances on MRI in both children and adults. Adults are more likely to have heterogeneous cerebellar hemisphere tumours, and this is thought to be related to the greater prevalence of desmoplastic tumours in adulthood. Few studies have addressed the MRI features of adult medulloblastoma and the specific characteristics of desmoplastic and classic tumours have not been analysed. Our aim was to analyse the imaging characteristics of desmoplastic (DM) and classic (CM) medulloblastomas in adult. We retrospectively studied preoperative MRI of six men and three women, median age 33 years, range 23-53 years, with pathologically proved medulloblastomas. There were six (67%) with DM. The tumour was in the cerebellar hemisphere in eight patients (89%), including the three with CM, one of which was bilateral. All tumours were heterogeneous, giving predominantly low or isointense signal on T1- and isointense signal on T2-weighted images. Cystic or necrotic areas in all patients were particularly visible on T2-weighted images. Contrast enhancement was absent in one DM and varied from slight to intense in eight (three CM), homogeneous in one DM and patchy in seven. All tumours extended to the surface of the cerebellum and two had well-defined margins. MRI does not allow a clear distinction between DM and CM in adults. (orig.)

  6. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-21

    Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Energy Option Analyses In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Description of Activities Performed The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor

  7. Supporting Dynamic Ad hoc Collaboration Capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern HENP experiments such as CMS and Atlas involve as many as 2000 collaborators around the world. Collaborations this large will be unable to meet often enough to support working closely together. Many of the tools currently available for collaboration focus on heavy-weight applications such as videoconferencing tools. While these are important, there is a more basic need for tools that support connecting physicists to work together on an ad hoc or continuous basis. Tools that support the day-to-day connectivity and underlying needs of a group of collaborators are important for providing light-weight, non-intrusive, and flexible ways to work collaboratively. Some example tools include messaging, file-sharing, and shared plot viewers. An important component of the environment is a scalable underlying communication framework. In this paper we will describe our current progress on building a dynamic and ad hoc collaboration environment and our vision for its evolution into a HENP collaboration environment

  8. Supporting Dynamic Ad hoc Collaboration Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Berket, Karlo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-07-14

    Modern HENP experiments such as CMS and Atlas involve as many as 2000 collaborators around the world. Collaborations this large will be unable to meet often enough to support working closely together. Many of the tools currently available for collaboration focus on heavy-weight applications such as videoconferencing tools. While these are important, there is a more basic need for tools that support connecting physicists to work together on an ad hoc or continuous basis. Tools that support the day-to-day connectivity and underlying needs of a group of collaborators are important for providing light-weight, non-intrusive, and flexible ways to work collaboratively. Some example tools include messaging, file-sharing, and shared plot viewers. An important component of the environment is a scalable underlying communication framework. In this paper we will describe our current progress on building a dynamic and ad hoc collaboration environment and our vision for its evolution into a HENP collaboration environment.

  9. Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deana D. Pennington

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex environmental problem solving depends on cross-disciplinary collaboration among scientists. Collaborative research must be preceded by an exploratory phase of collective thinking that creates shared conceptual frameworks. Collective thinking, in a cross-disciplinary setting, depends on the facility with which collaborators are able to learn and understand each others' perspectives. This paper applies three perspectives on learning to the problem of enabling cross-disciplinary collaboration: Maslow's hierarchy of needs, constructivism, and organizational learning. Application of learning frameworks to collaboration provides insights regarding receptive environments for collaboration, and processes that facilitate cross-disciplinary interactions. These environments and interactions need time to develop and require a long phase of idea generation preceding any focused research effort. The findings highlight that collaboration is itself a complex system of people, scientific theory, and tools that must be intentionally managed. Effective management of the system requires leaders who are facilitators and are capable of orchestrating effective environments and interactions.

  10. Using Wiki to Teach Part-Time Adult Learners in a Blended Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basar, Siti Mariam Muhammad Abdul; Yusop, Farrah Dina

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the perceptions of 31 part-time adult learners who participated in an online collaborative writing experience. Situated in the context of a blended learning environment of an advanced English learning course, this study looked into learners' perceptions with respect to the benefits of collaborative writing using…

  11. Evolution of Scientific Collaboration Network Driven by Homophily and Heterophily

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Peng; Xia, Haoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Many scientific collaboration networks exhibit clear community and small world structures. However, the studies on the underlying mechanisms for the formation and evolution of community and small world structures are still insufficient. The mechanisms of homophily and heterophily based on scholars' traits are two important factors for the formation of community and inter-communal links, which may deserve further exploration. In this paper, a multi-agent model, which is based on combinatorial effects of homophily and heterophily, is developed to investigate the evolution of scientific collaboration networks. The simulation results indicate that agents with similar traits aggregate to form community by homophily, while heterophily plays a major role in the formation of inter-communal links. The pattern of network evolution revealed in simulations is essentially consistent with what is observed in empirical analyses, as in both cases the giant component evolves from a small cluster to a structure of chained-comm...

  12. Collaborative Learning in the Remote Laboratory NetLab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Machotka

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available At the University of South Australia (UniSA the practical component of engineering education is considered to be a vital factor in developing university graduate qualities [1]. Practical experiments performed in laboratory facilitate students' abilities to apply their knowledge, work collaboratively, control equipment and analyse the measured data. The remote laboratory NetLab has been developed within the School of Electrical and Information Engineering (EIE. A fully functional system has been used by up to 200 onshore and offshore students to conduct remote experiments every year since 2003. This paper describes the remote laboratory and discusses how collaborative team oriented tasks can be conducted in the online environment. The functionality of NetLab is demonstrated by an example of a remote experiment.

  13. Reflexively exploring knowledge and power in collaborative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Phillips, Louise Jane; Pedersen, Christina Hee;

    of mutual learning. There are also tensions between processes of opening up for a plurality of knowledges and processes of closure in order to achieve strategic ends in the form of some kind of outcome. The basic premise underpinning this workshop is that we as researchers can best deal......The proposed workshop will take its starting point in the challenges which collaborative research practices share. The aim of the workshop is to work with, and further develop, a range of critical, reflexive strategies for understanding, analysing and dealing with those challenges. The workshop...... will be designed in order to stimulate dialogue across different analytical perspectives and empirical research. The analytical perspectives on which facilitation will be based are rooted in social constructionist approaches to dialogic communication theory and action research. The challenges of collaborative...

  14. Bringing Astronomy Activities and Science Content to Girls Locally and Nationally: A Girl Scout and NIRCam Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M. L.; Lebofsky, L. A.; McCarthy, D. W.; Lebofsky, N.

    2013-04-01

    In 2003, the University of Arizona's (UA) NIRCam EPO team (NASA James Webb Space Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera) and the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona began a long-term collaboration to bring STEM and astronomy activities and concepts to adult Girl Scout volunteers and staff and, in turn, their councils and girls, i.e., to train the trainers. Nationally, our goal is to reach adult volunteers and staff in all 112 councils. To date, this program has reached nearly 240 adults from 78 councils in 41 states, DC, Guam, and Japan, bringing together adult volunteers and staff, UA graduate students, and NIRCam scientists and educators to experience Arizona's dark skies.

  15. International Collaboration: Promises and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jay Widmer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rambam Maimonides Medical Journal 2015 April; 6(2: e0012. ISSN: 2076-9172 Published online 2015 April 29. Special Issue on the Rambam-Mayo Collaboration Guest Editor: John H. Davidson, M.D., M.A.H.L. doi: 10.5041/RMMJ.10196. International Collaboration: Promises and Challenges R. Jay Widmer, M.D., Ph.D.,1 Jocelyn M. Widmer, Ph.D., M.P.H.,2 and Amir Lerman, M.D.1* 1Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic and College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Urban and Regional Planning, College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Conflict of interest: No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported. * To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: lerman.amir@mayo.edu Copyright: © 2015 Widmer et al. This is an open-access article. All its content, except where otherwise noted, is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract We currently face a myriad of grand global challenges in fields such as poverty, the environment, education, science, and medicine. However, our current means of dealing with such challenges has fallen short, and ingenious solutions are required to overcome the inherent resistance to progress toward ameliorating such difficulties. Here, we highlight the promises and challenges of international collaboration in achieving success toward these trials. We note prior successes in fields such as education, medicine, science, and environmental issues made to date, yet at the same time we do note deficiencies and shortcomings in these efforts. Hence, the notion of international collaboration should be strengthened and encouraged by governments, non-profit organizations, and others moving forward using creative

  16. Collaborative design in virtual environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative virtual environments (CVEs) are multi-user virtual realities which actively support communication and co-operation. This book offers a comprehensive reference volume to the state-of-the-art in the area of design studies in CVEs. It is an excellent mix of contributions from over 25 leading researcher/experts in multiple disciplines from academia and industry, providing up-to-date insight into the current research topics in this field as well as the latest technological advancements and the best working examples. Many of these results and ideas are also applicable to other areas su

  17. Improving collaborative documentation in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Lassila-Perini, Kati

    2009-01-01

    Complete and up-to-date documentation is essential for efficient data analysis in a large and complex collaboration like CMS. Good documentation reduces the time spent in problem solving for users and software developers. The scientists in our research environment do not necessarily have the interests or skills of professional technical writers. This results in inconsistencies in the documentation. To improve the quality, we have started a multidisciplinary project involving CMS user support and expertise in technical communication from the University of Turku, Finland. In this paper, we present possible approaches to study the usability of the documentation, for instance, usability tests conducted recently for the CMS software and computing user documentation

  18. Adult hepatoblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Javier A. Cienfuegos; Tania Labiano; Nicolás Pedano; Gabriel N. Zozaya; Pablo Martí-Cruchaga; Ángel Panizo; Fernando Rotellar

    2013-01-01

    Adult hepatoblastoma (AHB) is a very rare tumor, having been described 45 cases up to June 2012. In contrast to HB in infancy (IHB), it has poor prognosis. We present the case of a 37-year-old asymptomatic woman who consulted for a large -12 cm diameter- mass involving segments 5 and 6 of the liver, and alfa-fetoprotein of 1,556,30 UI/mL. A bisegmentectomy was carried out. The microscopic study confirmed the AHB diagnosis, revealing the presence of epithelial cells forming clusters, trabecula...

  19. Polymorphic collaboration in the global grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuay, William K.

    2006-05-01

    Next generation collaborative systems must be able to represent the same information in different forms on a broad spectrum of devices and resources from low end personal digital assistants (PDA) to high performance computers (HPC). Users might be on a desktop then switch to a laptop and then to a PDA while accessing the global grid. The user preference profile for a collaboration session should be capable of moving with them as well as be automatically adjusted for the device type. Collaborative systems must be capable of representing the same information in many forms for different domains and on many devices and thus be polymorphic. Polymorphic collaboration will provide an ability for multiple heterogeneous resources (human to human, human to machine and machine to machine) to share information and activities, as well as the ability to regulate collaborative sessions based on client characteristics and needs; reuse user profiles, tool category choices, and settings in future collaboration session by same or different users; use intelligent agents to assist collaborative systems in learning user/resource preferences and behaviors, and autonomously derive optimal information to provide to users and decision makers. This paper discusses ongoing research in next generation collaborative environments with the goal of making electronic collaboration as easy to use as the telephone - collaboration at the touch of the screen.

  20. Communications fabric for scientific collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today's fusion experiments are geographically and institutionally dispersed collaborations. This makes the need for good remote collaboration tools particularly acute. Informal interactions between scientists are particularly important and hard to realize with traditional communications approaches. We are testing existing packages based on the IETF SIP (session initiation protocol) standard and integrating them into our applications to address these issues. Development of additional tools may be needed to provide better integration and enhanced functionality. By providing a spectrum of tools encompassing instant messaging, voice, video, presence, event notification and application sharing, we hope to overcome technical hurdles and a natural reluctance, among researchers, to interact with colleagues who are not on site. Existing web pages, which support integrated and shared workspaces, such as electronic logbooks, code and experimental run management, records of presentations and publications, personnel databases, and physical site maps will be 'communications enabled', so that just as currently there are 'mailto' links we will be able to have 'speak to:', 'instant message to:', 'video to:', and 'share with:' links. Mechanisms will be provided for session portability; a conference might be moved from a hard phone to a soft phone so that video or application sharing could be enabled. This paper discusses our ongoing efforts in these areas, including a prototype implementation of some of these tools

  1. Fluxnet Synthesis Dataset Collaboration Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Humphrey, Marty [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); van Ingen, Catharine [Microsoft. San Francisco, CA (United States); Beekwilder, Norm [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Goode, Monte [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rodriguez, Matt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Weber, Robin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-02-06

    The Fluxnet synthesis dataset originally compiled for the La Thuile workshop contained approximately 600 site years. Since the workshop, several additional site years have been added and the dataset now contains over 920 site years from over 240 sites. A data refresh update is expected to increase those numbers in the next few months. The ancillary data describing the sites continues to evolve as well. There are on the order of 120 site contacts and 60proposals have been approved to use thedata. These proposals involve around 120 researchers. The size and complexity of the dataset and collaboration has led to a new approach to providing access to the data and collaboration support and the support team attended the workshop and worked closely with the attendees and the Fluxnet project office to define the requirements for the support infrastructure. As a result of this effort, a new website (http://www.fluxdata.org) has been created to provide access to the Fluxnet synthesis dataset. This new web site is based on a scientific data server which enables browsing of the data on-line, data download, and version tracking. We leverage database and data analysis tools such as OLAP data cubes and web reports to enable browser and Excel pivot table access to the data.

  2. Collaborative virtual environments art exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinsky, Margaret; Anstey, Josephine; Pape, Dave E.; Aguilera, Julieta C.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Tsoupikova, Daria

    2005-03-01

    This panel presentation will exhibit artwork developed in CAVEs and discuss how art methodologies enhance the science of VR through collaboration, interaction and aesthetics. Artists and scientists work alongside one another to expand scientific research and artistic expression and are motivated by exhibiting collaborative virtual environments. Looking towards the arts, such as painting and sculpture, computer graphics captures a visual tradition. Virtual reality expands this tradition to not only what we face, but to what surrounds us and even what responds to our body and its gestures. Art making that once was isolated to the static frame and an optimal point of view is now out and about, in fully immersive mode within CAVEs. Art knowledge is a guide to how the aesthetics of 2D and 3D worlds affect, transform, and influence the social, intellectual and physical condition of the human body through attention to psychology, spiritual thinking, education, and cognition. The psychological interacts with the physical in the virtual in such a way that each facilitates, enhances and extends the other, culminating in a "go together" world. Attention to sharing art experience across high-speed networks introduces a dimension of liveliness and aliveness when we "become virtual" in real time with others.

  3. Analysing hybrid drive system topologies

    OpenAIRE

    Jonasson, Karin

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis a simulation model is presented that enables a comparison of different hybrid topologies, with respect to fuel consumption, emissions and performance. The obtained results stress the properties of the different topologies and form a foundation for the choice of hybrid topology. The simulation models included in this thesis are the result of collaboration with Petter Strandh at the Division of Combustion Engines, Department of Heat and Power Engineering, Lund University. The stu...

  4. An E-Learning Collaborative Environment: Learning within a Masters in Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Natheem

    2012-01-01

    This article contributes to the debate about e-learning as a form of adult education. It is based on the experiences of South African students, describes and analyses group interaction in an intercontinental Masters in Adult Education Programme which uses a computer electronic platform as the primary medium for learning and teaching. The article…

  5. An emerging view of scientific collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hara, Noriko; Solomon, Paul; Kim, Seung Lye;

    2003-01-01

    Collaboration is often a critical aspect of scientific research, which is dominated by complex problems, rapidly changing technology, dynamic growth of knowledge, and highly specialized areas of expertise. An individual scientist can seldom provide all of the expertise and resources necessary......-disciplinary research groups. Each group had 14 to 34 members, including faculty, postdoctoral fellows and students, at four geographically dispersed universities. To investigate challenges that emerge in establishing scientific collaboration, data were collected about members' previous and current collaborative...... of a framework that identifies forms of collaboration that emerged among scientists (e.g., complementary and integrative collaboration) and associated factors, which influenced collaboration including personal compatibility, work connections, incentives, and infrastructure. These results may inform...

  6. 10 years of the Medipix2 Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The Medipix2 Collaboration was started officially in September 1999 with the aim of disseminating hybrid pixel detector technology from High Energy Physics to other fields. The Collaboration was initially composed of 13 European research institutes. Over the ensuing 10 years the Collaboration expanded to reach a peak of 17 member institutes. Although our main scientific focus has been the development of the Medipix2 and Timepix single photon counting pixel detector readout chips the Collaboration members have expanded the range of applications for the technology to many more scientific fields than initially foreseen. We have signed a number of Technology Transfer Agreements during that time, most notably with PANalytical, whose commercially available PIXcel detector is based on the second version of the Medipix2 chip. This paper will review the history of the Collaboration covering as much as possible the main technical highlights. The success of the Collaboration is testimony to the willingness of a large nu...

  7. Managing collaboration in the nanoManipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Thomas C.; Helser, Aren T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.;

    2004-01-01

    We designed, developed, deployed, and evaluated the Collaborative nanoManipulator (CnM), a distributed, collaborative virtual environment system supporting remote scientific collaboration between users of the nanoManipulator interface to atomic force microscopes. This paper describes the entire...... collaboration system, but focuses on the shared nanoManipulator (nM) application. To be readily accepted by users, the shared nM application had to have the same high level of interactivity as the single-user system and include all the functions of the single-user system. In addition the application had...... to support a user's ability to interleave working privately and working collaboratively. Based on our experience developing the CnM, we present: a method of analyzing applications to characterize the concurrency requirements for sharing data between collaborating sites, examples of data structures...

  8. Tie Strength Distribution in Scientific Collaboration Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Science is increasingly dominated by teams. Understanding patterns of scientific collaboration and their impacts on the productivity and evolution of disciplines is crucial to understand scientific processes. Electronic bibliography offers a unique opportunity to map and investigate the nature of scientific collaboration. Recent work have demonstrated a counter-intuitive organizational pattern of scientific collaboration networks: densely interconnected local clusters consist of weak ties, whereas strong ties play the role of connecting different clusters. This pattern contrasts itself from many other types of networks where strong ties form communities while weak ties connect different communities. Although there are many models for collaboration networks, no model reproduces this pattern. In this paper, we present an evolution model of collaboration networks, which reproduces many properties of real-world collaboration networks, including the organization of tie strengths, skewed degree and weight distribut...

  9. Computer Supported Collaborative Processes in Virtual Organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Paszkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    In global economy, turbulent organization environment strongly influences organization's operation. Organizations must constantly adapt to changing circumstances and search for new possibilities of gaining competitive advantage. To face this challenge, small organizations base their operation on collaboration within Virtual Organizations (VOs). VO operation is based on collaborative processes. Due to dynamism and required flexibility of collaborative processes, existing business information systems are insufficient to efficiently support them. In this paper a novel method for supporting collaborative processes based on process mining techniques is proposed. The method allows activity patterns in various instances of collaborative processes to be identified and used for recommendation of activities. This provides an opportunity for better computer support of collaborative processes leading to more efficient and effective realization of business goals.

  10. Distributed user interfaces usability and collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, María D; Tesoriero, Ricardo; Penichet, Victor MR

    2013-01-01

    Written by international researchers in the field of Distributed User Interfaces (DUIs), this book brings together important contributions regarding collaboration and usability in Distributed User Interface settings. Throughout the thirteen chapters authors address key questions concerning how collaboration can be improved by using DUIs, including: in which situations a DUI is suitable to ease the collaboration among users; how usability standards can be used to evaluate the usability of systems based on DUIs; and accurately describe case studies and prototypes implementing these concerns

  11. R&D Collaboration Networks in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz Menéndez, Luis; García, Clara Eugenia

    1997-01-01

    This paper is the first draft of a series of analysis conducted within the inter-firm collaboration focus group of the OECD/NIS project. Its aim is to provide a basic framework for our understanding of the empirical issues tackled on inter-firm collaboration and more precisely on product development collaboration. The specific target of the activities conducted by the focus group has been to develop comparative knowledge, between different countries, on the way that firms related one each oth...

  12. Characterization and Classification of Collaborative Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Soriano Camino, Francisco Javier; Fernández Gallego, Rafael; Jiménez Gañán, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, collaboration has been a means for organizations to do their work. However, the context in which they do this work is changing, especially in regards to where the work is done, how the work is organized, who does the work, and with this the characteristics of collaboration. Software development is no exception; it is itself a collaborative effort that is likewise affected by these changes. In the context of both open source software development projects and communities and orga...

  13. Parallel and Distributed Collaborative Filtering: A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Karydi, Efthalia; Margaritis, Konstantinos G.

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative filtering is amongst the most preferred techniques when implementing recommender systems. Recently, great interest has turned towards parallel and distributed implementations of collaborative filtering algorithms. This work is a survey of the parallel and distributed collaborative filtering implementations, aiming not only to provide a comprehensive presentation of the field's development, but also to offer future research orientation by highlighting the issues that need to be f...

  14. Collaborative Practices that Support Creativity in Design

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Dhaval; Heylen, Dirk; Nijholt, Anton; Veer, van der, P.; Wagner, Ina

    2009-01-01

    Design is a ubiquitous, collaborative and highly material activity. Because of the embodied nature of the design profession, designers apply certain collaborative practices to enhance creativity in their everyday work. Within the domain of industrial design, we studied two educational design departments over a period of eight months. Using examples from our fieldwork, we develop our results around three broad themes related to collaborative practices that support the creativity of design prof...

  15. Collaborative work between the West and Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Bart, Gavin; Li, Li; Giang, Le Minh

    2013-01-01

    The “Collaborative Work between the West and Asia” session was chaired by Dr. Yih-Ing Hser and had three speakers. The speakers (and their topics) were: Dr. Gavin Bart (Collaborative Addiction Research in Asian Populations Home and Abroad), Dr. Li Li (Implementing Intervention Research Projects in Asia), and Dr. Le Minh Giang (Building Research Infrastructure for International Collaborative Studies on Substance Use Disorder and HIV: The Case of Hanoi Medical University/Vietnam).

  16. Understanding Collaborative capacity in an ICT context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Sudhanshu

    In this paper my endeavor is to explore the meaning and implication of collaberation within a dynamic frame which I refer to a capacity. First I review the collaboration literature from an innovation perspective and then develop a framework that enables me to engage with the data we collected dur...... this paper discussing the new insight on collaborative capacity (CC) of firms and their implications for ICT collaboration and firm innovativness....

  17. A collaborative learning approach and its evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Ishitani, Lucila; Guimarães, Silvio J. F.; Bruegger, Gisele

    2006-01-01

    The use of new technologies does not mean that the applied education model is modern. New technologies can be used in a way that follows the traditional education model, with all its deficiencies. The collaborative education model involves students in reflection, participation, and construction of their knowledge, or to collaboratively learn. This article aims to present mechanisms to stimulate collaborative learning, in present education, through the aid of virtual learning environments.

  18. Mobile Learning: location, collaboration and scaffolding inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Critiques of mobile learning pedagogy are concerned with whether such approaches are technology led. This chapter discusses how the particular features of mobile learning can be harnessed to provide new learning opportunities in relation to collaboration, inquiry and location-based learning. Technology supported inquiry learning is a situation rich with possibilities for collaboration. In particular, mobile learning offers new possibilities for scaffolding collaboration together with its othe...

  19. Strategy of interorganization collaboration: practical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galyna Tarasiuk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The approach to the development of organizational and operational changes program taking into consideration the peculiaritiesof the developed (improved interorganizational collaboration process has been covered. Types of business operations interdependency while executing the interorganizational collaboration process have been determined. The best practice advice concerning responsibility and accountabilitypattern transformation, communication process improvement, an approach to providing the conformity of rewarding mechanism with expected strategic results, coordination and control methodsof interorganizational collaboration have been given.

  20. Collaborative virtual gaming worlds in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Whitton, Nicola; Hollins, Paul

    2008-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of virtual gaming worlds in education, supported by the increased use of multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) and massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) for collaborative learning. However, this paper argues that collaborative gaming worlds have been in use much longer and are much wider in scope; it considers the range of collaborative gaming worlds that exist and discusses their potential for learning, with particular reference to h...