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Sample records for adult reproductively senescent

  1. Gene pathways that delay Caenorhabditis elegans reproductive senescence.

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    Meng C Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive senescence is a hallmark of aging. The molecular mechanisms regulating reproductive senescence and its association with the aging of somatic cells remain poorly understood. From a full genome RNA interference (RNAi screen, we identified 32 Caenorhabditis elegans gene inactivations that delay reproductive senescence and extend reproductive lifespan. We found that many of these gene inactivations interact with insulin/IGF-1 and/or TGF-β endocrine signaling pathways to regulate reproductive senescence, except nhx-2 and sgk-1 that modulate sodium reabsorption. Of these 32 gene inactivations, we also found that 19 increase reproductive lifespan through their effects on oocyte activities, 8 of them coordinate oocyte and sperm functions to extend reproductive lifespan, and 5 of them can induce sperm humoral response to promote reproductive longevity. Furthermore, we examined the effects of these reproductive aging regulators on somatic aging. We found that 5 of these gene inactivations prolong organismal lifespan, and 20 of them increase healthy life expectancy of an organism without altering total life span. These studies provide a systemic view on the genetic regulation of reproductive senescence and its intersection with organism longevity. The majority of these newly identified genes are conserved, and may provide new insights into age-associated reproductive senescence during human aging.

  2. Age-related changes in somatic condition and reproduction in the Eurasian beaver: Resource history influences onset of reproductive senescence.

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    Ruairidh D Campbell

    Full Text Available Using 15 years of data from a stable population of wild Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber, we examine how annual and lifetime access to food resources affect individual age-related changes in reproduction and somatic condition. We found an age-related decline in annual maternal reproductive output, after a peak at age 5-6. Rainfall, an established negative proxy of annual resource availability for beavers, was consistently associated with lower reproductive output for females of all ages. In contrast, breeding territory quality, as a measure of local resource history over reproductive lifetimes, caused differences in individual patterns of reproductive senescence; animals from lower quality territories senesced when younger. Litter size was unrelated to maternal age, although adult body weight increased with age. In terms of resource effects, in poorer years but not in better years, older mothers produced larger offspring than did younger mothers, giving support to the constraint theory. Overall, our findings exemplify state-dependent life-history strategies, supporting an effect of resources on reproductive senescence, where cumulative differences in resource access, and not just reproductive strategy, mediate long-term reproductive trade-offs, consistent with the disposable soma and reproductive restraint theories. We propose that flexible life-history schedules could play a role in the dynamics of populations exhibiting reproductive skew, with earlier breeding opportunities leading to an earlier senescence schedule through resource dependent mechanisms.

  3. The forms and fitness cost of senescence : Age-specific recapture, survival, reproduction, and reproductive value in a wild bird population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, Sandra; Choquet, Remi; Sheldon, Ben C.; Verhulst, Simon

    Longitudinal studies of senescence accumulate rapidly from natural populations. However, it is largely unknown whether different fitness components senesce in parallel, how reproductive and survival senescence contribute to declines in reproductive value, and how large the fitness cost of senescence

  4. An empirical test of evolutionary theories for reproductive senescence and reproductive effort in the garter snake Thamnophis elegans.

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    Sparkman, Amanda M; Arnold, Stevan J; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2007-04-07

    Evolutionary theory predicts that differential reproductive effort and rate of reproductive senescence will evolve under different rates of external mortality. We examine the evolutionary divergence of age-specific reproduction in two life-history ecotypes of the western terrestrial garter snake, Thamnophis elegans. We test for the signature of reproductive senescence (decreasing fecundity with age) and increasing reproductive effort with age (increasing reproductive productivity per gram female) in replicate populations of two life-history ecotypes: snakes that grow fast, mature young and have shorter lifespans, and snakes that grow slow, mature late and have long lives. The difference between life-history ecotypes is due to genetic divergence in growth rate. We find (i) reproductive success (live litter mass) increases with age in both ecotypes, but does so more rapidly in the fast-growth ecotype, (ii) reproductive failure increases with age in both ecotypes, but the proportion of reproductive failure to total reproductive output remains invariant, and (iii) reproductive effort remains constant in fast-growth individuals with age, but declines in slow-growth individuals. This illustration of increasing fecundity with age, even at the latest ages, deviates from standard expectations for reproductive senescence, as does the lack of increases in reproductive effort. We discuss our findings in light of recent theories regarding the phenomenon of increased reproduction throughout life in organisms with indeterminate growth and its potential to offset theoretical expectations for the ubiquity of senescence.

  5. Estradiol target neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and lateral ventromedial nucleus of young adult, reproductively senescent, and monosodium glutamate-lesioned female golden hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, G.C.; Lamperti, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Histoautoradiographic methods were used to assess estrogen target neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) and ventromedial nucleus, lateral portion (LVM), comparing young adult and aged female golden hamsters. A subgroup of young adult females had ARC lesions induced by monosodium glutamate at neonatal day 8. All were ovariectomized to remove endogenous estrogens. Controls were given nonradioactive estradiol. After 3 H-estradiol ( 3 H-E2) was injected intravenously, hypothalami were removed, frozen, and processed for histoautoradiography. In the ARC and LVM the ratio of 3 H-E2 labelled neurons to total neurons counted was significantly lower in the older animals. Young females with ARC lesions had very few 3 H-E2 labelled neurons remaining in the ARC but had a normal complement in the LVM. Although 3 H-E2 labelled ARC neurons were notably decreased in old females, those ARC neurons that were labelled in the old had virtually the same frequency distribution of the labelling index as in the young, suggesting no change in the average estrogen uptake per target cell

  6. Behavioral Senescence and Aging-Related Changes in Motor Neurons and Brain Neuromodulator Levels Are Ameliorated by Lifespan-Extending Reproductive Dormancy in Drosophila

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    Dick R. Nässel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The lifespan of Drosophilamelanogaster can be extended substantially by inducing reproductive dormancy (also known as diapause by lowered temperature and short days. This increase of longevity is accompanied by lowered metabolism and increased stress tolerance. We ask here whether behavioral senescence is ameliorated during adult dormancy. To study this we kept flies for seven or more weeks in normal rearing conditions or in diapause conditions and compared to 1-week-old flies in different behavioral assays of sleep, negative geotaxis and exploratory walking. We found that the senescence of geotaxis and locomotor behavior seen under normal rearing conditions was negligible in flies kept in dormancy. The normal senescence of rhythmic activity and sleep patterns during the daytime was also reduced by adult dormancy. Investigating the morphology of specific neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, we found that changes normally seen with aging do not take place in dormant flies. To monitor age-associated changes in neuronal circuits regulating activity rhythms, sleep and walking behavior we applied antisera to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, serotonin and several neuropeptides to examine changes in expression levels and neuron morphology. In most neuron types the levels of stored neuromodulators decreased during normal aging, but not in diapause treated flies. No signs of neurodegeneration were seen in either condition. Our data suggest that age-related changes in motor neurons could be the cause of part of the behavioral senescence and that this is ameliorated by reproductive diapause. Earlier studies established a link between age-associated decreases in neuromodulator levels and behavioral decline that could be rescued by overexpression of neuromodulator. Thus, it is likely that the retained levels of neuromodulators in dormant flies alleviate behavioral senescence.

  7. Reproductive effort accelerates actuarial senescence in wild birds : An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonekamp, Jelle J.; Salomons, Martijn; Bouwhuis, Sandra; Dijkstra, Cornelis; Verhulst, Simon

    Optimality theories of ageing predict that the balance between reproductive effort and somatic maintenance determines the rate of ageing. Laboratory studies find that increased reproductive effort shortens lifespan, but through increased short-term mortality rather than ageing. In contrast, high

  8. The Lr34 adult plant rust resistance gene provides seedling resistance in durum wheat without senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Amy; Gilbert, Brian; Boni, Rainer; Krattinger, Simon G; Singh, Davinder; Park, Robert F; Lagudah, Evans; Ayliffe, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) adult plant resistance gene, Lr34/Yr18/Sr57/Pm38/Ltn1, provides broad-spectrum resistance to wheat leaf rust (Lr34), stripe rust (Yr18), stem rust (Sr57) and powdery mildew (Pm38) pathogens, and has remained effective in wheat crops for many decades. The partial resistance provided by this gene is only apparent in adult plants and not effective in field-grown seedlings. Lr34 also causes leaf tip necrosis (Ltn1) in mature adult plant leaves when grown under field conditions. This D genome-encoded bread wheat gene was transferred to tetraploid durum wheat (T. turgidum) cultivar Stewart by transformation. Transgenic durum lines were produced with elevated gene expression levels when compared with the endogenous hexaploid gene. Unlike nontransgenic hexaploid and durum control lines, these transgenic plants showed robust seedling resistance to pathogens causing wheat leaf rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew disease. The effectiveness of seedling resistance against each pathogen correlated with the level of transgene expression. No evidence of accelerated leaf necrosis or up-regulation of senescence gene markers was apparent in these seedlings, suggesting senescence is not required for Lr34 resistance, although leaf tip necrosis occurred in mature plant flag leaves. Several abiotic stress-response genes were up-regulated in these seedlings in the absence of rust infection as previously observed in adult plant flag leaves of hexaploid wheat. Increasing day length significantly increased Lr34 seedling resistance. These data demonstrate that expression of a highly durable, broad-spectrum adult plant resistance gene can be modified to provide seedling resistance in durum wheat. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Morph-specific metabolic rate and the timing of reproductive senescence in a color polymorphic dragon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Christopher R; Johansson, Rasmus; Olsson, Mats

    2017-08-01

    Polymorphism has fascinated biologists for over a century because morphs persist within populations through evolutionary time in spite of showing disparate behavioral and physiological phenotypes; any one morph should go to fixation with the slightest fitness advantage over the others. Surely there must be trade-offs that balance selection on them. The polychromatic morphs of the Australian painted dragon lizard, Ctenophorus pictus, are one such system. The male color morphs of painted dragons have different physiological and behavioral traits including reproductive tactics, hormone levels, and the rate of body condition loss through the reproductive season. Due to their differences in physiology and reproductive tactics, we tested the hypotheses that male morphs would differ in resting metabolic rates (RMRs) and that the morphs' RMR would decline at different rates through the mating season. We found that bib-morphs (yellow gular patch) differ in RMR with bibbed (more aggressive) males having consistently higher RMR than non-bibbed males. Furthermore, we show that male dragons experience a decline in RMR as they age from reproductively active to inactive. We also found that the RMR of bibbed males has higher repeatability than non-bibbed males. Our results reinforce previous hypotheses about the morph-specific costs of bearing a gular patch in painted dragons. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. No evidence for neo-oogenesis may link to ovarian senescence in adult monkey.

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    Yuan, Jihong; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Mengyuan; Mao, Jian; Yin, Yu; Ye, Xiaoying; Liu, Na; Han, Jihong; Gao, Yingdai; Cheng, Tao; Keefe, David L; Liu, Lin

    2013-11-01

    Female germline or oogonial stem cells transiently residing in fetal ovaries are analogous to the spermatogonial stem cells or germline stem cells (GSCs) in adult testes where GSCs and meiosis continuously renew. Oocytes can be generated in vitro from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, but the existence of GSCs and neo-oogenesis in adult mammalian ovaries is less clear. Preliminary findings of GSCs and neo-oogenesis in mice and humans have not been consistently reproducible. Monkeys provide the most relevant model of human ovarian biology. We searched for GSCs and neo-meiosis in ovaries of adult monkeys at various ages, and compared them with GSCs from adult monkey testis, which are characterized by cytoplasmic staining for the germ cell marker DAZL and nuclear expression of the proliferative markers PCNA and KI67, and pluripotency-associated genes LIN28 and SOX2, and lack of nuclear LAMIN A, a marker for cell differentiation. Early meiocytes undergo homologous pairing at prophase I distinguished by synaptonemal complex lateral filaments with telomere perinuclear distribution. By exhaustive searching using comprehensive experimental approaches, we show that proliferative GSCs and neo-meiocytes by these specific criteria were undetectable in adult mouse and monkey ovaries. However, we found proliferative nongermline somatic stem cells that do not express LAMIN A and germ cell markers in the adult ovaries, notably in the cortex and granulosa cells of growing follicles. These data support the paradigm that adult ovaries do not undergo germ cell renewal, which may contribute significantly to ovarian senescence that occurs with age. Copyright © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  11. Toluene effects on the motor activity of adolescent, young-adult, middle-age and senescent male Brown Norway rats.

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    MacPhail, R C; Farmer, J D; Jarema, K A

    2012-01-01

    Life stage is an important risk factor for toxicity. Children and aging adults, for example, are more susceptible to certain chemicals than are young adults. In comparison to children, relatively little is known about susceptibility in older adults. Additionally, few studies have compared toxicant susceptibility across a broad range of life stages. Results are presented for behavioral evaluations of male Brown Norway rats obtained as adolescents (1 month), or young (4 months), middle-age (12 months) and senescent (24 months) adults. Motor activity was evaluated in photocell devices during 30-min sessions. Age-related baseline characteristics and sensitivity to toluene (0, 300, 650, or 1000mg/kg, p.o.) were determined. In Experiment 1, young-adult, middle-age and senescent rats were treated with corn-oil vehicle before five weekly test sessions. Baselines of horizontal and vertical activity decreased with age, but each age-group's averages remained stable across weeks of testing. Baseline activity of older rats was more variable than that of the young adults; older rats were also more variable individually from week to week. Toluene (1000mg/kg) increased horizontal activity proportionately more in senescent rats (ca. 300% of control) than in middle-age or young-adult rats (ca.145-175% of control). Experiment 2 established toluene dose-effect functions in individual adolescent, young-adult, middle-age and senescent rats; each rat received all treatments, counterbalanced across four weekly sessions. Toluene produced dose-related increases in horizontal activity that increased proportionately with age. Experiment 3 replicated the effects of toluene (1000mg/kg) in Experiment 1, showing that toluene-induced increases in horizontal activity were greatest in the oldest rats. Collectively, the results show that aging increased susceptibility to toluene and also increased variability in toluene response. Given the rapid growth of the aged population, further research is

  12. Density dependence triggers runaway selection of reduced senescence.

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    Robert M Seymour

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of exogenous mortality risks, future reproduction by an individual is worth less than present reproduction to its fitness. Senescent aging thus results inevitably from transferring net fertility into younger ages. Some long-lived organisms appear to defy theory, however, presenting negligible senescence (e.g., hydra and extended lifespans (e.g., Bristlecone Pine. Here, we investigate the possibility that the onset of vitality loss can be delayed indefinitely, even accepting the abundant evidence that reproduction is intrinsically costly to survival. For an environment with constant hazard, we establish that natural selection itself contributes to increasing density-dependent recruitment losses. We then develop a generalized model of accelerating vitality loss for analyzing fitness optima as a tradeoff between compression and spread in the age profile of net fertility. Across a realistic spectrum of senescent age profiles, density regulation of recruitment can trigger runaway selection for ever-reducing senescence. This novel prediction applies without requirement for special life-history characteristics such as indeterminate somatic growth or increasing fecundity with age. The evolution of nonsenescence from senescence is robust to the presence of exogenous adult mortality, which tends instead to increase the age-independent component of vitality loss. We simulate examples of runaway selection leading to negligible senescence and even intrinsic immortality.

  13. Feeding blueberry diets in early life prevent senescence of osteoblasts and bone loss in ovariectomized adult female rats.

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    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available Appropriate nutrition during early development is essential for maximal bone mass accretion; however, linkage between early nutrition, childhood bone mass, peak bone mass in adulthood, and prevention of bone loss later in life has not been studied.In this report, we show that feeding a high quality diet supplemented with blueberries (BB to pre-pubertal rats throughout development or only between postnatal day 20 (PND20 and PND34 prevented ovariectomy (OVX-induced bone loss in adult life. This protective effect of BB is due to suppression of osteoblastic cell senescence associated with acute loss of myosin expression after OVX. Early exposure of pre-osteoblasts to serum from BB-fed rats was found to consistently increase myosin expression. This led to maintenance osteoblastic cell development and differentiation and delay of cellular entrance into senescence through regulation of the Runx2 gene. High bone turnover after OVX results in insufficient collagenous matrix support for new osteoblasts and their precursors to express myosin and other cytoskeletal elements required for osteoblast activity and differentiation.These results indicate: 1 a significant prevention of OVX-induced bone loss from adult rats can occur with only 14 days consumption of a BB-containing diet immediately prior to puberty; and 2 the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects involves increased myosin production which stimulates osteoblast differentiation and reduces mesenchymal stromal cell senescence.

  14. Estimating reproduction numbers for adults and children from case data

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    Glass, K.; Mercer, G. N.; Nishiura, H.; McBryde, E. S.; Becker, N. G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for estimating reproduction numbers for adults and children from daily onset data, using pandemic influenza A(H1N1) data as a case study. We investigate the impact of different underlying transmission assumptions on our estimates, and identify that asymmetric reproduction matrices are often appropriate. Under-reporting of cases can bias estimates of the reproduction numbers if reporting rates are not equal across the two age groups. However, we demonstrate that the estimate of the higher reproduction number is robust to disproportionate data-thinning. Applying the method to 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 data from Japan, we demonstrate that the reproduction number for children was considerably higher than that of adults, and that our estimates are insensitive to our choice of reproduction matrix. PMID:21345858

  15. Notch signalling mediates reproductive constraint in the adult worker honeybee

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    Duncan, Elizabeth J.; Hyink, Otto; Dearden, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of eusociality is the reproductive division of labour, in which one female caste reproduces, while reproduction is constrained in the subordinate caste. In adult worker honeybees (Apis mellifera) reproductive constraint is conditional: in the absence of the queen and brood, adult worker honeybees activate their ovaries and lay haploid male eggs. Here, we demonstrate that chemical inhibition of Notch signalling can overcome the repressive effect of queen pheromone and promote ovary activity in adult worker honeybees. We show that Notch signalling acts on the earliest stages of oogenesis and that the removal of the queen corresponds with a loss of Notch protein in the germarium. We conclude that the ancient and pleiotropic Notch signalling pathway has been co-opted into constraining reproduction in worker honeybees and we provide the first molecular mechanism directly linking ovary activity in adult worker bees with the presence of the queen. PMID:27485026

  16. Contribution of Nitrogen Uptake and Retranslocation during Reproductive Growth to the Nitrogen Efficiency of Winter Oilseed-Rape Cultivars (Brassica napus L. Differing in Leaf Senescence

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    Fabian Koeslin-Findeklee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genotypic variation in N efficiency defined as high grain yield under limited nitrogen (N supply of winter oilseed-rape line-cultivars has been predominantly attributed to N uptake efficiency (NUPT through maintained N uptake during reproductive growth related to functional stay-green. For investigating the role of stay-green, N retranslocation and N uptake during the reproductive phase for grain yield formation, two line cultivars differing in N starvation-induced leaf senescence were grown in a field experiment without mineral N (N0 and with 160 kg N·ha−1 (N160. Through frequent harvests from full flowering until maturity N uptake, N utilization and apparent N remobilization from vegetative plant parts to the pods could be calculated. NUPT proved being more important than N utilization efficiency (NUE for grain yield formation under N-limiting (N0 conditions. For cultivar differences in N efficiency, particularly N uptake during flowering (NUPT and biomass allocation efficiency (HI to the grains, were decisive. Both crop traits were related to delayed senescence of the older leaves. Remobilization of N particularly from stems and leaves was more important for pod N accumulation than N uptake after full flowering. Pod walls (high N concentrations and stems (high biomass mainly contributed to the crop-residue N at maturity. Decreasing the crop-inherent high N budget surplus of winter oilseed-rape requires increasing the low N remobilization efficiency particularly of pod-wall N to the grains. Addressing this conclusion, multi-year and -location field experiments with an extended range of cultivars including hybrids are desirable.

  17. Plant senescence and crop productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Per L.; Culetic, Andrea; Boschian, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a developmental process which in annual crop plants overlaps with the reproductive phase. Senescence might reduce crop yield when it is induced prematurely under adverse environmental conditions. This review covers the role of senescence for the productivity of crop plants....... With the aim to enhance productivity, a number of functional stay-green cultivars have been selected by conventional breeding, in particular of sorghum and maize. In many cases, a positive correlation between leaf area duration and yield has been observed, although in a number of other cases, stay...... plants, the expression of the IPT gene under control of senescence-associated promoters has been the most successful. The promoters employed for senescence-regulated expression contain cis-elements for binding of WRKY transcription factors and factors controlled by abscisic acid. In most crops...

  18. Partial sleep deprivation activates the DNA damage response (DDR) and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in aged adult humans.

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    Carroll, Judith E; Cole, Steven W; Seeman, Teresa E; Breen, Elizabeth C; Witarama, Tuff; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; Irwin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Age-related disease risk has been linked to short sleep duration and sleep disturbances; however, the specific molecular pathways linking sleep loss with diseases of aging are poorly defined. Key cellular events seen with aging, which are thought to contribute to disease, may be particularly sensitive to sleep loss. We tested whether one night of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) would increase leukocyte gene expression indicative of DNA damage responses (DDR), the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), and senescence indicator p16(INK4a) in older adult humans, who are at increased risk for cellular senescence. Community-dwelling older adults aged 61-86years (n=29; 48% male) underwent an experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol over 4 nights, including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, partial sleep deprivation (sleep restricted 3-7AM), and a subsequent full night of sleep. Blood samples were obtained each morning to assess peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression using Illumina HT-12 arrays. Analyses of microarray results revealed that SASP (psleep deprivation activates PBMC gene expression patterns consistent with biological aging in this older adult sample. PSD enhanced the SASP and increased the accumulation of damage that initiates cell cycle arrest and promotes cellular senescence. These findings causally link sleep deprivation to the molecular processes associated with biological aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prenatal exposure to chromium induces early reproductive senescence by increasing germ cell apoptosis and advancing germ cell cyst breakdown in the F1 offspring.

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    Sivakumar, Kirthiram K; Stanley, Jone A; Arosh, Joe A; Pepling, Melissa E; Burghardt, Robert C; Banu, Sakhila K

    2014-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium (CrVI), one of the more toxic heavy metals, is widely used in more than 50 industries such as chrome plating, welding, wood processing and tanneries. As one of the world's leading producers of chromium compounds, the U.S. is facing growing challenges in protecting human health against multiple adverse effects of CrVI. CrVI is rapidly converted to CrIII intracellularly, and can induce apoptosis through different mechanisms. Our previous studies demonstrated postnatal exposure to CrVI results in a delay or arrest in follicle development and puberty. Pregnant rats were treated with 25 ppm potassium dichromate (CrVI) from gestational day (GD) 9.5 to 14.5 through drinking water, placentae were removed on GD 20, and total Cr was estimated in the placentae; ovaries were removed from the F1 offspring on postnatal day (PND)-1 and various analyses were performed. Our results show that gestational exposure to CrVI resulted in (i) increased Cr concentration in the placenta, (ii) increased germ cell apoptosis by up-regulating p53/p27-Bax-caspase-3 proteins and by increasing p53-SOD-2 co-localization; (iii) accelerated germ cell cyst (GCC) breakdown; (iv) advanced primordial follicle assembly and primary follicle transition and (v) down regulation of p-AKT, p-ERK and XIAP. As a result of the above events, CrVI induced early reproductive senescence and decrease in litter size in F1 female progeny. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Impact of Adult Weight, Density, and Age on Reproduction of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

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    The impact of adult weight, age, and density on reproduction of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was studied. The impact of adult weight on reproduction was determined in two ways: 1) counting the daily progeny of individual adult pairs of known weight and analyzing the data with line...

  1. Senescence is not inevitable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Owen; Vaupel, James W.

    2017-01-01

    trajectories exists. These empirical observations support theoretical work indicating that a wide range of mortality and fertility trajectories is indeed possible, including senescence, negligible senescence and even negative senescence (improvement). Although many mysteries remain in the field...

  2. Influences of sex and activity level on physiological changes in individual adult sockeye salmon during rapid senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Kimberly A; Hinch, Scott G; Healey, Michael C; Patterson, David A; Larsson, Stefan; Farrell, Anthony P

    2010-01-01

    A noninvasive biopsy protocol was used to sample plasma and gill tissue in individual sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) during the critical life stage associated with spawning-arrival at a spawning channel through senescence to death several days later. Our main objective was to characterize the physiological changes associated with rapid senescence in terms of the physiological stress/cortisol hypersecretion model and the energy exhaustion model. Salmon lived an average of 5 d in the spawning channel, during which time there were three major physiological trends that were independent of sexual status: a large increase in plasma indicators of stress and exercise (i.e., lactate and cortisol), a decrease in the major plasma ions (i.e., Cl(-) and Na(+)) and osmolality, and a decrease in gross somatic energy reserves. Contrary to a generalized stress response, plasma glucose decreased in approximately 2/3 of the fish after arrival, as opposed to increasing. Furthermore, plasma cortisol levels at spawning-ground arrival were not correlated with the degree of ionoregulatory changes during rapid senescence. One mechanism of mortality in some fish may involve the exhaustion of energy reserves, resulting in the inability to mobilize plasma glucose. Sex had a significant modulating effect on the degree of physiological change. Females exhibited a greater magnitude of change for gross somatic energy, osmolality, and plasma concentrations of Cl(-), Na(+), cortisol, testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone, 17,20beta-progesterone, and estradiol. The activity level of an individual on the spawning grounds appeared to influence the degree of some physiological changes during senescence. For example, males that received a greater frequency of attacks exhibited larger net decreases in plasma 11-ketotestosterone while on the spawning grounds. These results suggest that rapid senescence on spawning grounds is influenced by multiple physiological processes and perhaps behavior. This study

  3. Predatory senescence in ageing wolves.

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    MacNulty, Daniel R; Smith, Douglas W; Vucetich, John A; Mech, L David; Stahler, Daniel R; Packer, Craig

    2009-12-01

    It is well established that ageing handicaps the ability of prey to escape predators, yet surprisingly little is known about how ageing affects the ability of predators to catch prey. Research into long-lived predators has assumed that adults have uniform impacts on prey regardless of age. Here we use longitudinal data from repeated observations of individually-known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park to demonstrate that adult predatory performance declines with age and that an increasing ratio of senescent individuals in the wolf population depresses the rate of prey offtake. Because this ratio fluctuates independently of population size, predatory senescence may cause wolf populations of equal size but different age structure to have different impacts on prey populations. These findings suggest that predatory senescence is an important, though overlooked, factor affecting predator-prey dynamics.

  4. Predatory senescence in aging wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNulty, Daniel R.; Smith, Douglas W.; Vucetich, John A.; Mech, L. David; Stahler, Daniel R.; Packer, Craig

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that ageing handicaps the ability of prey to escape predators, yet surprisingly little is known about how ageing affects the ability of predators to catch prey. Research into long-lived predators has assumed that adults have uniform impacts on prey regardless of age. Here we use longitudinal data from repeated observations of individually-known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park to demonstrate that adult predatory performance declines with age and that an increasing ratio of senescent individuals in the wolf population depresses the rate of prey offtake. Because this ratio fluctuates independently of population size, predatory senescence may cause wolf populations of equal size but different age structure to have different impacts on prey populations. These findings suggest that predatory senescence is an important, though overlooked, factor affecting predator-prey dynamics.

  5. Predatory senescence in ageing wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNulty, D.R.; Smith, D.W.; Vucetich, J.A.; Mech, L.D.; Stahler, D.R.; Packer, C.

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that ageing handicaps the ability of prey to escape predators, yet surprisingly little is known about how ageing affects the ability of predators to catch prey. Research into long-lived predators has assumed that adults have uniform impacts on prey regardless of age. Here we use longitudinal data from repeated observations of individually-known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park to demonstrate that adult predatory performance declines with age and that an increasing ratio of senescent individuals in the wolf population depresses the rate of prey offtake. Because this ratio fluctuates independently of population size, predatory senescence may cause wolf populations of equal size but different age structure to have different impacts on prey populations. These findings suggest that predatory senescence is an important, though overlooked, factor affecting predator-prey dynamics. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  6. Delayed Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Researcher Dr. Yi Li developed a technique to manipulate certain characteristics of plant growth such as anit-senescence. For example, the tobacco leaf was clipped from a transgenic plant (right), and a wildtype plant (left). During ground-based laboratory studies, both leaves were left in a darkened area for 4 months. When retrieved, the wildtype plant leaf was dried-out and the transgenic leaf remained fresh and green. A variation of this technology that involves manipulating plant hormones has been conducted in space-based studies on tomato plants through BioServe Space Technologies. The transport and distribution of auxin, an important plant hormone has shown to be influenced by microgravity, which could lead to improving the quality of fruits and vegetables grown on Earth.

  7. Demographic aspects of Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera, Calliphoridae) adults maintained under experimental conditions: reproductive rate estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Marcelo Henrique de; Von Zuben, Claudio José

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate some aspects of the populational ecology of Chrysomya megacephala, analyzing demographic aspects of adults kept under experimental conditions. Cages of C. megacephala adults were prepared with four different larval densities (100, 200, 400 and 800). For each cage, two tables were made: one with demographic parameters for the life expectancy estimate at the initial age (e0), and another with the reproductive rate and average reproduction age estimates...

  8. Survival and reproduction of radio-marked adult spotted owls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.C. Foster; E.D. Forsman; E.C. Meslow; G.S. Miller; J.A. Reid; F.F. Wagner; A.B. Carey; J.B. Lint

    1992-01-01

    We compared survival, reproduction, and body mass of radio-marked and non radio-marked spotted owls (Strix occidentalis) to determine if backpack radios influenced reproduction or survival. In most study areas and years, there were no differences (P > 0.05) in survival of males and females or in survival of radio-marked versus banded owls. There...

  9. Adult carbohydrate feeding affects reproduction of Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordao, Alexandre L., E-mail: aljordao@hotmail.co [Instituto de Pesquisas Cientificas e Tecnologicas do Estado do Amapa (IEPA), Macapa, AP (Brazil); Nakano, Octavio, E-mail: onakano@esalq.usp.b [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia e Acarologia; Janeiro, Vanderly, E-mail: vjaneiro@hotmail.co [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Estatistica

    2010-06-15

    Reproduction of most insects depend on nutrients accumulated during the larval stage, but many lepidopteran species will also depend on nutrients obtained at the adult stage. Feeding at the adult stage allows the intake of carbohydrate and amino acid rich solutions, which may have an effect on the species reproduction and population growth. The objectives of the current study were to characterize the effects of sugar consumption by adults of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller), on its reproduction. To initially test the food intake by adults, a 10% honey solution or water (control), both containing a liquid dye were offered to adult insects 24 h after emergence, and the presence of the dye was observed by analysis of their digestive system. The effects of adult feeding on a 10% honey solution on the reproductive performance of P. operculella were evaluated by assessing the oviposition rate, fecundity and fertility. Adult feeding was proved by the presence of the dye within the digestive system of adults of P. operculella. Although the oviposition rate and fertility were not affected by adult feeding, female fecundity was higher in honey-fed females as compared to the water-fed females. (author)

  10. Adult carbohydrate feeding affects reproduction of Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordao, Alexandre L.; Nakano, Octavio; Janeiro, Vanderly

    2010-01-01

    Reproduction of most insects depend on nutrients accumulated during the larval stage, but many lepidopteran species will also depend on nutrients obtained at the adult stage. Feeding at the adult stage allows the intake of carbohydrate and amino acid rich solutions, which may have an effect on the species reproduction and population growth. The objectives of the current study were to characterize the effects of sugar consumption by adults of the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller), on its reproduction. To initially test the food intake by adults, a 10% honey solution or water (control), both containing a liquid dye were offered to adult insects 24 h after emergence, and the presence of the dye was observed by analysis of their digestive system. The effects of adult feeding on a 10% honey solution on the reproductive performance of P. operculella were evaluated by assessing the oviposition rate, fecundity and fertility. Adult feeding was proved by the presence of the dye within the digestive system of adults of P. operculella. Although the oviposition rate and fertility were not affected by adult feeding, female fecundity was higher in honey-fed females as compared to the water-fed females. (author)

  11. Nickel Nanoparticles Exposure and Reproductive Toxicity in Healthy Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Kong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nickel is associated with reproductive toxicity. However, the reproductive toxicity of nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs is unclear. Our goal was to determine the association between nickel nanoparticle exposure and reproductive toxicity. According to the one-generation reproductive toxicity standard, rats were exposed to nickel nanoparticles by gavage and we selected indicators including sex hormone levels, sperm motility, histopathology, and reproductive outcome etc. Experimental results showed nickel nanoparticles increased follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH, and lowered etradiol (E2 serum levels at a dose of 15 and 45 mg/kg in female rats. Ovarian lymphocytosis, vascular dilatation and congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and increase in apoptotic cells were found in ovary tissues in exposure groups. For male rats, the weights decreased gradually, the ratio of epididymis weight over body weight increased, the motility of rat sperm changed, and the levels of FSH and testosterone (T diminished. Pathological results showed the shedding of epithelial cells of raw seminiferous tubule, disordered arrangement of cells in the tube, and the appearance of cell apoptosis and death in the exposure group. At the same time, Ni NPs resulted in a change of the reproductive index and the offspring development of rats. Further research is needed to elucidate exposure to human populations and mechanism of actions.

  12. Nickel nanoparticles exposure and reproductive toxicity in healthy adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lu; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Dayong; Hu, Ke; Lu, Weiqi; Wei, Chao; Liang, Geyu; Pu, Yuepu

    2014-11-17

    Nickel is associated with reproductive toxicity. However, the reproductive toxicity of nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) is unclear. Our goal was to determine the association between nickel nanoparticle exposure and reproductive toxicity. According to the one-generation reproductive toxicity standard, rats were exposed to nickel nanoparticles by gavage and we selected indicators including sex hormone levels, sperm motility, histopathology, and reproductive outcome etc. Experimental results showed nickel nanoparticles increased follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), and lowered etradiol (E2) serum levels at a dose of 15 and 45 mg/kg in female rats. Ovarian lymphocytosis, vascular dilatation and congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and increase in apoptotic cells were found in ovary tissues in exposure groups. For male rats, the weights decreased gradually, the ratio of epididymis weight over body weight increased, the motility of rat sperm changed, and the levels of FSH and testosterone (T) diminished. Pathological results showed the shedding of epithelial cells of raw seminiferous tubule, disordered arrangement of cells in the tube, and the appearance of cell apoptosis and death in the exposure group. At the same time, Ni NPs resulted in a change of the reproductive index and the offspring development of rats. Further research is needed to elucidate exposure to human populations and mechanism of actions.

  13. Toluene effects on the motor activity of adolescent, young-adult, middle-age and senescent male Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life stage is an important risk factor for toxicity. Children and aging adults, for example, are more susceptible to certain chemicals than are young adults. In comparison to children, relatively little is known about susceptibility in older adults. Additionally, few studies have...

  14. Effects of task complexity on rhythmic reproduction performance in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannarilli, Flora; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Iosa, Marco; Pesce, Caterina; Capranica, Laura

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of task complexity on the capability to reproduce rhythmic patterns. Sedentary musically illiterate individuals (age: 34.8±4.2 yrs; M±SD) were administered a rhythmic test including three rhythmic patterns to be reproduced by means of finger-tapping, foot-tapping and walking. For the quantification of subjects' ability in the reproduction of rhythmic patterns, qualitative and quantitative parameters were submitted to analysis. A stereophotogrammetric system was used to reconstruct and evaluate individual performances. The findings indicated a good internal stability of the rhythmic reproduction, suggesting that the present experimental design is suitable to discriminate the participants' rhythmic ability. Qualitative aspects of rhythmic reproduction (i.e., speed of execution and temporal ratios between events) varied as a function of the perceptual-motor requirements of the rhythmic reproduction task, with larger reproduction deviations in the walking task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Adult lifetime reproductive value in fish depends on size and fecundity type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsoukali, Stavroula; Olsson, Karin H.; Visser, André W.

    2016-01-01

    In a stable population, the adult lifetime reproductive value must be balanced against early life survival. Although delaying maturity may increase fecundity, it also reduces survival. Larger size at maturity therefore not only allows for higher fecundity, but requires it. Using simple arguments......, the expected proportionality falls off if mortality increases to include fishing. Furthermore, we find that the fecundity type (determinate or indeterminate) affects the predicted adult reproductive value, which is significantly (10-fold) higher for an indeterminate spawner than for a determinate spawner...

  16. Senescence Meets Dedifferentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givaty Rapp, Yemima; Ransbotyn, Vanessa; Grafi, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Senescence represents the final stage of leaf development but is often induced prematurely following exposure to biotic and abiotic stresses. Leaf senescence is manifested by color change from green to yellow (due to chlorophyll degradation) or to red (due to de novo synthesis of anthocyanins coupled with chlorophyll degradation) and frequently culminates in programmed death of leaves. However, the breakdown of chlorophyll and macromolecules such as proteins and RNAs that occurs during leaf senescence does not necessarily represent a one-way road to death but rather a reversible process whereby senescing leaves can, under certain conditions, re-green and regain their photosynthetic capacity. This phenomenon essentially distinguishes senescence from programmed cell death, leading researchers to hypothesize that changes occurring during senescence might represent a process of trans-differentiation, that is the conversion of one cell type to another. In this review, we highlight attributes common to senescence and dedifferentiation including chromatin structure and activation of transposable elements and provide further support to the notion that senescence is not merely a deterioration process leading to death but rather a unique developmental state resembling dedifferentiation. PMID:27135333

  17. PML, SUMOylation and senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues eDe Thé

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, 25 years ago, PML has been an enigma. Implicated in the oncogenic PML/RARA fusion, forming elusive intranuclear domains, triggering cell death or senescence, controlled by and perhaps controlling SUMOylation... there are multiple PML-related issues. Here we review the reciprocal interactions between PML, senescence and SUMOylation, notably in the context of cellular transformation.

  18. Educational Needs of Adult Men regarding Sexual and Reproductive Health in Ahvaz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Hajizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Men’s sexual and reproductive health is one of the most important public health issues. However, less attention has been paid to this matter, compared to women’s health issues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the educational needs of men regarding sexual and reproductive health in Ahvaz, Iran. Methods:This descriptive study was performed on 1,068 adult men (aged 20-60 years, selected via random cluster sampling in Ahvaz city in 2014. In order to determine the educational needs of men regarding sexual and reproductive health, a questionnaire consisting of three major sections (i.e., demographic data, sexual and reproductive health needs, and men’s attitudes was designed. The validity of the questionnaire was determined by content and face validity. Its reliability was assessed by internal consistency (α=85% and test-retest. For data analysis, descriptive statistics, t-test and ANOVA were performed, using SPSS version 19. Results: The majority of men (75.1% had poor knowledge and a moderate attitude (67.3% towards sexual and reproductive health. The three most important educational needs of men regarding sexual and reproductive health were cancers of male reproductive system (83.8%, sexually transmitted diseases (STD/HIV (77.4% and religious attitudes toward sex (77%, respectively. Friends were the most important source of information in all aspects of sexual and reproductive health, while men preferred to receive information from a male physician or counselor. According to the results, men were dissatisfied with the amount of information they received about sexual and reproductive health. Conclusion: Based on the findings, men felt the need for sexual and reproductive health education; these needs were influenced by social and demographic factors, except marital status. If health policymakers pay attention to these educational needs, it is possible to implement suitable programs for improving men's sexual health and

  19. Evolution of plant senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Mike

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senescence is integral to the flowering plant life-cycle. Senescence-like processes occur also in non-angiosperm land plants, algae and photosynthetic prokaryotes. Increasing numbers of genes have been assigned functions in the regulation and execution of angiosperm senescence. At the same time there has been a large expansion in the number and taxonomic spread of plant sequences in the genome databases. The present paper uses these resources to make a study of the evolutionary origins of angiosperm senescence based on a survey of the distribution, across plant and microbial taxa, and expression of senescence-related genes. Results Phylogeny analyses were carried out on protein sequences corresponding to genes with demonstrated functions in angiosperm senescence. They include proteins involved in chlorophyll catabolism and its control, homeoprotein transcription factors, metabolite transporters, enzymes and regulators of carotenoid metabolism and of anthocyanin biosynthesis. Evolutionary timelines for the origins and functions of particular genes were inferred from the taxonomic distribution of sequences homologous to those of angiosperm senescence-related proteins. Turnover of the light energy transduction apparatus is the most ancient element in the senescence syndrome. By contrast, the association of phenylpropanoid metabolism with senescence, and integration of senescence with development and adaptation mediated by transcription factors, are relatively recent innovations of land plants. An extended range of senescence-related genes of Arabidopsis was profiled for coexpression patterns and developmental relationships and revealed a clear carotenoid metabolism grouping, coordinated expression of genes for anthocyanin and flavonoid enzymes and regulators and a cluster pattern of genes for chlorophyll catabolism consistent with functional and evolutionary features of the pathway. Conclusion The expression and phylogenetic

  20. Nutritional effects on reproductive performance of captive adult female coyotes (Canis latrans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gese, Eric M; Roberts, Beth M; Knowlton, Frederick F

    2016-02-01

    Interactions between animals and their environment are fundamental to ecological research. Field studies of coyote (Canis latrans) reproductive performance suggest mean litter size changes in response to prey abundance. However, this relationship has been assessed primarily by using carcasses collected from trappers. The objective of this study was to assess whether nutritional manipulation prior to mating affected reproduction in adult female coyotes. We examined the effects of caloric restriction during the 7 months prior to estrus on the reproductive rates of 11 captive female coyotes and the subsequent initial survival of pups through two reproductive cycles. This was a 2-year study with a cross-over design so each female was monitored for reproductive performance on each of the two diet treatments. We assessed the number of implantation scars, number of pups born, sex ratios of pups, average pup weight at birth and 2- and 6-weeks of age, and the survival rates between implantation and 2-weeks of age for two diet treatments. We found the mean number of implantation sites and pups whelped during a reproductive cycle was influenced by food-intake prior to conception. Additionally, we found evidence suggesting the effects of nutritional stress may persist for additional breeding cycles. We also provided evidence suggesting well-fed females tended to have more male pups. Understanding how environmental factors influence reproductive output may improve model predictions of coyote population dynamics. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Time perception and reproduction in young adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, R A; Murphy, K R; Bush, T

    2001-07-01

    Adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 104) were compared with a control group (n = 64) on time estimation and reproduction tasks. Results were unaffected by ADHD subtype or gender. The ADHD group provided larger time estimations than the control group, particularly at long intervals. This became nonsignificant after controlling for IQ. The ADHD group made shorter reproductions than did the control group (15- and 60-s intervals) and greater reproduction errors (12-, 45-, 60-s durations). These differences remained after controlling for IQ and comorbid oppositional defiant disorder, depression, and anxiety. Only the level of anxiety contributed to errors (at 12-s duration) beyond the level of ADHD. Results extended findings on time perception in ADHD children to adults and ruled out comorbidity as the basis of the errors.

  2. Reproductive status in adult male long-term survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, K.; Claessens, J. J. M.; Knijnenburg, S. L.; van der Pal, H. J. H.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Caron, H. N.; Beerendonk, C. C. M.; Kremer, L. C. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the long-term effects of cancer therapies on reproductive status in adult male childhood cancer survivors, evaluated the treatment-related risk factors for hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and assessed the association between the FSH levels and the later need for assisted

  3. Reproductive status in adult male long-term survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, K.; Claessens, J.J.M.; Knijnenburg, S.L.; Pal, H.J. van der; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Caron, H.N.; Beerendonk, C.C.M.; Kremer, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study assessed the long-term effects of cancer therapies on reproductive status in adult male childhood cancer survivors, evaluated the treatment-related risk factors for hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and assessed the association between the FSH levels and the later need for

  4. Variation in male reproductive longevity across traditional societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Vinicius

    Full Text Available Most accounts of human life history propose that women have short reproductive spans relative to their adult lifespans, while men not only remain fertile but carry on reproducing until late life. Here we argue that studies have overlooked evidence for variation in male reproductive ageing across human populations. We apply a Bayesian approach to census data from Agta hunter-gatherers and Gambian farmers to show that long post-reproductive lifespans characterise not only women but also males in some traditional human populations. We calculate three indices of reproductive ageing in men (oldest age at reproduction, male late-life reproduction, and post-reproductive representation and identify a continuum of male reproductive longevity across eight traditional societies ranging from !Kung, Hadza and Agta hunter-gatherers exhibiting low levels of polygyny, early age at last reproduction and long post-reproductive lifespans, to male Gambian agriculturalists and Turkana pastoralists showing higher levels of polygyny, late-life reproduction and shorter post-reproductive lifespans. We conclude that the uniquely human detachment between rates of somatic senescence and reproductive decline, and the existence of post-reproductive lifespans, are features of both male and female life histories, and therefore not exclusive consequences of menopause.

  5. Effects of adult feeding on the reproduction and longevity of Noctuidae, Crambidae, Tortricidae and Elachistidae species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milano, Patricia; Berti Filho, Evoneo; Parra, Jose R. P.; Consoli, Fernando L.; Oda, Melissa L.

    2010-01-01

    This research evaluates the effect of the adult diet on the reproduction of Anticarsia gemmatalis Hubner, Heliothis virescens (Fabr.), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Noctuidae), Diatraea saccharalis (Fabr.) (Crambidae), Gymnandrosoma aurantianum Lima (Tortricidae) and Stenoma catenifer Walsingham (Elachistidae). Adults of all species were fed either water or a 10% honey solution. The egg viability for the 1 st and 2 n d egg masses, adult fecundity, longevity, number of mating and the ovigeny index (OI) (degree of ovarian maturation) were evaluated. Fecundity of A. gemmatalis and H. virescens was drastically reduced when females were fed only on water. Egg viability from both 1 st and 2 nd egg masses was variable between treatments. Females of A. gemmatalis, H. virescens and S. frugiperda, and males of some species had a reduced longevity when fed only on water. The number of matings was higher for A. gemmatalis and D. saccharalis when fed on water only. The OI was < 1.0 for all species evaluated indicating that all females may develop new oocytes as they age. Based on the OI and the reduced fecundity of A. gemmatalis and H. virescens, one observes that adult feeding is important for the reproduction of both species, and the IO is not a good parameter to indicate such condition. Spodoptera frugiperda, G. aurantianum, D. saccharalis and S. catenifer do not require any source of carbohydrates as adults to sustain their reproduction. (author)

  6. [Reproductive health survey of young adults in greater Santiago].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, M S; Herold, J M; Morris, L; López, I M

    1992-01-01

    In 1988 a survey was carried out in order to obtain information on knowledge about reproduction, sexual activity, attitudes, and use of contraceptive methods among residents between 15 and 24 years of age in Greater Santiago. For this purpose, a multistage, self-weighted, non-replacement probability sample was chosen from the entire Santiago urban area. After 2,898 households were visited, 865 women and 800 men were selected and interviewed. For the interview, a questionnaire with 156 questions was developed; many questions were similar to those included in similar surveys in Brazil and Guatemala. The interviewers were professionals who had received prior training. Although 75% of the interviewees had attended sex education classes, they had erroneous ideas on various basic subjects. Sixty-nine percent of the women interviewed had undergone menarche before attending these classes. In addition, 35.4% of the women and 65.0% of the men had had sexual relations prior to marriage, and less than 20% had used any contraceptive method. More than 60% of the interviewees who had children had conceived them before marrying. These findings point up the necessity of offering sex education classes for children and young people, as well as facilitating their access to family planning services, in order to decrease the number of illegitimate and unwanted children that are born in Chile.

  7. Reproductive health in young male adults with chronic diseases in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Soliman, Ashraf; Mohamed, Yassin

    2013-01-01

    The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention have defined a chronic diseases as an "illnesses that are prolonged, do not resolve spontaneously, and are rarely cured completely". Approximately 20% of all children have a chronic illness and 65% of them the illness is severe enough to interfere with daily activities. Failure of pubertal growth, delay or absence of sexual development, infertility and sexual dysfunction due to hypogonadism and defective spermatogenesis are well recognized disturbances among adolescents and young male adult patients with chronic diseases. The causes are multifactorial and can be due to disease itself, associated complications or drugs. Haemoglobinopathies, endocrine disorders, gastrointestinal and renal diseases are some examples that frequently cause some degree of disability. Infertility affects the future quality of life of these patients and is a predictor of stress in current and future relationships. Health care providers often neglect the reproductive health of chronically ill adolescents and young adults, although many studies indicate that they are sexually active and interested in knowing about their future fertility. This review article provides an overview of the literature concerning the impact of some chronic diseases in adolescents and young adults on reproductive health but will not address patients with cancer because it has been tackled adequately in the literature.MEDLINE database search of English-language medical journal articles published between 1975 and 2012 for papers related to reproductive health in adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases since childhood was done. Several Authors, recommend that all young adult patients with severe/prolonged chronic disease in childhood should be offered reproductive health care in a specialized center with appropriate expertise, involving a multidisciplinary team, including endocrinologists, andrologists, geneticists, psychologists, urologists and specialist

  8. PPARgamma Deficiency Counteracts Thymic Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ernszt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thymic senescence contributes to increased incidence of infection, cancer and autoimmunity at senior ages. This process manifests as adipose involution. As with other adipose tissues, thymic adipose involution is also controlled by PPARgamma. This is supported by observations reporting that systemic PPARgamma activation accelerates thymic adipose involution. Therefore, we hypothesized that decreased PPARgamma activity could prevent thymic adipose involution, although it may trigger metabolic adverse effects. We have confirmed that both human and murine thymic sections show marked staining for PPARgamma at senior ages. We have also tested the thymic lobes of PPARgamma haplo-insufficient and null mice. Supporting our working hypothesis both adult PPARgamma haplo-insufficient and null mice show delayed thymic senescence by thymus histology, thymocyte mouse T-cell recombination excision circle qPCR and peripheral blood naive T-cell ratio by flow-cytometry. Delayed senescence showed dose–response with respect to PPARgamma deficiency. Functional immune parameters were also evaluated at senior ages in PPARgamma haplo-insufficient mice (null mice do not reach senior ages due to metabolic adverse affects. As expected, sustained and elevated T-cell production conferred oral tolerance and enhanced vaccination efficiency in senior PPARgamma haplo-insufficient, but not in senior wild-type littermates according to ELISA IgG measurements. Of note, humans also show increased oral intolerance issues and decreased protection by vaccines at senior ages. Moreover, PPARgamma haplo-insufficiency also exists in human known as a rare disease (FPLD3 causing metabolic adverse effects, similar to the mouse. When compared to age- and metabolic disorder-matched other patient samples (FPLD2 not affecting PPARgamma activity, FPLD3 patients showed increased human Trec (hTrec values by qPCR (within healthy human range suggesting delayed thymic senescence, in accordance with

  9. The Immortal Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi-Smiraglia, Anna; Lipchick, Brittany C; Nikiforov, Mikhail A

    2017-01-01

    Activation of oncogenic signaling paradoxically results in the permanent withdrawal from cell cycle and induction of senescence (oncogene-induced senescence (OIS)). OIS is a fail-safe mechanism used by the cells to prevent uncontrolled tumor growth, and, as such, it is considered as the first barrier against cancer. In order to progress, tumor cells thus need to first overcome the senescent phenotype. Despite the increasing attention gained by OIS in the past 20 years, this field is still rather young due to continuous emergence of novel pathways and processes involved in OIS. Among the many factors contributing to incomplete understanding of OIS are the lack of unequivocal markers for senescence and the complexity of the phenotypes revealed by senescent cells in vivo and in vitro. OIS has been shown to play major roles at both the cellular and organismal levels in biological processes ranging from embryonic development to barrier to cancer progression. Here we will briefly outline major advances in methodologies that are being utilized for induction, identification, and characterization of molecular processes in cells undergoing oncogene-induced senescence. The full description of such methodologies is provided in the corresponding chapters of the book.

  10. Reproductive health education and sexual risk among high-risk female adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancheta, Rosedelia; Hynes, Colin; Shrier, Lydia A

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the associations of sources, content, and timing of reproductive health education with cognitive and behavioral sexual risk in a sample of high-risk female adolescents and young adults. Female adolescents and young adults (n=113, median age 17 years) receiving treatment for a sexually transmitted disease (STD) reported sources of reproductive health education, topics covered, and when first formal education occurred. Dependent variables included sexual risk knowledge; condom attitudes, negotiation skills, and use (consistent and at last sex); and number of sexual partners. Most participants reported receiving reproductive health education from both parental (80%) and formal sources (92%). Parents discussed the menstrual cycle (94%) more frequently than other sex education topics, while formal sources focused most on teaching about STDs (91%). Although median age of first formal instruction was 12 years, 26% of girls received their first formal education during or after the year they initiated coitus. Girls with a parental source of education and those receiving formal instruction on pregnancy reported greater ability to negotiate condom use. Girls who received education later in relation to the onset of sexual activity and those with a parental source of education reported more sexual partners. Early reproductive health education and education from both parental and formal sources is associated with reduced sexual risk among high-risk adolescent girls. Interestingly, receiving parental education is also associated with more sexual partners, suggesting that parental educational efforts may be reactive to their daughters' increasing sexual risk behavior. Future research should examine multiple sources of reproductive health education and the timing of education from these sources to enhance understanding the dynamic interactions between reproductive health education and adolescent sexual risk.

  11. Birds sacrifice oxidative protection for reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, P; Selman, C; Speakman, [No Value; Verhulst, S; Speakman, John R.

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative metabolism has reactive oxygen species (ROS) as unavoidable by-products, and the damage ROS inflicts on DNA, proteins and lipids is considered to be a major agent of senescence. Increasing reproductive effort accelerates senescence, but whether reproductive effort is increased at the

  12. Assessment of the Reproductive Health Status of Adult Prison Inmates in Osun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Olugbenga-Bello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. All over the world, numbers of prisoners have being increasing with majority in the sexually active age group; hence diseases such as HIV, Tuberculosis and Hepatitis are more prevalent in prisons than in the community. This study thus aims to provide an overview of the reproductive health status of adult prison inmates in Osun State. Methodology. This is a cross-sectional study among adult inmates in Osun State prison. Data was obtained from 209 selected respondents using pre-tested semi structured questionnaire. Result. Majority of the respondents were in the age group 20–39 years with mean age of 30.9+7.5. 73.2% are aware of STIs, 93.3% HIV/AIDS and 81.3% contraception. 54.6% had multiple sexual partners before incarceration and 23.3% of them used condom always. 89.5% were not involved in any sexual practice inside the prison, 9.1% masturbated and 1.4% had homosexual partners. Less than 6% had access to male condoms gotten from prison staffs and prison clinics. Conclusion and recommendation. No comprehensive reproductive health care system to address reproductive health services in prisons. Respondents’ knowledge about STIs, HIV/AIDS and contraception is good, but their condom usage is low compared with the knowledge. Government should put in place specific reproductive health programmes in prisons.

  13. Assessment of the Reproductive Health Status of Adult Prison Inmates in Osun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olugbenga-Bello, A. I.; Adeoye, O. A.; Osagbemi, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. All over the world, numbers of prisoners have being increasing with majority in the sexually active age group; hence diseases such as HIV, Tuberculosis and Hepatitis are more prevalent in prisons than in the community. This study thus aims to provide an overview of the reproductive health status of adult prison inmates in Osun State. Methodology. This is a cross-sectional study among adult inmates in Osun State prison. Data was obtained from 209 selected respondents using pre-tested semi structured questionnaire. Result. Majority of the respondents were in the age group 20–39 years with mean age of 30.9 + 7.5. 73.2% are aware of STIs, 93.3% HIV/AIDS and 81.3% contraception. 54.6% had multiple sexual partners before incarceration and 23.3% of them used condom always. 89.5% were not involved in any sexual practice inside the prison, 9.1% masturbated and 1.4% had homosexual partners. Less than 6% had access to male condoms gotten from prison staffs and prison clinics. Conclusion and recommendation. No comprehensive reproductive health care system to address reproductive health services in prisons. Respondents' knowledge about STIs, HIV/AIDS and contraception is good, but their condom usage is low compared with the knowledge. Government should put in place specific reproductive health programmes in prisons. PMID:25763387

  14. Actuarial senescence in a long-lived orchid challenges our current understanding of ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Johan Petter; Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen R; Øien, Dag-Inge; Moen, Asbjørn; Sletvold, Nina

    2016-11-16

    The dominant evolutionary theory of actuarial senescence-an increase in death rate with advancing age-is based on the concept of a germ cell line that is separated from the somatic cells early in life. However, such a separation is not clear in all organisms. This has been suggested to explain the paucity of evidence for actuarial senescence in plants. We used a 32 year study of Dactylorhiza lapponica that replaces its organs each growing season, to test whether individuals of this tuberous orchid senesce. We performed a Bayesian survival trajectory analysis accounting for reproductive investment, for individuals under two types of land use, in two climatic regions. The mortality trajectory was best approximated by a Weibull model, showing clear actuarial senescence. Rates of senescence in this model declined with advancing age, but were slightly higher in mown plots and in the more benign climatic region. At older ages, senescence was evident only when accounting for a positive effect of reproductive investment on mortality. Our results demonstrate actuarial senescence as well as a survival-reproduction trade-off in plants, and indicate that environmental context may influence senescence rates. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the evolution of demographic senescence and for models of plant population dynamics. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Growth, development, reproductive competence and adult behaviour of Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) reared on different diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, R.K.; Sharma, V.P.

    2002-01-01

    Spodoptera litura was reared on natural food (castor leaves, Ricinus communis) and on a several semi-synthetic diets using quasi mass rearing techniques. The effect of the different diets and rearing regimes on S. litura growth, development, reproductive competence and adult behaviour was measured. Spodoptera litura reared from a modified chickpea-based diet provided the greatest growth index and index of adequacy. These studies were conducted as a prerequisite for the evaluation of F 1 sterility technique. (author)

  16. Predator Exclosures Enhance Reproductive Success but Increase Adult Mortality of Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Barber

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus are listed as endangered throughout Canada and the United States Great Lakes region. Most attempts to increase their numbers have focused on enhancing reproductive success. Using 22 years of data collected by Parks Canada in Prince Edward Island National Park of Canada, we examined whether predator exclosures installed around Piping Plover nests increased nest success and hatching and fledging success when compared to nests without exclosures. Nests with exclosures were significantly more likely to hatch at least one egg than nests without exclosures, and they hatched a significantly greater number of young. The greater reproductive success observed in exclosed nests is likely due to the increased protection from predators that the exclosures conferred; significantly fewer exclosed nests were depredated than nonexclosed nests. However, significantly more exclosed than nonexclosed nests were abandoned by adults, and they had significantly greater adult mortality. Whether benefits of increased reproductive success from exclosures outweigh costs of increased abandonment and adult mortality remains unknown, but must be considered.

  17. [Effect of tail-suspension on the reproduction of adult male rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dang-xia; Qiu, Shu-dong; Wang, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Jie

    2006-04-01

    To study the effects on the male reproduction in adult male rats and its mechanisms through simulated weightlessness using tail-suspension, in order to do a basic works of exploring the effects on human being's reproduction in outer space. Forty Spraque-Dawley adult male rats were randomly divided into four groups, two experimental groups and two control groups. Rats in the two experimental groups were tail-suspended for 14 d and 28 d respectively, then we examined the weight and morphology of testis, the quality and amount of sperm, also tested the serum hormone by radioimmunoassay and analyzed apoptosis rate of testicular cells by TUNEL in the experimental rats and control rats. After tail-suspension, the weight of testis, the sperm count and sperm motility significantly decreased (P 0.05). These changes were not significant between two experimental groups (P > 0.05). In addition, the seminiferous tubules became atrophy with the reduction of the layers of seminiferous epithelium, and sperm amount in lumens of seminiferous tubules decreased in experimental groups. The above were more remarkable in the 28 d experimental group. Simulating weightlessness has a harmful effect on reproduction of adult male rats. These may be caused by inducing apoptosis. The blocking apoptosis of testicular cells may be useful in improving the harmful effect.

  18. Influence of adult nutrition on the relationship between body size and reproductive parameters in a parasitoid wasp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Harvey, J.A.; Mills, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    1. An important constraint upon life-history evolution in parasitoids is the limit imposed by body size on allocation of limited metabolic resources to different fitness-related physiological functions such as reproduction and survival. 2. The influence of adult nutrition on reproductive and

  19. Sex differences in the effects of juvenile and adult diet on age-dependent reproductive effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houslay, T M; Hunt, J; Tinsley, M C; Bussière, L F

    2015-05-01

    Sexual selection should cause sex differences in patterns of resource allocation. When current and future reproductive effort trade off, variation in resource acquisition might further cause sex differences in age-dependent investment, or in sensitivity to changes in resource availability over time. However, the nature and prevalence of sex differences in age-dependent investment remain unclear. We manipulated resource acquisition at juvenile and adult stages in decorated crickets, Gryllodes sigillatus, and assessed effects on sex-specific allocation to age-dependent reproductive effort (calling in males, fecundity in females) and longevity. We predicted that the resource and time demands of egg production would result in relatively consistent female strategies across treatments, whereas male investment should depend sharply on diet. Contrary to expectations, female age-dependent reproductive effort diverged substantially across treatments, with resource-limited females showing much lower and later investment in reproduction; the highest fecundity was associated with intermediate lifespans. In contrast, long-lived males always signalled more than short-lived males, and male age-dependent reproductive effort did not depend on diet. We found consistently positive covariance between male reproductive effort and lifespan, whereas diet altered this covariance in females, revealing sex differences in the benefits of allocation to longevity. Our results support sex-specific selection on allocation patterns, but also suggest a simpler alternative: males may use social feedback to make allocation decisions and preferentially store resources as energetic reserves in its absence. Increased calling effort with age therefore could be caused by gradual resource accumulation, heightened mortality risk over time, and a lack of feedback from available mates. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary

  20. Reproductive health decision-making in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Cynthia; Wiener, Lori; Zadeh, Sima; Albright, Jamie; Mellins, Claude Ann; Mancilla, Michael; Tepper, Vicki; Trexler, Connie; Purdy, Julia; Osherow, Janet; Lovelace, Susan; Kapetanovic, Suad

    2013-07-01

    With widespread access to antiretroviral therapy in the United States, many perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) children are surviving into adolescence and adulthood, becoming sexually active and making decisions about their reproductive health. The literature focusing on the reproductive decisions of individuals behaviorally infected with HIV can serve as a springboard for understanding the decision-making process of PHIV+ youth. Yet, there are many differences that critically distinguish reproductive health and related decision-making of PHIV+ youth. Given the potential public health implications of their reproductive decisions, better understanding of factors influencing the decision-making process is needed to help inform the development of salient treatment and prevention interventions. To begin addressing this understudied area, a "think tank" session, comprised of clinicians, medical providers, and researchers with expertise in the area of adolescent HIV, was held in Bethesda, MD, on September 21, 2011. The focus was to explore what is known about factors that influence the reproductive decision-making of PHIV+ adolescents and young adults, determine what important data are needed in order to develop appropriate intervention for PHIV+ youth having children, and to recommend future directions for the field in terms of designing and carrying out collaborative studies. In this report, we summarize the findings from this meeting. The paper is organized around the key themes that emerged, including utilizing a developmental perspective to create an operational definition of reproductive decision-making, integration of psychosocial services with medical management, and how to design future research studies. Case examples are presented and model program components proposed.

  1. Impairment of male reproduction in adult rats exposed to hydroxyprogesterone caproate in utero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpalatha, T.; Ramachandra Reddy, P.; Sreenivasula Reddy, P.

    Hydroxyprogesterone caproate is one of the most effective and widely used drugs for the treatment of uterine bleeding and threatened miscarriage in women. Hydroxyprogesterone caproate was administered to pregnant rats in order to assess the effect of intraperitoneal exposure to supranormal levels of hydroxyprogesterone caproate on the male reproductive potential in the first generation. The cauda epididymal sperm count and motility decreased significantly in rats exposed to hydroxyprogesterone caproate during embryonic development, when compared with control rats. The levels of serum testosterone decreased with an increase in follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in adult rats exposed to hydroxyprogesterone caproate during the embryonic stage. It was suggested that the impairment of male reproductive performance could be mediated through the inhibition of testosterone production.

  2. Cytokine loops driving senescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lukáš, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 8 (2008), s. 887-889 ISSN 1465-7392 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cellular senescence * cytokines * autocrine feedback loop Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 17.774, year: 2008

  3. Actuarial senescence in a long-lived orchid challenges our current understanding of ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen R.; Øien, Dag-Inge; Moen, Asbjørn; Sletvold, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The dominant evolutionary theory of actuarial senescence—an increase in death rate with advancing age—is based on the concept of a germ cell line that is separated from the somatic cells early in life. However, such a separation is not clear in all organisms. This has been suggested to explain the paucity of evidence for actuarial senescence in plants. We used a 32 year study of Dactylorhiza lapponica that replaces its organs each growing season, to test whether individuals of this tuberous orchid senesce. We performed a Bayesian survival trajectory analysis accounting for reproductive investment, for individuals under two types of land use, in two climatic regions. The mortality trajectory was best approximated by a Weibull model, showing clear actuarial senescence. Rates of senescence in this model declined with advancing age, but were slightly higher in mown plots and in the more benign climatic region. At older ages, senescence was evident only when accounting for a positive effect of reproductive investment on mortality. Our results demonstrate actuarial senescence as well as a survival–reproduction trade-off in plants, and indicate that environmental context may influence senescence rates. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the evolution of demographic senescence and for models of plant population dynamics. PMID:27852801

  4. Contrasted patterns of age-specific reproduction in long-lived seabirds

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2008-01-01

    While the number of studies providing evidence of actuarial senescence is increasing, and covers a wide range of taxa, the process of reproductive senescence remains poorly understood. In fact, quite high reproductive output until the last years of life has been reported in several vertebrate species, so that whether or not reproductive senescence is widespread remains unknown. We compared age-specific changes of reproductive parameters between two closely related species of long-lived seabir...

  5. Senescence in the wild: Insights from a long-term study on Seychelles warblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammers, Martijn; Kingma, Sjouke A; Bebbington, Kat; van de Crommenacker, Janske; Spurgin, Lewis G; Richardson, David S; Burke, Terry; Dugdale, Hannah L; Komdeur, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Senescence--the progressive age-dependent decline in performance--occurs in most organisms. There is considerable variation in the onset and rate of senescence between and within species. Yet the causes of this variation are still poorly understood, despite being central to understanding the evolution of senescence. Long-term longitudinal studies on wild animals are extremely well-suited to studying the impact of environmental and individual characteristics (and the interaction between the two) on senescence, and can help us to understand the mechanisms that shape the evolution of senescence. In this review, we summarize and discuss the insights gained from our comprehensive long-term individual-based study of the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis). This species provides an excellent model system in which to investigate the evolution of senescence in the wild. We found that Seychelles warblers show senescent declines in survival and reproduction, and discuss how individual characteristics (body condition, body size) and environmental effects (low- versus high-quality environments) may affect the onset and rate of senescence. Further, we highlight the evidence for trade-offs between early-life investment and senescence. We describe how key cellular and physiological processes (oxidative stress and telomere shortening) underpinning senescence are affected by individual and environmental characteristics in the Seychelles warbler (e.g. food availability, reproductive investment, disease) and we discuss how such physiological variation may mediate the relationship between environmental characteristics and senescence. Based on our work using Seychelles warblers as a model system, we show how insights from long-term studies of wild animals may help unravel the causes of the remarkable variation in senescence observed in natural systems, and highlight areas for promising future research.

  6. Adult Neurogenesis in Sheep: Characterization and Contribution to Reproduction and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, Frederic; Batailler, Martine; Meurisse, Maryse; Migaud, Martine

    2017-01-01

    Sheep have many advantages to study neurogenesis in comparison to the well-known rodent models. Their development and life expectancy are relatively long and they possess a gyrencephalic brain. Sheep are also seasonal breeders, a characteristic that allows studying the involvement of hypothalamic neurogenesis in the control of seasonal reproduction. Sheep are also able to individually recognize their conspecifics and develop selective and lasting bonds. Adult olfactory neurogenesis could be adapted to social behavior by supporting recognition of conspecifics. The present review reveals the distinctive features of the hippocampal, olfactory, and hypothalamic neurogenesis in sheep. In particular, the organization of the subventricular zone and the dynamic of neuronal maturation differs from that of rodents. In addition, we show that various physiological conditions, such as seasonal reproduction, gestation, and lactation differently modulate these three neurogenic niches. Last, we discuss recent evidence indicating that hypothalamic neurogenesis acts as an important regulator of the seasonal control of reproduction and that olfactory neurogenesis could be involved in odor processing in the context of maternal behavior. PMID:29109674

  7. Pheromone modulates two phenotypically plastic traits - adult reproduction and larval diapause - in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharam, Barney; Weldon, Laura; Viney, Mark

    2017-08-22

    Animals use information from their environment to make decisions, ultimately to maximize their fitness. The nematode C. elegans has a pheromone signalling system, which hitherto has principally been thought to be used by worms in deciding whether or not to arrest their development as larvae. Recent studies have suggested that this pheromone can have other roles in the C. elegans life cycle. Here we demonstrate a new role for the C. elegans pheromone, showing that it accelerates hermaphrodites' reproductive rate, a phenomenon which we call pheromone-dependent reproductive plasticity (PDRP). We also find that pheromone accelerates larval growth rates, but this depends on a live bacterial food source, while PDRP does not. Different C. elegans strains all show PDRP, though the magnitude of these effects differ among the strains, which is analogous to the diversity of arrested larval phenotypes that this pheromone also induces. Using a selection experiment we also show that selection for PDRP or for larval arrest affects both the target and the non-target trait, suggesting that there is cross-talk between these two pheromone-dependent traits. Together, these results show that C. elegans' pheromone is a signal that acts at two key life cycle points, controlling alternative larval fates and affecting adult hermaphrodites' reproduction. More broadly, these results suggest that to properly understand and interpret the biology of pheromone signalling in C. elegans and other nematodes, the life-history biology of these organisms in their natural environment needs to be considered.

  8. Oral exposure of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 2,4,6-tribromophenol affects reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halden, Anna Norman; Nyholm, Jenny Rattfelt; Andersson, Patrik L

    2010-01-01

    The bromophenol 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP) is widely used as an industrial chemical, formed by degradation of tetrabromobisphenol-A, and it occurs naturally in marine organisms. Concentrations of TBP in fish have been related to intake via feed, but little is known about effects on fish health...... after oral exposure. In this study, we exposed adult male and female zebrafish (Danio rerio) to TBP via feed in nominal concentrations of 33, 330, and 3300 mu g/g feed (or control feed) for 6 weeks to assess the effects of TBP on reproductive output, gonad morphology, circulatory vitellogenin levels......, and early embryo development. The aim was also to investigate the extent to which TBP was metabolised to 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (IBA) in dietary exposed zebrafish, and the amounts of TBP and TBA found in offspring. After 6 weeks of exposure, we found about 3% of the daily dose of TBP in adult fish...

  9. Identification of 30 protein species involved in replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierick, Jean François; Kalume, Dário E; Wenders, Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of human proliferative cells to subcytotoxic stress triggers stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) which is characterized by many biomarkers of replicative senescence. Proteomic comparison of replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence indicates that, at the level...

  10. Cellular Senescence: A Translational Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Kirkland

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence entails essentially irreversible replicative arrest, apoptosis resistance, and frequently acquisition of a pro-inflammatory, tissue-destructive senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP. Senescent cells accumulate in various tissues with aging and at sites of pathogenesis in many chronic diseases and conditions. The SASP can contribute to senescence-related inflammation, metabolic dysregulation, stem cell dysfunction, aging phenotypes, chronic diseases, geriatric syndromes, and loss of resilience. Delaying senescent cell accumulation or reducing senescent cell burden is associated with delay, prevention, or alleviation of multiple senescence-associated conditions. We used a hypothesis-driven approach to discover pro-survival Senescent Cell Anti-apoptotic Pathways (SCAPs and, based on these SCAPs, the first senolytic agents, drugs that cause senescent cells to become susceptible to their own pro-apoptotic microenvironment. Several senolytic agents, which appear to alleviate multiple senescence-related phenotypes in pre-clinical models, are beginning the process of being translated into clinical interventions that could be transformative.

  11. [Immunological theory of senescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drela, Nadzieja

    2014-01-01

    Senescence can result from decreased potential of the immune system to respond to foreign and self antigens. The most common effect is the inhibition to destroy dying and cancer cells and the decrease of the immune response to pathogens. Aging is closely related to inflammatory phenotype, which facilitate the development of age-related diseases. The mammal immune system is highly organized and adapted to react to a wide range of antigens. According to the immunological theory, the causative agents of senescence are multilevel changes of development and functions of immune cells. Some of changes can be beneficial for the maintenance of homeostasis and lifespan in continuously changing endogenous environment and immune history of the organism.

  12. Cellular senescence and organismal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyapalan, Jessie C; Sedivy, John M

    2008-01-01

    Cellular senescence, first observed and defined using in vitro cell culture studies, is an irreversible cell cycle arrest which can be triggered by a variety of factors. Emerging evidence suggests that cellular senescence acts as an in vivo tumor suppression mechanism by limiting aberrant proliferation. It has also been postulated that cellular senescence can occur independently of cancer and contribute to the physiological processes of normal organismal aging. Recent data have demonstrated the in vivo accumulation of senescent cells with advancing age. Some characteristics of senescent cells, such as the ability to modify their extracellular environment, could play a role in aging and age-related pathology. In this review, we examine current evidence that links cellular senescence and organismal aging.

  13. Markers of T Cell Senescence in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing the aging of their population, and many more will face a similar obstacle in the near future, which could be a burden to many healthcare systems. Increased susceptibility to infections, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease, cancer as well as reduced efficacy of vaccination are important matters for researchers in the field of aging. As older adults show higher prevalence for a variety of diseases, this also implies higher risk of complications, including nosocomial infections, slower recovery and sequels that may reduce the autonomy and overall quality of life of older adults. The age-related effects on the immune system termed as “immunosenescence” can be exemplified by the reported hypo-responsiveness to influenza vaccination of the elderly. T cells, which belong to the adaptive arm of the immune system, have been extensively studied and the knowledge gathered enables a better understanding of how the immune system may be affected after acute/chronic infections and how this matters in the long run. In this review, we will focus on T cells and discuss the surface and molecular markers that are associated with T cell senescence. We will also look at the implications that senescent T cells could have on human health and diseases. Finally, we will discuss the benefits of having these markers for investigators and the future work that is needed to advance the field of T cell senescence markers.

  14. No Clear Association between Impaired Short-Term or Working Memory Storage and Time Reproduction Capacity in Adult ADHD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mette, Christian; Grabemann, Marco; Zimmermann, Marco; Strunz, Laura; Scherbaum, Norbert; Wiltfang, Jens; Kis, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Altered time reproduction is exhibited by patients with adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It remains unclear whether memory capacity influences the ability of adults with ADHD to reproduce time intervals. We conducted a behavioral study on 30 ADHD patients who were medicated with methylphenidate, 29 unmedicated adult ADHD patients and 32 healthy controls (HCs). We assessed time reproduction using six time intervals (1 s, 4 s, 6 s, 10 s, 24 s and 60 s) and assessed memory performance using the Wechsler memory scale. The patients with ADHD exhibited lower memory performance scores than the HCs. No significant differences in the raw scores for any of the time intervals (p > .05), with the exception of the variability at the short time intervals (1 s, 4 s and 6 s) (p memory performance (p > .05). We detected no findings indicating that working memory might influence time reproduction in adult patients with ADHD. Therefore, further studies concerning time reproduction and memory capacity among adult patients with ADHD must be performed to verify and replicate the present findings.

  15. No Clear Association between Impaired Short-Term or Working Memory Storage and Time Reproduction Capacity in Adult ADHD Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mette

    Full Text Available Altered time reproduction is exhibited by patients with adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. It remains unclear whether memory capacity influences the ability of adults with ADHD to reproduce time intervals.We conducted a behavioral study on 30 ADHD patients who were medicated with methylphenidate, 29 unmedicated adult ADHD patients and 32 healthy controls (HCs. We assessed time reproduction using six time intervals (1 s, 4 s, 6 s, 10 s, 24 s and 60 s and assessed memory performance using the Wechsler memory scale.The patients with ADHD exhibited lower memory performance scores than the HCs. No significant differences in the raw scores for any of the time intervals (p > .05, with the exception of the variability at the short time intervals (1 s, 4 s and 6 s (p .05.We detected no findings indicating that working memory might influence time reproduction in adult patients with ADHD. Therefore, further studies concerning time reproduction and memory capacity among adult patients with ADHD must be performed to verify and replicate the present findings.

  16. Photoperiod history differentially impacts reproduction and immune function in adult Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Brian J; Pyter, Leah M

    2009-12-01

    Seasonal changes in numerous aspects of mammalian immune function arise as a result of the annual variation in environmental day length (photoperiod), but it is not known if absolute photoperiod or relative change in photoperiod drives these changes. This experiment tested the hypothesis that an individual's history of exposure to day length determines immune responses to ambiguous, intermediate-duration day lengths. Immunological (blood leukocytes, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions [DTH]), reproductive, and adrenocortical responses were assessed in adult Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) that had been raised initially in categorically long (15-h light/day; 15L) or short (9L) photoperiods and were subsequently transferred to 1 of 7 cardinal experimental photoperiods between 9L and 15L, inclusive. Initial photoperiod history interacted with contemporary experimental photoperiods to determine reproductive responses: 11L, 12L, and 13L caused gonadal regression in hamsters previously exposed to 15L, but elicited growth in hamsters previously in 9L. In hamsters with a 15L photoperiod history, photoperiods history, DTH responses were largely unaffected by increases in day length. Enhancement and suppression of blood leukocyte concentrations occurred at 13L in hamsters with photoperiod histories of 15L and 9L, respectively; however, prior exposure to 9L imparted marked hysteresis effects, which suppressed baseline leukocyte concentrations. Cortisol concentrations were only enhanced in 15L hamsters transferred to 9L and, in common with DTH, were unaffected by photoperiod treatments in hamsters with a 9L photoperiod history. Photoperiod history acquired in adulthood impacts immune responses to photoperiod, but manifests in a markedly dissimilar fashion as compared to the reproductive system. Prior photoperiod exposure has an enduring impact on the ability of the immune system to respond to subsequent changes in day length.

  17. Effects of the neonicotinoid insecticide, clothianidin, on the reproductive organ system in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Ramazan; Türk, Gaffari; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Yılmaz, Ökkes; Kuloğlu, Tuncay; Baydaş, Gıyasettin; Naziroğlu, Mustafa; Yener, Zabit; Etem, Ebru; Tuzcu, Zeynep

    2013-10-01

    Clothianidin (CTD) is a novel, broad-spectrum insecticide. In the current study, it was aimed to study the effect of subchronic exposure to low doses of CTD (2, 8 and 24 mg/kg body weight/day) on the reproductive system in adult rats. CTD treatment did not significantly change serum testosterone level or sperm parameters (e.g. concentration, motility and morphology), but caused significant decreases in weights of epididymis, right cauda epididymis and seminal vesicles. CTD treatment did not cause sperm DNA fragmentation and did not change the apoptotic index in the seminiferous tubules and levels of α-tocopherol and glutathione, but increased the level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and cholesterol levels significantly at all doses. CTD exposure caused significant elevations in palmitic, linoleic and arachidonic acids in testis in all CTD-exposed groups. There was a drop in 20:4/18:2 (arachidonic acid/linoleic acid) ratio and an increase in 18:1n-9/18:0 (oleic acid/stearic acid) ratios in all CTD groups, in comparison to the control group. In conclusion, CTD had little detectable detrimental effects on the reproductive system of male rats over the measured parameters.

  18. Cancer in children and young adults born after assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundh, Karin Jerhamre; Henningsen, Anna-Karina A; Källen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Do children and young adults born after assisted reproductive technology (ART) have an increased risk of cancer? SUMMARY ANSWER: Children born after ART showed no overall increase in the rate of cancer when compared with children born as a result of spontaneous conception. WHAT...... IS KNOWN ALREADY: Children born after ART have more adverse perinatal outcomes, i.e. preterm births, low birthweights and birth defects. Previous studies have shown divergent results regarding the risk of cancer among children born after ART. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A retrospective Nordic population...... group of children born after spontaneous conception. This control group was almost 4-fold the size of the ART group (n = 358 419) and matched for parity, year of birth and country. Data on perinatal outcomes and cancer were obtained from the National Medical Birth Registries, the Cancer Registries...

  19. Demographic aspects of Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera, Calliphoridae adults maintained under experimental conditions: reproductive rate estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Henrique de Carvalho

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate some aspects of the populational ecology of Chrysomya megacephala, analyzing demographic aspects of adults kept under experimental conditions. Cages of C. megacephala adults were prepared with four different larval densities (100, 200, 400 and 800. For each cage, two tables were made: one with demographic parameters for the life expectancy estimate at the initial age (e0, and another with the reproductive rate and average reproduction age estimates. Populational parameters such as the intrinsic growth rate (r and the finite growth rate (lambda were calculated as well.Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius (Diptera, Calliphoridae é uma espécie de mosca-varejeira de considerável importância médico-sanitária que foi introduzida acidentalmente no Brasil nos anos 70. O objetivo do presente trabalho foi avaliar alguns aspectos da ecologia populacional desta espécie, analisando aspectos demográficos de adultos mantidos sob condições experimentais. Gaiolas de C. megacephala foram montadas com quatro diferentes densidades larvais (100, 200, 400 e 800. Para cada gaiola, foram confeccionadas duas tabelas: uma com parâmetros demográficos para a estimativa da expectativa de vida na idade inicial (e0, e outra com as estimativas de taxa reprodutiva e idade média de reprodução. Parâmetros populacionais tais como a taxa intrínseca de crescimento (r e a taxa finita de crescimento (lambda foram também calculados.

  20. Knowledge of and attitudes towards sexual and reproductive health in adults in Shiraz: a need for further education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehei, M; Ziyadlou, S; Ghanizadeh, A

    2013-12-01

    Sexual health influences general well-being and the overall quality of life of all men and women. This study in Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran, aimed to assess the level of knowledge of and attitudes towards sexual and reproductive health among adults. In a cross-sectional study in 2010, 276 men and 281 women were recruited at pre-marital counselling courses and completed a 33-item anonymous questionnaire in private. The overall level of knowledge of men and women was low. Both men and women had low scores on knowledge of genital anatomy, sexually transmitted infections and contraceptive use. The majority of participants had positive attitudes towards implementing educational programmes on sexual and reproductive health issues for young adults and prior to marriage. Efficient educational programmes providing up-to-date information about sexual and reproductive health are needed in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

  1. Biomarkers of replicative senescence revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers of replicative senescence can be defined as those ultrastructural and physiological variations as well as molecules whose changes in expression, activity or function correlate with aging, as a result of the gradual exhaustion of replicative potential and a state of permanent cell cycle...... arrest. The biomarkers that characterize the path to an irreversible state of cell cycle arrest due to proliferative exhaustion may also be shared by other forms of senescence-inducing mechanisms. Validation of senescence markers is crucial in circumstances where quiescence or temporary growth arrest may...... be triggered or is thought to be induced. Pre-senescence biomarkers are also important to consider as their presence indicate that induction of aging processes is taking place. The bona fide pathway leading to replicative senescence that has been extensively characterized is a consequence of gradual reduction...

  2. Actuarial senescence in a long-lived orchid challenges our current understanding of ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan; Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen

    2016-01-01

    The dominant evolutionary theory of actuarial senescence – an increase in death rate with advancing age – is based on the concept of a germ cell line that is separated from the somatic cells early in life. However, such a separation is not clear in all organisms. This has been suggested to explain...... the paucity of evidence for actuarial senescence in plants. We used a 32-year study of Dactylorhiza lapponica that replaces its organs each growing season, to test whether individuals of this tuberous orchid senesce. We performed a Bayesian survival trajectory analysis accounting for reproductive investment......, for individuals under two types of land-use, in two climatic regions. The mortality trajectory was best-approximated by a Weibull model, showing clear actuarial senescence. Rates of senescence in this model declined with advancing age, but were slightly higher in mown plots and in the more benign climatic region...

  3. Mercury reduces avian reproductive success and imposes selection: an experimental study with adult- or lifetime-exposure in zebra finch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire W Varian-Ramos

    Full Text Available Mercury is a global pollutant that biomagnifies in food webs, placing wildlife at risk of reduced reproductive fitness and survival. Songbirds are the most diverse branch of the avian evolutionary tree; many are suffering persistent and serious population declines and we know that songbirds are frequently exposed to mercury pollution. Our objective was to determine the effects of environmentally relevant doses of mercury on reproductive success of songbirds exposed throughout their lives or only as adults. The two modes of exposure simulated philopatric species versus dispersive species, and are particularly relevant because of the heightened mercury-sensitivity of developing nervous systems. We performed a dosing study with dietary methylmercury in a model songbird species, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata, at doses from 0.3 - 2.4 parts per million. Birds were exposed to mercury either as adults only or throughout their lives. All doses of mercury reduced reproductive success, with the lowest dose reducing the number of independent offspring produced in one year by 16% and the highest dose, representing approximately half the lethal dose for this species, causing a 50% reduction. While mercury did not affect clutch size or survivorship, it had the most consistent effect on the proportion of chicks that fledged from the nest, regardless of mode of exposure. Among birds exposed as adults, mercury caused a steep increase in the latency to re-nest after loss of a clutch. Birds exposed for their entire lifetimes, which were necessarily the offspring of dosed parents, had up to 50% lower reproductive success than adult-exposed birds at low doses of methylmercury, but increased reproductive success at high doses, suggesting selection for mercury tolerance at the highest level of exposure. Our results indicate that mercury levels in prey items at contaminated sites pose a significant threat to populations of songbirds through reduced reproductive

  4. Mercury Reduces Avian Reproductive Success and Imposes Selection: An Experimental Study with Adult- or Lifetime-Exposure in Zebra Finch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian-Ramos, Claire W.; Swaddle, John P.; Cristol, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant that biomagnifies in food webs, placing wildlife at risk of reduced reproductive fitness and survival. Songbirds are the most diverse branch of the avian evolutionary tree; many are suffering persistent and serious population declines and we know that songbirds are frequently exposed to mercury pollution. Our objective was to determine the effects of environmentally relevant doses of mercury on reproductive success of songbirds exposed throughout their lives or only as adults. The two modes of exposure simulated philopatric species versus dispersive species, and are particularly relevant because of the heightened mercury-sensitivity of developing nervous systems. We performed a dosing study with dietary methylmercury in a model songbird species, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), at doses from 0.3 – 2.4 parts per million. Birds were exposed to mercury either as adults only or throughout their lives. All doses of mercury reduced reproductive success, with the lowest dose reducing the number of independent offspring produced in one year by 16% and the highest dose, representing approximately half the lethal dose for this species, causing a 50% reduction. While mercury did not affect clutch size or survivorship, it had the most consistent effect on the proportion of chicks that fledged from the nest, regardless of mode of exposure. Among birds exposed as adults, mercury caused a steep increase in the latency to re-nest after loss of a clutch. Birds exposed for their entire lifetimes, which were necessarily the offspring of dosed parents, had up to 50% lower reproductive success than adult-exposed birds at low doses of methylmercury, but increased reproductive success at high doses, suggesting selection for mercury tolerance at the highest level of exposure. Our results indicate that mercury levels in prey items at contaminated sites pose a significant threat to populations of songbirds through reduced reproductive success. PMID

  5. Androgen receptor drives cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Mirochnik

    Full Text Available The accepted androgen receptor (AR role is to promote proliferation and survival of prostate epithelium and thus prostate cancer progression. While growth-inhibitory, tumor-suppressive AR effects have also been documented, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we for the first time link AR anti-cancer action with cell senescence in vitro and in vivo. First, AR-driven senescence was p53-independent. Instead, AR induced p21, which subsequently reduced ΔN isoform of p63. Second, AR activation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and thereby suppressed Rb phosphorylation. Both pathways were critical for senescence as was proven by p21 and Rb knock-down and by quenching ROS with N-Acetyl cysteine and p63 silencing also mimicked AR-induced senescence. The two pathways engaged in a cross-talk, likely via PML tumor suppressor, whose localization to senescence-associated chromatin foci was increased by AR activation. All these pathways contributed to growth arrest, which resolved in senescence due to concomitant lack of p53 and high mTOR activity. This is the first demonstration of senescence response caused by a nuclear hormone receptor.

  6. Intermittent Stem Cell Cycling Balances Self-Renewal and Senescence of the C. elegans Germ Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Cinquin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-renewing organs often experience a decline in function in the course of aging. It is unclear whether chronological age or external factors control this decline, or whether it is driven by stem cell self-renewal-for example, because cycling cells exhaust their replicative capacity and become senescent. Here we assay the relationship between stem cell cycling and senescence in the Caenorhabditis elegans reproductive system, defining this senescence as the progressive decline in "reproductive capacity," i.e. in the number of progeny that can be produced until cessation of reproduction. We show that stem cell cycling diminishes remaining reproductive capacity, at least in part through the DNA damage response. Paradoxically, gonads kept under conditions that preclude reproduction keep cycling and producing cells that undergo apoptosis or are laid as unfertilized gametes, thus squandering reproductive capacity. We show that continued activity is in fact beneficial inasmuch as gonads that are active when reproduction is initiated have more sustained early progeny production. Intriguingly, continued cycling is intermittent-gonads switch between active and dormant states-and in all likelihood stochastic. Other organs face tradeoffs whereby stem cell cycling has the beneficial effect of providing freshly-differentiated cells and the detrimental effect of increasing the likelihood of cancer or senescence; stochastic stem cell cycling may allow for a subset of cells to preserve proliferative potential in old age, which may implement a strategy to deal with uncertainty as to the total amount of proliferation to be undergone over an organism's lifespan.

  7. Comparing indicators of health and development of singleton young adults conceived with and without assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Jane; Wilson, Cate; Hammarberg, Karin; Doyle, Lex W; Bruinsma, Fiona; McLachlan, Robert; McBain, John; Berg, Turi; Fisher, Jane R; Amor, David

    2014-04-01

    To compare outcomes for young adults conceived by assisted reproductive technology (ART) with non-ART-conceived young adults. Cohort study. Not applicable. Mothers and their offspring (aged 18-28 years) conceived by ART; mothers and their non-ART-conceived offspring, randomly selected from the same source population. Structured telephone interviews, one with mothers and another with their young adult offspring. Maternal report on young adult offspring hospitalizations and chronic illness accumulated over the first 18 years of their lives; young adult self-report on perceived current quality of life, body mass index, pubertal development, and educational achievement. Of 1,480 eligible ART mothers, 80% were traced and contacted. Of those, 656 (55%) participated, reporting on 705 ART-conceived offspring; 269 (23%) declined participation and 262 (22%) did not respond. Of the participants, 84% consented to contact with their young adult offspring, of whom 547 (92%) participated. Random-digit dialing recruited 868 non-ART mothers and 549 offspring. Compared with non-ART young adults, the ART group had significant increases in three maternally reported outcomes: 1) hospital admissions, including those in the secondary school years; 2) atopic respiratory conditions; and 3) combined endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic disease ICD-10 category. Young adult reported outcomes were similar for both groups. This study addresses gaps in knowledge of outcomes beyond adolescence for those conceived by ART. Results show few adverse outcomes in this large cohort of young adults, but additional assessment through clinical review is required to address issues unable to be examined in this study. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Excessive dietary calcium in the disruption of structural and functional status of adult male reproductive system in rat with possible mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K Chandra, Amar; Sengupta, Pallav; Goswami, Haimanti; Sarkar, Mahitosh

    2012-05-01

    Calcium is essential for functioning of different systems including male reproduction. However, it has also been reported as chemo-castrative agent. The study has been undertaken to elucidate the effect of excessive dietary calcium on male reproductive system in animals with possible action. Adult male healthy rats fed CaCl(2) at different doses (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 g%) in diet for 13 and 26 days to investigate reproductive parameters as well as the markers of oxidative stress. Significant alteration was found (P male reproduction.

  9. Hypothyroidism after cancer and the ability to meet reproductive goals among a cohort of young adult female cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Helen B; Jacobson, Melanie H; Interrante, Julia D; Mertens, Ann C; Spencer, Jessica B; Howards, Penelope P

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether developing hypothyroidism after cancer treatment is associated with a decreased probability of women being able to meet their reproductive goals. A population-based cohort study. Not applicable. A total of 1,282 cancer survivors, of whom 904 met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. None. Three outcomes that may indicate reduced fertility, which include failure to achieve desired family size, childlessness, and not achieving pregnancy after at least 6 months of regular unprotected intercourse. We used data from the Furthering Understanding of Cancer Health and Survivorship in Adult (FUCHSIA) Women's Study to examine the association between being diagnosed with hypothyroidism after cancer and meeting reproductive goals. After adjusting for age and other potential confounders, women reporting hypothyroidism after cancer treatment were twice as likely to fail to achieve their desired family size (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09, 3.33) and be childless (aOR 2.13; 95% CI, 1.25, 3.65). They were also more likely to report having unprotected intercourse for at least 6 months without conceiving (aOR 1.37; 95% CI, 0.66, 2.83). Although cancer treatments themselves are gonadotoxic, it is important to consider other medical conditions such as hypothyroidism that occur after cancer treatment when counseling patients on the risks for impaired fertility or a shortened reproductive window. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Challis, Benjamin; Shannon, Nicholas; Hoare, Matthew; Heaney, Judith; Alexander, Graeme J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance

  11. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravinthan, Aloysious [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Challis, Benjamin [Institute of Metabolic Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Shannon, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hoare, Matthew [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Heaney, Judith [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Foundation for Liver Research, Institute of Hepatology, London (United Kingdom); Alexander, Graeme J.M., E-mail: gja1000@doctors.org.uk [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance.

  12. Transgenic plants with altered senescence characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amasino, Richard M.; Gan, Susheng; Noh, Yoo-Sun

    2002-03-19

    The identification of senescence-specific promoters from plants is described. Using information from the first senescence-specific promoter, SAG12 from Arabidopsis, other homologous promoters from another plant have been identified. Such promoters may be used to delay senescence in commercially important plants.

  13. [Protective effect of melatonin and epithalon on hypothalamic regulation of reproduction in female rats in its premature aging model and on estrous cycles in senescent animals in various lighting regimes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenevsky, A V; Milyutina, Yu P; Bukalyov, A V; Baranova, Yu P; Vinogradova, I A; Arutjunyan, A V

    2013-01-01

    Potential neuroprotective effects of the pineal gland hormone melatonin and peptide preparation epitalon on estrous cycles and the central regulation of reproduction in female rats exposed to unfavourable environmental factors have been studied. Estrous cycles of young, mature and aging rats exposed to light pollution were described. The diurnal dynamics and daily mean content of biogenic amines in the hypothalamic areas responsible for gonadotropin-releasing hormone synthesis and secretion in animals of different age groups were investigated. An effect of a chemical factor on the noradrenergic system of the medial preoptic area and on the dopaminergic system of the median eminence with arcuate nuclei of the hypothalamus was studied in premature aging of reproduction model. Administration of the pineal gland peptide melatonin and peptide preparation epitalon was shown to be able to correct a number of impairments of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that can be observed, when the experimental animals were exposed to permanent artificial lighting and a neurotoxic xenobiotic 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. The data obtained testify to an important role of the pineal gland in the circadian signal formation needed for gonadotropin-releasing hormone in order to exert its preovulatory peak secretion and to the protective effect of melatonin and epitalon, which are able to reduce unfavourable environmental influences on reproduction of young and aging female rats.

  14. Confidentiality Concerns and Sexual and Reproductive Health Care Among Adolescents and Young Adults Aged 15-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copen, Casey E; Dittus, Patricia J; Leichliter, Jami S

    2016-12-01

    Data from the National Survey of Family Growth •About 7% of persons aged 15-25 would not seek sexual or reproductive health care because of concerns that their parents might find out about it. •For females aged 15-17 and 18-25, those who had confidentiality concerns were less likely to receive sexual and reproductive health services in the past year compared with those without these concerns. •Less than one-half of teenagers aged 15-17 (38.1%) spent some time alone in the past year during a visit with a doctor or other health care provider without a parent, relative, or guardian in the room. •Teenagers aged 15-17 who spent some time alone during a visit with a health care provider were more likely to have received sexual or reproductive health services in the past year compared with those who had not. Confidentiality concerns can impact adolescent and young adults' access to sexual and reproductive health services (1-4). Young people who are covered by their parents' private health insurance may be deterred from obtaining these services due to concerns that their parents might find out about it (2). Similarly, confidentiality concerns may arise because youth seeking such services may not have time alone during a visit with a health care provider (4). This report describes two measures related to confidentiality concerns and sexual and reproductive health care. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  15. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.

    2015-01-01

    involving the hormone abscisic acid, Arabidopsis NAP promotes chlorophyll degradation, a hallmark of senescence. Furthermore, studies of the functional rice ortholog, OsNAP, suggest that NAC genes can be targeted to obtain specific changes in lifespan control and nutrient remobilization in crop plants...

  16. Telomeres, age and reproduction in a long-lived reptile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Plot

    Full Text Available A major interest has recently emerged in understanding how telomere shortening, mechanism triggering cell senescence, is linked to organism ageing and life history traits in wild species. However, the links between telomere length and key history traits such as reproductive performances have received little attention and remain unclear to date. The leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea is a long-lived species showing rapid growth at early stages of life, one of the highest reproductive outputs observed in vertebrates and a dichotomised reproductive pattern related to migrations lasting 2 or 3 years, supposedly associated with different environmental conditions. Here we tested the prediction of blood telomere shortening with age in this species and investigated the relationship between blood telomere length and reproductive performances in leatherback turtles nesting in French Guiana. We found that blood telomere length did not differ between hatchlings and adults. The absence of blood telomere shortening with age may be related to an early high telomerase activity. This telomere-restoring enzyme was formerly suggested to be involved in preventing early telomere attrition in early fast-growing and long-lived species, including squamate reptiles. We found that within one nesting cycle, adult females having performed shorter migrations prior to the considered nesting season had shorter blood telomeres and lower reproductive output. We propose that shorter blood telomeres may result from higher oxidative stress in individuals breeding more frequently (i.e., higher costs of reproduction and/or restoring more quickly their body reserves in cooler feeding areas during preceding migration (i.e., higher foraging costs. This first study on telomeres in the giant leatherback turtle suggests that blood telomere length predicts not only survival chances, but also reproductive performances. Telomeres may therefore be a promising new tool to evaluate

  17. Maternal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) promotes the transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset reproductive dysfunctions through the female germline in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pocar, Paola, E-mail: paola.pocar@unimi.it; Fiandanese, Nadia; Berrini, Anna; Secchi, Camillo; Borromeo, Vitaliano

    2017-05-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are compounds known to promote transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in subsequent generations after maternal exposure during fetal gonadal development. This study was designed to establish whether gestational and lactational exposure to the plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) at environmental doses promotes transgenerational effects on reproductive health in female offspring, as adults, over three generations in the mouse. Gestating F0 mouse dams were exposed to 0, 0.05, 5 mg/kg/day DEHP in the diet from gestational day 0.5 until the end of lactation. The incidence of adult-onset disease in reproductive function was recorded in F1, F2 and F3 female offspring. In adult F1 females, DEHP exposure induced reproductive adverse effects with: i) altered ovarian follicular dynamics with reduced primordial follicular reserve and a larger growing pre-antral follicle population, suggesting accelerated follicular recruitment; ii) reduced oocyte quality and embryonic developmental competence; iii) dysregulation of the expression profile of a panel of selected ovarian and pre-implantation embryonic genes. F2 and F3 female offspring displayed the same altered reproductive morphological phenotype and gene expression profiles as F1, thus showing transgenerational transmission of reproductive adverse effects along the female lineage. These findings indicate that in mice exposure to DEHP at doses relevant to human exposure during gonadal sex determination significantly perturbs the reproductive indices of female adult offspring and subsequent generations. Evidence of transgenerational transmission has important implications for the reproductive health and fertility of animals and humans, significantly increasing the potential biohazards of this toxicant. - Highlights: • Maternal exposure to DEHP transgenerationally affects female reproductive health. • DEHP reduced ovarian follicular reserve up to the third generation. • DEHP

  18. Maternal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) promotes the transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset reproductive dysfunctions through the female germline in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocar, Paola; Fiandanese, Nadia; Berrini, Anna; Secchi, Camillo; Borromeo, Vitaliano

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are compounds known to promote transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in subsequent generations after maternal exposure during fetal gonadal development. This study was designed to establish whether gestational and lactational exposure to the plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) at environmental doses promotes transgenerational effects on reproductive health in female offspring, as adults, over three generations in the mouse. Gestating F0 mouse dams were exposed to 0, 0.05, 5 mg/kg/day DEHP in the diet from gestational day 0.5 until the end of lactation. The incidence of adult-onset disease in reproductive function was recorded in F1, F2 and F3 female offspring. In adult F1 females, DEHP exposure induced reproductive adverse effects with: i) altered ovarian follicular dynamics with reduced primordial follicular reserve and a larger growing pre-antral follicle population, suggesting accelerated follicular recruitment; ii) reduced oocyte quality and embryonic developmental competence; iii) dysregulation of the expression profile of a panel of selected ovarian and pre-implantation embryonic genes. F2 and F3 female offspring displayed the same altered reproductive morphological phenotype and gene expression profiles as F1, thus showing transgenerational transmission of reproductive adverse effects along the female lineage. These findings indicate that in mice exposure to DEHP at doses relevant to human exposure during gonadal sex determination significantly perturbs the reproductive indices of female adult offspring and subsequent generations. Evidence of transgenerational transmission has important implications for the reproductive health and fertility of animals and humans, significantly increasing the potential biohazards of this toxicant. - Highlights: • Maternal exposure to DEHP transgenerationally affects female reproductive health. • DEHP reduced ovarian follicular reserve up to the third generation. • DEHP

  19. Impact of exposure to endocrine disrupters in utero and in childhood on adult reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgil Damgaard, Ida; Main, Katharina Maria; Toppari, Jorma

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated a decline in human male reproductive health: high and probably increasing prevalence of cryptorchidism and hypospadias, low and probably decreasing semen quality, a rising incidence of testicular cancer and a growing demand for assisted reproduction. These changes...... seem to be interrelated and may be symptoms of a common underlying entity, the testicular dysgenesis syndrome, with foundations in fetal life due to adverse environmental influences. Wildlife experience and animal studies have provided evidence that fetal or perinatal exposure to endocrine disrupters...

  20. ARSH 3: Reproductive and sexual health knowledge: a comparison among married male and female young adults (15-24 y).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M K C; Thankachi, Yamini; Leena, M L; George, Babu; Russell, Paul Swamidhas Sudhakar

    2013-11-01

    To examine reproductive and sexual knowledge of young married men and women between (15-24 y) in Kerala and to compare the reproductive health knowledge and sexual health knowledge among young married men and women of 20-24 y. This cross sectional community survey was conducted in three districts in Kerala. The married young adults were stratified into age groups of 15-19 y and 20-24 y. Data was collected using separate pretested structured interview schedule. There were no married males below the age of 20 y and only 24 females below the age of 20 y. More proportion of males had statistically significant knowledge about masturbation (72.3%), night emission in boys as an indicator of adolescence (92.6%), the fact that there is no relation between size of penis and sexual performance (78.8%) and condom prevents pregnancy and HIV/AIDS. Among the married 20-24 y group higher proportion of males had knowledge on safe period (47.9%) and condom use (97.9%) whereas higher proportion of females had knowledge on copper-T. With regard to sexual health higher percentage females talked about satisfactory sexual life (83.5%) and good sexual hygiene practices (81.5%). This study on reproductive sexual health knowledge of married men and women between 15 and 24 y, conducted in three districts of Kerala suggests a gap in knowledge level of reproductive health between married men and women. However, with regard to sexual health the opinion expressed are more open in content but not necessarily healthy, suggesting the need for both premarital and newlywed counseling.

  1. Identification of novel senescence-associated genes in ionizing radiation-induced senescent carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Bong Cho; Han, Na Kyung; Hong, Mi Na; Park, Su Min; Yoo, Hee Jung; Chu, In Sun; Lee, Sun Hee

    2009-01-01

    Cellular senescence is considered as a defense mechanism to prevent tumorigenesis. Ionizing radiation (IR) induces stress-induced premature senescence as well as apoptosis in various cancer cells. Senescent cells undergo functional and morphological changes including large and flattened cell shape, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-βGal) activity, and altered gene expressions. Even with the recent findings of several gene expression profiles and supporting functional data, it is obscure that mechanism of IR-induced premature senescence in cancer cells. We performed microarray analysis to identify the common regulated genes in ionizing radiation-induced prematurely senescent human carcinoma cell lines

  2. Understanding of Parents and Adults on the Down Syndrome Female Sexual Reproductive Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhagan, Madhya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the understanding of reproductive health among parents and female adolescents with Down syndrome. This cross-sectional study involved 22 parents and 22 female adolescents with Down syndrome in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The parents were required to fill up the socio-demographic information in questionnaire…

  3. Sex-Specific Associations between Telomere Dynamics and Oxidative Status in Adult and Nestling Pied Flycatchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Arrabé, Jimena; Monaghan, Pat; Cantarero, Alejandro; Boner, Winnie; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Moreno, Juan

    Oxidative stress can contribute to an acceleration of telomere erosion, leading to cellular senescence and aging. Increased investment in reproduction is known to accelerate senescence, generally resulting in reduced future reproductive potential and survival. To better understand the role played by oxidative status and telomere dynamics in the conflict between maintenance and reproduction, it is important to determine how these factors are related in parents and their offspring. We investigated the relationship between oxidative status and telomere measurements in pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca). Total antioxidant status (TAS) in plasma, total levels of glutathione in red blood cells (RBCs), and oxidative damage in plasma lipids (malondialdehyde [MDA]) were assessed in both parents and nestlings. Telomeres were measured in RBCs in adults. Our results showed sex differences in oxidative variables in adults that are likely to be mediated by sex steroids, with testosterone and estrogens increasing and reducing, respectively, the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We found a negative association between telomere length (TL) and MDA in adults in the previous season. Moreover, TL was positively associated with TAS in females, while telomere shortening (ΔTL) correlated positively with MDA in males in the current year. These associations could be reflecting differences between sexes in reproductive physiology. We found a positive correlation between parental ΔTL and nestling MDA, an example of how parental physiological aging could affect offspring quality in terms of oxidative stress that highlights the constraints imposed by higher rates of ΔTL during reproduction and rearing.

  4. The oxidative hypothesis of senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilca M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative hypothesis of senescence, since its origin in 1956, has garnered significant evidence and growing support among scientists for the notion that free radicals play an important role in ageing, either as "damaging" molecules or as signaling molecules. Age-increasing oxidative injuries induced by free radicals, higher susceptibility to oxidative stress in short-lived organisms, genetic manipulations that alter both oxidative resistance and longevity and the anti-ageing effect of caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are a few examples of accepted scientific facts that support the oxidative theory of senescence. Though not completely understood due to the complex "network" of redox regulatory systems, the implication of oxidative stress in the ageing process is now well documented. Moreover, it is compatible with other current ageing theories (e.g., those implicating the mitochondrial damage/mitochondrial-lysosomal axis, stress-induced premature senescence, biological "garbage" accumulation, etc. This review is intended to summarize and critically discuss the redox mechanisms involved during the ageing process: sources of oxidant agents in ageing (mitochondrial -electron transport chain, nitric oxide synthase reaction- and non-mitochondrial- Fenton reaction, microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, peroxisomal β -oxidation and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, antioxidant changes in ageing (enzymatic- superoxide dismutase, glutathione-reductase, glutathion peroxidase, catalase- and non-enzymatic glutathione, ascorbate, urate, bilirubine, melatonin, tocopherols, carotenoids, ubiquinol, alteration of oxidative damage repairing mechanisms and the role of free radicals as signaling molecules in ageing.

  5. The psychology of antecedents to adult reproductive disorders in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Sharon N; Martinez, Pedro E; Popat, Vaishali; Nandagopal, Radha; Ryan, Mary; Nelson, Lawrence M

    2008-01-01

    The normal developmental tasks and roles of adolescence are altered by a diagnosis of a reproductive disorder. The crisis of impaired fertility affects both parent and child, stressing the family system. For the adolescent girl, a reproductive disorder has an impact on her developing sense of self, body-image, and sexuality, which, in turn, can affect her self-esteem and relationships with others. Because of the sexual nature of a reproductive disorder, feelings of embarrassment or protectiveness are often engendered that can make it difficult for families to discuss. Nonetheless, families do best with openness and honesty regarding the condition and should be discouraged from keeping the diagnosis a secret. Adolescence encompasses a broad spectrum of emotional maturity, which needs to be considered by parents and clinicians when communicating information. Understanding that the family is an emotional unit, a family systems approach to deal with health issues is most appropriate. In this context, parents need to first deal with their own feelings about the diagnosis, before they can help their child. Secondly, parents must be provided with tools to build an ongoing conversation with their child that will avoid stigmatizing her condition and handicapping her growth into healthy adulthood. The goal for parent and clinician is to help the adolescent girl formulate positive self-esteem and body image, despite impaired fertility.

  6. A comparison of oncogene-induced senescence and replicative senescence: implications for tumor suppression and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David M; McBryan, Tony; Jeyapalan, Jessie C; Sedivy, John M; Adams, Peter D

    2014-06-01

    Cellular senescence is a stable proliferation arrest associated with an altered secretory pathway, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. However, cellular senescence is initiated by diverse molecular triggers, such as activated oncogenes and shortened telomeres, and is associated with varied and complex physiological endpoints, such as tumor suppression and tissue aging. The extent to which distinct triggers activate divergent modes of senescence that might be associated with different physiological endpoints is largely unknown. To begin to address this, we performed gene expression profiling to compare the senescence programs associated with two different modes of senescence, oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) and replicative senescence (RS [in part caused by shortened telomeres]). While both OIS and RS are associated with many common changes in gene expression compared to control proliferating cells, they also exhibit substantial differences. These results are discussed in light of potential physiological consequences, tumor suppression and aging.

  7. Forging a signature of in vivo senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Norman E; Sherr, Charles J

    2015-07-01

    'Cellular senescence', a term originally defining the characteristics of cultured cells that exceed their replicative limit, has been broadened to describe durable states of proliferative arrest induced by disparate stress factors. Proposed relationships between cellular senescence, tumour suppression, loss of tissue regenerative capacity and ageing suffer from lack of uniform definition and consistently applied criteria. Here, we highlight caveats in interpreting the importance of suboptimal senescence-associated biomarkers, expressed either alone or in combination. We advocate that more-specific descriptors be substituted for the now broadly applied umbrella term 'senescence' in defining the suite of diverse physiological responses to cellular stress.

  8. Senescence induction; a possible cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondoh Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cellular immortalization is a crucial step during the development of human cancer. Primary mammalian cells reach replicative exhaustion after several passages in vitro, a process called replicative senescence. During such a state of permanent growth arrest, senescent cells are refractory to physiological proliferation stimuli: they have altered cell morphology and gene expression patterns, although they remain viable with preserved metabolic activity. Interestingly, senescent cells have also been detected in vivo in human tumors, particularly in benign lesions. Senescence is a mechanism that limits cellular lifespan and constitutes a barrier against cellular immortalization. During immortalization, cells acquire genetic alterations that override senescence. Tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes are closely involved in senescence, as their knockdown and ectopic expression confer immortality and senescence induction, respectively. By using high throughput genetic screening to search for genes involved in senescence, several candidate oncogenes and putative tumor suppressor genes have been recently isolated, including subtypes of micro-RNAs. These findings offer new perspectives in the modulation of senescence and open new approaches for cancer therapy.

  9. Energy allocation during the maturation of adults in a long-lived insect: implications for dispersal and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, G; Giffard, B; van Halder, I; Piou, D; Jactel, H

    2015-10-01

    Energy allocation strategies have been widely documented in insects and were formalized in the context of the reproduction process by the terms 'capital breeder' and 'income breeder'. We propose here the extension of this framework to dispersal ability, with the concepts of 'capital disperser' and 'income disperser', and explore the trade-off in resource allocation between dispersal and reproduction. We hypothesized that flight capacity was sex-dependent, due to a trade-off in energy allocation between dispersal and egg production in females. We used Monochamus galloprovincialis as model organism, a long-lived beetle which is the European vector of the pine wood nematode. We estimated the flight capacity with a flight mill and used the number of mature eggs as a proxy for the investment in reproduction. We used the ratio between dry weights of the thorax and the abdomen to investigate the trade-off. The probability of flying increased with the adult weight at emergence, but was not dependent on insect age or sex. Flight distance increased with age in individuals but did not differ between sexes. It was also positively associated with energy allocation to thorax reserves, which increased with age. In females, the abdomen weight and the number of eggs also increase with age with no negative effect on flight capacity, indicating a lack of trade-off. This long-lived beetle has a complex strategy of energy allocation, being a 'capital disperser' in terms of flight ability, an 'income disperser' in terms of flight performance and an 'income breeder' in terms of egg production.

  10. Hypothyroidism after cancer and the ability to meet reproductive goals among a cohort of young adult female cancer survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Helen B.; Jacobson, Melanie H.; Interrante, Julia D.; Mertens, Ann C.; Spencer, Jessica B.; Howards, Penelope P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if developing hypothyroidism after cancer treatment is associated with a decreased probability of women being able to meet their reproductive goals. Design A population-based cohort study. Setting Not applicable. Patients A total of 1,282 cancer survivors participated in the study, of which 904 met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Three outcomes that may indicate reduced fertility, which include: failure to achieve desired family size, childlessness, and not achieving pregnancy after at least 6 months of regular unprotected intercourse. Results We used data from the Furthering Understanding of Cancer Health and Survivorship in Adult (FUCHSIA) Women’s Study to examine the association between being diagnosed with hypothyroidism after cancer and meeting reproductive goals. After adjusting for age and other potential confounders, women reporting hypothyroidism after cancer treatment were twice as likely to fail to achieve their desired family size (adjusted odds ratio (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)) = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.09, 3.33) and be childless (aOR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.25, 3.65). They were also more likely to report having unprotected intercourse for at least 6 months without conceiving (aOR = 1.37, 95% CI: 0.66, 2.83). Conclusion Although cancer treatments themselves are gonadotoxic, it is important to consider other medical conditions, such as hypothyroidism, that occur after cancer treatment when counseling patients on the risks for impaired fertility or a shortened reproductive window. PMID:26474733

  11. Cellular Senescence Promotes Adverse Effects of Chemotherapy and Cancer Relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demaria, Marco; O'Leary, Monique N.; Chang, Jianhui; Shao, Lijian; Liu, Su; Alimirah, Fatouma; Koenig, Kristin; Le, Catherine; Mitin, Natalia; Deal, Allison M.; Alston, Shani; Academia, Emmeline C.; Kilmarx, Sumner; Valdovinos, Alexis; Wang, Boshi; de Bruin, Alain; Kennedy, Brian K.; Melov, Simon; Zhou, Daohong; Sharpless, Norman E.; Muss, Hyman; Campisi, Judith

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by irreversibly arresting cell proliferation. Senescent cells acquire a proinfl ammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Many genotoxic chemotherapies target proliferating cells nonspecifi cally, often with adverse reactions. In accord with prior

  12. Reproductive and relational trajectories leading to pregnancy: Differences between adolescents and adult women who had an abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Joana I F; Pires, Raquel S A; Araújo-Pedrosa, Anabela F; Canavarro, Maria Cristina C S P

    2018-05-01

    The literature has been conceptualizing pregnancy occurrence as a multiphase event. However, the different combinations of decisions and behaviors leading to pregnancy that end in abortion remain unexplored in the literature. The aims of the study were to describe the reproductive and relational trajectories leading to pregnancy in women who decide to abort and to explore the differences in this process according to women's age [adolescents (leading to pregnancy were identified. The most frequent trajectory (30.8%) included women who 1) were involved in a long-term romantic relationship, 2) did not plan the pregnancy, 3) were using contraception, and 4) did not identify the contraceptive failure that led to pregnancy. Although this was the most frequent trajectory for both age groups, the remaining trajectories showed a different distribution. Compared to adolescents, adult women's trajectories more frequently included casual relationships with non-use of contraception, or contraceptive use with no contraceptive failure identification. Our study highlights the need to recognize the multiplicity of reproductive and relational trajectories leading to pregnancies that end in abortion and their specificities according to women's age. These findings have important implications for abortion counselling and for the development of age-appropriate guidelines for preventive interventions, by drawing attention to prioritization of different contexts of intervention according women's age. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Early experiences mediate distinct adult gene expression and reproductive programs in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Maria C.; Nichitean, Alexandra M.; Dorus, Steve; Hall, Sarah E.

    2018-01-01

    Environmental stress during early development in animals can have profound effects on adult phenotypes via programmed changes in gene expression. Using the nematode C. elegans, we demonstrated previously that adults retain a cellular memory of their developmental experience that is manifested by differences in gene expression and life history traits; however, the sophistication of this system in response to different environmental stresses, and how it dictates phenotypic plasticity in adults that contribute to increased fitness in response to distinct environmental challenges, was unknown. Using transcriptional profiling, we show here that C. elegans adults indeed retain distinct cellular memories of different environmental conditions. We identified approximately 500 genes in adults that entered dauer due to starvation that exhibit significant opposite (“seesaw”) transcriptional phenotypes compared to adults that entered dauer due to crowding, and are distinct from animals that bypassed dauer. Moreover, we show that two-thirds of the genes in the genome experience a 2-fold or greater seesaw trend in gene expression, and based upon the direction of change, are enriched in large, tightly linked regions on different chromosomes. Importantly, these transcriptional programs correspond to significant changes in brood size depending on the experienced stress. In addition, we demonstrate that while the observed seesaw gene expression changes occur in both somatic and germline tissue, only starvation-induced changes require a functional GLP-4 protein necessary for germline development, and both programs require the Argonaute CSR-1. Thus, our results suggest that signaling between the soma and the germ line can generate phenotypic plasticity as a result of early environmental experience, and likely contribute to increased fitness in adverse conditions and the evolution of the C. elegans genome. PMID:29447162

  14. Early experiences mediate distinct adult gene expression and reproductive programs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C Ow

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental stress during early development in animals can have profound effects on adult phenotypes via programmed changes in gene expression. Using the nematode C. elegans, we demonstrated previously that adults retain a cellular memory of their developmental experience that is manifested by differences in gene expression and life history traits; however, the sophistication of this system in response to different environmental stresses, and how it dictates phenotypic plasticity in adults that contribute to increased fitness in response to distinct environmental challenges, was unknown. Using transcriptional profiling, we show here that C. elegans adults indeed retain distinct cellular memories of different environmental conditions. We identified approximately 500 genes in adults that entered dauer due to starvation that exhibit significant opposite ("seesaw" transcriptional phenotypes compared to adults that entered dauer due to crowding, and are distinct from animals that bypassed dauer. Moreover, we show that two-thirds of the genes in the genome experience a 2-fold or greater seesaw trend in gene expression, and based upon the direction of change, are enriched in large, tightly linked regions on different chromosomes. Importantly, these transcriptional programs correspond to significant changes in brood size depending on the experienced stress. In addition, we demonstrate that while the observed seesaw gene expression changes occur in both somatic and germline tissue, only starvation-induced changes require a functional GLP-4 protein necessary for germline development, and both programs require the Argonaute CSR-1. Thus, our results suggest that signaling between the soma and the germ line can generate phenotypic plasticity as a result of early environmental experience, and likely contribute to increased fitness in adverse conditions and the evolution of the C. elegans genome.

  15. Physiology and molecular biology of petal senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Woltering, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Petal senescence is reviewed, with the main emphasis on gene expression in relation to physiological functions. Autophagy seems to be the major mechanism for large-scale degradation of macromolecules, but it is still unclear if it contributes to cell death. Depending on the species, petal senescence

  16. Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer. Cellular senescence is a programmed response to oncogenic (tumour-causing) stress that aims to halt the expansion of cells with malignant potential. It does this by stopping the proliferation of pre-cancerous lesions and recruitment of the immune system for their elimination.

  17. Oncogenic senescence: a multi-functional perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, D.J.; Alimirah, F.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Campisi, J.; Hildesheim, J.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence is defined as an irreversible growth arrest with the acquisition of a distinctive secretome. The growth arrest is a potent anticancer mechanism whereas the secretome facilitates wound healing, tissue repair, and development. The senescence response has also become increasingly

  18. Social Reproduction in Non-Formal Adult Education: The Case of Rural Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straubhaar, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Using fieldnotes from the non-formal adult education classes run by a non-profit international education with ground operations in rural Mozambique, this article documents how the comments made by class facilitators and class participants in those classes reflect inherent power inequalities between non-profit staff and local participants. These…

  19. Brief Report: Impaired Temporal Reproduction Performance in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jonathan S.; Poirier, Marie; Bowler, Dermot M.

    2010-01-01

    Although temporal processing has received little attention in the autism literature, there are a number of reasons to suspect that people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may have particular difficulties judging the passage of time. The present study tested a group of 20 high-functioning adults with ASD and 20 matched comparison participants on…

  20. Perception of Arabidopsis AtPep peptides, but not bacterial elicitors, accelerates starvation-induced senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay eGully

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the AtPep group of Arabidopsis endogenous peptides have frequently been reported to induce pattern-triggered immunity and to increase resistance to diverse pathogens by amplifying the innate immune response. Here, we made the surprising observation that dark-induced leaf senescence was accelerated by the presence of Peps. Adult leaves as well as leaf discs of Col-0 wild type plants showed a Pep-triggered early onset of chlorophyll breakdown and leaf yellowing whereas pepr1 pepr2 double mutant plants were insensitive. In addition, this response was dependent on ethylene signaling and inhibited by the addition of cytokinins. Notably, addition of the bacterial elicitors flg22 or elf18, both potent inducers of pattern-triggered immunity, did not provoke an early onset of leaf senescence.Continuous darkness leads to energy deprivation and starvation and therewith promotes leaf senescence. We found that continuous darkness also strongly induced PROPEP3 transcription. Moreover, Pep-perception led to a rapid induction of PAO, APG7 and APG8a, genes indispensable for chlorophyll degradation as well as autophagy, respectively, and all three hallmarks of starvation and senescence. Notably, addition of sucrose as a source of energy inhibited the Pep-triggered early onset of senescence. In conclusion, we report that Pep-perception accelerates dark/starvation-induced senescence via an early induction of chlorophyll degradation and autophagy. This represents a novel and unique characteristic of PEPR signaling, unrelated to pattern-triggered immunity.

  1. Possible Roles of Strigolactones during Leaf Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yamada

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is a complicated developmental process that involves degenerative changes and nutrient recycling. The progress of leaf senescence is controlled by various environmental cues and plant hormones, including ethylene, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, abscisic acid, cytokinins, and strigolactones. The production of strigolactones is induced in response to nitrogen and phosphorous deficiency. Strigolactones also accelerate leaf senescence and regulate shoot branching and root architecture. Leaf senescence is actively promoted in a nutrient-poor soil environment, and nutrients are transported from old leaves to young tissues and seeds. Strigolactones might act as important signals in response to nutrient levels in the rhizosphere. In this review, we discuss the possible roles of strigolactones during leaf senescence.

  2. Octopus senescence: the beginning of the end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roland C; Wood, James B; Byrne, Ruth A

    2002-01-01

    Senescence is a normal stage of an octopus's life cycle that often occurs before death. Some of the following symptoms typify it: lack of feeding, retraction of skin around the eyes, uncoordinated movement, increased undirected activity, and white unhealing lesions on the body. There is inter- and intraspecific variability. Senescence is not a disease or a result of disease, although diseases can also be a symptom of it. Both males and females go through a senescent stage before dying-the males after mating, the females while brooding eggs and after the eggs hatch. There are many aspects of octopus senescence that have not yet been studied. This study discusses the ecological implications of senescence.

  3. Assigning sex and reproductive stage to adult Lake Sturgeon using ultrasonography and common morphological measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiotti, Justin A.; Boase, James C.; Hondorp, Darryl W.; Briggs, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Sex determination of fish species is difficult to assess when sexual dimorphism and gametes are not apparent. For threatened and endangered fish species, noninvasive techniques are needed when determining sex to minimize stress and the potential for mortality. We evaluated the use of a portable ultrasound unit to determine sex of Lake Sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens in the field. Ultrasound images were collected from 9 yellow-egg (F2, F3), 32 black-egg (F4, F5), and 107 fully developed male (M2) Lake Sturgeon. Two readers accurately assigned sex to 88–96% of fish, but accuracy varied in relation to maturity stage. Black-egg females and fully developed males were correctly identified for 89–100% of the fish sampled, while these two readers identified yellow-egg females only 33% and 67% of the time. Time spent collecting images ranged between 2 and 3 min once the user was comfortable with operating procedures. Discriminant analysis revealed the total length : girth ratio was a strong predictor of sex and maturity, correctly classifying 81% of black-egg females and 97% of the fully developed males. However, yellow-egg females were incorrectly classified on all occasions. This study shows the utility of using ultrasonography and a total length : girth ratio for sex determination of Lake Sturgeon in later reproductive stages around the spawning season.

  4. Age and reproductive status of adult Varroa mites affect grooming success of honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirrane, Maria J; de Guzman, Lilia I; Rinderer, Thomas E; Frake, Amanda M; Wagnitz, Jeremy; Whelan, Pádraig M

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated for the first time the grooming response of honey bees to Varroa mites of different ages and reproductive statuses in the laboratory. Plastic cages containing a section of dark comb and about 200 bees were inoculated with groups of four classes of mites: gravid, phoretic foundresses, phoretic daughters and a combination of gravid and phoretic foundress mites. Each cage received 20 mites belonging to one of these classes. Our results showed that, 1 day after mite inoculation, phoretic daughter mites were the most prone to grooming by honey bees with an average mite drop of 49.8 ± 2.6 %. The lowest mite drop was recorded for bees inoculated with phoretic foundresses (30.3 ± 3.6 %) but was comparable to bees inoculated with gravid mites (31.8 ± 3.8 %) and the combination of gravid and phoretic foundress mites (34.2 ± 3.2 %). No differences among mite types were detected during the second and third days of observation. Regardless of mite type, the highest mite drop was recorded on the first day (35 ± 2.1 %) compared to the drop for any subsequent day (grooming behaviour may increase our insight into the importance of grooming in mite resistance.

  5. Piper betle L. Modulates Senescence-Associated Genes Expression in Replicative Senescent Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wati Durani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Piper betle (PB is a traditional medicine that is widely used to treat different diseases around Asian region. The leaf extracts contain various bioactive compounds, which were reported to have antidiabetic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. In this study, the effect of PB aqueous extracts on replicative senescent human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs was investigated by determining the expressions of senescence-associated genes using quantitative PCR. Our results showed that PB extracts at 0.4 mg/ml can improve cell proliferation of young (143%, presenescent (127.3%, and senescent (157.3% HDFs. Increased expressions of PRDX6, TP53, CDKN2A, PAK2, and MAPK14 were observed in senescent HDFs compared to young and/or presenescent HDFs. Treatment with PB extracts modulates the transcriptional profile changes in senescent HDFs. By contrast, expressions of SOD1 increased, whereas GPX1, PRDX6, TP53, CDKN2A, PAK2, and MAPK14 were decreased in PB-treated senescent HDFs compared to untreated senescent HDFs. In conclusion, this study indicates the modulation of PB extracts on senescence-associated genes expression of replicative senescent HDFs. Further studies warrant determining the mechanism of PB in modulating replicative senescence of HDFs through these signaling pathways.

  6. Piper betle L. Modulates Senescence-Associated Genes Expression in Replicative Senescent Human Diploid Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durani, Lina Wati; Khor, Shy Cian; Tan, Jen Kit; Chua, Kien Hui; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Makpol, Suzana

    2017-01-01

    Piper betle (PB) is a traditional medicine that is widely used to treat different diseases around Asian region. The leaf extracts contain various bioactive compounds, which were reported to have antidiabetic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. In this study, the effect of PB aqueous extracts on replicative senescent human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) was investigated by determining the expressions of senescence-associated genes using quantitative PCR. Our results showed that PB extracts at 0.4 mg/ml can improve cell proliferation of young (143%), presenescent (127.3%), and senescent (157.3%) HDFs. Increased expressions of PRDX6 , TP53 , CDKN2A , PAK2 , and MAPK14 were observed in senescent HDFs compared to young and/or presenescent HDFs. Treatment with PB extracts modulates the transcriptional profile changes in senescent HDFs. By contrast, expressions of SOD1 increased, whereas GPX1 , PRDX6 , TP53 , CDKN2A , PAK2 , and MAPK14 were decreased in PB-treated senescent HDFs compared to untreated senescent HDFs. In conclusion, this study indicates the modulation of PB extracts on senescence-associated genes expression of replicative senescent HDFs. Further studies warrant determining the mechanism of PB in modulating replicative senescence of HDFs through these signaling pathways.

  7. Neurokinin B is critical for normal timing of sexual maturation but dispensable for adult reproductive function in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Cadence; Nasrin Alam, Sayeda; Cox, Kimberly; Chan, Yee-Ming; Seminara, Stephanie B

    2015-04-01

    Humans carrying mutations in neurokinin B (NKB) or the NKB receptor fail to undergo puberty due to decreased secretion of GnRH. Despite this pubertal delay, many of these patients go on to achieve activation of their hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in adulthood, a phenomenon termed reversal, indicating that NKB signaling may play a more critical role for the timing of pubertal development than adult reproductive function. NKB receptor-deficient mice are hypogonadotropic but have no defects in the timing of sexual maturation. The current study has performed the first phenotypic evaluation of mice bearing mutations in Tac2, the gene encoding the NKB ligand, to determine whether they have impaired sexual development similar to their human counterparts. Male Tac2-/- mice showed no difference in the timing of sexual maturation or fertility compared with wild-type littermates and were fertile. In contrast, Tac2-/- females had profound delays in sexual maturation, with time to vaginal opening and first estrus occurring significantly later than controls, and initial abnormalities in estrous cycles. However, cycling recovered in adulthood and Tac2-/- females were fertile, although they produced fewer pups per litter. Thus, female Tac2-/- mice parallel humans harboring NKB pathway mutations, with delayed sexual maturation and activation of the reproductive cascade later in life. Moreover, direct comparison of NKB ligand and receptor-deficient females confirmed that only NKB ligand-deficient animals have delayed sexual maturation, suggesting that in the absence of the NKB receptor, NKB may regulate the timing of sexual maturation through other tachykinin receptors.

  8. Dose- dependent ameliorative effects of quercetin and l-Carnitine against atrazine- induced reproductive toxicity in adult male Albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Aziz, Rabie L; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed; Abo El-Ela, Fatma I; Hassan, Nour El-Houda Y; El-Nahass, El-Shaymaa; Ibrahim, Marwa A; Khalil, Abdel-Tawab A Y

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the protective effects of co-administration of Quercetin (QT) or l-Carnitine (LC) against the oxidative stress induced by Atrazine (ATZ) in the reproductive system of intact male Albino rats. 36 rats were divided equally into 6 groups. Rats in the control negative "CNT" group received 1.5 ml distilled water for 21 days. All rats in the other groups received ATZ (120 mg/kg bw) through gavage. Groups 3 and 4 were co-administered with either low or high dose of QT (10 "ATZLQT" and 50 "ATZHQT" mg/kg bw, respectively). Groups 5 and 6 were co-administered with either low or high dose of LC (200 "ATZLLC" and 400 "ATZHLC" mg/kg bw, respectively). At the end of the experiment, animals were sacrificed and all samples were collected. ATZ significantly increased serum level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Also, ATZ increased significantly the sperm cell abnormalities and reduced both testicular IgA and serum testosterone levels. Testicular DNA laddering % and CYP17A1 mRNA expression were significantly reduced in ATZ group. Interestingly, co-administration with low dose QT or different doses of LC succeeded to counteract the negative toxic effects of ATZ on serum oxidative stress indicators, serum testosterone levels, testicular IgA level and improved testicular CYP17A1 mRNA expression. In conclusion, QT in low dose and LC in both low and high doses exerted a significant protective action against the reproductive toxicity of ATZ, while higher dose of QT failed induce immune-stimulant effect against ATZ in adult male Albino rats. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Autocrine IL-6 mediates pituitary tumor senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Mariana; Ajler, Pablo; Carrizo, Guillermo; Cervio, Andrés; Sevlever, Gustavo; Stalla, Günter K.; Arzt, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stable proliferative arrest state. Pituitary adenomas are frequent and mostly benign, but the mechanism for this remains unknown. IL-6 is involved in pituitary tumor progression and is produced by the tumoral cells. In a cell autonomous fashion, IL-6 participates in oncogene-induced senescence in transduced human melanocytes. Here we prove that autocrine IL-6 participates in pituitary tumor senescence. Endogenous IL-6 inhibition in somatotroph MtT/S shRNA stable clones results in decreased SA-β-gal activity and p16INK4a but increased pRb, proliferation and invasion. Nude mice injected with IL-6 silenced clones develop tumors contrary to MtT/S wild type that do not, demonstrating that clones that escape senescence are capable of becoming tumorigenic. When endogenous IL-6 is silenced, cell cultures derived from positive SA-β-gal human tumor samples decrease the expression of the senescence marker. Our results establish that IL-6 contributes to maintain senescence by its autocrine action, providing a natural model of IL-6 mediated benign adenoma senescence. PMID:27902467

  10. Reproductive health outcomes of insured adolescent and adult women who access oral levonorgestrel emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine-Bennett, Tina; Merchant, Maqdooda; Sinclair, Fiona; Lee, Justine W; Goler, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    To assess the level of risk for adolescents and women who seek emergency contraception through various clinical routes and the opportunities for improved care provision. This study looked at a retrospective cohort to assess contraception and other reproductive health outcomes among adolescents and women aged 15-44 years who accessed oral levonorgestrel emergency contraception through an office visit or the call center at Kaiser Permanente Northern California from 2010 to 2011. Of 21,421 prescriptions, 14,531 (67.8%) were accessed through the call center. In the subsequent 12 months, 12,127 (56.6%) adolescents and women had short-acting contraception (pills, patches, rings, depot medroxyprogesterone) dispensed and 2,264 (10.6%) initiated very effective contraception (intrauterine contraception, implants, sterilization). Initiation of very effective contraception was similar for adolescents and women who accessed it through the call center-1,569 (10.8%) and office visits-695 (10.1%) (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93-1.13). In the subsequent 6 months, 2,056 (9.6%) adolescents and women became pregnant. Adolescents and women who accessed emergency contraception through the call center were less likely to become pregnant within 3 months of accessing emergency contraception than woman who accessed it through office visits (adjusted OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.72-0.94); however, they were more likely to become pregnant within 4-6 months (adjusted OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.16-1.60). Among adolescents and women who were tested for chlamydia and gonorrhea, 689 (7.8%) and 928 (7.9%) were positive in the 12 months before and after accessing emergency contraception, respectively. Protocols to routinely address unmet needs for contraception at every call for emergency contraception and all office visits, including visits with primary care providers, should be investigated.

  11. Prenatal and adult exposures to smoking are associated with adverse effects on reproductive hormones, semen quality, final height and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnborg, Trine L; Jensen, Tina K; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Exposure to tobacco smoking prenatally is a risk factor for reduced semen quality, but whether the exposure has adverse effects on reproductive hormones, pubertal development or adult BMI remain largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between...... these factors while controlling for the effects of current smoking in young adulthood. METHODS This cross-sectional study (1996-2006) included 3486 Danish men (median age: 19 years), participating in a semen-quality study. Data were obtained from questionnaires, physical examinations, semen analyses...... and assessments of reproductive hormones. The main outcome measures were markers of pubertal onset, BMI, reproductive hormones and semen variables. RESULTS Maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with earlier onset of puberty (e.g. early pubic hair development in 25.2 versus 18.9% of unexposed subjects...

  12. Reproductive toxicity of chromium in adult bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata Geoffrey). Reversible oxidative stress in the semen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, Senthivinayagam; Rajendiran, Gopalakrishnan; Sekhar, Pasupathi; Gowri, Chandrahasan; Govindarajulu, Pera; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates chromium-induced reproductive toxicity. Monthly semen samples were collected from adult monkeys (Macaca radiata), which were exposed to varying doses (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) of chromium (as potassium dichromate) for 6 months through drinking water. Chromium treatment decreased sperm count, sperm forward motility and the specific activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, and the concentration of reduced glutathione in both seminal plasma and sperm in a dose- and duration-dependent manner. On the other hand, the quantum of hydrogen peroxide in the seminal plasma/sperm from monkeys exposed to chromium increased with increasing dose and duration of chromium exposure. All these changes were reversed after 6 months of chromium-free exposure period. Simultaneous supplementation of vitamin C (0.5 g/L; 1.0 g/L; 2.0 g/L) prevented the development of chromium-induced oxidative stress. Data support the hypothesis and show that chronic chromium exposure induces a reversible oxidative stress in the seminal plasma and sperm by creating an imbalance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidant system, leading to sperm death and reduced motility of live sperm

  13. The Effects of Aqueous Extract of Anacyclus Pyrethrum on Sperm Count and Reproductive Organs in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Shahraki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: More than 80 million individuals suffer from infertility globally. Various factors such as some drugs and toxins have harmful effects on fertility. Anacyclus pyrethrum plant in Indian traditional medicine is used for treatment of many diseases including infertility. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 48 male adult rats were divided randomly into four groups (N=12 including one control group (A and three test groups (B, C and D. Test groups (B, C and D received root aqueous extract of A. pyrethrum intraperitoneally with doses of 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg for 28 days, respectively. At the end of the treatment period, the reproduction variables such as weight of body and sex organs, the sperm count in epididymis and right and left vas deferens and percent of abnormal spermatozoids were determined. The test groups were compared to the controls using analysis of variance following Tukey. Results: Data analysis of body and sex organs’ weight, sperm count of epididymis and right and left vas deferens and percent of abnormal spermatozoids showed a significant difference between the tests and control groups (p=0.02, p=0.0001; however, no significant difference was found between two groups regarding vas deferens weight. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that root aqueous extract of A. pyrethrum increased the weights of body and sex organs, increase of sperm count of epididymis and right and left vas deferens, and reduction of percent of abnormal spermatozoids in treated rats.

  14. Quantitative identification of senescent cells in aging and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biran, Anat; Zada, Lior; Abou Karam, Paula; Vadai, Ezra; Roitman, Lior; Ovadya, Yossi; Porat, Ziv; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2017-08-01

    Senescent cells are present in premalignant lesions and sites of tissue damage and accumulate in tissues with age. In vivo identification, quantification and characterization of senescent cells are challenging tasks that limit our understanding of the role of senescent cells in diseases and aging. Here, we present a new way to precisely quantify and identify senescent cells in tissues on a single-cell basis. The method combines a senescence-associated beta-galactosidase assay with staining of molecular markers for cellular senescence and of cellular identity. By utilizing technology that combines flow cytometry with high-content image analysis, we were able to quantify senescent cells in tumors, fibrotic tissues, and tissues of aged mice. Our approach also yielded the finding that senescent cells in tissues of aged mice are larger than nonsenescent cells. Thus, this method provides a basis for quantitative assessment of senescent cells and it offers proof of principle for combination of different markers of senescence. It paves the way for screening of senescent cells for identification of new senescence biomarkers, genes that bypass senescence or senolytic compounds that eliminate senescent cells, thus enabling a deeper understanding of the senescent state in vivo. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Oral administration of leaf extracts of Momordica charantia affect reproductive hormones of adult female Wistar rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewale, Osonuga Odusoga; Oduyemi, Osonuga Ifabunmi; Ayokunle, Osonuga

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of graded doses of aqueous leaf extracts of Momordica charantia on fertility hormones of female albino rats. Methods Twenty adult, healthy, female Wistar rats were divided into four groups: low dose (LD), moderate dose (MD) and high dose (HD) groups which received 12.5 g, 25.0 g, 50.0 g of the leaf extract respectively and control group that was given with water ad libatum. Result Estrogen levels reduced by 6.40 nmol/L, 10.80 nmol/L and 28.00 nmol/L in the LD, MD and HD groups respectively while plasma progesterone of rats in the LD, MD and HD groups reduced by 24.20 nmol/L, 40.8 nmol/L and 59.20 nmol/L respectively. Conclusion Our study has shown that the antifertility effect of Momordica charantia is achieved in a dose dependent manner. Hence, cautious use of such medication should be advocated especially when managing couples for infertility. PMID:25183143

  16. Semen quality and reproductive hormones according to birthweight and body mass index in childhood and adult life: two decades of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Hansen, Maj; Jensen, Cecilie Rutkjaer

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between childhood body mass index (BMI), birth weight, and adulthood BMI, and adult semen quality and level of reproductive hormones. DESIGN: Follow-up study. SETTING: From a pregnancy cohort established in 1984-1987. PATIENT(S): 347 out of 5,109 sons were...... selected for a study conducted 2005 to 2006. INTERVENTION(S): Semen and blood samples were related to information on BMI in boys (5-8 years), birth weight, and adult BMI. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Semen characteristics and reproductive hormones. RESULT(S): Neither childhood BMI, birth weight, nor adulthood...... BMI were significantly associated with semen quality. Men with the 33% highest childhood BMI had 15% lower sex hormone binding globulin, 8% lower testosterone, and 16% lower FSH than men with the 33% lowest childhood BMI. Men with high adulthood BMI had 14% lower testosterone, 9% lower inhibin B, 31...

  17. Senescence and programmed cell death in plants: polyamine action mediated by transglutaminase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eDel Duca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on polyamines in plants laps a long way of about 50 years and many roles have been discovered for these aliphatic cations. Polyamines regulate cell division, differentiation, organogenesis, reproduction, dormancy-break and senescence, homeostatic adjustments in response to external stimuli and stresses. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of their multiple activities are still matter of research. Polyamines are present in free and bound forms and interact with several important cell molecules; some of these interactions may occur by covalent linkages catalyzed by transglutaminase, giving rise to ‘cationisation’ or cross-links among specific proteins. Senescence and PCD can be delayed by polyamines; in order to re-interpret some of these effects and to obtain new insights into their molecular mechanisms, their conjugation has been revised here. The transglutaminase-mediated interactions between proteins and polyamines are the main target of this review. After an introduction on the characteristics of this enzyme, on its catalysis and role in PCD in animals, the plant senescence and PCD models in which TGase has been studied, are presented: the corolla of naturally senescing or excised flowers, the leaves senescing, either excised or not, the pollen during self-incompatible pollination, the hypersensitive response and the tuber storage parenchyma during dormancy release. In all the models examined, transglutaminase appears to be involved by a similar molecular mechanism as described during apoptosis in animal cells, even though several substrates are different. Its effect is probably related to the type of PCD, but mostly to the substrate to be modified in order to achieve the specific PCD program. As a cross-linker of polyamines and proteins, transglutaminase is an important factor involved in multiple, sometimes controversial, roles of polyamines during senescence and PCD.

  18. Contrasted patterns of age-specific reproduction in long-lived seabirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, M; Gaillard, J-M; Weimerskirch, H

    2009-01-22

    While the number of studies providing evidence of actuarial senescence is increasing, and covers a wide range of taxa, the process of reproductive senescence remains poorly understood. In fact, quite high reproductive output until the last years of life has been reported in several vertebrate species, so that whether or not reproductive senescence is widespread remains unknown. We compared age-specific changes of reproductive parameters between two closely related species of long-lived seabirds: the small-sized snow petrel Pagodroma nivea, and the medium-sized southern fulmar Fulmarus glacialoides. Both are sympatric in Antarctica. We used an exceptional dataset collected over more than 40 years to assess age-specific variations of both breeding probability and breeding success. We found contrasted age-specific reproductive patterns between the two species. Reproductive senescence clearly occurred from 21 years of age onwards in the southern fulmar, in both breeding probability and success, whereas we did not report any decline in the breeding success of the snow petrel, although a very late decrease in the proportion of breeders occurred at 34 years. Such a contrasted age-specific reproductive pattern was rather unexpected. Differences in life history including size or migratory behaviour are the most likely candidates to account for the difference we reported in reproductive senescence between these sympatric seabird species.

  19. A Content Analysis of How Sexual Behavior and Reproductive Health are Being Portrayed on Primetime Television Shows Being Watched by Teens and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsler, Janni J; Glik, Deborah; de Castro Buffington, Sandra; Malan, Hannah; Nadjat-Haiem, Carsten; Wainwright, Nicole; Papp-Green, Melissa

    2018-02-01

    Television is a leading source of sexual education for teens and young adults, thus it is important to understand how sexual behavior and reproductive health are portrayed in popular primetime programming. This study is a media content analysis of the 19 top-rated scripted English-language primetime television shows aired between January 1, 2015 and May 31, 2015, and viewed by American youth audiences 12-24 years of age. The purpose of this study is to assess how sex/sexuality and reproductive health are being portrayed in a popular medium that reaches many adolescent and young adult audiences. Themes used for this analysis include youth pregnancy/parenting, mentoring/guidance of youth regarding sexual behavior, sex/sexuality, body image/identity, sexual violence/abuse/harassment, gender identity/sexual orientation, and reproductive health. Themes have been classified in one of the following six categories: visual cues, brief mentions, dialogue, minor storylines, major storylines, and multi-episode storylines. Our findings indicate that narratives providing educational information regarding the risks and consequences of sexual behavior were missing from the television shows we analyzed and that storylines promoting low risk sexual behavior were rare. Sexual violence and abuse, casual sex among adults, lack of contraception use, or no portrayal of consequences of risky behaviors were common. Compared to prior research, we found an emergent theme normalizing non-heterosexual gender identity and sexual orientation. Our findings have important implications as exposure to popular media shapes the perceptions and behaviors of teens and young adults. This study has the potential to shed light on the need to create stories and narratives in television shows watched by American teens and young adults with educational messages regarding the risks and consequences of sexual behavior.

  20. Transcriptional analyses of natural leaf senescence in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is an important biological process that contributes to grain yield in crops. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying natural leaf senescence, we harvested three different developmental ear leaves of maize, mature leaves (ML, early senescent leaves (ESL, and later senescent leaves (LSL, and analyzed transcriptional changes using RNA-sequencing. Three sets of data, ESL vs. ML, LSL vs. ML, and LSL vs. ESL, were compared, respectively. In total, 4,552 genes were identified as differentially expressed. Functional classification placed these genes into 18 categories including protein metabolism, transporters, and signal transduction. At the early stage of leaf senescence, genes involved in aromatic amino acids (AAAs biosynthetic process and transport, cellular polysaccharide biosynthetic process, and the cell wall macromolecule catabolic process, were up-regulated. Whereas, genes involved in amino acid metabolism, transport, apoptosis, and response to stimulus were up-regulated at the late stage of leaf senescence. Further analyses reveals that the transport-related genes at the early stage of leaf senescence potentially take part in enzyme and amino acid transport and the genes upregulated at the late stage are involved in sugar transport, indicating nutrient recycling mainly takes place at the late stage of leaf senescence. Comparison between the data of natural leaf senescence in this study and previously reported data for Arabidopsis implies that the mechanisms of leaf senescence in maize are basically similar to those in Arabidopsis. A comparison of natural and induced leaf senescence in maize was performed. Athough many basic biological processes involved in senescence occur in both types of leaf senescence, 78.07% of differentially expressed genes in natural leaf senescence were not identifiable in induced leaf senescence, suggesting that differences in gene regulatory network may exist between these two leaf senescence

  1. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  2. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  3. Effects of sublethal exposure to boric acid sugar bait on adult survival, host-seeking, bloodfeeding behavior, and reproduction of Stegomyia albopicta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arshad; Xue, Rui-De; Barnard, Donald R

    2006-09-01

    Effects of sublethal exposure to 0.1% boric acid sugar bait on adult survival, host-seeking, bloodfeeding behavior, and reproduction of Stegomyia albopicta were studied in the laboratory. Survival of males as well as females was significantly reduced when exposed to the bait, compared to control adults. The host-seeking and bloodfeeding activities in the baited females decreased, but the mean duration of blood engorgement (probing to voluntary withdrawal of proboscis) was not significantly different between the baited and control females. The landing and biting rates (human forearm) were significantly reduced in the baited females compared to nonbaited controls. Fecundity and fertility (based on number of laid eggs per female and percentage egg hatch, respectively) in the baited females were significantly reduced, and ovarian development was retarded. Sublethal exposure to sugar-based boric acid bait has the potential to reduce adult populations of St. albopicta.

  4. CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 Inhibits Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Song

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is an integral part of plant development, and the timing and progressing rate of senescence could substantially affect the yield and quality of crops. It has been known that a circadian rhythm synchronized with external environmental cues is critical for the optimal coordination of various physiological and metabolic processes. However, the reciprocal interactions between the circadian clock and leaf senescence in plants remain unknown. Here, through measuring the physiological and molecular senescence related markers of several circadian components mutants, we found that CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 inhibits leaf senescence. Further molecular and genetic studies revealed that CCA1 directly activates GLK2 and suppresses ORE1 expression to counteract leaf senescence. As plants age, the expression and periodic amplitude of CCA1 declines and thus weakens the inhibition of senescence. Our findings reveal an age-dependent circadian clock component of the process of leaf senescence.

  5. In vitro senescence of immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effros, Rita B; Dagarag, Mirabelle; Valenzuela, Hector F

    2003-01-01

    Immune cells are eminently suitable model systems in which to address the possible role of replicative senescence during in vivo aging. Since there are more than 10(8) unique antigen specificities present within the total T lymphocyte population of each individual, the immune response to any single antigen requires massive clonal expansion of the small proportion of T cells whose receptors recognize that antigen. The Hayflick Limit may, therefore, constitute a barrier to effective immune function, at least for those T cells that encounter their specific antigen more than once over the life course. Application of the fibroblast replicative senescence model to the so-called cytotoxic or CD8 T cell, the class of T cells that controls viral infection and cancer, has revealed certain features in common with other cell types as well as several characteristics that are unique to T cells. One senescence-associated change that is T cell-specific is the complete loss of expression of the activation signaling surface molecule, CD28, an alteration that enabled the documentation of high proportions of senescent T cells in vivo. The T cell model has also provided the unique opportunity to analyze telomere dynamics in a cell type that has the ability to upregulate telomerase yet nevertheless undergoes senescence. The intimate involvement of the immune system in the control of pathogens and cancer as well as in modulation of bone homeostasis suggests that more extensive analysis of the full range of characteristics of senescent T cells may help elucidate a broad spectrum of age-associated physiological changes.

  6. Drying without senescence in resurrection plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Cara A.; Gaff, Donald F.; Neale, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    Research into extreme drought tolerance in resurrection plants using species such as Craterostigma plantagineum, C. wilmsii, Xerophyta humilis, Tortula ruralis, and Sporobolus stapfianus has provided some insight into the desiccation tolerance mechanisms utilized by these plants to allow them to persist under extremely adverse environmental conditions. Some of the mechanisms used to ensure cellular preservation during severe dehydration appear to be peculiar to resurrection plants. Apart from the ability to preserve vital cellular components during drying and rehydration, such mechanisms include the ability to down-regulate growth-related metabolism rapidly in response to changes in water availability, and the ability to inhibit dehydration-induced senescence programs enabling reconstitution of photosynthetic capacity quickly following a rainfall event. Extensive research on the molecular mechanism of leaf senescence in non-resurrection plants has revealed a multi-layered regulatory network operates to control programed cell death pathways. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that resurrection plants employ to avoid undergoing drought-related senescence during the desiccation process. To survive desiccation, dehydration in the perennial resurrection grass S. stapfianus must proceed slowly over a period of 7 days or more. Leaves detached from the plant before 60% relative water content (RWC) is attained are desiccation-sensitive indicating that desiccation tolerance is conferred in vegetative tissue of S. stapfianus when the leaf RWC has declined to 60%. Whilst some older leaves remaining attached to the plant during dehydration will senesce, suggesting dehydration-induced senescence may be influenced by leaf age or the rate of dehydration in individual leaves, the majority of leaves do not senesce. Rather these leaves dehydrate to air-dryness and revive fully following rehydration. Hence it seems likely that there are genes expressed in

  7. Emerging roles of lncRNAs in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes Resano, Marta; Lund, Anders H

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a complex stress response that leads to an irreversible state of cell growth arrest. Senescence may be induced by different stimuli such as telomere shortening, DNA damage or oncogenic insult among others. Senescent cells are metabolically highly active producing a wealth...

  8. Senescence rates in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, J J E; Rozing, M P; Kramer, Ada

    2011-01-01

    function of the Gompertz equation as a superior descriptor of senescence rate. Here, we tested both measures of the rate of senescence in a population of patients with end-stage renal disease. It is clinical dogma that patients on dialysis experience accelerated senescence, whereas those with a functional...

  9. Polychlorinated biphenyls in adult black bass and yellow perch were not associated with their reproductive success in the upper Hudson River, New York, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceina, Michael J; Sammons, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Although production and use of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) ceased nearly 35 yr ago, questions still remain concerning the potential chronic effects these compounds may have on wild fish, including their reproductive success. In the upper Hudson River, New York, USA, fish were exposed to PCBs primarily from 2 manufacturing plants located approximately 320 km upstream of New York City, New York, from the 1940s to 1977. The authors collected yellow perch (Perca flavescens), smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), and largemouth bass (M. salmoides) using electrofishing, measured PCBs in these adults, and estimated abundance and size of their offspring at age 1 yr (age-1 fish). Fish were collected annually from 2004 to 2009 from 1 control site upstream of the PCB discharge sites and from 2 sites downstream from where PCBs were released. These sites (pools) are separated by a series of dams, locks, and canals. Muscle tissue wet weight PCB and lipid-based PCB concentrations in adults in the 2 PCB exposure pools averaged approximately 1 to 3 µg/g and 100 to 500 µg/g, respectively. Age-1 abundances were not related to adult PCB concentrations but were inversely related to river flow. Size of age-1 fish was slightly greater at the PCB-exposure sites. Levels of PCBs in yellow perch, largemouth bass, and smallmouth bass in the upper Hudson River did not impair or reduce recruitment or reproductive success. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  10. [Age-related aspects of male rats sexual behavior with different senescence rates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstislavskaia, T G; Gladkikh, D V; Belousova, I I; Maslova, L N; Kolosova, N G

    2010-01-01

    Social and sexual behavior of males Wistar and senescence-accelerated OXYS rats was studied. The experimental model excluding direct interaction between partners showed that the exploratory activity decreased with aging in rats of both strains, but social motivation didn't change. No interstrain differences in intensity of sexual motivation in the presence of an inaccessible receptive female were observed in 4-month rats. The level of sexual motivation of 12-month Wistar rats didn't differ from that of 4-month animals. However, in 12-month OXYS males, sexual motivation was decreased as compared to both 4- and 12-month Wistar rats. The same regularities were found under conditions of direct interaction with a partner. Behavioral changes in 12-month OXYS rats were considered as genetically determinate abnormality at the initial stage of sexual behavior, i.e., sexual motivation. The results suggest the accelerated senescence of the reproductive system of OXYS rats.

  11. Lizard reproductive medicine and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Richard S

    2002-09-01

    Lizards are a diverse group of some 4470 species, a wide variety of which are now kept in captivity. Interest in captive lizards continues to increase, wild populations seem to be declining in some areas, and herpetoculturists continue to succeed in breeding more species; consequently, veterinarians must understand basic lizard reproductive biology to successfully treat lizard patients with reproductive problems. Just obtaining First Filial Generation (F1) offspring is an accomplishment. But we must look down the road to maintain a species in captivity for succeeding generations, and a lineage may not continue if attention is not given to details of appropriate husbandry and proper reproductive pursuits. One study documents the senescence of lineages in parthenogenetic lizards in captivity apparently associated with husbandry problems [99].

  12. Senescence and the pro-tumorigenic stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alspach, Elise; Fu, Yujie; Stewart, Sheila A

    2013-01-01

    Hayflick and Moorhead first described senescence in the late 1960's as a permanent growth arrest that primary cells underwent after a defined number of cellular divisions in culture. This observation gave rise to the hypothesis that cells contained an internal counting mechanism that limited cellular division and that this limit was an important barrier to cellular transformation. What began as an in vitro observation has led to an immense body of work that reaches into all fields of biology and is of particular interest in the areas of aging, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. The initially simplistic view that senescence limits cellular division and contributes to aging while stymying tumorigenesis has now evolved into an important and complex biological process that has numerous caveats and often opposing effects on tumorigenesis. In this review, we limit our discussion to the complex role senescence plays in tumorigenesis. Throughout the review we attempt to draw many parallels to other systems including the role senescent cells play in the tumor microenvironment and their significant molecular and phenotypic similarities to cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs).

  13. biomedical challenges of human senescence: a review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-12-12

    Dec 12, 2002 ... generation per mitochondrion. Understanding the role of cellular ageing in vivo is another major challenge for integrative study. The in vitro model of cell replicative senescence pioneered by. Sith and Pereira has elucidated the mechanisms limiting cell proliferation(30). Until recently the link between in.

  14. Senescence in the aging process [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard GA Faragher

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of ‘senescent’ cells has long been proposed to act as an ageing mechanism. These cells display a radically altered transcriptome and degenerative phenotype compared with their growing counterparts. Tremendous progress has been made in recent years both in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling entry into the senescent state and in the direct demonstration that senescent cells act as causal agents of mammalian ageing. The challenges now are to gain a better understanding of how the senescent cell phenotype varies between different individuals and tissues, discover how senescence predisposes to organismal frailty, and develop mechanisms by which the deleterious effects of senescent cells can be ameliorated.

  15. Effects of methoprene, a juvenile hormone analog, on survival of various developmental stages, adult emergence, reproduction and behavior of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Gurpreet S; Meyer, Wendy; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2015-12-01

    The Asian citrus citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, transmits a bacterium that causes huanglongbing in citrus. Frequent and repeated use of neurotoxic insecticides against D. citri has resulted in the development of insecticide resistance. We evaluated the effects of the juvenile hormone analog methoprene on egg hatch, nymphal development, adult emergence, reproduction and behavior of D. citri. Methoprene significantly reduced the viability of eggs that were between 0 and 4 days old. Egg hatch of 0-48-h-old and 49-96-h-old eggs was 8 and 9%, respectively, when treated with 320 µg mL(-1) of methoprene. Methoprene caused significant mortality of first-, third- and fifth-instar D. citri nymphs and reduced adult emergence as compared with controls. Methoprene caused less than 5% adult emergence when first- and third-instar stages were treated, respectively, and less than 40% adult emergence when fifth instars were treated. Reduced fertility of females was observed when they emerged from methoprene-treated fifth instars. Methoprene was effective in reducing egg hatch, suppressing nymphal development and decreasing adult emergence of D. citri under laboratory conditions. Treatment of fifth instars reduced the fertility of females. Methoprene might be a possible tool for integrated management of D. citri. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Sirtuins, Cell Senescence, and Vascular Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Yujiro; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    The sirtuins (SIRTs) constitute a class of proteins with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase or adenosine diphosphate-ribosyltransferase activity. Seven SIRT family members have been identified in mammals, from SIRT1, the best studied for its role in vascular aging, to SIRT7. SIRT1 and SIRT2 are localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial, and SIRT6 and SIRT7 are nuclear. Extensive studies have clearly revealed that SIRT proteins regulate diverse cell functions and responses to stressors. Vascular aging involves the aging process (senescence) of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Two types of cell senescence have been identified: (1) replicative senescence with telomere attrition; and (2) stress-induced premature senescence without telomere involvement. Both types of senescence induce vascular cell growth arrest and loss of vascular homeostasis, and contribute to the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Previous mechanistic studies have revealed in detail that SIRT1, SIRT3, and SIRT6 show protective functions against vascular aging, and definite vascular function of other SIRTs is under investigation. Thus, direct SIRT modulation and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide stimulation of SIRT are promising candidates for cardiovascular disease therapy. A small number of pilot studies have been conducted to assess SIRT modulation in humans. These clinical studies have not yet provided convincing evidence that SIRT proteins alleviate morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases. The outcomes of multiple ongoing clinical trials are awaited to define the efficacy of SIRT modulators and SIRT activators in cardiovascular diseases, along with the potential adverse effects of chronic SIRT modulation. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular bases of cellular senescence: Hayflick phenomenon 50 years later

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Sosińska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal human somatic cells have strictly limited proliferative capacity and reach a state of senescence when it becomes exhausted. It is believed that senescence is a response to extensive and irreparable DNA injury, localized in telomeric and/or non-telomeric regions of the genome. Main cause of this damage is oxidative stress, increasing due to deteriorated function of mitochondria. Senescent cells accumulate in tissues during aging, which is causatively linked with the development of various pathologies in elderly individuals, including cancer. This paper, prepared exactly 50 years after Leonard Hayflick’s discovery of the relationship between cellular senescence and organismal aging is aimed at presenting the current knowledge about molecular determinants of senescence, with particular emphasis paid to the role of oxidative stress, effectors of senescence at the level of cell cycle, markers of this phenomenon, and the effect of senescent cells on the development of certain age-related diseases.

  18. Use of NAP gene to manipulate leaf senescence in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Susheng; Guo, Yongfeng

    2013-04-16

    The present invention discloses transgenic plants having an altered level of NAP protein compared to that of a non-transgenic plant, where the transgenic plants display an altered leaf senescence phenotype relative to a non-transgenic plant, as well as mutant plants comprising an inactivated NAP gene, where mutant plants display a delayed leaf senescence phenotype compared to that of a non-mutant plant. The present invention also discloses methods for delaying leaf senescence in a plant, as well as methods of making a mutant plant having a decreased level of NAP protein compared to that of a non-mutant plant, where the mutant plant displays a delayed leaf senescence phenotype relative to a non-mutant plant. Methods for causing precocious leaf senescence or promoting leaf senescence in a plant are also disclosed. Also disclosed are methods of identifying a candidate plant suitable for breeding that displays a delayed leaf senescence and/or enhanced yield phenotype.

  19. Developmental exposure of zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 17α-ethinylestradiol affects non-reproductive behavior and fertility as adults, and increases anxiety in unexposed progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Kristina; Reyhanian Caspillo, Nasim; Porseryd, Tove; Hallgren, Stefan; Dinnétz, Patrik; Porsch-Hällström, Inger

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EDCs) during development affects fertility, reproductive and non-reproductive behavior in mammals and fish. These effects can also be transferred to coming generations. In fish, the effects of developmental EDC exposure on non-reproductive behavior are less well studied. Here, we analyze the effects of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) on anxiety, shoaling behavior and fertility in zebrafish after developmental treatment and remediation in clean water until adulthood. Zebrafish embryos were exposed from day 1 to day 80 post fertilization to actual concentrations of 1.2 and 1.6ng/L EE2. After remediation for 82days non-reproductive behavior and fertilization success were analyzed in both sexes. Males and females from the 1.2ng/L group, as well as control males and females, were bred, and behavior of the untreated F1 offspring was tested as adults. Developmental treatment with 1.2 and 1.6ng/L EE2 significantly increased anxiety in the novel tank test and increased shoaling intensity in both sexes. Fertilization success was significantly reduced by EE2 in both sexes when mated with untreated fish of opposite sex. Progeny of fish treated with 1.2ng/L EE2 showed increased anxiety in the novel tank test and increased light avoidance in the scototaxis test compared to control offspring. In conclusion, developmental exposure of zebrafish to low doses of EE2 resulted in persistent changes in behavior and fertility. The behavior of unexposed progeny was affected by their parents' exposure, which might suggest transgenerational effects. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Reproductive Health CHOICES for Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease or Trait: Randomized Controlled Trial Outcomes over Two Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Agatha M; Wilkie, Diana J; Yao, Yingwei; Molokie, Robert E; Stahl, Christiane; Hershberger, Patricia E; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Suarez, Marie L; Johnson, Bonnye; Angulo, Rigoberto; Carrasco, Jesus; Angulo, Veronica; Thompson, Alexis A

    2016-04-01

    Interventions to assist reproductive health decision-making in populations affected by sickle cell disease (SCD) or trait (SCT) lack proven efficacy over time. Our aim was to compare effects of CHOICES, a Web-based multimedia education program on implementing informed reproductive plans, and usual care education (e-Book) on reproductive knowledge, intention, and behavior over 24 months. We randomized 234 participants with SCD (n = 138) or SCT (n = 96) (age 18-35 years, 35 % male, 94 % African American) to CHOICES and e-Book groups. Participants completed a sickle cell-specific reproductive measure before and four times after the intervention (6, 12, 18 and 24 months). Compared to the e-Book group the CHOICES group had significantly more improvement in knowledge over time (p = .004) but not intention (p = .18) or behavior (p = .69). At baseline, 114 (48.7 %) participants reported having partners who would not put the couple at risk for their children inheriting SCD. Of the 116 (49.6 %) at-risk participants, a higher poroportion of those who were in the CHOICES group chose partners that reduced their risk by the last visit than the e-Book group (p = .04). Study findings provide important insights for designing a national trial of the CHOICES intervention focusing on subjects whose partner status puts them at risk for having a child with SCD.

  1. Parental High-Fat Diet Promotes Inflammatory and Senescence-Related Changes in Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulbhushan Tikoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity and dietary habits are associated with increased incidences of aging-related prostatic diseases. The present study was aimed to investigate transgenerational effects of chronic high-fat diet (HFD feeding on inflammation and senescence-related changes in prostate. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats were kept on either normal or HFD one. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal activity, inflammation, and cellular proliferation were determined in the prostate. Results. Increased SA β-gal activity, expression of p53, and cell proliferation marker PCNA were observed in ventral prostate of HFD-fed rats. Immunostaining for p53 and PCNA revealed that the p53 immunopositive cells were primarily in stroma while PCNA immunopositive cells were epithelial cells. An increase in expression of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2 and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB was observed in prostate of weaning pups HFD-fed parents. However, in adult pups, irrespective of dietary habit, a significant increase in the expression of COX-2, PCNA, phosphorylation of NF-kB, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and SA β-gal activity was observed. Conclusions. Present investigation reports that HFD feeding promotes accumulation of p53 expressing cells, proliferation of epithelial cells, and senescence-related changes in prostate. Further, parental HFD-feeding upholds inflammatory, proliferative, and senescence-related changes in prostate of pups.

  2. Reproductive health choices for young adults with sickle cell disease or trait: randomized controlled trial immediate posttest effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Diana J; Gallo, Agatha M; Yao, Yingwei; Molokie, Robert E; Stahl, Christine; Hershberger, Patricia E; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Suarez, Marie L; Labotka, Robert J; Johnson, Bonnye; Angulo, Rigo; Angulo, Veronica; Carrasco, Jesus; Shuey, David; Pelligra, Stephanie; Wang, Edward; Rogers, Dennie T; Thompson, Alexis A

    2013-01-01

    People with sickle cell disease (SCD) or sickle cell trait (SCT) may not have information about genetic inheritance needed for making informed reproductive health decisions. CHOICES is a Web-based, multimedia educational intervention that provides information about reproductive options and consequences to help those with SCD or SCT identify and implement an informed parenting plan. Efficacy of CHOICES compared with usual care must be evaluated. The purpose was to compare immediate posttest effects of CHOICES versus an attention-control usual care intervention (e-Book) on SCD-/SCT-related reproductive health knowledge, intention, and behavior. In a randomized controlled study, we recruited subjects with SCD/SCT from clinics, community settings, and online networks with data collected at sites convenient to the 234 subjects with SCD (n = 136) or SCT (n = 98). Their ages ranged from 18 to 35 years; 65% were women, and 94% were African American. Subjects completed a measure of sickle cell reproductive knowledge, intention, and behavior before and immediately after the intervention. Compared with the e-Book group, the CHOICES group had significantly higher average knowledge scores and probability of reporting a parenting plan to avoid SCD or SCD and SCT when pretest scores were controlled. Effects on intention and planned behavior were not significant. The CHOICES group showed significant change in their intention and planned behavior, whereas the e-Book group did not show significant change in their intention, but their planned behavior differed significantly. Initial efficacy findings are encouraging but warrant planned booster sessions and outcome follow-ups to determine sustained intervention efficacy on reproductive health knowledge, intention, and actual behavior of persons with SCD/SCT.

  3. Reproductive Health CHOICES for Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease or Trait: Randomized Controlled Trial Immediate Posttest Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Diana J; Gallo, Agatha M.; Yao, Yingwei; Molokie, Robert E.; Stahl, Christine; Hershberger, Patricia E.; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Suarez, Marie L.; Labotka, Robert J.; Johnson, Bonnye; Angulo, Rigo; Angulo, Veronica; Carrasco, Jesus; Shuey, David; Pelligra, Stephanie; Wang, Edward; Rogers, Dennie T.; Thompson, Alexis A.

    2013-01-01

    Background People with sickle cell disease (SCD) or sickle cell trait (SCT) may not have information about genetic inheritance needed for making informed reproductive health decisions. CHOICES is a web-based, multimedia educational intervention that provides information about reproductive options and consequences to help those with SCD or SCT identify and implement an informed parenting plan. Efficacy of CHOICES compared with usual care must be evaluated. Objective The purpose was to compare immediate posttest effects of CHOICES versus an attention control usual care intervention (e-Book) on SCD/SCT-related reproductive health knowledge, intention, and behavior. Methods In a randomized controlled study, we recruited subjects with SCD/SCT from clinics, community settings, and online networks with data collected at sites convenient to the 234 subjects with SCD (n = 136) or SCT (n = 98) (age ranged from18-35 years, 65% were female, and 94% were African American). Subjects completed a measure of sickle cell reproductive knowledge, intention, and behavior before and immediately after the intervention. Results Compared to the e-Book group, the CHOICES group had significantly higher average knowledge scores and probability of reporting a parenting plan to avoid SCD or SCD and SCT when pretest scores were controlled. Effects on intention and planned behavior were not significant. The CHOICES group showed significant change in their intention and planned behavior; the e-Book group did not show significant change in their intention, but their planned behavior differed significantly. Discussion Initial efficacy findings are encouraging but warrant planned booster sessions and outcome follow-ups to determine sustained intervention efficacy on reproductive health knowledge, intention, and actual behavior of persons with SCD/SCT. PMID:23995469

  4. Molecular genetic approaches to the study of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goletz, T J; Smith, J R; Pereira-Smith, O M

    1994-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an inability of cells to synthesize DNA and divide, which results in a terminal loss of proliferation despite the maintenance of basic metabolic processes. Senescence has been proposed as a model for the study of aging at the cellular level, and the basis for this model system and its features have been summarized. Although strong experimental evidence exists to support the hypothesis that cellular senescence is a dominant active process, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain a mystery. Investigators have taken several approaches to gain a better understanding of senescence. Several groups have documented the differences between young and senescent cells, and others have identified changes that occur during the course of a cell's in vitro life span. Using molecular and biochemical approaches, important changes in gene expression and function of cell-cycle-associated products have been identified. The active production of an inhibitor of DNA synthesis has been demonstrated. This may represent the final step in a cascade of events governing senescence. The study of immortal cells which have escaped senescence has also provided useful information, particularly with regard to the genes governing the senescence program. These studies have identified four complementation groups for indefinite division, which suggests that there are at least four genes or gene pathways in the senescence program. Through the use of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, chromosomes encoding senescence genes have been identified; efforts to clone these genes are ongoing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Effect of temperature on growth, mortality, reproduction, and production of adult Lymnaea obrussa Say (Mollusca:Gastropoda)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattice, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    Shell lengths and egg production were measured weekly under constant (K; 10, 15, 20, 25 0 C) and varying temperature regimes during the reproductive period. Varying regimes included natural field temperature in a pond (F; diurnal and seasonal), mean daily field temperature (anti F; seasonal) and 5 and 10 0 C above anti F. Growth rate of large snails (>10 mm) was unaffected by temperature, but small snails (6 to 10 mm) grew fastest at 15 0 C(K). Growth and reproductive periods were longest, production was highest, and mortality rate was lowest at 15 0 C(K). Rate (per snail) of egg production increased with temperature. At equal mean temperature, regime affected growth rate only at anti F. Regime affected the following values as shown: mortality rate,F > anti F = K; rate of reproduction, F > K > anti F; and total production, K > anti F = F. The validity of extrapolation of energetic data from laboratory to field is discussed. Data relating production and temperature are valuable in thermal impact analysis. (U.S.)

  6. Endothelial cell senescence with aging in healthy humans: prevention by habitual exercise and relation to vascular endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Matthew J; Kaplon, Rachelle E; Hill, Sierra D; McNamara, Molly N; Santos-Parker, Jessica R; Pierce, Gary L; Seals, Douglas R; Donato, Anthony J

    2017-11-01

    Cellular senescence is emerging as a key mechanism of age-related vascular endothelial dysfunction, but evidence in healthy humans is lacking. Moreover, the influence of lifestyle factors such as habitual exercise on endothelial cell (EC) senescence is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that EC senescence increases with sedentary, but not physically active, aging and is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Protein expression (quantitative immunofluorescence) of p53, a transcription factor related to increased cellular senescence, and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p16 were 116%, 119%, and 128% greater (all P age-related differences were not present (all P > 0.05) in venous ECs from older exercising adults (57 ± 1 yr, n = 13). Furthermore, venous EC protein levels of p53 ( r  = -0.49, P = 0.003), p21 ( r  = -0.38, P = 0.03), and p16 ( r  = -0.58, P = 0.002) were inversely associated with vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation). Similarly, protein expression of p53 and p21 was 26% and 23% higher (both P healthy older sedentary (63 ± 1 yr, n = 18) versus young sedentary (25 ± 1 yr, n = 9) adults; age-related changes in arterial EC p53 and p21 expression were not observed ( P > 0.05) in older habitually exercising adults (59 ± 1 yr, n = 14). These data indicate that EC senescence is associated with sedentary aging and is linked to endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, these data suggest that prevention of EC senescence may be one mechanism by which aerobic exercise protects against endothelial dysfunction with age. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our study provides novel evidence in humans of increased endothelial cell senescence with sedentary aging, which is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function. Furthermore, our data suggest an absence of age-related increases in endothelial cell senescence in older exercising adults, which is linked with preserved vascular endothelial function

  7. ARSH 1: Reproductive and sexual health problems of adolescents and young adults: a cross sectional community survey on knowledge, attitude and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M K C; Leena, M L; Thankachi, Yamini; George, Babu; Russell, Paul Swamidhas Sudhakar

    2013-11-01

    To understand the problems faced and the difference in knowledge, attitude and practice of young people across the age group of 10-24 y on reproductive and sexual health issues and to get their suggestions regarding adolescent care services. This cross sectional community survey involving three districts in Kerala was conducted among adolescents and young adults of 10-24 y using a population proportion to sample size technique. The main problems faced by the young people between 10 and 24 y of age were financial, substance abuse in family, poor academic performance, difference of opinion, disease in self/family, mental problems, lack of talent, strict parents, difficulty in mingling, love failure, broken family, loneliness and problems at school/office in the descending order. As the age advances higher percentage of both boys (43.4%) and girls (61.7%) discuss reproductive sexual health issues among themselves. There was a statistically significant difference in personal hygiene practices like changing napkins/cloths more than once a day (94.3%), cleaning genital organs with soap every day (71.7%), washing after urination (69.2%), washing from front to back after defecation (62.2%) and washing hands with soap after defecation (73.2%) between 10-14, 15-19, and 20-24 y age group with higher percentages in the older groups. In order to make the service more useful, more of the older group participants suggested giving information on adolescent services to parents, adolescents and society as a whole by creating better societal acceptance and keeping confidentiality in service delivery. This study has shown an overall inadequacy in reproductive health knowledge in all age groups, but increasing knowledge gain and better attitude and practices on reproductive and sexual health as the age increases. The suggestions made by the group regarding need for adolescent reproductive sexual health (ARSH) and counseling services with privacy and confidentiality ensured, is useful

  8. The effect of developmental nutrition on life span and fecundity depends on the adult reproductive environment in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, C.M.; Doroszuk, A.; Zwaan, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Both developmental nutrition and adult nutrition affect life-history traits; however, little is known about whether the effect of developmental nutrition depends on the adult environment experienced. We used the fruit fly to determine whether life-history traits, particularly life span and

  9. Seasonal life history trade-offs in two leafwing butterflies: Delaying reproductive development increases life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElderry, Robert M

    2016-04-01

    Surviving inhospitable periods or seasons may greatly affect fitness. Evidence of this exists in the prevalence of dormant stages in the life cycles of most insects. Here I focused on butterflies with distinct seasonal morphological types (not a genetic polymorphism) in which one morphological type, or form, delays reproduction until favorable conditions return, while the other form develops in an environment that favors direct reproduction. For two butterflies, Anaea aidea and A. andria, I tested the hypothesis that the development of each seasonal form involves a differential allocation of resources to survival at eclosion. I assayed differences in adult longevity among summer and winter forms in either a warm, active environment or a cool, calm environment. Winter form adults lived 40 times longer than summer form but only in calm, cool conditions. The magnitude of this difference provided compelling evidence that the winter form body plan and metabolic strategy (i.e. resource conservatism) favor long term survival. This research suggests that winter form adults maintain lowered metabolic rate, a common feature of diapause, to conserve resources and delay senescence while overwintering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Muscle senescence in short-lived wild mammals, the soricine shrews Blarina brevicauda and Sorex palustris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Allyson G; Lawler, John M; Campbell, Kevin L; Horning, Markus

    2009-06-01

    Red-toothed (soricine) shrews are consummate predators exhibiting the highest energy turnovers and shortest life spans (ca. 18 months) of any mammal, yet virtually nothing is known regarding their physiological aging. We assessed the emerging pattern of skeletal muscle senescence (contractile/connective tissue components) in sympatric species, the semi-aquatic water shrew (WS), Sorex palustris, and the terrestrial short-tailed shrew (STS), Blarina brevicauda, to determine if muscle aging occurs in wild, short-lived mammals (H(0): shrews do not survive to an age where senescence occurs), and if so, whether these alterations are species-specific. Gracilis muscles were collected from first-year (n=17) and second-year (n=17) field-caught shrews. Consistent with typical mammalian aging, collagen content (% area) increased with age in both species (S. palustris: approximately 50%; B. brevicauda: approximately 60%). Muscle was dominated by stiffer Type I collagen, and the ratio of collagen Type I:Type III more than doubled with age. The area ratio of muscle:collagen decreased with age in both species, but was considerably lower in adult STS, suggesting species-specificity of senescence. Extracellular space was age-elevated in B. brevicauda, but was preserved in S. palustris ( approximately 50 vs. 10% elevation). Though juvenile interspecific comparisons revealed no significance, adult WS myocytes had 68% larger cross-sectional area and occurred at 28% lower fibers/area than those of adult STS. We demonstrate that age-related muscle senescence does occur in wild-caught, short-lived mammals, and we therefore reject this classic aging theory tenet. Our findings moreover illustrate that differential age adjustments in contractile/connective tissue components of muscle occur in the two species of wild-caught shrews. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Muscle Senescence in Short-Lived Wild Mammals, the Soricine Shrews Blarina brevicauda and Sorex palustris

    Science.gov (United States)

    HINDLE, ALLYSON G.; LAWLER, JOHN M.; CAMPBELL, KEVIN L.; HORNING, MARKUS

    2015-01-01

    Red-toothed (soricine) shrews are consummate predators exhibiting the highest energy turnovers and shortest life spans (ca. 18 months) of any mammal, yet virtually nothing is known regarding their physiological aging. We assessed the emerging pattern of skeletal muscle senescence (contractile/connective tissue components) in sympatric species, the semi-aquatic water shrew (WS), Sorex palustris, and the terrestrial short-tailed shrew (STS), Blarina brevicauda, to determine if muscle aging occurs in wild, short-lived mammals (H0: shrews do not survive to an age where senescence occurs), and if so, whether these alterations are species-specific. Gracilis muscles were collected from first-year (n = 17) and second-year (n = 17) field-caught shrews. Consistent with typical mammalian aging, collagen content (% area) increased with age in both species (S. palustris: ~50%; B. brevicauda: ~60%). Muscle was dominated by stiffer Type I collagen, and the ratio of collagen Type I:Type III more than doubled with age. The area ratio of muscle:collagen decreased with age in both species, but was considerably lower in adult STS, suggesting species-specificity of senescence. Extracellular space was age-elevated in B. brevicauda, but was preserved in S. palustris (~50 vs. 10% elevation). Though juvenile interspecific comparisons revealed no significance, adult WS myocytes had 68% larger cross-sectional area and occurred at 28% lower fibers/area than those of adult STS. We demonstrate that age-related muscle senescence does occur in wild-caught, short-lived mammals, and we therefore reject this classic aging theory tenet. Our findings moreover illustrate that differential age adjustments in contractile/connective tissue components of muscle occur in the two species of wild-caught shrews. PMID:19296507

  12. Leaf senescence and nutrient remobilisation in barley and wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, P L; Holm, P B; Krupinska, K

    2008-01-01

    Extensive studies have been undertaken on senescence processes in barley and wheat and their importance for the nitrogen use efficiency of these crop plants. During the senescence processes, proteins are degraded and nutrients are re-mobilised from senescing leaves to other organs, especially...... of chloroplasts is summarised. Rubisco is thought to be released from chloroplasts into vesicles containing stroma material (RCB = Rubisco-containing bodies). These vesicles may then take different routes for their degradation. Transcriptome analyses on barley and wheat senescence have identified genes involved...... in degradative, metabolic and regulatory processes that could be used in future strategies aimed at modifying the senescence process. The breeding of crops for characters related to senescence processes, e.g. higher yields and better nutrient use efficiency, is complex. Such breeding has to cope with the dilemma...

  13. Cellular Senescence in Postmitotic Cells: Beyond Growth Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Mallette, Frédérick A

    2018-04-25

    In mitotic cells, cellular senescence is a permanent state of G1 arrest, that may have evolved in parallel to apoptosis, to limit proliferation of damaged cells and oncogenesis. Recent studies have suggested that postmitotic cells are also capable of entering a state of senescence, although the repercussions of postmitotic cellular senescence (PoMiCS) on tissue health and function are currently ill-defined. In tissues made largely of post-mitotic cells, it is evolutionary advantageous to preserve cellular integrity and cellular senescence of post-mitotic cells may prevent stressor-induced tissue degeneration and promote tissue repair. Paradoxically, PoMiCS may also contribute to disease progression through the generation of inflammatory mediators, termed the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Here, we discuss the potential roles of PoMiCS and propose to enlarge the current definition of cellular senescence to postmitotic terminally differentiated cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stem cell senescence drives age-attenuated induction of pituitary tumours in mouse models of paediatric craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mario Gonzalez-Meljem, Jose; Haston, Scott; Carreno, Gabriela; Apps, John R; Pozzi, Sara; Stache, Christina; Kaushal, Grace; Virasami, Alex; Panousopoulos, Leonidas; Neda Mousavy-Gharavy, Seyedeh; Guerrero, Ana; Rashid, Mamunur; Jani, Nital; Goding, Colin R; Jacques, Thomas S; Adams, David J; Gil, Jesus; Andoniadou, Cynthia L; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2017-11-28

    Senescent cells may promote tumour progression through the activation of a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), whether these cells are capable of initiating tumourigenesis in vivo is not known. Expression of oncogenic β-catenin in Sox2+ young adult pituitary stem cells leads to formation of clusters of stem cells and induction of tumours resembling human adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP), derived from Sox2- cells in a paracrine manner. Here, we uncover the mechanisms underlying this paracrine tumourigenesis. We show that expression of oncogenic β-catenin in Hesx1+ embryonic precursors also results in stem cell clusters and paracrine tumours. We reveal that human and mouse clusters are analogous and share a common signature of senescence and SASP. Finally, we show that mice with reduced senescence and SASP responses exhibit decreased tumour-inducing potential. Together, we provide evidence that senescence and a stem cell-associated SASP drive cell transformation and tumour initiation in vivo in an age-dependent fashion.

  15. In situ reproduction, abundance, and growth of young-of-year and adult largemouth bass in a population exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Dudley W; Greenberg, Emily S; Helser, Thomas E; Branton, Margaret; Jenkins, Kenneth D

    2004-07-01

    We conducted a two-year field study (2000-2001) in the Housatonic River, Massachusetts (USA) to determine if we could detect in situ population-level effects on largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exposed to elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Calculated whole-body PCB concentrations in adult bass in 2002 averaged 121 mg/kg (range = 34-556 mg/kg). Polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations in young-of-year (YOY) composites in 2000 and 2002 averaged 28 mg/kg (range = 21-41 mg/kg) and 19 mg/kg (range = 16-24 mg/kg), respectively. Laboratory studies of fish have reported PCB toxicity at exposure levels below and within the range of those found in the Housatonic River. We evaluated five field-derived metrics: reproductive activity, relative abundance of YOY, YOY growth rates, adult growth, and adult condition to determine whether we could detect effects of PCBs in the largemouth bass population. These computed metrics, when compared with data sets assembled for numerous largemouth bass populations in North America, provided no evidence of population-level impairment. Results of this study suggest that PCB tissue concentrations associated with effects in laboratory studies do not necessarily translate to detectable effects on largemouth bass populations in their natural environment.

  16. A comparison of anthropometric, metabolic and reproductive characteristics of young adult women from opposite-sex and same sex twin pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirkko eKorsoff

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prenatal exposure to androgens has been linked to masculinization of several traits. We aimed to determine whether putative female intra-uterine exposure to androgens influences PCOS-related phenotypes, including anthropometric, metabolic and reproductive parameters using a twin design.Methods: Two cohorts of Finnish twins born in 1975-1979 and 1983-1987 formed the basis for the longitudinal FinnTwin16 (FT16 and FinnTwin12 (FT12 studies. Self-reported anthropometric characteristics, disease status and reproductive history were compared between 679 same-sex (SS and 789 opposite-sex (OS female twins (mean age ± SD: 34 ± 1.1 from the wave 5 of data collection in FT16. Serum lipid and lipoprotein subclass concentrations measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared in 226 SS and 169 OS female twins (mean age ± SD: 24 ± 2.1 from wave 4 of data collection in FT12 and FT16. Results: Anthropometric measures, the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus type 2 did not differ significantly between females from SS and OS twin pairs at age 34. Similarly, the prevalence of infertility, age at first pregnancy and number of induced and spontaneous abortions did not differ significantly between these two groups of women. The serum lipid and lipoprotein profile did not differ between females from SS and OS twins at age 24. Conclusion: We found no evidence that androgen overexposure of the female fetus affects obesity, metabolic profile or reproductive health in young adult females. However, these results do not exclude the possibility that prenatal androgen exposure in females could be adversely associated with intermediate phenotypes of PCOS later in life.

  17. Flavonoids and darkness lower PCD in senescing Vitis vinifera suspension cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Alberto; Petrussa, Elisa; Patui, Sonia; Zancani, Marco; Peresson, Carlo; Casolo, Valentino; Vianello, Angelo; Braidot, Enrico

    2016-10-26

    Senescence is a key developmental process occurring during the life cycle of plants that can be induced also by environmental conditions, such as starvation and/or darkness. During senescence, strict control of genes regulates ordered degradation and dismantling events, the most remarkable of which are genetically programmed cell death (PCD) and, in most cases, an upregulation of flavonoid biosynthesis in the presence of light. Flavonoids are secondary metabolites that play multiple essential roles in development, reproduction and defence of plants, partly due to their well-known antioxidant properties, which could affect also the same cell death machinery. To understand further the effect of endogenously-produced flavonoids and their interplay with different environment (light or dark) conditions, two portions (red and green) of a senescing grapevine callus were used to obtain suspension cell cultures. Red Suspension cell Cultures (RSC) and Green Suspension cell Cultures (GSC) were finally grown under either dark or light conditions for 6 days. Darkness enhanced cell death (mainly necrosis) in suspension cell culture, when compared to those grown under light condition. Furthermore, RSC with high flavonoid content showed a higher viability compared to GSC and were more protected toward PCD, in accordance to their high content in flavonoids, which might quench ROS, thus limiting the relative signalling cascade. Conversely, PCD was mainly occurring in GSC and further increased by light, as it was shown by cytochrome c release and TUNEL assays. Endogenous flavonoids were shown to be good candidates for exploiting an efficient protection against oxidative stress and PCD induction. Light seemed to be an important environmental factor able to induce PCD, especially in GSC, which lacking of flavonoids were not capable of preventing oxidative damage and signalling leading to senescence.

  18. Determining phenological patterns associated with the onset of senescence in a wheat MAGIC mapping population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anyela Valentina Camargo Rodriguez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate timing of developmental transitions is critical for adapting many crops to their local climatic conditions. Therefore, understanding the genetic basis of different aspects of phenology could be useful in highlighting mechanisms underpinning adaptation, with implications in breeding for climate change. For bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth, the start and rate of leaf senescence and the relative timing of different stages of flowering and grain filling all contribute to plant performance. In this study we screened under Smart house conditions a large, multi-founder ‘NIAB elite MAGIC’ wheat population, to evaluate the genetic elements that influence the timing of developmental stages in European elite varieties. This panel of recombinant inbred lines was derived from eight parents that are or recently have been grown commercially in the UK and Northern Europe. We undertook a detailed temporal phenotypic analysis under Smart house conditions of the population and its parents, to try to identify known or novel Quantitative Trait Loci associated with variation in the timing of key phenological stages in senescence. This analysis resulted in the detection of QTL interactions with novel traits such the time between ‘half of ear emergence above flag leaf ligule’ and the onset of senescence at the flag leaf as well as traits associated with plant morphology such as stem height. In addition, strong correlations between several traits and the onset of senescence of the flag leaf were identified. This work establishes the value of systematically phenotyping genetically unstructured populations to reveal the genetic architecture underlying morphological variation in commercial wheat.

  19. The WRKY transcription factor family and senescence in switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinerson, Charles I; Scully, Erin D; Palmer, Nathan A; Donze-Reiner, Teresa; Rabara, Roel C; Tripathi, Prateek; Shen, Qingxi J; Sattler, Scott E; Rohila, Jai S; Sarath, Gautam; Rushton, Paul J

    2015-11-09

    Early aerial senescence in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) can significantly limit biomass yields. WRKY transcription factors that can regulate senescence could be used to reprogram senescence and enhance biomass yields. All potential WRKY genes present in the version 1.0 of the switchgrass genome were identified and curated using manual and bioinformatic methods. Expression profiles of WRKY genes in switchgrass flag leaf RNA-Seq datasets were analyzed using clustering and network analyses tools to identify both WRKY and WRKY-associated gene co-expression networks during leaf development and senescence onset. We identified 240 switchgrass WRKY genes including members of the RW5 and RW6 families of resistance proteins. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis of the flag leaf transcriptomes across development readily separated clusters of co-expressed genes into thirteen modules. A visualization highlighted separation of modules associated with the early and senescence-onset phases of flag leaf growth. The senescence-associated module contained 3000 genes including 23 WRKYs. Putative promoter regions of senescence-associated WRKY genes contained several cis-element-like sequences suggestive of responsiveness to both senescence and stress signaling pathways. A phylogenetic comparison of senescence-associated WRKY genes from switchgrass flag leaf with senescence-associated WRKY genes from other plants revealed notable hotspots in Group I, IIb, and IIe of the phylogenetic tree. We have identified and named 240 WRKY genes in the switchgrass genome. Twenty three of these genes show elevated mRNA levels during the onset of flag leaf senescence. Eleven of the WRKY genes were found in hotspots of related senescence-associated genes from multiple species and thus represent promising targets for future switchgrass genetic improvement. Overall, individual WRKY gene expression profiles could be readily linked to developmental stages of flag leaves.

  20. Effects of Chronic Exposure to Triclosan on Reproductive and Thyroid Endpoints in the Adult Wistar Female Rat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes the results of a long term adult female rat oral exposure to triclosan and includes hormone, estrous cyclicity, thyroid histology and liver...

  1. Distribution and probable physiological role of esterases in reproductive, digestive, and fat-body tissues of the adult cotton boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B R; Bancroft, H R

    1986-06-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to examine gut, Malpighian tube, fat-body, testes, and ovarioles tissues of the adult cotton boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh. Esterases for which the inheritance has been reported previously by Terranova using whole-body homogenates were detected in dissected tissues and the probable physiological function of each allozyme is suggested. EST-1 occurs most frequently in ovarioles and female fat bodies. EST-2 is most often found in fat bodies and may be important in lipid turnover. No sex difference was observed. EST-3S is found in fat bodies and reproductive tissue, while EST-3F is always located in gut tissues, indicating that EST-3 is not controlled by a single autosomal locus with two codominant alleles as previously reported. EST-4, the most abundant esterase, can be detected in gut tissue at any age and is probably involved in digestion. EST-5 contains four allozymes which appear most frequently in testes and may be important during reproduction.

  2. The evolution of senescence in the tree of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto

    The existing theories on the evolution of senescence assume that senescence is inevitable in all organisms. However, recent studies have shown that this is not necessarily true. A better understanding of senescence and its underlying mechanisms could have far-reaching consequences for conservation...... and eco-evolutionary research. This book is the first to offer interdisciplinary perspectives on the evolution of senescence in many species, setting the stage for further developments. It brings together new insights from a wide range of scientific fields and cutting-edge research done on a multitude...

  3. Senescent intervertebral disc cells exhibit perturbed matrix homeostasis phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Kevin; Patil, Prashanti; McGowan, Sara J; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robbins, Paul D; Kang, James; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Vo, Nam

    2017-09-01

    Aging greatly increases the risk for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) as a result of proteoglycan loss due to reduced synthesis and enhanced degradation of the disc matrix proteoglycan (PG). How disc matrix PG homeostasis becomes perturbed with age is not known. The goal of this study is to determine whether cellular senescence is a source of this perturbation. We demonstrated that disc cellular senescence is dramatically increased in the DNA repair-deficient Ercc1 -/Δ mouse model of human progeria. In these accelerated aging mice, increased disc cellular senescence is closely associated with the rapid loss of disc PG. We also directly examine PG homeostasis in oxidative damage-induced senescent human cells using an in vitro cell culture model system. Senescence of human disc cells treated with hydrogen peroxide was confirmed by growth arrest, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, γH2AX foci, and acquisition of senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Senescent human disc cells also exhibited perturbed matrix PG homeostasis as evidenced by their decreased capacity to synthesize new matrix PG and enhanced degradation of aggrecan, a major matrix PG. of the disc. Our in vivo and in vitro findings altogether suggest that disc cellular senescence is an important driver of PG matrix homeostatic perturbation and PG loss. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. At the intersection of non-coding transcription, DNA repair, chromatin structure, and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke eOhsawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that non-coding RNAs play a critical role in regulating gene expression. Recent paradigm-setting studies are now revealing that non-coding RNAs, other than microRNAs, also play intriguing roles in the maintenance of chromatin structure, in the DNA damage response, and in adult human stem cell aging. In this review, we will discuss the complex inter-dependent relationships among non-coding RNA transcription, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and adult stem cell senescence. DNA damage-induced non-coding RNAs transcribed in the vicinity of the DNA break regulate recruitment of the DNA damage machinery and DNA repair efficiency. We will discuss the correlation between non-coding RNAs and DNA damage repair efficiency and the potential role of changing chromatin structures around double-strand break sites. On the other hand, induction of non-coding RNA transcription from the repetitive Alu elements occurs during human stem cell aging and hinders efficient DNA repair causing entry into senescence. We will discuss how this fine balance between transcription and genomic instability may be regulated by the dramatic changes to chromatin structure that accompany cellular senescence.

  5. Translational research in immune senescence: Assessing the relevance of current models

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, Kevin P.; Akbar, Arne N.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2014-01-01

    Advancing age is accompanied by profound changes in immune function; some are induced by the loss of critical niches that support development of naïve cells (e.g. thymic involution), others by the intrinsic physiology of long-lived cells attempting to maintain homeostasis, still others by extrinsic effects such as oxidative stress or long-term exposure to antigen due to persistent viral infections. Once compensatory mechanisms can no longer maintain a youthful phenotype the end result is the immune senescent milieu – one characterized by chronic, low grade, systemic inflammation and impaired responses to immune challenge, particularly when encountering new antigens. This state is associated with progression of chronic illnesses like atherosclerosis and dementia, and an increased risk of acute illness, disability and death in older adults. The complex interaction between immune senescence and chronic illness provides an ideal landscape for translational research with the potential to greatly affect human health. However, current animal models and even human investigative strategies for immune senescence have marked limitations, and the reductionist paradigm itself may be poorly suited to meet these challenges. A new paradigm, one that embraces complexity as a core feature of research in older adults is required to address the critical health issues facing the burgeoning senior population, the group that consumes the majority of healthcare resources. In this review, we outline the major advantages and limitations of current models and offer suggestions for how to move forward. PMID:22633440

  6. Comparative analyses of longevity and senescence reveal variable survival benefits of living in zoos across mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidière, Morgane; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vérane; Müller, Dennis W H; Bingaman Lackey, Laurie; Gimenez, Olivier; Clauss, Marcus; Lemaître, Jean-François

    2016-11-07

    While it is commonly believed that animals live longer in zoos than in the wild, this assumption has rarely been tested. We compared four survival metrics (longevity, baseline mortality, onset of senescence and rate of senescence) between both sexes of free-ranging and zoo populations of more than 50 mammal species. We found that mammals from zoo populations generally lived longer than their wild counterparts (84% of species). The effect was most notable in species with a faster pace of life (i.e. a short life span, high reproductive rate and high mortality in the wild) because zoos evidently offer protection against a number of relevant conditions like predation, intraspecific competition and diseases. Species with a slower pace of life (i.e. a long life span, low reproduction rate and low mortality in the wild) benefit less from captivity in terms of longevity; in such species, there is probably less potential for a reduction in mortality. These findings provide a first general explanation about the different magnitude of zoo environment benefits among mammalian species, and thereby highlight the effort that is needed to improve captive conditions for slow-living species that are particularly susceptible to extinction in the wild.

  7. Strigolactone Regulates Leaf Senescence in Concert with Ethylene in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hiroaki; Kusaba, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Leaf senescence is not a passive degenerative process; it represents a process of nutrient relocation, in which materials are salvaged for growth at a later stage or to produce the next generation. Leaf senescence is regulated by various factors, such as darkness, stress, aging, and phytohormones. Strigolactone is a recently identified phytohormone, and it has multiple functions in plant development, including repression of branching. Although strigolactone is implicated in the regulation of leaf senescence, little is known about its molecular mechanism of action. In this study, strigolactone biosynthesis mutant strains of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) showed a delayed senescence phenotype during dark incubation. The strigolactone biosynthesis genes MORE AXIALLY GROWTH3 (MAX3) and MAX4 were drastically induced during dark incubation and treatment with the senescence-promoting phytohormone ethylene, suggesting that strigolactone is synthesized in the leaf during leaf senescence. This hypothesis was confirmed by a grafting experiment using max4 as the stock and Columbia-0 as the scion, in which the leaves from the Columbia-0 scion senesced earlier than max4 stock leaves. Dark incubation induced the synthesis of ethylene independent of strigolactone. Strigolactone biosynthesis mutants showed a delayed senescence phenotype during ethylene treatment in the light. Furthermore, leaf senescence was strongly accelerated by the application of strigolactone in the presence of ethylene and not by strigolactone alone. These observations suggest that strigolactone promotes leaf senescence by enhancing the action of ethylene. Thus, dark-induced senescence is regulated by a two-step mechanism: induction of ethylene synthesis and consequent induction of strigolactone synthesis in the leaf. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Interactive effects of senescence and natural disturbance on the annual survival probabilities of snail kites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Brian E.; Martin, J.; Kendall, William L.; Cattau, Christopher E.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals in wild populations face risks associated with both intrinsic (i.e. aging) and external (i.e. environmental) sources of mortality. Condition-dependent mortality occurs when there is an interaction between such factors; however, few studies have clearly demonstrated condition-dependent mortality and some have even argued that condition-dependent mortality does not occur in wild avian populations. Using large sample sizes (2084 individuals, 3746 re-sights) of individual-based longitudinal data collected over a 33 year period (1976-2008) on multiple cohorts, we used a capture-mark-recapture framework to model age-dependent survival in the snail kite Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus population in Florida. Adding to the growing amount of evidence for actuarial senescence in wild populations, we found evidence of senescent declines in survival probabilities in adult kites. We also tested the hypothesis that older kites experienced condition-dependent mortality during a range-wide drought event (2000-2002). The results provide convincing evidence that the annual survival probability of senescent kites was disproportionately affected by the drought relative to the survival probability of prime-aged adults. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of condition-dependent mortality to be demonstrated in a wild avian population, a finding which challenges recent conclusions drawn in the literature. Our study suggests that senescence and condition-dependent mortality can affect the demography of wild avian populations. Accounting for these sources of variation may be particularly important to appropriately compute estimates of population growth rate, and probabilities of quasi-extinctions.

  9. Similarities and differences in adult tortoises: a morphological approach and its implication for reproduction and mobility between species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. L. Zuffi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Sexes in Chelonia display marked differences. Sexual size dimorphism (SSD is important in evolutionary biology. Different sexual strategies result in species specific selection. Biometric variation in male and female tortoises of two species is studied. Eighteen biometrics were measured in 75 museum specimens (20 Testudo graeca; 55 T. hermanni. Nine of 18 parameters in T. hermanni and two of 18 in T. graeca were sexually dimorphic. Multivariate analyses (principal component analysis highlighted two components, with bridge length the first and anal divergence the second component. The bridge length can be used to separate sexes and species. Males of both species were most different, whereas females of two species overlapped in body shape measurements. We hypothesise that female similarity could be a by-product of reproductive biology and sexual selection that optimise individual fitness.

  10. Reproductive system abnormalities in Schistosoma mansoni adult worms isolated from Nectomys squamipes (Muridae: Sigmodontinae: brightfield and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Renata Heisler

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni adult worms with genital anomalies isolated from Nectomys squamipes (Muridae: Sigmodontinae were studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy under the reflected mode. One male without testicular lobes (testicular agenesia/anorchism and two females, one with an atrophied ovary and another with 17 uterine eggs, were identified. The absence of testicular lobes occurred in a worm presenting otherwise normal male adult characteristics: tegument, tubercles and a gynaecophoric canal with spines. In both female specimens the digestive tube showed a vacuolated appearance, and the specimen with supernumerary uterine eggs exhibited a developing miracidium and an egg with a formed shell. The area of the ventral sucker was similar in both specimens however the tegument thickness, ovary and vitelline glands of the specimen with the atrophied ovary were smaller than those of the one with supernumerary eggs. These reported anomalies in the reproductive system call attention to the need to improve our understanding of genetic regulation and the possible role of environmental influences upon trematode development.

  11. Polyamines, peroxidase and proteins involved in the senescence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Senescence is the natural aging process at the cellular level or range of phenomena associated with this process. The objective of this review was to show the involvement of substances that may be related to senescence in plants, such as polyamines, peroxidase and proteins. These substances were related with the ...

  12. CLCA2 as a p53-Inducible Senescence Mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chizu Tanikawa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently mutated in multiple cancer tissues. Activated p53 protein regulates its downstream genes and subsequently inhibits malignant transformation by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, and senescence. However, genes involved in the p53-mediated senescence pathway are not yet fully elucidated. Through the screening of two genome-wide expression profile data sets, one for cells in which exogenous p53 was introduced and the other for senescent fibroblasts, we have identified chloride channel accessory 2 (CLCA2 as a p53-inducible senescence-associated gene. CLCA2 was remarkably induced by replicative senescence as well as oxidative stress in a p53-dependent manner. We also found that ectopically expressed CLCA2 induced cellular senescence, and the down-regulation of CLCA2 by small interfering RNA caused inhibition of oxidative stress-induced senescence. Interestingly, the reduced expression of CLCA2 was frequently observed in various kinds of cancers including prostate cancer, whereas its expression was not affected in precancerous prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Thus, our findings suggest a crucial role of p53/CLCA2-mediated senescence induction as a barrier for malignant transformation.

  13. Cellular and molecular aspects of quinoa leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Burrieza, Hernán Pablo; Rizzo, Axel Joel; Martínez-Tosar, Leandro Julián; Maldonado, Sara

    2015-09-01

    During leaf senescence, degradation of chloroplasts precede to changes in nuclei and other cytoplasmic organelles, RuBisCO stability is progressively lost, grana lose their structure, plastidial DNA becomes distorted and degraded, the number of plastoglobuli increases and abundant senescence-associated vesicles containing electronically dense particles emerge from chloroplasts pouring their content into the central vacuole. This study examines quinoa leaf tissues during development and senescence using a range of well-established markers of programmed cell death (PCD), including: morphological changes in nuclei and chloroplasts, degradation of RuBisCO, changes in chlorophyll content, DNA degradation, variations in ploidy levels, and changes in nuclease profiles. TUNEL reaction and DNA electrophoresis demonstrated that DNA fragmentation in nuclei occurs at early senescence, which correlates with induction of specific nucleases. During senescence, metabolic activity is high and nuclei endoreduplicate, peaking at 4C. At this time, TEM images showed some healthy nuclei with condensed chromatin and nucleoli. We have found that DNA fragmentation, induction of senescence-associated nucleases and endoreduplication take place during leaf senescence. This provides a starting point for further research aiming to identify key genes involved in the senescence of quinoa leaves. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Delay of Iris flower senescence by protease inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pak, C.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2005-01-01

    asterisk inside a circle sign Visible senescence of the flag tepals in Iris x hollandica (cv. Blue Magic) was preceded by a large increase in endoprotease activity. Just before visible senescence about half of total endoprotease activity was apparently due to cysteine proteases, somewhat less than

  15. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, M.J.; White, T.A.; Evans, G.; Tonne, J.M.; Verzosa, G.C.; Stout, M.B.; Mazula, D.L.; Palmer, A.K.; Baker, D.J.; Jensen, M.D.; Torbenson, M.S.; Miller, J.D.; Ikeda, Y.; Tchkonia, T.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Kirkland, J.L.; LeBrasseur, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the

  16. Effects of adult feeding on the reproduction and longevity of Noctuidae, Crambidae, Tortricidae and Elachistidae species; Efeito da alimentacao da fase adulta na reproducao e longevidade de especies de Noctuidae, Crambidae, Tortricidae e Elachistidae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milano, Patricia; Berti Filho, Evoneo; Parra, Jose R. P.; Consoli, Fernando L., E-mail: patmilano@gmail.co, E-mail: eberti@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: jrpparra@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: fconsoli@esalq.usp.b [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia e Acarologia; Oda, Melissa L., E-mail: melissa.oda@gmail.co [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Florestais

    2010-04-15

    This research evaluates the effect of the adult diet on the reproduction of Anticarsia gemmatalis Hubner, Heliothis virescens (Fabr.), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Noctuidae), Diatraea saccharalis (Fabr.) (Crambidae), Gymnandrosoma aurantianum Lima (Tortricidae) and Stenoma catenifer Walsingham (Elachistidae). Adults of all species were fed either water or a 10% honey solution. The egg viability for the 1{sup st} and 2{sup n}d egg masses, adult fecundity, longevity, number of mating and the ovigeny index (OI) (degree of ovarian maturation) were evaluated. Fecundity of A. gemmatalis and H. virescens was drastically reduced when females were fed only on water. Egg viability from both 1{sup st} and 2{sup nd} egg masses was variable between treatments. Females of A. gemmatalis, H. virescens and S. frugiperda, and males of some species had a reduced longevity when fed only on water. The number of matings was higher for A. gemmatalis and D. saccharalis when fed on water only. The OI was < 1.0 for all species evaluated indicating that all females may develop new oocytes as they age. Based on the OI and the reduced fecundity of A. gemmatalis and H. virescens, one observes that adult feeding is important for the reproduction of both species, and the IO is not a good parameter to indicate such condition. Spodoptera frugiperda, G. aurantianum, D. saccharalis and S. catenifer do not require any source of carbohydrates as adults to sustain their reproduction. (author)

  17. Life History Trade-Offs Modulate the Speed of Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen

    2017-01-01

    that the speed of senescence varies dramatically across the Tree of Life and that it has a moderate phylogenetic signal when considering both plants and animals but that this signal is stronger in animals than in plants, indicating that the strength of selection on the trait may differ between kingdoms. We next...... examined the speed of senescence at two taxonomic levels: comparing kingdoms, with plants more likely to postpone senescence than animals, and, when the data allowed for it, comparing taxonomic classes, where we found that pine trees are particularly slow to senesce, followed by reptiles and sponges. Most...... puzzling and worthy of investigation in itself. We used two open-data repositories of high-quality demographic information for animals and plants to present a novel overview of the degree of variation in life-history strategies and their component life-history traits, including the speed of senescence...

  18. Senescence gives insights into the morphogenetic evolution of anamniotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Villiard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Senescence represents a mechanism to avoid undesired cell proliferation that plays a role in tumor suppression, wound healing and embryonic development. In order to gain insight on the evolution of senescence, we looked at its presence in developing axolotls (urodele amphibians and in zebrafish (teleost fish, which are both anamniotes. Our data indicate that cellular senescence is present in various developing structures in axolotls (pronephros, olfactory epithelium of nerve fascicles, lateral organs, gums and in zebrafish (epithelium of the yolk sac and in the lower part of the gut. Senescence was particularly associated with transient structures (pronephros in axolotls and yolk sac in zebrafish suggesting that it may play a role in the elimination of these tissues. Our data supports the notion that cellular senescence evolved early in vertebrate evolution to influence embryonic development.

  19. Evasion of Cell Senescence Leads to Medulloblastoma Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Tamayo-Orrego

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available How brain tumors progress from precancerous lesions to advanced cancers is not well understood. Using Ptch1+/− mice to study medulloblastoma progression, we found that Ptch1 loss of heterozygosity (LOH is an early event that is associated with high levels of cell senescence in preneoplasia. In contrast, advanced tumors have evaded senescence. Remarkably, we discovered that the majority of advanced medulloblastomas display either spontaneous, somatic p53 mutations or Cdkn2a locus inactivation. Consistent with senescence evasion, these p53 mutations are always subsequent to Ptch1 LOH. Introduction of a p53 mutation prevents senescence, accelerates tumor formation, and increases medulloblastoma incidence. Altogether, our results show that evasion of senescence associated with Ptch1 LOH allows progression to advanced tumors.

  20. Provider perceptions of stigma and discrimination experienced by adolescents and young adults with pHiV while accessing sexual and reproductive health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Cynthia D; Berk, Meredith

    2018-02-01

    Historically, children with perinatally-acquired HIV (PHIV) were viewed as the "innocent victims" as their HIV infection was not acquired through sexual/drug related means. Today, adolescents with PHIV are surviving into young adulthood and are engaging in developmentally expected behaviors such as establishing intimate, sexual relationships. Like other youth, those living with PHIV often need to access sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services. Previous research has documented stigma and discrimination experienced by adult women living with HIV as they try to access SRH care. However, little is known about the experiences of stigma and discrimination encountered by the maturing adolescents and young adults (AYA) with PHIV when accessing services. HIV health care providers (HHCPs) who frequently care for this population are in a unique position to learn about and understand the stigma and discrimination experienced by their patients in formal service settings. HHCPs (n = 57, 28 medical and 29 social service providers) were recruited using snowball sampling, and completed an online survey based on patient-shared experiences of stigma and discrimination when accessing SRH-related health care and social services. Thirty-eight percent (22/57) of providers reported that their patients with PHIV had shared encounters of stigma or discrimination when accessing SRH services. Coded open-ended provider comments indicated that AYA patients experienced challenges with providers who were unfamiliar with PHIV and expressed surprise that someone with PHIV was still alive. Analyses also revealed prejudicial attitudes towards women with HIV. Patients reported being counseled to terminate their pregnancy and lectured about their "poor choices." As AYA with PHIV transition out of pediatric and adolescent care, it is important for providers to simultaneously help them navigate care in other health settings, as well as educate adult health care providers about possible

  1. A review of human male field studies of hormones and behavioral reproductive effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter B; McHale, Timothy S; Carré, Justin M

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review field studies of human male hormones and reproductive behavior. We first discuss life history theory and related conceptual considerations. As illustrations, distinctive features of human male life histories such as coalitional aggression, long-term partnering and paternal care are noted, along with their relevance to overall reproductive effort and developmental plasticity. We address broad questions about what constitutes a human male field study of hormones and behavior, including the kinds of hormone and behavioral measures employed in existing studies. Turning to several sections of empirical review, we present and discuss evidence for links between prenatal and juvenile androgens and sexual attraction and aggression. This includes the proposal that adrenal androgens-DHEA and androstenedione-may play functional roles during juvenility as part of a life-stage specific system. We next review studies of adult male testosterone responses to competition, with these studies emphasizing men's involvement in individual and team sports. These studies show that men's testosterone responses differ with respect to variables such as playing home/away, winning/losing, and motivation. Field studies of human male hormones and sexual behavior also focus on testosterone, showing some evidence of patterned changes in men's testosterone to sexual activity. Moreover, life stage-specific changes in male androgens may structure age-related differences in sexual behavior, including decreases in sexual behavior with senescence. We overview the considerable body of research on male testosterone, partnerships and paternal care, noting the variation in social context and refinements in research design. A few field studies provide insight into relationships between partnering and paternal behavior and prolactin, oxytocin, and vasopressin. In the third section of the review, we discuss patterns, limitations and directions for future research. This

  2. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Marissa J; White, Thomas A; Evans, Glenda; Tonne, Jason M; Verzosa, Grace C; Stout, Michael B; Mazula, Daniel L; Palmer, Allyson K; Baker, Darren J; Jensen, Michael D; Torbenson, Michael S; Miller, Jordan D; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tchkonia, Tamara; van Deursen, Jan M; Kirkland, James L; LeBrasseur, Nathan K

    2016-06-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise prevents premature senescent cell accumulation and systemic metabolic dysfunction induced by a fast-food diet (FFD). Using transgenic mice that express EGFP in response to activation of the senescence-associated p16(INK4a) promoter, we demonstrate that FFD consumption causes deleterious changes in body weight and composition as well as in measures of physical, cardiac, and metabolic health. The harmful effects of the FFD were associated with dramatic increases in several markers of senescence, including p16, EGFP, senescence-associated β-galactosidase, and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) specifically in visceral adipose tissue. We show that exercise prevents the accumulation of senescent cells and the expression of the SASP while nullifying the damaging effects of the FFD on parameters of health. We also demonstrate that exercise initiated after long-term FFD feeding reduces senescent phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue while attenuating physical impairments, suggesting that exercise may provide restorative benefit by mitigating accrued senescent burden. These findings highlight a novel mechanism by which exercise mediates its beneficial effects and reinforces the effect of modifiable lifestyle choices on health span. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. An evaluation of the effectiveness of targeted social marketing to promote adolescent and young adult reproductive health in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rossem, R; Meekers, D

    2000-10-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of the PSI/PMSC Horizon Jeunes youth-targeted social marketing program for improving adolescent reproductive health in urban Cameroon. The program targeted adolescents through peer education, youth clubs, mass media promotion, and behavior change communications. After about 13 months of intervention, knowledge of the program was nearly universal, and the majority of youths had direct contact with the program. Program effectiveness is examined using a quasi-experimental research design with a preintervention and postintervention survey in an intervention and comparison site. The intervention had a significant effect on several determinants of preventive behavior, including awareness of sexual risks, knowledge of birth control methods, and discussion of sexuality and contraceptives. The intervention increased the proportion of female youths who reported using oral contraceptives and condoms for birth control. However, condom use is not yet consistent. Although the proportion of young men who reported using condoms for birth control also increased, this change could not be attributed to the intervention. Although this short intervention successfully increased the reported use of various birth control methods, including condoms, there is no evidence that the intervention increased use of condoms for STD prevention of sexually transmitted diseases.

  4. Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Hai-Chun; Anderson, Lisa; Sturre, Marcel J. G.; Hille, Jacques; Dijkwel, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence Hai-Chun Jing1,2, Lisa Anderson3, Marcel J.G. Sturre1, Jacques Hille1 and Paul P. Dijkwel1,* 1Molecular Biology of Plants, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and

  5. Senescent mouse cells fail to overtly regulate the HIRA histone chaperone and do not form robust Senescence Associated Heterochromatin Foci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enders Greg H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence is a permanent growth arrest that occurs in response to cellular stressors, such as telomere shortening or activation of oncogenes. Although the process of senescence growth arrest is somewhat conserved between mouse and human cells, there are some critical differences in the molecular pathways of senescence between these two species. Recent studies in human fibroblasts have defined a cell signaling pathway that is initiated by repression of a specific Wnt ligand, Wnt2. This, in turn, activates a histone chaperone HIRA, and culminates in formation of specialized punctate domains of facultative heterochromatin, called Senescence-Associated Heterochromatin Foci (SAHF, that are enriched in the histone variant, macroH2A. SAHF are thought to repress expression of proliferation-promoting genes, thereby contributing to senescence-associated proliferation arrest. We asked whether this Wnt2-HIRA-SAHF pathway is conserved in mouse fibroblasts. Results We show that mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and mouse skin fibroblasts, do not form robust punctate SAHF in response to an activated Ras oncogene or shortened telomeres. However, senescent MEFs do exhibit elevated levels of macroH2A staining throughout the nucleus as a whole. Consistent with their failure to fully activate the SAHF assembly pathway, the Wnt2-HIRA signaling axis is not overtly regulated between proliferating and senescent mouse cells. Conclusions In addition to the previously defined differences between mouse and human cells in the mechanisms and phenotypes associated with senescence, we conclude that senescent mouse and human fibroblasts also differ at the level of chromatin and the signaling pathways used to regulate chromatin. These differences between human and mouse senescence may contribute to the increased propensity of mouse fibroblasts (and perhaps other mouse cell types to become immortalized and transformed, compared to human cells.

  6. Different transcriptional profiling between senescent and non-senescent human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) by Omeprazole and Lansoprazole treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costarelli, Laura; Giacconi, Robertina; Malavolta, Marco; Basso, Andrea; Piacenza, Francesco; Provinciali, Mauro; Maggio, Marcello G; Corsonello, Andrea; Lattanzio, Fabrizia

    2017-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that high dose and/or long term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in older patients, but mechanisms underlying these detrimental effects are not known. Taking into account that the senescent endothelial cells have been implicated in the genesis or promotion of age-related cardiovascular disease, we hypothesized an active role of PPIs in senescent cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the changes in gene expression occurring in senescent and non-senescent human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) following Omeprazole (OPZ) or Lansoprazole (LPZ) treatment. Here, we show that atherogenic response is among the most regulated processes in PPI-treated HCAECs. PPIs induced down-regulation of anti-atherogenic chemokines (CXCL11, CXCL12 and CX3CL1) in senescent but not in non-senescent cells, while the same chemokines were up-regulated in untreated senescent cells. These findings support the hypothesis that up-regulated anti-atherogenic chemokines may represent a defensive mechanism against atherosclerosis during cellular senescence, and suggest that PPIs could activate pro-atherogenic pathways by changing the secretory phenotype of senescent HCAECs. Moreover, the genes coding for fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) and piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2 (PIEZO2) were modulated by PPIs treatment with respect to untreated cells. In conclusions, our results show that long-term and high dose use of PPI could change the secretory phenotype of senescent cells, suggesting one of the potential mechanisms by which use of PPI can increase adverse outcomes in older subjects.

  7. The Contribution of Cytomegalovirus Infection to Immune Senescence Is Set by the Infectious Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Redeker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections and accelerated immune senescence is controversial. Whereas some studies reported a CMV-associated impaired capacity to control heterologous infections at old age, other studies could not confirm this. We hypothesized that these discrepancies might relate to the variability in the infectious dose of CMV occurring in real life. Here, we investigated the influence of persistent CMV infection on immune perturbations and specifically addressed the role of the infectious dose on the contribution of CMV to accelerated immune senescence. We show in experimental mouse models that the degree of mouse CMV (MCMV-specific memory CD8+ T cell accumulation and the phenotypic T cell profile are directly influenced by the infectious dose, and data on HCMV-specific T cells indicate a similar connection. Detailed cluster analysis of the memory CD8+ T cell development showed that high-dose infection causes a differentiation pathway that progresses faster throughout the life span of the host, suggesting a virus–host balance that is influenced by aging and infectious dose. Importantly, short-term MCMV infection in adult mice is not disadvantageous for heterologous superinfection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. However, following long-term CMV infection the strength of the CD8+ T cell immunity to LCMV superinfection was affected by the initial CMV infectious dose, wherein a high infectious dose was found to be a prerequisite for impaired heterologous immunity. Altogether our results underscore the importance of stratification based on the size and differentiation of the CMV-specific memory T cell pools for the impact on immune senescence, and indicate that reduction of the latent/lytic viral load can be beneficial to diminish CMV-associated immune senescence.

  8. Senescent phenotypes of skin fibroblasts from patients with Tangier disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Fumihiko; Hirano, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Chiaki; Sandoval, Jose C.; Oku, Hiroyuki; Yuasa-Kawase, Miyako; Tsubakio-Yamamoto, Kazumi; Koseki, Masahiro; Masuda, Daisaku; Tsujii, Ken-ichi; Ishigami, Masato; Nishida, Makoto; Shimomura, Iichiro; Hori, Masatsugu; Yamashita, Shizuya

    2007-01-01

    Tangier disease (TD) is characterized by a deficiency of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in plasma and patients with TD have an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Recently, we reported that fibroblasts from TD exhibited large and flattened morphology, which is often observed in senescent cells. On the other hand, data have accumulated to show the relationship between cellular senescence and development of atherosclerotic CAD. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether TD fibroblasts exhibited cellular senescence. The proliferation of TD fibroblasts was gradually decreased at population doubling level (PDL) ∼10 compared with control cells. TD cells practically ceased proliferation at PDL ∼30. DNA synthesis was markedly decreased in TD fibroblasts. TD cells exhibited a higher positive rate for senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), which is one of the biomarkers of cellular senescence in vitro. These data showed that TD cells reached cellular senescence at an earlier PDL compared with controls. Although, there was no difference in the telomere length of fibroblasts between TD and controls at the earlier passage (PDL 6), the telomere length of TD cells was shorter than that of controls at the late passage (PDL 25). Taken together, the current study demonstrates that the late-passaged TD fibroblasts showed senescent phenotype in vitro, which might be related to the increased cardiovascular manifestations in TD patients

  9. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E Tourlakis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15(Ink4b and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis

  10. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourlakis, Marina E.; Zhang, Siyi; Ball, Heather L.; Gandhi, Rikesh; Liu, Hongrui; Zhong, Jian; Yuan, Julie S.; Guidos, Cynthia J.; Durie, Peter R.; Rommens, Johanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15Ink4b and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis, were determined to

  11. Contrasting patterns of cytokinins between years in senescing aspen leaves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Edlund, E.; Novák, Ondřej; Karady, M.; Ljung, K.; Jansson, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2017), s. 622-634 ISSN 0140-7791 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-34792S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : leaf senescence * arabidopsis-thaliana * autumn senescence * gene-expression * populus-trichocarpa * mass-spectrometry * tobacco plants * translocation * biosynthesis * identification * autumn senescence * gene expression * metabolism * Populus tremula * profiling Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 6.173, year: 2016

  12. Impact of Subolesin and Cystatin Knockdown by RNA Interference in Adult Female Haemaphysalis longicornis (Acari: Ixodidae on Blood Engorgement and Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Khalesur Rahman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, multi-antigenic vaccine use is the method of choice for the strategic control of ticks. Therefore, determining the efficacy of combined antigens is a promising avenue of research in the development of anti-tick vaccines. The antigen responsible for blood intake and reproduction has proven suitable as a vaccine antigen. It has been shown to silence Haemaphysalis longicornis salivary cystatin (HlSC-1 and subolesin by RNA interference. Adult unfed female ticks were injected with double-stranded RNA of (A subolesin, (B cystatin, (C subolesin plus cystatin, and (D injection buffer, then fed alongside normal unfed males up to spontaneous drop-down. The percentage of knockdowns was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Sixty-three percent and 53% knockdown rates were observed in subolesin and cystatin double-stranded RNA-injected ticks respectively, while 32 and 26% knockdown rates of subolesin and cystatin transcript were observed in subolesin plus cystatin double-stranded RNA-injected ticks. Subolesin and/or cystatin knockdown causes a significant (p < 0.05 reduction in tick engorgement, egg mass weight, and egg conversion ratio. Most importantly, combined silencing did not act synergistically, but caused a similarly significant (p < 0.05 reduction in tick engorgement, egg mass weight, and egg conversion ratio. Therefore, the elucidation of multiple antigens may be helpful in the future of vaccines.

  13. The commitment of human cells to senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, it was demonstrated by Leonard Hayflick that human diploid fibroblasts grown in culture have a finite lifespan. Since that time, innumerable experiments have been published to discover the mechanism(s) that are responsible for this 'Hayflick limit' to continuous growth. Much new information has been gained, but there are certain features of this experimental system which have not been fully understood. One is the fact that different populations of the foetal lung strains WI-38 and MRC-5 have a range in division potential of at least a millionfold. The commitment theory of cellular aging, published more than 30 years ago, is able to explain this, but it has been consistently ignored. The theory predicts that bottlenecks, which are transient reductions in population size, can significantly reduce lifespan, or increase variability of lifespans. Computer simulations specify the effects of bottlenecks on longevity, and these were confirmed in two series of experiments. Commitment to senescence may be the loss of telomerase, which leads to the erosion of telomeres and the inability to grow indefinitely. Many experiments have been done with skin fibroblasts from human donors of different age, and it was originally thought that in vitro lifespan was inversely correlated with donor age. In these experiments, a single skin biopsy produces a population of cells that are grown to senescence. However, there is no reason to believe that skin fibroblasts are less variable in their in vitro lifespan than foetal lung strains, in which case the data points with skin cells are so variable that they may completely obscure any inverse correlation between culture lifespans and donor age.

  14. Rescuing loading induced bone formation at senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar Srinivasan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of osteoporosis worldwide requires anabolic treatments that are safe, effective, and, critically, inexpensive given the prevailing overburdened health care systems. While vigorous skeletal loading is anabolic and holds promise, deficits in mechanotransduction accrued with age markedly diminish the efficacy of readily complied, exercise-based strategies to combat osteoporosis in the elderly. Our approach to explore and counteract these age-related deficits was guided by cellular signaling patterns across hierarchical scales and by the insight that cell responses initiated during transient, rare events hold potential to exert high-fidelity control over temporally and spatially distant tissue adaptation. Here, we present an agent-based model of real-time Ca(2+/NFAT signaling amongst bone cells that fully described periosteal bone formation induced by a wide variety of loading stimuli in young and aged animals. The model predicted age-related pathway alterations underlying the diminished bone formation at senescence, and hence identified critical deficits that were promising targets for therapy. Based upon model predictions, we implemented an in vivo intervention and show for the first time that supplementing mechanical stimuli with low-dose Cyclosporin A can completely rescue loading induced bone formation in the senescent skeleton. These pre-clinical data provide the rationale to consider this approved pharmaceutical alongside mild physical exercise as an inexpensive, yet potent therapy to augment bone mass in the elderly. Our analyses suggested that real-time cellular signaling strongly influences downstream bone adaptation to mechanical stimuli, and quantification of these otherwise inaccessible, transient events in silico yielded a novel intervention with clinical potential.

  15. Fish reproduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rocha, Maria João; Arukwe, Augustine; Kapoor, B. G

    2008-01-01

    ... of reproductive systems is essential for such studies. Fishes comprise over 28,000 species, with a remarkable variability in morphology, physiology and environmental adaptation. Knowledge on fish reproduction is scattered across numerous sources that shows a dynamic research field. The Editors believe it to be an opportune moment for a...

  16. Bone mineral content in the senescent rat femur: an assessment using single photon absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiebzak, G.M.; Smith, R.; Howe, J.C.; Sacktor, B.

    1988-01-01

    The single photon absorptiometry technique was evaluated for measuring bone mineral content (BMC) of the excised femurs of the rat, and the system was used to examine the changes in cortical and trabecular bone from young adult (6 mo), mature adult (12 mo), and senescent (24 mo) male and female animals. BMC of the femur midshaft, representing cortical bone, apparently increased progressively with advancing age. The width of the femur at the scan site also increased with age. Normalizing the midshaft BMC by width partially compensated for the age-associated increase. However, when bone mineral values were normalized by the cortical area at the scan site, to take into account the geometric differences in the femurs of different aged animals, maximum bone densities were found in the mature adult and these values decreased slightly in the femurs from senescent rats. In contrast, the BMC of the femur distal metaphysis, representing trabecular bone, decreased markedly in the aged rat. The loss of trabecular bone was also evident from morphological examination of the distal metaphysis. These findings indicated that bone mineral loss with age was site specific in the rat femur. These studies provided additional evidence that the rat might serve as a useful animal model for specific experiments related to the pathogenesis of age-associated osteopenia

  17. Transcriptional profile of genes involved in ascorbate glutathione cycle in senescing leaves for an early senescence leaf (esl) rice mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaowei; Su, Da; Lei, Bingting; Wang, Fubiao; Geng, Wei; Pan, Gang; Cheng, Fangmin

    2015-03-15

    To clarify the complex relationship between ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle and H2O2-induced leaf senescence, the genotype-dependent difference in some senescence-related physiological parameters and the transcript levels and the temporal patterns of genes involved in the AsA-GSH cycle during leaf senescence were investigated using two rice genotypes, namely, the early senescence leaf (esl) mutant and its wild type. Meanwhile, the triggering effect of exogenous H2O2 on the expression of OsAPX genes was examined using detached leaves. The results showed that the esl mutant had higher H2O2 level than its wild type at the initial stage of leaf senescence. At transcriptional level, the association of expression of various genes involved in the AsA-GSH cycle with leaf senescence was isoform dependent. For OsAPXs, the transcripts of two cytosolic OsAPX genes (OsAPX1 and OsAPX2), thylakoid-bound OsAPX8, chloroplastic OsAPX7 and peroxisomal OsAPX4 exhibited remarkable genotype-dependent variation in their expression levels and temporal patterns during leaf senescence, there were significantly increasing transcripts of OsAXP1 and OsAPX7, severely repressed transcripts of OsAPX4 and OsAPX8 for the esl rice at the initial leaf senescence. In contrast, the repressing transcript of OsAPX8 was highly sensitive to the increasing H2O2 level in the senescing rice leaves, while higher H2O2 concentration resulted in the enhancing transcripts of two cytosolic OsAPX genes, OsAPX7 transcript was greatly variable with different H2O2 concentrations and incubating duration, suggesting that the different OsAPXs isoforms played a complementary role in perceiving and scavenging H2O2 accumulation at various H2O2 concentrations during leaf senescence. Higher H2O2 level, increased AsA level, higher activities of APX and glutathione reductase (GR), and relatively stable GSH content during the entire sampling period in the leaves of esl mutant implied that a close interrelationship existed

  18. Telomeres and replicative senescence: Is it only length that counts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Zglinicki, T

    2001-07-26

    Telomeres are well established as a major 'replicometer', counting the population doublings in primary human cell cultures and ultimately triggering replicative senescence. However, neither is the pace of this biological clock inert, nor is there a fixed threshold telomere length acting as the universal trigger of replicative senescence. The available data suggest that opening of the telomeric loop and unscheduled exposure of the single-stranded G-rich telomeric overhang might act like a semaphore to signal senescent cell cycle arrest. Short telomere length, telomeric single-strand breaks, low levels of loop-stabilizing proteins, or other factors may trigger this opening of the loop. Thus, both telomere shortening and the ultimate signalling into senescence are able to integrate different environmental and genetic factors, especially oxidative stress-mediated damage, which might otherwise become a thread to genomic stability.

  19. Interaction Mortality: Senescence May Have Evolved because It Increases Lifespan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wensink, M. J.; Wrycza, T. F.; Baudisch, A.

    2014-01-01

    Given an extrinsic challenge, an organism may die or not depending on how the threat interacts with the organism's physiological state. To date, such interaction mortality has been only a minor factor in theoretical modeling of senescence. We describe a model of interaction mortality that does...... not involve specific functions, making only modest assumptions. Our model distinguishes explicitly between the physiological state of an organism and potential extrinsic, age-independent threats. The resulting mortality may change with age, depending on whether the organism's state changes with age. We find...... that depending on the physiological constraints, any outcome, be it 'no senescence' or 'high rate of senescence', can be found in any environment; that the highest optimal rate of senescence emerges for an intermediate physiological constraint, i.e. intermediate strength of trade-off; and that the optimal rate...

  20. Assessing senescence patterns in populations of large mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaillard, J.-M.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical models such as those of Gompertz and Weibull are commonly used to study senescence in survival for humans and laboratory or captive animals. For wild populations of vertebrates, senescence in survival has more commonly been assessed by fitting simple linear or quadratic relationships between survival and age. By using appropriate constraints on survival parameters in Capture-Mark-Recapture (CMR models, we propose a first analysis of the suitability of the Gompertz and the two-parameter Weibull models for describing aging-related mortality in free-ranging populations of ungulates. We first show how to handle the Gompertz and the two-parameter Weibull models in the context of CMR analyses. Then we perform a comparative analysis of senescence patterns in both sexes of two ungulate species highly contrasted according to the intensity of sexual selection. Our analyses provide support to the Gompertz model for describing senescence patterns in ungulates. Evolutionary implications of our results are discussed

  1. Role of P53 in Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dimri, Goberdhan P

    2006-01-01

    .... We also chose several other targets of p53 that are induced by DNA damage. The RT PCR analysis aws carried out using mRNA prepared from young growing early passage and senescent late passage HMECs...

  2. Senescent vs. non-senescent cells in the human annulus in vivo: Cell harvest with laser capture microdissection and gene expression studies with microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingram Jane A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senescent cells are well-recognized in the aging/degenerating human disc. Senescent cells are viable, cannot divide, remain metabolically active and accumulate within the disc over time. Molecular analysis of senescent cells in tissue offers a special challenge since there are no cell surface markers for senescence which would let one use fluorescence-activated cell sorting as a method for separating out senescent cells. Methods We employed a novel laser capture microdissection (LCM design to selectively harvest senescent and non-senescent annulus cells in paraffin-embedded tissue, and compared their gene expression with microarray analysis. LCM was used to separately harvest senescent and non-senescent cells from 11 human annulus specimens. Results Microarray analysis revealed significant differences in expression levels in senescent cells vs non-senescent cells: 292 genes were upregulated, and 321 downregulated. Genes with established relationships to senescence were found to be significantly upregulated in senescent cells vs. non-senescent cells: p38 (MPAK14, RB-Associated KRAB zinc finger, Discoidin, CUB and LCCL domain, growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible beta, p28ING5, sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 and somatostatin receptor 3; cyclin-dependent kinase 8 showed significant downregulation in senescent cells. Nitric oxidase synthase 1, and heat shock 70 kDa protein 6, both of which were significantly down-regulated in senescent cells, also showed significant changes. Additional genes related to cytokines, cell proliferation, and other processes were also identified. Conclusions Our LCM-microarray analyses identified a set of genes associated with senescence which were significantly upregulated in senescent vs non-senescent cells in the human annulus. These genes include p38 MAP kinase, discoidin, inhibitor of growth family member 5, and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible beta. Other genes, including genes

  3. GDP-D-mannose epimerase regulates male gametophyte development, plant growth and leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Tiancong; Liu, Zhipeng; Fan, Meng; Chen, Yan; Tian, Haixia; Wu, Dewei; Gao, Hua; Ren, Chunmei; Song, Susheng; Xie, Daoxin

    2017-09-04

    Plant GDP-D-mannose epimerase (GME) converts GDP-D-mannose to GDP-L-galactose, a precursor of both L-ascorbate (vitamin C) and cell wall polysaccharides. However, the genetic functions of GME in Arabidopsis are unclear. In this study, we found that mutations in Arabidopsis GME affect pollen germination, pollen tube elongation, and transmission and development of the male gametophyte through analysis of the heterozygous GME/gme plants and the homozygous gme plants. Arabidopsis gme mutants also exhibit severe growth defects and early leaf senescence. Surprisingly, the defects in male gametophyte in the gme plants are not restored by L-ascorbate, boric acid or GDP-L-galactose, though boric acid rescues the growth defects of the mutants, indicating that GME may regulate male gametophyte development independent of L-ascorbate and GDP-L-galactose. These results reveal key roles for Arabidopsis GME in reproductive development, vegetative growth and leaf senescence, and suggest that GME regulates plant growth and controls male gametophyte development in different manners.

  4. Calculating the Rate of Senescence From Mortality Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Rozing, Maarten P; Kramer, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    , they do not fit mortality rates at young and old ages. Therefore, we developed a method to calculate senescence rates from the acceleration of mortality directly without modeling the mortality rates. We applied the different methods to age group-specific mortality data from the European Renal Association......, the rate of senescence can be calculated directly from non-modeled mortality rates, overcoming the disadvantages of an indirect estimation based on modeled mortality rates....

  5. Accumulation of senescent cells in mitotic tissue of aging primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyapalan, Jessie C; Ferreira, Mark; Sedivy, John M; Herbig, Utz

    2007-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stress induced growth arrest of somatic cells, was first documented in cell cultures over 40 years ago, however its physiological significance has only recently been demonstrated. Using novel biomarkers of cellular senescence we examined whether senescent cells accumulate in tissues from baboons of ages encompassing the entire lifespan of this species. We show that dermal fibroblasts, displaying markers of senescence such as telomere damage, active checkpoint kinase ATM, high levels of heterochromatin proteins and elevated levels of p16, accumulate in skin biopsies from baboons with advancing age. The number of dermal fibroblasts containing damaged telomeres reaches a value of over 15% of total fibroblasts, whereas 80% of cells contain high levels of the heterochromatin protein HIRA. In skeletal muscle, a postmitotic tissue, only a small percentage of myonuclei containing damaged telomeres were detected regardless of animal age. The presence of senescent cells in mitotic tissues might therefore be a contributing factor to aging and age related pathology and provides further evidence that cellular senescence is a physiological event.

  6. Cancer in children and young adults born after assisted reproductive technology: a Nordic cohort study from the Committee of Nordic ART and Safety (CoNARTaS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundh, Karin Jerhamre; Henningsen, Anna-Karina A; Källen, Karin; Bergh, Christina; Romundstad, Liv Bente; Gissler, Mika; Pinborg, Anja; Skjaerven, Rolv; Tiitinen, Aila; Vassard, Ditte; Lannering, Birgitta; Wennerholm, Ulla-Britt

    2014-09-01

    Do children and young adults born after assisted reproductive technology (ART) have an increased risk of cancer? Children born after ART showed no overall increase in the rate of cancer when compared with children born as a result of spontaneous conception. Children born after ART have more adverse perinatal outcomes, i.e. preterm births, low birthweights and birth defects. Previous studies have shown divergent results regarding the risk of cancer among children born after ART. A retrospective Nordic population-based cohort study was performed, comprising all children born after ART in Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Norway between 1982 and 2007. The mean (±standard deviation) follow-up time was 9.5 (4.8) years. Children born after ART (n = 91 796) were compared with a control group of children born after spontaneous conception. This control group was almost 4-fold the size of the ART group (n = 358 419) and matched for parity, year of birth and country. Data on perinatal outcomes and cancer were obtained from the National Medical Birth Registries, the Cancer Registries, the Patient Registries and the Cause of Death Registries. The cancer diagnoses were divided into 12 main groups. Hazard ratios (HRs) and adjusted HR were calculated. Adjustments were carried out for country, maternal age, parity, sex, gestational age and birth defects. There was no significant increase in overall cancer rates among children born after ART when compared with children born after spontaneous conception (adjusted HR 1.08; 95% CI 0.91-1.27). Cancer, of any form, was found among 181 children born after ART (2.0/1000 children, 21.0/100 000 person-years) compared with 638 children born after spontaneous conception (1.8/1000 children, 18.8/100 000 person-years). Leukaemia was the most common type of cancer (n = 278, 0.62/1000 children) but no significantly increased incidence was found among children born after ART. An increased risk was observed for 2 of 12 cancer groups. They were central

  7. Stress-Induced Premature Senescence or Stress-Induced Senescence-Like Phenotype: One In Vivo Reality, Two Possible Definitions?

    OpenAIRE

    Toussaint, Olivier; Dumont, Patrick; Remacle, Jose; Dierick, Jean-Francois; Pascal, Thierry; Frippiat, Christophe; Magalhaes, Joao Pedro; Zdanov, Stephanie; Chainiaux, Florence

    2002-01-01

    No consensus exists so far on the definition of cellular senescence. The narrowest definition of senescence is irreversible growth arrest triggered by telomere shortening counting cell generations (definition 1). Other authors gave an enlarged functional definition encompassing any kind of irreversible arrest of proliferative cell types induced by damaging agents or cell cycle deregulations after overexpression of proto-oncogenes (definition 2). As stress increases, the proportion of cells in...

  8. Barriers and facilitators to sexual and reproductive health communication between pediatric oncology clinicians and adolescent and young adult patients: The clinician perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Natasha N; Campbell, Kevin; Kenney, Lisa B; Moss, Kerry; Speckhart, Ashley; Bober, Sharon L

    2018-04-26

    Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) is identified by adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer as an important but often neglected aspect of their comprehensive cancer care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes and perceptions of pediatric oncology clinicians towards discussing SRH with AYAs, and to understand perceived barriers to effective communication in current practice. Pediatric oncology clinicians (physicians, certified nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews investigating attitudes about SRH communication with AYAs and barriers to such conversations. Twenty-two clinicians participated from seven institutions in the Northeastern United States. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded using a thematic analysis approach. Interviews with pediatric oncology clinicians revealed the following five primary themes: the role for pediatric oncology clinicians to discuss SRH, the focus of current SRH conversations on fertility, the meaning of "sexual health" as safe sex and contraception only, clinician-reported barriers to SRH conversations, and the need for education and support. Communication barriers included lack of knowledge/experience, lack of resources/referrals, low priority, parents/family, patient discomfort, clinician discomfort, time, and lack of rapport. Clinicians identified resource and support needs, including formal education and SRH education materials for patients and families. Although the study participants identified a role for pediatric oncology clinicians in SRH care for AYA patients with cancer, multiple barriers interfere with such discussions taking place on a regular basis. Future efforts must focus on resource development and provider education and training in SRH to optimize the care provided to this unique patient population. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Human myotubes from myoblast cultures undergoing senescence exhibit defects in glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan O; Just, Marlene; Rustan, Arild C

    2011-01-01

    Adult stem cells are known to have a finite replication potential. Muscle biopsy-derived human satellite cells (SCs) were grown at different passages and differentiated to human myotubes in culture to analyze the functional state of various carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways. As the prolif......Adult stem cells are known to have a finite replication potential. Muscle biopsy-derived human satellite cells (SCs) were grown at different passages and differentiated to human myotubes in culture to analyze the functional state of various carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways...... number and could be explained by reduced incorporation into diacyl- and triacylglycerols. The levels of long-chain acyl-CoA esters decreased with increased passage number. Late-passage, non-proliferating, myoblast cultures showed strong senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity indicating...... that the observed metabolic defects accompany the induction of a senescent state. The main function of SCs is regeneration and skeletal muscle-build up. Thus, the metabolic defects observed during aging of SC-derived myotubes could have a role in sarcopenia, the gradual age-related loss of muscle mass and strength....

  10. PTTG1 attenuates drug-induced cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Tong

    Full Text Available As PTTG1 (pituitary tumor transforming gene abundance correlates with adverse outcomes in cancer treatment, we determined mechanisms underlying this observation by assessing the role of PTTG1 in regulating cell response to anti-neoplastic drugs. HCT116 cells devoid of PTTG1 (PTTG1(-/- exhibited enhanced drug sensitivity as assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation in vitro. Apoptosis, mitosis catastrophe or DNA damage were not detected, but features of senescence were observed using low doses of doxorubicin and TSA. The number of drug-induced PTTG1(-/- senescent cells increased ∼4 fold as compared to WT PTTG1-replete cells (p<0.001. p21, an important regulator of cell senescence, was induced ∼3 fold in HCT116 PTTG1(-/- cells upon doxorubicin or Trichostatin A treatment. Binding of Sp1, p53 and p300 to the p21 promoter was enhanced in PTTG1(-/- cells after treatment, suggesting transcriptional regulation of p21. p21 knock down abrogated the observed senescent effects of these drugs, indicating that PTTG1 likely suppresses p21 to regulate drug-induced senescence. PTTG1 also regulated SW620 colon cancer cells response to doxorubicin and TSA mediated by p21. Subcutaneously xenografted PTTG1(-/- HCT116 cells developed smaller tumors and exhibited enhanced responses to doxorubicin. PTTG1(-/- tumor tissue derived from excised tumors exhibited increased doxorubicin-induced senescence. As senescence is a determinant of cell responses to anti-neoplastic treatments, these findings suggest PTTG1 as a tumor cell marker to predict anti-neoplastic treatment outcomes.

  11. The search for evolutionary developmental origins of aging in zebrafish: a novel intersection of developmental and senescence biology in the zebrafish model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Shuji

    2011-09-01

    Senescence may be considered the antithesis of early development, but yet there may be factors and mechanisms in common between these two phenomena during the process of aging. We investigated whether any relationship exists between the regulatory mechanisms that function in early development and in senescence using the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small freshwater fish and a useful model animal for genetic studies. We conducted experiments to isolate zebrafish mutants expressing an apparent senescence phenotype during embryogenesis (embryonic senescence). Some of the genes we thereby identified had already been associated with cellular senescence and chronological aging in other organisms, but many had not yet been linked to these processes. Complete loss-of-function of developmentally essential genes induce embryonic (or larval) lethality, whereas it seems like their partial loss-of-function (i.e., decrease-of-function by heterozygote or hypomorphic mutations) still remains sufficient to go through the early developmental process because of its adaptive plasticity or rather heterozygote advantage. However, in some cases, such partial loss-of-function of genes compromise normal homeostasis due to haploinsufficiency later in adult life having many environmental stress challenges. By contrast, any heterozygote-advantageous genes might gain a certain benefit(s) (much more fitness) by such partial loss-of-function later in life. Physiological senescence may evolutionarily arise from both genetic and epigenetic drifts as well as from losing adaptive developmental plasticity in face of stress signals from the external environment that interacts with functions of multiple genes rather than effects of only a single gene mutation or defect. Previously uncharacterized developmental genes may thus mediate the aging process and play a pivotal role in senescence. Moreover, unexpected senescence-related genes might also be involved in the early developmental process and

  12. Inactivation of AKT Induces Cellular Senescence in Uterine Leiomyoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofei; Lu, Zhenxiao; Qiang, Wenan; Vidimar, Vania; Kong, Beihua

    2014-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are a major public health problem. Current medical treatments with GnRH analogs do not provide long-term benefit. Thus, permanent shrinkage or inhibition of fibroid growth via medical means remains a challenge. The AKT pathway is a major growth and survival pathway for fibroids. We propose that AKT inhibition results in a transient regulation of specific mechanisms that ultimately drive cells into cellular senescence or cell death. In this study, we investigated specific mechanisms of AKT inhibition that resulted in senescence. We observed that administration of MK-2206, an allosteric AKT inhibitor, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, up-regulated the microRNA miR-182 and several senescence-associated genes (including p16, p53, p21, and β-galactosidase), and drove leiomyoma cells into stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). Moreover, induction of SIPS was mediated by HMGA2, which colocalized to senescence-associated heterochromatin foci. This study provides a conceivable molecular mechanism of SIPS by AKT inhibition in fibroids. PMID:24476133

  13. Oxidative Stress Induces Senescence in Cultured RPE Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Nona; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S; Perry, George; Tsin, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine whether oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Cultured ARPE19 cells were subjected to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Cells were seeded into 24-well plates with hydrogen peroxide added to cell medium and incubated at 37°C + 5% CO2 for a 90-minute period [at 0, 300, 400 and 800 micromolar (MCM) hydrogen peroxide]. The number of viable ARPE19 cells were recorded using the Trypan Blue Dye Exclusion Method and cell senescence was measured by positive staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) protein. Without hydrogen peroxide treatment, the number of viable ARPE19 cells increased significantly from 50,000 cells/well to 197,000 within 72 hours. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide reduced this level of cell proliferation significantly (to 52,167 cells at 400 MCM; to 49,263 cells at 800 MCM). Meanwhile, cells with a high level of positive senescence-indicator SA-Beta-Gal-positive staining was induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment (from a baseline level of 12% to 80% at 400 MCM and at 800 MCM). Our data suggests that oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide treatment inhibited ARPE19 cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence.

  14. Regulation of replicative senescence by NADP+ -dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, In Sup; Huh, Tae Lin; Lee, Young Sup; Lee, You Mie; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2006-01-01

    The free radical hypothesis of aging postulates that senescence is due to an accumulation of cellular oxidative damage, caused largely by reactive oxygen species that are produced as by-products of normal metabolic processes. Recently, we demonstrated that the control of cytosolic and mitochondrial redox balance and the cellular defense against oxidative damage is one of the primary functions of cytosolic (IDPc) and mitochondrial NADP+ -dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDPm) by supplying NADPH for antioxidant systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that modulation of IDPc or IDPm activity in IMR-90 cells regulates cellular redox status and replicative senescence. When we examined the regulatory role of IDPc and IDPm against the aging process with IMR-90 cells transfected with cDNA for IDPc or IDPm in sense and antisense orientations, a clear inverse relationship was observed between the amount of IDPc or IDPm expressed in target cells and their susceptibility to senescence, which was reflected by changes in replicative potential, cell cycle, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity, expression of p21 and p53, and morphology of cells. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation, oxidative DNA damage, and intracellular peroxide generation were higher and cellular redox status shifted to a prooxidant condition in the cell lines expressing the lower level of IDPc or IDPm. The results suggest that IDPc and IDPm play an important regulatory role in cellular defense against oxidative stress and in the senescence of IMR-90 cells.

  15. Plant senescence and proteolysis: two processes with one destiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Velasco-Arroyo, Blanca; Santamaria, M Estrella; González-Melendi, Pablo; Martinez, Manuel; Diaz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Senescence-associated proteolysis in plants is a complex and controlled process, essential for mobilization of nutrients from old or stressed tissues, mainly leaves, to growing or sink organs. Protein breakdown in senescing leaves involves many plastidial and nuclear proteases, regulators, different subcellular locations and dynamic protein traffic to ensure the complete transformation of proteins of high molecular weight into transportable and useful hydrolysed products. Protease activities are strictly regulated by specific inhibitors and through the activation of zymogens to develop their proteolytic activity at the right place and at the proper time. All these events associated with senescence have deep effects on the relocation of nutrients and as a consequence, on grain quality and crop yield. Thus, it can be considered that nutrient recycling is the common destiny of two processes, plant senescence and, proteolysis. This review article covers the most recent findings about leaf senescence features mediated by abiotic and biotic stresses as well as the participants and steps required in this physiological process, paying special attention to C1A cysteine proteases, their specific inhibitors, known as cystatins, and their potential targets, particularly the chloroplastic proteins as source for nitrogen recycling.

  16. Large increase in nest size linked to climate change: an indicator of life history, senescence and condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Nielsen, Jan Tøttrup

    2015-11-01

    Many animals build extravagant nests that exceed the size required for successful reproduction. Large nests may signal the parenting ability of nest builders suggesting that nests may have a signaling function. In particular, many raptors build very large nests for their body size. We studied nest size in the goshawk Accipiter gentilis, which is a top predator throughout most of the Nearctic. Both males and females build nests, and males provision their females and offspring with food. Nest volume in the goshawk is almost three-fold larger than predicted from their body size. Nest size in the goshawk is highly variable and may reach more than 600 kg for a bird that weighs ca. 1 kg. While 8.5% of nests fell down, smaller nests fell down more often than large nests. There was a hump-shaped relationship between nest volume and female age, with a decline in nest volume late in life, as expected for senescence. Clutch size increased with nest volume. Nest volume increased during 1977-2014 in an accelerating fashion, linked to increasing spring temperature during April, when goshawks build and start reproduction. These findings are consistent with nest size being a reliable signal of parental ability, with large nest size signaling superior parenting ability and senescence, and also indicating climate warming.

  17. Progeny reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashneva, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    Studies on clarification of importance of different harmful factors of radiation and chemical nature on the function of progeny reproduction, growth and development are presented. Intake of radionuclides to organism, of white mices and rats in concentrations corresponding to 10 6 PCsub(s) ( 90 Sr, 210 Po, 210 Pb and other) is shown to result in 100% sterility of females, 10 5 -10 4 PCsub(s) concentrations cause damaging effect of different degrees of expression at later stages of effect. Smaller contents of radionuclides (10 3 -10 2 PCsub(s)) did not result in noticeable changes in reproductivity of animals. Similar regularities were observed under effect of different concentrations of chemical agent. Some peculiarities of animal physiology should be taken into account to obtain data of estimation of damaging effect of harmful factors on reproduction function

  18. Endocrinology of human female sexuality, mating, and reproductive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta-Mena, Natalie V; Puts, David A

    2017-05-01

    Hormones orchestrate and coordinate human female sexual development, sexuality, and reproduction in relation to three types of phenotypic changes: life history transitions such as puberty and childbirth, responses to contextual factors such as caloric intake and stress, and cyclical patterns such as the ovulatory cycle. Here, we review the endocrinology underlying women's reproductive phenotypes, including sexual orientation and gender identity, mate preferences, competition for mates, sex drive, and maternal behavior. We highlight distinctive aspects of women's sexuality such as the possession of sexual ornaments, relatively cryptic fertile windows, extended sexual behavior across the ovulatory cycle, and a period of midlife reproductive senescence-and we focus on how hormonal mechanisms were shaped by selection to produce adaptive outcomes. We conclude with suggestions for future research to elucidate how hormonal mechanisms subserve women's reproductive phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Involvement of beta 3-adrenoceptor in altered beta-adrenergic response in senescent heart: role of nitric oxide synthase 1-derived nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birenbaum, Aurélie; Tesse, Angela; Loyer, Xavier; Michelet, Pierre; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Heymes, Christophe; Riou, Bruno; Amour, Julien

    2008-12-01

    In senescent heart, beta-adrenergic response is altered in parallel with beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptor down-regulation. A negative inotropic effect of beta3-adrenoceptor could be involved. In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that beta3-adrenoceptor plays a role in beta-adrenergic dysfunction in senescent heart. beta-Adrenergic responses were investigated in vivo (echocardiography-dobutamine, electron paramagnetic resonance) and in vitro (isolated left ventricular papillary muscle, electron paramagnetic resonance) in young adult (3-month-old) and senescent (24-month-old) rats. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunolabeling (confocal microscopy), nitric oxide production (electron paramagnetic resonance) and beta-adrenoceptor Western blots were performed in vitro. Data are mean percentages of baseline +/- SD. An impaired positive inotropic effect (isoproterenol) was confirmed in senescent hearts in vivo (117 +/- 23 vs. 162 +/- 16%; P < 0.05) and in vitro (127 +/- 10 vs. 179 +/- 15%; P < 0.05). In the young adult group, the positive inotropic effect was not significantly modified by the nonselective NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME; 183 +/- 19%), the selective NOS1 inhibitor vinyl-L-N-5(1-imino-3-butenyl)-L-ornithine (L-VNIO; 172 +/- 13%), or the selective NOS2 inhibitor 1400W (183 +/- 19%). In the senescent group, in parallel with beta3-adrenoceptor up-regulation and increased nitric oxide production, the positive inotropic effect was partially restored by L-NAME (151 +/- 8%; P < 0.05) and L-VNIO (149 +/- 7%; P < 0.05) but not by 1400W (132 +/- 11%; not significant). The positive inotropic effect induced by dibutyryl-cyclic adenosine monophosphate was decreased in the senescent group with the specific beta3-adrenoceptor agonist BRL 37344 (167 +/- 10 vs. 142 +/- 10%; P < 0.05). NOS1 and NOS2 were significantly up-regulated in the senescent rat. In senescent cardiomyopathy, beta3-adrenoceptor overexpression plays an important role in the

  20. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  1. The Pace and Shape of Senescence in Angiosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudisch, Annette; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen

    2013-01-01

    1. Demographic senescence, the decay in fertility and increase in the risk of mortality with age, is one of the most striking phenomena in ecology and evolution. Comparative studies of senescence patterns of plants are scarce, and consequently, little is known about senescence and its determinants...... (‘senescence’), decreases (‘negative senescence’) or remains constant over age (‘negligible senescence’). 3. We extract mortality trajectories from ComPADRe III, a data base that contains demographic information for several hundred plant species. We apply age-from-stage matrix decomposition methods to obtain...... age-specific trajectories from 290 angiosperm species of various growth forms distributed globally. From these trajectories, we survey pace and shape values and investigate how growth form and ecoregion influence these two aspects of mortality using a Bayesian regression analysis that accounts...

  2. The emerging role of alternative splicing in senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschênes, Mathieu; Chabot, Benoit

    2017-10-01

    Deregulation of precursor mRNA splicing is associated with many illnesses and has been linked to age-related chronic diseases. Here we review recent progress documenting how defects in the machinery that performs intron removal and controls splice site selection contribute to cellular senescence and organismal aging. We discuss the functional association linking p53, IGF-1, SIRT1, and ING-1 splice variants with senescence and aging, and review a selection of splicing defects occurring in accelerated aging (progeria), vascular aging, and Alzheimer's disease. Overall, it is becoming increasingly clear that changes in the activity of splicing factors and in the production of key splice variants can impact cellular senescence and the aging phenotype. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The nuclear receptor NR2E1/TLX controls senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusche, Benjamin; Pemberton, Helen; Alonso, Marta M.; Chandler, Hollie; Brookes, Sharon; Parrinello, Simona; Peters, Gordon; Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor NR2E1 (also known as TLX or tailless) controls the self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs) and has been implied as an oncogene which initiates brain tumours including glioblastomas. Despite NR2E1 regulating targets like p21CIP1 or PTEN we still lack a full explanation for its role in NSC self-renewal and tumorigenesis. We know that Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC) also control stem cell self-renewal and tumorigenesis, but so far, no formal connection has been established between NR2E1 and PRCs. In a screen for transcription factors regulating the expression of the Polycomb protein CBX7, we identified NR2E1 as one of its more prominent regulators. NR2E1 binds at the CBX7 promoter, inducing its expression. Notably CBX7 represses NR2E1 as part of a regulatory loop. Ectopic NR2E1 expression inhibits cellular senescence, extending cellular lifespan in fibroblasts via CBX7-mediated regulation of p16INK4a and direct repression of p21CIP1. In addition NR2E1 expression also counteracts oncogene-induced senescence (OIS). The importance of NR2E1 to restrain senescence is highlighted through the process of knocking down its expression, which causes premature senescence in human fibroblasts and epithelial cells. We also confirmed that NR2E1 regulates CBX7 and restrains senescence in NSCs. Finally, we observed that the expression of NR2E1 directly correlates with that of CBX7 in human glioblastoma multiforme. Overall we identified control of senescence and regulation of Polycomb action as two possible mechanisms that can join those so far invoked to explain the role of NR2E1 in control of NSC self-renewal and cancer. PMID:25328137

  4. The nuclear receptor NR2E1/TLX controls senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loghlen, Ana; Martin, Nadine; Krusche, Benjamin; Pemberton, Helen; Alonso, Marta M; Chandler, Hollie; Brookes, Sharon; Parrinello, Simona; Peters, Gordon; Gil, Jesús

    2015-07-30

    The nuclear receptor NR2E1 (also known as TLX or tailless) controls the self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs) and has been implied as an oncogene which initiates brain tumors including glioblastomas. Despite NR2E1 regulating targets like p21(CIP1) or PTEN we still lack a full explanation for its role in NSC self-renewal and tumorigenesis. We know that polycomb repressive complexes also control stem cell self-renewal and tumorigenesis, but so far, no formal connection has been established between NR2E1 and PRCs. In a screen for transcription factors regulating the expression of the polycomb protein CBX7, we identified NR2E1 as one of its more prominent regulators. NR2E1 binds at the CBX7 promoter, inducing its expression. Notably CBX7 represses NR2E1 as part of a regulatory loop. Ectopic NR2E1 expression inhibits cellular senescence, extending cellular lifespan in fibroblasts via CBX7-mediated regulation of p16(INK4a) and direct repression of p21(CIP1). In addition NR2E1 expression also counteracts oncogene-induced senescence. The importance of NR2E1 to restrain senescence is highlighted through the process of knocking down its expression, which causes premature senescence in human fibroblasts and epithelial cells. We also confirmed that NR2E1 regulates CBX7 and restrains senescence in NSCs. Finally, we observed that the expression of NR2E1 directly correlates with that of CBX7 in human glioblastoma multiforme. Overall we identified control of senescence and regulation of polycomb action as two possible mechanisms that can join those so far invoked to explain the role of NR2E1 in control of NSC self-renewal and cancer.

  5. Senescent T-Cells Promote Bone Loss in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Fessler

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveT-cells are critical players in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Premature senescence of lymphocytes including the accumulation of senescent CD4+ T-cells is a hallmark feature of RA. Whether T-cell senescence is associated with bone loss in RA patients is elusive so far.MethodsThis includes a prospective study of consecutive patients with RA (n = 107, patients with primary osteopenia/-porosis (n = 75, and healthy individuals (n = 38. Bone mineral density (BMD was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Flow cytometry, magnetic-associated cell sorting, and cell culture experiments were performed to analyze the pro-osteoclastic phenotype and the function of senescent CD4+CD28− T-cells.ResultsPatients with osteopenia/-porosis yielded a higher prevalence of senescent CD4+CD28− T-cells than individuals with normal BMD, in the RA, as well as in the non-RA cohort. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL was expressed at higher levels on CD4+CD28− T-cells as compared to CD28+ T-cells. Stimulation with interleukin-15 led to an up-regulation of RANKL expression, particularly on CD28− T-cells. CD4+CD28− T-cells induced osteoclastogenesis more efficiently than CD28+ T-cells.ConclusionOur data indicate that senescent T-cells promote osteoclastogenesis more efficiently than conventional CD28+ T-cells, which might contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic bone loss in RA and primary osteoporosis.

  6. Reproduction Symposium: developmental programming of reproductive and metabolic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, V; Veiga-Lopez, A

    2014-08-01

    Inappropriate programming of the reproductive system by developmental exposure to excess steroid hormones is of concern. Sheep are well suited for investigating developmental origin of reproductive and metabolic disorders. The developmental time line of female sheep (approximately 5 mo gestation and approximately 7 mo to puberty) is ideal for conducting sequential studies of the progression of metabolic and/or reproductive disruption from the developmental insult to manifestation of adult consequences. Major benefits of using sheep include knowledge of established critical periods to target adult defects, a rich understanding of reproductive neuroendocrine regulation, availability of noninvasive approaches to monitor follicular dynamics, established surgical approaches to obtain hypophyseal portal blood for measurement of hypothalamic hormones, and the ability to perform studies in natural setting thereby keeping behavioral interactions intact. Of importance is the ability to chronically instrument fetus and mother for determining early endocrine perturbations. Prenatal exposure of the female to excess testosterone (T) leads to an array of adult reproductive disorders that include LH excess, functional hyperandrogenism, neuroendocrine defects, multifollicular ovarian morphology, and corpus luteum dysfunction culminating in early reproductive failure. At the neuroendocrine level, all 3 feedback systems are compromised. At the pituitary level, gonadotrope (LH secretion) sensitivity to GnRH is increased. Multifollicular ovarian morphology stems from persistence of follicles as well as enhanced follicular recruitment. These defects culminate in progressive loss of cyclicity and reduced fecundity. Prenatal T excess also leads to fetal growth retardation, an early marker of adult reproductive and metabolic diseases, insulin resistance, hypertension, and behavioral deficits. Collectively, the reproductive and metabolic deficits of prenatal T-treated sheep provide proof of

  7. Reproductive epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jørn; Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

    2010-01-01

    Reproductive health covers a broad category of health and disease conditions, according to the Cairo Statement. This chapter focuses on subfecundity fertility, fetal death, malformations, pregnancy complications, sexual health, and diseases that may have their origin in fetal life, but which will...

  8. Analysis of individual cells identifies cell-to-cell variability following induction of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Christopher D; Flynn, James M; Morrissey, Christapher; Lebofsky, Ronald; Shuga, Joe; Dong, Xiao; Unger, Marc A; Vijg, Jan; Melov, Simon; Campisi, Judith

    2017-10-01

    Senescent cells play important roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including cancer and aging. In all cases, however, senescent cells comprise only a small fraction of tissues. Senescent phenotypes have been studied largely in relatively homogeneous populations of cultured cells. In vivo, senescent cells are generally identified by a small number of markers, but whether and how these markers vary among individual cells is unknown. We therefore utilized a combination of single-cell isolation and a nanofluidic PCR platform to determine the contributions of individual cells to the overall gene expression profile of senescent human fibroblast populations. Individual senescent cells were surprisingly heterogeneous in their gene expression signatures. This cell-to-cell variability resulted in a loss of correlation among the expression of several senescence-associated genes. Many genes encoding senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) factors, a major contributor to the effects of senescent cells in vivo, showed marked variability with a subset of highly induced genes accounting for the increases observed at the population level. Inflammatory genes in clustered genomic loci showed a greater correlation with senescence compared to nonclustered loci, suggesting that these genes are coregulated by genomic location. Together, these data offer new insights into how genes are regulated in senescent cells and suggest that single markers are inadequate to identify senescent cells in vivo. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. An Essential Role for Senescent Cells in Optimal Wound Healing through Secretion of PDGF-AA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demaria, Marco; Ohtani, Naoko; Youssef Hassan, Sameh|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374027080; Rodier, Francis; Toussaint, Wendy; Mitchell, James R; Laberge, Remi-Martin; Vijg, Jan; Van Steeg, Harry; Dollé, Martijn E T; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; de Bruin, Alain|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837261; Hara, Eiji; Campisi, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by halting the growth of premalignant cells, yet the accumulation of senescent cells is thought to drive age-related pathology through a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), the function of which is unclear. To understand the physiological role(s)

  10. An essential role for senescent cells in optimal wound healing through secretion of PDGF-AA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demaria, Marco; Ohtani, Naoko; Youssef, Sameh A; Rodier, Francis; Toussaint, Wendy; Mitchell, James R; Laberge, Remi-Martin; Vijg, Jan; Van Steeg, Harry; Dollé, Martijn E T; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; de Bruin, Alain; Hara, Eiji; Campisi, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by halting the growth of premalignant cells, yet the accumulation of senescent cells is thought to drive age-related pathology through a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), the function of which is unclear. To understand the physiological role(s)

  11. An essential role for senescent cells in optimal wound healing through secretion of PDGF-AA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Demaria (Marco); N. Ohtani (Naoko); S. Youssef (SamehA.); F. Rodier (Francis); W. Toussaint (Wendy); J. Mitchell (JamesR.); R.-M. Laberge (Remi-Martin); J. Vijg (Jan); H. VanSteeg (Harry); M. Dollé (MartijnE.T.); J. Hoeijmakers (JanH.J.); A. deBruin (Alain); E. Hara (Eiji); J. Campisi (Judith)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractCellular senescence suppresses cancer by halting the growth of premalignant cells, yet the accumulation of senescent cells is thought to drive age-related pathology through a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), the function of which is unclear. To understand the

  12. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 delays replicative senescence of human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micutkova, Lucia; Diener, Thomas; Li, Chen

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence can be induced by a variety of mechanisms, and recent data suggest a key role for cytokine networks to maintain the senescent state. Here, we have used a proteomic LC-MS/MS approach to identify new extracellular regulators of senescence in human fibroblasts. We identified 26 e...

  13. Targeting Senescent Cells : Possible Implications for Delaying Skin Aging: A Mini-Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velarde, Michael C.; Demaria, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Senescent cells are induced by a wide variety of stimuli. They accumulate in several tissues during aging, including the skin. Senescent cells secrete proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases, a phenomenon called senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), which are

  14. Age-dependent terminal declines in reproductive output in a wild bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Hammers

    Full Text Available In many iteroparous species individual fitness components, such as reproductive output, first increase with age and then decline during late-life. However, individuals differ greatly in reproductive lifespan, but reproductive declines may only occur in the period just before their death as a result of an age-independent decline in physiological condition. To fully understand reproductive senescence it is important to investigate to what extent declines in late-life reproduction can be explained by age, time until death, or both. However, the study of late-life fitness performance in natural populations is challenging as the exact birth and death dates of individuals are often not known, and most individuals succumb to extrinsic mortality before reaching old age. Here, we used an exceptional long-term longitudinal dataset of individuals from a natural, closed, and predator-free population of the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis to investigate reproductive output, both in relation to age and to the time until the death of an individual (reverse-age approach. We observed an initial age-dependent increase in reproductive output that was followed by a decline in old age. However, we found no significant decline in reproductive output in the years directly preceding death. Although post-peak reproductive output declined with age, this pattern differed between terminal and non-terminal reproductive attempts, and the age-dependence of the terminal breeding attempt explained much of the variation in age-specific reproductive output. In fact, terminal declines in reproductive output were steeper in very old individuals. These results indicate that not only age-dependent, but also age-independent factors, such as physiological condition, need to be considered to understand reproductive senescence in wild-living animals.

  15. Insulin: its role in the central control of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwowska, Joanna H; Fergani, Chrysanthi; Gawałek, Monika; Skowronska, Bogda; Fichna, Piotr; Lehman, Michael N

    2014-06-22

    Insulin has long been recognized as a key regulator of energy homeostasis via its actions at the level of the brain, but in addition, plays a role in regulating neural control of reproduction. In this review, we consider and compare evidence from animal models demonstrating a role for insulin for physiological control of reproduction by effects on GnRH/LH secretion. We also review the role that insulin plays in prenatal programming of adult reproduction, and consider specific candidate neurons in the adult hypothalamus by which insulin may act to regulate reproductive function. Finally, we review clinical evidence of the role that insulin may play in adult human fertility and reproductive disorders. Overall, while insulin appears to have a significant impact on reproductive neuroendocrine function, there are many unanswered questions regarding its precise sites and mechanisms of action, and their impact on developing and adult reproductive neuroendocrine function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiometrical, hormonal and biological correlates of skeletal growth in the female rat from birth to senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pozo, Emilio; Janner, Marco; Mackenzie, Andrew R; Arampatzis, Spyridon; Dixon, Arnold K; Perrelet, Romain; Ruch, Walter; Lippuner, Kurt; Zapf, Juergen; Lamberts, Steven W; Mullis, Primus E

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the skeletal growth profile of female rats from birth to senescence (100weeks) on the basis of sequential radiometrical, hormonal and biochemical parameters. Weaning rats entered the study which was divided into two sections: a) sequential measurements of vertebral and tibial growths and bone mineral density (BMD), estimation of mineral content of the entire skeleton (BMC) and chemical analysis of vertebral Ca; and b) determination of basal and pulsatile growth hormone (rGH), insulin-like growth hormone (IGF-I), estradiol (E2), parathyroid hormone (PTH), osteocalcin (OC) and urinary d-pyridinoline (dp) throughout the experimental period. Vertebral and tibial growths ceased at week 25 whereas BMD and BMC as well as total vertebral Ca exhibited a peak bone mass at week 40. rGH pulsatile profiles were significantly higher in younger animals coinciding with the period of active growth and IGF-I peaked at 7weeks, slowly declining thereafter and stabilizing after week 60. OC and dp closely paralleled IGF-I coinciding with the period of enhanced skeletal growth, remaining thereafter in the low range indicative of reduced bone turnover. E2 increased during reproductive life but the lower values subsequently recorded were still in the physiological range, strongly suggesting a protective role of this steroid on bone remodeling. PTH followed a similar profile to E2, but the significance of this after completion of growth remains unclear. Mechanisms governing skeletal growth in the female rat appear similar to those in humans. Bone progression and attainment of peak bone mass are under simultaneous control of rGH, IGF-I and calciotropic hormones and are modulated by E2. This steroid seems to protect the skeleton from resorption before senescence whereas the role of PTH in this context remains uncertain. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Activation of p53 by nutlin-3a induces apoptosis and cellular senescence in human glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Villalonga-Planells

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Despite concerted efforts to improve current therapies and develop novel clinical approaches, patient survival remains poor. As such, increasing attention has focused on developing new therapeutic strategies that specifically target the apoptotic pathway in order to improve treatment responses. Recently, nutlins, small-molecule antagonists of MDM2, have been developed to inhibit p53-MDM2 interaction and activate p53 signaling in cancer cells. Glioma cell lines and primary cultured glioblastoma cells were treated with nutlin-3a. Nutlin-3a induced p53-dependent G1- and G2-M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioma cell lines with normal TP53 status. In addition, nutlin-arrested glioma cells show morphological features of senescence and persistent induction of p21 protein. Furthermore, senescence induced by nutlin-3a might be depending on mTOR pathway activity. In wild-type TP53 primary cultured cells, exposure to nutlin-3a resulted in variable degrees of apoptosis as well as cellular features of senescence. Nutlin-3a-induced apoptosis and senescence were firmly dependent on the presence of functional p53, as revealed by the fact that glioblastoma cells with knockdown p53 with specific siRNA, or cells with mutated or functionally impaired p53 pathway, were completely insensitive to the drug. Finally, we also found that nutlin-3a increased response of glioma cells to radiation therapy. The results provide a basis for the rational use of MDM2 antagonists as a novel treatment option for glioblastoma patients.

  18. Diving into old age: muscular senescence in a large-bodied, long-lived mammal, the Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Allyson G; Horning, Markus; Mellish, Jo-Ann E; Lawler, John M

    2009-03-01

    Classic aging theory postulates the absence of pronounced organismal senescence in wild animals since mortality probably occurs first. Large-bodied, long-lived mammals are a recognized exception to this tenet, yet organismal senescence has not been investigated to date in such mammals in the wild. Furthermore, oxidative stress theory of aging supports the suggestion that exercise hypoxia, as regularly incurred during apneustic foraging in diving mammals might lead to cellular dysfunction and accelerated aging. To determine if an aspect of organismal senescence occurs in wild marine mammals, we examined the pattern of skeletal muscle aging (contractile and connective tissue components of longissimus dorsi and pectoralis muscles) in free-ranging adult Weddell seals (9-26 years). The average myocyte cross-sectional area was 22% greater with age in the longissiums dorsi, but no significant increase occurred in the pectoralis. Cross-sectional area was not related to body mass. Changes in myocyte number per area were consistent with the 35-40% age-increase in extracellular space in both muscle groups. Also consistent with extracellular space remodeling, total and relative collagen contents were significantly elevated in older seals (115% in longissimus dorsi; 65% in pectoralis). The ratio of muscle myocyte to collagen declined with age (50-63%) at both sites. Additionally, a shift towards a higher ratio of type I to type III collagen occurred with advancing age in both muscle groups (79% increase in pectoralis; 49% in longissimus dorsi). We reject the classic tenet and null-hypothesis that Weddell seals do not survive to an age where muscular senescence becomes detectable.

  19. effect of farmyard manure on senescence, nitrogen and protein

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    treatment (manurex2) at the ratio of 5:1 soil to manure and the control (no manure added). Plastic pots of ... seasons, senescence started earlier rainy season than in dry season. On the other hand ... These changes, visible to the naked eye are.

  20. Alkaline protease from senesced leaves of invasive weed | Gaur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    step procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sephadex G-250 gel permeation chromatography. The Sephadex-G-250 fraction of senesced leaves of Lantana camara showed 28.31 fold with a yield of 6.19%. The enzyme was ...

  1. Role of polyamines and ethylene as modulators of plant senescence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Plant Biotechnology Division, Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur 176 061, India ... Under optimal conditions of growth, senescence, a terminal phase of development, sets in after a certain physio- logical age. It is a dynamic ..... Escribano M I and Merodio C 1994 The relevance of polyamine levels in ...

  2. Testosterone supplementation restores vasopressin innervation in the senescent rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, E.; Fliers, E.; Swaab, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    The vasopressin (AVP) innervation in the male rat brain is decreased in senescence. This decrease is particularly pronounced in brain regions where AVP fiber density is dependent on plasma levels of sex steroids. Since plasma testosterone levels decrease progressively with age in the rat, the

  3. Functional age as an indicator of reservoir senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Krogman, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    It has been conjectured that reservoirs differ in the rate at which they manifest senescence, but no attempt has been made to find an indicator of senescence that performs better than chronological age. We assembled an indicator of functional age by creating a multimetric scale consisting of 10 metrics descriptive of reservoir environments that were expected to change directionally with reservoir senescence. In a sample of 1,022 U.S. reservoirs, chronological age was not correlated with functional age. Functional age was directly related to percentage of cultivated land in the catchment and inversely related to reservoir depth. Moreover, aspects of reservoir fishing quality and fish population characteristics were related to functional age. A multimetric scale to indicate reservoir functional age presents the possibility for management intervention from multiple angles. If a reservoir is functionally aging at an accelerated rate, action may be taken to remedy the conditions contributing most to functional age. Intervention to reduce scores of selected metrics in the scale can potentially reduce the rate of senescence and increase the life expectancy of the reservoir. This leads to the intriguing implication that steps can be taken to reduce functional age and actually make the reservoir grow younger.

  4. Transcriptome profiling reveals regulatory mechanisms underlying Corolla Senescence in Petunia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic regulatory mechanisms that govern petal natural senescence in petunia is complicated and unclear. To identify key genes and pathways that regulate the process, we initiated a transcriptome analysis in petunia petals at four developmental time points, including petal opening without anthesis ...

  5. F4/80+ Macrophages Contribute to Clearance of Senescent Cells in the Mouse Postpartum Uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, Mahiro; Hirota, Yasushi; Shimizu-Hirota, Ryoko; Saito-Fujita, Tomoko; Haraguchi, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Leona; Matsuo, Mitsunori; Hiraoka, Takehiro; Tanaka, Tomoki; Akaeda, Shun; Takehisa, Chiaki; Saito-Kanatani, Mayuko; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2017-07-01

    Cellular senescence, defined as an irreversible cell cycle arrest, exacerbates the tissue microenvironment. Our previous study demonstrated that mouse uterine senescent cells were physiologically increased according to gestational days and that their abnormal accumulation was linked to the onset of preterm delivery. We hypothesized that there is a mechanism for removal of senescent cells after parturition to maintain uterine function. In the current study, we noted abundant uterine senescent cells and their gradual disappearance in wild-type postpartum mice. F4/80+ macrophages were present specifically around the area rich in senescent cells. Depletion of macrophages in the postpartum mice using anti-F4/80 antibody enlarged the area of senescent cells in the uterus. We also found excessive uterine senescent cells and decreased second pregnancy success rate in a preterm birth model using uterine p53-deleted mice. Furthermore, a decrease in F4/80+ cells and an increase in CD11b+ cells with a senescence-associated inflammatory microenvironment were observed in the p53-deleted uterus, suggesting that uterine p53 deficiency affects distribution of the macrophage subpopulation, interferes with senescence clearance, and promotes senescence-induced inflammation. These findings indicate that the macrophage is a key player in the clearance of uterine senescent cells to maintain postpartum uterine function. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  6. Selective elimination of senescent cells by mitochondrial targeting is regulated by ANT2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubackova, Sona; Davidova, Eliska; Rohlenova, Katerina

    2018-01-01

    and development of age-related diseases. We found that the anticancer agent mitochondria-targeted tamoxifen (MitoTam), unlike conventional anticancer agents, kills cancer cells without inducing senescence in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, it also selectively eliminates both malignant and non-cancerous senescent...... cells. In naturally aged mice treated with MitoTam for 4 weeks, we observed a significant decrease of senescence markers in all tested organs compared to non-treated animals. Mechanistically, we found that the susceptibility of senescent cells to MitoTam is linked to a very low expression level...... of adenine nucleotide translocase-2 (ANT2), inherent to the senescent phenotype. Restoration of ANT2 in senescent cells resulted in resistance to MitoTam, while its downregulation in non-senescent cells promoted their MitoTam-triggered elimination. Our study documents a novel, translationally intriguing role...

  7. HJURP regulates cellular senescence in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells via a p53-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jong-Ik; Cho, Jung Hee; Kim, Jae-Ryong

    2013-08-01

    Holliday junction recognition protein (HJURP), a centromere protein-A (CENP-A) histone chaperone, mediates centromere-specific assembly of CENP-A nucleosome, contributing to high-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division. However, the role of HJURP in cellular senescence of human primary cells remains unclear. We found that the expression levels of HJURP decreased in human dermal fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells in replicative or premature senescence. Ectopic expression of HJURP in senescent cells partially overcame cell senescence. Conversely, downregulation of HJURP in young cells led to premature senescence. p53 knockdown, but not p16 knockdown, abolished senescence phenotypes caused by HJURP reduction. These data suggest that HJURP plays an important role in the regulation of cellular senescence through a p53-dependent pathway and might contribute to tissue or organismal aging and protection of cellular transformation.

  8. Rethinking reproductive "tourism" as reproductive "exile".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2009-09-01

    Whereas reproductive "tourism" implies leisure travel, reproductive "exile" bespeaks the numerous difficulties and constraints faced by infertile patients who are "forced" to travel globally for assisted reproduction. Given this reality, it is time to rethink the language of "reproductive tourism," replacing it with more accurate and patient-centered terms.

  9. Mitochondrial pAL2-1 plasmid homologs are senescence factors in Podospora anserina independent of intrinsic senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Debets, A.J.M.; Slakhorst-Wandel, S.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first description of a linear mitochondrial plasmid in Podospora anserina, pAL2-1, and homologous plasmids have gone from being considered beneficial longevity plasmids, via neutral genetic elements, toward mutator plasmids causing senescence. The plasmid has an invertron structure, with

  10. Mitochondrial pAL2-1 plasmid homologs are senescence factors in Podospora anserina independent of intrinsic senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Debets, Alfons J M; Slakhorst, S Marijke; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    Since the first description of a linear mitochondrial plasmid in Podospora anserina, pAL2-1, and homologous plasmids have gone from being considered beneficial longevity plasmids, via neutral genetic elements, toward mutator plasmids causing senescence. The plasmid has an invertron structure, with

  11. Phosphorylation of Histone H2AX in the Mouse Brain from Development to Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Barral

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of the histone H2AX (γH2AX form is an early response to DNA damage and a marker of aging and disease in several cells and tissues outside the nervous system. Little is known about in vivo phosphorylation of H2AX in neurons, although it was suggested that γH2AX is an early marker of neuronal endangerment thus opening the possibility to target it as a neuroprotective strategy. After experimental labeling of DNA-synthesizing cells with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU, we studied the brain occurrence of γH2AX in developing, postnatal, adult and senescent (2 years mice by light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Focal and/or diffuse γH2AX immunostaining appears in interkinetic nuclei, mitotic chromosomes, and apoptotic nuclei. Immunoreactivity is mainly associated with neurogenetic areas, i.e., the subventricular zone (SVZ of telencephalon, the cerebellar cortex, and, albeit to a much lesser extent, the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In addition, γH2AX is highly expressed in the adult and senescent cerebral cortex, particularly the piriform cortex. Double labeling experiments demonstrate that γH2AX in neurogenetic brain areas is temporally and functionally related to proliferation and apoptosis of neuronal precursors, i.e., the type C transit amplifying cells (SVZ and the granule cell precursors (cerebellum. Conversely, γH2AX-immunoreactive cortical neurons incorporating the S phase-label BrdU do not express the proliferation marker phosphorylated histone H3, indicating that these postmitotic cells undergo a significant DNA damage response. Our study paves the way for a better comprehension of the role of H2AX phosphorylation in the normal brain, and offers additional data to design novel strategies for the protection of neuronal precursors and mature neurons in central nervous system (CNS degenerative diseases.

  12. Selective Reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mette N.

    2015-01-01

    This article employs a multi-species perspective in investigating how life's worth is negotiated in the field of neonatology in Denmark. It does so by comparing decision-making processes about human infants in the Danish neonatal intensive care unit with those associated with piglets who serve as...... as expectations within linear or predictive time frames are key markers in both sites. Exploring selective reproductive processes across human infants and research piglets can help us uncover aspects of the cultural production of viability that we would not otherwise see or acknowledge....

  13. Chlorophyll loss associated with heat-induced senescence in bentgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, David; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Bingru

    2016-08-01

    Heat stress-induced leaf senescence is characterized by the loss of chlorophyll from leaf tissues. The objectives of this study were to examine genetic variations in the level of heat-induced leaf senescence in hybrids of colonial (Agrostis capillaris)×creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) contrasting in heat tolerance, and determine whether loss of leaf chlorophyll during heat-induced leaf senescence was due to suppressed chlorophyll synthesis and/or accelerated chlorophyll degradation in the cool-season perennial grass species. Plants of two hybrid backcross genotypes ('ColxCB169' and 'ColxCB190') were exposed to heat stress (38/33°C, day/night) for 28 d in growth chambers. The analysis of turf quality, membrane stability, photochemical efficiency, and chlorophyll content demonstrated significant variations in the level of leaf senescence induced by heat stress between the two genotypes, with ColXCB169 exhibiting a lesser degree of decline in chlorophyll content, photochemical efficiency and membrane stability than ColXCB190. The assays of enzymatic activity or gene expression of several major chlorophyll-synthesizing (porphobilinogen deaminase, Mg-chelatase, protochlorophyllide-reductase) and chlorophyll-degrading enzymes (chlorophyllase, pheophytinase, and chlorophyll-degrading peroxidase) indicated heat-induced decline in leaf chlorophyll content was mainly due to accelerated chlorophyll degradation, as manifested by increased gene expression levels of chlorophyllase and pheophytinase, and the activity of pheophytinase (PPH), while chlorophyll-synthesizing genes and enzymatic activities were not differentially altered by heat stress in the two genotypes. The analysis of heat-induced leaf senescence of pph mutants of Arabidopsis further confirmed that PPH could be one enzymes that plays key roles in regulating heat-accelerated chlorophyll degradation. Further research on enzymes responsible in part for the loss of chlorophyll during heat

  14. Senescent Swallowing: Impact, Strategies and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Denise; Weiss, Jennifer; Kind, Amy; Robbins, JoAnne

    2010-01-01

    The risk for disordered oropharyngeal swallowing (dysphagia) increases with age. Loss of swallowing function can have devastating health implications including dehydration, malnutrition, and pneumonia, as well as reduced quality of life. Age-related changes place older adults at risk for dysphagia for two major reasons: One is that natural, healthy aging takes its toll on head and neck anatomy and physiologic and neural mechanisms underpinning swallowing function. This progression of change contributes to alterations in the swallowing in healthy older adults and is termed presbyphagia, naturally diminishing functional reserve. Second, disease prevalence increases with age and dysphagia is a co-morbidity of many age-related diseases and/or their treatments. Sensory changes, medication, sarcopenia and age-related diseases are discussed herein. Relatively recent findings that health complications are associated with dysphagia are presented. Nutrient requirements, fluid intake and nutritional assessment for older adults are reviewed relative to their relations to dysphagia. Dysphagia screening and the pros and cons of tube feeding as a solution are discussed. Optimal intervention strategies for elders with dysphagia ranging from compensatory interventions to more rigorous exercise approaches are presented. Compelling evidence of improved functional swallowing and eating outcomes resulting from active rehabilitation focusing on increasing strength of head and neck musculature is provided. In summary, while oropharyngeal dysphagia may be life-threatening, so are some of the traditional alternatives, particularly for frail, elderly patients. While the state of the evidence calls for more research, this review indicates the behavioral, dietary and environmental modifications emerging in this past decade are compassionate, promising and in many cases preferred alternatives to the always present option of tube feeding. PMID:19483069

  15. Negligible senescence in the longest living rodent, the naked mole-rat: insights from a successfully aging species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2008-05-01

    Aging refers to a gradual deterioration in function that, over time, leads to increased mortality risk, and declining fertility. This pervasive process occurs in almost all organisms, although some long-lived trees and cold water inhabitants reportedly show insignificant aging. Negligible senescence is characterized by attenuated age-related change in reproductive and physiological functions, as well as no observable age-related gradual increase in mortality rate. It was questioned whether the longest living rodent, the naked mole-rat, met these three strict criteria. Naked mole-rats live in captivity for more than 28.3 years, approximately 9 times longer than similar-sized mice. They maintain body composition from 2 to 24 years, and show only slight age-related changes in all physiological and morphological characteristics studied to date. Surprisingly breeding females show no decline in fertility even when well into their third decade of life. Moreover, these animals have never been observed to develop any spontaneous neoplasm. As such they do not show the typical age-associated acceleration in mortality risk that characterizes every other known mammalian species and may therefore be the first reported mammal showing negligible senescence over the majority of their long lifespan. Clearly physiological and biochemical processes in this species have evolved to dramatically extend healthy lifespan. The challenge that lies ahead is to understand what these mechanisms are.

  16. The impact of cellular senescence in skin ageing: A notion of mosaic and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutfaire, Marie; Bauwens, Emilie; Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence

    2017-10-15

    Cellular senescence is now recognized as one of the nine hallmarks of ageing. Recent data show the involvement of senescent cells in tissue ageing and some age-related diseases. Skin represents an ideal model for the study of ageing. Indeed, skin ageing varies between individuals depending on their chronological age but also on their exposure to various exogenous factors (mainly ultraviolet rays). If senescence traits can be detected with ageing in the skin, the senescent phenotype varies among the various skin cell types. Moreover, the origin of cellular senescence in the skin is still unknown, and multiple origins are possible. This reflects the mosaic of skin ageing. Senescent cells can interfere with their microenvironment, either via the direct secretion of factors (the senescence-associated secretory phenotype) or via other methods of communication, such as extracellular vesicles. Knowledge regarding the impact of cellular senescence on skin ageing could be integrated into dermatology research, especially to limit the appearance of senescent cells after photo(chemo)therapy or in age-related skin diseases. Therapeutic approaches include the clearance of senescent cells via the use of senolytics or via the cooperation with the immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxygen concentration modulates cellular senescence and autophagy in human trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, Kotomi; Tanikawa, Nao; Takahashi, Hironori; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Suzuki, Hirotada; Matsubara, Shigeki; Iwata, Hisataka; Kuwayama, Takehito; Shirasuna, Koumei

    2018-02-15

    We investigated the effect of oxygen concentrations on cellular senescence and autophagy and examined the role of autophagy in human trophoblast cells. Human first-trimester trophoblast cells (Sw.71) were incubated under 21%, 5%, or 1% O 2 concentrations for 24 hours. We examined the extent of senescence caused using senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) as markers. Moreover, we examined the role of autophagy in causing cellular senescence using an autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine, 3MA). Physiological normoxia (5% O 2 ) decreased SA-β-Gal-positive cells and SASP including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 compared with cultured cells in 21% O 2 . Pathophysiological hypoxia (1% O 2 ) caused cytotoxicity, including extracellular release of ATP and lactate dehydrogenase, and decreased senescence phenotypes. 3MA-treated trophoblast cells significantly suppressed senescence markers (SA-β-Gal-positive cells and SASP secretion) in O 2 -independent manner. We conclude that O 2 concentration modulates cellular senescence phenotypes regulating autophagy in the human trophoblast cells. Moreover, inhibiting autophagy suppresses cellular senescence, suggesting that autophagy contributes to oxygen stress-induced cellular senescence. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. In vivo inhibition of cysteine proteases provides evidence for the involvement of 'senescence-associated vacuoles' in chloroplast protein degradation during dark-induced senescence of tobacco leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Cristian A; Costa, María Lorenza; Martínez, Dana E; Mohr, Christina; Humbeck, Klaus; Guiamet, Juan J

    2013-11-01

    Breakdown of leaf proteins, particularly chloroplast proteins, is a massive process in senescing leaves. In spite of its importance in internal N recycling, the mechanism(s) and the enzymes involved are largely unknown. Senescence-associated vacuoles (SAVs) are small, acidic vacuoles with high cysteine peptidase activity. Chloroplast-targeted proteins re-localize to SAVs during senescence, suggesting that SAVs might be involved in chloroplast protein degradation. SAVs were undetectable in mature, non-senescent tobacco leaves. Their abundance, visualized either with the acidotropic marker Lysotracker Red or by green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence in a line expressing the senescence-associated cysteine protease SAG12 fused to GFP, increased during senescence induction in darkness, and peaked after 2-4 d, when chloroplast dismantling was most intense. Increased abundance of SAVs correlated with higher levels of SAG12 mRNA. Activity labelling with a biotinylated derivative of the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 was used to detect active cysteine proteases. The two apparently most abundant cysteine proteases of senescing leaves, of 40kDa and 33kDa were detected in isolated SAVs. Rubisco degradation in isolated SAVs was completely blocked by E-64. Treatment of leaf disks with E-64 in vivo substantially reduced degradation of Rubisco and leaf proteins. Overall, these results indicate that SAVs contain most of the cysteine protease activity of senescing cells, and that SAV cysteine proteases are at least partly responsible for the degradation of stromal proteins of the chloroplast.

  19. Survival of egg-laying controlling neuroendocrine cells during reproductive senescence of a mollusc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, C.

    2004-01-01

    During brain aging neuronal degradation occurs. In some neurons this may result in degeneration and cell death, still other neurons may survive and maintain their basic properties. The present study deals with survival of the egg-laying controlling neuroendocrine caudodorsal cells (CDCs) during

  20. Ovarian transcriptome associated with reproductive senescence in the long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Augusto; Matkovich, Scot J; Saccon, Tatiana; Victoria, Berta; Spinel, Lina; Lavasani, Mitra; Bartke, Andrzej; Golusinski, Pawel; Masternak, Michal M

    2017-01-05

    The aim of the current work was to evaluate the ovarian follicle reserve and the ovarian transcriptome in Ames dwarf (df/df) mice. The results suggest a delayed ovarian aging in df/df mice compared to normal (N) mice. Although a high number of genes were differentially expressed during aging of N mice, only a small fraction of these changed with aging in df/df mice. These alterations involved more than 500 categorized biological processes. The majority of these biological processes, including inflammatory/immune responses, were up-regulated with aging in N mice, while old df/df mice were characterized by down-regulation of these same processes in comparison to age matched N mice. However, biological processes related to DNA damage and repairing were commonly down-regulated with aging in both genotypes. In conclusion, delayed ovarian aging in long-living df/df mice was associated with reduced expression of genes related to the inflammatory and immune responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Members of the barley NAC transcription factor gene family show differential co-regulation with senescence-associated genes during senescence of flag leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Michael W; Gregersen, Per L.

    2014-01-01

    -expressed with members of the NAC gene family. In conclusion, a list of up to 15 NAC genes from barley that are strong candidates for being regulatory factors of importance for senescence and biotic stress-related traits affecting the productivity of cereal crop plants has been generated. Furthermore, a list of 71...... in the NAC transcription factor family during senescence of barley flag leaves was studied. Several members of the NAC transcription factor gene family were up-regulated during senescence in a microarray experiment, together with a large range of senescence-associated genes, reflecting the coordinated...... activation of degradation processes in senescing barley leaf tissues. This picture was confirmed in a detailed quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) experiment, which also showed distinct gene expression patterns for different members of the NAC gene family, suggesting a group of ~15 out of the 47...

  2. The role of SUMOylation in ageing and senescent decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princz, Andrea; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2017-03-01

    Posttranslational protein modifications are playing crucial roles in essential cellular mechanisms. SUMOylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of specific target proteins by the attachment of a small ubiquitin-like protein. Although the mechanism of conjugation of SUMO to proteins is analogous to ubiquitination, it requires its own, specific set of enzymes. The consequences of SUMOylation are widely variable, depending on the physiological state of the cell and the attached SUMO isoform. Accumulating recent findings have revealed a prominent role of SUMOylation in molecular pathways that govern senescence and ageing. Here, we review the link between SUMO attachment events and cellular processes that influence senescence and ageing, including promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear body and telomere function, autophagy, reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and growth factor signalling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stress-induced premature senescence of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Patschan, Susann; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    Stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) is characterized by cell cycle arrest and curtailed Hayflick limit. Studies support a central role for Rb protein in controlling this process via signaling from the p53 and p16 pathways. Cellular senescence is considered an essential contributor to the aging process and has been shown to be an important tumor suppression mechanism. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that SIPS may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic human diseases. Here, focusing on endothelial cells, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of SIPS and the pathways that trigger it, evaluate their correlation with the apoptotic response and examine their links to the development of chronic diseases, with the emphasis on vasculopathy. Emerging novel therapeutic interventions based on recent experimental findings are also reviewed.

  4. Immune senescence: relative contributions of age and cytomegalovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mekker

    Full Text Available Immune senescence, defined as the age-associated dysregulation and dysfunction of the immune system, is characterised by impaired protective immunity and decreased efficacy of vaccines. Recent clinical, epidemiological and immunological studies suggest that Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection may be associated with accelerated immune senescence, possibly by restricting the naïve T cell repertoire. However, direct evidence whether and how CMV-infection is implicated in immune senescence is still lacking. In this study, we have investigated whether latent mouse CMV (MCMV infection with or without thymectomy (Tx alters antiviral immunity of young and aged mice. After infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV or Vaccinia virus, specific antiviral T cell responses were significantly reduced in old, old MCMV-infected and/or Tx mice compared to young mice. Importantly, control of LCMV replication was more profoundly impaired in aged MCMV-infected mice compared to age-matched MCMV-naïve or young mice. In addition, latent MCMV infection was associated with slightly reduced vaccination efficacy in old Tx mice. In contrast to the prevailing hypothesis of a CMV-mediated restriction of the naïve T cell repertoire, we found similar naïve T cell numbers in MCMV-infected and non-infected mice, whereas ageing and Tx clearly reduced the naïve T cell pool. Instead, MCMV-infection expanded the total CD8(+ T cell pool by a massive accumulation of effector memory T cells. Based on these results, we propose a new model of increased competition between CMV-specific memory T cells and any 'de novo' immune response in aged individuals. In summary, our results directly demonstrate in a mouse model that latent CMV-infection impairs immunity in old age and propagates immune senescence.

  5. A continuum mathematical model of endothelial layer maintenance and senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedman Avner

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs lining the inner wall of blood vessels deteriorates as a person ages due to a complex interplay of a variety of causes including cell death arising from shear stress of blood flow and cellular oxidative stress, cellular senescence, and decreased rate of replacement of dead ECs by progenitor stem cells. Results A continuum mathematical model is developed to describe the dynamics of large EC populations of the endothelium using a system of differential equations for the number densities of cells of different generations starting from endothelial progenitors to senescent cells, as well as the densities of dead cells and the holes created upon clearing dead cells. Aging of cells is manifested in three ways, namely, losing the ability to divide when the Hayflick limit of 50 generations is reached, decreasing replication rate parameters and increasing death rate parameters as cells divide; due to the dependence of these rate parameters on cell generation, the model predicts a narrow distribution of cell densities peaking at a particular cell generation. As the chronological age of a person advances, the peak of the distribution – corresponding to the age of the endothelium – moves towards senescence correspondingly. However, computer simulations also demonstrate that sustained and enhanced stem cell homing can halt the aging process of the endothelium by maintaining a stationary cell density distribution that peaks well before the Hayflick limit. The healing rates of damaged endothelia for young, middle-aged, and old persons are compared and are found to be particularly sensitive to the stem cell homing parameter. Conclusion The proposed model describes the aging of the endothelium as being driven by cellular senescence, with a rate that does not necessarily correspond to the chronological aging of a person. It is shown that the age of the endothelium depends sensitively on the homing

  6. A continuum mathematical model of endothelial layer maintenance and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Aguda, Baltazar D; Friedman, Avner

    2007-08-10

    The monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs) lining the inner wall of blood vessels deteriorates as a person ages due to a complex interplay of a variety of causes including cell death arising from shear stress of blood flow and cellular oxidative stress, cellular senescence, and decreased rate of replacement of dead ECs by progenitor stem cells. A continuum mathematical model is developed to describe the dynamics of large EC populations of the endothelium using a system of differential equations for the number densities of cells of different generations starting from endothelial progenitors to senescent cells, as well as the densities of dead cells and the holes created upon clearing dead cells. Aging of cells is manifested in three ways, namely, losing the ability to divide when the Hayflick limit of 50 generations is reached, decreasing replication rate parameters and increasing death rate parameters as cells divide; due to the dependence of these rate parameters on cell generation, the model predicts a narrow distribution of cell densities peaking at a particular cell generation. As the chronological age of a person advances, the peak of the distribution - corresponding to the age of the endothelium - moves towards senescence correspondingly. However, computer simulations also demonstrate that sustained and enhanced stem cell homing can halt the aging process of the endothelium by maintaining a stationary cell density distribution that peaks well before the Hayflick limit. The healing rates of damaged endothelia for young, middle-aged, and old persons are compared and are found to be particularly sensitive to the stem cell homing parameter. The proposed model describes the aging of the endothelium as being driven by cellular senescence, with a rate that does not necessarily correspond to the chronological aging of a person. It is shown that the age of the endothelium depends sensitively on the homing rates of EC progenitor cells.

  7. Cytokines shape chemotherapy-induced and 'bystander' senescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hodný, Zdeněk; Hubáčková, Soňa; Bartek, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2010), s. 375-376 ISSN 1945-4589 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/1418; GA ČR GA301/08/0353 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : bystander cellular senescence * cytokines * PML Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.964, year: 2010

  8. Cytoplasmic chromatin triggers inflammation in senescence and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Zhixun; Ghosh, Kanad; Vizioli, Maria Grazia; Zhu, Jiajun; Sen, Payel; Wangensteen, Kirk J; Simithy, Johayra; Lan, Yemin; Lin, Yanping; Zhou, Zhuo; Capell, Brian C; Xu, Caiyue; Xu, Mingang; Kieckhaefer, Julia E; Jiang, Tianying; Shoshkes-Carmel, Michal; Tanim, K M Ahasan Al; Barber, Glen N; Seykora, John T; Millar, Sarah E; Kaestner, Klaus H; Garcia, Benjamin A; Adams, Peter D; Berger, Shelley L

    2017-10-19

    Chromatin is traditionally viewed as a nuclear entity that regulates gene expression and silencing. However, we recently discovered the presence of cytoplasmic chromatin fragments that pinch off from intact nuclei of primary cells during senescence, a form of terminal cell-cycle arrest associated with pro-inflammatory responses. The functional significance of chromatin in the cytoplasm is unclear. Here we show that cytoplasmic chromatin activates the innate immunity cytosolic DNA-sensing cGAS-STING (cyclic GMP-AMP synthase linked to stimulator of interferon genes) pathway, leading both to short-term inflammation to restrain activated oncogenes and to chronic inflammation that associates with tissue destruction and cancer. The cytoplasmic chromatin-cGAS-STING pathway promotes the senescence-associated secretory phenotype in primary human cells and in mice. Mice deficient in STING show impaired immuno-surveillance of oncogenic RAS and reduced tissue inflammation upon ionizing radiation. Furthermore, this pathway is activated in cancer cells, and correlates with pro-inflammatory gene expression in human cancers. Overall, our findings indicate that genomic DNA serves as a reservoir to initiate a pro-inflammatory pathway in the cytoplasm in senescence and cancer. Targeting the cytoplasmic chromatin-mediated pathway may hold promise in treating inflammation-related disorders.

  9. Ageing induced vascular smooth muscle cell senescence in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uryga, Anna K; Bennett, Martin R

    2016-04-15

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of ageing in that its incidence and prevalence increase with age. However, atherosclerosis is also associated with biological ageing, manifest by a number of typical hallmarks of ageing in the atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, accelerated biological ageing may be superimposed on the effects of chronological ageing in atherosclerosis. Tissue ageing is seen in all cells that comprise the plaque, but particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hallmarks of ageing include evidence of cell senescence, DNA damage (including telomere attrition), mitochondrial dysfunction, a pro-inflammatory secretory phenotype, defects in proteostasis, epigenetic changes, deregulated nutrient sensing, and exhaustion of progenitor cells. In this model, initial damage to DNA (genomic, telomeric, mitochondrial and epigenetic changes) results in a number of cellular responses (cellular senescence, deregulated nutrient sensing and defects in proteostasis). Ultimately, ongoing damage and attempts at repair by continued proliferation overwhelm reparative capacity, causing loss of specialised cell functions, cell death and inflammation. This review summarises the evidence for accelerated biological ageing in atherosclerosis, the functional consequences of cell ageing on cells comprising the plaque, and the causal role that VSMC senescence plays in atherogenesis. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  10. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandl, Anita [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Nerlich, Michael [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Angele, Peter, E-mail: Peter.Angele@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  11. The thorny path linking cellular senescence to organismalaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Christopher K.; Mian, Saira; Campisi, Judith

    2005-08-09

    Half a century is fast approaching since Hayflick and colleagues formally described the limited ability of normal human cells to proliferate in culture (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961). This finding--that normal somatic cells, in contrast to cancer cells, cannot divide indefinitely--challenged the prevailing idea that cells from mortal multicellular organisms were intrinsically ''immortal'' (Carrell, 1912). It also spawned two hypotheses, essential elements of which persist today. The first held that the restricted proliferation of normal cells, now termed cellular senescence, suppresses cancer (Hayflick, 1965; Sager, 1991; Campisi, 2001). The second hypothesis, as explained in the article by Lorenzini et al., suggested that the limited proliferation of cells in culture recapitulated aspects of organismal aging (Hayflick, 1965; Martin, 1993). How well have these hypotheses weathered the ensuing decades? Before answering this question, we first consider current insights into the causes and consequences of cellular senescence. Like Lorenzini et al., we limit our discussion to mammals. We also focus on fibroblasts, the cell type studied by Lorenzini et al., but consider other types as well. We suggest that replicative capacity in culture is not a straightforward assessment, and that it correlates poorly with both longevity and body mass. We speculate this is due to the malleable and variable nature of replicative capacity, which renders it an indirect metric of qualitative and quantitative differences among cells to undergo senescence, a response that directly alters cellular phenotype and might indirectly alter tissue structure and function.

  12. Hard time to be parents? Sea urchin fishery shifts potential reproductive contribution of population onto the shoulders of the young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Loi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background In Sardinia, as in other regions of the Mediterranean Sea, sustainable fisheries of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have become a necessity. At harvesting sites, the systematic removal of large individuals (diameter ≥ 50 mm seriously compromises the biological and ecological functions of sea urchin populations. Specifically, in this study, we compared the reproductive potential of the populations from Mediterranean coastal areas which have different levels of sea urchin fishing pressure. The areas were located at Su Pallosu Bay, where pressure is high and Tavolara-Punta Coda Cavallo, a marine protected area where sea urchin harvesting is low. Methods Reproductive potential was estimated by calculating the gonadosomatic index (GSI from June 2013 to May 2014 both for individuals of commercial size (diameter without spines, TD ≥ 50 mm and the undersized ones with gonads (30 ≤ TD < 40 mm and 40 ≤ TD < 50 mm. Gamete output was calculated for the commercial-size class and the undersized individuals with fertile gonads (40 ≤ TD < 50 mm in relation to their natural density (gamete output per m2. Results The reproductive potential of populations was slightly different at the beginning of the sampling period but it progressed at different rates with an early spring spawning event in the high-pressure zone and two gamete depositions in early and late spring in the low-pressure zone. For each fertile size class, GSI values changed significantly during the year of our study and between the two zones. Although the multiple spawning events determined a two-fold higher total gamete output of population (popTGO in the low-pressure zone, the population mean gamete output (popMGO was similar in the two zones. In the high-pressure zone, the commercial-sized individuals represented approximatively 5% of the population, with almost all the individuals smaller than 60 mm producing an amount of gametes nearly three times lower than the

  13. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x756 ... Large: 3000x3150 View Download Title: Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the female reproductive system; drawing ...

  14. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  15. Direct and indirect genetic effects of sex-specific mitonuclear epistasis on reproductive ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immonen, Elina; Collet, Marie; Goenaga, Julieta

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in ageing and their function requires coordinated action of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes. Epistasis between the two genomes can influence lifespan but whether this also holds for reproductive senescence is unclear. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria predicts sex...... to slower senescence relative to novel mitonuclear combinations. We found no evidence for mitonuclear coadaptation in males. Mitonuclear epistasis not only affected age-specific ejaculate weight, but also influenced male age-dependent indirect effects on traits expressed by their female partners (fecundity...... beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, using introgression lines harbouring distinct mitonuclear genotypes. Our results reveal both direct and indirect sex-specific effects of mitonuclear epistasis on reproductive ageing. Females harbouring coadapted mitonuclear genotypes showed higher lifetime fecundity due...

  16. Hard time to be parents? Sea urchin fishery shifts potential reproductive contribution of population onto the shoulders of the young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Barbara; Guala, Ivan; Pires da Silva, Rodrigo; Brundu, Gianni; Baroli, Maura; Farina, Simone

    2017-01-01

    In Sardinia, as in other regions of the Mediterranean Sea, sustainable fisheries of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus have become a necessity. At harvesting sites, the systematic removal of large individuals (diameter ≥ 50 mm) seriously compromises the biological and ecological functions of sea urchin populations. Specifically, in this study, we compared the reproductive potential of the populations from Mediterranean coastal areas which have different levels of sea urchin fishing pressure. The areas were located at Su Pallosu Bay, where pressure is high and Tavolara-Punta Coda Cavallo, a marine protected area where sea urchin harvesting is low. Reproductive potential was estimated by calculating the gonadosomatic index (GSI) from June 2013 to May 2014 both for individuals of commercial size (diameter without spines, TD ≥ 50 mm) and the undersized ones with gonads (30 ≤ TD sea urchins than on their size. However, since population survival in the high-pressure zone is supported by the high density of undersized sea urchins between 30 and 50 mm, management measures should be addressed to maintain these sizes and to shed light on the source of the larval supply.

  17. Translational researches on leaf senescence for enhancing plant productivity and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongfeng; Gan, Su-Sheng

    2014-07-01

    Leaf senescence is a very important trait that limits yield and biomass accumulation of agronomic crops and reduces post-harvest performance and the nutritional value of horticultural crops. Significant advance in physiological and molecular understanding of leaf senescence has made it possible to devise ways of manipulating leaf senescence for agricultural improvement. There are three major strategies in this regard: (i) plant hormone biology-based leaf senescence manipulation technology, the senescence-specific gene promoter-directed IPT system in particular; (ii) leaf senescence-specific transcription factor biology-based technology; and (iii) translation initiation factor biology-based technology. Among the first strategy, the P SAG12 -IPT autoregulatory senescence inhibition system has been widely explored and successfully used in a variety of plant species for manipulating senescence. The vast majority of the related research articles (more than 2000) showed that crops harbouring the autoregulatory system displayed a significant delay in leaf senescence without any abnormalities in growth and development, a marked increase in grain yield and biomass, dramatic improvement in horticultural performance, and/or enhanced tolerance to drought stress. This technology is approaching commercialization. The transcription factor biology-based and translation initiation factor biology-based technologies have also been shown to be very promising and have great potentials for manipulating leaf senescence in crops. Finally, it is speculated that technologies based on the molecular understanding of nutrient recycling during leaf senescence are highly desirable and are expected to be developed in future translational leaf senescence research. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. MicroRNA-33 promotes the replicative senescence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts by suppressing CDK6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shun; Huang, Haijiao; Li, Nanhong; Zhang, Bing; Jia, Yubin; Yang, Yukun; Yuan, Yuan; Xiong, Xing-dong; Wang, Dengchuan; Zheng, Hui-ling [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Diagnostics, Dongguan (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang (China); Liu, Xinguang, E-mail: xgliu64@126.com [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Diagnostics, Dongguan (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang (China)

    2016-05-13

    MicroRNAs are a large class of tiny noncoding RNAs, which have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, and thus are involved in multiple cellular processes, including cellular senescence. MicroRNA-33 has previously been established to exert crucial effect on cell proliferation, lipid metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. Nonetheless, the association between microRNA-33 and cellular senescence and its underlying molecular mechanism are far to be elucidated. The present study has attempted to probe into the effect of microRNA-33 on MEFs senescence. Our data unveiled that microRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEFs compared to the young MEFs, and ectopic expression of microRNA-33 promoted MEFs senescence, while knock-down of microRNA-33 exhibited a protective effect against senescence phenotype. Moreover, we verified CDK6 as a direct target of microRNA-33 in mouse. Silencing of CDK6 induced the premature senescence phenotype of MEFs similarly as microRNA-33, while enforced expression of CDK6 significantly reverse the senescence-induction effect of microRNA-33. Taken together, our results suggested that microRNA-33 enhanced the replicative senescence of MEFs potentially by suppressing CDK6 expression. -- Highlights: •MicroRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEF cells. •Altered expression of microRNA-33 exerted a critical role in MEFs senescence. •MicroRNA-33 promoted the replicative senescence of MEFs via targeting of CDK6.

  19. MicroRNA-33 promotes the replicative senescence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts by suppressing CDK6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shun; Huang, Haijiao; Li, Nanhong; Zhang, Bing; Jia, Yubin; Yang, Yukun; Yuan, Yuan; Xiong, Xing-dong; Wang, Dengchuan; Zheng, Hui-ling; Liu, Xinguang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a large class of tiny noncoding RNAs, which have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, and thus are involved in multiple cellular processes, including cellular senescence. MicroRNA-33 has previously been established to exert crucial effect on cell proliferation, lipid metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. Nonetheless, the association between microRNA-33 and cellular senescence and its underlying molecular mechanism are far to be elucidated. The present study has attempted to probe into the effect of microRNA-33 on MEFs senescence. Our data unveiled that microRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEFs compared to the young MEFs, and ectopic expression of microRNA-33 promoted MEFs senescence, while knock-down of microRNA-33 exhibited a protective effect against senescence phenotype. Moreover, we verified CDK6 as a direct target of microRNA-33 in mouse. Silencing of CDK6 induced the premature senescence phenotype of MEFs similarly as microRNA-33, while enforced expression of CDK6 significantly reverse the senescence-induction effect of microRNA-33. Taken together, our results suggested that microRNA-33 enhanced the replicative senescence of MEFs potentially by suppressing CDK6 expression. -- Highlights: •MicroRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEF cells. •Altered expression of microRNA-33 exerted a critical role in MEFs senescence. •MicroRNA-33 promoted the replicative senescence of MEFs via targeting of CDK6.

  20. Premature aging/senescence in cancer cells facing therapy: good or bad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Llilians Calvo; Ghadaouia, Sabrina; Martinez, Aurélie; Rodier, Francis

    2016-02-01

    Normal and cancer cells facing their demise following exposure to radio-chemotherapy can actively participate in choosing their subsequent fate. These programmed cell fate decisions include true cell death (apoptosis-necroptosis) and therapy-induced cellular senescence (TIS), a permanent "proliferative arrest" commonly portrayed as premature cellular aging. Despite a permanent loss of proliferative potential, senescent cells remain viable and are highly bioactive at the microenvironment level, resulting in a prolonged impact on tissue architecture and functions. Cellular senescence is primarily documented as a tumor suppression mechanism that prevents cellular transformation. In the context of normal tissues, cellular senescence also plays important roles in tissue repair, but contributes to age-associated tissue dysfunction when senescent cells accumulate. Theoretically, in multi-step cancer progression models, cancer cells have already bypassed cellular senescence during their immortalization step (see hallmarks of cancer). It is then perhaps surprising to find that cancer cells often retain the ability to undergo TIS, or premature aging. This occurs because cellular senescence results from multiple signalling pathways, some retained in cancer cells, aiming to prevent cell cycle progression in damaged cells. Since senescent cancer cells persist after therapy and secrete an array of cytokines and growth factors that can modulate the tumor microenvironment, these cells may have beneficial and detrimental effects regarding immune modulation and survival of remaining proliferation-competent cancer cells. Similarly, while normal cells undergoing senescence are believed to remain indefinitely growth arrested, whether this is true for senescent cancer cells remains unclear, raising the possibility that these cells may represent a reservoir for cancer recurrence after treatment. This review discusses our current knowledge on cancer cell senescence and highlight questions

  1. Evolution of senescence in nature: physiological evolution in populations of garter snake with divergent life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Kylie A; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2010-02-01

    Evolutionary theories of aging are linked to life-history theory in that age-specific schedules of reproduction and survival determine the trajectory of age-specific mutation/selection balances across the life span and thus the rate of senescence. This is predicted to manifest at the organismal level in the evolution of energy allocation strategies of investing in somatic maintenance and robust stress responses in less hazardous environments in exchange for energy spent on growth and reproduction. Here we report experiments from long-studied populations of western terrestrial garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) that reside in low and high extrinsic mortality environments, with evolved long and short life spans, respectively. Laboratory common-environment colonies of these two ecotypes were tested for a suite of physiological traits after control and stressed gestations. In offspring derived from control and corticosterone-treated dams, we measured resting metabolism; mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ATP and free radical production rates; and erythrocyte DNA damage and repair ability. We evaluated whether these aging biomarkers mirrored the evolution of life span and whether they were sensitive to stress. Neonates from the long-lived ecotype (1) were smaller, (2) consumed equal amounts of oxygen when corrected for body mass, (3) had DNA that damaged more readily but repaired more efficiently, and (4) had more efficient mitochondria and more efficient cellular antioxidant defenses than short-lived snakes. Many ecotype differences were enhanced in offspring derived from stress-treated dams, which supports the conclusion that nongenetic maternal effects may further impact the cellular stress defenses of offspring. Our findings reveal that physiological evolution underpins reptilian life histories and sheds light on the connectedness between stress response and aging pathways in wild-dwelling organisms.

  2. Redox regulation of peroxiredoxin and proteinases by ascorbate and thiols during pea root nodule senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Karin; Dutilleul, Christelle; van Heerden, Philippus D R; Vanacker, Hélène; Bernard, Stéphanie; Finkemeier, Iris; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Foyer, Christine H

    2006-02-20

    Redox factors contributing to nodule senescence were studied in pea. The abundance of the nodule cytosolic peroxiredoxin but not the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin protein was modulated by ascorbate. In contrast to redox-active antioxidants such as ascorbate and cytosolic peroxiredoxin that decreased during nodule development, maximal extractable nodule proteinase activity increased progressively as the nodules aged. Cathepsin-like activities were constant throughout development but serine and cysteine proteinase activities increased during senescence. Senescence-induced cysteine proteinase activity was inhibited by cysteine, dithiotreitol, or E-64. Senescence-dependent decreases in redox-active factors, particularly ascorbate and peroxiredoxin favour decreased redox-mediated inactivation of cysteine proteinases.

  3. The emerging role of senescent cells in tissue homeostasis and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Tominaga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is a state of permanent growth arrest and is thought to play a pivotal role in tumor suppression. Cellular senescence may play an important role in tumor suppression, wound healing, and protection against tissue fibrosis in physiological conditions in vivo. However, accumulating evidence that senescent cells may have harmful effects in vivo and may contribute to tissue remodeling, organismal aging, and many age-related diseases also exists. Cellular senescence can be induced by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Both p53/p21 and p16/RB pathways are important for irreversible growth arrest in senescent cells. Senescent cells secret numerous biologically active factors. This specific secretion phenotype by senescent cells may largely contribute to physiological and pathological consequences in organisms. Here I review the molecular basis of cell cycle arrest and the specific secretion phenotype in cellular senescence. I also summarize the current knowledge of the role of cellular senescence in vivo in physiological and pathological settings.

  4. Identification and characterization of secretory proteins during ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Na Kyung; Hong, Mi Na; Jung, Seung Hee; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Jae Seon; Chi, Seong Gil

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence was first described by Hayflick and Moorhead in 1961 who observed that cultures of normal human fibroblasts had a limited replicative potential and eventually became irreversibly arrest. The majority of senescent cells assume a characteristic flattened and enlarged morphological change, senescence associated β alactosidase positivity. Recently a large number of molecular phenotypes such as changes in gene expression, protein processing and chromatin organization have been also described. In contrast to apoptosis, senescence does not destroy the cells but leaves them metabolically and synthetically active and therefore able to affect their microenvironment. In particular, senescent fibroblasts and some cancer cells were found to secrete proteins with known or putative tumor-promoting functions such as growth factors or proteolytic enzymes. However, the knowledge about secreted proteins from senescent tumor cells and their functions to surrounding cells is still lacking. In this study, changes of senescence associated secretory protein expression profile were observed in MCF7 human breast cancer cells exposed to gamma-ray radiation using two dimensional electrophoresis. Also, we identified up-regulated secretory proteins during ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence. Here, we show that senescent human breast cancer MCF7 cells promote the proliferation, invasion and migration of neighboring cells

  5. Aberrant localization of lamin B receptor (LBR) in cellular senescence in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Rumi; En, Atsuki; Ukekawa, Ryo [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Miki, Kensuke [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Ichiban Life Corporation, 1-1-7 Horai-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama 231-0048 (Japan); Fujii, Michihiko, E-mail: mifuji@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Ayusawa, Dai [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Ichiban Life Corporation, 1-1-7 Horai-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama 231-0048 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    5-Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analogue, induces cellular senescence in mammalian cells. BrdU induces cellular senescence probably through the regulation of chromatin because BrdU destabilizes or disrupts nucleosome positioning and decondenses heterochromatin. Since heterochromatin is tethered to the nuclear periphery through the interaction with the nuclear envelope proteins, we examined the localization of the several nuclear envelope proteins such as lamins, lamin-interacting proteins, nuclear pore complex proteins, and nuclear transport proteins in senescent cells. We have shown here that lamin B receptor (LBR) showed a change in localization in both BrdU-induced and replicative senescent cells.

  6. Physiological and biochemical aspects of flower development and senescence in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Viv.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar Shaziya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthy buds of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia growing in the Kashmir University Botanic Garden were selected for the present study. Flower development and senescence was divided into seven stages, viz., tight bud stage (I, mature bud stage (II, pencil stage (III, partially open stage (IV, open stage (V, partially senescent stage (VI and senescent stage (VII. Various physiological and biochemical changes were recorded at each stage of flower development and senescence. Floral diameter, fresh mass, dry mass and water content showed an increase up to flower opening (stage V and thereafter a significant decrease was recorded as the flower development progressed towards senescence through stages VI and VII. An increase in α-amino acids, total phenols and sugars was registered towards anthesis (stage V and a decrease in these parameters was recorded with senescence. Protease activity showed a significant increase towards senescence with a concomitant decrease in soluble proteins. Based on the quantitative analysis of various biochemical parameters, the flower opening in N. plumbaginifolia seems to be accompanied by an increase in the water content, soluble proteins, α‑amino acids and phenols. A decrease in these parameters, besides an increase in protease activity induces senescence in the beautiful flowers of N. plumbaginifolia. Understanding flower senescence may help in improving the postharvest performance of this beautiful ornamental flower to make it a potential material for the floriculture industry.

  7. Identification and characterization of secretory proteins during ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Na Kyung; Hong, Mi Na; Jung, Seung Hee; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Jae Seon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chi, Seong Gil [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Cellular senescence was first described by Hayflick and Moorhead in 1961 who observed that cultures of normal human fibroblasts had a limited replicative potential and eventually became irreversibly arrest. The majority of senescent cells assume a characteristic flattened and enlarged morphological change, senescence associated {beta} alactosidase positivity. Recently a large number of molecular phenotypes such as changes in gene expression, protein processing and chromatin organization have been also described. In contrast to apoptosis, senescence does not destroy the cells but leaves them metabolically and synthetically active and therefore able to affect their microenvironment. In particular, senescent fibroblasts and some cancer cells were found to secrete proteins with known or putative tumor-promoting functions such as growth factors or proteolytic enzymes. However, the knowledge about secreted proteins from senescent tumor cells and their functions to surrounding cells is still lacking. In this study, changes of senescence associated secretory protein expression profile were observed in MCF7 human breast cancer cells exposed to gamma-ray radiation using two dimensional electrophoresis. Also, we identified up-regulated secretory proteins during ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence. Here, we show that senescent human breast cancer MCF7 cells promote the proliferation, invasion and migration of neighboring cells

  8. The Role of the S40 Gene Family in Leaf Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jehanzeb

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Senescence affect different traits of plants, such as the ripening of fruit, number, quality and timing of seed maturation. While senescence is induced by age, growth hormones and different environmental stresses, a highly organized genetic mechanism related to substantial changes in gene expression regulates the process. Only a few genes associated to senescence have been identified in crop plants despite the vital significance of senescence for crop yield. The S40 gene family has been shown to play a role in leaf senescence. The barley HvS40 gene is one of the senescence marker genes which shows expression during age-dependent as well as dark-induced senescence. Like barley HvS40, the Arabidopsis AtS40-3 gene is also induced during natural senescence as well as in response to treatment with abscisic acid, salicylic acid, darkness and pathogen attack. It is speculated that rice OsS40 has a similar function in the leaf senescence of rice.

  9. The Dual Role of Cellular Senescence in Developing Tumors and Their Response to Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schosserer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence describes an irreversible growth arrest characterized by distinct morphology, gene expression pattern, and secretory phenotype. The final or intermediate stages of senescence can be reached by different genetic mechanisms and in answer to different external and internal stresses. It has been maintained in the literature but never proven by clearcut experiments that the induction of senescence serves the evolutionary purpose of protecting the individual from development and growth of cancers. This hypothesis was recently scrutinized by new experiments and found to be partly true, but part of the gene activities now known to happen in senescence are also needed for cancer growth, leading to the view that senescence is a double-edged sword in cancer development. In current cancer therapy, cellular senescence is, on the one hand, intended to occur in tumor cells, as thereby the therapeutic outcome is improved, but might, on the other hand, also be induced unintentionally in non-tumor cells, causing inflammation, secondary tumors, and cancer relapse. Importantly, organismic aging leads to accumulation of senescent cells in tissues and organs of aged individuals. Senescent cells can occur transiently, e.g., during embryogenesis or during wound healing, with beneficial effects on tissue homeostasis and regeneration or accumulate chronically in tissues, which detrimentally affects the microenvironment by de- or transdifferentiation of senescent cells and their neighboring stromal cells, loss of tissue specific functionality, and induction of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, an increased secretory profile consisting of pro-inflammatory and tissue remodeling factors. These factors shape their surroundings toward a pro-carcinogenic microenvironment, which fuels the development of aging-associated cancers together with the accumulation of mutations over time. We are presenting an overview of well-documented stress

  10. ACHIEVEMENTS OF PEDIATRIC ANDROLOGY/GYNECOLOGY AS THE FOUNDATION FOR PREVENTION OF REPRODUCTIVE AND SEXUAL FAILURE OF ADULT PATIENTS. THE SCIENCE ABOUT HUMAN SEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Okulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors summarize the experience of management of children with different disorders of reproductive system and emphasize typical mistakes of practitioners, leading in future to decreased human fertility and to deterioration of demographical problems in Russia. Necessity of pediatric andrology/gynecology development as special area of medicine is proved and problems of its establishment are discussed. Authors bring up debatable issue about age qualification for choice of sex in patients born with malformations of externalia. Borderlines and content of new research area – science about human sex – are determined with emphasizing of its interdisciplinary character and problems of professional education which is in prevalence individual. Necessity of terminological unification in pediatric andrology/gynecology is emphasized because inaccurate terms lead to erroneous decisions and actions with long-term sequels. 

  11. Botanical compound p-anisaldehyde repels larval lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae), and halts reproduction by gravid adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.), widely distributed across eastern, southeastern, and midwestern regions of the United States and south into Mexico, is an obligate blood feeder that attaches to three hosts during the larval, nymphal, and adult stages. White-tailed deer and wild turkey ...

  12. Female reproductive disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crain, D Andrew; Janssen, Sarah J; Edwards, Thea M

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the possible role of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on female reproductive disorders emphasizing developmental plasticity and the complexity of endocrine-dependent ontogeny of reproductive organs. Declining conception rates and the high incidence of female reproductive...... disruptions warrant evaluation of the impact of EDCs on female reproductive health....

  13. MicroRNA Regulation of Ionizing Radiation-Induced Premature Senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yong; Scheiber, Melissa N.; Neumann, Carola; Calin, George A.; Zhou Daohong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of many cellular pathways. Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure causes DNA damage and induces premature senescence. However, the role of miRNAs in IR-induced senescence has not been well defined. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify and characterize senescence-associated miRNAs (SA-miRNAs) and to investigate the role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence. Methods and Materials: In human lung (WI-38) fibroblasts, premature senescence was induced either by IR or busulfan (BU) treatment, and replicative senescence was accomplished by serial passaging. MiRNA microarray were used to identify SA-miRNAs, and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR validated the expression profiles of SA-miRNAs in various senescent cells. The role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence was characterized by knockdown of miRNA expression, using anti-miRNA oligonucleotides or by miRNA overexpression through the transfection of pre-miRNA mimics. Results: We identified eight SA-miRNAs, four of which were up-regulated (miR-152, -410, -431, and -493) and four which were down-regulated (miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a), that are differentially expressed in both prematurely senescent (induced by IR or BU) and replicatively senescent WI-38 cells. Validation of the expression of these SA-miRNAs indicated that down-regulation of miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a is a characteristic miRNA expression signature of cellular senescence. Functional analyses revealed that knockdown of miR-155 or miR-20a, but not miR-25 or miR-15a, markedly enhanced IR-induced senescence, whereas ectopic overexpression of miR-155 or miR-20a significantly inhibited senescence induction. Furthermore, our studies indicate that miR-155 modulates IR-induced senescence by acting downstream of the p53 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and in part via regulating tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) expression. Conclusion: Our

  14. Genome-wide transcriptional reorganization associated with senescence-to-immortality switch during human hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Yildiz

    Full Text Available Senescence is a permanent proliferation arrest in response to cell stress such as DNA damage. It contributes strongly to tissue aging and serves as a major barrier against tumor development. Most tumor cells are believed to bypass the senescence barrier (become "immortal" by inactivating growth control genes such as TP53 and CDKN2A. They also reactivate telomerase reverse transcriptase. Senescence-to-immortality transition is accompanied by major phenotypic and biochemical changes mediated by genome-wide transcriptional modifications. This appears to happen during hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC development in patients with liver cirrhosis, however, the accompanying transcriptional changes are virtually unknown. We investigated genome-wide transcriptional changes related to the senescence-to-immortality switch during hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Initially, we performed transcriptome analysis of senescent and immortal clones of Huh7 HCC cell line, and identified genes with significant differential expression to establish a senescence-related gene list. Through the analysis of senescence-related gene expression in different liver tissues we showed that cirrhosis and HCC display expression patterns compatible with senescent and immortal phenotypes, respectively; dysplasia being a transitional state. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that cirrhosis/senescence-associated genes were preferentially expressed in non-tumor tissues, less malignant tumors, and differentiated or senescent cells. In contrast, HCC/immortality genes were up-regulated in tumor tissues, or more malignant tumors and progenitor cells. In HCC tumors and immortal cells genes involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, telomere extension and branched chain amino acid metabolism were up-regulated, whereas genes involved in cell signaling, as well as in drug, lipid, retinoid and glycolytic metabolism were down-regulated. Based on these distinctive gene expression features we developed a 15

  15. Female reproductive disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crain, D Andrew; Janssen, Sarah J; Edwards, Thea M

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the possible role of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on female reproductive disorders emphasizing developmental plasticity and the complexity of endocrine-dependent ontogeny of reproductive organs. Declining conception rates and the high incidence of female reproductive disrupti......To evaluate the possible role of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on female reproductive disorders emphasizing developmental plasticity and the complexity of endocrine-dependent ontogeny of reproductive organs. Declining conception rates and the high incidence of female reproductive...... disruptions warrant evaluation of the impact of EDCs on female reproductive health....

  16. Sun Ginseng Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells From Senescence Associated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Wooseok; Chung, Jin-Young; Bhan, Jaejun; Lim, Jiyeon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Kim, Manho

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are a population of cells that circulate in the blood stream. They play a role in angiogenesis and, therefore, can be prognostic markers of vascular repair. Ginsenoside Rg3 prevents endothelial cell apoptosis through the inhibition of the mitochondrial caspase pathway. It also affects estrogen activity, which reduces EPC senescence. Sun ginseng (SG), which is heat-processed ginseng, has a high content of ginsenosides. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of SG on senescence-associated apoptosis in EPCs. In order to isolate EPCs, mononuclear cells of human blood buffy coats were cultured and characterized by their uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein (acLDL) and their binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (ulex-lectin). Flow cytometry with annexin-V staining was performed in order to assess early and late apoptosis. Senescence was determined by β-galactosidase (β-gal) staining. Staining with 4′-6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole verified that most adherent cells (93±2.7%) were acLDL-positive and ulex-lectin-positive. The percentage of β-gal-positive EPCs was decreased from 93.8±2.0% to 62.5±3.6% by SG treatment. A fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis showed that 4.9% of EPCs were late apoptotic in controls. Sun ginseng decreased the apoptotic cell population by 39% in the late stage of apoptosis from control baseline levels. In conclusion, these results show antisenescent and antiapoptotic effects of SG in human-derived EPCs, indicating that SG can enhance EPC-mediated repair mechanisms. PMID:23717107

  17. Reproductive Disorders in Snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Nicola; Selleri, Paolo

    2017-05-01

    Reproduction of snakes is one of the challenging aspects of herpetology medicine. Due to the complexity of reproduction, several disorders may present before, during, or after this process. This article describes the physical examination, and radiographic, ultrasonographic, and endoscopic findings associated with reproductive disorders in snakes. Surgical techniques used to resolve reproductive disorders in snakes are described. Finally, common reproductive disorders in snakes are individually discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Flight, feeding and reproductive behavior of Phyllophaga cuyabana (Moser (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae adults Comportamento de vôo, de alimentação e de reprodução de adultos de Phyllophaga cuyabana (Moser (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenita Jacob Oliveira

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Phyllophaga cuyabana is a univoltine species and its development occurs completely underground. Its control by conventional methods, such as chemical and biological insecticides, is difficult, so it is important to understand its dispersion, reproduction, and population behavior in order to determine best pest management strategies. The objective of this work was to study the behavior of adults of P. cuyabana. This study was carried out in the laboratory, greenhouse and field sites in Paraná State, Brazil (24º25' S and 52º48' W, during four seasons. The results obtained demonstrate that: a P. cuyabana adults have a synchronized short-flight period when mating and reproduction occurs; b adults tend to aggregate in specific sites for mating; c the majority of adults left the soil on alternate nights; d the choice of mating and oviposition sites was made by females before copulation, since after copulation adults did not fly from or bury themselves at nearby locations; e females that fed on leaves after mating, oviposited more eggs than females that had not fed;f plant species such as sunflower (Helianthus annuus and the Crotalaria juncea are important food sources for adults.Phyllophaga cuyabana é uma espécie univoltina cujo desenvolvimento ocorre no solo. Seu controle por inseticidas químicos e biológicos é difícil, assim é importante entender sua dispersão, reprodução e comportamento populacional a fim de identificar estratégias potenciais de manejo dessa praga. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o comportamento de adultos de P. cuyabana. O estudo foi realizado em laboratório, casa de vegetação e campo, no Estado do Paraná, Brasil (24º25' S e 52º48' O, durante quatro safras. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que: a os adultos de P. cuyabana têm um vôo sincronizado durante um curto período quando ocorre o acasalamento e reprodução; b os adultos tendem a se agregar em sítios específicos para o acasalamento; c a

  19. Amyloid β Protein Aggravates Neuronal Senescence and Cognitive Deficits in 5XFAD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wei

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: oAβ-accelerated neuronal senescence may be associated with the cognitive impairment in 5XFAD mice. Senescence-associated marker p16 can serve as an indicator to estimate the cognitive prognosis for AD population.

  20. Cytokine expression and signaling in drug-induced cellular senescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Zora; Hubáčková, Soňa; Košař, Martin; Janderová-Rossmeislová, Lenka; Dobrovolná, Jana; Vašicová, Pavla; Vančurová, Markéta; Hořejší, Zuzana; Hozák, Pavel; Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2010), s. 273-284 ISSN 0950-9232 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390501; GA ČR GA204/08/1418; GA MŠk LC545 Grant - others:EC(XE) TRIREME Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cellular senescence * cytokines * JAK/STAT signaling pathway Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.414, year: 2010

  1. Radiosensitivity of diapausing and nondiapausing larvae of trogoderma granarium everts to gamma radiation and its effect on the adults reproductive potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharieb, O.H.

    2002-01-01

    Diapausing (D) and nondiapausing (ND) larvae of Trogoderma Granarium Everts were irradiated with a graded series of gamma doses from 20-160 Gy. Larval mortality was much greater in the diapause line, whereas pupal mortality was much greater in the non-diapause line. The percent emergence of both D and ND adults decreased as the dose increased and the D line showed less emergence (17 and 6%) at doses of 60 and 80 Gy while it was (5 and 2%) at doses of 120 and 140 Gy for the ND line. Irradiation delayed the mean emergence time of both D and ND adults and the amount of delay was dose-dependent. Also, Females of both lines were more more sensitive the somatic effects of larval irradiation than were males. Both males and females of the D strain retained a significantly greater production and fertility at each dose as compared to the ND strain. Thus, diapausing larvae have limited value in a sterile insect release program because higher doses would be needed to sterilize D larvae than ND larvae, more somatic damage would occur, and less competitive adults would be produced

  2. The effect of environmentally induced changes in the bark of young conifers on feeding behaviour and reproductive development of adult Hylobius abietis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainhouse, D; Staley, J; Johnston, J; Boswell, R

    2005-04-01

    Young plants of Sitka spruce, Scots and Corsican pine were subject to high and low light, and high and low nitrogen treatments in a polyhouse experiment. The effect of treatments on resin duct size and nitrogen concentration in stem bark was determined together with feeding by Hylobius abietis Linnaeus on the stems of 'intact' plants and on 'detached' stems cut from the plant. Resin duct size was largest on Corsican pine and smallest on Sitka spruce and inherent variation in duct size between the three conifer species appears to determine the pattern of weevil feeding between species. Resin ducts and the flow of resin from them protect the stems of young conifers from weevil feeding not by affecting the total amount of bark eaten but by limiting the depth of feeding and so protecting the inner phloem and cambium. Shallow feeding may increase the likelihood of effective wound repair. Duct size was positively related to plant growth and in particular increased with bark thickness. Overall, ducts were largest in the high light treatment although species differed in their response to the treatment. It is suggested that the effects of plant size, growing conditions and transplantation on susceptibility to attack by H. abietis, reported in various studies, may be due to underlying variation in resin duct size or flow rate. The effect on weevils of superficial feeding on stems is to increase the time for reproductive maturation by reducing consumption of the inner bark which has a higher nitrogen content.

  3. Effect of chronic treatment with three varieties of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) on reproductive parameters and DNA quantification in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasco, M; Aguilar, J; Gonzales, G F

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the chronic effect of different varieties of Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca, Yellow Maca and Black Maca). Male rats were treated by gavage with aqueous extract of each variety of maca equivalent to 1 g hypocotyl kg(-1) body weight (BW) for 84 days. At the end of the treatment, daily sperm production (DSP), epididymal sperm count (ESC) and sperm count in vas deferens (SCVD) were assessed. In addition, testis DNA quantification was also determined. Any toxic effect was assessed in liver and spleen by histological studies. The results indicate that Yellow Maca and Black Maca improved ESC and that three varieties of maca increased the SCVD without affecting DSP. Moreover, testis DNA levels were not affected by treatment with any of the three varieties of maca. Histological picture of the liver in animals treated with the three varieties of maca was similar to that observed in controls. In conclusion, Yellow and Black Maca increased epididymal sperm count after 84 days of treatment without affecting DSP. Maca seems to act as a modulator of sperm count at the reproductive tract level.

  4. Mechanisms of Diabetes-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence: Role of Arginase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esraa Shosha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We have recently found that diabetes-induced premature senescence of retinal endothelial cells is accompanied by NOX2-NADPH oxidase-induced increases in the ureohydrolase enzyme arginase 1 (A1. Here, we used genetic strategies to determine the specific involvement of A1 in diabetes-induced endothelial cell senescence. We used A1 knockout mice and wild type mice that were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin and retinal endothelial cells (ECs exposed to high glucose or transduced with adenovirus to overexpress A1 for these experiments. ABH [2(S-Amino-6-boronohexanoic acid] was used to inhibit arginase activity. We used Western blotting, immunolabeling, quantitative PCR, and senescence associated β-galactosidase (SA β-Gal activity to evaluate senescence. Analyses of retinal tissue extracts from diabetic mice showed significant increases in mRNA expression of the senescence-related proteins p16INK4a, p21, and p53 when compared with non-diabetic mice. SA β-Gal activity and p16INK4a immunoreactivity were also increased in retinal vessels from diabetic mice. A1 gene deletion or pharmacological inhibition protected against the induction of premature senescence. A1 overexpression or high glucose treatment increased SA β-Gal activity in cultured ECs. These results demonstrate that A1 is critically involved in diabetes-induced senescence of retinal ECs. Inhibition of arginase activity may therefore be an effective therapeutic strategy to alleviate diabetic retinopathy by preventing premature senescence.

  5. Long noncoding RNA PANDA and scaffold-attachment-factor SAFA control senescence entry and exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvvula, Pavan Kumar; Desetty, Rohini Devi; Pineau, Pascal; Marchio, Agnés; Moon, Anne; Dejean, Anne; Bischof, Oliver

    2014-11-19

    Cellular senescence is a stable cell cycle arrest that limits the proliferation of pre-cancerous cells. Here we demonstrate that scaffold-attachment-factor A (SAFA) and the long noncoding RNA PANDA differentially interact with polycomb repressive complexes (PRC1 and PRC2) and the transcription factor NF-YA to either promote or suppress senescence. In proliferating cells, SAFA and PANDA recruit PRC complexes to repress the transcription of senescence-promoting genes. Conversely, the loss of SAFA-PANDA-PRC interactions allows expression of the senescence programme. Accordingly, we find that depleting either SAFA or PANDA in proliferating cells induces senescence. However, in senescent cells where PANDA sequesters transcription factor NF-YA and limits the expression of NF-YA-E2F-coregulated proliferation-promoting genes, PANDA depletion leads to an exit from senescence. Together, our results demonstrate that PANDA confines cells to their existing proliferative state and that modulating its level of expression can cause entry or exit from senescence.

  6. Effects of PSAG12-IPT gene expression on development and senescence in transgenic Lettuce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCabe, M.S.; Garratt, L.C.; Schepers, F.; Jordi, W.J.R.M.; Stoopen, G.M.; Davelaar, E.; Rhijn, van J.H.A.; Power, J.B.; Davey, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    An ipt gene under control of the senescence-specific SAG12 promoter from Arabidopsis (PSAG12-IPT) significantly delayed developmental and postharvest leaf senescence in mature heads of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv Evola) homozygous for the transgene. Apart from retardation of leaf

  7. Basal metabolic rate and the rate of senescence in the great tit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, Sandra; Sheldon, Ben C.; Verhulst, Simon; Koteja, Pawel

    1. Between-individual variation in rates of senescence has recently been found to relate to natal and early-life conditions in several natural populations. Mechanistic theories of senescence have predicted between-individual variation in basal metabolic rate (BMR) to also underlie such variation in

  8. The Splicing Factor SRSF1 as a Marker for Endothelial Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Francisco Javier; Bernabéu, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor per se for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The senescence of the endothelial cells (ECs) that line the lumen of blood vessels is the cellular basis for these age-dependent vascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis and hypertension. During their lifespan, ECs may reach a stage of senescence by two different pathways; a replicative one derived from their preprogrammed finite number of cell divisions; and one induced by stress stimuli. Also, certain physiological stimuli, such as transforming growth factor-β, are able to modulate cellular senescence. Currently, the cellular aging process is being widely studied to identify novel molecular markers whose changes correlate with senescence. This review focuses on the regulation of alternative splicing mediated by the serine–arginine splicing factor 1 (SRSF1, or ASF/SF2) during endothelial senescence, a process that is associated with a differential subcellular localization of SRSF1, which typically exhibits a scattered distribution throughout the cytoplasm. Based on its senescence-dependent involvement in alternative splicing, we postulate that SRSF1 is a key marker of EC senescence, regulating the expression of alternative isoforms of target genes such as endoglin (ENG), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), tissue factor (T3), or lamin A (LMNA) that integrate in a common molecular senescence program. PMID:22470345

  9. Finding Shangri-La: Limiting the Impact of Senescence on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabucco, Sally E; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-03

    Senescence plays an important role in the age-associated decline of tissue functions. Recent studies now show that targeting senescent cells can enhance the functions of stem/progenitor cells in aged mice and extend lifespan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A decrease in cyclin B1 levels leads to polyploidization in DNA damage-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ikue; Nakayama, Yuji; Morinaga, Takao; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2010-05-04

    Adriamycin, an anthracycline antibiotic, has been used for the treatment of various types of tumours. Adriamycin induces at least two distinct types of growth repression, such as senescence and apoptosis, in a concentration-dependent manner. Cellular senescence is a condition in which cells are unable to proliferate further, and senescent cells frequently show polyploidy. Although abrogation of cell division is thought to correlate with polyploidization, the mechanisms underlying induction of polyploidization in senescent cells are largely unclear. We wished, therefore, to explore the role of cyclin B1 level in polyploidization of Adriamycin-induced senescent cells. A subcytotoxic concentration of Adriamycin induced polyploid cells having the features of senescence, such as flattened and enlarged cell shape and activated beta-galactosidase activity. In DNA damage-induced senescent cells, the levels of cyclin B1 were transiently increased and subsequently decreased. The decrease in cyclin B1 levels occurred in G2 cells during polyploidization upon treatment with a subcytotoxic concentration of Adriamycin. In contrast, neither polyploidy nor a decrease in cyclin B1 levels was induced by treatment with a cytotoxic concentration of Adriamycin. These results suggest that a decrease in cyclin B1 levels is induced by DNA damage, resulting in polyploidization in DNA damage-induced senescence.

  11. Early Autumn Senescence in Red Maple (Acer rubrum L.) Is Associated with High Leaf Anthocyanin Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rachel; Ryser, Peter

    2015-08-05

    Several theories exist about the role of anthocyanins in senescing leaves. To elucidate factors contributing to variation in autumn leaf anthocyanin contents among individual trees, we analysed anthocyanins and other leaf traits in 27 individuals of red maple (Acer rubrum L.) over two growing seasons in the context of timing of leaf senescence. Red maple usually turns bright red in the autumn, but there is considerable variation among the trees. Leaf autumn anthocyanin contents were consistent between the two years of investigation. Autumn anthocyanin content strongly correlated with degree of chlorophyll degradation mid to late September, early senescing leaves having the highest concentrations of anthocyanins. It also correlated positively with leaf summer chlorophyll content and dry matter content, and negatively with specific leaf area. Time of leaf senescence and anthocyanin contents correlated with soil pH and with canopy openness. We conclude that the importance of anthocyanins in protection of leaf processes during senescence depends on the time of senescence. Rather than prolonging the growing season by enabling a delayed senescence, autumn anthocyanins in red maple in Ontario are important when senescence happens early, possibly due to the higher irradiance and greater danger of oxidative damage early in the season.

  12. Proteome oxidative carbonylation during oxidative stress-induced premature senescence of WI-38 human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Boulch, Marine; Ahmed, Emad K; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2018-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidatively damaged proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing, and is also a phenotypic feature shared by both replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence of human fibroblasts. Moreover, proteins that are building up as oxidized (i.e. the "Oxi-pro...

  13. Identification of Secreted Proteins from Ionizing Radiation-Induced Senescent MCF7 Cells Using Comparative Proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Na Kyung; Kim, Han Na; Hong, Mi Na; Park, Su Min; Lee, Jae Seon; Chi, Seong Gil

    2010-01-01

    Cellular senescence was first described by Hayflick and Moorhead in 1961 who observed that cultures of normal human fibroblasts had a limited replicative potential and eventually became irreversibly arrest. The majority of senescent cells assume a characteristic flattened and enlarged morphological change, senescence associated β-galactosidase positivity and over the years a large number of molecular phenotypes have been described, such as changes in gene expression, protein processing and chromatin organization. In contrast to apoptosis, senescence does not destroy the cells but leaves them metabolically and synthetically active and therefore able to affect their microenvironment. In particular, senescent fibroblasts and some cancer cells were found to secrete proteins with known or putative tumor-promoting functions such as growth factors or proteolytic enzymes. However, the knowledge about secreted proteins from senescent tumor cells and their functions to surrounding cells is still lacking. In this study, changes of senescence-associated secretory protein expression profile were observed in MCF7 human breast cancer cells exposed to gamma-ray radiation using two dimensional electrophoresis. Also, we identified up-regulated secretory proteins during ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence

  14. Replicative senescence of T cells: does the Hayflick Limit lead to immune exhaustion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effros, R B; Pawelec, G

    1997-09-01

    Extensive in vitro research on fibroblasts has defined numerous genetic and phenotypic changes associated with replicative senescence. Identification of T-cell replicative senescence as a feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and ageing suggests this phenomenon merits more careful consideration by immunologists, especially with regard to chronic infection, memory and adoptive immunotherapy.

  15. The cell cycle regulator protein P16 and the cellular senescence of dental follicle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Hullmann, Markus; Reck, Anja; Reichert, Torsten E

    2018-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a restricting factor for regenerative therapies with somatic stem cells. We showed previously that the onset of cellular senescence inhibits the osteogenic differentiation in stem cells of the dental follicle (DFCs), although the mechanism remains elusive. Two different pathways are involved in the induction of the cellular senescence, which are driven either by the cell cycle protein P21 or by the cell cycle protein P16. In this study, we investigated the expression of cell cycle proteins in DFCs after the induction of cellular senescence. The induction of cellular senescence was proved by an increased expression of β-galactosidase and an increased population doubling time after a prolonged cell culture. Cellular senescence regulated the expression of cell cycle proteins. The expression of cell cycle protein P16 was up-regulated, which correlates with the induction of cellular senescence markers in DFCs. However, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)2 and 4 and the expression of the cell cycle protein P21 were successively decreased in DFCs. In conclusion, our data suggest that a P16-dependent pathway drives the induction of cellular senescence in DFCs.

  16. NAC Transcription Factors in Senescence: From Molecular Structure to Function in Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Podzimska-Sroka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes as important regulators of the senescence process. The consensus DNA binding site of the NAC domain is used to predict NAC target genes, and protein interaction sites can be predicted for the intrinsically disordered transcription regulatory domains of NAC proteins. The molecular characteristics of these domains determine the interactions in gene regulatory networks. Emerging local NAC-centered gene regulatory networks reveal complex molecular mechanisms of stress- and hormone-regulated senescence and basic physiological steps of the senescence process. For example, through molecular interactions involving the hormone abscisic acid, Arabidopsis NAP promotes chlorophyll degradation, a hallmark of senescence. Furthermore, studies of the functional rice ortholog, OsNAP, suggest that NAC genes can be targeted to obtain specific changes in lifespan control and nutrient remobilization in crop plants. This is also exemplified by the wheat NAM1 genes which promote senescence and increase grain zinc, iron, and protein content. Thus, NAC genes are promising targets for fine-tuning senescence for increased yield and quality.

  17. Identification of Secreted Proteins from Ionizing Radiation-Induced Senescent MCF7 Cells Using Comparative Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Na Kyung; Kim, Han Na; Hong, Mi Na; Park, Su Min; Lee, Jae Seon [Korea Institue of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chi, Seong Gil [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Cellular senescence was first described by Hayflick and Moorhead in 1961 who observed that cultures of normal human fibroblasts had a limited replicative potential and eventually became irreversibly arrest. The majority of senescent cells assume a characteristic flattened and enlarged morphological change, senescence associated beta-galactosidase positivity and over the years a large number of molecular phenotypes have been described, such as changes in gene expression, protein processing and chromatin organization. In contrast to apoptosis, senescence does not destroy the cells but leaves them metabolically and synthetically active and therefore able to affect their microenvironment. In particular, senescent fibroblasts and some cancer cells were found to secrete proteins with known or putative tumor-promoting functions such as growth factors or proteolytic enzymes. However, the knowledge about secreted proteins from senescent tumor cells and their functions to surrounding cells is still lacking. In this study, changes of senescence-associated secretory protein expression profile were observed in MCF7 human breast cancer cells exposed to gamma-ray radiation using two dimensional electrophoresis. Also, we identified up-regulated secretory proteins during ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence

  18. JNK inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to radiation-induced premature senescence via Bcl-2/ROS/DDR signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Lee, Je Jung

    2009-01-01

    Premature senescence is considered as a cellular defense mechanism to prevent tumorigenesis. Although recent evidences demonstrate that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is involved in the senescence process, the target and exact mechanism of JNK signaling in the regulation of cell proliferation has yet to be defined. In this study, we investigated the role of JNK in premature senescence and demonstrated JNK inhibition sensitized tumor cells to radiation-induced premature senescence

  19. Blocking negative effects of senescence in human skin fibroblasts with a plant extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmermann, Ingo; Terlecki-Zaniewicz, Lucia; Weinmüllner, Regina; Schosserer, Markus; Dellago, Hanna; de Matos Branco, André Dargen; Autheried, Dominik; Sevcnikar, Benjamin; Kleissl, Lisa; Berlin, Irina; Morizot, Frédérique; Lejeune, Francois; Fuzzati, Nicola; Forestier, Sandra; Toribio, Alix; Tromeur, Anaïs; Weinberg, Lionel; Higareda Almaraz, Juan Carlos; Scheideler, Marcel; Rietveld, Marion; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoel; Tschachler, Erwin; Gruber, Florian; Grillari, Johannes

    2018-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that senescent cells are a driving force behind many age-related pathologies and that their selective elimination increases the life- and healthspan of mice. Senescent cells negatively affect their surrounding tissue by losing their cell specific functionality and by secreting a pro-tumorigenic and pro-inflammatory mixture of growth hormones, chemokines, cytokines and proteases, termed the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Here we identified an extract from the plant Solidago virgaurea subsp. alpestris , which exhibited weak senolytic activity, delayed the acquisition of a senescent phenotype and induced a papillary phenotype with improved functionality in human dermal fibroblasts. When administered to stress-induced premature senescent fibroblasts, this extract changed their global mRNA expression profile and particularly reduced the expression of various SASP components, thereby ameliorating the negative influence on nearby cells. Thus, the investigated plant extract represents a promising possibility to block age-related loss of tissue functionality.

  20. Fatty acid and sterol contents during tulip leaf senescence induced by methyl jasmonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Saniewski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown previously that methyl jasmonate (JA-Me applied in lanolin paste on the bottom surface of intact tulip leaves causes a rapid and intense its senescence. The aim of this work was to study the effect of JA-Me on free and bound fatty acid and sterol contents during tulip leaf senescence. The main free and bound fatty acids of tulip leaf, in decreasing order of their abundance, were linolenic, linoleic, palmitic, oleic, stearic and myristic acids. Only the content of free linolenic acid decreased after treatment with JA-Me during visible stage of senescence. ß-Sitosterol (highest concentration, campesterol, stigmasterol and cholesterol were identified in tulip leaf. Methyl jasmonate evidently increased the level of ß-sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol during induced senescence. It is suggested that the increase in sterol concentrations under the influence of methyl jasmonate induced changes in membrane fluidity and permeability, which may be responsible for senescence.

  1. Process of endogenous homeostatic characteristics decline in two suproopganismal biosystems from the standpoint of parametabolistic theory of senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrushin, A V; Aladin, N V

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous decline in homeostatic characteristics of supraorganismal level systems is similar to individual senescence. Similarity is in the fact that this decline as individual senescence is called by negative consequences from specialization of elements the system consists. In systems of supraorganismal level these effects are analogues of parametabolic reactions of senescence individuals.

  2. Comparison between various biomarkers of senescence in bone marrow-derived stromal cells in vitro and ex-vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan; Kassem, Moustapha; Frary, Charles

    Senescent stem cells are classified as non-quiescent, irreversibly growth-arrested, non-terminally differentiated, apoptosis resistant multipotent stem cells that maintain an altered gene expression from their juvenescent precursors. Established markers of senescence such as senescent-associated ...

  3. NMDA receptor function during senescence: implication on cognitive performance

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    Ashok eKumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors, a family of L-glutamate receptors, play an important role in learning and memory, and are critical for spatial memory. These receptors are tetrameric ion channels composed of a family of related subunits. One of the hallmarks of the aging human population is a decline in cognitive function; studies in the past couple of years have demonstrated deterioration in NMDA receptor subunit expression and function with advancing age. However, a direct relationship between impaired memory function and a decline in NMDA receptors is still ambiguous. Recent studies indicate a link between an age-associated NMDA receptor hypofunction and memory impairment and provide evidence that age-associated enhanced oxidative stress might be contributing to the alterations associated with senescence. However, clear evidence is still deficient in demonstrating the underlying mechanisms and a relationship between age-associated impaired cognitive faculties and NMDA receptor hypofunction. The current review intends to present an overview of the research findings regarding changes in expression of various NMDA receptor subunits and deficits in NMDA receptor function during senescence and its implication in age-associated impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function.

  4. Placental telomere shortening in stillbirth: a sign of premature senescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Francesca; Facchinetti, Fabio; Saade, George; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate placental telomere shortening in unexplained stillbirths (SBs) as an indication of premature senescence. Placentas were collected from 42 unexplained SB (>22 weeks), 43 term and 15 preterm live births, at the Policlinico Hospital of Modena (Italy). DNA extracted from placentae was studied for telomere length by real time PCR. Standard curves were generated for telomere lengths from single copy gene amplifications using a reference DNA. The telomere length for each sample was derived based on the ratio of telomere length between the sample and single copy gene standard (T/S ratio). The mean ratio of placental telomere in term live births was 5.181 ± 3.841. A twofold decrease in telomere length was seen in SBs (over all 2.455 ± 1.239; p PTBs) (6.382 ± 5.525; p < 0.01), whereas SBs telomere length were similar to those of preterm premature rupture of membranes (pPROM) (3.296 ± 3.599; p = ns). Substantial reduction in telomere length in SBs is indicative of placental senescence. These data provide mechanistic insights that premature aging may lead to placental dysfunction as an initiator of fetal demise in unexplained SBs.

  5. Genome-wide evaluation of histone methylation changes associated with leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy A Brusslan

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is the orderly dismantling of older tissue that allows recycling of nutrients to developing portions of the plant and is accompanied by major changes in gene expression. Histone modifications correlate to levels of gene expression, and this study utilizes ChIP-seq to classify activating H3K4me3 and silencing H3K27me3 marks on a genome-wide scale for soil-grown mature and naturally senescent Arabidopsis leaves. ChIPnorm was used to normalize data sets and identify genomic regions with significant differences in the two histone methylation patterns, and the differences were correlated to changes in gene expression. Genes that showed an increase in the H3K4me3 mark in older leaves were senescence up-regulated, while genes that showed a decrease in the H3K4me3 mark in the older leaves were senescence down-regulated. For the H3K27me3 modification, genes that lost the H3K27me3 mark in older tissue were senescence up-regulated. Only a small number of genes gained the H3K27me3 mark, and these were senescence down-regulated. Approximately 50% of senescence up-regulated genes lacked the H3K4me3 mark in both mature and senescent leaf tissue. Two of these genes, SAG12 and At1g73220, display strong senescence up-regulation without the activating H3K4me3 histone modification. This study provides an initial epigenetic framework for the developmental transition into senescence.

  6. Senescence as biologic endpoint following pharmacological targeting of receptor tyrosine kinases in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francica, Paola; Aebersold, Daniel M; Medová, Michaela

    2017-02-15

    Cellular senescence was first described in 1961 in a seminal study by Hayflick and Moorhead as a limit to the replicative lifespan of somatic cells after serial cultivation. Since then, major advances in our understanding of senescence have been achieved suggesting that this mechanism is activated also by oncogenic stimuli, oxidative stress and DNA damage, giving rise to the concept of premature senescence. Regardless of the initial trigger, numerous experimental observations have been provided to support the notion that both replicative and premature senescence play pivotal roles in early stages of tumorigenesis and in response of tumor cells to anticancer treatments. Moreover, various studies have suggested that the induction of senescence by both chemo- and radiotherapy in a variety of cancer types correlates with treatment outcome. As it is widely accepted that cellular senescence may function as a fundamental barrier of tumor progression, the significance of senescence for clinical interventions that make use of novel molecular targeting-based modalities needs to be well defined. Interestingly, despite numerous studies evaluating efficacies of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) targeting strategies in both preclinical and clinical settings, the relevance of RTKs inhibition-associated senescence in tumors remains less characterized. Here we review the available literature that describes premature senescence as a major mechanism following targeting of RTKs in preclinical as well as in clinical settings. Additionally, we discuss the possible role of diverse RTKs in regulating the induction of senescence following cellular stress and possible implications of this crosstalk in identification of biomarkers of inhibitor-mediated chemo- and radiosensitization approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Age-Associated Loss of OPA1 in Muscle Impacts Muscle Mass, Metabolic Homeostasis, Systemic Inflammation, and Epithelial Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezze, Caterina; Romanello, Vanina; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Fadini, Gian Paolo; Albiero, Mattia; Favaro, Giulia; Ciciliot, Stefano; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Morbidoni, Valeria; Cerqua, Cristina; Loefler, Stefan; Kern, Helmut; Franceschi, Claudio; Salvioli, Stefano; Conte, Maria; Blaauw, Bert; Zampieri, Sandra; Salviati, Leonardo; Scorrano, Luca; Sandri, Marco

    2017-06-06

    Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs during aging, but its impact on tissue senescence is unknown. Here, we find that sedentary but not active humans display an age-related decline in the mitochondrial protein, optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), that is associated with muscle loss. In adult mice, acute, muscle-specific deletion of Opa1 induces a precocious senescence phenotype and premature death. Conditional and inducible Opa1 deletion alters mitochondrial morphology and function but not DNA content. Mechanistically, the ablation of Opa1 leads to ER stress, which signals via the unfolded protein response (UPR) and FoxOs, inducing a catabolic program of muscle loss and systemic aging. Pharmacological inhibition of ER stress or muscle-specific deletion of FGF21 compensates for the loss of Opa1, restoring a normal metabolic state and preventing muscle atrophy and premature death. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction in the muscle can trigger a cascade of signaling initiated at the ER that systemically affects general metabolism and aging. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Low Birth Weight Is Associated with a Decreased Overall Adult Health Status and Reproductive Capability - Results of a Cross-Sectional Study in Primary Infertile Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Boeri

    Full Text Available Individuals born with low birth weight (LBW risk cardiometabolic complications later in life. However the impact of LBW on general health status and male reproductive function has been scantly analysed. We investigated the clinical and seminal impact of different birth weights (BW in white-European men presenting for primary couple's infertility. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from 827 primary infertile men were compared with those of 373 consecutive fertile men. Patients with BW ≤2500, 2500-4200, and ≥4200gr were classified as having LBW, normal (NBW, and high BW (HBW, respectively. Health-significant comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI. Testicular volume was assessed with a Prader orchidometer. Semen analysis values were assessed based on 2010 WHO reference criteria. Descriptive statistics and regression models tested associations between semen parameters, clinical characteristics and BW categories. LBW, NBW and HBW were found in 71 (8.6%, 651 (78.7% and 105 (12.7% infertile men, respectively. LBW was more frequent in infertile patients than fertile men (p = 0.002. Infertile patients with LBW had a higher rate of comorbidities (p = 0.003, lower mean testicular volume (p = 0.007, higher FSH (p = 0.02 and lower tT levels (p = 0.04 compared to other BW groups. Higher rates of asthenozoospermia (p = 0.02 and teratozoospermia (p = 0.03 were also found in LBW men. At logistic regression models, LBW was univariably associated with pathologic progressive motility (p≤0.02 and pathologic sperm morphology (p<0.005. At multivariable logistic regression analysis, LBW achieved independent predictor status for both lower sperm motility and pathologic sperm morphology (all p≤0.04. Only LBW independently predicted higher CCI values (p<0.001. In conclusion, we found that LBW was more frequent in infertile than in fertile men. Infertile individuals with LBW showed a higher rate of comorbidities and significantly

  9. Reproductive ecology of lampreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas S.; Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Lampreys typically spawn in riffle habitats during the spring. Spawning activity and diel (i.e., during daylight and at night) behavioral patterns are initiated when spring water temperatures increase to levels that coincide with optimal embryologic development. Nests are constructed in gravel substrate using the oral disc to move stones and the tail to fan sediment out of the nest. Spawning habitat used by individual species is generally a function of adult size, where small-bodied species construct nests in shallower water with slower flow and smaller gravel than large-bodied species. The mating system of lampreys is primarily polygynandrous (i.e., where multiple males mate with multiple females). Lamprey species with adult total length less than 30 cm generally spawn communally, where a nest may contain 20 or more individuals of both sexes. Lamprey species with adult sizes greater than 35 cm generally spawn in groups of two to four. Operational sex ratios of lampreys are highly variable across species, populations, and time, but are generally male biased. The act of spawning typically starts with the male attaching with his oral disc to the back of the female’s head; the male and female then entwine and simultaneously release gametes. However, alternative mating behaviors (e.g., release of gametes without paired courtship and sneaker males) have been observed. Future research should determine how multiple modalities of communication among lampreys (including mating pheromones) are integrated to inform species recognition and mate choice. Such research could inform both sea lamprey control strategies and provide insight into possible evolution of reproductive isolation mechanisms between paired lamprey species in sympatry.

  10. Effects of fluctuating temperature and food availability on reproduction and lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Pearson, Phillip; Dawson, John; Allison, David B; Gohlke, Julia M

    2016-12-15

    Experimental studies on energetics and aging often remove two major factors that in part regulate the energy budget in a normal healthy individual: reproduction and fluctuating environmental conditions that challenge homeostasis. Here we use the cyclical parthenogenetic Daphnia pulex to evaluate the role of a fluctuating thermal environment on both reproduction and lifespan across six food concentrations. We test the hypotheses that (1) caloric restriction extends lifespan; (2) maximal reproduction will come with a cost of shortened lifespan; and (3) at a given food concentration, relative to a metabolically equivalent constant temperature environment a diel fluctuating thermal environment will alter the allocation of energy to reproduction and lifespan to maintain homeostasis. We did not identify a level of food concentration that extended lifespan in response to caloric restriction, and we found no cost of reproduction in terms of lifespan. Rather, the individuals at the highest food levels generally had the highest reproductive output and the longest lifespans, the individuals at the intermediate food level decreased reproduction and maintained lifespan, and the individuals at the three lower food concentrations had a decrease in reproduction and lifespan as would be predicted with increasing levels of starvation. Fluctuating temperature had no effect on lifespan at any food concentration, but delayed time to reproductive maturity and decreased early reproductive output at all food concentrations. This suggests that a fluctuating temperature regimen activates molecular pathways that alter energy allocation. The costs of fluctuating temperature on reproduction were not consistent across the lifespan. Statistical interactions for age of peak reproduction and lifetime fecundity suggest that senescence of the reproductive system may vary between temperature regimens at the different food concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The endocrine-brain-aging triad where many paths meet: female reproductive hormone changes at midlife and their influence on circuits important for learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebele, Stephanie V; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2017-08-01

    Female mammals undergo natural fluctuations in sex steroid hormone levels throughout life. These fluctuations span from early development, to cyclic changes associated with the menstrual or estrous cycle and pregnancy, to marked hormone flux during perimenopause, and a final decline at reproductive senescence. While the transition to reproductive senescence is not yet fully understood, the vast majority of mammals experience this spontaneous, natural phenomenon with age, which has broad implications for long-lived species. Indeed, this post-reproductive life stage, and its transition, involves significant and enduring physiological changes, including considerably altered sex steroid hormone and gonadotropin profiles that impact multiple body systems, including the brain. The endocrine-brain-aging triad is especially noteworthy, as many paths meet and interact. Many of the brain regions affected by aging are also sensitive to changes in ovarian hormone levels, and aging and reproductive senescence are both associated with changes in memory performance. This review explores how menopause is related to cognitive aging, and discusses some of the key neural systems and molecular factors altered with age and reproductive hormone level changes, with an emphasis on brain regions important for learning and memory. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Female Reproductive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Female Reproductive System Print en español Sistema reproductor femenino About Human Reproduction All living things ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for ...

  13. Children's Concepts of Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James E.; Kendall, Diane G.

    1971-01-01

    Results of this study provide little support for either Freudian or Piagetian theorizing about what the young child thinks of reproduction. Implications for sex education and reproduction information are presented. (Author/CJ)

  14. Squalus cubensis Reproduction Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Reproductive data from Squalus cubensis (Cuban dogfish) were opportunistically collected from 2005-2012. Data include those necessary to examine reproductive cycle,...

  15. Resource allocation to reproduction in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M; Lika, Konstadia

    2014-11-01

    The standard Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model assumes that a fraction κ of mobilised reserve is allocated to somatic maintenance plus growth, while the rest is allocated to maturity maintenance plus maturation (in embryos and juveniles) or reproduction (in adults). All DEB parameters have been estimated for 276 animal species from most large phyla and all chordate classes. The goodness of fit is generally excellent. We compared the estimated values of κ with those that would maximise reproduction in fully grown adults with abundant food. Only 13% of these species show a reproduction rate close to the maximum possible (assuming that κ can be controlled), another 4% have κ lower than the optimal value, and 83% have κ higher than the optimal value. Strong empirical support hence exists for the conclusion that reproduction is generally not maximised. We also compared the parameters of the wild chicken with those of races selected for meat and egg production and found that the latter indeed maximise reproduction in terms of κ, while surface-specific assimilation was not affected by selection. We suggest that small values of κ relate to the down-regulation of maximum body size, and large values to the down-regulation of reproduction. We briefly discuss the ecological context for these findings. © 2014 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2014 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  16. Gene expression changes in male accessory glands during ageing are accompanied by reproductive decline in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppik, Mareike; Fricke, Claudia

    2017-12-01

    Senescence is accompanied by loss of reproductive functions. Here, we studied reproductive ageing in Drosophila melanogaster males and asked whether the expected decline in male reproductive success is due to diminished functionality of the male accessory gland (AG). The male AG produces the majority of seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) transferred to the female at mating. SFPs induce female postmating changes and are key to male reproductive success. We measured age-dependent gene expression changes for five representative SFP genes in males from four different age groups ranging from 1 to 6 weeks after eclosion. Simultaneously, we also measured male reproductive success in postmating traits mediated by transfer of these five SFPs. We found a decreased in male SFP gene expression with advancing age and an accompanying decline in male postmating success. Hence, male reproductive senescence is associated with a decline in functionality of the male AG. While overall individual SFP genes decreased in expression, our results point towards the idea that the composition of an ejaculate might change with male age as the rate of change was variable for those five genes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Integrin Beta 3 Regulates Cellular Senescence by Activating the TGF-β Pathway

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    Valentina Rapisarda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is an important in vivo mechanism that prevents the propagation of damaged cells. However, the precise mechanisms regulating senescence are not well characterized. Here, we find that ITGB3 (integrin beta 3 or β3 is regulated by the Polycomb protein CBX7. β3 expression accelerates the onset of senescence in human primary fibroblasts by activating the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β pathway in a cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous manner. β3 levels are dynamically increased during oncogene-induced senescence (OIS through CBX7 Polycomb regulation, and downregulation of β3 levels overrides OIS and therapy-induced senescence (TIS, independently of its ligand-binding activity. Moreover, cilengitide, an αvβ3 antagonist, has the ability to block the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP without affecting proliferation. Finally, we show an increase in β3 levels in a subset of tissues during aging. Altogether, our data show that integrin β3 subunit is a marker and regulator of senescence.

  18. Oxidative Stress Induces Endothelial Cell Senescence via Downregulation of Sirt6

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    Rong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has shown that diabetes accelerates aging and endothelial cell senescence is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, including diabetic retinopathy. Oxidative stress is recognized as a key factor in the induction of endothelial senescence and diabetic retinopathy. However, specific mechanisms involved in oxidative stress-induced endothelial senescence have not been elucidated. We hypothesized that Sirt6, which is a nuclear, chromatin-bound protein critically involved in many pathophysiologic processes such as aging and inflammation, may have a role in oxidative stress-induced vascular cell senescence. Measurement of Sirt6 expression in human endothelial cells revealed that H2O2 treatment significantly reduced Sirt6 protein. The loss of Sirt6 was associated with an induction of a senescence phenotype in endothelial cells, including decreased cell growth, proliferation and angiogenic ability, and increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Additionally, H2O2 treatment reduced eNOS expression, enhanced p21 expression, and dephosphorylated (activated retinoblastoma (Rb protein. All of these alternations were attenuated by overexpression of Sirt6, while partial knockdown of Sirt6 expression by siRNA mimicked the effect of H2O2. In conclusion, these results suggest that Sirt6 is a critical regulator of endothelial senescence and oxidative stress-induced downregulation of Sirt6 is likely involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Escherichia coli producing colibactin triggers premature and transmissible senescence in mammalian cells.

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    Thomas Secher

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is an irreversible state of proliferation arrest evoked by a myriad of stresses including oncogene activation, telomere shortening/dysfunction and genotoxic insults. It has been associated with tumor activation, immune suppression and aging, owing to the secretion of proinflammatory mediators. The bacterial genotoxin colibactin, encoded by the pks genomic island is frequently harboured by Escherichia coli strains of the B2 phylogenetic group. Mammalian cells exposed to live pks+ bacteria exhibit DNA-double strand breaks (DSB and undergo cell-cycle arrest and death. Here we show that cells that survive the acute bacterial infection with pks+ E. coli display hallmarks of cellular senescence: chronic DSB, prolonged cell-cycle arrest, enhanced senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal activity, expansion of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear foci and senescence-associated heterochromatin foci. This was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and proteases secretion. These mediators were able to trigger DSB and enhanced SA-β-Gal activity in bystander recipient cells treated with conditioned medium from senescent cells. Furthermore, these senescent cells promoted the growth of human tumor cells. In conclusion, the present data demonstrated that the E. coli genotoxin colibactin induces cellular senescence and subsequently propel bystander genotoxic and oncogenic effects.

  20. Cell Electrical Impedance as a Novel Approach for Studies on Senescence Not Based on Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Joon Cha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Senescence of cardiac myocytes is frequently associated with heart diseases. To analyze senescence in cardiac myocytes, a number of biomarkers have been isolated. However, due to the complex nature of senescence, multiple markers are required for a single assay to accurately depict complex physiological changes associated with senescence. In single cells, changes in both cytoplasm and cell membrane during senescence can affect the changes in electrical impedance. Based on this phenomenon, we developed MEDoS, a novel microelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy for diagnosis of senescence, which allows us to precisely measure quantitative changes in electrical properties of aging cells. Using cardiac myocytes isolated from 3-, 6-, and 18-month-old isogenic zebrafish, we examined the efficacy of MEDoS and showed that MEDoS can identify discernible changes in electrical impedance. Taken together, our data demonstrated that electrical impedance in cells at different ages is distinct with quantitative values; these results were comparable with previously reported ones. Therefore, we propose that MEDoS be used as a new biomarker-independent methodology to obtain quantitative data on the biological senescence status of individual cells.

  1. SIRT1 suppresses the senescence-associated secretory phenotype through epigenetic gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Hayakawa

    Full Text Available Senescent cells develop a pro-inflammatory response termed the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP. As many SASP components affect surrounding cells and alter their microenvironment, SASP may be a key phenomenon in linking cellular senesence with individual aging and age-related diseases. We herein demonstrated that the expression of Sirtuin1 (SIRT1 was decreased and the expression of SASP components was reciprocally increased during cellular senescence. The mRNAs and proteins of SASP components, such as IL-6 and IL-8, quickly accumulated in SIRT1-depleted cells, and the levels of these factors were also higher than those in control cells, indicating that SIRT1 negatively regulated the expression of SASP factors at the transcriptional level. SIRT1 bound to the promoter regions of IL-8 and IL-6, but dissociated from them during cellular senescence. The acetylation of Histone H3 (K9 and H4 (K16 of the IL-8 and IL-6 promoter regions gradually increased during cellular senescence. In SIRT1-depleted cells, the acetylation levels of these regions were already higher than those in control cells in the pre-senescent stage. Moreover, these acetylation levels in SIRT1-depleted cells were significantly higher than those in control cells during cellular senescence. These results suggest that SIRT1 repressed the expression of SASP factors through the deacetylation of histones in their promoter regions.

  2. Extracellular cystatin SN and cathepsin B prevent cellular senescence by inhibiting abnormal glycogen accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang-Seok; Park, Soojong; Lee, Ki-Won; Madhi, Hamadi; Park, Sae Gwang; Lee, Hee Gu; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Yoo, Jiyun; Dong Kim, Kwang

    2017-04-06

    Cystatin SN (CST1), a known inhibitor of cathepsin B (CatB), has important roles in tumor development. Paradoxically, CatB is a member of the cysteine cathepsin family that acts in cellular processes, such as tumor development and invasion. However, the relationship between CST1 and CatB, and their roles in tumor development are poorly understood. In this study, we observed that the knockdown of CST1 induced the activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, a marker of cellular senescence, and expression of senescence-associated secretory phenotype genes, including interleukin-6 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20, in MDA-MB-231 and SW480 cancer cells. Furthermore, CST1 knockdown decreased extracellular CatB activity, and direct CatB inhibition, using specific inhibitors or shCatB, induced cellular senescence. Reconstitution of CST1 restored CatB activity and inhibited cellular senescence in CST1 knockdown cells. CST1 knockdown or CatB inhibition increased glycogen synthase (GS) kinase 3β phosphorylation at serine 9, resulting in the activation of GS and the induction of glycogen accumulation associated with cellular senescence. Importantly, CST1 knockdown suppressed cancer cell proliferation, soft agar colony growth and tumor growth in a xenograft model. These results indicate that CST1-mediated extracellular CatB activity enhances tumor development by preventing cellular senescence. Our findings suggest that antagonists of CST1 or inhibitors of CatB are potential anticancer agents.

  3. Girassol ornamental: caracterização, pós-colheita e escala de senescência Ornamental sunflower: characterization, postharvest and senescence scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Luiz Curti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O girassol ornamental amplia o mercado de comercialização de plantas ornamentais no Brasil. Desta forma, este trabalho teve como objetivo apresentar uma caracterização do manejo pós-colheita e propor uma escala de senescência da cultura do girassol ornamental quanto à senescência, durabilidade das flores e referências de valores de comercialização. A produção de flores é uma atividade de alto risco pela fragilidade do produto, qualidades estéticas e as condições de produção, bem como a menor durabilidade pós-colheita do produto. Esse estudo propõe uma escala de senescência para cultivares de girassol ornamental quanto à senescência dos capítulos para atribuir diferentes remunerações e possibilidades de comercialização da cultura.The ornamental sunflower widen the market of ornamental plants in Brazil. Thus, this study aimed to present a characterization of post-harvest management and to propose a range of senescence stage of sunflower as an ornamental in relation to senescence, flower longevity and benchmark values of trade. The production of flowers is a high risk activity for the fragility of the product, aesthetic qualities and conditions of production as well as lower post-harvest durability of the product. This study proposes a range of senescence stages for ornamental sunflower cultivars as the aging of different chapters to assign salaries and marketability of the crop.

  4. Male Reproductive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With the Male Reproductive System Print en español Sistema reproductor masculino Reproduction All living things reproduce. Reproduction — ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for ...

  5. Ionizing Radiation Induces Cellular Senescence of Articular Chondrocytes via Negative Regulation of SIRT1 by p38 Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Hee; Hwang, Sang Gu [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Senescent cells exhibit irreversible growth arrest, large flat morphology, and up-regulated senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase activity at pH 6.0. Several conditions, including oncogenic stress, oxidative stress, and DNA damage are associated with cellular senescence. Massive acute DNA double-strand breaks occurring as a result of mechanical and chemical stress can be repaired, but some DNA damage persists, eventually triggering premature senescence. Since ionizing radiation directly induces DBS, it is possible that cellular senescence is activated under these conditions. The biological events in chondrocytes following irradiation are poorly understood, and limited information is available on the molecular signal transduction mechanisms of cellular senescence at present. In this study, we identify SIRT1 as a target molecule of p38 kinase and demonstrate that the interactions between p38 kinase and SIRT1 protein play an important role in the regulation of cellular senescence in response to IR.

  6. IGF-I enhances cellular senescence via the reactive oxygen species-p53 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handayaningsih, Anastasia-Evi; Takahashi, Michiko; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Suda, Kentaro [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Takahashi, Yutaka, E-mail: takahash@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular senescence plays an important role in tumorigenesis and aging process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in primary confluent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging. -- Abstract: Cellular senescence is characterized by growth arrest, enlarged and flattened cell morphology, the expression of senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), and by activation of tumor suppressor networks. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a critical role in cellular growth, proliferation, tumorigenesis, and regulation of aging. In the present study, we show that IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in mouse, rat, and human primary cells in the confluent state. IGF-I induced expression of a DNA damage marker, {gamma}H2AX, the increased levels of p53 and p21 proteins, and activated SA-{beta}-gal. In the confluent state, an altered downstream signaling of IGF-I receptor was observed. Treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetylcystein (NAC) significantly suppressed induction of these markers, indicating that ROS are involved in the induction of cellular senescence by IGF-I. In p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the IGF-I-induced augmentation of SA-{beta}-gal and p21 was inhibited, demonstrating that p53 is required for cellular senescence induced by IGF-I. Thus, these data reveal a novel pathway whereby IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner and may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging.

  7. Stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS)--influence of SIPS on radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Boothman, David A

    2008-03-01

    Replicative senescence is a fundamental feature in normal human diploid cells and results from dysfunctional telomeres at the Hayflick cell division limit. Ionizing radiation (IR) prematurely induces the same phenotypes as replicative senescence prior to the Hayflick limit. This process is known as stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). Since the cell cycle is irreversibly arrested in SIPS-induced cells, even if they are stimulated by various growth factors, it is thought that SIPS is a form of cell death, irreversibly eliminating replicating cells. IR-induced-focus formation of DNA repair proteins, a marker of DNA damage, is detected in SIPS as well as replicative senescent cells. Furthermore, both processes persistently induce cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms, indicating DNA damage created by ionizing radiation induces SIPS in normal cells, possibly by the same mechanisms as those occurring in replicative senescence. Interestingly, IR induces SIPS not only in normal cells, but also in tumor cells. Due to the expression of telomerase in tumor cells, telomere-dependent replicative senescence does not occur. However, SIPS is induced under certain conditions after IR exposure. Thus, cell death triggered by IR can be attributed to apoptosis or SIPS in tumor cells. However, metabolic function remains intact in SIPS-induced cancer cells, and recent studies show that senescence eliminate cells undergoing SIPS secrete various kinds of factors outside the cell, changing the microenvironment. Evidence using co-culture systems containing normal senescent stromal cells and epithelial tumor cells show that factors secreted from senescent stroma cells promote the growth of tumor epithelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, regulation of factors secreted from SIPS-induced stromal cells, as well as tumor cells, may affect radiotherapy.

  8. Stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). Influence of SIPS on radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Boothman, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Replicative senescence is a fundamental feature in normal human diploid cells and results from dysfunctional telomeres at the Hayflick cell division limit. Ionizing radiation (IR) prematurely induces the same phenotypes as replicative senescence prior to the Hayflick limit. This process is known as stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). Since the cell cycle is irreversibly arrested in SIPS-induced cells, even if they are stimulated by various growth factors, it is thought that SIPS is a form of cell death, irreversibly eliminating replicating cells. IR-induced-focus formation of DNA repair proteins, a marker of DNA damage, is detected in SIPS as well as replicative senescent cells. Furthermore, both processes persistently induce cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms, indicating DNA damage created by ionizing radiation induces SIPS in normal cells, possibly by the same mechanisms as those occurring in replicative senescence. Interestingly, IR induces SIPS not only in normal cells, but also in tumor cells. Due to the expression of telomerase in tumor cells, telomere-dependent replicative senescence does not occur. However, SIPS is induced under certain conditions after IR exposure. Thus, cell death triggered by IR can be attributed to apoptosis or SIPS in tumor cells. However, metabolic function remains intact in SIPS-induced cancer cells, and recent studies show that senescence eliminate cells undergoing SIPS secrete various kinds of factors outside the cell, changing the microenvironment. Evidence using co-culture systems containing normal senescent stromal cells and epithelial tumor cells show that factors secreted from senescent stroma cells promote the growth of tumor epithelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, regulation of factors secreted from SIPS-induced stromal cells, as well as tumor cells, may affect radiotherapy. (author)

  9. IGF-I enhances cellular senescence via the reactive oxygen species–p53 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handayaningsih, Anastasia-Evi; Takahashi, Michiko; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Suda, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cellular senescence plays an important role in tumorigenesis and aging process. ► We demonstrated IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in primary confluent cells. ► IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner. ► These results may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging. -- Abstract: Cellular senescence is characterized by growth arrest, enlarged and flattened cell morphology, the expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), and by activation of tumor suppressor networks. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a critical role in cellular growth, proliferation, tumorigenesis, and regulation of aging. In the present study, we show that IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in mouse, rat, and human primary cells in the confluent state. IGF-I induced expression of a DNA damage marker, γH2AX, the increased levels of p53 and p21 proteins, and activated SA-β-gal. In the confluent state, an altered downstream signaling of IGF-I receptor was observed. Treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetylcystein (NAC) significantly suppressed induction of these markers, indicating that ROS are involved in the induction of cellular senescence by IGF-I. In p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the IGF-I-induced augmentation of SA-β-gal and p21 was inhibited, demonstrating that p53 is required for cellular senescence induced by IGF-I. Thus, these data reveal a novel pathway whereby IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner and may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging.

  10. Deacetylation of H4-K16Ac and heterochromatin assembly in senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Contrepois Kévin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence is a stress response of mammalian cells leading to a durable arrest of cell proliferation that has been implicated in tumor suppression, wound healing, and aging. The proliferative arrest is mediated by transcriptional repression of genes essential for cell division by the retinoblastoma protein family. This repression is accompanied by varying degrees of heterochromatin assembly, but little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms involved. Results We found that both deacetylation of H4-K16Ac and expression of HMGA1/2 can contribute to DNA compaction during senescence. SIRT2, an NAD-dependent class III histone deacetylase, contributes to H4-K16Ac deacetylation and DNA compaction in human fibroblast cell lines that assemble striking senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHFs. Decreased H4-K16Ac was observed in both replicative and oncogene-induced senescence of these cells. In contrast, this mechanism was inoperative in a fibroblast cell line that did not assemble extensive heterochromatin during senescence. Treatment of senescent cells with trichostatin A, a class I/II histone deacetylase inhibitor, also induced rapid and reversible decondensation of SAHFs. Inhibition of DNA compaction did not significantly affect the stability of the senescent state. Conclusions Variable DNA compaction observed during senescence is explained in part by cell-type specific regulation of H4 deacetylation and HMGA1/2 expression. Deacetylation of H4-K16Ac during senescence may explain reported decreases in this mark during mammalian aging and in cancer cells.

  11. Pulsed electric field increases reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the effect of pulsed electric field - applied in corona discharge photography - on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction, possible induction of DNA fragmentation, and morphological alterations in the gonads. Materials and methods Animals were exposed to different field intensities (100, 200, 300, and 400 kV/m) during the first 2-5 days of their adult lives, and the effect on reproductive capacity was assessed. DNA fragmentation during early- and mid-oogenesis was investigated by application of the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay. Sections of follicles after fixation and embedding in resins were observed for possible morphological/developmental abnormalities. Results The field increased reproduction by up to 30% by increasing reproductive capacity in both sexes. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The rate of increase diminished at the strongest intensities. Slight induction of DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively in the nurse (predominantly) and follicle cells, and exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages, i.e., germarium and predominantly stage 7-8. Sections of follicles from exposed females at stages of early and mid-oogennesis other than germarium and stages 7-8 did not reveal abnormalities. Conclusions (1) The specific type of electric field may represent a mild stress factor, inducing DNA fragmentation and cell death in a small percentage of gametes, triggering the reaction of the animal's reproductive system to increase the rate of gametogenesis in order to compensate the loss of a small number of gametes. (2) The nurse cells are the most sensitive from all three types of egg chamber cells. (3) The mid-oogenesis checkpoint (stage 7-8) is more sensitive to this field than the early oogenesis one (germarium) in contrast to microwave exposure. (4) Possible therapeutic applications, or applications in increasing fertility, should be investigated.

  12. Feeding the beast: can microglia in the senescent brain be regulated by diet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rodney W

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells, resident macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS), are relatively quiescent but can respond to signals from the peripheral immune system and induce neuroinflammation. In aging, microglia tend to transition to the M1 pro-inflammatory state and become hypersensitive to messages emerging from immune-to-brain signaling pathways. Thus, whereas in younger individuals where microglia respond to signals from the peripheral immune system and induce a well-controlled neuroinflammatory response that is adaptive (e.g., when well controlled, fever and sickness behavior facilitate recovery from infection), in older individuals with an infection, microglia overreact and produce excessive levels of inflammatory cytokines causing behavioral pathology including cognitive dysfunction. Importantly, recent studies indicate a number of naturally occurring bioactive compounds present in certain foods have anti-inflammatory properties and are capable of mitigating brain microglial cells. These include, e.g., flavonoid and non-flavonoid compounds in fruits and vegetables, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in oily fish. Thus, dietary bioactives have potential to restore the population of microglial cells in the senescent brain to a more quiescent state. The pragmatic concept to constrain microglia through dietary intervention is significant because neuroinflammation and cognitive deficits are co-morbid factors in many chronic inflammatory diseases. Controlling microglial cell reactivity has important consequences for preserving adult neurogenesis, neuronal structure and function, and cognition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Zika Virus in the Male Reproductive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesel Stassen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses are resurging across the globe. Zika virus (ZIKV has caused significant concern in recent years because it can lead to congenital malformations in babies and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. Unlike other arboviruses, ZIKV can be sexually transmitted and may persist in the male reproductive tract. There is limited information regarding the impact of ZIKV on male reproductive health and fertility. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie persistent ZIKV infections in men is critical to developing effective vaccines and therapies. Mouse and macaque models have begun to unravel the pathogenesis of ZIKV infection in the male reproductive tract, with the testes and prostate gland implicated as potential reservoirs for persistent ZIKV infection. Here, we summarize current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of ZIKV in the male reproductive tract, the development of animal models to study ZIKV infection at this site, and prospects for vaccines and therapeutics against persistent ZIKV infection.

  14. Aging and senescence of skin cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Studying age-related changes in the physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of isolated skin cell populations in culture has greatly expanded the understanding of the fundamental aspects of skin aging. The three main cell types that have been studied extensively with respect to cellular...... aging in vitro are dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and melanocytes. Serial subcultivation of normal diploid skin cells can be performed only a limited number of times, and the emerging senescent phenotype can be categorized into structural, physiological, biochemical, and molecular...... phenotypes, which can be used as biomarkers of cellular aging in vitro. The rate and phenotype of aging are different in different cell types. There are both common features and specific features of aging of skin fibroblasts, keratinocytes, melanocytes, and other cell types. A progressive accumulation...

  15. Retardation of senescence by UV-A light in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) leaf segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuello, J.; Sanchez, M.D.; Sabater, B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of low intensity (0.9–2.2 W m −2 ) UV-A radiation on barley leaf senescence were investigated. UV-A inhibited chlorophyll loss and caused increases in membrane permeability and chloroplast endopeptidases associated with senescence. The treatment of leaf segments with UV-A changed the type of proteins synthesized by chloroplasts, stimulating the synthesis of some specific polypeptides. It is concluded that the senescence of detached leaves provides an appropriate system for investigating effects of low UV-A intensities which are probably mediated by synthesis of specific proteins. (author)

  16. Senescence-associated microRNAs target cell cycle regulatory genes in normal human lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markopoulos, Georgios S; Roupakia, Eugenia; Tokamani, Maria; Vartholomatos, George; Tzavaras, Theodore; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Fackelmayer, Frank O; Sandaltzopoulos, Raphael; Polytarchou, Christos; Kolettas, Evangelos

    2017-10-01

    Senescence recapitulates the ageing process at the cell level. A senescent cell stops dividing and exits the cell cycle. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) acting as master regulators of transcription, have been implicated in senescence. In the current study we investigated and compared the expression of miRNAs in young versus senescent human fibroblasts (HDFs), and analysed the role of mRNAs expressed in replicative senescent HFL-1 HDFs. Cell cycle analysis confirmed that HDFs accumulated in G 1 /S cell cycle phase. Nanostring analysis of isolated miRNAs from young and senescent HFL-1 showed that a distinct set of 15 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in senescent cells including hsa-let-7d-5p, hsa-let-7e-5p, hsa-miR-23a-3p, hsa-miR-34a-5p, hsa-miR-122-5p, hsa-miR-125a-3p, hsa-miR-125a-5p, hsa-miR-125b-5p, hsa-miR-181a-5p, hsa-miR-221-3p, hsa-miR-222-3p, hsa-miR-503-5p, hsa-miR-574-3p, hsa-miR-574-5p and hsa-miR-4454. Importantly, pathway analysis of miRNA target genes down-regulated during replicative senescence in a public RNA-seq data set revealed a significant high number of genes regulating cell cycle progression, both G 1 /S and G 2 /M cell cycle phase transitions and telomere maintenance. The reduced expression of selected miRNA targets, upon replicative and oxidative-stress induced senescence, such as the cell cycle effectors E2F1, CcnE, Cdc6, CcnB1 and Cdc25C was verified at the protein and/or RNA levels. Induction of G1/S cell cycle phase arrest and down-regulation of cell cycle effectors correlated with the up-regulation of miR-221 upon both replicative and oxidative stress-induced senescence. Transient expression of miR-221/222 in HDFs promoted the accumulation of HDFs in G1/S cell cycle phase. We propose that miRNAs up-regulated during replicative senescence may act in concert to induce cell cycle phase arrest and telomere erosion, establishing a senescent phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of L1-ORF2 on senescence of GES-1 cells and its molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-nan LI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effect of long interspersed nuclear elements 1 open reading frame 2(L1-ORF2 gene on the senescence of GES-1 cells and its mechanism of molecular regulation. Methods  Cell culture of high glucose was used to construct stable model of senescent GES-1 cells. L1-ORF2 siRNA vector was constructed and then transfected into normal GES1 and senescent ones with liposome transfection reagents for transient expression. Forty eight hours after transfection, cell growth curves were drawn to show the speed of cell proliferation, flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle, β-galactosidase staining to detect cell aging and Western blotting to detect the expressions of L1-ORF2, P53 and P21proteins. Results  Senescent GES-1 cell model and L1-ORF2 siRNA vector were constructed. Compared with negative control group, the L1-ORF2 expression decreased in normal and senescent GES-1 cells transfected with L1-ORF2 siRNA vector. There was a faster proliferation of senescent GES1 cells (P<0.05 and lower ratio of β-galactosidase (56% vs 69%, P<0.05 and G0/G1 phase (34.2% vs 39.3%, P<0.05 in senescent GES-1 cells transfected with L1-ORE2 siRNA vector than those transfected with negative control vector, while there was no obvious difference between normal GES-1 cells transfected with L1-ORF2 siRNA vector and negative control vector (P>0.05. P53 protein was expressed only in senescent GES-1 cell, while P21 protein was expressed in both normal and senescent GES-1 cells, and the latter had a higher expression level (P<0.05. The GES-1 cells transfected with L1-ORF2 siRNA vector showed lower expressions of P53 and P21 proteins than those transfected with negative control vector (P<0.05. Conclusions  L1-ORF2-siRNA vector could down-regulate the expression of L1-ORF2 protein in normal and senescent GES-1 cells and promote the proliferation of senescent GES-1 cells. P21 and P53 proteins participate in the process of L1-ORF2 regulating

  18. Demographic analysis reveals gradual senescence in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braeckman Bart P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Free-living flatworms ("Turbellaria" are appropriate model organisms to gain better insight into the role of stem cells in ageing and rejuvenation. Ageing research in flatworms is, however, still scarce. This is partly due to culture difficulties and the lack of a complete set of demographic data, including parameters such as median lifespan and age-specific mortality rate. In this paper, we report on the first flatworm survival analysis. We used the species Macrostomum lignano, which is an emerging model for studying the reciprocal influence between stem cells, ageing and rejuvenation. This species has a median lifespan of 205 ± 13 days (average ± standard deviation [SD] and a 90th percentile lifespan of 373 ± 32 days. The maximum lifespan, however, is more than 745 days, and the average survival curve is characterised by a long tail because a small number of individuals lives twice as long as 90% of the population. Similar to earlier observations in a wide range of animals, in M. lignano the age-specific mortality rate increases exponentially, but levels off at the oldest ages. To compare the senescence of M. lignano with that of other ageing models, we determined the mortality rate doubling time, which is 0.20 ± 0.02 years. As a result, we can conclude that M. lignano shows gradual senescence at a rate similar to the vertebrate ageing models Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus. We argue that M. lignano is a suitable model for ageing and rejuvenation research, and especially for the role of stem cells in these processes, due to its accessible stem cell system and regeneration capacity, and the possibility of combining stem cell studies with demographic analyses.

  19. Regulation of neutrophil senescence by microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon R Ward

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are rapidly recruited to sites of tissue injury or infection, where they protect against invading pathogens. Neutrophil functions are limited by a process of neutrophil senescence, which renders the cells unable to respond to chemoattractants, carry out respiratory burst, or degranulate. In parallel, aged neutrophils also undergo spontaneous apoptosis, which can be delayed by factors such as GMCSF. This is then followed by their subsequent removal by phagocytic cells such as macrophages, thereby preventing unwanted inflammation and tissue damage. Neutrophils translate mRNA to make new proteins that are important in maintaining functional longevity. We therefore hypothesised that neutrophil functions and lifespan might be regulated by microRNAs expressed within human neutrophils. Total RNA from highly purified neutrophils was prepared and subjected to microarray analysis using the Agilent human miRNA microarray V3. We found human neutrophils expressed a selected repertoire of 148 microRNAs and that 6 of these were significantly upregulated after a period of 4 hours in culture, at a time when the contribution of apoptosis is negligible. A list of predicted targets for these 6 microRNAs was generated from http://mirecords.biolead.org and compared to mRNA species downregulated over time, revealing 83 genes targeted by at least 2 out of the 6 regulated microRNAs. Pathway analysis of genes containing binding sites for these microRNAs identified the following pathways: chemokine and cytokine signalling, Ras pathway, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Our data suggest that microRNAs may play a role in the regulation of neutrophil senescence and further suggest that manipulation of microRNAs might represent an area of future therapeutic interest for the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  20. Liver damage and senescence increases in patients developing hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Silvia; Quintavalle, Cristina; Burmeister, Katharina; Calabrese, Diego; Schlageter, Manuel; Quagliata, Luca; Cathomas, Gieri; Diebold, Joachim; Molinolo, Alfredo; Heim, Markus H; Terracciano, Luigi M; Matter, Matthias S

    2017-08-01

    Most patients with a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have an underlying chronic liver inflammation, which causes a continuous damage leading to liver cirrhosis and eventually HCC. However, only a minority of cirrhotic patients develop HCC. To assess a possible differential impact of liver inflammation in patients developing HCC versus patients remaining tumor-free, we designed a longitudinal study and analysed liver tissue of the same patients (n = 33) at two points in time: once when no HCC was present and once several years later when an HCC was present. As a control group, we followed cirrhotic patients (n = 37) remaining tumor-free over a similar time frame. We analysed cell damage and senescence of hepatocytes by measuring γ-H2AX positivity, p16 INK4 and p21 WAF/Cip1 expression, nuclear size, and telomere length. γ-H2AX positivity, p16 INK4 and p21 WAF/Cip1 expression, in the first liver biopsy was similar in patients developing HCC later on and cirrhotic patients remaining tumor free. In contrast, γ-H2AX positivity, p16 INK4 and p21 WAF/Cip1 expression, was significantly higher in the second non-tumoral liver biopsy of HCC patients than in the control patients. Consequently, the individual increase in γ-H2AX positivity, p16 INK4 and p21 WAF/Cip1 expression, from the first biopsy to the second biopsy was significantly higher in patients developing HCC than in patients remaining tumor free. In addition, changes in nuclear size and telomere length revealed a more pronounced cell aging in patients developing HCC than in patients remaining tumor free. Hepatocytes from patients developing HCC go through more pronounced cell damage and senescence in contrast to cirrhotic patients remaining tumor free. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Effects of marine reserves on the reproductive biology and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of marine reserves on the reproductive biology and recruitment rates of commonly and rarely exploited limpets. ... For recruitment, we hypothesised that if recruits are attracted to adults or survive better ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  2. Neurogenetics of female reproductive behaviors in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laturney, Meghan; Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Friedmann, T; Dunlap, JC; Goodwin, SF

    2014-01-01

    We follow an adult Drosophila melanogaster female through the major reproductive decisions she makes during her lifetime, including habitat selection, precopulatory mate choice, postcopulatory physiological changes, polyandry, and egg-laying site selection. In the process, we review the molecular

  3. SOX2 and SOX2-MYC Reprogramming Process of Fibroblasts to the Neural Stem Cells Compromised by Senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Winiecka-Klimek

    Full Text Available Tumorigenic potential of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs infiltrating population of induced neural stem cells (iNSCs generated from iPSCs may limit their medical applications. To overcome such a difficulty, direct reprogramming of adult somatic cells into iNSCs was proposed. The aim of this study was the systematic comparison of induced neural cells (iNc obtained with different methods-direct reprogramming of human adult fibroblasts with either SOX2 (SiNSc-like or SOX2 and c-MYC (SMiNSc-like and induced pluripotent stem cells differentiation to ebiNSc-in terms of gene expression profile, differentiation potential as well as proliferation properties. Immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR analyses were used to evaluate gene expression profile and differentiation potential of various iNc types. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation and senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal assays were used to estimate proliferation potential. All three types of iNc were capable of neuronal differentiation; however, astrocytic differentiation was possible only in case of ebiNSc. Contrary to ebiNSc generation, the direct reprogramming was rarely a propitious process, despite 100% transduction efficiency. The potency of direct iNSCs-like cells generation was lower as compared to iNSCs obtained by iPSCs differentiation, and only slightly improved when c-MYC was added. Directly reprogrammed iNSCs-like cells were lacking the ability to differentiate into astrocytic cells and characterized by poor efficiency of neuronal cells formation. Such features indicated that these cells could not be fully reprogrammed, as confirmed mainly with senescence detection. Importantly, SiNSc-like and SMiNSc-like cells were unable to achieve the long-term survival and became senescent, which limits their possible therapeutic applicability. Our results suggest that iNSCs-like cells, generated in the direct reprogramming attempts, were either not fully reprogrammed or

  4. Low Oxygen Modulates Multiple Signaling Pathways, Increasing Self-Renewal, While Decreasing Differentiation, Senescence, and Apoptosis in Stromal MIAMI Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Carmen; D'Ippolito, Gianluca; Curtis, Kevin M.; Delcroix, Gaëtan J.-R.; Gomez, Lourdes A.; El Hokayem, Jimmy; Rieger, Megan; Parrondo, Ricardo; de las Pozas, Alicia; Perez-Stable, Carlos; Howard, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) number decreases with aging. Subpopulations of hMSCs can differentiate into cells found in bone, vasculature, cartilage, gut, and other tissues and participate in their repair. Maintaining throughout adult life such cell subpopulations should help prevent or delay the onset of age-related degenerative conditions. Low oxygen tension, the physiological environment in progenitor cell-rich regions of the bone marrow microarchitecture, stimulates the self-renewal of marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells and expression of Sox2, Nanog, Oct4a nuclear accumulation, Notch intracellular domain, notch target genes, neuronal transcriptional repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), and additionally, by decreasing the expression of (i) the proapoptotic proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and Bak, and (ii) senescence-associated p53 expression and β-galactosidase activity. Furthermore, low oxygen increases canonical Wnt pathway signaling coreceptor Lrp5 expression, and PI3K/Akt pathway activation. Lrp5 inhibition decreases self-renewal marker Sox2 mRNA, Oct4a nuclear accumulation, and cell numbers. Wortmannin-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway inhibition leads to increased osteoblastic differentiation at both low and high oxygen tension. We demonstrate that low oxygen stimulates a complex signaling network involving PI3K/Akt, Notch, and canonical Wnt pathways, which mediate the observed increase in nuclear Oct4a and REST, with simultaneous decrease in p53, AIF, and Bak. Collectively, these pathway activations contribute to increased self-renewal with concomitant decreased differentiation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and/or senescence in MIAMI cells. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt pathway plays a central mechanistic role in the oxygen tension-regulated self-renewal versus osteoblastic differentiation of progenitor cells. PMID:27059084

  5. Effects of aging on the male reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Sezgin; Hekim, Gulgez Neslihan Taskurt; Arslan, Mehmet Alper; Asci, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to discuss the effects of aging on the male reproductive system. A systematic review was performed using PubMed from 1980 to 2014. Aging is a natural process comprising of irreversible changes due to a myriad of endogenous and environmental factors at the level of all organs and systems. In modern life, as more couples choose to postpone having a child due to various socioeconomic reasons, research for understanding the effects of aging on the reproductive system has gained an increased importance. Paternal aging also causes genetic and epigenetic changes in spermatozoa, which impair male reproductive functions through their adverse effects on sperm quality and count as, well as, on sexual organs and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Hormone production, spermatogenesis, and testes undergo changes as a man ages. These small changes lead to decrease in both the quality and quantity of spermatozoa. The offspring of older fathers show high prevalence of genetic abnormalities, childhood cancers, and several neuropsychiatric disorders. In addition, the latest advances in assisted reproductive techniques give older men a chance to have a child even with poor semen parameters. Further studies should investigate the onset of gonadal senesce and its effects on aging men.

  6. Endocrine disruptors in female reproductive tract development and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Liang

    2009-01-01

    Growing concerns over endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their effects on human fetal development and adult health have promoted research into the underlying molecular mechanisms of endocrine disruption. Gene targeting technology has allowed insight into the genetic pathways governing reproductive tract development and how exposure to EDCs during a critical developmental window can alter reproductive tract development, potentially forming the basis for adult diseases. This review prima...

  7. Reproduction (II): Human Control of Reproductive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Alfred

    1970-01-01

    Describes methods of intervening in reproduction of animals and humans (artificial insemination, contraception, ovular and blastodisc transplants, pre selection of sex, cloning) and discusses the social implications of their use with humans. (AL)

  8. Efeitos dos esteroides anabólicos androgênicos sobre o útero e parâmetros reprodutivos de ratas adultas Effects of androgenic anabolic steroids on the uterus and reproductive parameters of adult female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Cherici Camargo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar os efeitos da administração de dois esteroides sintéticos sobre a morfologia do útero e parâmetros reprodutivos de ratas adultas. MÉTODOS: quarenta ratas foram aleatoriamente distribuídas nos grupos experimentais: controle (C; solução fisiológica; tratados com decanoato de nandrolona (DN; 7,5 mg/kg de peso corpóreo; composto de ésteres de testosterona (T; 7,5 mg/kg de peso corpóreo; e, simultaneamente, com DN e T (7,5 mg/kg de peso corpóreo de cada esteroide, em uma única dose/semana, intraperitoneal, durante oito semanas. Cinco fêmeas de cada grupo foram sacrificadas e os cornos uterinos foram coletados, pesados e preparados para avaliação histológica e morfométrica. As ratas restantes foram acasaladas com machos normais para avaliação dos parâmetros reprodutivos, constituindo os grupos tratados durante o período pré-gestacional. Outro grupo de 20 ratas recebeu os tratamentos durante o período gestacional (7º-14º dias. Foi aplicada a análise de variância não paramétrica de Kruskal-Wallis, complementada com o teste de Dunn ou de Student-Newman-Kleus para análise dos dados (5% de significância. RESULTADOS: houve aumento significativo no peso corpóreo das fêmeas androgenizadas (DN: 305±50; T: 280±35; DN+T: 275±30 versus C: 255±22 g (pPURPOSE: to evaluate the effects of the administration of two synthetic steroids in the uterus morphology and in the reproductive parameters of adult female rats. METHODS: divided into four experimental groups: control (C; physiological solution; treated with nandrolone decanoate (DN; 7.5 mg/kg of body weight; with a testosterone esters compound (T; 7.5 mg/kg; and simultaneously with DN and T (7.5 mg/kg of each steroid, in a single intraperitoneal weekly dose, for eight weeks. Five females of each group were sacrificed and the uterine horns were collected, weighted and prepared for histological and morphometrical evaluation. The remaining rats were mated with

  9. Enhanced molecular aging in late-life depression: the Senescent Associated Secretory Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Breno Satler; Reynolds, Charles F.; Sibille, Etienne; Lin, Chien-Wei; Tseng, George; Lotrich, Francis; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Butters, Meryl A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to investigate whether a systemic molecular pattern associated with aging (senescent-associated secretory phenotype – SASP) is elevated in adults with late-life depression (LLD), compared to never-depressed elderly comparison participants. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants We included 111 older adults (80 with LLD and 31 comparison participants) in this study. Measurement A panel of 22 SASP-related proteins was extracted from a previous multiplex protein panel performed in these participants. We conducted a principal component analysis to create the SASP index based on individual weights of each of protein. Results Participants with LLD showed a significantly increased SASP index compared to comparison participants, after controlling for age, depressive symptoms, medical comorbidity (CIRS-G) scores, gender, and cognitive performance (F(1,98)=7.3, p=0.008). Correlation analyses revealed that the SASP index was positively correlated with age (r=0.2, p = 0.03) and CIRS score (r=0.27, p=0.005), and negatively correlated with information processing speed (r=−0.34, p=0.001), executive function (r=−0.27, p=0.004) and global cognitive performance (r=−0.28, p=0.007). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that a set of proteins (i.e., SASP index) primarily associated with cellular aging, is abnormally regulated and elevated in LLD. These results suggest that individuals with LLD display enhanced aging-related molecular patterns that are associated with higher medical comorbidity and worse cognitive function. Finally, we provide a set of proteins that can serve as potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers to monitor the effects of therapeutic or preventative interventions in LLD. PMID:27856124

  10. Implication of p53-dependent cellular senescence related gene, TARSH in tumor suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakoh, Takeshi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Terauchi, Kunihiko; Sugimoto, Masataka; Ishigami, Akihito; Shimada, Jun-ichi; Maruyama, Mitsuo

    2009-01-01

    A novel target of NESH-SH3 (TARSH) was identified as a cellular senescence related gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) replicative senescence, the expression of which has been suppressed in primary clinical lung cancer specimens. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of TARSH involved in pulmonary tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the reduction of TARSH gene expression by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) system robustly inhibited the MEFs proliferation with increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity. Using p53 -/- MEFs, we further suggest that this growth arrest by loss of TARSH is evoked by p53-dependent p21 Cip1 accumulation. Moreover, we also reveal that TARSH reduction induces multicentrosome in MEFs, which is linked in chromosome instability and tumor development. These results suggest that TARSH plays an important role in proliferation of replicative senescence and may serve as a trigger of tumor development.

  11. Nitric oxide prevents alveolar senescence and emphysema in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Boe

    Full Text Available Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME treatment induces arteriosclerosis and vascular senescence. Here, we report that the systemic inhibition of nitric oxide (NO production by L-NAME causes pulmonary emphysema. L-NAME-treated lungs exhibited both the structural (alveolar tissue destruction and functional (increased compliance and reduced elastance characteristics of emphysema development. Furthermore, we found that L-NAME-induced emphysema could be attenuated through both genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. Because PAI-1 is an important contributor to the development of senescence both in vitro and in vivo, we investigated whether L-NAME-induced senescence led to the observed emphysematous changes. We found that L-NAME treatment was associated with molecular and cellular evidence of premature senescence in mice, and that PAI-1 inhibition attenuated these increases. These findings indicate that NO serves to protect and defend lung tissue from physiological aging.

  12. Lovastatin-induced RhoA modulation and its effect on senescence in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Inkyoung; Park, Chaehwa; Kang, Won Ki

    2006-01-01

    Lovastatin inhibits a 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and prevents the synthesis of cholesterol precursors, such as farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), responsible for important cell signaling in cell proliferation and migration. Recently, the anti-cancer effect of lovastatin has been suggested in various tumor types. In this study, we showed that a low dose lovastatin induced senescence and G1 cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells. Addition of GGPP or mevalonate, but not FPP, prevented the lovastatin-induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest and cell senescence. We found that constitutively active RhoA (caRhoA) reversed lovastatin-induced senescence in caRhoA-transfected PC-3 cells. Thus, we postulate that modulation of RhoA may be critical in lovastatin-induced senescence in PC-3 cells

  13. Cytokine-induced 'bystander' senescence in DDR and immuno-surveillance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hodný, Zdeněk; Hubáčková, Soňa; Bartek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 10 (2013), s. 1552-1553 ISSN 1949-2553 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cell senescence * cytokines * immuno-surveillance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.627, year: 2013

  14. Suppression of the vacuolar invertase gene delays senescent sweetening in chipping potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Potato chip processors require potato tubers that meet quality specifications for fried chip color, and color depends largely upon tuber sugar contents. At later times in storage, potatoes accumulate sucrose, glucose and fructose. This developmental process, senescent sweetening, manifes...

  15. [The contribution of plant physiology to understanding the nature of senescence and oncogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrushin, A V

    2008-01-01

    It is suggested to consider a destructive effect on parenchymal tissue of propagative connective-tissue cells in senescence and tumor cells in oncogenesis as a particular case of the apical dominance, the process described for plants.

  16. Developmental origins of adult health and disease: the role of periconceptional and foetal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, I Caroline; MacLaughlin, Severence M; Muhlhausler, Beverly S; Gentili, Sheridan; Duffield, Jaime L; Morrison, Janna L

    2008-02-01

    The 'developmental origins of adult health and disease' hypothesis stated that environmental factors, particularly maternal undernutrition, act in early life to programme the risks for adverse health outcomes, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and the metabolic syndrome in adult life. Early physiological tradeoffs, including activation of the foetal hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, confer an early fitness advantage such as foetal survival, while incurring delayed health costs. We review the evidence that such tradeoffs are anticipated from conception and that the periconceptional nutritional environment can programme the developmental trajectory of the stress axis and the systems that maintain and regulate arterial blood pressure. There is also evidence that restriction of placental growth and function, results in an increased dependence of the maintenance of arterial blood pressure on the sequential recruitment of the sympathetic nervous system and HPA axis. While the 'early origins of adult disease' hypothesis has focussed on the impact of maternal undernutrition, an increase in maternal nutritional intake and in maternal body mass intake has become more prevalent in developed countries. Exposure to overnutrition in foetal life results in a series of central and peripheral neuroendocrine responses that in turn programme development of the fat cell and of the central appetite regulatory system. While the physiological responses to foetal undernutrition result in the physiological trade off between foetal survival and poor health outcomes that emerge after reproductive senescence, exposure to early overnutrition results in poor health outcomes that emerge in childhood and adolescence. Thus, the effects of early overnutrition can directly impact on reproductive fitness and on the health of the next generation. In this context, the physiological responses to relative overnutrition in early life may directly contribute to an intergenerational cycle of

  17. Delayed animal aging through the recovery of stem cell senescence by platelet rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hen-Yu; Huang, Chiung-Fang; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Tsai, Ching-Yu; Tina Chen, Szu-Yu; Liu, Alice; Chen, Wei-Hong; Wei, Hong-Jian; Wang, Ming-Fu; Williams, David F; Deng, Win-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Aging is related to loss of functional stem cell accompanying loss of tissue and organ regeneration potentials. Previously, we demonstrated that the life span of ovariectomy-senescence accelerated mice (OVX-SAMP8) was significantly prolonged and similar to that of the congenic senescence-resistant strain of mice after platelet rich plasma (PRP)/embryonic fibroblast transplantation. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of PRP for recovering cellular potential from senescence and then delaying animal aging. We first examined whether stem cells would be senescent in aged mice compared to young mice. Primary adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow derived stem cells (BMSCs) were harvested from young and aged mice, and found that cell senescence was strongly correlated to animal aging. Subsequently, we demonstrated that PRP could recover cell potential from senescence, such as promote cell growth (cell proliferation and colony formation), increase osteogenesis, decrease adipogenesis, restore cell senescence related markers and resist the oxidative stress in stem cells from aged mice. The results also showed that PRP treatment in aged mice could delay mice aging as indicated by survival, body weight and aging phenotypes (behavior and gross morphology) in term of recovering the cellular potential of their stem cells compared to the results on aged control mice. In conclusion these findings showed that PRP has potential to delay aging through the recovery of stem cell senescence and could be used as an alternative medicine for tissue regeneration and future rejuvenation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased storage and secretion of phosphatidylcholines by senescent human peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosova, Maria; Rudolf, Andras; Pichl, Sebastian; Schmidt, Kathrin; Okun, Jürgen G; Straub, Beate K; Rutkowski, Rafael; Witowski, Janusz; Schmitt, Claus P

    2016-08-01

    Human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) secrete phosphatidylcholines (PC) which form a lipid bilayer lining the peritoneum. They prevent frictions and adhesions and act as a barrier to the transport of water-soluble solutes while permitting water flux. PC may play an essential role in peritoneal integrity and function, the role of PD induced HPMC senescence on PC homeostasis, however, is unknown. HPMC cell lines were isolated from four non-uremic patients. Expression of the three PC synthesis genes (rt-PCR), and cellular storage and secretion of PC (ESI-mass-spectrometry) were analyzed in young and senescent HPMC (>Hayflick-limit). Senescent cells displayed significantly altered morphology; flow cytometry demonstrated extensive staining for senescence-associated beta galactosidase. Nine different PC were detected in HPMC with palmitoyl-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine (PMPC) being most abundant. In senescent HPMC mRNA expression of the three key PC synthesis genes was 1.5-, 2.4- and 6-fold increased as compared to young HPMC, with the latter, phosphatidylcholine cytidylyltransferase, being rate limiting. Intracellular storage of the nine PC was 75-450 % higher in senescent vs. young HPMC, PC secretion rates were 100-300 % higher. Intracellular PC concentrations were not correlated with the PC secretion rates. Electron microscopy demonstrated lamellar bodies, the primary storage site of PC, in senescent but not in young cells. Senescent HPMC store and secrete substantially more PC than young cells. Our findings indicate a novel protective mechanism, which should counteract peritoneal damage induced by chronic exposure to PD fluids.

  19. Oncogene-induced senescence is part of the tumorigenesis barrier imposed by DNA damage checkpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Rezaei, Nousin; Liontos, Michalis

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the existence of tumorigenesis barriers that slow or inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions to neoplasia. One such barrier involves DNA replication stress, which leads to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and thereby to apoptosis or cell cycle arrest...... and senescence markers cosegregate closely. Thus, senescence in human preneoplastic lesions is a manifestation of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress and, together with apoptosis, provides a barrier to malignant progression....

  20. Suppressor of Overexpression of CO 1 Negatively Regulates Dark-Induced Leaf Degreening and Senescence by Directly Repressing Pheophytinase and Other Senescence-Associated Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junyi; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Ren, Jun; Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Xie, Zuokun; Gao, Jiong; Zhou, Xin; Kuai, Benke

    2017-03-01

    Although the biochemical pathway of chlorophyll (Chl) degradation has been largely elucidated, how Chl is rapidly yet coordinately degraded during leaf senescence remains elusive. Pheophytinase (PPH) is the enzyme for catalyzing the removal of the phytol group from pheophytin a , and PPH expression is significantly induced during leaf senescence. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of PPH , we used a yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) one-hybrid system to screen for its trans-regulators. SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO 1 (SOC1), a key flowering pathway integrator, was initially identified as one of the putative trans-regulators of PPH After dark treatment, leaves of an SOC1 knockdown mutant ( soc1-6 ) showed an accelerated yellowing phenotype, whereas those of SOC1 -overexpressing lines exhibited a partial stay-green phenotype. SOC1 and PPH expression showed a negative correlation during leaf senescence. Substantially, SOC1 protein could bind specifically to the CArG box of the PPH promoter in vitro and in vivo, and overexpression of SOC1 significantly inhibited the transcriptional activity of the PPH promoter in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) protoplasts. Importantly, soc1-6 pph-1 (a PPH knockout mutant) double mutant displayed a stay-green phenotype similar to that of pph-1 during dark treatment. These results demonstrated that SOC1 inhibits Chl degradation via negatively regulating PPH expression. In addition, measurement of the Chl content and the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II of soc1-6 and SOC1-OE leaves after dark treatment suggested that SOC1 also negatively regulates the general senescence process. Seven SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENES ( SAGs ) were thereafter identified as its potential target genes, and NONYELLOWING1 and SAG113 were experimentally confirmed. Together, we reveal that SOC1 represses dark-induced leaf Chl degradation and senescence in general in Arabidopsis. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All

  1. A crucial role for CDC42 in senescence-associated inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi K Ito

    Full Text Available Risk factors for atherosclerosis accelerate the senescence of vascular endothelial cells and promote atherogenesis by inducing vascular inflammation. A hallmark of endothelial senescence is the persistent up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes. We identified CDC42 signaling as a mediator of chronic inflammation associated with endothelial senescence. Inhibition of CDC42 or NF-κB signaling attenuated the sustained up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes in senescent human endothelial cells. Endothelium-specific activation of the p53/p21 pathway, a key mediator of senescence, also resulted in up-regulation of pro-inflammatory molecules in mice, which was reversed by Cdc42 deletion in endothelial cells. Likewise, endothelial-specific deletion of Cdc42 significantly attenuated chronic inflammation and plaque formation in atherosclerotic mice. While inhibition of NF-κB suppressed the pro-inflammatory responses in acute inflammation, the influence of Cdc42 deletion was less marked. Knockdown of cdc-42 significantly down-regulated pro-inflammatory gene expression and restored the shortened lifespan to normal in mutant worms with enhanced inflammation. These findings indicate that the CDC42 pathway is critically involved in senescence-associated inflammation and could be a therapeutic target for chronic inflammation in patients with age-related diseases without compromising host defenses.

  2. NOX2-Induced Activation of Arginase and Diabetes-Induced Retinal Endothelial Cell Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modesto Rojas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS and decreases in nitric oxide (NO have been linked to vascular dysfunction during diabetic retinopathy (DR. Diabetes can reduce NO by increasing ROS and by increasing activity of arginase, which competes with nitric oxide synthase (NOS for their commons substrate l-arginine. Increased ROS and decreased NO can cause premature endothelial cell (EC senescence leading to defective vascular repair. We have previously demonstrated the involvement of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2-derived ROS, decreased NO and overactive arginase in DR. Here, we investigated their impact on diabetes-induced EC senescence. Studies using diabetic mice and retinal ECs treated with high glucose or H2O2 showed that increases in ROS formation, elevated arginase expression and activity, and decreased NO formation led to premature EC senescence. NOX2 blockade or arginase inhibition prevented these effects. EC senescence was also increased by inhibition of NOS activity and this was prevented by treatment with a NO donor. These results indicate that diabetes/high glucose-induced activation of arginase and decreases in NO bioavailability accelerate EC senescence. NOX2-generated ROS contribute importantly to this process. Blockade of NOX2 or arginase represents a strategy to prevent diabetes-induced premature EC senescence by preserving NO bioavailability.

  3. Targeted Apoptosis of Senescent Cells Restores Tissue Homeostasis in Response to Chemotoxicity and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baar, Marjolein P; Brandt, Renata M C; Putavet, Diana A; Klein, Julian D D; Derks, Kasper W J; Bourgeois, Benjamin R M; Stryeck, Sarah; Rijksen, Yvonne; van Willigenburg, Hester; Feijtel, Danny A; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Essers, Jeroen; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; van IJcken, Wilfred F; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Pothof, Joris; de Bruin, Ron W F; Madl, Tobias; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Campisi, Judith; de Keizer, Peter L J

    2017-03-23

    The accumulation of irreparable cellular damage restricts healthspan after acute stress or natural aging. Senescent cells are thought to impair tissue function, and their genetic clearance can delay features of aging. Identifying how senescent cells avoid apoptosis allows for the prospective design of anti-senescence compounds to address whether homeostasis can also be restored. Here, we identify FOXO4 as a pivot in senescent cell viability. We designed a FOXO4 peptide that perturbs the FOXO4 interaction with p53. In senescent cells, this selectively causes p53 nuclear exclusion and cell-intrinsic apoptosis. Under conditions where it was well tolerated in vivo, this FOXO4 peptide neutralized doxorubicin-induced chemotoxicity. Moreover, it restored fitness, fur density, and renal function in both fast aging Xpd TTD/TTD and naturally aged mice. Thus, therapeutic targeting of senescent cells is feasible under conditions where loss of health has already occurred, and in doing so tissue homeostasis can effectively be restored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in protein patterns and in vivo protein synthesis during senescence of hibiscus petals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodson, W.R.; Handa, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    Changes in proteins associated with senescence of the flowers of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis was studied using SDS-PAGE. Total extractable protein from petals decreased with senescence. Changes were noted in patterns of proteins from aging petals. Flower opening and senescence was associated with appearance and disappearance of several polypeptides. One new polypeptide with an apparent mw of 41 kd was first seen the day of flower opening and increased to over 9% of the total protein content of senescent petal tissue. Protein synthesis during aging was investigated by following uptake and incorporation of 3 H-leucine into TCA-insoluble fraction of petal discs. Protein synthesis, as evidenced by the percent of label incorporated into the TCA-insoluble fraction, was greatest (32%) the day before flower opening. Senescent petal tissue incorporated 4% of label taken up into protein. Proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and labelled polypeptides identified by fluorography. In presenescent petal tissue, radioactivity was distributed among several major polypeptides. In senescent tissue, much of the radioactivity was concentrated in the 41 kd polypeptide

  5. Environmental stress, ageing and glial cell senescence: a novel mechanistic link to Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinta, S J; Lieu, C A; Demaria, M; Laberge, R-M; Campisi, J; Andersen, J K

    2013-05-01

    Exposure to environmental toxins is associated with a variety of age-related diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. For example, in Parkinson's disease (PD), chronic environmental exposure to certain toxins has been linked to the age-related development of neuropathology. Neuronal damage is believed to involve the induction of neuroinflammatory events as a consequence of glial cell activation. Cellular senescence is a potent anti-cancer mechanism that occurs in a number of proliferative cell types and causes the arrest of proliferation of cells at risk of malignant transformation following exposure to potentially oncogenic stimuli. With age, senescent cells accumulate and express a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP; that is the robust secretion of many inflammatory cytokines, growth factors and proteases). Whereas cell senescence in peripheral tissues has been causally linked to a number of age-related pathologies, little is known about the induction of cellular senescence and the SASP in the brain. On the basis of recently reported findings, we propose that environmental stressors associated with PD may act in part by eliciting senescence and the SASP within non neuronal glial cells in the ageing brain, thus contributing to the characteristic decline in neuronal integrity that occurs in this disorder. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  6. Environmental stress, ageing and glial cell senescence: a novel mechanistic link to Parkinson’s disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinta, Shankar J; Lieu, Christopher A; DeMaria, Marco; Laberge, Remi-Martin; Campisi, Judith; Andersen, Julie K

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to environmental toxins is associated with a variety of age-related diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. For example, in Parkinson’s disease (PD), chronic environmental exposure to certain toxins has been linked to the age-related development of neuropathology. Neuronal damage is believed to involve the induction of neuroinflammatory events as a consequence of glial cell activation. Cellular senescence is a potent anti-cancer mechanism that occurs in a number of proliferative cell types and causes the arrest of proliferation of cells at risk of malignant transformation following exposure to potentially oncogenic stimuli. With age, senescent cells accumulate and express a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP; i.e. the robust secretion of many inflammatory cytokines, growth factors and proteases). Whereas cell senescence in peripheral tissues has been causally linked to a number of age-related pathologies, little is known about the induction of cellular senescence and the SASP in the brain. Based on recently reported findings, we propose that environmental stressors associated with PD may act in part by eliciting senescence and the SASP within non-neuronal glial cells in the ageing brain, thus contributing to the characteristic decline in neuronal integrity that occurs in this disorder. PMID:23600398

  7. Arctigenin induced gallbladder cancer senescence through modulating epidermal growth factor receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingdi; Cai, Shizhong; Zuo, Bin; Gong, Wei; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhou, Di; Weng, Mingzhe; Qin, Yiyu; Wang, Shouhua; Liu, Jun; Ma, Fei; Quan, Zhiwei

    2017-05-01

    Gallbladder cancer has poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Arctigenin, a representative dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, occurs in a variety of plants. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the antitumor effect of arctigenin on gallbladder cancer have not been fully elucidated. The expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptor were examined in 100 matched pairs of gallbladder cancer tissues. A positive correlation between high epidermal growth factor receptor expression levels and poor prognosis was observed in gallbladder cancer tissues. Pharmacological inhibition or inhibition via RNA interference of epidermal growth factor receptor induced cellular senescence in gallbladder cancer cells. The antitumor effect of arctigenin on gallbladder cancer cells was primarily achieved by inducing cellular senescence. In gallbladder cancer cells treated with arctigenin, the expression level of epidermal growth factor receptor significantly decreased. The analysis of the activity of the kinases downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor revealed that the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway was significantly inhibited. Furthermore, the cellular senescence induced by arctigenin could be reverted by pcDNA-epidermal growth factor receptor. Arctigenin also potently inhibited the growth of tumor xenografts, which was accompanied by the downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and induction of senescence. This study demonstrates arctigenin could induce cellular senescence in gallbladder cancer through the modulation of epidermal growth factor receptor pathway. These data identify epidermal growth factor receptor as a key regulator in arctigenin-induced gallbladder cancer senescence.

  8. Proteomic and Biochemical Changes during Senescence of Phalaenopsis 'Red Dragon' Petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Zeng, Lanting; Ye, Qingsheng

    2018-04-28

    Phalaenopsis flowers are some of the most popular ornamental flowers in the world. For most ornamental plants, petal longevity determines postharvest quality and garden performance. Therefore, it is important to have insight into the senescence mechanism of Phalaenopsis . In the present study, a proteomic approach combined with ultrastructural observation and activity analysis of antioxidant enzymes was used to profile the molecular and biochemical changes during pollination-induced petal senescence in Phalaenopsis “Red Dragon”. Petals appeared to be visibly wilting at 24 h after pollination, accompanied by the mass degradation of macromolecules and organelles during senescence. In addition, 48 protein spots with significant differences in abundance were found by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS). There were 42 protein spots successfully identified and homologous to known functional protein species involved in key biological processes, including antioxidant pathways, stress response, protein metabolism, cell wall component metabolism, energy metabolism, cell structure, and signal transduction. The activity of all reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes was increased, keeping the content of ROS at a low level at the early stage of senescence. These results suggest that two processes, a counteraction against increased levels of ROS and the degradation of cellular constituents for maintaining nutrient recycling, are activated during pollination-induced petal senescence in Phalaenopsis . The information provides a basis for understanding the mechanism regulating petal senescence and prolonging the florescence of Phalaenopsis .

  9. ROS, Cell Senescence, and Novel Molecular Mechanisms in Aging and Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaola Davalli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging process worsens the human body functions at multiple levels, thus causing its gradual decrease to resist stress, damage, and disease. Besides changes in gene expression and metabolic control, the aging rate has been associated with the production of high levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS and/or Reactive Nitrosative Species (RNS. Specific increases of ROS level have been demonstrated as potentially critical for induction and maintenance of cell senescence process. Causal connection between ROS, aging, age-related pathologies, and cell senescence is studied intensely. Senescent cells have been proposed as a target for interventions to delay the aging and its related diseases or to improve the diseases treatment. Therapeutic interventions towards senescent cells might allow restoring the health and curing the diseases that share basal processes, rather than curing each disease in separate and symptomatic way. Here, we review observations on ROS ability of inducing cell senescence through novel mechanisms that underpin aging processes. Particular emphasis is addressed to the novel mechanisms of ROS involvement in epigenetic regulation of cell senescence and aging, with the aim to individuate specific pathways, which might promote healthy lifespan and improve aging.

  10. Inhibition of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C prevents bone marrow stromal cell senescence in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunhui; Wang, Nan; Huang, Jie; Xin, Jie; Peng, Fen; Ren, Yinshi; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2009-10-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate in vitro and can be transplanted for treating many kinds of diseases. However, BMSCs become senescent with long-term culture, which inhibits their application. To understand the mechanism underlying the senescence, we investigated the activity of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS with BMSC senescence. The activity of PC-PLC and levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS increased greatly during cell senescence. Selective inhibition of increased PC-PLC activity with D609 significantly decreased the number of senescence-associated beta galactosidase positive cells in BMSCs. Furthermore, D609 restored proliferation of BMSCs and their differentiation into adipocytes. Moreover, D609 suppressed the elevated levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS. The data suggest that PC-PLC is involved in senescence of BMSCs, and its function is associated with integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Photosynthetic Characteristics of Flag Leaves in Rice White Stripe Mutant 6001 During Senescence Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hui ZHEN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Physiological, biochemical and electron microscopy analyses were used to investigate the photosynthetic performance of flag leaves in rice white stripe mutant 6001 during the senescence process. Results showed that the chlorophyll content at the heading and milk-ripe stages in rice mutant 6001 were about 34.78% and 3.00% less than those in wild type 6028, respectively. However, the chlorophyll content at the fully-ripe stage in rice mutant 6001 was higher than that in wild type 6028. At the heading stage, the net photosynthetic rate (Pn in rice mutant 6001 was lower than that in wild type 6028. Rice mutant 6001 also exhibited a significantly slower decrease rate of Pn than wild type 6028 during the senescence progress, especially at the later stage. Furthermore, Ca2+-ATPase, Mg2+-ATPase and photophosphorylation activities exhibited the similar trends as the Pn. During the senescence process, the 68 kDa polypeptide concentrations in the thylakoid membrane proteins exhibited a significant change, which was one of the critical factors that contributed to the observed change in photosynthesis. We also observed that the chloroplasts of rice mutant 6001 exhibited higher integrity than those of wild type 6028, and the chloroplast membrane of rice mutant 6001 disintegrated more slow during the senescence process. In general, rice mutant 6001 had a relatively slower senescence rate than wild type 6028, and exhibited anti-senescence properties.

  12. Non-Cell Autonomous Effects of the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tareq Saleh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In addition to promoting various forms of cell death, most conventional anti-tumor therapies also promote senescence. There is now extensive evidence that therapy-induced senescence (TIS might be transient, raising the concern that TIS could represent an undesirable outcome of therapy by providing a mechanism for tumor dormancy and eventual disease recurrence. The senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP is a hallmark of TIS and may contribute to aberrant effects of cancer therapy. Here, we propose that the SASP may also serve as a major driver of escape from senescence and the re-emergence of proliferating tumor cells, wherein factors secreted from the senescent cells contribute to the restoration of tumor growth in a non-cell autonomous fashion. Accordingly, anti-SASP therapies might serve to mitigate the deleterious outcomes of TIS. In addition to providing an overview of the putative actions of the SASP, we discuss recent efforts to identify and eliminate senescent tumor cells.

  13. Twist1 suppresses senescence programs and thereby accelerates and maintains mutant Kras-induced lung tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuoc T Tran

    Full Text Available KRAS mutant lung cancers are generally refractory to chemotherapy as well targeted agents. To date, the identification of drugs to therapeutically inhibit K-RAS have been unsuccessful, suggesting that other approaches are required. We demonstrate in both a novel transgenic mutant Kras lung cancer mouse model and in human lung tumors that the inhibition of Twist1 restores a senescence program inducing the loss of a neoplastic phenotype. The Twist1 gene encodes for a transcription factor that is essential during embryogenesis. Twist1 has been suggested to play an important role during tumor progression. However, there is no in vivo evidence that Twist1 plays a role in autochthonous tumorigenesis. Through two novel transgenic mouse models, we show that Twist1 cooperates with Kras(G12D to markedly accelerate lung tumorigenesis by abrogating cellular senescence programs and promoting the progression from benign adenomas to adenocarcinomas. Moreover, the suppression of Twist1 to physiological levels is sufficient to cause Kras mutant lung tumors to undergo senescence and lose their neoplastic features. Finally, we analyzed more than 500 human tumors to demonstrate that TWIST1 is frequently overexpressed in primary human lung tumors. The suppression of TWIST1 in human lung cancer cells also induced cellular senescence. Hence, TWIST1 is a critical regulator of cellular senescence programs, and the suppression of TWIST1 in human tumors may be an effective example of pro-senescence therapy.

  14. Ring-like distribution of constitutive heterochromatin in bovine senescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichugin, Andrey; Beaujean, Nathalie; Vignon, Xavier; Vassetzky, Yegor

    2011-01-01

    Cells that reach "Hayflick limit" of proliferation, known as senescent cells, possess a particular type of nuclear architecture. Human senescent cells are characterized by the presence of highly condensed senescent associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF) that can be detected both by immunostaining for histone H3 three-methylated at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) and by DAPI counterstaining. We have studied nuclear architecture in bovine senescent cells using a combination of immunofluorescence and 3D fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH). Analysis of heterochromatin distribution in bovine senescent cells using fluorescent in situ hybridization for pericentric chromosomal regions, immunostaining of H3K9me3, centromeric proteins CENP A/B and DNA methylation showed a lower level of heterochromatin condensation as compared to young cells. No SAHF foci were observed. Instead, we observed fibrous ring-like or ribbon-like heterochromatin patterns that were undetectable with DAPI counterstaining. These heterochromatin fibers were associated with nucleoli. Constitutive heterochromatin in bovine senescent cells is organized in ring-like structures.

  15. Ring-like distribution of constitutive heterochromatin in bovine senescent cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Pichugin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells that reach "Hayflick limit" of proliferation, known as senescent cells, possess a particular type of nuclear architecture. Human senescent cells are characterized by the presence of highly condensed senescent associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF that can be detected both by immunostaining for histone H3 three-methylated at lysine 9 (H3K9me3 and by DAPI counterstaining. METHODS: We have studied nuclear architecture in bovine senescent cells using a combination of immunofluorescence and 3D fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH. RESULTS: Analysis of heterochromatin distribution in bovine senescent cells using fluorescent in situ hybridization for pericentric chromosomal regions, immunostaining of H3K9me3, centromeric proteins CENP A/B and DNA methylation showed a lower level of heterochromatin condensation as compared to young cells. No SAHF foci were observed. Instead, we observed fibrous ring-like or ribbon-like heterochromatin patterns that were undetectable with DAPI counterstaining. These heterochromatin fibers were associated with nucleoli. CONCLUSIONS: Constitutive heterochromatin in bovine senescent cells is organized in ring-like structures.

  16. Limited role of murine ATM in oncogene-induced senescence and p53-dependent tumor suppression.

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    Alejo Efeyan

    Full Text Available Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability.

  17. Reproductive strategies in snakes.

    OpenAIRE

    Shine, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Snakes of both sexes display remarkable flexibility and diversity in their reproductive tactics. Many features of reproduction in female snakes (such as reproductive mode and frequency, seasonality and multiple mating) allow flexible maternal control. For example, females can manipulate not only the genotypes of their offspring (through mate choice or enhanced sperm competition) but also the phenotypes of their offspring (through allocation 'decisions', behavioural and physiological thermoreg...

  18. Reproductive and developmental toxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-01-01

    .... Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology is a comprehensive and authoritative resource providing the latest literature enriched with relevant references describing every aspect of this area of science...

  19. Rplp1 bypasses replicative senescence and contributes to transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artero-Castro, A. [Pathology Department, Fundacio Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Passeig Vall d' Hebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Kondoh, H. [Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Fernandez-Marcos, P.J.; Serrano, M. [Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), 3 Melchor Fernandez Almagro St, Madrid 28029 (Spain); Ramon y Cajal, S. [Pathology Department, Fundacio Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Passeig Vall d' Hebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona (Spain); LLeonart, M.E., E-mail: melleona@ir.vhebron.net [Pathology Department, Fundacio Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Passeig Vall d' Hebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-01

    To determine whether genes expressed by embryonic stem cells have a proliferative effect in primary cells, primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts were infected with an ES cell cDNA library. This led to identification of the ribosomal protein, Rplp1, a member of the P group of ribosomal proteins, whose putative role for bypassing replicative senescence in MEFs was investigated. Our results show that Rplp1 produces a two-fold increase in the expression of an E2F1 promoter and upregulation of cyclin E in MEFs. Therefore, this study is the first to show that overexpression of a single ribosomal protein, Rplp1, is a cause and not a consequence of cell proliferation. In addition, co-expression of Rplp1 with mutant ras{sup Val12} contributed to transformation in NIH3T3 cells, as was evidenced by colony production in soft-agar assays. Moreover, the Rplp1 protein was upregulated in MEFs and NIH3T3 cells upon expression of a p53 dominant negative mutant gene designated p53R175H. Hence, mutation of p53 may facilitate immortalization in vitro by upregulating Rplp1. Lastly, Rplp1 mRNA was found to be upregulated in 16 of 26 human colon cancer biopsy specimens, a finding that may be of relevance to cancer research.

  20. Rplp1 bypasses replicative senescence and contributes to transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artero-Castro, A.; Kondoh, H.; Fernandez-Marcos, P.J.; Serrano, M.; Ramon y Cajal, S.; LLeonart, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether genes expressed by embryonic stem cells have a proliferative effect in primary cells, primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts were infected with an ES cell cDNA library. This led to identification of the ribosomal protein, Rplp1, a member of the P group of ribosomal proteins, whose putative role for bypassing replicative senescence in MEFs was investigated. Our results show that Rplp1 produces a two-fold increase in the expression of an E2F1 promoter and upregulation of cyclin E in MEFs. Therefore, this study is the first to show that overexpression of a single ribosomal protein, Rplp1, is a cause and not a consequence of cell proliferation. In addition, co-expression of Rplp1 with mutant ras Val12 contributed to transformation in NIH3T3 cells, as was evidenced by colony production in soft-agar assays. Moreover, the Rplp1 protein was upregulated in MEFs and NIH3T3 cells upon expression of a p53 dominant negative mutant gene designated p53R175H. Hence, mutation of p53 may facilitate immortalization in vitro by upregulating Rplp1. Lastly, Rplp1 mRNA was found to be upregulated in 16 of 26 human colon cancer biopsy specimens, a finding that may be of relevance to cancer research.

  1. Whole plant senescence of sunflower following seedhead removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, InSun; Below, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to further clarify the relationship between seed development and monocarpic senescence of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Field-grown plants with and without seedheads were evaluated for rate and duration of accumulation of dry weight, reduced N, and P by whole shoots, and for partitioning of these constituents within the individual plant parts. Concurrent with seedhead removal, [ 15 N]nitrate was applied to the plants in a selected are of the experimental plot. Whole plants (above ground portions) were harvested seven times during the seed-filling period and analyzed from dry weight, reduced N, and P. Although seedhead removal depressed the rates of dry weight, reduced N, and P accumulation by whole shoots, it extended the duration of accumulation of these constituents, relative to headed control plants. As a result, the final whole shoot dry weight and N and P contents at seed maturity were similar for deheaded and headed plants. Seedhead removal also affected the partitioning of dry matter, reduced N, and P but the relative proportions varied as a function of constituent and growth stage. Analysis of 15 N present in whole shoots at physiological maturity showed that similar amounts of nitrate were absorbed during the postflowering period by headed and deheaded plants. These data indicate that the absence of seeds does not affect the total accumulation of dry matter, reduced N, or P, by sunflower plants, but does alter the rates of accumulation and partitioning of these constituents

  2. Zmpste24-/- mouse model for senescent wound healing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Parag; Szpalski, Caroline; Soares, Marc; Davidson, Edward H; Knobel, Denis; Warren, Stephen M

    2012-12-01

    The graying of our population has motivated the authors to better understand age-related impairments in wound healing. To increase research throughput, the authors hypothesized that the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome Zmpste24-deficient (Zmpste24(-/-)) mouse could serve as a model of senescent wound healing. Using a stented excisional wound closure model, the authors tested this hypothesis on 8-week-old male Zmpste24(-/-) mice (n = 25) and age-matched male C57BL/6J wild-type mice (n = 25). Wounds were measured photogrammetrically and harvested for immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and circulating vasculogenic progenitor cells were measured by flow cytometry. Zmpste24(-/-) mice had a significant delay in wound closure compared with wild-type mice during the proliferative/vasculogenic phase. Zmpste24(-/-) wounds had decreased proliferation, increased 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels, increased proapoptotic signaling (i.e., p53, PUMA, BAX), decreased antiapoptotic signaling (i.e., Bcl-2), and increased DNA fragmentation. These changes correlated with decreased local vasculogenic growth factor expression, decreased mobilization of bone marrow-derived vasculogenic progenitor cells, and decreased new blood vessel formation. Age-related impairments in wound closure are multifactorial. The authors' data suggest that the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome Zmpste24(-/-) progeroid syndrome shares mechanistic overlap with normal aging and therefore might provide a uniquely informative model with which to study age-associated impairments in wound closure.

  3. Overexpression of the novel senescence marker β-galactosidase (GLB1 in prostate cancer predicts reduced PSA recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Wagner

    Full Text Available Senescence is a terminal growth arrest that functions as a tumor suppressor in aging and precancerous cells and is a response to selected anticancer compounds. Lysosomal-β-galactosidase (GLB1 hydrolyzes β-galactose from glycoconjugates and is the origin of senescence-associated β-gal activity (SA-β-gal. Using a new GLB1 antibody, senescence biology was investigated in prostate cancer (PCa tissues.In vitro characterization of GLB1 was determined in primary prostate epithelial cell cultures passaged to replicative senescence and in therapy-induced senescence in PCa lines using chemotherapeutic agents. FFPE tissue microarrays were subjected to immunofluorescent staining for GLB1, Ki67 and HP1γ and automated quantitative imaging initially using AQUA in exploratory samples and Vectra in a validation series.GLB1 expression accumulates in replicative and induced senescence and correlates with senescent morphology and P16 (CDKN2 expression. In tissue arrays, quantitative imaging detects increased GLB1 expression in high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN, known to contain senescent cells, and cancer compared to benign prostate tissues (p<0.01 and senescent cells contain low Ki67 and elevated HP1γ. Within primary tumors, elevated GLB1 associates with lower T stage (p=0.01, localized versus metastatic disease (p=0.0003 and improved PSA-free survival (p=0.03. Increased GLB1 stratifies better PSA-free survival in intermediate grade PCa (0.01. Tissues that elaborate higher GLB1 display increased uniformity of expression.Increased GLB1 is a valuable marker in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues for the senescence-like phenotype and associates with improved cancer outcomes. This protein addresses a lack of senescence markers and should be applicable to study the biologic role of senescence in other cancers.

  4. WRKY54 and WRKY70 co-operate as negative regulators of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Besseau, Sébastien; Li, Jing; Palva, E. Tapio

    2012-01-01

    The plant-specific WRKY transcription factor (TF) family with 74 members in Arabidopsis thaliana appears to be involved in the regulation of various physiological processes including plant defence and senescence. WRKY53 and WRKY70 were previously implicated as positive and negative regulators of senescence, respectively. Here the putative function of other WRKY group III proteins in Arabidopsis leaf senescence has been explored and the results suggest the involvement of two additional WRKY TF...

  5. Lipid profiling demonstrates that suppressing Arabidopsis phospholipase Dδ retards ABA-promoted leaf senescence by attenuating lipid degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxia Jia

    Full Text Available Senescence is the last phase of the plant life cycle and has an important role in plant development. Degradation of membrane lipids is an essential process during leaf senescence. Several studies have reported fundamental changes in membrane lipids and phospholipase D (PLD activity as leaves senesce. Suppression of phospholipase Dα1 (PLDα1 retards abscisic acid (ABA-promoted senescence. However, given the absence of studies that have profiled changes in the compositions of membrane lipid molecules during leaf senescence, there is no direct evidence that PLD affects lipid composition during the process. Here, we show that application of n-butanol, an inhibitor of PLD, and N-Acylethanolamine (NAE 12∶0, a specific inhibitor of PLDα1, retarded ABA-promoted senescence to different extents. Furthermore, phospholipase Dδ (PLDδ was induced in leaves treated with ABA, and suppression of PLDδ retarded ABA-promoted senescence in Arabidopsis. Lipid profiling revealed that detachment-induced senescence had different effects on plastidic and extraplastidic lipids. The accelerated degradation of plastidic lipids during ABA-induced senescence in wild-type plants was attenuated in PLDδ-knockout (PLDδ-KO plants. Dramatic increases in phosphatidic acid (PA and decreases in phosphatidylcholine (PC during ABA-induced senescence were also suppressed in PLDδ-KO plants. Our results suggest that PLDδ-mediated hydrolysis of PC to PA plays a positive role in ABA-promoted senescence. The attenuation of PA formation resulting from suppression of PLDδ blocks the degradation of membrane lipids, which retards ABA-promoted senescence.

  6. Herança da senescência retardada em milho Inheritance of the delayed senescence in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Fernandes Nassau Costa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a herança da senescência retardada em milho. Foram realizados cruzamentos dialélicos parciais entre 50 linhagens e cinco testadores. Os 250 cruzamentos resultantes, além de seis híbridos comerciais utilizados como testemunhas, foram avaliados em oito ambientes, no delineamento látice simples 16x16, com duas repetições por ambiente. Os cruzamentos dialélicos foram analisados utilizando o método 4 do modelo 1 de Griffing, adaptado para múltiplos ambientes. A contribuição da capacidade geral de combinação (CGC para a expressão do caráter "stay-green" (69,06% foi maior que a da capacidade específica de combinação (CEC (30,94%, evidenciando que os efeitos aditivos são mais importantes que os efeitos não aditivos na expressão deste caráter. Tanto a CGC como a CEC interagiram significativamente com o ambiente, indicando que a seleção para este caráter deve ser realizada com base nas médias de experimentos em diversos ambientes.The objective of this research was to study the inheritance of delayed senescence in maize. Partial diallel crosses among 50 inbred lines and five testers were made. The 250 crosses, along with six commercial hybrids used as checks, were evaluated at eight environments in lattices 16x16 with two replications per environment. The diallel crosses were analyzed following the method 4 model 1 of Griffing, extended to multiple environments. The contribution of the general combining ability (CGA for the expression of the stay-green trait (69.06% was greater than the specific combining ability (SCA (30.94%, showing that additive effects are more important than non-additive effects for the expression of this trait. Both GCA and SCA interacted significantly with the environments, indicating that the selection for this trait should be based on the means across environments.

  7. Curcumin elevates sirtuin level but does not postpone in vitro senescence of human cells building the vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Wioleta; Suszek, Małgorzata; Wnuk, Maciej; Lewinska, Anna; Wasiak, Emilia; Sikora, Ewa; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that curcumin, a component of the turmeric that belongs to hormetins, possesses anti-aging propensity. This property of curcumin can be partially explained by its influence on the level of sirtuins. Previously, we have shown that relatively high (2.5-10 μM) doses of curcumin induce senescence of cancer cells and cells building the vasculature. In the present study we examined whether curcumin at low doses (0.1 and 1 μM) is able to delay cell senescence and upregulate the level of sirtuins in human cells building the vasculature, namely vascular smooth muscle (VSMC) and endothelial (EC) cells. To this end we used cells senescing in a replicative and premature manner. We showed that low doses of curcumin in case of VSMC neither postponed the replicative senescence nor protected from premature senescence induced by doxorubicin. Moreover, curcumin slightly accelerated replicative senescence of EC. Despite some fluctuations, a clear increasing tendency in the level of sirtuins was observed in curcumin-treated young, senescing or already senescent cells. Sirtuin activation could be caused by the activation of AMPK resulting from superoxide elevation and ATP reduction. Our results show that curcumin at low doses can increase the level of sirtuins without delaying senescence of VSMC. PMID:27034011

  8. From the Hayflick mosaic to the mosaics of ageing. Role of stress-induced premature senescence in human ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Olivier; Remacle, Jose; Dierick, Jean-François; Pascal, Thierry; Frippiat, Christophe; Zdanov, Stéphanie; Magalhaes, Joao Pedro; Royer, Véronique; Chainiaux, Florence

    2002-11-01

    The Hayflick limit-senescence of proliferative cell types-is a fundamental feature of proliferative cells in vitro. Various human proliferative cell types exposed in vitro to many types of subcytotoxic stresses undergo stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) (also called stress-induced premature senescence-like phenotype, according to the definition of senescence). The known mechanisms of appearance the main features of SIPS are reviewed: senescent-like morphology, growth arrest, senescence-related changes in gene expression, telomere shortening. Long before telomere-shortening induces senescence, other factors such as culture conditions or lack of 'feeder cells' can trigger either SIPS or prolonged reversible G(0) phase of the cell cycle. In vivo, 'proliferative' cell types of aged individuals are likely to compose a mosaic made of cells irreversibly growth arrested or not. The higher level of stress to which these cells have been exposed throughout their life span, the higher proportion of the cells of this mosaic will be in SIPS rather than in telomere-shortening dependent senescence. All cell types undergoing SIPS in vivo, most notably the ones in stressful conditions, are likely to participate in the tissular changes observed along ageing. For instance, human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) exposed in vivo and in vitro to pro-inflammatory cytokines display biomarkers of senescence and might participate in the degradation of the extracellular matrix observed in ageing.

  9. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inactivation Induces Cell Senescence through Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1-Mediated Lipogenesis in Chang Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You-Mie; Song, Insun; Seo, Yong-Hak; Yoon, Gyesoon

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced lipogenesis plays a critical role in cell senescence via induction of expression of the mature form of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1), which contributes to an increase in organellar mass, one of the indicators of senescence. We investigated the molecular mechanisms by which signaling molecules control SREBP1-mediated lipogenesis and senescence. We developed cellular models for stress-induced senescence, by exposing Chang cells, which are immortalized human liver cells, to subcytotoxic concentrations (200 µM) of deferoxamine (DFO) and H2O2. In this model of stress-induced cell senescence using DFO and H2O2, the phosphorylation profile of glycogen synthase kinase 3α (GSK3α) and β corresponded closely to the expression profile of the mature form of SREBP-1 protein. Inhibition of GSK3 with a subcytotoxic concentration of the selective GSK3 inhibitor SB415286 significantly increased mature SREBP1 expression, as well as lipogenesis and organellar mass. In addition, GSK3 inhibition was sufficient to induce senescence in Chang cells. Suppression of GSK3 expression with siRNAs specific to GSK3α and β also increased mature SREBP1 expression and induced senescence. Finally, blocking lipogenesis with fatty acid synthase inhibitors (cerulenin and C75) and siRNA-mediated silencing of SREBP1 and ATP citrate lyase (ACL) significantly attenuated GSK3 inhibition-induced senescence. GSK3 inactivation is an important upstream event that induces SREBP1-mediated lipogenesis and consequent cell senescence.

  10. The Reproduction of Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisenberg, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Although a negative relationship between fertility and education has been described consistently in most countries of the world, less is known about the relationship between intelligence and reproductive outcomes. Also the paths through which intelligence influences reproductive outcomes are uncertain. The present study uses the NLSY79 to analyze…

  11. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Mishra, Anurag [Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Krynetskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: ekrynets@temple.edu [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  12. Cytokinin delays dark-induced senescence in rice by maintaining the chlorophyll cycle and photosynthetic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talla, Sai Krishna; Panigrahy, Madhusmita; Kappara, Saivishnupriya; Nirosha, P; Neelamraju, Sarla; Ramanan, Rajeshwari

    2016-03-01

    The phytohormone cytokinin (CK) is known to delay senescence in plants. We studied the effect of a CK analog, 6-benzyl adenine (BA), on rice leaves to understand the possible mechanism by which CK delays senescence in a drought- and heat-tolerant rice cultivar Nagina22 (N22) using dark-induced senescence (DIS) as a surrogate for natural senescence of leaves. Leaves of N22-H-dgl162, a stay-green mutant of N22, and BA-treated N22 showed retention of chlorophyll (Chl) pigments, maintenance of the Chl a/b ratio, and delay in reduction of both photochemical efficiency and rate of oxygen evolution during DIS. HPLC analysis showed accumulation of 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll (HmChl) during DIS, and the kinetics of its accumulation correlated with progression of senescence. Transcriptome analysis revealed that several plastid-localized genes, specifically those associated with photosystem II (PSII), showed higher transcript levels in BA-treated N22 and the stay-green mutant leaves compared with naturally senescing N22 leaves. Real-time PCR analyses showed that genes coding for enzymes associated with Chl a/b interconversion and proteins associated with light-harvesting complexes maintained higher transcript levels up to 72h of DIS following BA treatment. The pigment-protein complexes analyzed by green gel remained intact in both N22-H-dgl162 and BA-treated N22 leaves even after 96h of DIS. Thus, CK delays senescence by accumulation of HmChl and up-regulating genes in the Chl cycle, thereby maintaining the Chl a/b ratio. Also, CK treatment retains higher transcript levels of PSII-related genes, resulting in the stability of photosynthetic pigment complexes and functional stay-greenness in rice. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  13. Modulation of the Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Phenotype in Human Fibroblasts by Olive Phenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Menicacci

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Senescent cells display an increase in the secretion of growth factors, inflammatory cytokines and proteolytic enzymes, termed the “senescence-associated-secretory-phenotype” (SASP, playing a major role in many age-related diseases. The phenolic compounds present in extra-virgin olive oil are inhibitors of oxidative damage and have been reported to play a protective role in inflammation-related diseases. Particularly, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein are the most abundant and more extensively studied. Pre-senescent human lung (MRC5 and neonatal human dermal (NHDF fibroblasts were used as cellular model to evaluate the effect of chronic (4–6 weeks treatment with 1 μM hydroxytyrosol (HT or 10 μM oleuropein aglycone (OLE on senescence/inflammation markers. Both phenols were effective in reducing β-galactosidase-positive cell number and p16 protein expression. In addition, senescence/inflammation markers such as IL-6 and metalloprotease secretion, and Ciclooxigenase type 2 (COX-2 and α-smooth-actin levels were reduced by phenol treatments. In NHDF, COX-2 expression, Nuclear Factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB protein level and nuclear localization were augmented with culture senescence and decreased by OLE and HT treatment. Furthermore, the inflammatory effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα exposure was almost completely abolished in OLE- and HT-pre-treated NHDF. Thus, the modulation of the senescence-associated inflammatory phenotype might be an important mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of olive oil phenols.

  14. YUCCA6 over-expression demonstrates auxin function in delaying leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Jeong Im

    2011-04-21

    The Arabidopsis thaliana YUCCA family of flavin monooxygenase proteins catalyses a rate-limiting step in de novo auxin biosynthesis. A YUCCA6 activation mutant, yuc6-1D, has been shown to contain an elevated free IAA level and to display typical high-auxin phenotypes. It is reported here that Arabidopsis plants over-expressing YUCCA6, such as the yuc6-1D activation mutant and 35S:YUC6 transgenic plants, displayed dramatic longevity. In addition, plants over-expressing YUCCA6 exhibited classical, delayed dark-induced and hormone-induced senescence in assays using detached rosette leaves. However, plants over-expressing an allele of YUCCA6, that carries mutations in the NADPH cofactor binding site, exhibited neither delayed leaf senescence phenotypes nor phenotypes typical of auxin overproduction. When the level of free IAA was reduced in yuc6-1D by conjugation to lysine, yuc6-1D leaves senesced at a rate similar to the wild-type leaves. Dark-induced senescence in detached leaves was accompanied by a decrease in their free IAA content, by the reduced expression of auxin biosynthesis enzymes such as YUCCA1 and YUCCA6 that increase cellular free IAA levels, and by the increased expression of auxin-conjugating enzymes encoded by the GH3 genes that reduce the cellular free auxin levels. Reduced transcript abundances of SAG12, NAC1, and NAC6 during senescence in yuc6-1D compared with the wild type suggested that auxin delays senescence by directly or indirectly regulating the expression of senescence-associated genes. 2011 The Author(s).

  15. Possible role of ginsenoside Rb1 in skin wound healing via regulating senescent skin dermal fibroblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingang; Kim, Sunchang

    2018-05-05

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by inducing irreversible cell growth arrest. Nevertheless, senescent cells is proposed as causal link with aging and aging-related pathologies. The physiological beneficial functions of senescent cells are still of paucity. Here we show that senescent human dermal fibroblast accelerates keratinocytes scratch wound healing and stimulates differentiation of fibroblast. Using oxidative stress (100 μM H 2 O 2 exposure for 1 h) induction, we successfully triggered fibroblast senescence and developed senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP). The induction of SASP was regulated by p38MAPK/MSK2/NF-κB pathway. Interestingly, inhibition of p38MAPK activation only partially suppressed SASP. However, SASP was significantly inhibited by SB747651A, a specific MSK inhibitor. Additionally, we demonstrate that SASP stimulates migration of keratinocytes and myofibroblast transition of fibroblast, through fold-increased secretion of growth factors, platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGF-AA) and AB (PDGF-AB), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and beta 2 (TGF-β2), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and D (VEGF-D), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and 3 (VEGFR3). Importantly, we also confirmed ginsenoside Rb1 promoted SASP-mediated healing process via p38MAPK/MSK2/NF-κB pathway. The results pointed to senescent fibroblast as a potential mechanism of wound healing control in human skin. Further, it provided a candidate targeted for wound therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Involvement of NADPH oxidase isoforms in the production of O2- manipulated by ABA in the senescing leaves of early-senescence-leaf (esl) mutant rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaowei; Wang, Fubiao; Zhao, Qian; Liu, Jianchao; Cheng, Fangmin

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the differences in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in senescing leaves were investigated by early-senescence-leaf (esl) mutant and its wild type, to clarify the relationship among ABA levels, ROS generation, and NADPH oxidase (Nox) in senescing leaves of rice (Oryza sativa). The temporal expression levels of OsNox isoforms in senescing leaves and their expression patterns in response to ABA treatment were determined through quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Results showed that the flag leaf of the esl mutant generated more O2- concentrations and accumulated higher ABA levels than the wild-type cultivar did in the grain-filling stage. Exogenous ABA treatment induced O2- generation; however, it was depressed by diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) pretreatment in the detached leaf segments. This finding suggested the involvement of NADPH oxidase in ABA-induced O2- generation. The esl mutant exhibited significantly higher expression of OsNox2, OsNox5, OsNox6, and OsNox7 in the initial of grain-filling stage, followed by sharply decrease. The transcriptional levels of OsNox1, OsNox3, and OsFR07 in the flag leaf of the esl mutant were significantly lower than those in the wild-type cultivar. The expression levels of OsNox2, OsNox5, OsNox6, and OsNox7 were significantly enhanced by exogenous ABA treatments. The enhanced expression levels of OsNox2 and OsNox6 were dependent on the duration of ABA treatment. The inducible expression levels of OsNox5 and OsNox7 were dependent on ABA concentrations. By contrast, exogenous ABA treatment severely repressed the transcripts of OsNox1, OsNox3, and OsFR07 in the detached leaf segments. Therefore, OsNox2, OsNox5, OsNox6, and OsNox7 were probably involved in the ABA-induced O2- generation in the initial stage of leaf senescence. Subsequently, other oxidases activated in deteriorating cells were associated with ROS generation and accumulation in the

  17. The oxidative costs of reproduction are group-size dependent in a wild cooperative breeder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Dominic L; Blount, Jonathan D; Young, Andrew J

    2015-11-22

    Life-history theory assumes that reproduction entails a cost, and research on cooperatively breeding societies suggests that the cooperative sharing of workloads can reduce this cost. However, the physiological mechanisms that underpin both the costs of reproduction and the benefits of cooperation remain poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that reproductive costs may arise in part from oxidative stress, as reproductive investment may elevate exposure to reactive oxygen species, compromising survival and future reproduction and accelerating senescence. However, experimental evidence of oxidative costs of reproduction in the wild remains scarce. Here, we use a clutch-removal experiment to investigate the oxidative costs of reproduction in a wild cooperatively breeding bird, the white-browed sparrow weaver, Plocepasser mahali. Our results reveal costs of reproduction that are dependent on group size: relative to individuals in groups whose eggs were experimentally removed, individuals in groups that raised offspring experienced an associated cost (elevated oxidative damage and reduced body mass), but only if they were in small groups containing fewer or no helpers. Furthermore, during nestling provisioning, individuals that provisioned at higher rates showed greater within-individual declines in body mass and antioxidant protection. Our results provide rare experimental evidence that reproduction can negatively impact both oxidative status and body mass in the wild, and suggest that these costs can be mitigated in cooperative societies by the presence of additional helpers. These findings have implications for our understanding of the energetic and oxidative costs of reproduction, and the benefits of cooperation in animal societies. © 2015 The Authors.

  18. The Future of human reproduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overall, Christine

    1989-01-01

    ... Contradictions III SOCIAL POLICY QUESTIONS Pregnancy as Justification for Loss of Juridical Autonomy Sanda Rodgers 174 Prenatal Diagnosis: Reproductive Choice? Reproductive Control? Abby Lippman ...

  19. The future of human reproduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overall, Christine

    1989-01-01

    ... Contradictions III SOCIAL POLICY QUESTIONS Pregnancy as Justification for Loss of Juridical Autonomy Sanda Rodgers 174 Prenatal Diagnosis: Reproductive Choice? Reproductive Control? Abby Lippman ...

  20. Induction of senescence and identification of differentially expressed genes in tomato in response to monoterpene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Ghosh

    Full Text Available Monoterpenes, which are among the major components of plant essential oils, are known for their ecological roles as well for pharmaceutical properties. Geraniol, an acyclic monoterpene induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis/senescence in various cancer cells and plants; however, the genes involved in the process and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment of tomato plants with geraniol results in induction of senescence due to a substantial alteration in transcriptome. We have identified several geraniol-responsive protein encoding genes in tomato using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH approach. These genes comprise of various components of signal transduction, cellular metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS, ethylene signalling, apoptosis and DNA damage response. Upregulation of NADPH oxidase and antioxidant genes, and increase in ROS level after geraniol treatment point towards the involvement of ROS in geraniol-mediated senescence. The delayed onset of seedling death and induced expression of geraniol-responsive genes in geraniol-treated ethylene receptor mutant (Nr suggest that geraniol-mediated senescence involves both ethylene dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, expression analysis during tomato ripening revealed that geraniol-responsive genes are also associated with the natural organ senescence process.

  1. Induction of Senescence and Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Tomato in Response to Monoterpene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Kumar, Anil; Irfan, Mohammad; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra; Datta, Asis

    2013-01-01

    Monoterpenes, which are among the major components of plant essential oils, are known for their ecological roles as well for pharmaceutical properties. Geraniol, an acyclic monoterpene induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis/senescence in various cancer cells and plants; however, the genes involved in the process and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment of tomato plants with geraniol results in induction of senescence due to a substantial alteration in transcriptome. We have identified several geraniol-responsive protein encoding genes in tomato using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach. These genes comprise of various components of signal transduction, cellular metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ethylene signalling, apoptosis and DNA damage response. Upregulation of NADPH oxidase and antioxidant genes, and increase in ROS level after geraniol treatment point towards the involvement of ROS in geraniol-mediated senescence. The delayed onset of seedling death and induced expression of geraniol-responsive genes in geraniol-treated ethylene receptor mutant (Nr) suggest that geraniol-mediated senescence involves both ethylene dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, expression analysis during tomato ripening revealed that geraniol-responsive genes are also associated with the natural organ senescence process. PMID:24098759

  2. Identification of senescence-associated genes in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Eunsook; Hong, Su; Kang, Jaeku; Woo, Junghoon; Park, Jungjun; Lee, Jongho; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2008-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into several specialized cell types, including bone, cartilage, and fat cells. The proliferative capacity of hBMMSCs paves the way for the development of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. However, long-term in vitro culture of hBMMSCs leads to a reduced life span of the cells due to senescence, which leads eventually to growth arrest. To investigate the molecular mechanism behind the cellular senescence of hBMMSCs, microarray analysis was used to compare the expression profiles of early passage hBMMSCs, late passage hBMMSCs and hBMMSCs ectopically expressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Using an intersection analysis of 3892 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) out of 27,171 total genes analyzed, we identified 338 senescence-related DEGs. GO term categorization and pathway network analysis revealed that the identified genes are strongly related to known senescence pathways and mechanisms. The genes identified using this approach will facilitate future studies of the mechanisms underlying the cellular senescence of hBMMSCs

  3. The Antioxidant Machinery of Young and Senescent Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells and Their Microvesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Bodega

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the antioxidant role of young and senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and their microvesicles (MVs. Proteomic and Western blot studies have shown young HUVECs to have a complete and well-developed antioxidant system. Their MVs also contain antioxidant molecules, though of a smaller and more specific range, specialized in the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and the superoxide anion via the thioredoxin-peroxiredoxin system. Senescence was shown to be associated with a large increase in the size of the antioxidant machinery in both HUVECs and their MVs. These responses might help HUVECs and their MVs deal with the more oxidising conditions found in older cells. Functional analysis confirmed the antioxidant machinery of the MVs to be active and to increase in size with senescence. No glutathione or nonpeptide antioxidant (ascorbic acid and vitamin E activity was detected in the MVs. Endothelial cells and MVs seem to adapt to higher ROS concentrations in senescence by increasing their antioxidant machinery, although this is not enough to recover completely from the senescence-induced ROS increase. Moreover, MVs could be involved in the regulation of the blood plasma redox status by functioning as ROS scavengers.

  4. Persistent Amplification of DNA Damage Signal Involved in Replicative Senescence of Normal Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX and ATM are the surrogate markers of DNA double strand breaks. We previously reported that the residual foci increased their size after irradiation, which amplifies DNA damage signals. Here, we addressed whether amplification of DNA damage signal is involved in replicative senescence of normal human diploid fibroblasts. Large phosphorylated H2AX foci (>1.5 μm diameter were specifically detected in presenescent cells. The frequency of cells with large foci was well correlated with that of cells positive for senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Hypoxic cell culture condition extended replicative life span of normal human fibroblast, and we found that the formation of large foci delayed in those cells. Our immuno-FISH analysis revealed that large foci partially localized at telomeres in senescent cells. Importantly, large foci of phosphorylated H2AX were always colocalized with phosphorylated ATM foci. Furthermore, Ser15-phosphorylated p53 showed colocalization with the large foci. Since the treatment of senescent cells with phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, suppressed p53 phosphorylation, it is suggested that amplification of DNA damage signaling sustains persistent activation of ATM-p53 pathway, which is essential for replicative senescence.

  5. Interplay between Selenium Levels and Replicative Senescence in WI-38 Human Fibroblasts: A Proteomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ghania; Legrain, Yona; Touat-Hamici, Zahia; Duhieu, Stéphane; Cornu, David; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Chavatte, Laurent

    2018-01-20

    Selenoproteins are essential components of antioxidant defense, redox homeostasis, and cell signaling in mammals, where selenium is found in the form of a rare amino acid, selenocysteine. Selenium, which is often limited both in food intake and cell culture media, is a strong regulator of selenoprotein expression and selenoenzyme activity. Aging is a slow, complex, and multifactorial process, resulting in a gradual and irreversible decline of various functions of the body. Several cellular aspects of organismal aging are recapitulated in the replicative senescence of cultured human diploid fibroblasts, such as embryonic lung fibroblast WI-38 cells. We previously reported that the long-term growth of young WI-38 cells with high (supplemented), moderate (control), or low (depleted) concentrations of selenium in the culture medium impacts their replicative lifespan, due to rapid changes in replicative senescence-associated markers and signaling pathways. In order to gain insight into the molecular link between selenium levels and replicative senescence, in the present work, we have applied a quantitative proteomic approach based on 2-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to the study of young and presenescent cells grown in selenium-supplemented, control, or depleted media. Applying a restrictive cut-off (spot intensity ±50% and a p value iii) spots varying in response to selenium concentration in presenescent cells. Interestingly, a 72% overlap between the impact of senescence and selenium was observed in our proteomic results, demonstrating a strong interplay between selenium, selenoproteins, and replicative senescence.

  6. Senescence-Induced Alterations of Laminin Chain Expression Modulate Tumorigenicity of Prostate Cancer Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Cynthia C T; Drivdahl, Rolf H; Woodke, Lillie B; Eyman, Daniel; Reed, May J; Carter, William G; Plymate, Stephen R

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is an age-associated epithelial cancer, and as such, it contributes significantly to the mortality of the elderly. Senescence is one possible mechanism by which the body defends itself against various epithelial cancers. Senescent cells alter the microenvironment, in part, through changes to the extracellular matrix. Laminins (LMs) are extracellular proteins important to both the structure and function of the microenvironment. Overexpression of the senescence-associated gene mac25 in human prostate cancer cells resulted in increased mRNA levels of the LM α4 and β2 chains compared to empty vector control cells. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of these senescence-induced LM chains on tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells. We created stable M12 human prostate cancer lines overexpressing either the LM α4 or β2 chain or both chains. Increased expression of either the LM α4 or β2 chain resulted in increased in vitro migration and in vivo tumorigenicity of those cells, whereas high expression of both chains led to decreased in vitro proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity compared to M12 control cells. This study demonstrates that senescent prostate epithelial cells can alter the microenvironment and that these changes modulate progression of prostate cancer. PMID:19048114

  7. Senescence-Induced Alterations of Laminin Chain Expression Modulate Tumorigenicity of Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia C.T. Sprenger

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is an age-associated epithelial cancer, and as such, it contributes significantly to the mortality of the elderly. Senescence is one possible mechanism by which the body defends itself against various epithelial cancers. Senescent cells alter the microenvironment, in part, through changes to the extracellular matrix. Laminins (LMs are extracellular proteins important to both the structure and function of the microenvironment. Overexpression of the senescence-associated gene mac25 in human prostate cancer cells resulted in increased mRNA levels of the LM α4 and β2 chains compared to empty vector control cells. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of these senescence-induced LM chains on tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells. We created stable M12 human prostate cancer lines overexpressing either the LM α4 or β2 chain or both chains. Increased expression of either the LM α4 or β2 chain resulted in increased in vitro migration and in vivo tumorigenicity of those cells, whereas high expression of both chains led to decreased in vitro proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity compared to M12 control cells. This study demonstrates that senescent prostate epithelial cells can alter the microenvironment and that these changes modulate progression of prostate cancer.

  8. The senescent microenvironment promotes the emergence of heterogeneous cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Vega, Luis Jaime; Jouravleva, Karina; Ortiz-Montero, Paola; Liu, Win-Yan; Galeano, Jorge Luis; Romero, Martha; Popova, Tatiana; Bacchetti, Silvia; Vernot, Jean Paul; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo

    2015-10-01

    There is a well-established association between aging and the onset of metastasis. Although the mechanisms through which age impinges upon the malignant phenotype remain uncharacterized, the role of a senescent microenvironment has been emphasized. We reported previously that human epithelial cells that undergo telomere-driven chromosome instability (T-CIN) display global microRNA (miR) deregulation and develop migration and invasion capacities. Here, we show that post-crisis cells are not able to form tumors unless a senescent microenvironment is provided. The characterization of cell lines established from such tumors revealed that these cells have acquired cell autonomous tumorigenicity, giving rise to heterogeneous tumors. Further experiments demonstrate that explanted cells, while displaying differences in cell differentiation markers, are all endowed of enhanced stem cell properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity. Treatments of T-CIN+ cells with senescence-conditioned media induce sphere formation exclusively in cells with senescence-associated tumorigenicity, a capacity that depends on miR-145 repression. These results indicate that the senescent microenvironment, while promoting further transdifferentiations in cells with genome instability, is able to propel the progression of premalignant cells towards a malignant, cell stem-like state. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Modulation of Cell Cycle Profile by Chlorella vulgaris Prevents Replicative Senescence of Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyebeh Saberbaghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of Chlorella vulgaris (CV on replicative senescence of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs were investigated. Hot water extract of CV was used to treat HDFs at passages 6, 15, and 30 which represent young, presenescence, and senescence ages, respectively. The level of DNA damage was determined by comet assay while apoptosis and cell cycle profile were determined using FACSCalibur flow cytometer. Our results showed direct correlation between increased levels of damaged DNA and apoptosis with senescence in untreated HDFs (P<0.05. Cell cycle profile showed increased population of untreated senescent cells that enter G0/G1 phase while the cell population in S phase decreased significantly (P<0.05. Treatment with CV however caused a significant reduction in the level of damaged DNA and apoptosis in all age groups of HDFs (P<0.05. Cell cycle analysis showed that treatment with CV increased significantly the percentage of senescent HDFs in S phase and G2/M phases but decreased the population of cells in G0/G1 phase (P<0.05. In conclusion, hot water extract of Chlorella vulgaris effectively decreased the biomarkers of ageing, indicating its potential as an antiageing compound.

  10. The Japanese diet from 1975 delays senescence and prolongs life span in SAMP8 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kazushi; E, Shuang; Hatakeyama, Yu; Sakamoto, Yu; Honma, Taro; Jibu, Yuri; Kawakami, Yuki; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy in Japan is high, suggesting that the Japanese diet, Nihon shoku (Japanese food), has significant health benefits. However, these benefits have been called into question over the past 50 y, during which time the Japanese diet has become increasingly Westernized. The aim of the present study was to focus on senescence delay and to examine the effects of Japanese diets from different years to identify which Japanese diet is most effective in enhancing life expectancy and delaying senescence. Weekly menus from the years 1960, 1975, 1990, and 2005 were reproduced based on the National Health and Nutrition Survey in Japan and prepared as powdered foods. The senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice were fed standard laboratory chow supplemented with a 30% mix of Japanese meals from various years ad libitum throughout their lifetime. Additionally, the control group was given standard laboratory chow only, to examine the development of mice reared under standard conditions. In the group that ingested the traditional 1975 Japanese diet, life span was prolonged, senescence was delayed, and learning and memory capacities were maintained compared with the group fed the 2005 Japanese diet. The life span of the group that ingested the 1990 Japanese diet showed a tendency to be longer than SAMP8 mice fed the 2005 diet. The results of the present study suggested that the traditional Japanese diet is more effective in enhancing life expectancy and delaying senescence than the current Japanese diet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Haplo-insufficiency of both BubR1 and SGO1 accelerates cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hyun Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spindle assembly checkpoint components BubR1 and Sgo1 play a key role in the maintenance of chromosomal instability during cell division. These proteins function to block the anaphase entry until all condensed chromosomes have been attached by the microtubules emanating from both spindle poles. Haplo-insufficiency of either BubR1 or SGO1 results in enhanced chromosomal instability and tumor development in the intestine. Recent studies show that spindle checkpoint proteins also have a role in slowing down the ageing process. Therefore, we want to study whether haplo-insufficiency of both BubR1 and SGO1 accelerates cellular senescence in mice. Methods We took advantage of the availability of BubR1 and SGO1 knockout mice and generated primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs with mutations in either BubR1, SGO1, or both and analyzed cellular senescence of the MEFs of various genetic backgrounds. Results We observed that BubR1 +/− SGO +/− MEFs had an accelerated cellular senescence characterized by morphological changes and expressed senescence-associated β-galactosidase. In addition, compared with wild-type MEFs or MEFs with a single gene deficiency, BubR1 +/− SGO1 +/− MEFs expressed enhanced levels of p21 but not p16. Conclusions Taken together, our observations suggest that combined deficiency of BubR1 and Sgo1 accelerates cellular senescence.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for the stochastic heterogeneity in telomere-dependent senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João F Passos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging is an inherently stochastic process, and its hallmark is heterogeneity between organisms, cell types, and clonal populations, even in identical environments. The replicative lifespan of primary human cells is telomere dependent; however, its heterogeneity is not understood. We show that mitochondrial superoxide production increases with replicative age in human fibroblasts despite an adaptive UCP-2-dependent mitochondrial uncoupling. This mitochondrial dysfunction is accompanied by compromised [Ca(2+]i homeostasis and other indicators of a retrograde response in senescent cells. Replicative senescence of human fibroblasts is delayed by mild mitochondrial uncoupling. Uncoupling reduces mitochondrial superoxide generation, slows down telomere shortening, and delays formation of telomeric gamma-H2A.X foci. This indicates mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS as one of the causes of replicative senescence. By sorting early senescent (SES cells from young proliferating fibroblast cultures, we show that SES cells have higher ROS levels, dysfunctional mitochondria, shorter telomeres, and telomeric gamma-H2A.X foci. We propose that mitochondrial ROS is a major determinant of telomere-dependent senescence at the single-cell level that is responsible for cell-to-cell variation in replicative lifespan.

  13. The different fates of mitochondria and chloroplasts during dark-induced senescence in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keech, Olivier; Pesquet, Edouard; Ahad, Abdul; Askne, Anna; Nordvall, Dag; Vodnala, Sharvani Munender; Tuominen, Hannele; Hurry, Vaughan; Dizengremel, Pierre; Gardeström, Per

    2007-12-01

    Senescence is an active process allowing the reallocation of valuable nutrients from the senescing organ towards storage and/or growing tissues. Using Arabidopsis thaliana leaves from both whole darkened plants (DPs) and individually darkened leaves (IDLs), we investigated the fate of mitochondria and chloroplasts during dark-induced leaf senescence. Combining in vivo visualization of fates of the two organelles by three-dimensional reconstructions of abaxial parts of leaves with functional measurements of photosynthesis and respiration, we showed that the two experimental systems displayed major differences during 6 d of dark treatment. In whole DPs, organelles were largely retained in both epidermal and mesophyll cells. However, while the photosynthetic capacity was maintained, the capacity of mitochondrial respiration decreased. In contrast, IDLs showed a rapid decline in photosynthetic capacity while maintaining a high capacity for mitochondrial respiration throughout the treatment. In addition, we noticed an unequal degradation of organelles in the different cell types of the senescing leaf. From these data, we suggest that metabolism in leaves of the whole DPs enters a 'stand-by mode' to preserve the photosynthetic machinery for as long as possible. However, in IDLs, mitochondria actively provide energy and carbon skeletons for the degradation of cell constituents, facilitating the retrieval of nutrients. Finally, the heterogeneity of the degradation processes involved during senescence is discussed with regard to the fate of mitochondria and chloroplasts in the different cell types.

  14. Elevated COX2 expression and PGE2 production by downregulation of RXRα in senescent macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Huimin; Ma, Feng; Hu, Xiaona; Jin, Ting; Xiong, Chuhui; Teng, Xiaochun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Downregulation of RXRα in senescent macrophage. •RXRα suppresses NF-κB activity and COX2 expression. •Increased PGE2 production due to downregulation of RXRα. -- Abstract: Increased systemic level of inflammatory cytokines leads to numerous age-related diseases. In senescent macrophages, elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production contributes to the suppression of T cell function with aging, which increases the susceptibility to infections. However, the regulation of these inflammatory cytokines and PGE2 with aging still remains unclear. We have verified that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and PGE2 production are higher in LPS-stimulated macrophages from old mice than that from young mice. Downregulation of RXRα, a nuclear receptor that can suppress NF-κB activity, mediates the elevation of COX2 expression and PGE2 production in senescent macrophages. We also have found less induction of ABCA1 and ABCG1 by RXRα agonist in senescent macrophages, which partially accounts for high risk of atherosclerosis in aged population. Systemic treatment with RXRα antagonist HX531 in young mice increases COX2, TNF-α, and IL-6 expression in splenocytes. Our study not only has outlined a mechanism of elevated NF-κB activity and PGE2 production in senescent macrophages, but also provides RXRα as a potential therapeutic target for treating the age-related diseases

  15. Innate immunity and cellular senescence: The good and the bad in the developmental and aged brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Antonietta; Spinelli, Chiara Carmela; Martucciello, Stefania; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Capunzo, Mario; Puca, Annibale Alessandro; Ciaglia, Elena

    2018-03-01

    Ongoing studies evidence cellular senescence in undifferentiated and specialized cells from tissues of all ages. Although it is believed that senescence plays a wider role in several stress responses in the mature age, its participation in certain physiological and pathological processes throughout life is coming to light. The "senescence machinery" has been observed in all brain cell populations, including components of innate immunity (e.g., microglia and astrocytes). As the beneficial versus detrimental implications of senescence is an open question, we aimed to analyze the contribution of immune responses in regulatory mechanisms governing its distinct functions in healthy (development, organogenesis, danger patrolling events) and diseased brain (glioma, neuroinflammation, neurodeneration), and the putative connection between cellular and molecular events governing the 2 states. Particularly this review offers new insights into the complex roles of senescence both as a chronological event as age advances, and as a molecular mechanism of brain homeostasis through the important contribution of innate immune responses and their crosstalk with neighboring cells in brain parenchyma. We also highlight the impact of the recently described glymphatic system and brain lymphatic vasculature in the interplay between peripheral and central immune surveillance and its potential implication during aging. This will open new ways to understand brain development, its deterioration during aging, and the occurrence of several oncological and neurodegenerative diseases. ©2018 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  16. Happily (never after: Aging in the context of oxidative stress, proteostasis loss and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Höhn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a complex phenomenon and its impact is becoming more relevant due to the rising life expectancy and because aging itself is the basis for the development of age-related diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and type 2 diabetes. Recent years of scientific research have brought up different theories that attempt to explain the aging process. So far, there is no single theory that fully explains all facets of aging. The damage accumulation theory is one of the most accepted theories due to the large body of evidence found over the years. Damage accumulation is thought to be driven, among others, by oxidative stress. This condition results in an excess attack of oxidants on biomolecules, which lead to damage accumulation over time and contribute to the functional involution of cells, tissues and organisms. If oxidative stress persists, cellular senescence is a likely outcome and an important hallmark of aging. Therefore, it becomes crucial to understand how senescent cells function and how they contribute to the aging process. This review will cover cellular senescence features related to the protein pool such as morphological and molecular hallmarks, how oxidative stress promotes protein modifications, how senescent cells cope with them by proteostasis mechanisms, including antioxidant enzymes and proteolytic systems. We will also highlight the nutritional status of senescent cells and aged organisms (including human clinical studies by exploring trace elements and micronutrients and on their importance to develop strategies that might increase both, life and health span and postpone aging onset.

  17. The Lcn2-engineered HEK-293 cells show senescence under stressful condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Bahmani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Lipocalin2 (Lcn2 gene is highly expressed in response to various types of cellular stresses. The precise role of Lcn2 has not been fully understood yet. However, it plays a key role in controlling vital cellular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis and metabolism. Recently it was shown that Lcn2 decreases senescence and increases proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC with finite life span under either normal or oxidative stress conditions. However, Lcn2 effects on immortal cell line with infinite proliferation are not defined completely.  Materials and Material and Methods: HEK-293 cells were transfected with recombinant pcDNA3.1 containing Lcn2 fragment (pcDNA3.1-Lcn2. Expression of lipocalin2 in transfected cells was evaluated by RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR, and ELISA. Different cell groups were treated with H2O2 and WST-1 assay was performed to determine their proliferation rate. Senescence was studied by β-galactosidase and gimsa staining methods as well as evaluation of the expression of senescence-related genes by real time RT-PCR. Results: Lcn2 increased cell proliferation under normal culture condition, while the proliferation slightly decreased under oxidative stress.  This decrease was further found to be attributed to senescence. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that under harmful conditions, Lcn2 gene is responsible for the regulation of cell survival through senescence.

  18. Identification of volatile compound markers during the ripening and senescence of lulo (Solanum quitoense Lam.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas Iguarán, Eduardo; Taborda Ocampo, Gonzalo; Tapasco Alzate, Omar

    2018-01-01

    Lulo ( Solanum quitoense Lam.) is an exotic fruit cultivated in Colombia. During ripening and senescence, this climactic fruit undergoes biochemical processes that produce the volatiles responsible for its aroma. This study aimed to evaluate the changes in the volatile content during the ripening and senescence of lulo. Analysis of the volatile composition of lulo harvested in each of its five ripening stages and during its senescence time when stored at 18 ± 2 °C was performed using HS-SPME with GC-MS. Throughout ripening, the most notable change was the transformation of alcohols such as (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol and 1-penten-3-ol to afford esters such as (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate and ketones such as 1-penten-3-one. Some acids reacted with alcohols to produce acetate and hexanoate esters, concentrations which increased more than sixfold between stage one and five. Moreover, all the major compounds were C 6 straight chain compounds related to the lipoxygenase pathway. During senescence, majority of compounds were methyl esters, which increased in concentration consistently until day eight. Remarkably, the content of methyl butanoate increased from 0.9% of the total amount of volatiles on day two up to 76.4% on day eight. Some of these volatiles are probably contributors to the "off flavor" during senescence.

  19. Critical transition in tissue homeostasis accompanies murine lung senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla L Calvi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory dysfunction is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in aged populations. The susceptibility to pulmonary insults is attributed to "low pulmonary reserve", ostensibly reflecting a combination of age-related musculoskeletal, immunologic and intrinsic pulmonary dysfunction. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a murine model of the aging lung, senescent DBA/2 mice, we correlated a longitudinal survey of airspace size and injury measures with a transcriptome from the aging lung at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 months of age. Morphometric analysis demonstrated a nonlinear pattern of airspace caliber enlargement with a critical transition occurring between 8 and 12 months of age marked by an initial increase in oxidative stress, cell death and elastase activation which is soon followed by inflammatory cell infiltration, immune complex deposition and the onset of airspace enlargement. The temporally correlative transcriptome showed exuberant induction of immunoglobulin genes coincident with airspace enlargement. Immunohistochemistry, ELISA analysis and flow cytometry demonstrated increased immunoglobulin deposition in the lung associated with a contemporaneous increase in activated B-cells expressing high levels of TLR4 (toll receptor 4 and CD86 and macrophages during midlife. These midlife changes culminate in progressive airspace enlargement during late life stages. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings establish that a tissue-specific aging program is evident during a presenescent interval which involves early oxidative stress, cell death and elastase activation, followed by B lymphocyte and macrophage expansion/activation. This sequence heralds the progression to overt airspace enlargement in the aged lung. These signature events, during middle age, indicate that early stages of the aging immune system may have important correlates in the maintenance of tissue morphology. We further show that time-course analyses of aging

  20. HIV and drug abuse mediate astrocyte senescence in a β-catenin-dependent manner leading to neuronal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunjiang; Narasipura, Srinivas D; Richards, Maureen H; Hu, Xiu-Ti; Yamamoto, Bryan; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2017-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cell senescence plays an important role in aging-associated diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. HIV leads to a spectrum of neurologic diseases collectively termed HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Drug abuse, particularly methamphetamine (meth), is a frequently abused psychostimulant among HIV+ individuals and its abuse exacerbates HAND. The mechanism by which HIV and meth lead to brain cell dysregulation is not entirely clear. In this study, we evaluated the impact of HIV and meth on astrocyte senescence using in vitro and several animal models. Astrocytes constitute up to 50% of brain cells and play a pivotal role in marinating brain homeostasis. We show here that HIV and meth induce significant senescence of primary human fetal astrocytes, as evaluated by induction of senescence markers (β-galactosidase and p16 INK 4A ), senescence-associated morphologic changes, and cell cycle arrest. HIV- and meth-mediated astrocyte senescence was also demonstrated in three small animal models (humanized mouse model of HIV/NSG-huPBMCs, HIV-transgenic rats, and in a meth administration rat model). Senescent astrocytes in turn mediated neuronal toxicity. Further, we show that β-catenin, a pro-survival/proliferation transcriptional co-activator, is downregulated by HIV and meth in human astrocytes and this downregulation promotes astrocyte senescence while induction of β-catenin blocks HIV- and meth-mediated astrocyte senescence. These studies, for the first time, demonstrate that HIV and meth induce astrocyte senescence and implicate the β-catenin pathway as potential therapeutic target to overcome astrocyte senescence. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Reproductive strategies in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, Richard

    2003-05-22

    Snakes of both sexes display remarkable flexibility and diversity in their reproductive tactics. Many features of reproduction in female snakes (such as reproductive mode and frequency, seasonality and multiple mating) allow flexible maternal control. For example, females can manipulate not only the genotypes of their offspring (through mate choice or enhanced sperm competition) but also the phenotypes of their offspring (through allocation 'decisions', behavioural and physiological thermoregulation, and nest-site selection). Reliance on stored energy ('capital') to fuel breeding results in low frequencies of female reproduction and, in extreme cases, semelparity. A sophisticated vomeronasal system not only allows male snakes to locate reproductive females by following scent trails, but also facilitates pheromonally mediated mate choice by males. Male-male rivalry takes diverse forms, including female mimicry and mate guarding; combat bouts impose strong selection for large body size in males of some species. Intraspecific (geographical) variation and phenotypic plasticity in a wide array of reproductive traits (offspring size and number; reproductive frequency; incidence of multiple mating; male tactics such as mate guarding and combat; mate choice criteria) provide exceptional opportunities for future studies.

  2. The cost of reproduction in women: Reproductive effort and oxidative stress in premenopausal and postmenopausal American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziomkiewicz, Anna; Frumkin, Amara; Zhang, Yawei; Sancilio, Amelia; Bribiescas, Richard G

    2018-01-01

    Life history theory predicts a trade-off between female investment in reproduction and somatic maintenance, which can result in accelerated senescence. Oxidative stress has been shown to be a causal physiological mechanism for accelerated aging and a possible contributor to this trade-off. We aimed to test the hypothesis for the existence of significant associations between measures of reproductive effort and the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in premenopausal and postmenopausal American women. Serum samples and questionnaire data were collected from 63 premenopausal and postmenopausal women (mean age 53.4 years), controls in the Connecticut Thyroid Health Study, between May 2010 and December 2013. Samples were analyzed for levels of 8-OHdG and Cu/Zn-SOD using immunoassay method. Levels of oxidative damage (8-OHdG) but not oxidative defense (Cu/Zn-SOD) were negatively associated with parity and number of sons in premenopausal women (r = -0.52 for parity, r = -0.52 for number of sons, P reproductive effort, women's BMI, age, and menopausal status explained around 15% of variance in level of 8-OHdG. No association between reproductive effort characteristics and oxidative damage was found for postmenopausal women. We found no evidence of a trade-off between somatic maintenance as measured by 8-OHdG and reproductive effort in women from this American population. On the contrary, higher gravidity and parity in premenopausal women was associated with lower damage to cellular DNA caused by oxidative stress. These results highlight the importance of population variation and environmental conditions when testing the occurrence of life-history trade-offs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Selective Reproductive Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Tine; Wahlberg, Ayo

    2014-01-01

    From a historical perspective, selective reproduction is nothing new. Infanticide, abandonment, and selective neglect of children have a long history, and the widespread deployment of sterilization and forced abortion in the twentieth century has been well documented. Yet in recent decades select......, discussing how selective reproduction engages with issues of long-standing theoretical concern in anthropology, such as politics, kinship, gender, religion, globalization, and inequality....... (ARTs), what we term selective reproductive technologies (SRTs) are of a more specific nature: Rather than aiming to overcome infertility, they are used to prevent or allow the birth of certain kinds of children. This review highlights anthropological research into SRTs in different parts of the world...

  4. Redox markers for drought-induced nodule senescence, a process occurring after drought-induced senescence of the lowest leaves in soybean (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Garcia, Belén; Shaw, Daniel; Cooper, James William; Karpinska, Barbara; Quain, Marian Dorcas; Makgopa, Eugene Matome; Kunert, Karl; Foyer, Christine Helen

    2015-09-01

    Water is an increasingly scarce resource that limits crop productivity in many parts of the world, and the frequency and severity of drought are predicted to increase as a result of climate change. Improving tolerance to drought stress is therefore important for maximizing future crop yields. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of drought on soybean (Glycine max) leaves and nodules in order to define phenotypic markers and changes in cellular redox state that characterize the stress response in different organs, and to characterize the relationships between leaf and nodule senescence during drought. Leaf and crown nodule metabolite pools were measured together with leaf and soil water contents, and leaf chlorophyll, total protein contents and chlorophyll a fluorescence quenching parameters in nodulated soybeans that were grown under either well-watered conditions or deprived of water for up to 21 d. Ureides, ascorbate, protein, chlorophyll and the ratios of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence (Fv') to maximal chlorophyll a fluorescence (Fm') fell to levels below detection in the oldest leaves after 21 d of drought. While these drought-induced responses were not observed in the youngest leaf ranks, the Fv'/Fm' ratios, pyridine nucleotide levels and the reduction state of the ascorbate pool were lower in all leaf ranks after 21 d of drought. In contrast to leaves, total nodule protein, pyridine nucleotides, ureides, ascorbate and glutathione contents increased as a result of the drought treatment. However, the nodule ascorbate pool was significantly less reduced as a result of drought. Higher levels of transcripts encoding two peroxiredoxins were detected in nodules exposed to drought stress but senescence-associated transcripts and other mRNAs encoding redox-related proteins were similar under both conditions. While the physiological impact of the drought was perceived throughout the shoot, stress-induced senescence occurred only in the oldest

  5. The Arabidopsis transcription factor ABIG1 relays ABA signaled growth inhibition and drought induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Longhurst, Adam D; Talavera-Rauh, Franklin; Hokin, Samuel A; Barton, M Kathryn

    2016-10-04

    Drought inhibits plant growth and can also induce premature senescence. Here we identify a transcription factor, ABA INSENSITIVE GROWTH 1 (ABIG1) required for abscisic acid (ABA) mediated growth inhibition, but not for stomatal closure. ABIG1 mRNA levels are increased both in response to drought and in response to ABA treatment. When treated with ABA, abig1 mutants remain greener and produce more leaves than comparable wild-type plants. When challenged with drought, abig1 mutants have fewer yellow, senesced leaves than wild-type. Induction of ABIG1 transcription mimics ABA treatment and regulates a set of genes implicated in stress responses. We propose a model in which drought acts through ABA to increase ABIG1 transcription which in turn restricts new shoot growth and promotes leaf senescence. The results have implications for plant breeding: the existence of a mutant that is both ABA resistant and drought resistant points to new strategies for isolating drought resistant genetic varieties.

  6. Predictive value of plasma β2-microglobulin on human body function and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X-M; Cai, R; Yang, F; Zhang, Y-Y; Wang, X-G; Fu, S-L; Zhang, J-R

    2016-06-01

    To explore the correlation between plasma β2-microglobulin (β2-MG) as senescence factor with age, heart, liver and kidney function as well as the predictive value of β2-MG in human metabolism function and senescence. 387 cases of healthy people of different ages were selected and the automatic biochemical analyzer was used to test β2-MG in plasma based on immunoturbidimetry and also all biochemical indexes. The correlation between β2-MG and age, gender and all biochemical indexes was analyzed. β2-MG was positively correlated to age, r = 0.373; and the difference was of statistical significance (p human body function and anti-senescence and have significant basic research and clinical guidance values.

  7. Protein modification and replicative senescence of WI-38 human embryonic fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Emad K; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Roepstorff, Peter

    2010-01-01

    reflects a preferential accumulation of damaged proteins within the mitochondria during cellular senescence. Accumulation of AGE-modified proteins could be explained by the senescence-associated decreased activity of glyoxalase-I, the major enzyme involved in the detoxification of the glycating agents...... methylglyoxal and glyoxal, in both cytosol and mitochondria. This finding suggests a role of detoxification systems in the age-related build-up of damaged proteins. Moreover, the oxidized protein repair system methionine sulfoxide reductase was more affected in the mitochondria than in the cytosol during......Summary Oxidized proteins as well as proteins modified by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and by glycation (AGE) have been shown to accumulate with aging in vivo and during replicative senescence in vitro. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins...

  8. Fitness prospects: effects of age, sex and recruitment age on reproductive value in a long-lived seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Rebke, Maren; Becker, Peter H; Bouwhuis, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive value is an integrated measure of survival and reproduction fundamental to understanding life-history evolution and population dynamics, but little is known about intraspecific variation in reproductive value and factors explaining such variation, if any. By applying generalized additive mixed models to longitudinal individual-based data of the common tern Sterna hirundo, we estimated age-specific annual survival probability, breeding probability and reproductive performance, based on which we calculated age-specific reproductive values. We investigated effects of sex and recruitment age (RA) on each trait. We found age effects on all traits, with survival and breeding probability declining with age, while reproductive performance first improved with age before levelling off. We only found a very small, marginally significant, sex effect on survival probability, but evidence for decreasing age-specific breeding probability and reproductive performance with RA. As a result, males had slightly lower age-specific reproductive values than females, while birds of both sexes that recruited at the earliest ages of 2 and 3 years (i.e. 54% of the tern population) had somewhat higher fitness prospects than birds recruiting at later ages. While the RA effects on breeding probability and reproductive performance were statistically significant, these effects were not large enough to translate to significant effects on reproductive value. Age-specific reproductive values provided evidence for senescence, which came with fitness costs in a range of 17-21% for the sex-RA groups. Our study suggests that intraspecific variation in reproductive value may exist, but that, in the common tern, the differences are small. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2014 British Ecological Society.

  9. Local clearance of senescent cells attenuates the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis and creates a pro-regenerative environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeon, O.H.; Kim, C.; Laberge, R.M.; Demaria, M.; Rathod, S.; Vasserot, A.P.; Chung, J.W.; Kim, D.H.; Poon, Y.; David, N.; Baker, D.J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Campisi, J.; Elisseeff, J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Senescent cells (SnCs) accumulate in many vertebrate tissues with age and contribute to age-related pathologies, presumably through their secretion of factors contributing to the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Removal of SnCs delays several pathologies and increases healthy

  10. Local clearance of senescent cells attenuates the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis and creates a pro-regenerative environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeon, Ok Hee; Kim, Chaekyu; Laberge, Remi-Martin; Demaria, Marco; Rathod, Sona; Vasserot, Alain P.; Chung, Jae Wook; Kim, Do Hun; Poon, Yan; David, Nathaniel; Baker, Darren J.; van Deursen, Jan M.; Campisi, Judith; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    Senescent cells (SnCs) accumulate in many vertebrate tissues with age and contribute to age-related pathologies(1-3), presumably through their secretion of factors contributing to the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)(4-6). Removal of SnCs delays several pathologies(7-9) and increases

  11. p53-independent upregulation of miR-34a during oncogene-induced senescence represses MYC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, N R; Shalgi, R; Frankel, L B

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant oncogene activation induces cellular senescence, an irreversible growth arrest that acts as a barrier against tumorigenesis. To identify microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in oncogene-induced senescence, we examined the expression of miRNAs in primary human TIG3 fibroblasts after constitutive...

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Hypomethylation Is a Biomarker Associated with Induced Senescence in Human Fetal Heart Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehai Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fetal heart can regenerate to restore its normal anatomy and function in response to injury, but this regenerative capacity is lost within the first week of postnatal life. Although the specific molecular mechanisms remain to be defined, it is presumed that aging of cardiac stem or progenitor cells may contribute to the loss of regenerative potential. Methods. To study this aging-related dysfunction, we cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human fetal heart tissues. Senescence was induced by exposing cells to chronic oxidative stress/low serum. Mitochondrial DNA methylation was examined during the period of senescence. Results. Senescent MSCs exhibited flattened and enlarged morphology and were positive for the senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal. By scanning the entire mitochondrial genome, we found that four CpG islands were hypomethylated in close association with senescence in MSCs. The mitochondrial COX1 gene, which encodes the main subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex and contains the differentially methylated CpG island 4, was upregulated in MSCs in parallel with the onset of senescence. Knockdown of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3B also upregulated COX1 expression and induced cellular senescence in MSCs. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that mitochondrial CpG hypomethylation may serve as a critical biomarker associated with cellular senescence induced by chronic oxidative stress.

  13. Pregnancy and Reproductive Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Pregnancy Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Pregnancy and Reproductive Issues Tahirah Diagnosed in 2003 Pregnancy ... in control groups without the disease. Effects of pregnancy on MS Before 1950, most women with MS ...

  14. Environment, epigenetics and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Michael K

    2017-07-01

    A conference summary of the third biannual Kenya Africa Conference "Environment, Epigenetics and Reproduction" is provided. A partial special Environmental Epigenetics issue containing a number of papers in Volume 3, Issue 3 and 4 are discussed.

  15. Reproductive and developmental toxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-01-01

    .... With a special focus on placental toxicity, this book is the only available reference to connect the three key risk stages, and is the only resource to include reproductive and developmental toxicity in domestic animals, fish, and wildlife.

  16. Reproductive data for groundfish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ROCKFISH database houses data from rockfish species collected by the SWFSC FED along the California coast as part of a reproductive study originating in the...

  17. Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the surrogate and to the male partner. Surrogacy can be used when the female of the ... party reproduction (sperm, egg, and embryo donation and surrogacy): A guide for patients . Retrieved May 31, 2016, ...

  18. AMP-activated protein kinase reduces inflammatory responses and cellular senescence in pulmonary emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao-Yu; Li, Yang-Yang; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jun; Yao, Hong-Wei

    2017-04-04

    Current drug therapy fails to reduce lung destruction of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has emerged as an important integrator of signals that control energy balance and lipid metabolism. However, there are no studies regarding the role of AMPK in reducing inflammatory responses and cellular senescence during the development of emphysema. Therefore, we hypothesize that AMPK reduces inflammatroy responses, senescence, and lung injury. To test this hypothesis, human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) were treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in the presence of a specific AMPK activator (AICAR, 1 mM) and inhibitor (Compound C, 5 μM). Elastase injection was performed to induce mouse emphysema, and these mice were treated with a specific AMPK activator metformin as well as Compound C. AICAR reduced, whereas Compound C increased CSE-induced increase in IL-8 and IL-6 release and expression of genes involved in cellular senescence. Knockdown of AMPKα1/α2 increased expression of pro-senescent genes (e.g., p16, p21, and p66shc) in BEAS-2B cells. Prophylactic administration of an AMPK activator metformin (50 and 250 mg/kg) reduced while Compound C (4 and 20 mg/kg) aggravated elastase-induced airspace enlargement, inflammatory responses and cellular senescence in mice. This is in agreement with therapeutic effect of metformin (50 mg/kg) on airspace enlargement. Furthermore, metformin prophylactically protected against but Compound C further reduced mitochondrial proteins SOD2 and SIRT3 in emphysematous lungs. In conclusion, AMPK reduces abnormal inflammatory responses and cellular senescence, which implicates as a potential therapeutic target for COPD/emphysema.

  19. Dissociating markers of senescence and protective ability in memory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Prlic

    Full Text Available No unique transcription factor or biomarker has been identified to reliably distinguish effector from memory T cells. Instead a set of surface markers including IL-7Rα and KLRG1 is commonly used to predict the potential of CD8 effector T cells to differentiate into memory cells. Similarly, these surface markers together with the tumor necrosis factor family member CD27 are frequently used to predict a memory T cell's ability to mount a recall response. Expression of these markers changes every time a memory cell is stimulated and repeated stimulation can lead to T cell senescence and loss of memory T cell responsiveness. This is a concern for prime-boost vaccine strategies which repeatedly stimulate T cells with the aim of increasing memory T cell frequency. The molecular cues that cause senescence are still unknown, but cell division history is likely to play a major role. We sought to dissect the roles of inflammation and cell division history in developing T cell senescence and their impact on the expression pattern of commonly used markers of senescence. We developed a system that allows priming of CD8 T cells with minimal inflammation and without acquisition of maximal effector function, such as granzyme expression, but a cell division history similar to priming with systemic inflammation. Memory cells derived from minimal effector T cells are fully functional upon rechallenge, have full access to non-lymphoid tissue and appear to be less senescent by phenotype upon rechallenge. However, we report here that these currently used biomarkers to measure senescence do not predict proliferative potential or protective ability, but merely reflect initial priming conditions.

  20. SORBS2 and TLR3 induce premature senescence in primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liesenfeld, Melanie; Mosig, Sandy; Funke, Harald; Jansen, Lars; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Backsch, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Genetic aberrations are required for the progression of HPV-induced cervical precancers. A prerequisite for clonal expansion of cancer cells is unlimited proliferative capacity. In a cell culture model for cervical carcinogenesis loss of genes located on chromosome 4q35→qter and chromosome 10p14-p15 were found to be associated with escape from senescence. Moreover, by LOH and I-FISH analyses a higher frequency of allele loss of these regions was also observed in cervical carcinomas as compared to CIN3. The aim of this study was to identify candidate senescence-related genes located on chromosome 4q35→qter and chromosome 10p14-p15 which may contribute to clonal expansion at the transition of CIN3 to cancer. Microarray expression analyses were used to identify candidate genes down-regulated in cervical carcinomas as compared to CIN3. In order to relate these genes with the process of senescence their respective cDNAs were overexpressed in HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes as well as in primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes using lentivirus mediated gene transduction. Overall fifteen genes located on chromosome 4q35→qter and chromosome 10p14-p15 were identified. Ten of these genes could be validated in biopsies by RT-PCR. Of interest is the novel finding that SORBS2 and TLR3 can induce senescence in primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes but not in HPV-immortalized cell lines. Intriguingly, the endogenous expression of both genes increases during finite passaging of primary keratinocytes in vitro. The relevance of the genes SORBS2 and TLR3 in the process of cellular senescence warrants further investigation. In ongoing experiments we are investigating whether this increase in gene expression is also characteristic of replicative senescence

  1. Rejuvenation of MPTP-induced human neural precursor cell senescence by activating autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Dong, Chuanming [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, The Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Neuroregeneration, Nantong University, Nantong (China); Sun, Chenxi; Ma, Rongjie; Yang, Danjing [East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Hongwen, E-mail: hongwen_zhu@hotmail.com [Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin Academy of Integrative Medicine, Tianjin